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[The application of creative thinking teaching in nursing education].  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing education is increasingly expected to cultivate nursing student creative abilities in line with general Ministry of Education promotion of greater creativity within education and the greater leeway for creativity won domestically for nurses by professional nursing organizations. Creative thinking has been named by education experts in the United States as the third most important goal of nursing education. However, nursing students in Taiwan have been shown to test lower in terms of creativity than students enrolled in business management. Leaders in nursing education should consider methods by which to improve the creative thinking capabilities of nursing students. Articles in the literature indicate that courses in creative studies are concentrated in the field of education, with few designed specifically for nursing. The teaching of constructing creative thinking is particularly weak in the nursing field. The purpose of this article was to review literature on education and nursing in order to explore current definitions, teaching strategies, and evaluation approaches related to creativity, and to develop a foundation for teaching creativity in nursing. The authors hope that an appropriate creative thinking course for nursing students may be constructed by referencing guidance provided in this in order to further cultivate creative thinking abilities in nursing students that will facilitate their application of creative thinking in their future clinical practicum. PMID:20401872

Ku, Ya-Lie; Chang, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Sheu, Sheila

2010-04-01

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Roles of parents in enhancing children’s creative thinking skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Since creative thinking is an essential requirement in today’s societies, educational institutions have to make some reforms in order to prepare next generation according to the needs of the societies such as giving more emphasis on creative thinking. The main aims of this paper are to reveal the parents’ opinions about the creative thinking skills, to teach parents the meaning of creative thinking, and to teach parents to create home environments that enhance creative thinking skills. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods was employed. Pretest- posttest experimental design was used and qualitative data were collected by an open-ended questionnaire. A 10-hour parent education seminar was used as an intervention for the experimental group. The participants of the research were 80 parents (40 parents in the experimental group, 40 parents in the control group from a primary school in Ankara, Turkey. Content analysis was applied to analyze the qualitative data. The pretest results have indicated that there were no differences between parents groups according to the knowledge level about the creative thinking. According to posttest results, the knowledge levels of parents in the experimental group who were given 10-hour parent education seminar were increased. However, the knowledge levels of the parents who have not given any education in the control group, were remained the same. Besides, experimental group parents have more information about creating home environments that enhance creativity rather than control group parents. According to the findings, parents' perspectives in the experimental group on the creative thinking skills have changed after the parent education seminar. However, the perspectives of the parent in the control group have not changed.

Pervin Oya Taneri

2012-07-01

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Teaching Design of Cultivating Nursing Students' Creative Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

Chinese nursing education levels have developed fast over the past few years. Many nursing educators are devoted to the research of nursing teaching. How to cultivate nursing students, creative thinking is one of the principle researches and has received increasing attention. In the course of nursing teaching, we renewed the teaching design based…

Xi-wen, Liu; Chun-ping, Ni; Rui, Yang; Xiu-chuan, Li; Cheng, Cheng

2007-01-01

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The extent to which teachers nurture creative thinking in the Grade 9 Social Sciences classroom through the choice of teaching methods / Byron John Bunt  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The nurturing of creative thinking skills is one of the cornerstones of Outcomes-Based Education (OBE). This study investigated to what extent teachers nurture the development of creative thinking through the choice of teaching methods, which include the application of teaching strategies and the utilization of resources, in the Grade 9 Social Sciences classroom. A literature study was undertaken to highlight the importance and nature of the development of creative thinking skills, and to est...

Bunt, Byron John

2012-01-01

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Effect of Collaborative Studies on Prospective Teachers’ Creative Thinking Skills while Designing Computer Based Material  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study to examine effect of collaborative studies on prospective teachers? creative thinking skills while designing computer based materials. One group pre-test and post-test design of the pre-experimental model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. This experimental study have been applied to 34 prospective teachers who studied at Artvin Coruh University Facult of Education Primary Education Department in 2009-2010 spring term within the context of “Computer-II” course. “Creative Thinking Skill Scale” was applied at two different stages as pre-test and post-test and opinions of students were gathered about the method in research via interview forms. As a result, it was found that there was a significant difference between the prospective teachers? creative thinking skills and scores taken from scale were increased in favor of post-test. Collaborative group works have a great importance in occurrence of this increase was revealed from student views.

Salih B?R??Ç?

2011-06-01

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Teaching creative thinking in regular science lessons: Potentials and obstacles of three different approaches in an Asian context  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In response to the recent school creativity reforms in Asian places, this paper studied three different approaches of integrating creative thinking training into regular science lessons. They include developing creative thinking through science process, science content and science scenario. Three teacher case studies were conducted to examine the potentials and obstacles of implementing these approaches in classroom of Hong Kong. This study found that all the approaches were useful in developing student creative thinking, yet teachers experienced different tensions and dilemmas in different approaches. This paper suggests that the science content approach may be more readily accepted by teachers and students in an educational system which is dominated by knowledge content and examinations. However, with the limited skills and experience in creativity, teachers and students may feel that the science process and science scenario approach are easier to start with, as they are less constrained by the rigid content in the syllabus. Among various hindering factors, the most crucial one was found to be the original heavy knowledge-content, which in fact is a common characteristic of secondary science curriculum in many Asian places. In our future research and educational reforms, the dilemma between creative thinking and content learning needs to be seriously considered and solved at both individual and system levels.

Vivian M. Y. CHENG

2010-06-01

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The Learner-Directed Classroom: Developing Creative Thinking Skills through Art  

Science.gov (United States)

Educators at all levels want their students to develop habits of self-directed learning and critical problem-solving skills that encourage ownership and growth. In "The Learner-Directed Classroom," practicing art educators (PreK-16) offer both a comprehensive framework for understanding student-directed learning and concrete pedagogical strategies…

Jaquith, Diane B., Ed.; Hathaway, Nan E., Ed.

2012-01-01

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METHODS FOR IMPROVING INFORMATION CULTURE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF RESEARCH AND CREATIVE SKILLS STUDENTS BASED ON CREATIVE THINKING  

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Full Text Available The article discusses methods to improve the information culture in the development of research and creative abilities of students on the basis of creative thinking. The purpose: consider ways to improve the information culture in the development of research and creative abilities of students on the basis of creative thinking. Method or methodology of carrying out of job: theoretical analysis of the psychological and educational literature. Results: The essence of the methods to improve the information culture, which leads to the development of abilities to work in a multi-factor systems in the face of uncertainty, to the construction of more complex hierarchical structures of their own activities, updating combinatorial abilities, that improve the development process of research and creativity, to generate the highest level IV information Culture - Professionally. Scope of results: preparation of the information for University students.

Teplaya Naila Aligasanovna

2013-05-01

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Thinking Creatively; Thinking Critically  

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Full Text Available The development of creative and critical thinking is seen as an encouragement to independent and student-centred learning.  But what exactly do we mean when we talk about creative and critical thinking? When  and why did these terms come into prominence in modern education?  This paper will compare and consider some of the diverse but not universally agreed definitions of these widely used terms.  The language and literature classroom will be offered as an example in order to demonstrate ways of putting these approaches into practice.  Finally the paper will close with a discussion of the application of critical and creative thinking in the Hong Kong context.

Julie C. FORRESTER

2009-02-01

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The effectiveness of teaching strategies for creativity in a nursing concepts teaching protocol on the creative thinking of two-year RN-BSN students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Because of changes in the medical environment, nurses must maintain the ability of divergent thinking to solve the health problems of patients. However, many nurses whose work in clinical practice has become routine have lost the ability of creativity. To cultivate nurses creativity should be a goal of nursing education. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a nursing concepts teaching protocol by utilizing teaching strategies directed toward creativity to promote creativity in two-year RN-BSN students. This study design is a time series and one group experiment utilizing multiple instances of treatment. Teaching strategies for creativity were applied to a teaching unit and 52 two-year RN-BSN students were tested for creativity before the end of each semester. This study was conducted from March, 1999 to May, 2000, but only 30 students completed all tests and reached a 58% return rate. Torrance s (1974) definitions of creativity includ fluency, flexibility, and uniqueness were followed and the instrument, a questionnaire on Creativity in the application of the Nursing Process Tool (CNPT), was designed based on Emerson (1988). The content validity of Chinese-version CNPT was.79. The inter-coder reliability between two researchers was.84 following a coding guide that ten nursing education experts had established. The results indicated that 30 two-year RN-BSN students had improved fluency and flexibility. The improvements reached a significant level after the third semester. Only uniqueness declined. It is suggested that nursing faculty apply teaching strategies uniqueness more often in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts. By utilizing teaching strategies of creativity in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts, it is expected that two-year RN-BSN students can acquire characteristics of creativity for problem-solving skills in clinical settings. PMID:12119595

Ku, Ya-Lie; Kao Lo, Chi-Hui; Wang, Jing-Jy; Lee Hsieh, Jane; Chen, Kuei-Min

2002-06-01

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Assessing Creative Thinking in Design-Based Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Infusing creative thinking competence through the design process of authentic projects requires not only changing the teaching methods and learning environment, but also adopting new assessment methods, such as portfolio assessment. The participants in this study were 128 high school pupils who have studied MECHATRONICS from 10th to 12th grades…

Doppelt, Yaron

2009-01-01

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Integrating the Cognitive Research Trust (CoRT) Programme for Creative Thinking into a Project-Based Technology Curriculum.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes the Creative Thinking in Technology (CTT) program in which creative thinking is presented as a synthesis between lateral thinking and vertical thinking. Analyzes student projects in light of this definition of creativity, and explores the role technology can play in developing students' higher order thinking skills. (Contains 37…

Barak, Moshe; Doppelt, Yaron

1999-01-01

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The Du Pont OZ Creative Thinking Network.  

Science.gov (United States)

The OZ Creative Thinking Network is a volunteer group of Du Pont Corporation employees devoted to educating themselves and others concerning creativity and innovation. This network, organized in 1986, has a current membership of over 600 employees and has produced a book that couples essays expressing concepts in creativity and innovation with…

Tanner, David

1994-01-01

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Visual Material Effect on Academic Achievement, Creative Thinking and Attitude towards Course  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test the effectiveness of the visual materials’ usage in Social Sciences on students’ academic achievement, creative thinking skills and their attitudes towards the course. The study was based on the Social Sciences unit titled ‘’Geography and Our World’’ and conducted with a total number of 38 students, (18 of them were in the experimental group and 20 of them were in the control group. The participants were 6th grade students of Koç Primary School in Bolu. For data collection, Social Sciences Achievement Test, Torrance Creative Thinking Test and Attitude Scale were used as instruments. In the statistical analysis of data, Mean, Standard Deviation levels and Mann Whitney-U Test were used. The results of the study revealed that the program designed for the experimental group, increased the participants’ academic achievement and creative thinking skills and had a positive impact on their attitudes towards the course.© 2013 IOJES. All rights reserved

Serap Emir.

2013-08-01

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The Effectiveness of the Creative Reversal Act (CREACT) on Students' Creative Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

A research study using one-group pretest-posttest design was carried out on the effectiveness of the Creative Reversal Act (CREACT) on creative thinking. The CREACT is a new, teaching technique developed based on the theory of the janusian process. The research participants included 34 students who were attending 10th grade at a social studies…

Sak, Ugur; Oz, Ozge

2010-01-01

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The Relationship Between Creative Thinking And Empathy With Self-awareness In High School Students In India  

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Full Text Available Previous studies revealed that there is moderate to strong correlation between creative thinking and empathy with self-awareness as three important skills in human life and the aim of the present study is to find out the relationship between these three aspects of life skills. The participants in the study contained of 96(54 males and 42 females 10 grade of high school students from Mysore in India. Life skill questionnaire - India (LSQI, carried out on the group sample and date analyzed through Pearson correlation and multiple regression using SPSS soft ware.The results revealed that self-awareness significantly has positive correlation with creative thinking (r=31, p<.01 and empathy(r=36, p<.01. Analysis of regression also shows that multiple relationships between three variables is significant (MR=0.36 and RS = .12, p<.01 and 12 percent of variation of self-awareness can be predicts by empathy and creative thinking.

Ayatollah Karimi

2012-09-01

17

Leveling Students’ Creative Thinking in Solving and Posing Mathematical Problem  

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Full Text Available Many researchers assume that people are creative, but their degree of creativity is different. The notion of creative thinking level has been discussed .by experts. The perspective of mathematics creative thinking refers to a combination of logical and divergent thinking which is based on intuition but has a conscious aim. The divergent thinking is focused on flexibility, fluency, and novelty in mathematical problem solving and problem posing. As students have various backgrounds and different abilities, they possess different potential in thinking patterns, imagination, fantasy and performance; therefore, students have different levels of creative thinking. A research study was conducted in order to develop a framework for students’ levels of creative thinking in mathematics. This research used a qualitative approach to describe the characteristics of the levels of creative thinking. Task-based interviews were conducted to collect data with ten 8th grade junior secondary school students. The results distinguished five levels of creative thinking, namely level 0 to level 4 with different characteristics in each level. These differences are based on fluency, flexibility, and novelty in mathematical problem solving and problem posing.

Tatag Yuli Eko Siswono

2010-07-01

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THE CREATIVE THINKING LEVELS OF STUDENTS AT SIXTH CLASS OF PRIMARY EDUCATION  

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Full Text Available Today it is necessary to develop an education model that is special to creative individuals and their creativeness. It is also required to discover children and young people who have creative qualities at an early stage and improve creative thinking in their minds. For this aim, it is very important to determine the high-level thinking skills, especially creative thinking levels of children at primary education period. Therefore, there are considerable duties available for the teachers.In this study, the creative thinking levels of two distinct student groups from different primary schools who study at sixth class of primary education are explored and a comparison is made between their levels. The goal of this research is to find out how the fluency, flexibility and originality dimensions of these students differ. In the way of this purpose, there are fourty-three sixth class of primary education students, who study at two different primary schools in ?zmir, formed the research sampling. Twenty-six of these students are female while seventeen students are male. The Torrance Creative Thinking Test Linguistic –A Form is used as a data collecting tool in the study. The application and form evaluation periods have done by the researchers. At the end of the research, there are meaningful differences obtained between the two schools about the fluency, flexibility and originality levels of students attended to the research. When it is considered in terms of total creative levels, it is seen that the fluency points of those two schools attended to this study are the highest while the flexibility points are the lowest. This situation betrays that the students participated in this study can not use their skill of producing many ideas in terms of handling cases from all points of views.

Esen ERSOY

2009-10-01

19

Teaching Soft Skills Employers Need  

Science.gov (United States)

This study identifies the soft skills community colleges teach in an office technology course and determines whether the skills taught are congruent with the soft skills employers require in today's entry-level office work. A qualitative content analysis of a community college office technology soft skills course was performed using 23 soft…

Ellis, Maureen; Kisling, Eric; Hackworth, Robbie G.

2014-01-01

20

Current methodology and methods in psychophysiological studies of creative thinking.  

Science.gov (United States)

Important points on methodology and detailed description of methods used in polymodal psychophysiological studies of human verbal creative thinking are presented. The psychophysiological studies were conducted with healthy volunteers during implementations of specially developed and adapted psychological tests aimed to bring the subjects into states of verbal creative thinking. Four different task sets ("story composition", "associative chains", "original definitions", "proverb sense flipping") were developed and applied. Positron emission tomography of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and state-related quantitative electroencephalography (power and coherence evaluated) were used. The effectiveness of the methods is illustrated with figures. PMID:17434420

Bechtereva, N P; Danko, S G; Medvedev, S V

2007-05-01

 
 
 
 
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Secondary Teachers' Conceptions of Creative Thinking within the Context of Environmental Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Creative thinking in Environmental Education (EE) remains greatly under researched topic. Research on teachers' conceptions of creative thinking within EE context is also limited, although their role in facilitating creative thinking in students is well documented. The small-scale qualitative study presented here investigates Greek secondary…

Daskolia, Maria; Dimos, Athanasios; Kampylis, Panagiotis G.

2012-01-01

22

Creative Thinking of Practical Engineering Students During a Design Project  

Science.gov (United States)

Creativity in engineering design had become an economic necessity and not merely the privilege of unique individuals. The search for new, innovative and effective ideas in engineering design stands in center of daily creative performance. This search requires sensitivity to gaps of knowledge and information, and the ability to evoke numerous, different and unique ideas about engineering problems. The source of such information or knowledge can be either extrinsic-such as provided by an instructor or expert or intrinsic, which might involve transformation from one field or context to another. Furthermore, interaction with an exterior source as well as developing an inherent drive, have an impact on the motivation to perform creatively. This article, which is based on a study conducted among Israeli practical engineering students, deals with the variations in creative thinking during various stages of a design project and the relation between creative thinking and motivation factors.

Waks, Shlomo; Merdler, Moti

2003-01-01

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The Analysing Children's Creative Thinking Framework: Development of an Observation-Led Approach to Identifying and Analysing Young Children's Creative Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

Increased international recognition of the value of supporting creative thinking suggests the value of development of approaches to its identification in children. Development of an observation-led framework, the Analysing Children's Creative Thinking (ACCT) framework, is described, and a case made for the validity of inferring creative…

Robson, Sue

2014-01-01

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The Relationship Between Creative Thinking And Empathy With Self-awareness In High School Students In India  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Previous studies revealed that there is moderate to strong correlation between creative thinking and empathy with self-awareness as three important skills in human life and the aim of the present study is to find out the relationship between these three aspects of life skills. The participants in the study contained of 96(54 males and 42 females) 10 grade of high school students from Mysore in India. Life skill questionnaire - India (LSQI), carried out on the group sample and date analyzed th...

Ayatollah Karimi; Venkatesh Kumar, G.

2012-01-01

25

Creative thinking in prospective teachers: the status quo and the impact of contextual factors  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

To create unique and appropriate learning opportunities and environments and to nurture the development of creative thinking abilities among learners are some of the demands for creative thinking currently expected of teachers globally and also in South Africa. Creative thinking in academic context assumes, among other things, the ability to generate a variety of original ideas, to see different viewpoints and elaborate on ideas. We report on the findings of a quantitative pilot investigation...

Hannetjie Meintjes; Mary Grosser

2010-01-01

26

The Role of Teaching Poetry in Developing Literacy in Greek Primary School: A Case Study  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this case study is to examine the ways in which the systematic teaching of poetry reading at Greek primary school enhances children's interest in reading and helps develop their oral skills by enriching their vocabulary and creative thinking. The present poetry project was implemented at a Greek public kindergarten in Rethymno,…

Aravani, Evagelia

2012-01-01

27

Cultivating the College Students’ Creative Thinking in Industrial Design  

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Full Text Available This paper probes into the source of “originality” in developing the creative thinking of the science students majoring in industrial design. The authors believe that the critical factors for the source of “originality” lie in not only the internal cause, but also the external cause. Whether the science students take a great consideration of art and humanity courses, in other words, whether they are aware of the relationship between artistical thought and industrial design or not, it is very important. In addition, creative capacity cannot be taught, and it only results from inspiration and guidance of teachers from multidisciplinary.

Hua Cen

2013-08-01

28

Creative Thinking Development Program for Learning Activity Management of Secondary School Teachers  

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Full Text Available The objectives of this research were: to design a creative thinking development program for learning activity management of secondary school teachers, and to study the program’s efficiency and effectiveness of usage. The results of the study were as follows: the program includes the vision, principles, objectives, content, program development process, evaluation of performance and effectiveness. The process development had 5 stages and 8 activities of construction. The efficiency of the development program in learning activity management of secondary school teachers by 82.15/80.81 was an established requirement. The findings indicated that the teachers attained knowledge, skill and attitude towards creative learning activity management after using the program at a higher than before using the program at .05 significant level.

Sutinan Pukdeewut

2013-11-01

29

A Comparative Study of Creative Thinking of American and Japanese College Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cross-cultural differences in creative thinking were assessed for 51 American and 54 Japanese college students. The American students showed significantly higher scores on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) figural test than the Japanese students. No gender differences were found in either culture. TTCT performance did not correlate…

Saeki, Noriko; Fan, Xitao; Van Dusen, Lani

2001-01-01

30

Hemispheric Specialization and Creative Thinking: A Meta-Analytic Review of Lateralization of Creativity  

Science.gov (United States)

In the last two decades research on the neurophysiological processes of creativity has found contradicting results. Whereas most research suggests right hemisphere dominance in creative thinking, left-hemisphere dominance has also been reported. The present research is a meta-analytic review of the literature to establish how creative thinking

Mihov, Konstantin M.; Denzler, Markus; Forster, Jens

2010-01-01

31

Designscholar: Examining Creative Thinking in an Online Learning Community for Interior Design Graduate Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the creative thinking of interior design graduate students in an online learning community. This study considered potential changes in creative thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration) about design research resulting from peer-led online discussions. It further studied the learner characteristics of…

Ransdell, Marlo Evelyn

2009-01-01

32

Meeting the Demand: Teaching "Soft" Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document contains four papers (and an introduction by William Wilhelm) on teaching "soft" skills in business education programs. "The Skill Building Challenge: Preparing a Bridge for the Workforce Skills Gap" (Sheila M. Smith) examines the following topics: the workforce skills gap; the importance of academic and behavioral skills; and public…

Wilhelm, William J.; Logan, Joyce; Smith, Sheila M.; Szul, Linda F.

33

Domain-General and Domain-Specific Creative-Thinking Tests: Effects of Gender and Item Content on Test Performance  

Science.gov (United States)

The study examined the effects of gender and item content of domain-general and domain-specific creative-thinking tests on four subscale scores of creative-thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration). Chinese tenth-grade students (234 males and 244 females) participated in the study. Domain-general creative thinking was measured…

Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; Wu, Junbin

2013-01-01

34

Development of future faculty teaching skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Doctoral and postdoctoral students considering a career as an educator would be well served by: (1) training in effective classroom communication skills, (2) the use of existing technology in teaching, (3) developing a new course or updating an existing course, and (4) availing themselves of campus teaching resources designed enhance their teaching portfolio. Universities need to place more attention on developing the teaching skills of their doctoral and postdoctoral students. This should include teaching methods and aids, communication skills, motivation, learning theory, testing, counselling and guidance, and course design. An important dimension from a guidance stand point is the conduct of a formal peer review process for beginning faculty. PMID:20491397

Penson, J B

2010-01-01

35

Interactive Teaching in Interpersonal Skills  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Engineers are very much part of the ongoing globalization and they are encountering problems of cross-disciplinary nature. Team working skills respecting other peoples’ qualifications are required so therefore interpersonal skills are becoming more and more important, including communications skills, leadership and awareness. Consequently, educational programs for teaching engineers should work with the fact that the capability of communicating with people with different background competences is important, nevertheless the engineering education has traditionally focused on technical skills rather than on personal development. In order to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers on all levels, the DTU (Technical University of Denmark) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) modified their education according to the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) approach in the autumn of 2008. The CDIO pedagogy encouraged to develop aninteractive course in interpersonal skills, where the students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process. The course consists of various exercises from which the participants will develop their awareness and knowledge of communication. It is the intention to give the students a personal understanding and idea of a different approach to communicating between people. The students evaluated the course, and the four key questions dealing with the quality of the course show a very high satisfaction with the instruction. The grades one and two (1 best/very much, 5 worst/very little) of the responses to these four questions are ranging on average from 69.5% to 88% (on a yearly basis). The positive responses indicate that the students are very satisfied with the course recognizing the need for education on international communication.

Christensen, JØrgen Erik

2013-01-01

36

Exploratory Examination of Relationships between Learning Styles and Creative Thinking in Math Students  

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Full Text Available It is believed that identifying any strong relationships between learning styles and creative thinking within the context of the math classroom will help improve instruction by providing course delivery strategies tailored to different learning preferences and promotion of creative thinking. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to identify which (if any of the cognitive learning dimensions would be related to creative thinking in math students. The major findings of this study indicate that creative thinking, assessed by RAT, and learning preferences, evaluated by ILS, are not highly correlated. Over all, students in this study show a balanced learning preference across four dimensions. In summary, this study directs a possible path for future researchers to investigate this phenomenon.

Kuan Chen Tsai

2013-08-01

37

Peer Assessment of Elementary Science Teaching Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, peer assessment was applied in assessing elementary science teaching skills. Preservice teachers taught a science topic as a team to their peers in an elementary science methods course. The peers participating in the science lesson assessed teacher-groups' elementary science teaching skills on an assessment form provided by the…

Kilic, Gulsen Bagci; Cakan, Mehtap

2007-01-01

38

Project-Based Activity: Root of Research and Creative Thinking  

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Full Text Available Decreasing of interest in mathematics and science subjects among students in Malaysia has been discussed lately. Applications of mathematics and science in real world settings might be able to facilitate increased interests in the subjects, especially in doing research. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to manifest that learning mathematics through project-based activity would cultivate interest in students towards research and foster research-like skill. Experience of teaching mathematics in School of Mathematical Sciences, UKM with integration of biological and physics problems are discussed. The level of interest is measured through students’ interest in doing their research projects in the final semester of the undergraduate study. The percentage of students interested in doing applied problems showed an increased in number. Thus it is concluded that the project-based activity led the students to identify their interest and hence head their interest into research.

Rambely A. S.

2013-05-01

39

LANGUAGE SKILLS AND THE CRITICAL THINKING
D?L BECER?LER? VE ELE?T?REL DÜ?ÜNME
 

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Critical thinking is one of the eight basic skills in the primary school curriculum which has been prepared with a constructivist approach. Teaching critical thinking in Turkish language lessons has an importance in reaching curricular aims. Critical thinking has bonds with skills such as creative thinking, communication, research making, problem solving, using ICT, entrepreneurship, and using Turkish appropriatelyCritical thinking is involved with questioning, interpreting and decision makin...

Karadu?z, Adnan

2010-01-01

40

?he Contribution of Music and Movement Activities to Creative Thinking in Pre-School Children  

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Full Text Available As interest in creativity is rising, kindergarten teachers are looking for ways to strengthen the creative potential of young children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music and movement activities to creative thinking in preschool children. A three month educational programme was designed and implemented, using an experimental research method. The effect on fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration of thought of 5 year old children, as well as how the programme affected creative behaviours, was studied. The results, upon completion of the educational programme, showed that the growth rate of these variables in the experimental group was statistically significant compared to the corresponding rates in the control group. In addition, the emergence of creative behaviours, such as an increased freedom of expression, a tendency to explore and experiment, and a questioning of what is commonly accepted, were considered to be a consequence of the implementation of the specific educational programme. The experimental research produced valuable information about the design and philosophy of educational programmes, and about the teaching methods of music and movement activities in kindergarten.

Elena Chronopoulou

2012-04-01

 
 
 
 
41

Teamwork: Effectively Teaching an Employability Skill  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a case study on improvements to professional teaching practice within an undergraduate university business programme to more effectively teach an employability skill and enhance the student experience of teamwork. Design/methodology/approach: A three-phase approach to teaching teamwork was…

Riebe, Linda; Roepen, Dean; Santarelli, Bruno; Marchioro, Gary

2010-01-01

42

Teaching physicists' thinking skills in the laboratory  

Science.gov (United States)

We describe a prototype introductory physics laboratory designed to teach students some general intellectual skills widely useful in scientific work. These skills include both basic skills (such as estimating quantities, determining errors, or applying useful measuring techniques) and higher-level skills (such as effectively describing experiments and flexibly adapting the resulting knowledge to different conditions). The teaching methods emphasize the utility of organizing information in hierarchical and goal-directed fashion. Furthermore, they strive to use an optimum combination of instruction means ("minilabs," more major "group labs," and integrated assessment devices) to achieve the desired ends. A careful evaluation showed (i) that the prototype course is indeed quite successful in teaching the desired general intellectual skills, and (ii) that these skills are ordinarily not acquired by students in traditional courses. Students' attitudes toward the prototype course are also appreciably more positive.

Reif, Frederick; John, Mark S.

2005-10-20

43

Teaching Interviewing Skills by Encountering Patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

Since first-year psychiatric residents were observed to lack many interviewing skills necessary for both physicians and psychiatrists, a method of teaching the skills in a group setting with live patients was constructed. Research results supported self-report changes in empathy, congruence, and level of regard. (Author/LBH)

Junek, Wade; And Others

1979-01-01

44

Teaching Quantitative Skills in a Geoscience Context  

Science.gov (United States)

New attention is needed to the ways in which quantitative skills are taught in the geosciences. At the introductory level, geoscience courses play an important role in teaching students the basic abilities needed to use and understand quantitative information. These skills are becoming more important as quantitative information is increasingly used by all citizens to make informed personal choices, for financial success, and to guide our democracy (Mathematics and Democracy, Steen, 2001). Mathematical skills are also becoming increasingly fundamental to success as a practicing geoscientist requiring modification of teaching within the major. An integrated approach developing synergies between mathematics, geoscience and other science courses will be most effective in enhancing students learning in these areas. This summer 40 mathematics and geoscience faculty met at Carleton College for 5 days to explore the ways in which geoscience and mathematical approaches to teaching skills complement each other and to develop materials that reflected the strengths of both approaches. Primary outcomes included 1) new appreciation of the importance of incorporating multiple representations, in-depth problems, contextual examples, and group work in teaching mathematical and quantitative skills, 2) a preliminary list of skills that can form a basic vocabulary for discussions of course content, 3) ten resources developed jointly by mathematicians and geoscientists for use in courses, and 4) new collaborations between geoscientists and mathematicians both on campuses and beyond. Full information about the workshop and its results are available at http://serc.carleton.edu/quantskills/events/NAGT02

Manduca, C. A.; MacDonald, R. H.; Savina, M.; Andersen, J.; Patterson, S.; Mason, M.

2002-12-01

45

DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF RECORDED PROGRAMMED EXPERIENCES IN CREATIVE THINKING IN THE FOURTH GRADE.  

Science.gov (United States)

TWO MAJOR PROBLEMS IN THE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF CREATIVE TALENT IN THE FOURTH GRADE WERE CONSIDERED--THE NEED TO OVERCOME DIFFICULTIES WHICH TEACHERS EXPERIENCE IN CREATIVE GUIDANCE, AND THE NEED TO DEVELOP WAYS OF COUNTERACTING A SLUMP IN CREATIVE THINKING. EXPERIMENTAL SUBJECTS SHOWED STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT GAINS ON NONVERBAL…

GUPTA, RAM; TORRANCE, E. PAUL

46

DEVELOPMENT of CREATIVE THINKING through SPEECH SITUATIONS at the ENGLISH LESSONS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of speech situations created at the English lessons. The purpose is to study one of the most efficient methods to involve pupils into the active speech activity through their imagination and creative thinking and show the essential condition which is pupils’ interest in the topic of speech situations.

Alferova Olga Ivanovna

2013-03-01

47

Assessing Creativity: The Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production (TCT-DP)  

Science.gov (United States)

The Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production (TCT-DP), its design, concept and evaluation scheme as well as experiences and results of application are described. The test was designed to mirror a more holistic concept of creativity than the mere quantitatively oriented, traditional divergent thinking tests. The specific design using figural…

Urban, Klaus K.

2005-01-01

48

Teaching and Assessing Engineering Professional Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Engineering students are required to have, by the time of graduation, a set of professional skills related to teamwork, oral and written communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and knowledge of contemporary issues. Teaching and assessment of these skills, as part of ABET accreditation, remains problematic. A systematic methodology to integrate these skills and their assessment in the curriculum is described. The method was recently applied in several engineering programs and proved to be efficient in generating data and evidences for evaluation and continuous improvement of these outcomes.

Ali M. Al-Bahi

2013-05-01

49

Teach People Skills Totally Online?  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes the adaptation for distance learning of an MBA organizational behavior course. Explains that the most effective strategy involved conducting group exercises and role plays synchronously in the chat room. A student survey indicated that online students developed skills comparable to face-to-face students. (EV)

Liebowitz, Jay

2003-01-01

50

Teaching Badminton Based on Student Skill Levels  

Science.gov (United States)

Badminton has been identified as a lifelong activity. It is an inexpensive sport and everyone--children, seniors, and individuals with disabilities--can reach a level of enjoyment in the game after mastering basic skills and tactics. In teaching badminton, teachers need to understand how students develop game play ability from a low level to an…

Wang, Jianyu; Moffit, Jeff

2009-01-01

51

QUEST FOR TEACHING EXPERIMENTAL SKILLS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In Andhra Pradesh, India, chemical experimenting in under graduate college labs by students is neglected because most of the intermediate (10+1 and 10+2 students concentrate on writing competitive exams like EAMCET (Engineering and Medical Common Entrance Test, IIT JEE (Indian Institute of Technology Joint Entrance Test, AIEEE (All India Engineering Entrance Examination, AFMS (Armed Forces Medical Services, AIMS (All India Institute of Medical Science. The students spend most of their time in preparing for competitive exams, practicing bits, and writing many model exams. Even Parents, staff, and management are also motivated and allow the students towards preparation for competitive exams because of the increase in number of engineering seats and demand of medical seats. Ultimately, the quality and quantity of students who join the B.Sc. (Bachelor of Science has been decreasing day by day. Even after joining the B.Sc., the students are motivated towards immediate white collared job oriented courses like M.C.A (Master of Computer Applications and M.B.A (Master Business Administration and spending their time for preparing for competitive exams for those courses. Only a few students are interested to join Post graduation in chemistry and try to learn experimental skills in chemistry laboratory. However, the motivated students towards undergraduate chemistry will be demotivated towards it due to lack of fundamentals in chemistry (in 10+2 level, which are essential for better job market. Ultimately, the students are in confusion and neglect learning the skills in doing experiments in chemistry lab. The present paper focuses on the thorough quest of one such teacher who strives for his own professional development. He has developed his own method of guiding the students for their improvement of skills in doing experiments in lab. The teacher explored solutions to his problems or problems of students by sorting out the critical incidents from his own laboratory experiences, documented through regular journal writing. The teacher cum researcher guided the students to overcome the difficulties in Ø Determination of melting point Ø Determination of Boiling Point Ø Test for Extra elements Ø Ignition Test for Aliphatic/Aromatic/Carbohydrate/Amide andØ Test for Functional groups Quest, Professional development, Organic Practical class, Laboratory Experiences, Experimental Skills.

B. Samrajya LAKSHMI

2013-01-01

52

Cogniton-based Enlightenment of Creative Thinking: Examplars in Computer Science  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is reputed that “Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration”, but it can also be noted that “sometimes, 1% inspiration is more important than 99% perspiration.” As this 1% is so important, can it be understood, and even learned? If so, how can cognition be used to enlighten a scientist's inspiration (creative thinking? Both questions are considered on the basis of cognitive theory in the paper. We illustrate our ideas with examples from computer science.

2013-01-01

53

Using Precision Teaching to Teach Minimum Competency Test Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

A project combined precision teaching techniques and a flashcard approach known as SAFMEDS, with 4 students with learning disabilities or behavior disorders, age 14-18. Project results determined that the techniques provided students with necessary skills to pass the school district's minimum competency test in the area of local, state, and…

Byrnes, Michael E.; And Others

1990-01-01

54

Surgical handicraft: teaching and learning surgical skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Surgeons choose their profession with a strong desire to excel at manual therapeutic skills. Although we mime our mentors, we have often received the torch of technique in the absence of a systematic program to optimally develop our manual dexterity. The operating room is the ultimate arena to refine one's technical ability, but a surgical skills laboratory should assume increasing importance in introducing the trainee to the many nuances of the fine manual motor skills necessary for optimal surgical technique. Surgical educators should address the science of surgical handicraft in a manner similar to the science of preoperative and postoperative surgical principles that have been espoused over the past 40 years. Although it has been euphemistically said that "you can teach a monkey to operate," few of us have broken the process down into the basic elements to accomplish such a goal. In view of the increasing complexity of operations and equipment, the constraints on animal laboratories and teaching caseloads, and the mounting economic and medico-legal pressures, the development of optimal surgical skills should be a major objective of every surgical training program. By developing novel programs and scientifically evaluating the results of such endeavors, surgical faculties may find increased academic rewards for being a good teacher. PMID:3578661

Barnes, R W

1987-05-01

55

Technological and Technical Skills of the Teaching Faculty Members in Balqa Applied University / Jordan - In the Light of Comprehensive Quality Standards from the Viewpoint of a Number of Colleges Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the reality of the practices of the faculty members of teaching skills in light of comprehensive quality standards from the viewpoint of Balqa applied University College students. To achieve the objective of the study the researcher designed a questionnaire included four axes on quality standards in teaching. The study found out that the teachers of these colleges have skills associated with qualities of teaching methods, strategies, teaching methods, techniques, interaction, communication and the evaluation. But they’re poor if some special skills like the inability to diversify in the initialization methods to lecture in various ways, to motivate students to learn, does not possesses the ability to provide feedback to students answers, does not support scientific and creative thinking. Never use modern teaching methods and techniques in the best way, and does not emphasize the student use of computers outside the classroom in organizing their daily duties and perform scientific tasks and scientific research. The study recommended the teachers of Applied University of Balqa colleges to increase the attention to skills associated with teaching methods and strategies, teaching methods and techniques, interaction and communication, and evaluation. Particular as regards to diversification in the initialization methods for lecture using the different available methods to stimulating students learning, such as using stories, realistic problems, current events, PowerPoint, scientific demonstration, and to develop their abilities in providing feedback to students answers and support their skills in scientific, creative and critic thinking and to use modern teaching methods and techniques, and the use of student computers outside the classroom in organizing their daily duties and perform scientific tasks and scientific research.

Burhan M Awad Al-Omari

2012-09-01

56

Nursing Instructors Must Also Teach Reading and Study Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

To be successful in nursing courses, students must be able to read and comprehend a large volume of information. This requires different types of reading and study skills from other courses to which they have been exposed. The formal teaching of these skills in a nursing course takes second place to the teaching of required nursing skills. Because…

White, Hazel L.

2004-01-01

57

An Approach to Teaching Organizational Skills to Adults  

Science.gov (United States)

In English language teaching, it is not unusual to come across a student who seems to lack certain basic organizational skills. However, many of the language teaching techniques and materials require students to rely heavily on these skills. The use of textbooks and handouts, the assigning of tasks and homework, and the planning of a syllabus or…

Issa, Sandra Tompson

2009-01-01

58

Research on Professional Teaching Skills Training of Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The teaching skills are basic ability of the teacher; in order to improve the teaching skill of the non-normal major teacher, a set of the training system and method are proposed. This paper analyzes some important characteristics of teaching skills; and more attention is concentrated on the basic skills such as “speaking, showing, writing, drawing and attitude”. And this paper is concerned with the analysis of the many training methods of the basic teaching skills. The main training ways such as sophisticated teaching for key points, demonstration for examples and so on are proposed. The experiments on some new teachers have been carried out using these methods, and the studies have shown that they are effective.

Yanli Shi

2012-12-01

59

A historical marker in the development of critical and creative thinking in psychiatric-mental health nursing education and practice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: This investigation focuses on traumatic events of World War II and postwar reconstruction in US society in the 1940s, taking into account the development of psychiatric nursing as a specialty within the context of nursing education and practice trends. Scotomas of historic world figures, including Hildegard Peplau, renowned educator and psychiatric nurse, are examined. These blind spots profoundly affected their reactions and behaviors, for the betterment of society or the destruction of it. Method: Psychohistory looks at the “why” of historical events and is concerned with the motivation in human behavior and with the underlying meaning lurking beneath the surface of logic. In this psychohistorical exploration, figurative snapshots highlight a historical marker that commemorates a fire that blazed out of control in 1948 at Highland Hospital, a mental institution in Asheville, North Carolina, where Peplau held directorship. This fire served as a springboard for the evolution of the nurse-patient relationship within the nursing profession, as influenced by Peplau. Relevant questions explored are: What nurses were implicated in the fire? What did the characters at the scene believe and perceive? What were the motivations of key players? Who qualified as nurses? What ramifications did the fire have for nursing education and practice in the development of analytical thought and theoretical concepts? Significance: Some view the historic fire as a black mark against nursing. Nurses, however, with the assistance of Peplau’s teachings, can see it as a benchmark that began the process of eradication of resistances that prevent growth and the illumination of educational curricula that promote advancement of critical and creative thinking. Today, nurses can take advantage of their knowledge base learned from the past and can create expansive innovation in nursing education and practice that is supportive of global health and safety in the 21st century.

Christine M. Silverstein

2013-01-01

60

Teaching 21st Century Skills: An ASCD Action Tool  

Science.gov (United States)

Any school interested in preparing students for learning and working in 21st century academic and job settings needs this resource to explain to teachers the new skills students need and provide teachers with tools to teach and reinforce these skills. Based on the work of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, this action tool defines what…

Beers, Sue

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

An Evaluation of Computerized Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Safety Skills to Young Children  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) and in situ training (IST) for teaching children to protect themselves. However, BST may be resource intensive and difficult to implement on a large scale. We evaluated a computerized version of BST (CBST) to teach safety skills and determined the extent to which…

Vanselow, Nicholas R.; Hanley, Gregory P.

2014-01-01

62

A Brief Review on Developing Creative Thinking in Young Children by Mind Mapping  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mind mapping is a presentation form of radiant thinking, utilizing lines, colors, characters, numbers, symbols, image, pictures or keywords, etc. to associate, integrate and visualize the learned concept and evoke brain potential. Through mind maps, one’s attention, coordination ability, logic, reasoning, thinking, analyzing, creativity, imagination, memory, ability of planning and integration, speed reading, character, number, visuality, hearing, kinesthetic sense, sensation, etc. are significantly enhanced. “Picture” is not limited by nationality and language and is the best tool for young children to explore new things and learning. Because pictorial representation is one of the most primal human traits and drawing ability is better than writing ability in young children, learning and expressing through mind mapping prevents difficulties of writing, grammar and long description in children. Thus, this study reviews related researches to figure out whether mind mapping can be applied by young children to develop their creative thinking.

Wen-Cheng Wang

2010-06-01

63

Applying MacKinnon's 4Ps to Foster Creative Thinking and Creative Behaviours in Kindergarten Children  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to identify certain strategies and conditions that should be used by teachers in kindergarten so as to foster creative thinking and creative behaviours to children. We used a quasi-experimental research design for 6 months in a public kindergarten in a suburban area of Greece, and we developed a creative music and…

Riga, Vassiliki; Chronopoulou, Elena

2014-01-01

64

Habilidades de pensamento criativo em crianças institucionalizadas e não institucionalizadas / Creative thinking abilities in institutionalized and non institutionalized children  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este estudo examinou diferenças em habilidades de pensamento criativo entre 25 crianças institucionalizadas e 30 crianças não institucionalizadas, sendo 23 do sexo masculino e 32 do sexo feminino. Todas responderam a um teste de natureza verbal da Bateria Torrance de Pensamento Criativo (Torrance, 1 [...] 974) e ao Teste de Pensamento Criativo - Produção Divergente (Urban & Jellen, 1996). Não foram observadas diferenças significativas nas medidas de pensamento criativo entre crianças institucionalizadas e não institucionalizadas. Diferença significativa entre gêneros foi observada no Teste de Pensamento Criativo - Produção Divergente, a favor do gênero masculino, paralelamente a uma interação entre gênero e instituição neste teste. Observou-se também uma relação positiva entre os escores dos dois testes utilizados. Abstract in english This study investigated the differences in creative thinking abilities among 25 institutionalized children and 30 non-institutionalized children, being 23 male and 30 female. These children answered a verbal test of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Torrance, 1974) and the Test of Creative Th [...] inking - Divergent Production (Urban & Jellen, 1996). No significant differences were observed among male and female children in the creative thinking abilities. However, a significant difference between gender was observed in the Test of Creative Thinking - Divergent Production, to the advantage of the male gender as far as an interaction between gender and institutionalization in the same test. It was observed also, a positive relation among the scores of the tests.

Paulo Gomes de, Sousa Filho; Eunice M. L. Soriano, Alencar.

2003-12-01

65

Temper and Tantrum Tamers. Breakthrough Strategies To Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth: Social Skills, School Skills, Coping Skills Lesson Series.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is one of eight in a series of guides designed to help teach and counsel troubled youth. It presents 20 lessons designed to teach the coping skills necessary to control one's temper. The first lesson teaches students the meaning of aggressive behavior; this lesson and several others throughout the guide focus on helping aggressive…

Wells, Ruth Herman

66

Favorite Sentences: Grammar in Action (Teaching Skills within Meaningful Contexts).  

Science.gov (United States)

Voices concerns with isolated exercises in grammar. Offers an alternative, in which teachers collect sentences (mostly from literature) and use them to point out or teach skills for writers. Offers numerous examples. (SR)

Kane, Sharon

1997-01-01

67

Teaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available To be successful in today's workplace, engineering and computer science students must possess high levels of teamwork skills. Unfortunately, most engineering programs provide little or no specific instruction in this area. This paper outlines an assessment-driven approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Working with the Industrial Advisory Board for the College, a set of performance criteria for teamwork was developed. This set of criteria was used to build an assessment instrument to measure the extent to which students are able to achieve the necessary skills. This set of criteria provides a clear basis for the development of an approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Furthermore, the results from the assessment can be used to adjust the teaching techniques to address the particular skills where students show some weaknesses. Although this effort is in the early stages, the approach seems promising and will be improved over time.

Robert W. Lingard

2010-02-01

68

A computer simulation for teaching critical thinking skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Critical thinking is difficult to teach because it is an abstract conceptual skill and there is no standard model. The authors discuss the development and use of a computer simulation that stimulates critical thinking in nursing students. Computer simulations are an efficient method of teaching students content and critical thinking skills without exhausting severely limited clinical time or placing a patient in jeopardy. PMID:9582801

Weis, P A; Guyton-Simmons, J

1998-01-01

69

Evaluation of Peer Training for Teaching Abduction Prevention Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Child abduction is a serious problem, with approximately 100 children killed each year by nonfamily abductors. Training programs to teach children the correct skills to use if they ever come into contact with a stranger can be effective when they incorporate behavioral skills training (BST) and in-situ training (IST) into their protocol. However,…

Tarasenko, Melissa A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Brower-Breitwieser, Carrie; Bosch, Amanda

2010-01-01

70

Observing Student Teachers for a Hierarchy of Generic Teaching Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

An approach to supervision and evaluation of student teachers includes identification of generic teaching competencies and a systematic appraisal with reference to established desirable teaching behaviors. Structured Classroom Observation Guides, focusing on particular skills during each week of the practicum experience and progressing from basic…

Woolever, Roberta

71

Project AIM: A New Way to Teach Coping Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

The Apperceptual Interaction Method (AIM), developed by World Education, teaches coping skills to Adult Basic Education and English as a Second Language students. AIM develops teaching materials locally in the form of leaflets which students build into books. Special emphasis is placed on solving practical life problems. (NHM)

Rivera, William M.

1975-01-01

72

Heritage in hospitals: Using museum objects to teach communications skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Museum objects can be used to inspire a wide variety of teaching and learning. This paper discusses how museum objects can be used to teach communications skills to medical students as part of a project investigating the benefits of taking museum objects to patients at University College London Hospitals.

Guy Noble

2010-01-01

73

The "Strategies-for-Achievement" Approach for Teaching Study Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

An educational psychology-based study skills program called Strategies for Achievement was developed to teach learning and motivation strategies to college students. It involved teaching student four major achievement strategies: take reasonable risk, take responsibility for outcomes, search the environment (for information), and use feedback.…

Tuckman, Bruce W.

74

Teaching Beginning Chess Skills to Students with Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses teaching higher-level thinking skills and concentration to students with disabilities through chess instruction. Guidelines for chess instruction are provided, including: teaching ideas and strategy first rather than specific lines of play, using a variety of instructional modalities, and building in reinforcement for…

Storey, Keith

2000-01-01

75

Higher order thinking skills competencies required by outcomes-based education from learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Outcomes-Based Education (OBE brought about a significant paradigm shift in the education and training of learners in South Africa. OBE requires a shift from focusing on the teacher input (instruction offerings or syllabuses expressed in terms of content, to focusing on learner outcomes. OBE is moving away from ‘transmission’ models to constructivistic, learner-centered models that put emphasis on learning as an active process (Nieburh, 1996:30. Teachers act as facilitators and mediators of learning (Norms and Standards, Government Gazette vol 415, no 20844 of 2000. Facilitators are responsible to create the environment that is conducive for learners to construct their own knowledge, skills and values through interaction (Peters, 2000. The first critical cross-field outcome accepted by the South African Qualification Framework (SAQA is that learners should be able to identify and solve problems by using critical and creative thinking skills. This paper seeks to explore some higher order thinking skills competencies required by OBE from learners such as critical thinking, reflective thinking, creative thinking, dialogic / dialectic thinking, decision making, problem solving and emotional intelligence and their implications in facilitating teaching and learning from the theoretical perspective. The philosophical underpinning of these higher order thinking skills is described to give direction to the study. It is recommended that a study focusing on the assessment of these intellectual concepts be made. The study may be qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods in nature (Creswell 2005.

MM Chabeli

2006-09-01

76

Higher order thinking skills competencies required by outcomes-based education from learners.  

Science.gov (United States)

Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) brought about a significant paradigm shift in the education and training of learners in South Africa. OBE requires a shift from focusing on the teacher input (instruction offerings or syllabuses expressed in terms of content), to focusing on learner outcomes. OBE is moving away from 'transmission' models to constructivistic, learner-centered models that put emphasis on learning as an active process (Nieburh, 1996:30). Teachers act as facilitators and mediators of learning (Norms and Standards, Government Gazette vol 415, no 20844 of 2000). Facilitators are responsible to create the environment that is conducive for learners to construct their own knowledge, skills and values through interaction (Peters, 2000). The first critical cross-field outcome accepted by the South African Qualification Framework (SAQA) is that learners should be able to identify and solve problems by using critical and creative thinking skills. This paper seeks to explore some higher order thinking skills competencies required by OBE from learners such as critical thinking, reflective thinking, creative thinking, dialogic / dialectic thinking, decision making, problem solving and emotional intelligence and their implications in facilitating teaching and learning from the theoretical perspective. The philosophical underpinning of these higher order thinking skills is described to give direction to the study. It is recommended that a study focusing on the assessment of these intellectual concepts be made. The study may be qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods in nature (Creswell 2005). PMID:17131612

Chabeli, M M

2006-08-01

77

TLC--Teaching, Learning, and Caring: Teaching Interpersonal Problem-Solving Skills to Behaviorally Disordered Adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

The article describes "Teaching, Learning, and Caring" (TLC), a program designed for partially mainstreamed behavior disordered adolescents (ages 14-18). Eight TLC skill areas are the focus of interpersonal skills training: communication mode, empathy, goal identification, cue sensitivity, alternative thinking, skills implementation, consequential…

Vaughn, Sharon

1987-01-01

78

The Teaching Methodology of Arabic Speaking Skills: Learners’ Perspectives  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teaching methodology plays an important role in transmitting knowledge and skills to learners. The effectiveness of both knowledge and skills depends greatly on the methodology used. This paper describes a study to investigate the learners’ perspectives on the teaching methodology used by the teachers at the Centre for Foundation Studies, International Islamic University Malaysia, to teach Arabic speaking skills. The data were collected using a focus group interview with 6 Arabic language learners at the centre. The findings show that the learners were dissatisfied with the teaching methodology as it emphasizes memorization. Instead they prefer a communicative approach where they can apply orally what they have learned, be corrected and improve.

Sueraya Che Haron

2013-12-01

79

Teaching Creative Thinking and Transitioning Students to the Workplace in an Academic Setting  

Science.gov (United States)

In their collegiate studies, students are given a wide range of concepts, theories, and equations to assist them in their future endeavors. However, students have not been sufficiently exposed to practical critical thinking methodologies that will benefit them as they encounter open-ended problems. A course developed at the University of Michigan…

Senra, Michael; Fogler, H. Scott

2014-01-01

80

Teaching Basic Skills in Business Education.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document provides a business education model or set of criteria against which instructional practices in basic and survival skills may be compared. These criteria are valid for business instruction at the 9th- through 12th-grade levels. Section 1 contains the Business Education Survival Skills Matrix. An "x" indicates that 50 percent or more…

California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

 
 
 
 
81

Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Nontraditional Learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Different teaching methods should be used when instructing adults versus those used to teach children. Adults have many life experiences, they have a need to know, and they are often highly motivated to learn as it relates to career growth and personal advancement. In this paper, the author discusses andragogy and how adult learning theory affects the learner. The principles of andragogy provide the librarian instructor with a foundation for how to teach the adult learner. Suggestions for how to apply the principles of andragogy are listed in the paper. The paper will also benefit those working in public libraries who work with lifelong learners.

Lauren Hays

2014-02-01

82

[Gender differences in EEG coherence changes during figural creative thinking: the efficacy coupling].  

Science.gov (United States)

The study was aimed to explore the features of interaction between cortical areas during figural creative task performance in high- and low-creative men and women. We divided the participants into two groups with high and low creativity by the median of originality score. EEG was recorded at rest and during task performance (Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking "Incomplete figures"). The EEG coherence was computed in six frequency bands from theta1 to beta2. We analyzed the total values of coherence for each of 16 sites, calculated separately for intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connections. In the theta2, alphal, and alpha2 bands, coherence values decreased in task performance as compared to baseline in subjects with lower originality scores, whereas in subjects with higher scores, they increased in the theta2 and alpha1 bands. The decrease in the alpha2 band in the higher-creativity group was significantly lower in comparison with the decrease in the lower-score group. In the alpha2 band, the interaction of gender, creativity, laterality, and electrode position factors was also found during analysis of task-induced coherence changes. Further examination of the interaction showed the similarity of EEG coherence patterns in men and women with opposite creative abilities and higher values of task-induced coherence changes in the anterior regions of the left hemisphere and posterior regions of the right hemisphere in high-creative in comparison with low-creative men. The findings are discussed in terms of different cognitive strategies used by men and women that may have the same results in creative problem solving. PMID:19795805

Vol'f, N V; Tarasova, I V; Razumnikova, O M

2009-01-01

83

TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS : THE CONCEPT OF SOCIAL RISK ANALYSIS  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of learning objectives, but realised in practical teaching activities and as an integrated part of the examination. This study aims at presenting and reviewing a practical approach to teaching of interpersonal skills, referred to as the Social Risk Analysis, which has been applied and integrated into the curriculum of two engineering courses. The Social Risk Analysis encourages and imposes a critical review of the social interaction in a small group of students and thus facilitates communication and teamwork operation. Students find the Social Risk Analysis being easy to apprehend and meaningful in engineering teaching, and most significantly, they perceive that the Social Risk Analysis facilitates the work performance. The study found it possible to successfully implement the Social Risk Analysis into the course curriculum of the two engineering courses. The implementation required, however, refinement of the pedagogical approach by integrating the Social Risk Analysis into the learning objectives, teaching activities and assessment of the course, and further, redesign of the engineering work assignments in order to impel cooperation, communication and participation of the students in a team. The establishment of an engineering context provides an important basis for the teaching of interpersonal skill using the Social Risk Analysis.

Andersson, Niclas

2009-01-01

84

Teaching strategies to promote critical thinking skills in nursing staff.  

Science.gov (United States)

The promotion of critical thinking skills necessary for safe, effective, state-of-the-art nursing care is discussed in this article. Definitions of critical thinking and inductive and deductive reasoning are explored. Benner's (1986) research, based on Dreyfus and Dreyfus' (1980) model of skill acquisition, provides a basis for the various strategies mentioned to teach critical thinking. Implementation and evaluation of these strategies are addressed. PMID:7868746

Dobrzykowski, T M

1994-01-01

85

Teaching empathy and other compassion-based communication skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Empathy plays an important role in comprehensive nursing care. Empathy outcome research shows that exposure to an empathetic person has a palliative and even healing effect on patients. Teaching nurses how to communicate with empathy is crucial to unleash the true potential that empathy has to transform and heal. Four active listening skills and six compassion-based skills are defined. A suggested training rubric appropriate for use in multiple training contexts is provided. PMID:24256934

Kelley, Kevin J; Kelley, Mary F

2013-01-01

86

Skills and Competencies Set Forth by Bologna Process in Higher Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Scientific and technological advances of today, force the universities to train more qualified individuals. That needs to increase the quality of educational programs and practices, and requires constant updating in universities. So within the framework of the “Bologna Process” higher education programs have been started to be updated in our country. These studies, carried out to develop the skills and competencies of students' knowledge with student-centered educational approach. Besides a variety of knowledge and skills, ability to work independently and assume responsibility, learning, communication and social competence skills, such as domain specific competencies and professional competence is intended to gain to the students. This approach needs to teaching cognitive (logical, intuitive and creative thinking and practical (manual skills, methods, materials, tools to use skills, that is to say language, mental, social and emotional skills in higher education. Teaching of skills is different from teaching of the information in methods and practice. Therefore the universities should be developed for the assessment of teaching and coaching skills. Otherwise, the rote teaching of information will inevitably grow and achieving the goals of higher education will be difficult.

Firdevs GÜNE?

2012-01-01

87

Teaching intercultural negotiation and communication skills: an international experiment  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports on the initial phase of an international teaching experiment involving the use of videoconferencing for the teaching of intercultural business communication and negotiation skills. The experiment has the following aims: (a) to give insight into how students from different cultures operate in nearly identical situations, (b) to give students exposure to intercultural communication through videoconferencing, (c) to allow students to assess videoconferencing as a tool for inte...

Poncini, Gina; Charles, Mirjaliisa

2005-01-01

88

The Integrative Nature of BE Teaching: Knowledge and Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the great development of the international trade and communication after China’s entry into the WTO, the demand for talents qualified in both English and business is increasing, so more universities or colleges have paid their attention to the fostering and cultivation of business talents. Starting with the status quo of the market need for BE (Business English talents and the required knowledge and skills for them, this paper intends to explore effective BE teaching ways from the perspectives of teachers’ qualifications, course designs, teaching models and teaching methodologies.

Tingting Guo

2009-10-01

89

Using Music Sampling to Teach Research Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

One way to teach the research paper is by first discussing sampling, the musical practice of using other artists' work. By studying the lyrics of Sean "P. Diddy" Combs, a widely known hip-hop sampler, students gain an understanding of quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing sources.

Wakefield, Sarah R.

2006-01-01

90

Teaching Interactive Decisionmaking Skills to Preservice Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

A report is given of a program that was developed to train student teachers in how to make effective decisions while they are engaged in the act of teaching. This type of thinking has been labeled "interactive decisionmaking" (IDM). As a result of the training, the beginning teachers were expected to make improvements in their classroom decisions.…

Stuempfig, Daniel W.

91

Comparing Language Teaching and Other-Skill Teaching: Has the Language Teacher Anything to Learn?  

Science.gov (United States)

The paper describes a research project which observes the teaching practices of trainers working in three non-linguistic skill ("other-skill") areas--music (classical singing), table tennis, and flight simulation. The aim is to compare these practices with those of the language teacher and to consider whether the latter has anything to learn from…

Johnson, Keith; Jackson, Sarah

2006-01-01

92

A Comparative Study of Teaching Typing Skills on Microcomputers.  

Science.gov (United States)

A 4-week experimental study was conducted with 105 high school students in 4 introductory typewriting classes of a large urban school in British Columbia during the 1981 spring semester. The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of teaching the skill-building components of typewriting speed and accuracy using either the…

Lindsay, Robert M.

93

Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills. The Classroom Strategies Series  

Science.gov (United States)

As the 21st century unfolds, the pace of change in the world is accelerating. Teachers and administrators must lead the cultural shift required to ensure their students can survive and thrive in the changing world. In Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills the authors present a model of instruction and assessment based on a combination of…

Marzano, Robert J.; Heflebower, Tammy

2012-01-01

94

Teaching Job Interviewing Skills with the Help of Television Shows  

Science.gov (United States)

Because of its potential for humor and drama, job interviewing is frequently portrayed on television. This article discusses how scenes from popular television series such as "Everybody Loves Raymond," "Friends," and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" can be used to teach effective job interview skills in business communication courses. Television…

Bloch, Janel

2011-01-01

95

Teaching Directional Skills to Preschool and Kindergarten Children  

Science.gov (United States)

Studied a new device and training procedure for teaching the directional orientation and sentence tracking skills used in reading and writing western languages. Left-right and up-down directional confusion were shown to be rapidly corrected in normal children by the use of a simple electronic device providing clear feedback. (Author)

Sterritt, Graham M.; And Others

1976-01-01

96

Involving Parents in Teaching Social Communication Skills to Young Children  

Science.gov (United States)

This article focuses on why and how speech-language pathologists and other professionals can encourage the involvement of parents in teaching social communication skills to their young children. Four main topics are explored: (1) the evidence that many of the children with special needs served by speech-language pathologists and other…

Weiss, Amy L.; Theadore, Geraldine

2011-01-01

97

Teaching critical thinking skills to undergraduate nursing students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching nursing students to use critical thinking skills is important in today's changing healthcare system. Formal instruction in critical thinking theory is included in a professional issues nursing course for junior nursing students. The authors describe healthcare and non-healthcare educational activities used to promote application of the principles of critical thinking. PMID:9197656

Beeken, J E; Dale, M L; Enos, M F; Yarbrough, S

1997-01-01

98

Using Banks: Teaching Banking Skills to Low-Income Consumers.  

Science.gov (United States)

This module, one of six on teaching consumer matters to low-income adults, discusses banking skills. Topics include banking services (savings accounts, safety deposit boxes, Christmas clubs, loans, etc.), checking accounts (deposits, checkwriting, check registers, opening an account), how to use the check register (cancelled checks, deposits),…

Shurtz, Mary Ann; LeFlore, Ann Becker

99

Are medical schools hesitant to teach undergraduate students teaching skills? A medical student's critical view  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Junior medical staff provides a large proportion of undergraduate student education. However, despite increasing numbers of resident-as-teacher training programs, junior doctors may still not be sufficiently prepared to teach medical students. Hence, medical schools should consider implementing formal teaching skills training into undergraduate curricula.

Lukas Peter Mileder

2013-11-01

100

Are medical schools hesitant to teach undergraduate students teaching skills? A medical student's critical view.  

Science.gov (United States)

Junior medical staff provides a large proportion of undergraduate student education. However, despite increasing numbers of resident-as-teacher training programs, junior doctors may still not be sufficiently prepared to teach medical students. Hence, medical schools should consider implementing formal teaching skills training into undergraduate curricula. PMID:24229730

Mileder, Lukas Peter

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Teaching Listening Comprehension Skills: A Test-orientated Approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Attributed to a “receptive skill” in the communicative process, listening comprehension would be the most arduous task of all four language skills. It is likely that EFL (English as a foreign language students encounter various predicaments, of e.g. grasping main ideas of the dialogues in contexts, and in turn suffer from learning anxiety. The issue of how to assist the students in improving their listening competency is worth attention. This article is, therefore, intended for illustrating a test-orientated approach to teaching listening comprehension skills to EFL students through an analysis of sample questions about listening comprehension (i.e. Choosing the Right Picture, Short Questions, and Short Conversations on GEPT tests at the elementary level and through provision of tips (i.e. Skim, Scan, Listen, Guess/Infer, Choose & Write and Check on how to answer the questions effectively. Implications for teaching listening comprehension are also made at the end of the paper.

Shao-Wen Su

2012-05-01

102

Should we teach thinking skills to deaf children?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to identify the benefits of developing thinking skills with KS1 deaf children who used British Sign Language (BSL. It arose as a response to the findings of a variety of researches who had reported a number of ‘failings’ apparent in the educational and learning activity of deaf children. It used a case study approach involving five profoundly deaf Key stage 1 children and explored the extent to which, using materials grounded in the Somerset Thinking Skills Course, the teaching of thinking skills in a supportive environment could remediate some of these issues. The strongly visual nature of the material supported pupil exchanges mediated by the use of sign language. Analysis of video film was used to plot individual pupil development of scanning skills, their use of nouns versus adjectives, micro-skills and macro-abilities. Pupil reasoning skills, how they were supported, their ownership and role of the facilitator were also examined. The results showed that within eight weeks (equivalent to four hours in total the children were more able to express their perceptions. They watched other children in order to access their signed information and appeared to use this to develop, elaborate, extend and provide reasons when it was their turn to present. There was also evidence of enhanced creativity and originality in their contributions. This pilot study urges the need for further research and suggests that a priority should be given to developing this approach in the teaching of deaf children. Due to the complexity of thinking skills it further recommends that this area should be taught as a separate topic that can inform other subjects.

Emma Tamsin Kelty

2006-04-01

103

Perspective: Serious play: teaching medical skills with improvisational theater techniques.  

Science.gov (United States)

The physician-patient encounter may be structured, but it is never scripted; every physician-patient interaction is to some degree improvised. Both physicians and improvisers must prepare for unpredictability, and the surprising and unrecognized overlap between improvisational theater and medical training and medical practice led the author to develop a seminar that tailors improvisational skills to physician needs, teaching communication, professionalism, and other medical skills through an approach she calls "medical improv." The author observes that there is no example of this teaching strategy as a recurring part of a medical school curriculum reported in the literature, and she describes the contributions medical improv can make to physician skills. The author reports on medical students' positive response to the medical improv seminar she has taught at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine since 2002: 95% of students anonymously evaluating the seminar from 2002 to 2010 agreed with the statement, "Studying improv could make me a better doctor," and 100% agreed with the statement, "I would recommend this class to other medical students." The author proposes a medical improv teaching model that other medical schools and hospitals could adapt and adopt. PMID:21869654

Watson, Katie

2011-10-01

104

Promoting the teaching of critical thinking skills through faculty development.  

Science.gov (United States)

Practical and effective faculty development programs are vital to individual and institutional success. However, there is little evidence that program outcomes result in instructional changes. The purpose of this study was to determine if and how faculty development would enhance participants' use of critical thinking skills in instruction. Seven faculty members from the University of Florida College of Dentistry and one faculty member from another health science college participated in six weekly two-hour faculty development sessions in spring 2007 that focused on enhancing critical thinking skills in instruction. Kaufman's and Rachal's principles of andragogy (adult learning) were used to design the sessions. Participants used learning journals to respond to four instructor-assigned prompts and provided one presentation to peers. With the use of qualitative methods, eight themes emerged across the learning journals: teaching goals, critical thinking, awareness of learners, planned instructional change, teaching efficacy, self-doubt, external challenges, and changes made. Five of eight participants incorporated critical thinking skills into their presentations at a mean level of 2.4 or higher on a 5-point scale using Paul and Elder's behavioral definition of critical thinking skills. Faculty development opportunities that cause participants to reason through learning journals, peer presentations, and group discussion demonstrated the incorporation of critical thinking concepts in 63 percent of this cohort group's presentations, suggesting that if evidence-based pedagogies are followed, instructional changes can result from faculty development. PMID:19491344

Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Schneider-Mitchell, Gail; Graff, Randy

2009-06-01

105

The teaching of clinical skills at a postgraduate hospital.  

Science.gov (United States)

The teaching of 'clinical skills' is generally held to be central to postgraduate training in psychiatry, but the term itself has so far escaped exact definition. In an effort to study some of the component clinical abilities, their inter-relationships, and the factors promoting their transmission, all junior psychiatrists at the Maudsley Hospital were surveyed for their views on the clinical training they had received. Three hundred and seventy three assessement on 43 units were made. Trainees perceived the academic instruction and advice on formulating cases which they had received as being quite unrelated to the quality of help with interview skills and instruction in practical management, but feedback from the consultant to the trainee on the latter's performance was necessary for a high standard of both academic and practical instruction. Encouragement to do research was transmitted independently of other clinical teaching. Over a 3-year period the standard of multi-disciplinary teamwork appeared to improve, but there was a decline in the standard of academic instruction and in encouragement to do research. These overall differences were due to changes in the teaching staff, rather than alterations in teaching methods. Surveys such as this may help to define the goals of postgraduate clinical training, and also monitor the extent to which an institution is achieving these goals. PMID:7267879

Creed, F; Murray, R M

1981-05-01

106

Decision story strategy: a practical approach for teaching decision making.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers are usually very enthusiastic in their evaluations of decision stories. Decision Story Strategies offer a change of pace, promote student involvement and stimulate creative thinking, problem solving and everpresent creative teaching-learning opportunities. The real-life problems presented within the structure of a decision story provide meaningful learning opportunities for students. Students begin to think in a broader perspective when considering other points of view and information sources. The Decision Story Strategy used with the Decision-Making Model provides a powerful tool for health educators to develop skills for making and evaluating decisions in an interesting and meaningful context. It may not be a panacea for all health educators, but is an effective strategy for the teacher concerned with developing independent decision makers. Most importantly, students are provided opportunities to solve their present problems as well as develop decision-making skills for the future. PMID:6916032

Smith, D L; Hamrick, M H; Anspaugh, D J

1981-12-01

107

Utilizing Teaching Interactions to Facilitate Social Skills in the Natural Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in social skills. While research has shown behavioral interventions to be effective in teaching and/or increasing a variety of appropriate social skills, limited research has shown generalization of these skills to the natural setting. The Teaching Interaction procedure…

Kassardjian, Alyne; Taubman, Mitchell; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.; Edwards, Andrew; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ron; Schulze, Kim

2013-01-01

108

An Investigation of an Arts Infusion Program on Creative Thinking, Academic Achievement, Affective Functioning, and Arts Appreciation of Children at Three Grade Levels.  

Science.gov (United States)

Investigates the effects of an arts infusion program (SPECTRA+) on the creative thinking, academic achievement, self-esteem, locus of control, and appreciation of the arts by school children (n=615). Reports that SPECTRA+ program children scored higher than the control group in creativity, self-esteem, and arts appreciation, while data for…

Luftig, Richard L.

2000-01-01

109

Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings. PMID:22616410

Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

2012-01-01

110

Small group teaching improves students’ acquisition of knowledge and skills  

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Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of small group teaching (SGT in improving the undergraduate medical students’ knowledge and skills. Methods: This study took place at the College of Medicine, Taibah University, Madina, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between September 2011 and September 2012. Small group teaching was applied by the surgery department. In this prospective study, fifth year students were divided into groups of 8 students, and teaching strategies of SGT were applied. The marks in the clinical examinations of long case and objective structured clinical examination (OSCE of the students with a traditional teaching cohort of 2010-2011 were compared to a SGT cohort of 2011-2012. Data were analyzed by comparing the means, standard error, and standard deviation. Results: One hundred and sixty-four students were incorporated, 82 students for each year (41 males and 41 females in each group. The analysis showed a statistical significant difference in marks obtained by male and female students of both cohorts (p=0.000. In the 2011-2012 group, male students’ mean score was 43.1±2.99 which was higher than the 2010-2011 male students’ (mean±SD: 38.7±2.81; p=0.000. Similarly, the 2011-2012 female students attained a higher mean score than those in the 2010-2011 (39.8±4.0 and 35.6±3.88 (p=0.000. Conclusion: Small group teaching is a valuable strategy in enhancing students’ performance in the clinical settings. Small group teaching can be applied to other clinical disciplines of the medical curriculum for production of safe and clinically competent graduates. 

Hamdi H. Almaramhy

2012-11-01

111

The influence of teaching hardwriting, reading and spelling skills on the accuracy of world level reading  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of THRASS (Teaching Handwriting, Reading and Spelling Skills) on the word level accuracy skills of a group of grade 2 learners. Word level accuracy is one sub skill in learning to read and is an indicator of the word recognition abilities of the child. THRASS is a program that has been designed to systematically teach phonics and, thus, teaches the basic building blocks of word sounds and structure so as to improve th...

Stark, Robert John Alexander

2010-01-01

112

Let's Have Fun! Teaching Social Skills through Stories, Telecommunications, and Activities  

Science.gov (United States)

This article concerns social skills interventions for children with emotional/behavioral disorders. Drawing on the author's teaching experience and the findings of research on social skills training in schools, and exploring effective ways to facilitate children's social skill development, the paper describes how social skills interventions can be…

Zhang, Kaili Chen

2011-01-01

113

Teaching Basic Skills through Home Economics. Instructional Activities for Home Economics Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

This publication is designed to help home economics teachers as they identify and teach basic skills in their programs. Part I, "Basic Skills Instruction in Home Economics" (Miller), discusses strategies for supplementing basic skills through home economics content. It addresses preparation of home economics teachers to incorporate basic skills in…

Miller, Sandra W., Ed.; Tulloch, Charlotte R., Ed.

114

Teaching physiology to dental students: matching teaching and learning styles in a South African dental school.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study compared the preference for learning styles of dental students in a small class in physiology at a South African university with the preference for teaching styles of the lecturers. It also analyzed and evaluated the teaching methods and aids the lecturers used. The study was done in the last teaching block of the year after students have been exposed to all the lecturing styles in the same premedical subject. Two separate questionnaires were used in the study in order to evaluate teaching methods and teaching media used by the lecturers and to measure the teaching methods and teaching media that students preferred. Through a critical analysis of the data, it was found that the students preferred cooperative and active teaching/learning experiences more than the lecturers are using them. The study emphasizes the importance of students being actively involved in the teaching-learning process through cooperative methods. This may enhance their ability to utilize cognitive skills such as creative thinking, interpretation, critical thinking, and problem-solving. PMID:20837740

Allers, Nico

2010-09-01

115

Creative Thinking in Schools: Finding the "Just Right" Challenge for Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Spurred on by explosive technological developments and unprecedented access to information, leaders in the fields of business, industry, and education are all calling for creative, innovative workers. In an atmosphere of high-stakes testing and global competitiveness, educators around the world are examining their teaching methods to determine…

Fletcher, Tina Sue

2011-01-01

116

Surveying Colorado Band Directors' Opinions of Skills and Characteristics Important to Successful Music Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was designed to (a) gather band directors' opinions of skills and characteristics important to teaching and (b) examine the relative effectiveness of electronic versus paper survey methods. Survey respondents ranked lists of music, teaching, and personal skills or characteristics in order of importance and answered open-ended items…

Miksza, Peter; Roeder, Matthew; Biggs, Dana

2010-01-01

117

Teaching Sexual History-Taking Skills Using the Sexual Events Classification System  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: The authors review the literature about educational programs for teaching sexual history-taking skills and describe novel techniques for teaching these skills. Methods: Psychiatric residents enrolled in a brief sexual history-taking course that included instruction on the Sexual Events Classification System, feedback on residents'…

Fidler, Donald C.; Petri, Justin Daniel; Chapman, Mark

2010-01-01

118

Practice Teaching in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research project entitled Teaching Exercises in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills, which was conducted during 2011-2012 by the Department of Teaching Research and Studies from the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education (Escalante, Fernández and Gaete, 2012, in order to explore cultural diversity in classrooms and educational institutions in Costa Rica. This multicultural phenomenon has forced authorities to pay special attention to the educational services provided, particularly in elementary. In addition, it has sparked a discussion regarding the teachers’ conceptual and pedagogical void and a gap in their teaching skills to deal with student populations of different origins. Similarly, it leads to a reflection about the basic national educational curriculum. The research was conducted in 12 elementary schools from different educational districts, which have a high cultural diversity among students. Using qualitative research techniques, the opinions of principals, teachers and students regarding this topic are explored. The most important conclusion reached in this study is the absence of an intercultural pedagogy in the country’s classrooms and the need to prepare teachers in this respect.

Cristina Escalante Rivera

2014-05-01

119

Teaching Research Skills at the K-12 Level  

Science.gov (United States)

Few programs have as much of an impact on students' understanding of science as science fair projects. Science fair projects allow students to learn the scientific process through observation and discovery, and provides them the opportunity to share the excitement of their discoveries with practicing scientists and engineers. With the increasing demand to meet State and National student achievement levels, schools are focusing on content rather than process. To provide teachers with the knowledge and skills to develop project-based instruction pedagogy, American Indian Programs (AIP) at Arizona State University initiated a State Science Fair. Through the Arizona American Indian Science and Engineering Fair, teachers and students develop scientific skills and knowledge through actively engaging in research. Teaching these skills at the K-12 level increases students' interest in the sciences and provides them the skills to actively engage in research at the post secondary level. With American Indians being the most underrepresented minority in the sciences this effort can have a major influence in students choosing a career in the sciences. Because most teachers lack even a basic understanding of research or the scientific method, AIP has developed a three-day teacher workshop designed to promote greater understanding in the scientific process, research and how to support high quality research projects. Referred to as the AIP Intel Educator Academy, the demand for this type of teacher training is reflective in this workshop being requested and presented in other States as well as internationally. This session will provide: An overview of the workshop, the development of school-based science fair programs, partnerships to support science learning in schools, how to get involved, and the efforts of AIP to reform science teaching at Arizona Tribal schools through participation in science fairs. Networking through the AISEF e-mentor program. In depth information on the AISEF and International Science and Engineering Fair. A CD resource guide. A CD with all the information needed to participate in the AISEF and International Science and Engineering Fair.

Huebner, P. J.

2004-12-01

120

Teaching effective problem solving skills to radiation protection students  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Problem solving skills are essential for all radiation protection personnel. Although some students have more natural problem solving skills than others, all students require practice to become comfortable using these skills. At the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), a unique one-semester course was developed as part of the core curriculum to teach students problem solving skills and elements of modelling and simulation. The underlying emphasis of the course was to allow students to develop their own problem solving strategies, both individually and in groups. Direction was provided on how to examine problems from different perspectives, and how to determine the proper root problem statement. A five-point problem solving strategy was presented as: 1) Problem definition; 2) Solution generation; 3) Decision; 4) Implementation; 5) Evaluation. Within the strategy, problem solving techniques were integrated from diverse areas such as: De Bono 's six thinking hats, Kepner-Tregoe decision analysis, Covey's seven habits of highly effective people, Reason's swiss cheese theory of complex failure, and Howlett's common failure modes. As part of the evaluation step, students critically explore areas such as ethics and environmental responsibility. In addition to exploring problem solving methods, students learn the usefulness of simulation methods, and how to model and simulate complex phenomena of relevance to radiation protection. Computational aspects of problem solving are explored using the commercially available MATLAB computer code. A number of case studies are presented as both examples and problems to the students. Emphasis was placed on solutions to problems of interest to radiation protection, health physics and nuclear engineering. A group project, pertaining to an accident or event related to the nuclear industry is a course requirement. Students learn to utilize common time and project management tools such as flowcharting, Pareto analysis, Fishbone diagrams and Gantt charts. It has been found that the tools learned in this course are used through all subsequent courses. In addition, early student and employer feedback suggests that the problem solving, modeling and simulation skills of the undergraduate students make them extremely valuable in the workplace. (author)

 
 
 
 
121

Teaching physiotherapy skills in culturally-diverse classes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultural competence, the ability to work in cross-cultural situations, has been acknowledged as a core skill for physiotherapists and other health professionals. Literature in this area has focused on the rationale for physiotherapists to provide culturally-competent care and the effectiveness of various educational strategies to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge about cultural competence by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students. However, there is a paucity of research on how students with different cultural needs, who are attending one university class, can be accommodated within a framework of learning core physiotherapy skills to achieve professional standards. Results This paper reports on steps which were taken to resolve the specific needs of a culturally-diverse body of first year physiotherapy students, and the impact this had on teaching in a new physiotherapy program located in Greater Western Sydney, Australia. Physiotherapy legislative, accreditation and registration requirements were considered in addition to anti-discrimination legislation and the four ethical principles of decision making. Conclusions Reflection on this issue and the steps taken to resolve it has resulted in the development of a generic framework which focuses on providing quality and equitable physiotherapy education opportunities to all students. This framework is generalizable to other health professions worldwide.

Grimmer-Somers Karen

2011-06-01

122

Developing Creative Teaching Module: Business Simulation in Teaching Strategic Management  

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Full Text Available Globalization and liberalization in the business environment have changed the requirements of types and qualities of human capital needed by the corporate sector. In relation to this, business graduates not only need to have theoretical understanding, but they also need to have creative thinking, communication skills and decision making skills based on multidisciplinary knowledge. Simulation game in business education is suggested to fill the gap by exposing students to real business situations. This study evaluates the effectiveness of business simulation in teaching Strategic Management in Faculty of Economics and Management, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM. A total of 48 students participated in the business simulation game and answered a survey at the end of the Strategic Management course. The objective of this paper is to present the findings in terms of contextual and processual context of using business simulation as an approach in teaching strategic management. The important findings of this research are the ability of simulation in transferring theory to practice, applying multidisciplinary knowledge, managing team dynamics, making decisions in uncertainties and managing in realistic situation. This study highlights the potential of business simulations in developing competent business graduates that fulfill the requirements of the industry.

Nor Liza Abdullah

2013-05-01

123

Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

AIM: The aim of this study is to compare student teachers and clinical associate professors regarding the quality of procedural skills teaching in terms of participants' technical skills, knowledge and satisfaction with the teaching. METHODS: This is an experimental, randomized, controlled study comparing the teaching of student teachers and associate professors regarding participants' learning outcome and satisfaction with the teaching. Two skills are chosen for the experiment, i.v.-access and bladder catheterization. Learning outcome is assessed by a pre- and post testing of the participants' knowledge and skills. Participants evaluate satisfaction with teaching on nine statements immediately after the teaching. RESULTS: In total 59 first year medical students are included as participants in the experiment. The students taught by student teachers perform just as well as the students taught by associate professors and in one skill--catheterization--they perform even better, mean post- minus pre-test scores 65.5 (SD 12.9) vs. 35.0 (SD 23.3), One-way ANOVA, p < 0.0001, effect size 1.62. Student teachers receive significantly more positive evaluations than associate professors on several statements. CONCLUSION: Trained student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep

Tolsgaard, Martin G; Gustafsson, Amandus

2007-01-01

124

The Effectiveness of the Constant Time Delay Procedure in Teaching Pre-School Academic Skills to Children with Developmental Disabilities in a Small Group Teaching Arrangement  

Science.gov (United States)

Children with developmental disabilities are trained using different teaching arrangements. One of these arrangements is called small-group teaching. It has been ascertained that a small-group teaching arrangement is more effective than a one-to-one teaching arrangement. In that sense, teaching academic skills to pre-school children in small-group…

Aldemir, Ozgul; Gursel, Oguz

2014-01-01

125

Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

2014-01-01

126

Adivinanzas audiovisuales para ejercitar el pensamiento creativo infantil Audiovisual Riddles to Stimulate Children’s Creative Thinking  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Para resolver una adivinanza hay que asociar ideas, analizar metáforas, descubrir analogías. Por eso, impulsar esta forma de entretenimiento infantil es un modo de ejercitar el pensamiento creativo. Sin embargo, existe un problema: las adivinanzas tradicionales son formas literarias que corresponden a una época pre-digital. ¿Cómo lograr, entonces, que tengan mayor aceptación entre los nativos digitales? Una posible solución sería crear adivinanzas audiovisuales diseñadas especialmente para YouTube. En esta investigación se realizaron cinco prototipos de adivinanzas audiovisuales con características creativas diferentes y se validaron con estudiantes de tercero a sexto grado de educación primaria. Los resultados de la validación permitieron identificar las actitudes, reacciones, interpretaciones y modos de razonamiento de los niños y niñas cuando intentan resolver este tipo de adivinanzas. También se identificaron los recursos de lenguaje y formatos creativos que funcionan mejor en una adivinanza audiovisual. En las conclusiones se destaca la necesidad de formular correctamente los enunciados de las adivinanzas audiovisuales y sus respectivas «pistas» para que los niños y niñas tengan la satisfacción intelectual y emocional de resolverlas. Se precisa, además, que leer o escuchar una adivinanza tradicional representa una experiencia cognitiva y sensorial muy distinta que interactuar con esa misma adivinanza en un lenguaje multimedia. Finalmente, se discute y analiza el rol mediador del docente y la importancia del aprendizaje colaborativo en los proyectos educativos que emplean tecnologías digitales.Solving riddles involves association of ideas, analysis of metaphors, and discovery of analogies. Therefore, promoting this type of children’s entertainment is a way to develop creative thinking. However, there is a problem: traditional riddles are literary forms that correspond to a pre-digital era. How can we increase its acceptance among the digital natives? One way might be creating audiovisual riddles specially designed for YouTube. In this research we made five prototypes of audiovisual riddles with different creative characteristics and validated them among 8-12 years old students. The validation results helped us to identify the attitudes, reactions, interpretations and ways of thinking of children when they try to solve such riddles. We also identified the resources of language and creative formats that fit best in audio-visual riddles. The outcome of this research emphasizes the need to correctly formulate the audiovisual riddle statements and their «clues» for children; this way we assure an intellectual and emotional satisfaction when solving them. It also concludes that reading or listening to traditional riddles are cognitive and sensory experiences that are very different from interacting with the same riddle in a multimedia language. Finally, we discuss and analyze the mediating role of the teacher and the importance of collaborative learning in educational projects using digital technologies.

Jorge Montalvo Castro

2011-03-01

127

Teaching Efficacy in the Classroom: Skill Based Training for Teachers’ Empowerment  

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Full Text Available This study aims to use an experimental research design to enhance teaching efficacy by social-emotional skills training in teachers. The statistical sample comprised of 68 elementary teachers (grades 4 and 5 with at least 10 years teaching experience and a bachelor’s degree who were randomly assigned into control (18 female, 16 male and experimental (20 female, 14 male groups. During ten weekly sessions of training the experimental groups learned a set of social-emotional skills (interpersonal—intrapersonal skills. Bar-On social emotional scales (adult version and a researcher-made questionnaire for teaching efficacy were used to collect the required data. Independent t-tests, mix models of variance, multivariate analyses of variance, and regressions were used to compare the mean of social-emotional intelligence and its components and teaching efficacy differences between and within groups. The results showed that training had a significant effect on increasing social emotional skills and its components of the experimental group teachers. This research also showed a positive correlation between the enhancement of emotional skills and effective teaching. To be most effective, emotional skills training programs need to be applied in the classroom consistently across the curriculum, and teachers` involvement with these skills is needed to promote their social-emotional abilities.

Mansoureh Karimzadeh

2014-07-01

128

Implementation of teaching Skills & Strategies in the Schools: A study of graduates of a teacher education program : Implementation of teaching Skills & Strategies in the Schools: A study of graduates of a teacher education program  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ are two core (professional) modules offered at the two colleges of education in Bhutan to develop pedagogical knowledge and skills of student teachers. However, a tracer study (in press) done by Samtse College of Education [SCE] revealed teacher graduates’ (1) confusion over the two concepts, ‘teaching skill’ and ‘teaching strategy’ and (2) the lack of confidence in integrating the two in their daily teaching activities. Therefore, this study was carried out to find out the graduates’ understanding of the concepts and implementation of ‘Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ in the classroom. Further, it was aimed to find lapses, inappropriateness and irrelevancies in the two professional modules in which pedagogical concepts and skills were taught. Survey questionnaire, interview and participant observation were used to gather data to find out the use of teaching skills and strategies in the schools. Teacher graduates, both male and female having working experience of three years and above, teaching in Middle Secondary and Higher Secondary Schools, were selected as the participants in the study. Samples were drawn from the different parts of the country covering seventeen Dzongkhags. The study revealed adequate understanding of the concepts of professional modules. However, teachers were found to be grappling with the extra responsibilities affecting their planning to integrate skills and strategies into their teaching. Key words: Teaching skills, Teaching strategies, Microteaching

Kinley, Kinley; Choeda, Choeda

2013-01-01

129

SKILL--A Scalable Internet-Based Teaching and Learning System.  

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This paper describes the architecture and discusses implementation issues of a scalable Internet-based teaching and learning system (SKILL) being developed at the University of Essen (Germany). The primary objective of SKILL is to cope with the different knowledge levels and learning preferences of the students, providing them with a collaborative…

Neumann, Gustaf; Zirvas, Jana

130

Friendship and Stories: Using Children's Literature To Teach Friendship Skills to Children with Learning Disabilities.  

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Discusses the difficulty children with learning disabilities have in making friends and describes a strategy for incorporating children's literature into teaching friendship skills. A practice lesson that used this strategy with five elementary children with disabilities is described and found to be effective in promoting friendship skills. (CR)

DeGeorge, Katherine L.

1998-01-01

131

Assessment and Teaching of Science Skills: Whole of Programme Perceptions of Graduating Students  

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This study reports on science student perceptions of their skills (scientific knowledge, oral communication, scientific writing, quantitative skills, teamwork and ethical thinking) as they approach graduation. The focus is on which teaching activities and assessment tasks over the whole programme of study students thought utilised each of the six…

Hodgson, Yvonne; Varsavsky, Cristina; Matthews, Kelly E.

2014-01-01

132

Will We Teach Leadership or Skilled Incompetence? The Challenge of Student Project Teams.  

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Defensive routines and tolerance of skilled incompetence can harm student team performance. Strategies to overcome these problems include emphasizing the importance of process learning, teaching team development, providing practice in communication skills, coaching individual students, and providing graded feedback for process quality. (Contains…

Holmer, Leanna L.

2001-01-01

133

A Money Planner. Teaching Budgeting Skills to Low-Income Consumers.  

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This module, one of six on teaching consumer matters to low-income groups, focuses on budgeting and managing money. Budgeting is examined in two contexts: skills which apply to everyone at every income level and skills which specifically apply to low-income people. Topics include how to write a budget (starting a group workshop, small group work,…

Shurtz, Mary Ann; LeFlore, Ann Becker

134

Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses  

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Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching

Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

2010-01-01

135

Teaching Communication Skills: A Comparison of Videotape Feedback Methods.  

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Assessed changes in skills level of 50 students taking a course in basic interpersonal skills and compared two methods of providing feedback. All subjects were videotaped. Increases in empathy, self-disclosure, and nonverbal listening skills were found in both dyad and group feedback conditions. Both conditions were equally effective. (JAC)

Sollie, Donna L.; Scott, Jean Pearson

1983-01-01

136

High Tech Cooking: A Literature Review of Evolving Technologies for Teaching a Functional Skill  

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This review synthesizes the empirical literature (1986-2006) focusing on teaching cooking skills to persons with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. Twenty-two studies were identified which provided information on four forms of technologies currently being used to teach food preparation: (a) picture-based systems; (b) Palmtop personal…

Mechling, Linda C.

2008-01-01

137

Searching for the Formula: How Librarians Teach Chemistry Graduate Students Research Skills  

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An exploratory study was conducted in Summer 2012 in an effort to determine what librarians in the United States are doing to teach chemistry graduate students research skills. Chemistry librarians at ARL (Association of Research Libraries) institutions were surveyed about the content they teach; when, where, and how they present it; and what…

Fong, Bonnie L.

2014-01-01

138

Teaching Residents Practice-Management Knowledge and Skills: An "in Vivo" Experience  

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Objective: This article explores the relevant data regarding teaching psychiatric residents practice management knowledge and skills. This article also introduces a unique program for teaching practice management to residents. Methods: A literature search was conducted through PubMed and "Academic Psychiatry". Additionally residents involved in…

Williams, Laurel Lyn

2009-01-01

139

Teaching Vocational, Functional Language and Reading Skills to the Adolescent Hispanic Severely Handicapped.  

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Vocational and language skill development of severely retarded and autistic adolescent Hispanics is a training focus at the University of Texas, El Paso. University students and parents of the handicapped are trained in the following areas: teaching grocery shopping and how to order from fast food restaurants, teaching use of public…

Duran, Elva

140

Impact of Milieu Teaching on Communication Skills of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder  

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This 5-month study examined the impact of a behaviorally based naturalistic teaching strategy, milieu teaching, on the communication skills of preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in an early childhood special education (ECSE) classroom. A multiple baseline across participants design was used. Communication targets were…

Christensen-Sandfort, Robyn J.; Whinnery, Stacie B.

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

The Strategies-for-Achievement Approach (stACH) for Teaching "Study Skills."  

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A complete course, curriculum, and textbook were developed to teach college level "study skills" using an educational, psychology-based strategies-for-achievement (stACH) approach. The approach involved teaching students four major achievement strategies: (1) taking reasonable risk; (2) taking responsibility for outcomes; (3) searching the…

Tuckman, Bruce W.

142

Microsituations as an Active-Learning Tool To Teach Endocrine Pharmacology and Problem-Solving Skills.  

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Microsituations teaching is a case-based, active learning tool developed from cognitive learning theory to teach problem-solving skills to large classes while conserving faculty and other resources. Since implementing this method in an endocrine pharmacology course at the University of Kentucky, student performance on problem-solving examinations…

Brandt, Barbara F.; Lubawy, William C.

1998-01-01

143

THE TEACHING OF FUNCTIONAL LANGUAGE SKILLS IN A SECOND LANGUAGE TO A CHILD WITH AUTISM  

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This article examined the rate of self-initiated communication acquisition, in a second language, of a child with autism. The language treatment objective was to teach functional communication skills in English through the use of Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). The findings of this study show that it is possible for a child with autism to acquire functional communication skills in his second language even though he did not possess such communication skills in his first language.

Renee Chong

2006-01-01

144

Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Physicians and medical educators have repeatedly acknowledged the inadequacy of communication skills training in the medical school curriculum and opportunities to improve these skills in practice. This study of a controlled intervention evaluates the effect of teaching practicing physicians the skill of "agenda-setting" on patients' experiences with care. The agenda-setting intervention aimed to engage clinicians in the practice of initiating patient enco...

Rogers William H; Odigie Esosa G; Frankel Richard M; Anastario Michael P; Rodriguez Hector P; von Glahn Ted; Safran Dana G

2008-01-01

145

Teaching Number Skills and Concepts with Stern Structural Arithmetic Materials  

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This paper discusses the use of Stern teaching materials with children with Down syndrome. The theory underlying the design of the materials is discussed, the teaching approach and methodology are described and evidence supporting effectiveness is outlined. (Contains 2 figures.)

Horner, Vikki

2007-01-01

146

Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience  

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Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school.

Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

2014-01-01

147

Teaching social skills: evaluation of an "independence week".  

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This study evaluated the achievements of a training course in social skills for physically disabled young people reaching school-leaving age. The course enabled the students to acquire skills in personal care and mobility, but not all the gains were sustained on return home. That basic skills can be acquired as a result of such a short intervention shows that more attention should be paid to them in school. PMID:6236910

Macredie, T; Bradshaw, J

1984-01-01

148

Comparison of four teaching methods on Evidence-based Practice skills of postgraduate nursing students.  

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The aim of this study was to compare four teaching methods on the evidence-based practice knowledge and skills of postgraduate nursing students. Students enrolled in the Evidence-based Nursing (EBN) unit in Australia and Hong Kong in 2010 and 2011 received education via either the standard distance teaching method, computer laboratory teaching method, Evidence-based Practice-Digital Video Disc (EBP-DVD) teaching method or the didactic classroom teaching method. Evidence-based Practice (EBP) knowledge and skills were evaluated using student assignments that comprised validated instruments. One-way analysis of covariance was implemented to assess group differences on outcomes after controlling for the effects of age and grade point average (GPA). Data were obtained from 187 students. The crude mean score among students receiving the standard+DVD method of instruction was higher for developing a precise clinical question (8.1±0.8) and identifying the level of evidence (4.6±0.7) compared to those receiving other teaching methods. These differences were statistically significant after controlling for age and grade point average. Significant improvement in cognitive and technical EBP skills can be achieved for postgraduate nursing students by integrating a DVD as part of the EBP teaching resources. The EBP-DVD is an easy teaching method to improve student learning outcomes and ensure that external students receive equivalent and quality learning experiences. PMID:23107585

Fernandez, Ritin S; Tran, Duong Thuy; Ramjan, Lucie; Ho, Carey; Gill, Betty

2014-01-01

149

Effects of Play Practice on Teaching Table Tennis Skills  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Play Practice (PP) instruction on the performance of table tennis skills. Fifty-six college students in four intact classes were taught by two instructors using PP and Skill-focused Instruction (SI). A nonequivalent control/comparison group experimental design with pre and post measures was…

Zhang, Peng; Ward, Phillip; Li, Weidong; Sutherland, Sue; Goodway, Jackie

2012-01-01

150

Teaching Communication Skills in Science: Tracing Teacher Change  

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This paper describes a general model for skills instruction and its implementation through the program "Scientific Communication" for acquiring learning skills. The model is characterized by modularity, explicit instruction, spiral integration into contents, practice in various contexts, and implementation in performance tasks. It requires…

Spektor-Levy, Ornit; Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Scherz, Zahava

2008-01-01

151

Teaching Comments: Intercultural Communication Skills in the Digital Age  

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This paper explores the pedagogical and conceptual issues that accompany the integration of intercultural communication skills into the secondary curriculum by analyzing the interactions of 102 adolescents in Spain and the USA during a 15-week, classroom-based, international online exchange. Focusing on the skills of discovery and interaction…

Ware, Paige

2013-01-01

152

Teaching Learning-Related Social Skills in Kindergarten Physical Education  

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A lack of social skills may lead young children to have difficulties in establishing close relationships with their peers. This could lead to school maladjustment and academic failure. Research indicates that it is important for children to learn specific learning-related social skills (LRSS) to get along with others in order to succeed in the…

Liu, Michelle Hsiu-Chen; Karp, Grace Goc; Davis, Debby

2010-01-01

153

Teaching Information Evaluation and Critical Thinking Skills in Physics Classes  

Science.gov (United States)

The physics curriculum at all educational levels can be enriched to include tools for strengthening students' information evaluation skills. The Report of the Joint APS-AAPT Task Force on Graduate Education in Physics calls for such training to be part of graduate programs, but training to acquire these lifetime skills can be incorporated in the curriculum even before graduate level.

Popescu, Adriana; Morgan, James

2007-11-01

154

Teaching Oral Hygiene Skills to Elementary Students with Visual Impairments  

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This study investigated the effects of a program that taught oral hygiene skills to students with visual impairments using group instruction and individual coaching. The results showed that the program enhanced the oral hygiene skills of the three participants significantly, and its effectiveness lasted for at least two months after the…

Shih, Yeng-Hung; Chang, Chien-Huey Sophie

2005-01-01

155

The need for professional training programs to improve faculty members teaching skills  

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Full Text Available There is no doubt that the large majority of faculty members are expert and knowledgeable in their specializations. Yet, we still find that university graduates are not as qualified as they are supposed to be. The poorer university students are, the more likely they are taught by unskilled teachers. Ironically, many studies have concluded that faculty members tend to believe that students lack the basic skills for college-level work (UCLA Survey, 2005, ignoring that they themselves lack the effective teaching skills. The Saudi government as such has realized that 21st century requires generic skills to be integrated in the curriculum which in turn obligates faculty members to improve their teaching skills accordingly. Saudi universities expect the Deanships for Academic Development across all universities to provide trainings on different teaching and learning skills to improve the quality of their faculty members. The purpose of this study was to investigate the need and the competencies that are required by facultymembers to acquire in Saudi universities to enable them achieve the standards stated by the NCAAA. A questionnaire and semistructured interviews were utilized to get the data. The sample consisted of 882 participants (students, faculty members, chairmen and colleges boards, colleges’ deans, and deanships’ deans from some universities in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The results showed the great need and importance of providing training programs to enhance and elevate faculty members' professional abilities in teaching. Many participants emphasized that in-service trainings should be mandated to ensure quality teaching.

Ismail A. Elmahdi

2013-07-01

156

Bedside teaching and the acquisition of practical skills in mid-sixteenth-century padua.  

Science.gov (United States)

Very little is known to this point about the practical skills which sixteenth-century physicians needed and applied at the bedside and even less about how these skills were taught to students. Drawing on student notebooks and on printed collections of consilia by Padua professors, this paper outlines the different settings in which case-centered and, more specifically, bedside teaching was imparted in mid-sixteenth-century Padua. It describes the range of diagnostic and therapeutic skills that students acquired thanks to this hands-on training at the patient's bedside, from uroscopy and feeling the pulse to the manual exploration of the patient's abdomen, which, historians have wrongly believed, physicians performed very rarely or not at all, and surgical skills. Taking a closer look, more specifically, at the role of teaching in the Hospital of San Francesco in Padua, the paper provides evidence that not only Giovanna Battista da Monte but also at least one other mid-sixteenth-century professor, Antonio Fracanzani, made systematic use of the teaching opportunities which the hospital offered. Ultimately, the paper will argue that clinical teaching in the hospital did not differ fundamentally from forms of bedside teaching in the patients' homes, however. Both became increasingly popular in Padua and elsewhere at the time, reflecting a growing appreciation for the practical and sensory skills which future physicians needed in addition to theoretical learning if they hoped to be successful in the highly contested early modern medical marketplace. PMID:23788496

Stolberg, Michael

2014-10-01

157

Reported goals of instructors of responsible conduct of research for teaching of skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) training grant requirement to provide training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) is now more than 20 years old. Implicit in the requirement is that this training will have an impact not only on what trainees know, but on what they know how to do. There is, however, a range of responses about what skills are seen to be necessary for the ethical practice of science. As part of a larger, earlier study examining RCR instructors' overall goals in teaching RCR, we asked 50 RCR instructors from 37 different institutions what their goals were for teaching skills in their RCR courses. The responses about what constituted necessary skills were wide ranging, from a focus on teaching the skill of ethical decision making to the perceived importance of ensuring that trainees understand the importance of the community in some research relationships. This diversity in responses about what skills should be taught in RCR courses is not especially surprising, given the variation in instructors, formats, instruction, goals, and outcome measures for RCR courses, but it does reinforce the necessity of giving more thought to what goals are to be achieved. This is true not only of skills to be learned, but of any other objectives one might have for research ethics teaching and learning. PMID:23651933

Plemmons, Dena K; Kalichman, Michael W

2013-04-01

158

Teach and Assess Library Skills in 30 Minutes (or Less)  

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School librarians have always been teachers, even before the term "teacher-librarian" was coined. They teach every time they help students select books, locate and evaluate resources for research projects, or troubleshoot a computer problem. When they assist students, they explain and model the steps they are taking. Teaching for school librarians…

Lohmiller, Darcy

2012-01-01

159

LANGUAGE SKILLS AND THE CRITICAL THINKING D?L BECER?LER? VE ELE?T?REL DÜ?ÜNME  

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Full Text Available Critical thinking is one of the eight basic skills in the primary school curriculum which has been prepared with a constructivist approach. Teaching critical thinking in Turkish language lessons has an importance in reaching curricular aims. Critical thinking has bonds with skills such as creative thinking, communication, research making, problem solving, using ICT, entrepreneurship, and using Turkish appropriatelyCritical thinking is involved with questioning, interpreting and decision making skills in a skeptical approach. It contains sub-skills such as identifying cause and effect relations, catching similarities and differences, making classifications using certain criteria, determining validity of information, making analysis, evaluation, and inferencesTo develop and conserve language skills, teaching critical thinking skills is a very important task. Developing students’ critical thinking skills is essential in order to develop language skills such as listening, speaking, and writing. Curricular aims involved with critical reading, critical listening, and critical writing depend on critical thinking. Instructional methods which foster critical thinking skills should be employed in educational settings to develop basic language skills. Teacher’s role, approach and competency in critical thinking are also essential to create a critical thinking atmosphere.Connecting language skills with general skills is a part of learning philosophy in a constructivist approach. The goal of language teaching, the main mean of thinking that preparing students who can critically think become also one of the main goals of learning. When the expected achievement in language skills occurs in critical thinking, language development could be affected with individuals’ thinking development symmetrically. Critical reading, listening, speaking and creative writing could support development of such foundational skills; students’ creative thinking, communication skills, problem solving, and researching and decision making. For the purpose of what to do and what decision to make, individuals have to be problem solver, conscious to assessment and judgments, and explaining these judgments. The foundation of critical thinking is based on healthy, disciplined, systematic and queried thinking and for the development of critical thinking skills individuals should have enough thinking previously. The development of thinking and learning thinking help individuals to become themselves and structuring their own ideas. When the development in students’ reading skills turn to critical thinking for the students, they are more able to understand what they read and come to conclusion easily. Critical readers judge what they read and they may make comments and critics about what they read. They try to find implementation of the ideas that the writer explains in the content. Individuals’ understanding skills can occur both with reading and with listening. Critical listening is, in another way, a process of checking the accuracy of the information, understanding of this information, and discussing it. Speaking and writing skills which are part of explanation skills also helps the development of critical thinking. People who do critical explanations also have social skills, ability to be in groups, and ability to collaborate. In a learning setting where critical approach is used, students are more able to express their ideas in oral and in writings and these students are able to make comment about issues and provide solutions for these issues. During the process of critical writing, individuals come up with new ideas and start to have a broader perspective. The model of this study is literature review. Literature about critical thinking skills has been reviewed. Afterwards methods that should be employed in Turkish language lessons to foster critical thinking skills have been studied Yap?land?rmac? ö?renme yakla??m?na göre olu?turulan ilkö?retim program?nda yer verilen sekiz temel beceriden birisi de ele?tirel dü?ün

Adnan KARADÜZ

2010-07-01

160

Parents as Teachers: Teaching Parents How to Teach Toilet Skills to Their Children with Autism and Mental Retardation  

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The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a parent training program for teaching toilet skills to children with autism and mental retardation. The study was conducted with three mothers and their children. A multiple probe design using probe sessions across subjects was used. The experimental procedure consisted of two…

Ozcan, Nihal; Cavkaytar, Atilla

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND MEANING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING  

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Full Text Available Many ELT experts believe that the inclusion of critical thinking skills in English classes is necessary to improve students’ English competence. Students’ critical thinking skills will be optimally increased if meaning is prioritized in English lessons. Those two inter-related elements can be implemented when teachers do collaborative activities stimulating students’ thinking process and meaning negotiation. Yet, the realization might be counter-productive if they are applied without careful consideration of task purposes and of students’ roles. Based on the consideration, this paper is focused on presenting how critical thinking skills and meaning should be properly incorporated in an English lesson.

Harits Masduqi

2011-07-01

162

Teaching Prereading Skills through Training in Pattern Recognition  

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This study, using the Visual Pattern Recognition Test for Prereading Skills, found that beginning readers improve in word recognition if they are given training in identifying essential components of letters. (HOD)

Montgomery, Diane

1977-01-01

163

Teaching child-care skills to mothers with developmental disabilities.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present study identified and remediated child-care skill deficits in parents with developmental disabilities to reduce their risk of child neglect. Eleven mothers with developmental disabilities who were considered by social service and child welfare agencies to be providing neglectful child care were found in baseline to have several important child-care skill deficits (e.g., bathing, diaper rash treatment, cleaning baby bottles) compared to nonhandicapped mothers. Parent training (consi...

Feldman, M. A.; Case, L.; Garrick, M.; Macintyre-grande, W.; Carnwell, J.; Sparks, B.

1992-01-01

164

Should we teach thinking skills to deaf children?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This pilot study aimed to identify the benefits of developing thinking skills with KS1 deaf children who used British Sign Language (BSL). It arose as a response to the findings of a variety of researches who had reported a number of ‘failings’ apparent in the educational and learning activity of deaf children. It used a case study approach involving five profoundly deaf Key stage 1 children and explored the extent to which, using materials grounded in the Somerset Thinking Skills Course,...

Emma Tamsin Kelty

2006-01-01

165

Office Skills: Junk Mail: Added Dimension to Teaching Records Management  

Science.gov (United States)

A junk mail filing simulation is described as a simple but effective approach to teaching records management. Implementation of the approach is described in sixteen steps. Eight objectives and five variations to the simulation are included. (SH)

Klemin, Wayne

1977-01-01

166

Exploring Effectiveness of Problem Based Learning on Developing Logical Thinking Skills in Science Teaching  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine whether students acquire logical thinking skills in different teaching methods and strategies which are used during the given the course. To that end, PBL approach was used as an alternative to traditional methods in laboratuvar applications in this study. In that context, main research problem of this study is “is there any statistically significant between logical thinking skills of prospective teachers who continue education according to PBL approach and traditional teaching methods in science education and their gender and their according to ranking preference of department?”

Süleyman YAMAN

2005-05-01

167

Ex-vivo porcine organs with a circulation pump are effective for teaching hemostatic skills  

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Full Text Available Abstract Surgical residents have insufficient opportunites to learn basic hemostatic skills from clinical experience alone. We designed an ex-vivo training system using porcine organs and a circulation pump to teach hemostatic skills. Residents were surveyed before and after the training and showed significant improvement in their self-confidence (1.83 ± 1.05 vs 3.33 ± 0.87, P

Izawa Yoshimitsu

2012-03-01

168

Teaching Communication Skills Using Role-Play: An Experience-Based Guide for Educators  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Teaching advanced communication skills requires educators who are not only excellent communicators themselves but have the ability to deconstruct the components of the interaction and develop a cognitive approach that can be used across a variety of learners, diverse content, and under different time constraints while helping the learner develop the skill of self-reflection in a ‘safe’ and effective learning environment. The use of role-play in small groups is an important method to help ...

Jackson, Vicki A.; Back, Anthony L.

2011-01-01

169

Teaching Communication Skills: A five year experience from a private medical school of Nepal  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Communication with the patient is an art. A medical professional can earn a lot of degrees but communicating with the patient always remains a problem for some of them. Communication plays a key role to make him/her successful in Life .Communication Skill is an important part of the pharmacology teaching and learning session followed at Manipal College of Medical Sciences. Most of the textbooks that are commonly followed in Nepal merely tell about communication skills. In Communication Skil...

Dr Indrajit Banerjee, Mbbs

2013-01-01

170

Teaching child-care skills to mothers with developmental disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study identified and remediated child-care skill deficits in parents with developmental disabilities to reduce their risk of child neglect. Eleven mothers with developmental disabilities who were considered by social service and child welfare agencies to be providing neglectful child care were found in baseline to have several important child-care skill deficits (e.g., bathing, diaper rash treatment, cleaning baby bottles) compared to nonhandicapped mothers. Parent training (consisting of verbal instructions, pictorial manuals, modeling, feedback, and reinforcement) resulted in rapid acquisition and maintenance of child-care skills in all mothers. Mean percentage correct scores increased from 58% in baseline to 90% in training and 91% in follow-up (M = 31 weeks). The latter two scores compare favorably to the mean score (87%) of 20 nonhandicapped mothers on the same skills. Where observable, parent training was associated with corresponding benefits to the children (e.g., elimination of diaper rash and cradle cap, increased weight gain, successful toilet training). These results indicate that parent training may be a viable option to the removal of the child from the home when parenting skill deficits place the child's well-being in jeopardy. PMID:1582966

Feldman, M A; Case, L; Garrick, M; MacIntyre-Grande, W; Carnwell, J; Sparks, B

1992-01-01

171

Developing Students’ Critical Thinking Skills by Task-Based Learning in Chemistry Experiment Teaching  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Task-Based Learning (TBL) is a student-centered, teacher-guided and task-performed teaching approach. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of task-based learning (TBL) in chemistry experiment teaching on promoting high school students’ critical thinking skills in Xi’an, China. To achieve the aims, a pre-test and post-test experimental design with an experimental group and a control group was employed. Stu...

Qing Zhou; Qiuyan Huang; Hong Tian

2013-01-01

172

The Development of Critical Thinking Skills: Undergraduate Sociology Students as Teaching Assistants for Prisoners  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This research is a follow up to an article that I published in the April 2003 (Volume 23, Number 2) edition of Analytic Teaching: The Community of Inquiry Journal entitled "An Integrated Approach to teaching Sociology: Merging Theory and Practice When Studying Women Offenders." It addresses the need to provide experiential learning opportunities for undergraduate students that would result in the enhancement of their critical thinking skills and provide them with a stronger foundation to make...

Joesph R Franco, Ph D.

2006-01-01

173

Manifestation of critical thinking skills in the English textbooks employed by language institutes in Iran  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Scholars in the field of education have unanimously subscribed to the pivotal role of critical thinking in individuals' life in general and their academic life in particular (Bloom, 1956; Ennis, 2003; Dewey, 1933. The thrust of the current study was to investigate the extent to which the books employed for Teaching English as Foreign Language include critical thinking skills. To attain this goal, 3 series of English books, namely, Top notch, Interchange, and English files series utilized by language institutes in Iran were targeted. Next, a seventy two-item critical thinking checklist based on Likert-scale and consisting of twelve skills; namely, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, deduction, induction, balanced-thinking, multiple perspective-taking, creative thinking, building community of thinkers, and knowledge was developed. The target skills on the checklist were mainly based on Bloom's taxonomy and the related literature on critical thinking. The checklist was validated by the researchers themselves and some experts in the field and the reliability coefficient was also estimated at 0.86. Then, two raters conducted a content analysis on the books and determined the magnitude of each skill. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and inferential statistics (Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis Non-parametric tests. Findings of the study revealed that the books mainly tapped knowledge, comprehension, application and building community of thinkers skills and failed to acceptably include other skills reported to be of utmost importance for students' academic success. The comparison of the mean rank of the skills in the three books also disclosed that as for lower order thinking skills there wasn’t a significant difference among the books; however, as for other skills Top notch was marginally higher. The paper also discusses the lack of critical thinking in the classroom and materials and proposes some ways to include more critical thinking skills in the materials. The results of the study have significant implications for material developers, educational policy makers and teachers.

Birjandi, Parviz

2013-01-01

174

Comparing Video Modeling and Graduated Guidance Together and Video Modeling Alone for Teaching Role Playing Skills to Children with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching play skills is important for children with autism. The purpose of the present study was to compare effectiveness and efficiency of providing video modeling and graduated guidance together and video modeling alone for teaching role playing skills to children with autism. The study was conducted with four students. The study was conducted…

Akmanoglu, Nurgul; Yanardag, Mehmet; Batu, E. Sema

2014-01-01

175

Teaching Problem-Solving Skills to Nuclear Engineering Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Problem solving is an essential skill for nuclear engineering graduates entering the workforce. Training in qualitative and quantitative aspects of problem solving allows students to conceptualise and execute solutions to complex problems. Solutions to problems in high consequence fields of study such as nuclear engineering require rapid and…

Waller, E.; Kaye, M. H.

2012-01-01

176

Strategic Teaching: Fostering Communication Skills in Diverse Young Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

Effective communication is essential for young children's academic and social competence. During the preschool years, children acquire the language and communication skills necessary to express their needs, thoughts, and feelings in social interactions, and they learn to respond appropriately to others. Through effective communication, they also…

Chen, Jennifer J.; Shire, Suzanne H.

2011-01-01

177

Teaching Dining Skills to Students with Emotional and Behavior Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Children with emotional and behavior disorders often have difficulties understanding social cues, responding appropriately in social situations, and initiating age-appropriate interactions with peers and adults. A real-life social activity that is often neglected in social skills training is dining. Dining involves dining etiquette, personal…

Shepherd, Terry L.

2009-01-01

178

Teaching Leisure Skills to Adolescents with Moderate Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Four leisure skills (playing cards, selecting a television program, playing a sports videotape, and playing a computer game) were taught to four secondary students with moderate mental retardation by using least prompts procedures. Nondisabled peers assessed generalization across persons. Benefits were shown to the students with disabilities and…

Collins, Belva C.; And Others

1997-01-01

179

Problematic Issues Related to the Systematic Teaching of Affective Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents a discussion of three problem areas that were delineated during the course of a field test designed to assess the effects of the "Heartsmart Adventures," an interpersonal skills curriculum developed from the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO) Theory as described by William C. Schutz. Students and teachers…

Ruff, Frances K.; Roberts, Jane M. E.

180

Teaching Young Children Interpersonal Problem-Solving Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Learning how to problem solve is one of the key developmental milestones in early childhood. Children's problem-solving skills represent a key feature in the development of social competence. Problem solving allows children to stay calm during difficult situations, repair social relations quickly, and get their needs met in ways that are safe and…

Joseph, Gail E.; Strain, Phillip S.

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

Teaching Problem Solving Skills to Elementary Age Students with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

Students with disabilities need problem-solving skills to promote their success in solving the problems of daily life. The research into problem-solving instruction has been limited for students with autism. Using a problem-solving intervention and the Self Determined Learning Model of Instruction, three elementary age students with autism were…

Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Barnett, Crystal; Pavelek, Karin; Nguyen, Hoang; Sparks, Shannon L.

2014-01-01

182

Teaching Motor Skills to Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are commonly characterized by deficits in the social and communication domains. However, up to 80 percent of this population also have poor motor skills. Individuals with an ASD experience difficulties in motor planning, imitation, and postural stability. A better understanding of these deficits and of strategies…

Todd, Teri

2012-01-01

183

"Say Cheese": Teaching Photography Skills to Adults with Developmental Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

We evaluated a video prompting procedure to teach adults with developmental disabilities to take a digital photograph and print it using a laptop computer and a printer. Participants were four men with developmental disabilities. Training was conducted at the participants' residential facility. During baseline, participants were told to take a…

Edrisinha, Chaturi; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Choi, Ha Young; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio E.

2011-01-01

184

Electronic Teaching Portfolios: Multimedia Skills + Portfolio Development = Powerful Professional Development.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two bodies of literature define the process for developing electronic teaching portfolios to support long-term professional growth: the multimedia development process (decide/assess, design/plan, develop, implement, evaluate) and the portfolio development process (collection, selection, reflection, projection/direction, presentation). As further…

Barrett, Helen

185

Teaching Emotion Recognition Skills to Children with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

Autism is associated with difficulty interacting with others and an impaired ability to recognize facial expressions of emotion. Previous teaching programmes have not addressed weak central coherence. Emotion recognition training focused on components of facial expressions. The training was administered in small groups ranging from 4 to 7…

Ryan, Christian; Charragain, Caitriona Ni

2010-01-01

186

Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating  

Science.gov (United States)

Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

2011-01-01

187

Teaching Written Communication Skills in Professional Selling: The Cover Letter  

Science.gov (United States)

The selling process steps have been an integral part of professional selling courses and textbooks for years. Although slight changes have been made in their wording and format, most textbooks are consistent in the recommended process for an effective sales interaction. In an effort to combine teaching the selling process with the increased demand…

West, Vicki L.

2006-01-01

188

Teaching Professional Engineering Skills : Industry Participation in Realistic Role Play Simulation  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Engineering education aims at providing students with sufficient disciplinary knowledge of science and engineering principles in order for them to become successful engineers. However, to fulfil their roles as professional engineers, students also need to develop personal and interpersonal skills, as well as professional skills, in order to implement and apply their theoretical and technical knowledge in a real context. CDIO constitutes a comprehensive approach to engineering education in which these additional skills represent fundamental principles besides the predominant technical knowledge. The implementation of professional skills as well as personal and interpersonal skills in engineering teaching must be done, however, without reducing the existing curriculum of technical disciplines and still allow for the continuous acquisition of new technical knowledge. The general purpose of this study is to discuss how to facilitate the teaching of professional skills in engineering education in parallel with thetechnical disciplines. The objective is to test and evaluate extensive role play simulation in which the students interact with professional engineers in a realistic, industrial context. The underlying argument for this approach is to establish a realistic learning environment that will foster the learning of professional skills. The role play simulation has been applied and reviewed in two engineering courses, i.e. at Lund University in Sweden and at the Technical University of Denmark. Course evaluations, a questionnaire, and discussions with students confirm a genuinely positive attitude towards the role play simulation. The students engage in the role play and express an increased understanding of the requirements and the implicit rules of real-life engineering. The interaction between students and the professional engineers act as a prime mover for the students to perform their best, which in turn strengthens the learning of the technical content. The study concludes that role play with participation ofrepresentatives from the industry can facilitate the teaching of professional skills in engineering education.

Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

2010-01-01

189

Using Video Prompting to Teach Cooking Skills to Secondary Students with Moderate Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

Three secondary students with moderate disabilities acquired cooking skills through a constant time delay procedure used with video prompting. A multiple probe design was used to evaluate effectiveness of the procedure to teach preparation of a food item (a) on a stove, (b) in a microwave, and (c) on a counter top. The procedure was effective for…

Graves, Tara B.; Collins, Belva C.; Schuster, John W.; Kleinert, Harold

2005-01-01

190

The Use of Music to Teach Life Skills to Students with Emotional Disabilities in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses the teaching of life skills to urban American youths who are highly fascinated with the hip-hop culture--songs, raps, miming, lyrics, dressing and musical rhythms, especially individuals with emotional disabilities in the public schools. This is an instructional curriculum strategy to encourage positive and active…

Obiozor, Williams Emeka

2010-01-01

191

The Benefits of Teaching Self-Management Skills to Students of Psychology  

Science.gov (United States)

The various student gains and reported satisfaction with self-management projects have been well documented. However, we found that few psychology programs explicitly teach these skills. In this paper we demonstrate how self-management projects can meet nine out of the ten undergraduate student learning goals outlined by the APA Task Force (2002).…

Kazemi, Ellie; Rice, Brian; Rylander, Alyssa; Morgan, Shannon F.

2011-01-01

192

Learning 21st-Century Skills Requires, 21st-Century Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

For students to learn 21st-century skills, we will have to teach them differently than we have in the past. The outdated, transmission model, through which teachers transmit factual knowledge to students via lectures and textbooks, remains the dominant approach to compulsory education in much of the world, yet it is not the most effective way to…

Saavedra, Anna Rosefsky; Opfer, V. Darleen

2012-01-01

193

Examining the Effects of Teaching Self-Determination Skills to High School Youth with Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

An extensive review of the literature has been conducted in the area of self-determination for youth with disabilities who are preparing for their transitions from school to post school activities. Self-determination is presented as a best practice for transition education and current instructional practices used to teach such skills are…

Zito, Stephanie Theresa

2009-01-01

194

Evaluating New Approaches to Teaching of Sight-Reading Skills to Advanced Pianists  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper evaluates three teaching approaches to improving sight-reading skills against a control in a large-scale study of advanced pianists. One hundred pianists in four equal groups participated in newly developed training programmes (accompanying, rhythm, musical style and control), with pre- and post-sight-reading tests analysed using…

Zhukov, Katie

2014-01-01

195

Teaching Interview Skills to Undergraduate Engineers: An Emerging Area of Library Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Librarianship is one of a limited number of disciplines that deliberately learn and practice the art of the interview. For engineering librarians, this gives expertise and a role in teaching professional skills that are increasingly expected in the engineering profession. The reference interview and design interview have many similarities. Some…

Nelson, Megan Sapp

2009-01-01

196

Clinically Oriented Physiology Teaching: Strategy for Developing Critical-Thinking Skills in Undergraduate Medical Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Medicine is an applied science, interpreting evidence and applying it to real life by using clinical reasoning skills and experience. COPT (clinically oriented physiology teaching) was incorporated in physiology instruction aiming to relate the study of physiology to real-life problems, to generate enthusiasm and motivation for learning, and to…

Abraham, Reem Rachel; Upadhya, Subramanya; Torke, Sharmila; Ramnarayan, K.

2004-01-01

197

Could MOOCs Answer the Problems of Teaching AQF-Required Skills in Australian Tertiary Programmes?  

Science.gov (United States)

From 2015, Australian universities will be required to demonstrate that their programmes explicitly teach and assess achievement of, knowledge and skills, and the application of both as specified by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF). Over the last twenty years, the sector has applied significant effort and resources to embedding the…

Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

2013-01-01

198

Teaching Interpersonal Social Skills: A Prototype Manual of Activities; 1974-1975.  

Science.gov (United States)

The manual presents activities designed to teach educationally handicapped children (K-6) interpersonal social skills. Group problem solving and individual behavior control techniques are emphasized. Described are approximately 45 games, role playing situations, critical incident simulations, and cartoon discussions. Entries usually contain…

San Diego County Dept. of Education, CA.

199

Teaching Social Skills to Persons with Severe Handicaps in Community Settings: A Review.  

Science.gov (United States)

A review of research on teaching social skills to severely handicapped persons discusses training procedures, domain, generalization, maintenance, cost efficiency, reliability, social interaction partners, social validation, research design, and simulation. Evaluation of nine studies affirms that severely handicapped persons can learn to interact…

Storey, Keith

1987-01-01

200

Using Corporate-Sponsored Materials to Teach History and Social Science Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Once corporate-sponsored material gets into the classroom, teachers can use it to teach critical thinking skills, such as analyzing and drawing conclusions from statistics and graphs; identifying and labeling examples of bias, propaganda, and racial and sex stereotyping; detecting and recording fallacies; and identifying "pro" and "con" arguments.…

Doherty, Dennis C.

1990-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Can Student Teachers Acquire Core Skills for Teaching from Part-Time Employment?  

Science.gov (United States)

Part-time employment among university students has become commonplace internationally. Research has largely focused on the impact of part-time employment on academic performance. This research takes an original approach in that it poses the question whether students can acquire core skills relevant to teaching from their part-time employment. The…

Wylie, Ken; Cummins, Brian

2013-01-01

202

Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model  

Science.gov (United States)

Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

Santana Arroyo, Sonia

2013-01-01

203

Teaching Effective Helping Skills at a Distance: The Development of Project CATHIE  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes an exploratory study of two Web-based learning environments designed to teach helping skills to human service students. Participants used either an interactive pedagogical agent environment or read a helper-client script. Environments were compared and learning gains were assessed in each of the environments, along with user…

Adcock, Amy B.; Duggan, Molly H.; Nelson, Elizabeth K.; Nickel, Christine

2006-01-01

204

Teaching Critical-Thinking Skills Using Course Content Material: A Reversal of Roles  

Science.gov (United States)

The strategy of getting students to understand science content using critical thinking has been widely used by instructors for decades. The methodology presented here was used to teach and improve critical-thinking skills in an atmosphere that focused on content material and was devoid of educational terminology.

Lauer, Thomas

2005-05-01

205

A study on the current status of teaching and learning science process skills in Anhui Province secondary schools  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Using 2 sets of questionnaire instrument on the current status of teaching and learning science process skills, we carried out a survey in some Anhui Province secondary schools. The findings of this survey reveals that science teachers’ pedagogical knowledge level on the teaching of science process skills in secondary schools is not quite high. Students’ science process skills are generally not quite high too. Some suggestions are put forward as based on the findings of this study.

Xian-wei FANG

2010-06-01

206

An Alternative Approach for Designing and Teaching Communication Skills to University of Technology Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article examines the contents and teaching strategies of communication skills courses at a South African higher institution: Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT. It seeks to understand why the courses have not been very responsive to increasing academic and professional challenges undergraduate students’ experience at this university. Also, it proposes alternative contents and methods of teaching that can ensure that these courses remain relevant to the diversity of vocational diploma programmes offered by the university. The article is written against the backdrop of conceptions of ‘unpreparedness’ and ‘disadvantage’ repeatedly used by academics of this institution to justify the poor academic performance of students.The article draws on data gleaned from sustained one-on-one interviews with fifteen students and four communication skills lecturers as well as on course reflections with 1st year students collected during one academic year. This empirical data revealed that Communication courses provide a unique space for the development of generic cognitive skills which are critical for academic development and which can put graduates at a competitive advantage in the workplace. However it argues that for these courses to provide students with lifelong academic and professional skills, existing curricula and teaching approaches should be revised. This is because the current delivery methods are seemingly very pedantic, less stimulating and do not promote higher-order thinking in students. This piece therefore recommends a model, which focuses on the development of metacognitive skills such as critical thinking, creative and innovative thinking as well as problem solving.

Ernest Pineteh

2014-03-01

207

Information Literacy – a New Approach Supporting Teaching Skills Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Information literacy represents a determining factor in the development of the information society because a society based on lifelong training cannot be imagined without an adequate information literacy. In this sense, it becomes the primordial condition of the professionalism and success of the future specialist in any domain. This is why, simultaneously to his professional training, a student must acquire habits of scientific information and his own experience related to scientific information. Information literacy skills constitute the key factor in lifelong learning, being the first step on the road towards the realization of the educational goals. In the present paper, we aim to highlight the primordial role played by information literacy in the education of any individual in the society and also the help it provides to academics in the development of their didactic skills.

Agnes Erich

2012-01-01

208

Teaching physiotherapy skills in culturally-diverse classes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Cultural competence, the ability to work in cross-cultural situations, has been acknowledged as a core skill for physiotherapists and other health professionals. Literature in this area has focused on the rationale for physiotherapists to provide culturally-competent care and the effectiveness of various educational strategies to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge about cultural competence by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students. However, there...

Grimmer-Somers Karen; Wells Cherie; Bialocerkowski Andrea

2011-01-01

209

The use of chicken legs for teaching wound closure skills  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Objective Training models are required to impart surgical skills, like wound closure techniques, prior to practice in patients. In an ideal case, the tissue characteristics of the model are close to those of humans, easy to create and of low cost. Methods Here, we describe a model to train students in wound closure technique using conventional chicken legs obtained from the supermarket. Results The described model has good tissue character...

Pn, Khalil; Siebeck M; Mutschler W; K-g, Kanz

2009-01-01

210

Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder  

Science.gov (United States)

This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to…

Waltz, Jennifer; Dimeff, Linda A.; Koerner, Kelly; Linehan, Marsha M.; Taylor, Laura; Miller, Christopher

2009-01-01

211

A Brief Group Intervention Using Video Games to Teach Sportsmanship Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Impaired social skills represent a fundamental deficit for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Despite the potential importance of "good sportsmanship," this social skill has received relatively little attention in the literature. The current study utilized a Behavioral Skills Training (BST) approach to teach three…

Ferguson, Bill R.; Gillis, Jennifer M.; Sevlever, Melina

2013-01-01

212

Chunking, Priming and Active Learning: Toward an Innovative and Blended Approach to Teaching Communication-Related Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Possessing communication-related skills is vital to student success within and beyond college. The utilization of these skills, or being considered socially competent, has been linked to personal, relational, and occupational success. But how do we teach the necessary social skills to today's students? Building on research from education and…

Bodie, Graham D.; Powers, William G; Fitch-Hauser, Margaret

2006-01-01

213

PILOTing Undergraduate Students to Hands-On Teaching and Research Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Undergraduate research can make a positive impact on science education. Unfortunately, the one studentone mentor paradigm of undergraduate research generates a wide range of variability in the student’s experience and further limits its availability to a select few students. In contrast, a single faculty member can offer multiple undergraduate teaching positions that provide a consistent experience for the student. We attempted to combine the undergraduate research and teaching experiences in an internship practicum called Peer Instruction and Laboratory Occupational Training (PILOT. Students enrolled in PILOT served as teaching assistants for the upper division Quantitative Biological Methods (QBM laboratory course. In addition, PILOT students worked on an independent lab project that provided them with hands-on training and supported the QBM course. The development of presentation and teaching skills was also emphasized in PILOT. These activities were designed to improve student communication skills, lab skills, and knowledge of molecular biology content. Here, we describe the PILOT curriculum and report the results of an anonymous assessment survey administered to 75 students who had completed PILOT in the previous five semesters. Our data indicate that PILOT provides an effective format to expand undergraduate opportunities for research and teaching experiences.

Robert A. Borgon

2013-05-01

214

THE IMPACT OF ACTIVE LEARNING APPROACH ON IMPROVING THE READING SKILLS IN NATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this research, the effectiveness of active learning approach in native language education has been emphasized. This research is an experimental one that is used by Turkish Teaching organized by active learning approach for determining learning levels of the students concerning their reading comprehension skills. Data have been obtained by utilizing “Turkish Reading Comprehension Skill Test”. The research was conducted at fifth class level in ªehit Tuncer and Geçitkale primary schools by getting permission from Ministry of Education and it lasted for fourteen weeks in the second term of 2005-2006 education semester. In Turkish teaching, there is a meaningful difference in favor of the active learning group between the experiment group’s (that active learning approach is applied to and control group’s (that traditional method is applied to average of the reading comprehension skill points. The results of the study indicated that the active learning approach is more effective than the traditional approach.

Ahmet Güneyli

2008-10-01

215

Teaching intercultural communicative competence through the four skills  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Nowadays, the most accepted instructional framework in second or foreign language (L2) programs is Communicative Language Teaching, whose main goal is to increase learners’ communicative competence. This theoretical term means being able to use the linguistic system effectively and appropriately in the target language and culture. However, the implementation of a communicative methodology is not an easy task since it requires an understanding of the integrated nature of th...

Uso? Juan, Esther; Marti?nez Flor, Alicia

2008-01-01

216

Killing Two Birds with the Same Stone. Higher Order Skills Embedded in E-teaching Strategies  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Meta-cognitive skills have become a sine qua non in any 21st century teaching approach from primary, lower- and upper-secondary education, tertiary or university level. Whilst the traditional recipe of instruction based on “what to teach” has consumed so much effort, time, and energies meant at transmitting and acquiring knowledge, little or no attention has been allotted to higher-order skills which, once embedded in a curriculum and further-on released within a teaching-learning-evaluating paradigm, could make a qualitative difference. This paper aims at providing a scaffolding strategy of launching a blended learning curriculum online,as any specialist in education would love to “kill two birds with the same stone”.

Monica Giuchici

2011-11-01

217

Teaching scientific thinking skills: Students and computers coaching each other  

Science.gov (United States)

Our attempts to improve physics instruction have led us to analyze thought processes needed to apply scientific principles to problemsâand to recognize that reliable performance requires the basic cognitive functions of deciding, implementing, and assessing. Using a reciprocal-teaching strategy to teach such thought processes explicitly, we have developed computer programs called PALs (P ersonal Assistants for Learning) in which computers and students alternately coach each other. These computer-implemented tutorials make it practically feasible to provide students with individual guidance and feedback ordinarily unavailable in most courses. We constructed PALs specifically designed to teach the application of Newton's laws. In a comparative experimental study these computer tutorials were found to be nearly as effective as individual tutoring by expert teachersâand considerably more effective than the instruction provided in a well-taught physics class. Furthermore, almost all of the students using the PALs perceived them as very helpful to their learning. These results suggest that the proposed instructional approach could fruitfully be extended to improve instruction in various practically realistic contexts.

Reif, Frederick; Scott, Lisa

2005-11-23

218

Teaching scientific thinking skills: Students and computers coaching each other  

Science.gov (United States)

Our attempts to improve physics instruction have led us to analyze thought processes needed to apply scientific principles to problems—and to recognize that reliable performance requires the basic cognitive functions of deciding, implementing, and assessing. Using a reciprocal-teaching strategy to teach such thought processes explicitly, we have developed computer programs called PALs (P_ersonal A_ssistants for L_earning) in which computers and students alternately coach each other. These computer-implemented tutorials make it practically feasible to provide students with individual guidance and feedback ordinarily unavailable in most courses. We constructed PALs specifically designed to teach the application of Newton's laws. In a comparative experimental study these computer tutorials were found to be nearly as effective as individual tutoring by expert teachers—and considerably more effective than the instruction provided in a well-taught physics class. Furthermore, almost all of the students using the PALs perceived them as very helpful to their learning. These results suggest that the proposed instructional approach could fruitfully be extended to improve instruction in various practically realistic contexts.

Reif, Frederick; Scott, Lisa A.

1999-09-01

219

The Use of Video Role Play for Teaching Therapeutic Communication Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Effective Communication is a fundamental skill for practice across health care settings and is a component ofundergraduate nursing programs around the world. Resource materials appropriate for the teaching of communication in an Asiancontext are lacking.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a self-developed video using role play in facilitating teaching andlearning associated with therapeutic communication.Methods: Videos were produced which demonstrated the fundamental communication skills of listening, understanding,exploring and comforting/supporting, using role play. These were shown to Year 1 nursing students in tutorials over four weeks.Their usefulness was evaluated using a self-developed questionnaire. Among 74 questionnaires distributed at the end of thefourth tutorial, 72 were returned, with a 97% response rate.Results: Most students agreed that the video clips provided useful examples for role-playing the communication skills (89%,helped trigger them to perform role-playing (74%, were useful to improve understanding of different communication skills(93% and helped them learn from other students’ role-playing performance (87%. Overall impression of using the videos in thetutorial teaching was very useful (27% and useful (68%.Conclusions: Most students valued the videos developed purposely for teaching therapeutic communication and recommendedthat the videos be used in the future. Using video role plays facilitated the teaching and learning process and enhancedundergraduate nursing students’ understanding and application of communication skills. More video clips will be developed inthe future, with improved quality and with a broader range of health care communication scenarios demonstrated in order to beused more widely.

Elaine Ng

2011-01-01

220

ROTC training teaches nursing students critical thinking skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The rising cost of college has many students seeking financial assistance. One option for helping students pay for an education is the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC). Most educators are aware that ROTC students attend military classes and maintain physical fitness in addition to attending regular classes. However, nurse educators may not know that ROTC students receive intensive training in teamwork, leadership, and critical thinking, all extremely important skills required in professional nursing. The author describes the ROTC National Advanced Leadership Camp. PMID:15685024

Griggs, Rosanne

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

A case study for teaching information literacy skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The Internet has changed contemporary workplace skills, resulting in a need for proficiency with specific digital, online and web-based technologies within the fields of medicine, dentistry and public health. Although younger students, generally under 30 years of age, may appear inherently comfortable with the use of technology-intensive environments and digital or online search methods, competence in information literacy among these students may be lacking. Methods This project involved the design and assessment of a research-based assignment to help first-year, graduate-level health science students to develop and integrate information literacy skills with clinical relevance. Results One cohort of dental students (n = 78) was evaluated for this project and the results demonstrate that although all students were able to provide the correct response from the content-specific, or technology-independent, portion of the assignment, more than half (54%) were unable to demonstrate competence with a web-based, technology-dependent section of this assignment. No correlation was found between any demographic variable measured (gender, age, or race). Conclusion More evidence is emerging that demonstrates the need for developing curricula that integrates new knowledge and current evidence-based practices and technologies, traditionally isolated from graduate and health-care curricula, that can enhance biomedical and clinical training for students. This study provides evidence, critical for the evaluation of new practices, which can promote and facilitate the integration of information literacy into the curriculum. PMID:19178715

Kingsley, Karla V; Kingsley, Karl

2009-01-01

222

A SURVEY AND STUDY OF THE STUDENTS TOWARDS MICRO TEACHING PROGRAMME FOR IMPROVING TEACHING SKILL  

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Full Text Available A teacher can never truly teach unless he is still learning himself. A lamp can never light another lamp unless it continuous to burn its own flame. Above quotation of Tagore clearly indicates that teacher should always learn new things and should update and enrich his/her knowledge. Teacher education has been facing many problems related to curriculum 'teaching methods learning strategies and related to the evaluation system. Now days, there are so many challenges and threats in teacher education. To improve the quality of teacher education programme, we should point out the problems in micro teaching, teaching methods, learning strategies etc.

Dr. Pawar Vatsala Udhav

2012-03-01

223

Teaching interpersonal skills in an international design-build course  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) started the CDIO concept in the autumn of 2008. The aim with this was to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers. The working conditions of a typical engineer involve many other fields than just those requiring technical skills. Interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important, including communication, teamwork and leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the co-operation between DTU and Metropolia on the development of an International Communication Course for the engineering students and to emphasize the importance of including a course like this into the CDIO concept, to be worked on in the process of further development. The course described in this paper is a strictly non-engineering course in communication; it is special in that its chief purpose is to bring into focus the fact that students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process. This is in stark contrast to a teacher giving lectures about communication, leaving the students passive listeners. The personal involvement aroused a negative reaction from several students at the beginning of the course however, during the one- week course the students gained a better understanding of the importance of learning how to communicate appropriately. Altogether, the four key questions dealing with the quality of the course show a very high satisfaction with the instruction. The grades one and two (1 best/very much, 5 worst/very little) of the responses to these four questions are ranging on average from 69.5% to 88% (on a yearly basis). The positive responses indicate that the students are very satisfied with the course recognising the need for education on international communication.

Christensen, JØrgen Erik

2011-01-01

224

On Cultivation of Cross-cultural Awareness in College English Teaching:Take Integrated Skills of English as an Example  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract: Language is an indispensable part of culture. To understand language means knowing about culture first. Culture teaching plays an essential role in English language teaching. The cultural orientation in language communication should be highly valued and the relevant cultural background should be led in where necessary. This paper discusses the training of cross-cultural awareness in college English teaching by taking Integrated Skills of English as an example. Besides teaching langu...

Yang, Ying

2011-01-01

225

Teaching of reading and writing skills: Process syllabus and global issues  

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Full Text Available This study aims to present a suggested syllabus that can set an example for process and task based syllabus applications for the teaching of reading and writing skills in a foreign language. It proposes a teaching model and the related evaluative data analysis. In the spring term of 2006-2007 academic year, 50 first year pre-service teachers at Hacettepe University, Division of English Language Teaching attended the course ‘Reading and Writing Skills II’. The course was designed in line with process and task based syllabus. While desinging the course syllabus, the aim was to develop an alternative teaching model. Therefore, the main goals were identified as improving critical reading skills, achieving student autonomy and focusing on global issues. To achieve these goals, the participants identified 5 global issues to do research and reading/writing activities on. Hence, these issues composed the syllabus and its sequence. The course work and materials were collected in personal portfolios which took the place of the coursebook and encouraged library and the Internet search and written personal reflections. Those subjects identified by the participants were terorism, great middle east project, freedom of expression, multi-lingualism/culturalism and sexism. The qualitative data gathered during and after the application and also the quantitative data and feedback collected at the end of the application provided sound findings on both the syllabus and its evaluation. In these findings, it is observable that the syllabus/teaching model encouraging the students to choose the reading texts on their own, to compose portfolios and to manage the teaching/learning process appreciated by the participants and achieved student participation and motivation.

Sezgi Sarac

2008-09-01

226

Developing teaching skills for the internationalized university: A Danish project  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

As an increasing number of higher education institutions offer degree programs taught in English, university management as well as teachers on the ground realize that while the English proficiency of faculty and students is important, there is more to it than just that; students and faculty not only have different first languages, they also come from different cultures, with tacit knowledge and expectations about what is expected in the multilingual and multicultural classroom in which English is the one language shared by all, and in which linguistic, cultural and educational issues all play complex and interlocking roles. This has created a pressing need to explore, develop and share strategies for addressing the needs of English-medium lecturers faced with the challenges and opportunities presented by the multicultural classroom. This poster will present the outcomes of a major project that has attempted to address these needs by designing, piloting and revising a set of resources available online for lecturers teaching through the medium of English in multicultural university settings.

Lauridsen, Karen M.; Cozart, Stacey Marie

227

IDENTIFYING RELATIONSHIP INVOLVING LEARNING STYLES AND PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS AMONG VOCATIONAL STUDENTS  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between students’ learning styles and problem solving skills among students in Building Construction Course at Vocational School. This study also investigated the differences between the students’ type of learning styles and their ability to solve the problem using their creative thinking. A survey was carried out on 68 vocational students in Building Construction Course from two Vocational Schools. Felder-Soloman’s Index of Learning Styles (ILS and elements of creative thinking in problem solving for Vocational Education were the tools used in this study. Creative thinking in problem solving elements was categorized from the subject specification used in Building Construction curriculum. In brief, the ILS have five dimension; Processing, Perception, Input, Understanding and Perception. The results show that the Input style dominates the learning styles of Building Construction’s students in Vocational School and manipulating idea is the dominant creative thinking elements to solve the problem which students preferred. In conclusion, type of students’ learning styles will influence how they can cater their learning to improve their academic achievement and how they can use their creativity to solve the problem in actual situation in Building Construction work. However, learning styles are not main indicator to predict how students excellent are.

Muhammad Rashid Rajuddin

2011-09-01

228

Assessment of the Teaching Methods that Influence the Acquisition of Practical Skills  

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Full Text Available This study is designed to identify the teaching methods that influence the acquisition of practical skills ofmechanical engineering trades students at technical college level using regression analysis. Descriptive surveyresearch design was utilized in carrying out the study. Ninety nine (99 mechanical engineering trades’ teachersand fourty six (46 administrators in the technical colleges in north central states of Nigeria responded to astructured questionnaire which addressed the research question. Cronbach Alpha coefficient was used indetermining the reliability of the instrument. The reliability co-efficient of the instrument used for data collectionstood at 0.78. It was recommended that mechanical engineering trades teachers and administrators in the schoolsbe encouraged to use different instructional methods, especially the methods identified in the study as the mostsignificant determinants of the teaching methods that influence the acquisition of practical, so that the studentscan acquire the skills for gainful employment in the labor market or be able to establish on their own and becomeself-reliant.

R. Audu

2014-10-01

229

Trigger Points: Enhancing Generic Skills in Accounting Education Through Changes to Teaching Practices  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In 2001 a small Australian university implement particular intervention strategies designed to improvespecific educational outcomes in its accounting degree program. These outcomes mirrored the three coreareas of the Graduate Careers Council of Australia’s Course Experience Questionnaire: (1) good teaching,(2) overall satisfaction, and (3) generic skills. Five areas were identified for intervention: (1) the effectiveallocation of full-time staff, (2) the effective use of sessional staff, (3...

Ted Watts; Mcnair, C. J.

2008-01-01

230

Promoting Generalization and Maintenance of Skills Learned via Natural Language Teaching  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper addresses the ability of strategies associated with natural language teaching (NLT) to support the generalization of language skills by children with developmental disabilities. A discussion of critical issues (e.g., specific NLT procedures, generalization) is followed by a systematic review of 57 studies. The studies were selected from the results of a PsychLit search if they met specific criteria (e.g., they were published in a peer-reviewedjournal, described original research, i...

Pete Peterson

2007-01-01

231

Informing Pedagogy Through the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, ed...

Mariale Hardiman

2012-01-01

232

Developing Students’ Critical Thinking Skills by Task-Based Learning in Chemistry Experiment Teaching  

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Full Text Available Task-Based Learning (TBL is a student-centered, teacher-guided and task-performed teaching approach. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of task-based learning (TBL in chemistry experiment teaching on promoting high school students’ critical thinking skills in Xi’an, China. To achieve the aims, a pre-test and post-test experimental design with an experimental group and a control group was employed. Students in the experimental group were taught with TBL, while students in the control group were taught with lecturing teaching methods. Five chemical experiments were selected, and 119 students aged at 17 - 19 voluntarily participated in the research which lasted one semester. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST was used as a data collection tool. Results showed there was an obvious significant difference (p 0.05 in the dimension of analyticity in the experimental group after TBL, while there were no significant differences in the total score, the evaluation and inference of CCTST. The findings provide an effective way for chemistry teachers to improve students’ critical thinking analyticity skills.

Qing Zhou

2013-12-01

233

Measurement Invariance of Torrance Test of Creative Thinking Figural Scores across Age: A study in Spanish-Speaking Children and Adolescents.  

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Full Text Available On the basis of a previous study carried out with Spanish-speaking children which indicates that the Creativity construct, operationalized by means of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT-Figural, consists of two factors –Innovation and Adaptation– (Krumm, Lemos & Arán Filippetti, in press, the objective of the present work was to prove whether this structure is invariant across age. A sample of 652 Spanish-speaking children and adolescents aged 9-17 years of both sexes was tested. It was in turn divided into three age groups: (a 9-10, (b 11-13 and (c 16 -17 years. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA showed that in each group of the sample, the structure of the TTCT is composed of two correlated factors, namely Innovation and Adaptation. In addition, Multigroup CFA demonstrated that the two-factor solution was actually invariant (configural and metric across age, meaning that children and adolescents equally conceptualize the Creativity construct. Finally, MANOVA showed a significant age effect on every subscale. These data suggest the relevance of considering the age factor when assessing the creative potential through the TTCT-Figural.

Gabriela L. Krumm

2013-12-01

234

A Novel Educational Game for teaching Emotion Identification Skills to Preschoolers with Autism Diagnosis  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Emotion recognition is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in understanding and expressing emotions. Those deficits seem to be rather permanent so intervention tools for improving those impairments are desirable. Educational interventions for teaching emotion recognition should occur as early as possible. It is argued that Serious Games can be very effective in the areas of therapy and education for children with autism. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Before the age of 6, most children with autism do not have such basic motor skills in order to manipulate a mouse or a keyboard. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game, which provides physical interaction with natural user interface (NUI), we aim to support early intervention and to enhance emotion recognition skills.

Christinaki, Eirini; Vidakis, Nikolaos

2014-01-01

235

Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor' on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Methods Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC. Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Results Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part of their career. However, whilst a number of students reported that their views of teachers and teaching had changed as a result of participation, this did not translate into significant changes in responses to questions that explored their views of the roles and qualities required of a good clinical teacher. Conclusion Findings affirm the benefits to volunteer tutors of cross-year peer tutoring, particularly in terms of skills enhancement and reinforcement of positive attitudes towards future teaching responsibilities, and have implications for the design and organisation of such programmes.

Zamora Javier

2007-06-01

236

The Effect of Teaching Practice Conducted by Using Metacognition Strategies on Students’ Reading Comprehension Skills  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of teaching practise conducted by using metacognitive strategies on students’ reading comprehension skills at Turkish language course. For this purpose, this study has been carried out with 65 students at 5th grade of secondary education in 2012–2013 academic year. In the research, pre-test post-test control group design of experiment method has been used. While the subjects have been taught to students in experimental group by using metacognitive strategies in addition to teacher’s book, the same subjects have been taught to students in control group as they are stated within the curriculum and teacher’s book. The study took a total of 6 weeks. As data collection tool, Achievement Test For Measuring Students’ Reading Comprehension Skills which was developed by the researcher to determine the effect of metacognitive strategies on students’ reading comprehension skills was used. As a result of the reliability and validity studies, the reliability coefficient of the test was found to be 0.91, the average difficulty was found to be 0.64. At the end of the research, at teaching practice in which metacognitive strategies(planning, monitoring and regulation were used, a significant increase on students’ reading comprehension skills was found in favor of the experimental group.

Cevat Eker

2014-08-01

237

Involving students in real-world research: a pilot study for teaching public health and research skills  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background There is some evidence that medical students consider population health issues less important than other domains in the health sciences and attitudes to this field may become more negative as training progresses. A need to improve research skills among medical students has also been suggested. Therefore we piloted an integrative teaching exercise that combined teaching of research skills and public health, with real-world research. Methods Th...

Wilson Nick; Howden-Chapman Philippa; Baker Michael G; Millar Elinor; Dickson Nigel

2009-01-01

238

A model for changing teachers' attitudes towards the value of teaching critical thinking skills : school management perspective / Jacobus A. Souls.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The primary aim of the study was to design a model for changing teachers' attitudes towards the value of teaching critical thinking skills. Currently, information regarding the conceptualisation of this topic is inadequate and vague. In this study the nature of the complexities involved in the management and implementation of the teaching of critical thinking skills were researched through a literature study and an empirical investigation. A model was then designed for the effective managemen...

Souls, Jacobus Abram

2009-01-01

239

From Initial Phonics to Functional Phonics: Teaching Word-Analysis Skills to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability  

Science.gov (United States)

Reading instruction for students with MoID is typically limited to sight-word instruction. We developed a 2-part, phonetic instructional sequence based upon Direct Instruction teaching methodology to teach students with MoID word-analysis skills that generalize to untaught words encountered in their environment. Elementary and middle-school…

Fredrick, Laura D.; Davis, Dawn H.; Alberto, Paul A.; Waugh, Rebecca E.

2013-01-01

240

Using Parent-Delivered Graduated Guidance To Teach Functional Living Skills to a Child with Cri du Chat Syndrome.  

Science.gov (United States)

The parents of a child with Cri du Chat syndrome successfully implemented a gradated guidance procedure the mother had read about in the training manual, "Teaching Developmentally Disabled Children: The ME Book" (Lovaas et al., 1981), to teach their child eating and ball rolling. Skills were maintained at a 52-week follow-up. (Contains…

Denny, Michael; Marchand-Martella, Nancy; Martella, Ronald C.; Reilly, Jennifer R.; Reilly, Jason F.; Cleanthous, Charalambos C.

2000-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

The effect of an innovative clinical teaching method on nursing students' knowledge and critical thinking skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the effect of an experimental clinical teaching method on nursing students' knowledge and critical thinking skills during clinical rotations in psychiatric nursing. Ausubel's Assimilation Theory of Learning provided the theoretical framework for this research. The subjects (N = 83) were from the baccalaureate nursing graduating classes of 1992 and 1993 of a medium-sized state university in the mid-atlantic region of the United States. The experimental clinical teaching method used computer-assisted instruction (CAI) throughout and a collaboration model (student-faculty-service) during initial clinical experiences. Knowledge was measured by the score for the psychiatric nursing component of the Mosby Assess Test and two parts of the National League for Nursing's (NLN) Psychiatric Exam (theory and total scores). Critical thinking was measured by two parts of the NLN's Psychiatric Nursing Exam (the score for assess, analyze, and evaluate as one measure and planning and implementation for the other measure). The comparison group scored significantly higher than the control group on assessing, analyzing, and evaluating (t = 2.15; p < .03), as well as planning and implementation (t = 2.33; p < .02), measures for critical thinking skills. However, there was no significant difference between the study groups with respect to knowledge. The findings support the appropriateness of Ausubel's Assimilation Theory with this clinical teaching method. Discussion relevant to the application of the study findings to nursing education and future research is presented. PMID:8926511

Perciful, E G; Nester, P A

1996-01-01

242

Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study evaluated whether critical thinking ability can be improved through participation in occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) curricula. The researchers compared levels of the critical thinking skills of OT and PT students at the beginning and end of their programs to determine whether changes occurred and to examine facets of the curricula that may have caused the differences. The curricula include teaching strategies of problem-based learning modules, small group discussion and problem-solving, case studies, clinical observation, and evidence-based practice assignments, as well as teaching about critical thinking as a process in itself. Fifty OT and PT students completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal at the beginning and end of 20 mos of the academic phase of their master's degree programs. Researchers analyzed the data using a one-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Results showed no differences between OT and PT students on the pretest or post-test and no differences for PT students between the pretest and post-test. OT students' scores increased significantly from pretest to post-test. The influence of the timing of teaching critical thinking skills in the resulting differences between the two curricula, as well as the validity of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal is a valid measure of critical thinking changes in allied health students are discussed. PMID:19753426

Vogel, Kimberly A; Geelhoed, Michael; Grice, Kimatha O; Murphy, Douglas

2009-01-01

243

Using mother delivered simultaneous prompting for teaching independent toileting skills to a child with developmental disability  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to give a sample of an application that a mother delivered home-based instruction via simultaneous prompting for teaching independent toilet skill to her child with developmental disability. Simultaneous prompting (SP is one of the systematic teaching methods, and studies showing the effectiveness of this method has increased in recent years in literature. Although many studies have showed an increase in development and learning of the children with disability if the parents participate in the education of them, parent participation has been found very few in effective teaching literature. This study is a sample of an application for using SP by parents. Training processes of the study offered to the mother and used measuring instruments are reported in detail. At the end of the study, SP used by mother was caused the child has used toilet independently and he maintained this skill. It has been thought that more studies are need to be conducted by the SP delivered by parents of the children with developmental disability.

Nesrin Sönmez

2011-03-01

244

Desarrollo del pensamiento creativo en la formación laboral juvenil / Developement of creative thinking in youth work training  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Argentina | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Proyecto de investigación que analiza las representaciones educativo-laborales sobre las atribuciones de valor a la creatividad, motivación e innovación en jóvenes de la educación formal y no formal que se preparan para el mundo del trabajo. La desarticulación educativa entre oferta, demanda y neces [...] idad, exige búsquedas que complementen la didáctica homogénea de un pensamiento convergente con otras vertientes que favorecen el pensamiento divergente. Se asume la creatividad como un concepto teórico, no observable, que difícilmente se da en forma espontánea y se reconoce solo como atributo exclusivo de artistas, siendo necesario generarla en todos los sujetos y disciplinas para una construcción de valores y desarrollo a escala humana. Avanza sobre nuevas aristas didácticas integradoras que cubren un extenso espectro de pertenencias culturales, con disimilitudes de conocimientos, de abstracción, de lenguajes e ideologías. Se opta por una integración metodológica para ampliar las posibilidades de los contextos de descubrimiento y validación priorizando el primero. La metodología comprensivista apunta más directamente a las metas propuestas con los aportes de la etnografía, interaccionismo simbólico y la etnometodología. Los primeros resultados parciales evidencian que las actitudes y motivaciones de los jóvenes, dentro y fuera de las aulas e instituciones, cambian radicalmente, apareciendo estrategias creativas e innovadoras para actividades que responden a intereses diferentes a los contenidos curriculares. En jóvenes alumnos de posgrado en educación, se relevan dificultades para enseñar y desconocimiento de didácticas orientadas al pensamiento divergente, pero interés por interiorizarse en la teoría e instrumentación de las mismas. Abstract in english This research project analyzes the education-labour representations on value attributions to creativity, motivation and innovation in youth with formal and non-formal education that are training for the job world. The educational detachment between offer, demand and need, requests a search that can [...] complement the homogeneous didactics of a converging line of thought with other currents that favour divergent thinking. Creativity is considered a theoretical concept, non observable, that can hardly happen in a spontaneous way and is solely an attribute of artists, but also necessary to be generated in all individuals and disciplines for a construction of values and development at a human scale. It makes progress over new integrating didactic aspects that cover a wide spectrum of cultural belongings, with dissimilar knowledge, of abstraction, of languages and ideologies. A methodological integration is chosen to enlarge the possibilities of the discovery and validation contexts prioritizing the former. The comprehensive methodology aims more directly to intended goals with contributions from ethnography, symbolic interaction and ethnomethodology. The first partial results show that attitudes and motivation in youngsters, inside and outside classrooms and institutions, change radically, giving rise to creative and innovative strategies that respond to different interests to those in curricular contents. Among young postgraduate students in education, difficulties in teaching and both an ignorance but also an interest in didactics oriented to diverging thought are shown.

Rosa, Pérez del Viso de Palou.

245

Desarrollo del pensamiento creativo en la formación laboral juvenil / Developement of creative thinking in youth work training  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Argentina | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Proyecto de investigación que analiza las representaciones educativo-laborales sobre las atribuciones de valor a la creatividad, motivación e innovación en jóvenes de la educación formal y no formal que se preparan para el mundo del trabajo. La desarticulación educativa entre oferta, demanda y neces [...] idad, exige búsquedas que complementen la didáctica homogénea de un pensamiento convergente con otras vertientes que favorecen el pensamiento divergente. Se asume la creatividad como un concepto teórico, no observable, que difícilmente se da en forma espontánea y se reconoce solo como atributo exclusivo de artistas, siendo necesario generarla en todos los sujetos y disciplinas para una construcción de valores y desarrollo a escala humana. Avanza sobre nuevas aristas didácticas integradoras que cubren un extenso espectro de pertenencias culturales, con disimilitudes de conocimientos, de abstracción, de lenguajes e ideologías. Se opta por una integración metodológica para ampliar las posibilidades de los contextos de descubrimiento y validación priorizando el primero. La metodología comprensivista apunta más directamente a las metas propuestas con los aportes de la etnografía, interaccionismo simbólico y la etnometodología. Los primeros resultados parciales evidencian que las actitudes y motivaciones de los jóvenes, dentro y fuera de las aulas e instituciones, cambian radicalmente, apareciendo estrategias creativas e innovadoras para actividades que responden a intereses diferentes a los contenidos curriculares. En jóvenes alumnos de posgrado en educación, se relevan dificultades para enseñar y desconocimiento de didácticas orientadas al pensamiento divergente, pero interés por interiorizarse en la teoría e instrumentación de las mismas. Abstract in english This research project analyzes the education-labour representations on value attributions to creativity, motivation and innovation in youth with formal and non-formal education that are training for the job world. The educational detachment between offer, demand and need, requests a search that can [...] complement the homogeneous didactics of a converging line of thought with other currents that favour divergent thinking. Creativity is considered a theoretical concept, non observable, that can hardly happen in a spontaneous way and is solely an attribute of artists, but also necessary to be generated in all individuals and disciplines for a construction of values and development at a human scale. It makes progress over new integrating didactic aspects that cover a wide spectrum of cultural belongings, with dissimilar knowledge, of abstraction, of languages and ideologies. A methodological integration is chosen to enlarge the possibilities of the discovery and validation contexts prioritizing the former. The comprehensive methodology aims more directly to intended goals with contributions from ethnography, symbolic interaction and ethnomethodology. The first partial results show that attitudes and motivation in youngsters, inside and outside classrooms and institutions, change radically, giving rise to creative and innovative strategies that respond to different interests to those in curricular contents. Among young postgraduate students in education, difficulties in teaching and both an ignorance but also an interest in didactics oriented to diverging thought are shown.

Rosa, Pérez del Viso de Palou.

2008-11-01

246

Description and evaluation of a bench porcine model for teaching surgical residents vascular anastomosis skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models, of variable quality, exist to impart the complex skills required to perform vascular anastomosis. These models differ with regard to the kinds of materials used, as well as their sizes, the time needed for their preparation, their availability, and the associated costs. The present study describes a bench model that uses formalin-fixed porcine aorta, and its evaluation by young surgical residents during a recent skills course. Findings The aortic segments used were a by-product of slaughtering. They were fixed and stored after harvesting for eventual use. Ten young surgical residents participated, and each performed one end-to-side vascular anastomosis. The evaluation was a questionnaire maintaining anonymity of the participant containing questions addressing particular aspects of the model and the experiences of the trainee, along with their ratings concerning the need for a training course to learn vascular anastomosis techniques. The scoring on the survey was done using a global 6-point rating scale (Likert Scale. In addition, we ranked the present model by reviewing the current literature for models that address vascular anastomosis skills. The trainees who participated were within their first two years of training (1.25 ± 0.46. A strong agreement in terms of the necessity of training for vascular anastomosis techniques was evident among the participating trainees (5.90 ± 0.32, who had only few prior manual experiences (total number 1.50 ± 0.53. The query revealed a strong agreement that porcine aorta is a suitable model that fits the needs for training vascular anastomosis skills (5.70 ± 0.48. Only a few bench models designed to teach surgical residents vascular anastomosis techniques were available in the literature. Conclusions The preparatory and financial resources needed to perform anastomosis skills training using porcine aorta are few. The presented bench model appears to be appropriate for learning vascular anastomosis skills, as rated by the surgical trainees themselves.

Jauch Karl-Walter

2010-07-01

247

Teaching citizen science skills online: Implications for invasive species training programs  

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Citizen science programs are emerging as an efficient way to increase data collection and help monitor invasive species. Effective invasive species monitoring requires rigid data quality assurances if expensive control efforts are to be guided by volunteer data. To achieve data quality, effective online training is needed to improve field skills and reach large numbers of remote sentinel volunteers critical to early detection and rapid response. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of online static and multimedia tutorials to teach citizen science volunteers (n = 54) how to identify invasive plants; establish monitoring plots; measure percent cover; and use Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Participants trained using static and multimedia tutorials provided less (p Trained volunteers struggled with plot setup and GPS skills. Overall, the online approach used did not influence conferred field skills and abilities. Traditional or multimedia online training augmented with more rigorous, repeated, and hands-on, in-person training in specialized skills required for more difficult tasks will likely improve volunteer abilities, data quality, and overall program effectiveness. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Newman, G.; Crall, A.; Laituri, M.; Graham, J.; Stohlgren, T.; Moore, J.C.; Kodrich, K.; Holfelder, K.A.

2010-01-01

248

Investigation on Requirements of Robotic Platforms to Teach Social Skills to Individuals with Autism  

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This paper reports on some of the robotic platforms used in the project AUROSO which investigates the use of robots as educationally useful interventions to improve social interactions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Our approach to treatment uses an educational intervention based on Socially Assistive Robotics (SAR), the DIR/Floortime intervention model and social script/stories. Requirements are established and a variety of robotic models/platforms were investigated as to the feasibility of an economical, practical and efficient means of helping teach social skills to individuals with ASD for use by teachers, families, service providers and other community organizations.

Nikolopoulos, Chris; Kuester, Deitra; Sheehan, Mark; Dhanya, Sneha

249

The Impact of Teaching Critical Thinking Skills on Reading Comprehension of Iranian EFL Learners  

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Full Text Available In line with the studies confirming the positive relationship between critical thinking ability and language proficiency, this study intended to investigate the impact of teaching critical thinking skills on reading comprehension ability, as well as the effect of applying debate on critical thinking of EFL learners. For this purpose 60 intermediate students were assigned to two experimental and control groups after being homogenized through a Nelson test. Afterwards, a reading comprehension and a critical thinking appraisal pretest were administered to the two groups. During the term the experimental group received 8 sessions of treatment using debate as a classroom activity. To compare the two groups they were given the same tests as a posttest.The analysis of collected data showed significant difference between the two groups on reading comprehension test, but the difference on critical thinking test was non-significant. However, the results indicate that teaching critical thinking skills in EFL context can improve language learning. The study has implication for course designers, teachers and students.

Mansoor Fahim

2011-07-01

250

A step-wise role playing approach for teaching patient counseling skills to medical students.  

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We describe a step-wise role playing approach to bedside teaching during the clinical training of medical students. The objective of this approach is to teach them the skills which are required to practice patient-centered medicine. "Patient-centered medicine" refers to a style of practice which relates to patients' needs rather than to the doctor's own plan, and which moves from professional control to patient empowerment. Our approach is based on: (a) interviews with real patients, and (b) re-play of doctor--patient encounters in small group teaching sessions using the instructor (a physician) as a simulated patient, while a student assumes the role of the physician. The objective of the simulation is to assess the student's ability to provide health-related information, involve patients in making clinical decisions and plan their management in a manner which suits their preferences and lifestyle. The medical background of the instructor who simulates the patient eliminates barriers in communication and allows these objectives to be easily accomplished. The discussion which follows, attempts to: (a) identify discrepancies between the optimal counseling which was offered to the simulated patient and that offered to the real patient; and (b) show that although inevitable, these discrepancies are not irreducible. We have no formal evaluation of our approach in terms of whether it achieved its objective, produced changes in students' attitudes and bedside manners, or in terms of students' ratings of the teaching approach. However, student participation and occasional verbal feedback have indicated that the teaching intervention may be a valid contribution to the clinical training of medical students and that it may be of use for other clinical instructors. PMID:11867245

Benbassat, Jochanan; Baumal, Reuben

2002-02-01

251

Learning and teaching about the nature of science through process skills  

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This dissertation, a three-paper set, explored whether the process skills-based approach to nature of science instruction improves teachers' understandings, intentions to teach, and instructional practice related to the nature of science. The first paper examined the nature of science views of 53 preservice science teachers before and after a year of secondary science methods instruction that incorporated the process skills-based approach. Data consisted of each participant's written and interview responses to the Views of the Nature of Science (VNOS) questionnaire. Systematic data analysis led to the conclusion that participants exhibited statistically significant and practically meaningful improvements in their nature of science views and viewed teaching the nature of science as essential to their future instruction. The second and third papers assessed the outcomes of the process skills-based approach with 25 inservice middle school science teachers. For the second paper, she collected and analyzed participants' VNOS and interview responses before, after, and 10 months after a 6-day summer professional development. Long-term retention of more aligned nature of science views underpins teachers' ability to teach aligned conceptions to their students yet it is rarely examined. Participants substantially improved their nature of science views after the professional development, retained those views over 10 months, and attributed their more aligned understandings to the course. The third paper addressed these participants' instructional practices based on participant-created video reflections of their nature of science and inquiry instruction. Two participant interviews and class notes also were analyzed via a constant comparative approach to ascertain if, how, and why the teachers explicitly integrated the nature of science into their instruction. The participants recognized the process skills-based approach as instrumental in the facilitation of their improved views. Additionally, the participants saw the nature of science as an important way to help students to access core science content such as the theory of evolution by natural selection. Most impressively, participants taught the nature of science explicitly and regularly. This instruction was student-centered, involving high levels of student engagement in ways that represented applying, adapting, and innovating on what they learned in the summer professional development.

Mulvey, Bridget K.

252

Evaluating the Use of Role Playing Simulations in Teaching Negotation Skills to University Students  

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Full Text Available This paper critically evaluates the use of role-playing simulations in a negotiation course taught to graduate students. The course consisted primarily of a series of simulations involving the alternative dispute resolution (ADR processes of negotiation, facilitation and mediation. Data were obtained from two sets of questionnaires completed by 41 students before and after the course. A review of previous research reveals that despite the widespread use of role-playing simulations in education, there has been very little empirical evaluation of their effectiveness, especially in conflict resolution and planning. Comparison of the data acquired from the two surveys generated findings regarding student understanding of ADR processes and key issues in conflict resolution; the educational value of simulations; the amenability of types of planning and planning goals to ADR; appropriate learning objectives; the importance of negotiation skills in planning; challenges in conducting effective simulations; the value of simulations in resolving real conflicts; the utility of negotiation theory; and obstacles to applying ADR to planning disputes. More generally, the paper concludes that role-playing simulations are very effective for teaching negotiation skills to students, and preparing them to manage actual conflicts skillfully and to participate effectively in real ADR processes. However, this technique is somewhat less valuable for teaching aspects of planning other than conflict resolution. Surprisingly, prior experience with simulations had no significant influence on the responses to the pre-course survey. Also surprising was the lack of a significant correlation between final exam scores and responses to relevant questions on the post-course survey.

John Andrew

2012-10-01

253

Children's Creative Thinking in Kenya.  

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Describes performing arts and story-telling programs in Kenya that help to meet the needs for a creative framework and orientation to genuine learning that recovers some of the diminishing traditions of pre-colonial Kenya. Includes descriptions of the Kenya Schools Drama Festival, the resurgence of traditional story telling, and the Kenya Drama…

Gacheru, Margaretta; Smutny, Joan Franklin; Opiyo, Mumma

1999-01-01

254

Using the case study teaching method to promote college students' critical thinking skills  

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The purpose of this study was to examine general and domain-specific critical thinking skills in college students, particularly ways in which these skills might be increased through the use of the case study method of teaching. General critical thinking skills were measured using the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA) Short Form, a forty-item paper-and-pencil test designed to measure important abilities involved in critical thinking, including inference, recognition of assumptions, deduction, interpretation, and evaluation of arguments. The ability to identify claims and support those claims with evidence is also an important aspect of critical thinking. I developed a new instrument, the Claim and Evidence Assessment Tool (CEAT), to measure these skills in a domain-specific manner. Forty undergraduate students in a general science course for non-science majors at a small two-year college in the northeastern United States experienced positive changes in general critical thinking according to results obtained using the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA). In addition, the students showed cumulative improvement in their ability to identify claims and evidence, as measured by the Claim and Evidence Assessment Tool (CEAT). Mean score on the WGCTA improved from 22.15 +/- 4.59 to 23.48 +/- 4.24 (out of 40), and the mean CEAT score increased from 14.98 +/- 3.28 to 16.20 +/- 3.08 (out of 24). These increases were modest but statistically and educationally significant. No differences in claim and evidence identification were found between students who learned about specific biology topics using the case study method of instruction and those who were engaged in more traditional instruction, and the students' ability to identify claims and evidence and their factual knowledge showed little if any correlation. The results of this research were inconclusive regarding whether or not the case study teaching method promotes college students' general or domain-specific critical thinking skills, and future research addressing this issue should probably utilize larger sample sizes and a pretest-posttest randomized experimental design.

Terry, David Richard

255

The Effect of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching on Elementary School Students' Science Process Skills and Science Attitudes  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish elementary school students’ level of success on science process skills and science attitudes and if there were statistically significant differences in their success degree and science attitudes depending to their grade level and teaching method. The total 241 students comprised of 122 males, 119 females. For this purpose, a pretest-post test control group and experimental group design was used. The data were collected through using Basic Science Process Skill Test and Integrated Science Process Skill Test and Science Attitude Scale. Study was conducted during the two semesters. Results of the study showed that use of inquiry based teaching methods significantly enhances students’ science process skills and attitudes.

R. Ergul

2011-05-01

256

ssessment of Learner Acceptance and Satisfaction with Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance  

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As video-based instructional materials become available to distance learners to learn practical skills at a distance, it is important to assess the instructional effectiveness of these materials and to understand how students respond to them. This paper is the second part of a larger exploratory study that assessed the instructional effectiveness of video-based instructional materials for teaching distance learners practical skills in block-laying and concreting and how learners respond to th...

Francis Donkor

2011-01-01

257

Communicating with first year medical students to improve Communication Skills teaching in The University of the West Indies  

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Full Text Available Objectives: This paper reports first year Caribbean medical students' preferred and least preferred Communication Skills teaching styles. It also reports their views on assessment and what qualities they valued in a good Communication Skills teacher. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to first year students at the end of Semester One and the data compared with the results of a study using the same questionnaire format in the UK. Results: Caribbean medical students favoured interactive lectures with opportunities for discussion over the didactic formal lecture. The least preferred modes of teaching selected were private study, formal lecture, role play and student presentations. The qualities that students rated highly in their Communication Skills teachers were being a skilled teacher and being knowledgeable and approachable. The preferred assessment style was a 50-50 balance between coursework and exam. Conclusions: First year medical students in the Caribbean studying Communication Skills preferred interactive lectures with opportunities for discussion. Their explanations indicated that interactive lectures provided more stimulation allowing opportunities for learning and greater retention of information. Students also found small group discussions with constructive feedback helpful in developing their own communication skills. Other international faculty may find this approach of establishing students' preferences for teaching style useful in planning their curriculum delivery.

Stella Williams

2010-03-01

258

Using Basic Reading Skills Instruction and Formative Assessments to Teach an Adult with Traumatic Brain Injury to Read: A Case Study  

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Literacy expectations for persons with cognitive impairments, including impairments caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI), have remained quite low. Some researchers have suggested that educators move from a focus on teaching functional skills to teaching basic reading skills in a manner similar to instruction for nondisabled learners. The purpose…

Goddard, Yvonne; Rinderknecht, Laura

2009-01-01

259

A gesture-controlled Serious Game for teaching emotion recognition skills to preschoolers with autism  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The recognition of facial expressions is important for the perception of emotions. Understanding emotions is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in the recognition of affective expressions. With the appropriate intervention, elimination of those deficits can be achieved. Interventions are proposed to start as early as possible. Computer-based programs have been widely used with success to teach people with autism to recognize emotions. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Such abilities are beyond very young children with autism as they have major restriction in their ability to interact with computers. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game which provides physical interaction, we aim to support early intervention and to foster emotion learning.

Christinaki, Eirini; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

260

In search of a course design and teaching methods to improve critical thinking skills.  

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This article describes a unique course design to teach critical thinking skills to students in formal academic degree programs preparing to become healthcare administrators. The course and its experimental design were motivated by several factors. First, intelligent and competent problem solving and decision making, most would agree, are directly dependent on critical thinking proficiency. Therefore, elevating students' critical-thinking competence will inherently improve their problem-solving and decision-making ability. Second, problem solving and decision making consumes the majority of an administrator's time. And finally, a review of AUPHA's catalog descriptions of healthcare graduate curriculums listrelatively few critical-thinking courses compared to the time administrators devote to it. PMID:14527103

Simendinger, Earl

2003-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

The Relative Value of Skills, Knowledge, and Teaching Methods in Explaining Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program Return on Investment  

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In this article, the authors provide insight into alumni perceptions of Master of Business Administration (MBA) program return on investment (ROI). They sought to assess the relative value of skills, knowledge, and teaching methods in explaining ROI. By developing insight into the drivers of ROI, the real utility of MBA program ingredients can be…

van Auken, Stuart; Wells, Ludmilla Gricenko; Chrysler, Earl

2005-01-01

262

The Effect of a Constant Time Delay Procedure on Teaching an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation a Recreation Bowling Skill  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a constant time delay (CTD) procedure on teaching a recreational bowling skill to a 39-year-old male with severe mental retardation. The CTD procedure used 5 seconds as delay interval, task direction as target stimulus, physical assistance as controlling prompt, and oral praise as reinforcer.…

Zhang, Jiabei; Cote, Bridget; Chen, Shihui; Liu, John

2004-01-01

263

Effectiveness of Structured Teaching Programme on the Level of Knowledge of Communication Skill among Nurses Working at NIMHANS, Bangalore  

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Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders of different kinds leave the clients with communication problems that make the interaction difficult to understand. Almost all the mental disorders lead to a pathological communication pattern. Like other skills of professional nursing, communication requires intense education. Aims and Objectives: 1. To develop structured teaching programme on communication skill for nurses 2. To identify the socio demographic characteristics of the nurses in the study. 3. To assess the level of knowledge of communication skill before the structured teaching programme. 4. To evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching programme. Material and methods: A quasi experimental study design with two groups' pre test and post test was used. The study population comprised of 32 nurses, 17 in experimental group and 15 in control group, working at NIMHANS, Bangalore using convenient sampling technique. The data were collected by using socio demographic data sheet and knowledge assessment questionnaire. The tools were prepared with the experts' guidance. Pilot study conducted was found to be feasible and reliable. The collected data were statistically analyzed. Results: The subjects in control and experimental group matched with each other in six socio demographic characteristics. There was a significant improvement in the level of knowledge in experimental group subjects after the intervention. Conclusion: Structured teaching programme was effective in improving the knowledge of communication skill.

Banu M. R

2014-07-01

264

Use of Computer-Based Interventions to Teach Communication Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review  

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The purpose of this review is to provide a systematic analysis of studies involving the use of computer-based interventions (CBI) to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This review evaluates intervention outcomes, appraises the certainty of evidence, and describes software and system requirements for each…

Ramdoss, Sathiyaprakash; Lang, Russell; Mulloy, Austin; Franco, Jessica; O'Reilly, Mark; Didden, Robert; Lancioni, Giulio

2011-01-01

265

Teaching Academic Skills as an Answer to Behavioural Problems of Students with Emotional or Behavioural Disorders: A Review  

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Academic learning has always been a serious issue for students with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) and their teachers. However, teaching academic skills could be an important protective and curative factor for the problem behaviour of these students. The current review was conducted to study the effect of interventions developed to…

van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

2014-01-01

266

Applied Psychology in the Junior High School: Teaching ESL Communicative Skills to Twelve-to-Fourteen-Year-Olds.  

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Boys and girls in the early years of adolescence can best learn ESL communicative skills if the instructor has an understanding of the main characteristics of early adolescence and an appreciation of the teaching techniques best adaped to them. Characteristics which should be taken into account when designing an ESL course include the following:…

Adams-Smith, Diana E.

267

Opportunities to Improve Skills and to Teach and Train Others: Employee Outcomes in the United States and Japan  

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Opportunities to improve skills and opportunities to teach or train others may be associated with job satisfaction, work engagement and organizational commitment. The analysis reported in this paper used a subsample of 823 employees within two Japanese and three American worksites. We tested not only the direct relationships of each type of…

Lee, HaeNim; McNamara, Tay K.; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Lee, Jungui

2014-01-01

268

An Exploratory Investigation: Are Driving Simulators Appropriate to Teach Pre-Driving Skills to Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities?  

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Research examining driver training for young adults with intellectual disabilities has been limited since the 1970s. The current pilot and exploratory study investigated teaching pre-driving skills (i.e. lane keeping and speed maintenance) to young adults with intellectual disabilities using an interactive driving simulator to provide dynamic and…

Brooks, Johnell O.; Mossey, Mary E.; Tyler, Peg; Collins, James C.

2014-01-01

269

A Report on Using General-Case Programming to Teach Collateral Academic Skills to a Student in a Postsecondary Setting  

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The authors' purpose in this report is to examine the application of general-case programming to teach collateral academic skills to a student with pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and with a mild intellectual disability who was attending college. The authors use data drawn from their work with Tom to explain and…

Chezan, Laura C.; Drasgow, Erik; Marshall, Kathleen J.

2012-01-01

270

Clarity in Mathematics Instruction: The Impact of Teaching Number Sense and Place Value Skills on Elementary School Students  

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There is a concern among educators in schools with high levels of poverty that students are lacking certain academic strategies, especially in mathematics. These students struggle to explore data systematically and procedurally. The purpose of this pre-posttest design study is to intentionally teach number sense skills in order to increase…

Stella, Molly E.; Fleming, Megan R.

2011-01-01

271

Managing the teaching of critical thinking skills in English home language to second language speakers in the further education and training phase / P. Pillay  

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The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyse the effectiveness and necessity of managing the teaching of critical thinking skills in English Home Language to second language speakers in the Further Education and Training phase, by focusing on critical thinking skills; classroom management; management skills of professional teachers; the relationship between teaching and management; guidelines for effective classroom management; the National Curriculum Statement Grades 10-12; the Na...

Pillay, Parvathy

2011-01-01

272

Talking the Talk: Developing a Student Centered Approach for Teaching Communication Skills for Operational Policing  

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Full Text Available The increasingly complex police - citizen situations in which the novice police officer may be placed demand that police training environments continually assess their education programs to ensure that such programs are contemporary and meet the expectations of stakeholders. One challenge facing recruit raining is the need to prepare the novice police officer to communicate effectively in often stressful and complicated situations. Police educators must develop learning strategies which provide opportunity for students to build their capacity to be effective communicators through autonomous, student - centered learning experiences. The communications teaching and learning opportunities within the Associate Degree in Policing Practice for New South Wales Police Force (NSWPF recruits is no exception. This paper discusses the changes that have occurred to the delivery of communication training to NSWPF recruits over the past 15 years. It considers the merits of incorporating authentic teaching strategies and learner assessment processes into the delivery of communication education and of creating experiential learning experiences that support autonomous, self-regulated learners. In particular, it discusses the use of role plays (verbal communication trials to provide a unique and authentic learning experience for students and to assess their verbal and non-verbal communication skills in a simulated policing environment.

Amanda Davies

2014-11-01

273

Found in translation: exporting patient-centered communication and small group teaching skills to China.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Chinese Medical Doctor's Association asked us to develop a train-the-trainers program in doctor-patient communication and in teaching skills for a select group of Chinese health care professionals, who would then serve as trainers for practicing physicians throughout China. The request came in the context of increasing doctor-patient friction related, in part, to the dissolution of the socialist health care safety net in China. In this article we recount the implementation of our 5-day training program in Beijing. We explore cross-cultural issues that arose in presenting the program's two principal training domains: small group teaching and patient-centered doctor-patient communication. We also explore the linguistic challenges we encountered as non-Chinese speaking teachers. Finally, we reflect on the lessons learned from this project that may be of value to others called upon to export Western doctor-patient communications training to other cultures. In this age of increasing globalization, cross-cultural sharing of medical education represents a growing trend. PMID:20165520

Blatt, Benjamin; Kallenberg, Gene; Lang, Forrest; Mahoney, Patrick; Patterson, JoEllen; Dugan, Beverly; Sun, Shaobang

2009-01-01

274

Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians and medical educators have repeatedly acknowledged the inadequacy of communication skills training in the medical school curriculum and opportunities to improve these skills in practice. This study of a controlled intervention evaluates the effect of teaching practicing physicians the skill of "agenda-setting" on patients' experiences with care. The agenda-setting intervention aimed to engage clinicians in the practice of initiating patient encounters by eliciting the full set of concerns from the patient's perspective and using that information to prioritize and negotiate which clinical issues should most appropriately be dealt with and which (if any should be deferred to a subsequent visit. Methods Ten physicians from a large physician organization in California with baseline patient survey scores below the statewide 25th percentile participated in the agenda-setting intervention. Eleven physicians matched on baseline scores, geography, specialty, and practice size were selected as controls. Changes in survey summary scores from pre- and post-intervention surveys were compared between the two groups. Multilevel regression models that accounted for the clustering of patients within physicians and controlled for respondent characteristics were used to examine the effect of the intervention on survey scale scores. Results There was statistically significant improvement in intervention physicians' ability to "explain things in a way that was easy to understand" (p = 0.02 and marginally significant improvement in the overall quality of physician-patient interactions (p = 0.08 compared to control group physicians. Changes in patients' experiences with organizational access, care coordination, and office staff interactions did not differ by experimental group. Conclusion A simple and modest behavioral training for practicing physicians has potential to positively affect physician-patient relationship interaction quality. It will be important to evaluate the effect of more extensive trainings, including those that work with physicians on a broader set of communication techniques.

Rogers William H

2008-01-01

275

THE EFFECT OF A FIGURE WHERE SYMMETRY USED IN TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IS APPLIED ON WRITING SKILLS OF TURKISH LANGUAGE AND PRIMARY MATHEMATICS TEACHING 1ST GRADE STUDENTS  

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Full Text Available With this study, it is aimed to afford an artistic development for science of mathematics with using literary language and learn with associating visual themes and imaginariness in essays. In the study, different written expression works, which are composed about same symmetric figure, of first grade preservice teachers of Turkish Language and Mathematics Teaching are compared.This study will put forth the grasp of communication skill of preservice students who are implementers of new program of Turkish and Mathematics lesson used from 2005 and in which the importance of this skill is emphasized. Also this study will contribute education of preservice students henceforwards.

Mine AKTA?

2011-08-01

276

Teaching Strategy to Develop the Skill of Certifying Death in Medicine Students Estrategia didáctica para el desarrollo de la habilidad certificar la defunción en estudiantes de Medicina  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

One of the most serious issues higher education faces today is the current inconsistency between the level of requirements and development of skills in future professionals training. Research has proved that there are difficulties in medicine students when developing the skill of certifying death. Therefore, we propose the following objective: to develop a teaching strategy based on the psychopedagogical foundations of skills formation processes in order to develop the skill of certifying dea...

Josefa Caridad de la Rosa Chaviano; Eloy Arteaga Valdés; Olga Castellanos Morales; Bladimir Arteaga Valdés; Leslie Carcassés de la Rosa

2012-01-01

277

A taxonomy for teaching transfer skills in the Danish VET system  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The educational system is grounded in the belief that you can teach people in one setting — the school — in order that they will be able to perform in other settings outside school. The vital process of applying knowledge and skills acquired in an educational situation to working life is known as ‘transfer’. The transfer process poses a continual challenge to all spheres of education and training, for while transfer is positively influenced by identical elements shared by the training and transfer situations, more often than not, the two are markedly dissimilar. This discussion is confined to the transfer process solely within the specialised vocational and education and training (VET) stream in Denmark. The existence of many identical elements in both training and transfer situations is known as ‘near transfer’, and is most readily achieved when training is conducted within company premises. Students find the relevance of their theoretical training to in-house application highly motivating. Cognitively, transfer is facilitated by the concrete similarities between training and its application. However, the purpose of school-based education is to develop the students’ mastery of ‘far transfer’; in other words, their ability to apply knowledge and skills to a broad range of situations. To adapt to frequent changes in the labour market, students need to develop general competences that will enable them to move to other jobs and other companies. Therefore the pedagogy of VET should provide a progression from near to far transfer. The aim of this article is to describe and discuss some of the pedagogical challenges for VET of near and far transfer.

Aarkrog, Vibe

2011-01-01

278

The First Clinical Skills: Students Teach Students To Take Vital Signs  

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Full Text Available Abstract: Transition from the role of passive student to medical practitioner begins with learning the first clinical skill. This transition can be stressful for those experiencing it and to some extent by those coordi-nating it. Logistically, it requires demonstration of the techniques to the entire class by a single practitio-ner or to smaller groups of students by multiple practitioners. The former reduces the opportunity for close observation of technique and is less conducive to questions, while the latter requires multiple practi-tioners, which can be prohibitive given their already dense schedules. To reduce the stress for all in-volved and to maximize learning opportunities, an innovative approach to teaching the first skill, vital signs measurement, was developed. Small group instruction and practice were facilitated by senior medi-cal student volunteers in a simulated outpatient clinic using actual equipment. Instruction was provided in a relaxed, but guided format. Students were provided with a lesson plan that detailed both, technique and brief physiology points, as well as check sheets to use during the lab and later as a refresher guide. The lesson plan, instructions for facilitators, and student check sheets were developed by a senior medical stu-dent and reviewed by the course faculty. Recruitment and briefing of student facilitators and conduct of the lab were also performed by the senior student. The purpose of this trend article is to describe the de-velopment of a new course format and to report our experience with implementation of the new format. It is intended to spark interest in applying similar approaches to other curricular issues

R. Gregg Dwyer, M.D., Ed.D.

2002-10-01

279

Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology  

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Full Text Available Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology Rory McGREAL, PhD Athabasca University – Canada’s Open University Athabasca AB, CANADA Sue DAVIS, MSc. New Brunswick Community College–Saint John Saint John, CANADA Terry MURPHY, PhD Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA Chris SMITH, BA Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA ABSTRACT The evaluation of this pilot of an epidemiology course conducted online and delivered across Canada was based on four main criteria: design, content, process and outcomes. Data was collected through seven sources: participant online survey results, post-pilot workshop feedback, four focus groups, telephone interviews with participants, interviews with course developers, examination of online materials, and analysis of log files generated by the web server. The pilot course had the following outcomes: Findings on the delivery showed that the course took much more time than estimated; the online environment was challenging/frustrating for some; there were technical glitches; discussion boards were not regularly used; interaction with instructors was minimal; feedback from instructors was slow in coming; the short development time led to errors/mismatches between content and assessment; and the high student/teacher ratio of 1:48 made it difficult to provide timely feedback.

Terry MURPHY

2006-01-01

280

The Effect of Problem Solving Teaching with Texts of Turkish Lesson on Students’ Problem Solving Skills  

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Full Text Available In this research, by carrying out activities based on texts, effect of providing problem solving skill on students’ levels of problem solving attainment was tried to be identified. Research was performed according to pretest-posttest Experimental Model with Control Group, in 2008-2009 educational year at second grade of an elementary school in Denizli province. For nine weeks, four hours in a week, while teacher guide book was being followed in control group in Turkish language lesson, texts were carried out with problem solving activities in experimental group. In the research, “Problem Solving Test” which were used as data collection tools, were developed by benefiting from matching of attainment-problem solving steps-cognitive domain steps. Problem Solving Test is made up of 16 multiple choice and 9 open ended questions. In the analysis of data, t test was used. It was found that problem solving teaching succeeded at “identifying different possible solutions in the light of collected data, applying the decided way of solution, evaluating types of solutions, evaluating used problem solving method” stages of problem solving.

Havva ILGIN

2012-08-01

 
 
 
 
281

Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients  

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Background Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers’ communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. Methods A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants’ confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Results Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients’ assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. Conclusions The program’s positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients. PMID:24886341

2014-01-01

282

Training teachers to teach mental health skills to staff in primary care settings in a vast, under-populated area.  

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Background The Arkhangelsk Oblast is an area the size of France with a sparsely distributed population. The existing primary care staff have had very little training in the management of mental health disorders, despite the frequency of these disorders in the population. They requested special teaching on depression, suicide, somatisation and alcohol problems. Methods An educational intervention was developed in partnership with mental health and primary care staff in Russia, to develop mental health skills using established, evidence-based methods. After a preliminary demonstration of teaching methods to be employed, a 5-day full-time teaching course was offered to trainers of general practitioners and feldshers. Results The findings are presented by providing details of improvements that occurred over a 3-month period in four areas, namely depression in primary care, somatic presentations of distress, dealing with suicidal patients, and alcohol problems. We present preliminary data on how the training has generalised since our visits to Archangelsk. Conclusions Teachers who are used to teaching by didactic lectures can be taught the value of short introductory talks that invite discussion, and mental health skills can be taught using role play. The content of such training should be driven by perceived local needs, and developed in conjunction with local leaders and teachers within primary care services. Further research will be needed to establish the impact on clinical outcomes. PMID:24294296

Goldberg, D P; Gask, L; Zakroyeva, A; Proselkova, E; Ryzhkova, N; Williams, P

2012-12-01

283

Using simulation to teach critical thinking skills. You can't just throw the book at them.  

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Critical thinking is essential in critical care practice. How to define, measure, and teach thinking are subjects of debate with no clearly proven method for doing so. Simulation as a teaching strategy appears to hold great promise for teaching critical thinking. Sophisticated simulators allow real patient situations to be replicated in a safe environment for practice and learning. Research is needed to support this theory. Dr. Gaba, a pioneer in the use of simulation, said "No industry in which human lives depend on the skilled performance of responsible operators has waited for unequivocal proof of the benefit of simulation before embracing it." Embracing simulation in academic and clinical education is appropriate, but efforts must continue to evaluate this strategy. PMID:11863144

Rauen, C A

2001-03-01

284

The ABC's of teaching social skills to adolescents with autism spectrum disorder in the classroom: the UCLA PEERS (®) Program.  

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Social skills training is a common treatment method for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet very few evidence-based interventions exist to improve social skills for high-functioning adolescents on the spectrum, and even fewer studies have examined the effectiveness of teaching social skills in the classroom. This study examines change in social functioning for adolescents with high-functioning ASD following the implementation of a school-based, teacher-facilitated social skills intervention known as Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills (PEERS (®) ). Seventy-three middle school students with ASD along with their parents and teachers participated in the study. Participants were assigned to the PEERS (®) treatment condition or an alternative social skills curriculum. Instruction was provided daily by classroom teachers and teacher aides for 14-weeks. Results reveal that in comparison to an active treatment control group, participants in the PEERS (®) treatment group significantly improved in social functioning in the areas of teacher-reported social responsiveness, social communication, social motivation, social awareness, and decreased autistic mannerisms, with a trend toward improved social cognition on the Social Responsiveness Scale. Adolescent self-reports indicate significant improvement in social skills knowledge and frequency of hosted and invited get-togethers with friends, and parent-reports suggest a decrease in teen social anxiety on the Social Anxiety Scale at a trend level. This research represents one of the few teacher-facilitated treatment intervention studies demonstrating effectiveness in improving the social skills of adolescents with ASD in the classroom: arguably the most natural social setting of all. PMID:24715256

Laugeson, Elizabeth A; Ellingsen, Ruth; Sanderson, Jennifer; Tucci, Lara; Bates, Shannon

2014-09-01

285

On Cultivation of Cross-cultural Awareness in College English Teaching:Take Integrated Skills of English as an Example  

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Full Text Available Abstract: Language is an indispensable part of culture. To understand language means knowing about culture first. Culture teaching plays an essential role in English language teaching. The cultural orientation in language communication should be highly valued and the relevant cultural background should be led in where necessary. This paper discusses the training of cross-cultural awareness in college English teaching by taking Integrated Skills of English as an example. Besides teaching language, English teaching is to cultivate the students’ cross-cultural awareness and transform their linguistic competence into communicative competence in an effective way.Key words: Culture teaching; Cross-cultural awareness; Communicative competence; Integrated Skills of EnglishRésumé: La langue est un élément indispensable de la culture. Afin de comprendre une langue, il faut connaître la culture d'abord. L’enseignement de la culture joue un rôle essentiel dans l'enseignement de la langue anglaise. L'orientation culturelle dans la communication linguistique devrait être mise en valeur et le fond culturel approprié doit être introduit dans le cas échéant. Cet article discute la formation de sensibilisation interculturelle dans l'enseignement de l’anglais au collège en prenant des compétences intégrées en anglais comme un exemple. Outre l'enseignement de la langue, l’enseignement de l'anglais est de former la sensibilisation interculturelle des élèves et de transformer leurs compétences linguistiques en compétence communicative de manière efficace. Mots clés: Enseignement de la culture; Sensibilisation interculturelle; Compétence communicative; Compétences intégrées en anglais

Ying YANG

2011-04-01

286

Involving students in real-world research: a pilot study for teaching public health and research skills  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background There is some evidence that medical students consider population health issues less important than other domains in the health sciences and attitudes to this field may become more negative as training progresses. A need to improve research skills among medical students has also been suggested. Therefore we piloted an integrative teaching exercise that combined teaching of research skills and public health, with real-world research. Methods Third year medical students at the University of Otago (Dunedin, New Zealand filled in a questionnaire on their housing conditions and health. The students were given the results of the survey to discuss in a subsequent class. Student response to this teaching exercise was assessed using a Course Evaluation Questionnaire. Results Of the 210 students in the class, 136 completed the Course Evaluation Questionnaire (65%. A majority of those who responded (77% greatly supported or supported the use of the survey and seminar discussion for future third year classes. Most (70% thought that the session had made them more aware and concerned about societal problems, and 72% felt that they now had an improved understanding of the environmental determinants of health. Students liked the relevance and interaction of the session, but thought it could be improved by the inclusion of small group discussion. The findings of the students' housing and health were considered by the tutors to be of sufficient value to submit to a scientific journal and are now contributing to community action to improve student housing in the city. Conclusion In this pilot study it was feasible to integrate medical student teaching with real-world research. A large majority of the students responded favourably to the teaching exercise and this was generally successful in raising the profile of public health and research. This approach to integrated teaching/research should be considered further in health sciences training and continue to be evaluated and refined.

Wilson Nick

2009-07-01

287

Using Standardized Clients in the Classroom: An Evaluation of a Training Module to Teach Active Listening Skills to Social Work Students  

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This article describes the implementation of a module that utilizes drama students to teach social work students how to use active listening skills in an interview environment. The module was implemented during a semester-long micro skills practice course taught to 13 undergraduate social work seniors in a western liberal arts university. Four…

Rogers, Anissa; Welch, Benjamin

2009-01-01

288

Rethinking Teacher Education: Synchronizing Eastern and Western Views of Teaching and Learning to Promote 21st Century Skills and Global Perspectives  

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The purpose of the study was to share findings with educators across disciplines of how to incorporate an eastern and western blended philosophy of teaching and learning to promote 21st century skills and global perspectives. Drawing from a previous self-study of their views of teaching and learning between Chinese and American cultures, the two…

Smith, Judith; Hu, Ran

2013-01-01

289

Teaching and maintaining behavior management skills with nursing assistants in a nursing home.  

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This article describes a nursing staff training program in basic behavior management skills and a formal staff management system to encourage the application of these basic skills on the nursing unit. Behavioral skills training consists of a 5-hour in-service followed by three weeks of on-the-job training to ensure accurate application of behavior management skills. Following training, a staff management system is used to facilitate long-term use of the skills. Components of the staff management system include supervisory monitoring of the nursing assistants (NAs) by licensed practical nurses (LPNs), NA self-monitoring, verbal and written performance feedback, and incentives. PMID:9640858

Stevens, A B; Burgio, L D; Bailey, E; Burgio, K L; Paul, P; Capilouto, E; Nicovich, P; Hale, G

1998-06-01

290

Computers in the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language: Access to the Diversity of Textual Genres and Language Skills  

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In the area of language teaching both language skills and textual genres can be worked with simultaneously (thus responding to the Brazilian Curricular Parameters and to the trends in contemporary education, which emphasize contextualized teaching) by means of computers. Computers can make the teaching process dynamic and rich, since they enable the access to the foreign language through virtual environments, which creates a larger number of learning contexts, with all their specific vocabulary and linguistic features in real communication. This study focuses on possible applications of this kind of approach. The computer online is a resource of diverse textual genres and can be an important tool in the language classroom as well as an access to authentic material produced in contextualized practice close to real-life communication. On the other hand, all these materials must be appropriately used without ever worshipping the technology as if it were a miraculous solution. After all, the professional pedagogic skills of the teacher should never be forgotten or taken for granted. In this study, a series of interviews with teachers was carried out - both with Brazilian teachers of the public sector (basic education) and language institutes (private English courses) as well as teacher trainers (university professors), in order to verify if the teachers were prepared to work with informatics in teaching practices, and check the professionals’ views on the subject. The ideas of Maingueneau and Marcuschi about textual genres are a theoretical base in this work, besides the concept of cognitive economy. The text and its typology are focused here as the basic material for teaching English, through digital technologies and hypermedia. The study is also based on Sharma and Barrett’s notion of blended learning as a balanced combination of technological resources and traditional practices in the classroom. Thus, this is an attempt to investigate the relevance of information and communication technologies in the education and professional practice of English teachers in Brazil in the context of the 21st century.

Dos Santos, Roberto-Márcio; Sobrinho, Jerônimo Coura

291

From Schoolroom to Living Room: Teaching Independent Living Skills to Multihandicapped Students.  

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Classroom simulation activities helped multihandicapped hearing impaired adolescents acquire independent living skills related to finding employment, handling job finances, and finding an apartment. (CL)

Levine, Linda Bearman; Pearson, Julie Ann

1985-01-01

292

Teaching high-performance skills using above-real-time training  

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The above real-time training (ARTT) concept is an approach to teaching high-performance skills. ARTT refers to a training paradigm that places the operator in a simulated environment that functions at faster than normal time. It represents a departure from the intuitive, but not often supported, feeling that the best practice is determined by the training environment with the highest fidelity. This approach is hypothesized to provide greater 'transfer value' per simulation trial, by incorporating training techniques and instructional features into the simulator. Two related experiments are discussed. In the first, 25 naive male subjects performed three tank gunnery tasks on a simulator under varying levels of time acceleration (i.e., 1.0x, 1.6x, 2.0x, sequential, and mixed). They were then transferred to a standard (1.0x) condition for testing. Every accelerated condition or combination of conditions produced better training and transfer than the standard condition. Most effective was the presentation of trials at 1.0x, 1.6x, and 2.0x in a random order during training. Overall, the best ARTT group scored about 50 percent higher and trained in 25 percent less time compared to the real-time control group. In the second experiment, 24 mission-capable F-16 pilots performed three tasks on a part-task F-16A flight simulator under varying levels of time compression (i.e., 1.0x, 1.5x, 2.0x, and random). All subjects were then tested in a real-time environment. The emergency procedure (EP) task results showed increased accuracy for the ARTT groups. In testing (transfer), the ARTT groups not only performed the EP more accurately, but dealt with a simultaneous enemy significantly better than a real-time control group. Although the findings on an air combat maneuvering task and stern conversion task were mixed, most measures indicated that the ARTT groups performed better and faster than a real-time control group. Other implications for ARTT are discussed along with future research directions.

Guckenberger, Dutch; Uliano, Kevin C.; Lane, Norman E.

1993-01-01

293

Approaches to Curriculum and Teaching Materials to Bring Out Better Skilled Software Engineers-An Indian Perspective  

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Development of Curriculum and delivery materials has undergone changes over a period of time, in undergraduate engineering degree system in Indian universities. However, there exists a gap between industry expectations in IT field and skills and knowledge that the graduating engineers possess and this continues to grow. A similar situation has been seen in the developed countries like USA, UK and Australia. Several researchers and practitioners have discussed and tried to come up with innovative approaches to teaching software engineering and IT as a whole. In India, it is of vital importance that steps be taken to address this issue seriously. This paper discusses some of the measures that have been implemented so that this gap is reduced and software engineers with better skills are produced. Changes to curriculum, industry-academia collaboration through conferences, sabbaticals etc., industry internships and live projects for final year students are some of the measures that have been discussed in this pap...

Padmini, H A; Nair, T R Gopalakrishnan

2010-01-01

294

Affective Characteristics and Teaching Skills of English Language Teachers: Comparing Perceptions of Elementary, Secondary and High School Students  

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Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the elementary, secondary and high school students’ perceptions on a good language teacher. The participants are 365 Turkish school students who are learning English as a foreign language. The present study has revealed that most of the student groups generally differ in terms of issues related to teaching skills when compared with the issues related to the affective skills. In the present study it has been also found that what students expect from a good English teacher is to have the ability to maintain discipline, motivate students, learn about the learner’ needs and establish good relations with them. The study also reveals striking results with respect to classroom discipline and teacher subject knowledge.

Ebru Melek Koç

2013-02-01

295

The Intercultural Communication Negotiation Simulation: An Instructional Model for Teaching/Training Intercultural Communication Skills.  

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The intercultural reality of the global marketplace necessitates effective intercultural communication and diplomatic skills training. An effective educational strategy must emphasize a balanced enhancement of learners' conceptual understanding of intercultural communication, their attitudes toward cultural differences, and the skills required for…

Samp, Jennifer A.

296

Teaching 21st Century Process Skills to Strengthen and Enhance Family and Consumer Sciences Education  

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Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals need to be equipped with a set of strategies and tools to prepare their students for the challenges they will face in the 21st century. Nationwide, educators are integrating a set of skills deemed essential for student success in college and a career. Building upon these skills and the process areas…

Mosenson, Andrea B.; Fox, Wanda S.

2011-01-01

297

Teaching Listening Skills to Young Learners through "Listen and Do" Songs  

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In this article, the author examines the use of songs to improve the listening skills of young learners. He first provides a theoretical discussion about listening skills and YLs, and about songs and YLs in general; second, he provides a sample lesson for what can be called "Listen and Do" songs for YLs at the beginning level. These are the songs…

Sevik, Mustafa

2012-01-01

298

How to Teach Thinking and Learning Skills: A Practical Programme for the Whole School  

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By helping children to form positive thinking and learning habits, and to develop a range of transferable skills, we give them the tools they need to become successful learners. This book is grounded in the best of current practice and theories surrounding thinking and learning skills. It provides a highly effective method for introducing a…

Simister, Catherine Jane

2007-01-01

299

Teaching and Assessing Critical Thinking Skills for Argument Analysis in Psychology  

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Critical thinking is a valued educational outcome; however, little is known about whether psychology courses, especially ones such as research methods courses that might be expected to promote critical thinking skills, actually improve them. We compared the acquisition of critical thinking skills for analyzing psychological arguments in 3 groups…

Bensley, D. Alan; Crowe, Deborah S.; Bernhardt, Paul; Buckner, Camille; Allman, Amanda L.

2010-01-01

300

[The effect of teaching critical thinking skills in an introductory nursing course].  

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This almost-experimental study utilized an education model to develop critical thought in a group of first year nursing students having as an objective to determine skills acquisition. Twelve weeks after its implementation the results showed the treatment statistical significance. Therefore, the instruction method utilized to promote critical thought skills produced the intended result in introductory nursing courses. PMID:7921269

de Isaacs, L G

1994-07-01

 
 
 
 
301

Using Content Reading Assignments in a Psychology Course to Teach Critical Reading Skills  

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Liberal arts students are expected to graduate college with fully developed critical reading and writing skills. However, for a variety of reasons these skills are not always as well developed as they might be--both during and upon completion of college. This paper describes a reading assignment that was designed to increase students'…

Van Camp, Debbie; Van Camp, Wesley

2013-01-01

302

Domain-Specific Knowledge and Why Teaching Generic Skills Does Not Work  

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Domain-general cognitive knowledge has frequently been used to explain skill when domain-specific knowledge held in long-term memory may provide a better explanation. An emphasis on domain-general knowledge may be misplaced if domain-specific knowledge is the primary factor driving acquired intellectual skills. We trace the long history of…

Tricot, André; Sweller, John

2014-01-01

303

Autismo e ensino de habilidades acadêmicas: adição e subtração Autism and teaching academic skills: addition and subtraction  

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Full Text Available O ensino de habilidades acadêmicas para pessoas com autismo tem recebido pouca atenção de estudos, provavelmente porque os comprometimentos clássicos do transtorno relacionados à comunicação, interação social e comportamentos são vistos como prioritários no desenvolvimento de pesquisas. Porém, o desenvolvimento de tecnologias para o ensino de habilidades acadêmicas que atinjam esse público é fundamental, principalmente na realidade brasileira em que, com o advento da filosofia de inclusão escolar, a educação de pessoas com necessidades educacionais especiais, incluindo autistas, passou a ser direcionada para a escola regular. Assim, crianças com autismo estão cada vez mais expostas aos conteúdos acadêmicos nas salas de aula regulares e estratégias de ensino adequadas às suas necessidades são fundamentais para a entrada, permanência e progresso destas pessoas na escola. Assim, este trabalho descreve o ensino de habilidades de adição e subtração para uma adolescente com autismo e utilizou procedimentos adaptados com base em descrições sobre o quadro de autismo, princípios de aprendizagem da análise experimental do comportamento, técnicas de ensino e observação direta do repertório da participante. Para as tarefas acadêmicas foram utilizados estímulos visuais - gráficos e uso das mãos - que indicavam relações visualmente óbvias para explicar à participante como as operações aritméticas deveriam ser realizadas. Gradualmente, aumentou-se a complexidade das operações ensinadas, à medida que ia aumentando o número de acertos dela nas tarefas. Esses procedimentos foram realizados no decorrer de nove sessões. Os erros e acertos foram computados e serviram para representação gráfica. Os resultados demonstram a aprendizagem gradativa das habilidades ensinadas à medida que a intervenção ocorreu.The teaching of academic skills to individuals with autism has received little attention from research literature, probably because the classical deficits in communication, reciprocal social interaction and behaviors are seen as priorities in scientific investigations. Nevertheless, the development of technologies for teaching academic skills to this population is necessary, mainly in the context of Brazilian school inclusion. People with autism are being included with greater frequency in regular classes and, consequently, need adequate strategies to learn academic contents for their entrance, permanence and progress in the schools. Many studies describe characteristics and difficulties that people with autism have, which can influence the way they learn. These variables need to be considered when planning appropriate teaching strategies for this population. Among these variables are the ways in which these individuals respond to environmental stimuli, the way they think and their typical behaviors. This study describes strategies for teaching addition and subtraction to an adolescent with autism. These teaching procedures were elaborated based on the general characteristics of autism, principles derived from Applied Behavior Analysis, and the repertoire of the participant. The results show gradual learning of the taught skills.

Camila Graciella Santos Gomes

2007-12-01

304

Improving the Teaching of Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science  

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Full Text Available It is important that engineering and computer science students learn teamwork skills as an integral part of their educational development. These skills are often not explicitly taught, but rather it is expected that students learn them on their own through participation in various team projects. Furthermore, the actual skills that students are expected to learn are usually not well articulated, or even understood. The approach outlined here attempts to address these problems by first establishing a process for defining what is meant by teamwork, by using this definition to assess the extent to which students are learning teamwork skills, and by using the assessment results to formulate approaches to improve student learning with respect to these skills. Specific attempts at the definition, assessment, and instruction improvement process are discussed.

Robert W. Lingard

2010-12-01

305

Research-Based Techniques for Teaching Early Reading Skills to Students with Intellectual Disabilities  

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Teaching students with intellectual disabilities (ID) to read is extremely challenging. Fortunately, the outlook for students with ID is improving because we now know much more about how to teach reading to students who struggle, including those with ID. The central theme of this article is that reading instruction for students with ID must be a…

Allor, Jill H.; Mathes, Patricia G.; Champlin, Tammi; Cheatham, Jennifer P.

2009-01-01

306

Technological and Technical Skills of the Teaching Faculty Members in Balqa Applied University / Jordan - In the Light of Comprehensive Quality Standards from the Viewpoint of a Number of Colleges Students  

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The aim of this study is to determine the reality of the practices of the faculty members of teaching skills in light of comprehensive quality standards from the viewpoint of Balqa applied University College students. To achieve the objective of the study the researcher designed a questionnaire included four axes on quality standards in teaching. The study found out that the teachers of these colleges have skills associated with qualities of teaching methods, strategies, teaching methods, tec...

Al Shra’ah, Ata E. M.; Al, Amal Yaseen Majali; Mohammed Abu Rumman; Awad Al-omari, Burhan M.

2012-01-01

307

The Effect Of Life-skill Training On Life Satisfaction  

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Full Text Available Background. Previous studies have found life-skill training to be effective in increasing of life satisfaction. Aim. This study initially attempts to assess the effect of Life-skill training on life satisfaction among high school students in Iran. Methods and Material.The questionnaire used in the process of study developed by the researchers. The validity and reliability rated high at a previous investigation. The sample consisted of 26 high school students in ahvaz- Iran, randomly assigned to control (n = 13 and experimental (n = 13 groups. After pre-test stage the experimental group were trained some skills (like problem solving method, decision-making, critical and creative thinking, interpersonal communications, etc. through undirected trainings such as role playing, brain storming, discussion, working in small groups.

Ahmad Farhady

2012-07-01

308

Developing Speaking and Writing Skills of L1 Arabic EFL Learners through Teaching of IPA Phonetic Codes  

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Full Text Available This exploratory study investigated the development of speaking and writing skills of L1 Arabic EFL learners based on their level of perception and understanding of phonetic transcriptions through visualisation of letter-to-symbol representations using the International Phonetic Alphabet (henceforth IPA. The participants were 169 University-level Preparatory Year Program (PYP male Saudi EFL students. The study was carried out as a pedagogical approach to improve university first year students’ pronunciation, correct speech and writing skills. The students selected attended 6, 50-minute Integrated Pronunciation Teaching (IPT lessons which included IPA transcription codes using both audio and visual teaching methods in addition to one ICT aided lesson.  Throughout those lessons, students were initially introduced to the IPA phonetic codes in gradual increase of difficulty and were encouraged to use the monolingual (English-English, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (LDCE. Two written tests and one oral test were conducted using a number of carefully selected IPA transcription codes related questions and results were analysed and interpreted. Results obtained showed slight variations between higher and lower ability students in understanding the IPA transcription codes. As a whole, however, the results indicated that students reached a high level of understanding of letter-to-symbol representations – the IPA system - and oral test results proved that phonological awareness can help Saudi students at tertiary level education improve their writing and speaking skills. Above all, learning the phonetic transcription codes helped them develop a sense of autonomy and competence when using monolingual dictionaries. The study concluded with a brief discussion of the ramifications of the study and the potential for further research.

Hussam Rajab

2013-04-01

309

ssessment of Learner Acceptance and Satisfaction with Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance  

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Full Text Available As video-based instructional materials become available to distance learners to learn practical skills at a distance, it is important to assess the instructional effectiveness of these materials and to understand how students respond to them. This paper is the second part of a larger exploratory study that assessed the instructional effectiveness of video-based instructional materials for teaching distance learners practical skills in block-laying and concreting and how learners respond to these instructional materials. Specifically, this paper aims to assess learners’ acceptance and satisfaction with the materials. It also aims to determine whether levels of learner satisfaction and acceptance differ according to study centres. Data were collected from 71 respondents at three study centres using a self-completion questionnaire comprising 17 Likert-type items. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Scheffe’s post hoc test at a 0.05 level of significance. Learners appeared positive about their learning experiences with the use of video-based instructional materials to learn practical skills at a distance as they rated highly all the items assessing their acceptance and satisfaction. Results of item-by-item ANOVA regarding learner acceptance indicated that the respondents, categorized according to study centres, exhibited similar levels of acceptance for nine of the ten items. For learner satisfaction, there were no statistically significant differences for six of the seven items. Thus, learners of different study centres exhibited about the same level of acceptance and satisfaction.

Francis Donkor

2011-06-01

310

Comparison the Effect of Teaching of SBAR Technique with Role Play and Lecturing on Communication Skill of Nurses  

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Introduction: Ineffective communication is a main factor in engender of unwanted hospital errors and impede suitable patient care. SBAR technique (Situation-Background- Assessment- Recommendation) is a standard tool for building communication among healthcare professionals. While educating the SBAR technique requires appropriate educational methods, but this issue has been less investigated. So, the aim of present study was to compare the effect of educating the SBAR technique with role play and lecturing on communication skills of nurses in transferring patients to next shift. Methods: This quasi-experimental study conducted by participating 78 nurses who assigned to role play and lecturing groups randomly. SBAR technique was educated to each group separately. At the end of the learning session in each group, the skills of the participants in performing SBAR technique were investigated by the standard SBAR scale. Data analysis was performed by using SPSS statistical software version 11.5. Results: Comparison the total score of performing SBAR technique using independent samples t-test showed statistical differences between mean score of role play and lecturing groups. Similarly, comparison the scores of skill in performing each four parts of SBAR technique showed statistical differences between two groups. Conclusion: Role play is an effective educational method in teaching SBAR technique for nurses and it can be used as a tool for build effective communication between healthcare professionals. PMID:25276757

Toghian Chaharsoughi, Narges; Ahrari, Shahnaz; Alikhah, Shahnaz

2014-01-01

311

PILOTing Undergraduate Students to Hands-On Teaching and Research Skills  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Undergraduate research can make a positive impact on science education. Unfortunately, the one student-one mentor paradigm of undergraduate research generates a wide range of variability in the student’s experience and further limits its availability to a select few students. In contrast, a single faculty member can offer multiple undergraduate teaching positions that provide a consistent experience for the student. We attempted to combine the undergraduate research and teaching experiences...

Ken Teter; Nicole Verity; Borgon, Robert A.

2013-01-01

312

Teachers' intentions with outdoor teaching in school forests : Skills and knowledge teachers want students to develop  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

There is an interest among Swedish teachers to locate teaching outdoors. This study focuses on four teachers in grades 4-6, to explore their intentions and objectives with regular teaching outdoors. Data sources consist of semi-structured interviews, descriptions on successful activities, and reflections on metaphors.   The use of intentional analysis and Bloom’s revised taxonomy on teachers’ objectives show that the teachers stress the out-of-school learning that draws on the actual wo...

Wilhelmsson, Birgitta; Ottander, Christina; Lidestav, Gun

2012-01-01

313

LA EVALUACIÓN DE COMPETENCIAS DOCENTES EN EL MODELO DECA: ANCLAJES TEÓRICOS / ASSESSMENT OF TEACHING SKILLS IN THE DECA MODEL: THEORETICAL ANCHORS  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish En este artículo se analizan algunos anclajes teóricos del Modelo para el Desarrollo y Evaluación de Competencias Académicas. Inicialmente se revisa el concepto de competencias y sus posibilidades de trasladarlo a momentos de práctica docente y de evaluación de competencias. Específicamente, se abor [...] dan conceptos relacionados con competencias y competencias docentes. De los dos dispositivos que el modelo integra, aquí se aborda el de evaluación de competencias docentes, concebido como un momento más de su desarrollo y se proponen estrategias e instrumentos centrados en la evaluación auténtica de competencias docentes que permitan evaluar profesores en procesos de formación centrados en sus producciones. Dentro del modelo, se destaca al portafolio docente como una estrategia para la formación y evaluación de profesores y como un dispositivo de práctica reflexiva que contribuye a los procesos de formación y evaluación de competencias docentes. Abstract in english This article discusses some theoretical anchors of the Model for Development and Assessment of Academic Skills. It initially reviews the concept of skills and the possibility of going to moments of teaching practice and skill assessment. It specifically addresses concepts related to skills and teach [...] ing skills. We herein address one of the two devices included in the model: the assessment of teaching skills, conceived as one more moments of their development; strategies and tools are proposed focused on an authentic assessment of teaching skills to evaluate teachers in their training processes, focusing on their productions. Within this model, the Teaching Portfolio is stressed as a strategy to train and evaluate teachers.

Rigoberto, Marín; Isabel, Guzmán; Amelia, Márquez; Manuel, Peña.

314

Tapping the Potential of Skill Integration as a Conduit for Communicative Language Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this classroom-based study was to discover the kinds of skill integration tasks that were employed by English teachers in Kuwait and to measure their attitudes toward implementing the skill integration technique in their classrooms. Data collection involved recording 25 hours of classroom-based observations, conducting interviews with the same group of teachers, and distributing a survey to further explore the teachers’ attitudes toward the skill integration technique. Data analysis involved categorizing skill integration tasks, analyzing the interview data, and counting the means and standard deviations of the survey data. Findings indicated that the participating teachers performed a wide range of transactional and interactional tasks that involved the simultaneous integration of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in their classrooms. The findings also revealed that even though the skill integration technique was adopted by most of the English teachers, they were ambivalent toward its implementation in their classrooms. This was partly due to the negative washback effect of traditional English tests that measure students’ accurate application of grammar rules but not their fluency and ability to use the L2 as a tool for communication. Implications for L2 pedagogy were drawn regarding the need for teachers to expose students of all proficiency levels to both transactional and interactional tasks in the classroom. To counter the negative washback effect of conventional discrete-point tests, English teachers were encouraged to develop communicative tests that involve skill integration and emphasize the development of the four language skills in their daily classroom activities.

Shu-hua Wu

2014-10-01

315

Práctica docente en contextos multiculturales:: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales / Practice Teaching in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Costa Rica | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El presente artículo proviene de una investigación titulada Ejercicios docentes en contextos multiculturales: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales, realizada durante el 2011-2012, por el Departamento de Estudios e Investigación Educativa del Ministerio de Educación Pú [...] blica (Escalante, Fernández y Gaete, 2012), con la finalidad de explorar la diversidad cultural en las aulas e instituciones educativas en Costa Rica. Este fenómeno multicultural ha obligado a prestar especial atención a la oferta educativa que se brinda, principalmente, en primaria. Además, ha generado la discusión con respecto a los vacíos conceptuales y pedagógicos en el personal y en sus habilidades y destrezas en el proceso de enseñanza de estas poblaciones de origen distinto. De igual manera se impone una reflexión de los currículos educativos, los que resultan mayoritariamente nacionales y básicos. El estudio se realizó en 12 instituciones de primaria de diferente direcciones regionales, que tienen una alta diversidad cultural entre el alumnado. Por medio de técnicas cualitativas de investigación se explora las opiniones de directores, docentes y estudiantes al respecto. La conclusión más importante a la que se ha llegado es la ausencia de una pedagogía intercultural en las aulas nacionales y la necesidad de preparar al cuerpo docente en este sentido. Abstract in english This paper presents the results of a research project entitled Teaching Exercises in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills, which was conducted during 2011-2012 by the Department of Teaching Research and Studies from the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education [...] (Escalante, Fernández and Gaete, 2012), in order to explore cultural diversity in classrooms and educational institutions in Costa Rica. This multicultural phenomenon has forced authorities to pay special attention to the educational services provided, particularly in elementary. In addition, it has sparked a discussion regarding the teachers’ conceptual and pedagogical void and a gap in their teaching skills to deal with student populations of different origins. Similarly, it leads to a reflection about the basic national educational curriculum. The research was conducted in 12 elementary schools from different educational districts, which have a high cultural diversity among students. Using qualitative research techniques, the opinions of principals, teachers and students regarding this topic are explored. The most important conclusion reached in this study is the absence of an intercultural pedagogy in the country’s classrooms and the need to prepare teachers in this respect.

Cristina, Escalante Rivera; David, Fernández Obando; Marcelo, Gaete Astica.

2014-08-01

316

Práctica docente en contextos multiculturales:: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales / Practice Teaching in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Costa Rica | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El presente artículo proviene de una investigación titulada Ejercicios docentes en contextos multiculturales: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales, realizada durante el 2011-2012, por el Departamento de Estudios e Investigación Educativa del Ministerio de Educación Pú [...] blica (Escalante, Fernández y Gaete, 2012), con la finalidad de explorar la diversidad cultural en las aulas e instituciones educativas en Costa Rica. Este fenómeno multicultural ha obligado a prestar especial atención a la oferta educativa que se brinda, principalmente, en primaria. Además, ha generado la discusión con respecto a los vacíos conceptuales y pedagógicos en el personal y en sus habilidades y destrezas en el proceso de enseñanza de estas poblaciones de origen distinto. De igual manera se impone una reflexión de los currículos educativos, los que resultan mayoritariamente nacionales y básicos. El estudio se realizó en 12 instituciones de primaria de diferente direcciones regionales, que tienen una alta diversidad cultural entre el alumnado. Por medio de técnicas cualitativas de investigación se explora las opiniones de directores, docentes y estudiantes al respecto. La conclusión más importante a la que se ha llegado es la ausencia de una pedagogía intercultural en las aulas nacionales y la necesidad de preparar al cuerpo docente en este sentido. Abstract in english This paper presents the results of a research project entitled Teaching Exercises in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills, which was conducted during 2011-2012 by the Department of Teaching Research and Studies from the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education [...] (Escalante, Fernández and Gaete, 2012), in order to explore cultural diversity in classrooms and educational institutions in Costa Rica. This multicultural phenomenon has forced authorities to pay special attention to the educational services provided, particularly in elementary. In addition, it has sparked a discussion regarding the teachers’ conceptual and pedagogical void and a gap in their teaching skills to deal with student populations of different origins. Similarly, it leads to a reflection about the basic national educational curriculum. The research was conducted in 12 elementary schools from different educational districts, which have a high cultural diversity among students. Using qualitative research techniques, the opinions of principals, teachers and students regarding this topic are explored. The most important conclusion reached in this study is the absence of an intercultural pedagogy in the country’s classrooms and the need to prepare teachers in this respect.

Cristina, Escalante Rivera; David, Fernández Obando; Marcelo, Gaete Astica.

317

Herramientas informáticas para la aplicación de técnicas de desarrollo de pensamiento creativo / Computing tools for the application of creative thinking development techniques  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Venezuela | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El sistema educativo no escapa a la renovación de las técnicas para incentivar el pensamiento innovador. El objetivo de esta reflexión monográfica es mostrar la relación entre el desarrollo de la creatividad y los usos de los softwares educativos. Las técnicas seleccionadas son, el mapa mental y el [...] de conceptos, el mandala y las supernotas. Y los softwares empleados, son el Mind Manager, el Inspiración y el CMap Tool. El procedimiento hace referencia a los fundamentos teóricos argumentados por los autores y, a una descripción de las bondades de los tres softwares seleccionados. Como reflexión final se puede decir que los softwares seleccionados cumplen la función de herramienta mental-tecnológica, al desarrollar habilidades para procesar información de forma creativa. Abstract in english The educational system does not escape to renewing the techniques to motivate innovative thinking. The goal of this monographic reflection is to show the relation between creativity development and education software uses. The chosen techniques are, mental and concept map, the mandala and super note [...] -taking. The software used is the Mind Manager, Inspiration, and the CMap Tool. The procedure refers to the theoretical fundaments argued by the authors and, to a description of the goodness of the software used. As a final reflection it can be said that the software work as a mental-technological tool, by developing skills to process information in a creative way.

Anny, Castillo Rojas.

2008-12-01

318

Teaching toilet skills in a public school setting to a child with pervasive developmental disorder.  

Science.gov (United States)

An 8-year old boy with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) was taught toileting skills within a public elementary school. During baseline, he never urinated successfully in the toilet and wore a disposable diaper throughout the day. The training program included scheduling a toileting opportunity at a time that increased the likelihood of urination and providing positive reinforcement when voiding in the toilet occurred. Toileting skills were established rapidly and were maintained when another bathroom visit was added to the toileting schedule, primary reinforcement was eliminated, and the boy no longer wore a disposable diaper. Issues related to behavioral support programming within inclusive educational settings are discussed. PMID:9194013

Luiselli, J K

1997-06-01

319

O ensino de habilidades e atitudes: um relato de experiências / Teaching of attitudes and skills: an experience report  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo relata a experiência do ensino de Habilidades e Atitudes, na graduação em Medicina da Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL) com a metodologia de ensino da Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas, ancorada no modelo biopsicossocial. O ensino de Habilidades e Atitudes implica a formulação diag [...] nóstica mutiaxial, descrição contextual e padronizada da condição clínica. Utiliza como instrumento a avaliação sistemática de eixos e domínios altamente informativos e relevantes para o tratamento. Eixo I: transtornos clínicos (mentais e condições médicas gerais); Eixo II: incapacidades nos cuidados pessoais, funcionamento ocupacional e com a família, e funcionamento social mais amplo; Eixo III: fatores contextuais (problemas interpessoais e outros psicossociais e ambientais); Eixo IV: qualidade de vida (refletindo primariamente as percepções do próprio paciente). A competência clínica foi avaliada por meio da discussão de casos clínicos, portfólios reflexivos e pelo Exame Clínico Estruturado por Objetivo (Osce), método que avalia as habilidades clínicas, as habilidades de atitudes e a comunicação dos estudantes de Medicina. Abstract in english This article describes an experience of teaching Attitudes and Skills in a medical course at the Londrina State University using the methodology of Problem-Based Learning grounded in a biopsychosocial model. The teaching of Attitudes and Skills requires from teachers a multi-axial diagnostic formula [...] tion in a contextual and standardized description of the clinical condition through a number of highly informative, therapeutically significant and systematically assessed axes or domains. The assessment of a patient should lead to multi-axial diagnostic formulation in a systematically assessed axes or domains. Axis I: clinical disorders (mental and general medical conditions); Axis II: disabilities (in personal care, occupational functioning, functioning with family, and broader social functioning); Axis III: contextual factors (interpersonal and other psychosocial and environmental problems); Axis IV: quality of life (primarily reflecting patient's self-perceptions).The assessment of clinical competence was performed through the discussion of clinical cases, the use of reflexive portfolios, and Objective Structured Clinical Exams (Osce), a method to evaluate the medical students' clinical skills, attitudes and communications skills.

Sandra Odebrecht Vargas, Nunes; Evelin Massae Ogatta, Muraguchi; Olavo Franco, Ferreira Filho; Rose Meire Albuquerque, Pontes; Lucienne Tibery Queiroz, Cardoso; Cíntia Magalhães Carvalho, Grion; Renata Maciulis, Dip; Luiz Carlos Lúcio, Carvalho.

320

O ensino de habilidades e atitudes: um relato de experiências / Teaching of attitudes and skills: an experience report  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo relata a experiência do ensino de Habilidades e Atitudes, na graduação em Medicina da Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL) com a metodologia de ensino da Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas, ancorada no modelo biopsicossocial. O ensino de Habilidades e Atitudes implica a formulação diag [...] nóstica mutiaxial, descrição contextual e padronizada da condição clínica. Utiliza como instrumento a avaliação sistemática de eixos e domínios altamente informativos e relevantes para o tratamento. Eixo I: transtornos clínicos (mentais e condições médicas gerais); Eixo II: incapacidades nos cuidados pessoais, funcionamento ocupacional e com a família, e funcionamento social mais amplo; Eixo III: fatores contextuais (problemas interpessoais e outros psicossociais e ambientais); Eixo IV: qualidade de vida (refletindo primariamente as percepções do próprio paciente). A competência clínica foi avaliada por meio da discussão de casos clínicos, portfólios reflexivos e pelo Exame Clínico Estruturado por Objetivo (Osce), método que avalia as habilidades clínicas, as habilidades de atitudes e a comunicação dos estudantes de Medicina. Abstract in english This article describes an experience of teaching Attitudes and Skills in a medical course at the Londrina State University using the methodology of Problem-Based Learning grounded in a biopsychosocial model. The teaching of Attitudes and Skills requires from teachers a multi-axial diagnostic formula [...] tion in a contextual and standardized description of the clinical condition through a number of highly informative, therapeutically significant and systematically assessed axes or domains. The assessment of a patient should lead to multi-axial diagnostic formulation in a systematically assessed axes or domains. Axis I: clinical disorders (mental and general medical conditions); Axis II: disabilities (in personal care, occupational functioning, functioning with family, and broader social functioning); Axis III: contextual factors (interpersonal and other psychosocial and environmental problems); Axis IV: quality of life (primarily reflecting patient's self-perceptions).The assessment of clinical competence was performed through the discussion of clinical cases, the use of reflexive portfolios, and Objective Structured Clinical Exams (Osce), a method to evaluate the medical students' clinical skills, attitudes and communications skills.

Sandra Odebrecht Vargas, Nunes; Evelin Massae Ogatta, Muraguchi; Olavo Franco, Ferreira Filho; Rose Meire Albuquerque, Pontes; Lucienne Tibery Queiroz, Cardoso; Cíntia Magalhães Carvalho, Grion; Renata Maciulis, Dip; Luiz Carlos Lúcio, Carvalho.

2013-03-01

 
 
 
 
321

Effective Methods for Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Undergraduate Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective The objective of this systematic review was to assess which library instruction methods are most effective for improving the information skills of students at an introductory, undergraduate level, using cognitive outcomes (measuring changes in knowledge. The study sought to address the following questions: 1 What is the overall state of research on this topic? 2 Which teaching methods are more effective? Methods This project utilised systematic review methodology. Researchers searched fifteen databases and retrieved 4,356 potentially relevant citations. They reviewed the titles and abstracts for relevance, and of those, 257 complete articles were considered in-depth using a predetermined inclusion/exclusion form. There were 122 unique studies that met the inclusion criteria and were subjected to an extensive data extraction and critical appraisal process. Of these studies, 55 met author?defined quality criteria to provide information on the effectiveness of different teaching methods. From this review there was a final group of 16 studies with sufficient information to enable meta-analyses and calculations of standardized mean differences. Results The overwhelming majority of studies were conducted in the United States (88%. Experimental or quasi-experimental research methods were used in 79 studies (65%. Teaching methods used in the studies varied, with the majority focused on traditional methods of teaching, followed by computer assisted instruction (CAI, and self?directed independent learning (SDIL. Studies measured outcomes that correlated with Bloom’s lower levels of learning (‘Remember’, ‘Understand’, ‘Apply’. Sixteen studies compared traditional instruction (TI with no instruction, and twelve of those found a positive outcome. Meta-analysis of the data from 4 of these studies agreed with the positive conclusions favouring TI. Fourteen studies compared CAI with traditional instruction (TI, and 9 of these showed a neutral result. Meta-analysis of 8 of these studies agreed with this neutral result. Another group of 6 studies compared SDIL with no instruction, and meta-analysis of 5 of these agreed that the result was positive in favour of SDIL. Conclusion Based on the results of the meta-analysis, there is sufficient evidence to suggest that CAI is as effective as TI. Evidence also suggests that both TI and SDIL are more effective than no instruction. Additional comparative research needs to be done across different teaching methods. Studies comparing active learning (AL, CAI, and SDIL would greatly enrich the research literature. Further studies utilizing appropriate methodologies and validated research tools would enrich our evidence base, and contribute to the growth of knowledge about effectiveness of particular teaching methods.

Denise Koufogiannakis

2006-09-01

322

Teaching Play Analysis: How a Key Dramaturgical Skill Can Foster Critical Approaches.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes the development of an introductory theater course which encourages students to fashion well-informed views of plays. Notes that the skills fostered in this course could start students on the road to becoming active, critically informed practitioners in whatever role they chose to take on in production. Explains that the course…

Orr, Shelley

2003-01-01

323

Teaching Cooking Skills to Young Women with Mild Intellectual Disability: The Effectiveness of Internet Websites  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using streaming video websites to improve, maintain, and generalize the cooking (meal-making) skills of four young women (18-22 years old) diagnosed with intellectual disabilities. A pre-experimental design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based multimedia…

Alqahtani, Hanadi Hussein; Schoenfeld, Naomi A.

2014-01-01

324

Using Video to Teach Social Skills to Secondary Students with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

Many students with disabilities have difficulty acquiring social skills, especially those necessary for employment. Students with autism struggle because of problems with (1) theory of mind; (2) reading facial expressions; (3) auditory processing problems; and (4) a lack of exposure to social conventions. Virtual reality and video have been used…

Parsons, Lynn D.

2006-01-01

325

Teaching Online Social Skills to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often lack appropriate social skills. This deficit can lead to negative outcomes including peer and teacher rejection, increased behavioral problems at school, and decreased academic achievement. In order to improve the social outcomes of students with emotional and behavioral disorders, teachers…

Morgan, Joseph John

2012-01-01

326

Applying Analogical Reasoning Techniques for Teaching XML Document Querying Skills in Database Classes  

Science.gov (United States)

XML has become the most ubiquitous format for exchange of data between applications running on the Internet. Most Web Services provide their information to clients in the form of XML. The ability to process complex XML documents in order to extract relevant information is becoming as important a skill for IS students to master as querying…

Mitri, Michel

2012-01-01

327

Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine Skills through a Residency-Developed Guideline.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes a curriculum intended to culminate in a resident-produced, evidence-based guideline for the care of patients with diabetes. Evaluation of the curriculum showed that learners appreciated the skills and knowledge gained in devising guidelines in an evidence-based manner but were uncertain that their searches were complete. Clinical…

Epling, John; Smucny, John; Patil, Anita; Tudiver, Fred

2002-01-01

328

Let's Teach Unskilled Readers like Skilled Readers: A Closer Look at Meaning-Based Instruction.  

Science.gov (United States)

Analyzes transcripts of four reading lessons based on the Kamehameha Reading Program (emphasizing discussion and oral language within group reading lessons) given to three low-ability second grade readers. Identifies six components important to reading success, including contextual-based lessons, minimal skills instruction, and active quests for…

Dowhower, Sarah L.; Speidel, Gisela E.

1989-01-01

329

Metacognition Needed: Teaching Middle and High School Students to Develop Strategic Learning Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Students' ineffective learning strategies are linked to poor metacognition, revealing that struggling learners have not developed the practical "figure it out" skills to succeed in academic challenges. Well-documented research has noted the positive effect of self-reflective learning on students' academic and personal development. Also,…

Joseph, Nancy

2009-01-01

330

Teaching Composition Skills with Weekly Multiple Choice Tests in Lieu of Theme Writing. Final Report.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness with which composition skills could be taught by the traditional theme-assignment approach and by an experimental method using weekly multiple-choice composition tests in lieu of theme writing. The weekly tests were based on original but typical first-draft compositions and covered problems…

Scannell, Dale P.; Haugh, Oscar M.

331

Minimum Knowledge and Skills Objectives for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Teaching.  

Science.gov (United States)

This publication brings together statements concerning the minimum knowledge and skills objectives in alcohol and other drug abuse determined by the professional organizations of six medical specialties: pediatrics; emergency medicine; obstetrics and gynecology; psychiatry; general internal medicine; and family medicine for undergraduate,…

American Psychiatric Association, Hartford, CT.

332

Using Public-Speaking Skills for Teaching Improvement in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

By using public speaking skills, typical classroom problem areas can be reduced or eliminated. During the first five minutes of class, instructors can orient their audience by reviewing information from the previous class, or gain attention with an interesting story, quote, or humorous incident related to the subject matter. To avoid wasting the…

Weiss, Peter E.; And Others

333

The Relationship between the Information Technology Skills Acquired by Secretarial Teachers in Nigeria Colleges of Education and Their Utilization of Internet for Effective Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study established the relationship between the Information Technology skills acquired by Secretarial Teachersin Nigerian Colleges of Education and their utilization of Internet for effective teaching. 250 Secretarial Teachersdrawn from 58 Accredited Nigerian Colleges of Education responded to the questionnaire that was divided into 4parts. The questionnaire was used to obtained information on the respondents’ Bio-data and computer usebackground, Teacher Information Technology Skill Acquisition Competence (TITSC, Teacher InformationTechnology Skills Usage (TITSU, Teacher Information Technology Internet Knowledge (TITIK, and The extent ofusage of Internet information to teach the Secretarial courses. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics andPearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficientat 0.01 level of significance. Using Choudhury’s Range, there was amoderate positive correlation or relationship between the IT skills of Secretarial Teachers and the ability to useinternet to access information for effective teaching. The implication of this result is that, if the secretarial teachers aremore competent in their IT skills, then the more will they be enabled to access information from the Internet foreffective teaching. In this study it was found that the secretarial teachers were not knowledgeable in the use of somevital and important Internet instructional delivery tools. Secretarial Teachers in the Nigeria Colleges of Educationlacked some vital Information Technology skills such as, ability to operate data base, ability to extract relevantinformation using integrated software packages, ability to extract information using electronic mails and applicationsoftware, ability to use voice recognition system and ability to operate other different technologies and appreciatetheir benefits. It was therefore recommended that, National Commission of Colleges of Education should bringtogether all the secretarial education stakeholders: curriculum experts, the teachers, representatives of ministries andindustries; to revisit the existing curriculum. The integration of latest Information Technology practices and therequisite Internet skills which the Secretarial Teachers lack, will reposition Secretarial Studies programme to meetthe challenges of an IT driven classroom.

Adeshina, Tunde Joel

2013-04-01

334

The Impact of Different Teaching Methods on Students' Arithmetic and Self-Regulated Learning Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study examines the effect of three different structured methods, traditional, independent and problem-solving, of teaching children arithmetic in the beginning of 7th grade in Sweden, age 13 years. The progress made by these students is presented by measures of their arithmetic ability, calculation and quantitative concept, as well as…

Samuelsson, Joakim

2008-01-01

335

Increasing the Skills of Children with Developmental Disabilities through Staff Training in Behavioral Teaching Techniques  

Science.gov (United States)

Two staff members working in different preschools received training in the form of instructions, modeling, immediate feedback, and social reinforcement of good performance. Effects of training were assessed with a multiple baseline ABCDCDCD design. Correct use of basic behavioral teaching techniques increased from 16-31% to 92-95% and the rate of…

Petursdottir, Anna-Lind; Sigurdardottir, Zuilma Gabriela

2006-01-01

336

Preparing Adult Educators: The Need to Develop Communicative Language Teaching Skills in College-Level Instructors  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper examines why communicative language teaching (CLT) fails to improve student learning in certain contexts by assessing two adult educators' communicative and noncommunicative practices through qualitative case studies, interviews, and participant observations. Results show no inherent CLT problems that prevent teachers from grasping…

Shawer, Saad

2013-01-01

337

Reading Clinic: Use Brand-Name Products to Teach Basic Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents phonic activities based on brand names for teaching primary students basic reading. The first uses familiar brand-name products with rhyming elements in their names. The second has teachers write longer words that rhyme with and have similar spelling patterns to product names. Both activities help students use patterns in familiar words…

Cunningham, Patricia

1998-01-01

338

A Comparative Study on the Effects of Core and Peripheral Teaching on Iranian EFL Learners’ Writing Skill in Conventional and Cyber Environments  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

This study aimed to find outthe effects of core and peripheral teaching on Iranian EFL learners’ writing skills in conventional and cyber environments. After administrating a Nelson (Fowler and Coe, 1976 test, a group of 160 homogeneous students at language institute were selected from a total population of 200 at the intermediate level in Dehdasht, Kohgiloyeh & Boyer Ahmad province, Iran. Then, they were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups and each into subgroups. While experimental sub-group A was assigned to physical (conventional environment and received instructions regarding core and peripheral teaching, experimental sub-group B was assigned to cyber environment and received instructions regarding core and peripheral teaching. One sub-control group was assigned to physical environment and received no instruction, while the other control subgroup was assigned cyber environment. A T-test was conducted to compare the subjects’ means and to determine the effect of core and peripheral teaching. The results depicted that peripheral teaching in both physical and cyber environments had a significant effect on improving Iranian EFL learners’ writing skills, (P<.05.

Key words: Core teaching; Peripheral teaching; Conventional environment; Cyber environments

Seyyed Mohammad Reza Yousefi Far

2012-04-01

339

O pensamento criativo de Paul Klee: arte e música na constituição da Teoria da Forma The creative thinking of Paul Klee: art and music in the formation of the Theory of Form  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Estudo sobre a Teoria da Forma concebida no início do século XX pelo artista plástico Paul Klee e publicado no livro O Pensamento Criativo (KLEE, 1920. A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é uma demonstração do pensamento artístico que adota pressupostos formais, previamente estabelecidos para resultar na prática da representação artística. Klee identificou as relações formais entre a música e as artes visuais, apresentando conexões entre a linha melódica e a linha no desenho; o ritmo e as seqüências de módulos e sub-módulos; os tempos dos compassos e as divisões da pintura; a métrica da música e a modulação da forma e da cor nas artes visuais. Klee também apresentou suas experiências com superposição de cores e texturas para representar visualmente a polifonia. A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é um exemplo de estudo que pressupõe modelos formais para a elaboração artística e projetual.Study on the Theory of Form conceived in the early twentieth century by artist Paul Klee and published in the book The Creative Thinking (KLEE, 1920. The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is a demonstration of an artistic thought that adopts the previously established formal prerequisites that result in the practice of artistic representation. Klee identified the formal relationship between music and the visual arts, providing connections between the melodic line and the line in the drawing, rhythm and sequence of modules and sub-modules, the pulses of the measures and the divisions of the painting, metrics in music and the modulation of shape and color in the visual arts. Klee also presented his experiences with overlapping colors and textures to visually represent polyphony. The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is an example of a study that requires formal models for the artistic and design elaboration.

Rosana Costa Ramalho de Castro

2010-01-01

340

O pensamento criativo de Paul Klee: arte e música na constituição da Teoria da Forma / The creative thinking of Paul Klee: art and music in the formation of the Theory of Form  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Estudo sobre a Teoria da Forma concebida no início do século XX pelo artista plástico Paul Klee e publicado no livro O Pensamento Criativo (KLEE, 1920). A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é uma demonstração do pensamento artístico que adota pressupostos formais, previamente estabelecidos para resultar n [...] a prática da representação artística. Klee identificou as relações formais entre a música e as artes visuais, apresentando conexões entre a linha melódica e a linha no desenho; o ritmo e as seqüências de módulos e sub-módulos; os tempos dos compassos e as divisões da pintura; a métrica da música e a modulação da forma e da cor nas artes visuais. Klee também apresentou suas experiências com superposição de cores e texturas para representar visualmente a polifonia. A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é um exemplo de estudo que pressupõe modelos formais para a elaboração artística e projetual. Abstract in english Study on the Theory of Form conceived in the early twentieth century by artist Paul Klee and published in the book The Creative Thinking (KLEE, 1920). The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is a demonstration of an artistic thought that adopts the previously established formal prerequisites that result in [...] the practice of artistic representation. Klee identified the formal relationship between music and the visual arts, providing connections between the melodic line and the line in the drawing, rhythm and sequence of modules and sub-modules, the pulses of the measures and the divisions of the painting, metrics in music and the modulation of shape and color in the visual arts. Klee also presented his experiences with overlapping colors and textures to visually represent polyphony. The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is an example of a study that requires formal models for the artistic and design elaboration.

Rosana Costa Ramalho de, Castro.

 
 
 
 
341

The Effect of Teaching Practical Physical Modalities on the Ordering Skills of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residents  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Physical modalities are performed by physiotherapists based on physiatrists’ orders, so the residents pay less attention to the need and importance of learning the practical modalities. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of teaching the practical aspects of modalities to residents of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in order to improve their skills and attitudes toward ordering and doing physical modalities. Methods: In an interventional, before after study, all residents of physical medicine and rehabilitation, took the medical history of the patients willingly participatedand performed physical examinationand ordered physical modalities. They were also assessed by performing the modalities on the patient. Following the primary assessment, an experienced physiotherapist taught the residents how to do physical modalities. After the practical education, residents were assessed by ordering the modalities and performing them on simulated patients. Their satisfaction of the educational program was evaluated after the intervention. Results: The mean scores of using modalities before and after the education were 23.08± 5.50 and 52±10.18 respectively (p=0.0001. The mean scores of ordering the modalities before and after the education were 1 and 1.66 (p=0.038. The mean score of satisfaction was 91.66±8.74 out of 100. Conclusion: Since physical medicine and rehabilitation residents and specialists who order physical modalities for patients do not perform it on their own patients, teaching the practical physical modalities can improve their skills. The satisfaction rate of residents with the course was very high.

Bina Eftekhar Sadat

2013-05-01

342

Autismo e ensino de habilidades acadêmicas: adição e subtração / Autism and teaching academic skills: addition and subtraction  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese O ensino de habilidades acadêmicas para pessoas com autismo tem recebido pouca atenção de estudos, provavelmente porque os comprometimentos clássicos do transtorno relacionados à comunicação, interação social e comportamentos são vistos como prioritários no desenvolvimento de pesquisas. Porém, o des [...] envolvimento de tecnologias para o ensino de habilidades acadêmicas que atinjam esse público é fundamental, principalmente na realidade brasileira em que, com o advento da filosofia de inclusão escolar, a educação de pessoas com necessidades educacionais especiais, incluindo autistas, passou a ser direcionada para a escola regular. Assim, crianças com autismo estão cada vez mais expostas aos conteúdos acadêmicos nas salas de aula regulares e estratégias de ensino adequadas às suas necessidades são fundamentais para a entrada, permanência e progresso destas pessoas na escola. Assim, este trabalho descreve o ensino de habilidades de adição e subtração para uma adolescente com autismo e utilizou procedimentos adaptados com base em descrições sobre o quadro de autismo, princípios de aprendizagem da análise experimental do comportamento, técnicas de ensino e observação direta do repertório da participante. Para as tarefas acadêmicas foram utilizados estímulos visuais - gráficos e uso das mãos - que indicavam relações visualmente óbvias para explicar à participante como as operações aritméticas deveriam ser realizadas. Gradualmente, aumentou-se a complexidade das operações ensinadas, à medida que ia aumentando o número de acertos dela nas tarefas. Esses procedimentos foram realizados no decorrer de nove sessões. Os erros e acertos foram computados e serviram para representação gráfica. Os resultados demonstram a aprendizagem gradativa das habilidades ensinadas à medida que a intervenção ocorreu. Abstract in english The teaching of academic skills to individuals with autism has received little attention from research literature, probably because the classical deficits in communication, reciprocal social interaction and behaviors are seen as priorities in scientific investigations. Nevertheless, the development [...] of technologies for teaching academic skills to this population is necessary, mainly in the context of Brazilian school inclusion. People with autism are being included with greater frequency in regular classes and, consequently, need adequate strategies to learn academic contents for their entrance, permanence and progress in the schools. Many studies describe characteristics and difficulties that people with autism have, which can influence the way they learn. These variables need to be considered when planning appropriate teaching strategies for this population. Among these variables are the ways in which these individuals respond to environmental stimuli, the way they think and their typical behaviors. This study describes strategies for teaching addition and subtraction to an adolescent with autism. These teaching procedures were elaborated based on the general characteristics of autism, principles derived from Applied Behavior Analysis, and the repertoire of the participant. The results show gradual learning of the taught skills.

Camila Graciella Santos, Gomes.

343

The Effects of Multimedia Software Instruction and Lecture-based Instruction on Learning and Teaching Cues of Manipulative Skills on Preservice Physical Education Teachers.  

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Investigated the effects of multimedia-based instruction versus lecture-based instruction on teaching cognitive components of manipulative skills to physical education majors. Comparison of control, multimedia, and lecture group students' pretests and posttests indicated that though there were no significant differences in scores between the…

McKethan, Robert; Everhart, Brett; Sanders, Renee

2001-01-01

344

The Effectiveness of a Constant Time Delay Procedure on Teaching Lifetime Sport Skills to Adolescents with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities.  

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A constant time delay (CTD) procedure was used to teach four adolescents with severe/profound intellectual disabilities to perform bowling, throwing, and putting. Results indicated that the adolescents could be effectively taught gross motor lifetime sport skills with the CTD procedure and that verbal description plus physical assistance could be…

Zhang, Jiabei; And Others

1995-01-01

345

Soft Skills Communication Teaching to Technical Students:A Vital Role of an English Faculty  

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Full Text Available The present paper discusses about the students to enhance presentation skills in working culture and developing themselves in front of anybody. The English faculty dictates the latest technology and innovative methods to be adopted by the students. English faculties are responsible for managing and monitoring students learning. English language is a systematic means of communication by the use of sound or conventional symbols. Our mind develops through thinking and impossible without language, so English language shows the engineering students to be participative in global movements for their carrier. A good faculty helps to enhance student's soft skills to present in environment. Faculty dictates to the students how vocabulary can be by wrote and English speaking practice. Motivate and change attitudes of the students can be formatted by the faculty into right path and evaluates the students, in which way students can be learnt easily. My paper also concludes the role of an English faculty in engineering colleges and technical education.

Deepesh Kumar Thakur

2013-06-01

346

Teaching surgical skills in obstetrics using a cesarean section simulator – bringing simulation to life  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Venkata Sujatha Vellanki1, Sarath Babu Gillellamudi21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2Department of General Surgery Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Sreepuram, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, IndiaPurpose: Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in obstetrics. Incorporating a simulation model into training provides a safe, low-stress environment in which students can gain skills and receive feedback. The purpose of this study was to determine the effective...

Venkata Sujatha Vellanki; Sarath Babu Gillellamudi

2010-01-01

347

Teaching reading comprehension : the effects of direct instruction and cognitive apprenticeship on comprehension skills and metacognition  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Governments, organisations and educators agree that education should not just focus on basic skills, but also on more complex outcomes such as metacognition. Youngsters must be prepared to deal with the rapidly changing society; they need to become life-long learners. Schools must provide opportunities for active, self-directed and independent learning to prepare students for this life-long learning. Metacognition plays an important role in this lifelong learning. This study ad...

Jager, Bernadet

2002-01-01

348

PRAGMATISMO EM ARISTÓTELES: APROXIMAÇÕES COM AS COMPETÊNCIAS DO ENSINO ATUAL. PRAGMATISM IN ARISTOTLE: APPROACHES TO CURRENT TEACHING SKILLS  

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Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é contribuir para uma fundamentação do trabalho docente e do educador social, tendo como base exploratória a potência e ato em Aristóteles. No primeiro momento aborda-se o contexto da prática aristotélica; já no segundo, discorre-se de forma exploratória pelos caminhos das competências sob a exigência das novas tendências educacionais. E sobre a fundamentação da teoria educacional de Aristóteles foi utilizada uma análise historiográfica da obra Ética a Nicômaco. Como resultado pode-se perceber que o pragmatismo de Aristóteles pode se relacionar com as competências vivenciadas pela experiência dos indivíduos no ensino atual.The aim of this paper is to contribute to a foundation of teaching and of the social educator, having as an exploratory basis the power and act in Aristotle. At first, it addresses the practical context of Aristotle, then, it discusses in an exploratory way the paths of skills under the demands of the new educational trends. Moreover, on the merits of Aristotle's educational theory, a historiographical analysis of the work Nicomachean Ethics was used. As a result, we can see that Aristotle's pragmatism can relate to the skills experienced by individuals in current education.

Alessandro Barreta Garcia

2012-11-01

349

Teaching Cultural Competency Through a Pharmacy Skills and Applications Course Series  

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Objective. To incorporate cultural competency in a Pharmacy Skills and Application course series and assess the level of cultural competency in students who did and did not complete the courses. Design. The course series focused on cultural competency throughout the PharmD curriculum and included such activities as self-reflection, lecture, diversity service-learning, case studies, and discussion. Assessment. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professionals – Revised (IAPCC-R) was used to measure cultural competence in 2 cohorts: the last class preceding implementation of the new course series and the first class after its implementation. Overall scores between the 2 cohorts were not significantly different; however, 2 subscale scores were significantly higher among students who completed the course series: cultural skills (p = 0.021) and cultural encounters (p = 0.048). Conclusions. The Pharmacy Skills and Application course series appears to improve some aspects of cultural competence in pharmacy students, but may not be sufficient to elicit change in all areas. PMID:22438599

Phillips, Charles

2012-01-01

350

Teaching communication and therapeutic relationship skills to baccalaureate nursing students: a peer mentorship simulation approach.  

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The literature on techniques for improving student competency in therapeutic communication and interpersonal skills is limited. A simulation approach to enhance the learning of communication skills was developed to address these issues. Second-semester and senior nursing students participated in videorecorded standardized patient simulations, with senior students portraying the patient. Following simulated interactions, senior students provided feedback to junior students on their use of communication skills and other therapeutic factors. To integrate the learning experience, junior students completed a written assignment, in which they identified effective and noneffective communication; personal strengths and weaknesses; and use of genuineness, empathy, and positive regard. A videorecording of each student interaction gave faculty the opportunity to provide formative feedback to students. Student evaluations have been positive. Themes identified in student evaluations include the impact of seeing oneself, significance of practicing, getting below the surface in communication, and moving from insight to goal setting. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(10), 34-41.]. PMID:25207556

Miles, Leslie W; Mabey, Linda; Leggett, Sarah; Stansfield, Katie

2014-10-01

351

METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING A SKILL IN THE TEACHING OF PHYSIC IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL / METODOLOGÍA PARA DETERMINAR UNA HABILIDAD GENERALIZADORA EN LA ENSEÑANZA DE LA FÍSICA DE PREUNIVERSITARIO  

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Full Text Available In this work, it is proposed a methodology through which it is determined a skill for the development of the teaching-learning process of physic in senior high. It acquires such a connotation that it constitutes the maximum expression of logic in the referred process and it integrates in a system the abilities of such a discipline contribute with the formation of the students of this level. The referred skill is: solving problem, this allows to be used as a model of learning sciences. The newness lies on the usage of it as an essential theoretical support of the Didactic Theory of Invariant Skill, which was designed for the formation of professionals. For senior high, are just taken those concepts and methodological aspects that are not in contradiction of this teaching level.

Ramón Rubén González Nápoles

2010-01-01

352

A Study on Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Teachers Ö?retmenlere Bilgi Okuryazarl??? Becerilerinin Kazand?r?lmas? Üzerine Bir Çal??ma  

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Full Text Available Teaching information literacy skills to the individuals of information society has a great importance. In this paper, necessity of equipping primary and secondary school teachers with information literacy skills is discussed. A study to teach information literacy skills to teachers and the findings of the study will also be introduced. Bilgi toplumunun bireylerine bilgi okuryazarl??? becerilerinin ö?retilmesi büyük önem ta??maktad?r. Bu yaz?da, ilkö?retim ve ortaö?retim ö?retmenlerinin bilgi okuryazarl??? becerileriyle donat?lmalar?n?n gereklili?i tart???lmaktad?r. Ö?retmenlere bilgi okuryazarl??? becerilerini kazand?rmaya yönelik bir çal??ma ile bu çal??madan elde edilen bulgular da aktar?lacakt?r.

Buket Akkoyunlu

2002-06-01

353

Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

Gupta Garima

2012-01-01

354

Developments in undergraduate teaching of small-animal soft-tissue surgical skills at the University of Sydney.  

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This article discusses recent developments in soft-tissue surgery teaching at the University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science. An integrated teaching program was developed for Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) students with the aim of providing them with optimal learning opportunities to meet "Day One" small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies. Didactic lectures and tutorials were introduced earlier into the curriculum to prepare students for live-animal surgery practical. In addition to existing clinics, additional spay/neuter clinics were established in collaboration with animal welfare organizations to increase student exposure to live-animal surgery. A silicon-based, life-like canine ovariohysterectomy model was developed with the assistance of a model-making and special effects company. The model features elastic ovarian pedicles and suspensory ligaments, which can be stretched and broken like those of an actual dog. To monitor the volume and type of student surgical experience, an E-portfolio resource was established. This resource allows for the tracking of numbers of live, student-performed desexing surgeries and incorporates competency-based assessments and reflective tasks to be completed by students. Student feedback on the integrated surgical soft-tissue teaching program was assessed. Respondents were assessed in the fourth year of the degree and will have further opportunities to develop Day One small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies in the fifth year. Ninety-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they were motivated to participate in all aspects of the program, while 78% agreed or strongly agreed that they received an adequate opportunity to develop their skills and confidence in ovariohysterectomy or castration procedures through the fourth-year curriculum. PMID:22430078

Gopinath, Deepa; McGreevy, Paul D; Zuber, Richard M; Klupiec, Corinna; Baguley, John; Barrs, Vanessa R

2012-01-01

355

Statistical study on bodily communication skills in volleyball to improve teaching methods  

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Full Text Available Focus of the study is to verify the incidence of performance analysis data of bodily communication in volleyball. The sample was chosen to represent the scores obtained in three technical skills strongly influenced by bodily communication: the second ball goes to the opposite court instead of setting for attacking; the attack as fast as possible in the middle of the net and the off speed hit instead of power spike over the block. The purpose of this study is to measure the amount of the three technical skills points for each set, the total of them, the points awarded to the attack and the total points of each set, and so to read the relations between the different categories of scoring. The method used is the recruitment of the data with the use of video software Data Project by a team of operators made by the team’s official analyst, by the coach and by the single athlete, only for measurements concerning him. The assignment of the data is attributed by the team's official analyst after sharing with the coach and the athlete. The datum recruited must necessarily accepted by the coach, otherwise is not considered. The data recruited were compared with data on total points in the set and with the overall results of the attack, first individually and then together, in order to determine the relationship among points attributable to bodily communication and the final score. The dependency relationship, analyzed through a simple regression model, was statistically significant. The results show as this study can help the coach to train the team for improving the analyzed technical skills in different mode, creating a methodological system training to enhance the performance.

GAETANO RAIOLA

2012-06-01

356

Enhancing diversity in science: is teaching science process skills the answer?  

Science.gov (United States)

The Biology Fellows Program at the University of Washington aims to enhance diversity in science by helping students succeed in the rigorous introductory biology classes and motivating them to engage in undergraduate research. The composite Scholastic Achievement Test scores and high school grade point averages of the Biology Fellows are comparable to those of students who are not in the program; however, they earn, on average, higher grades in introductory biology classes than non-Biology Fellows. Underrepresented minorities and disadvantaged students in the program also earn higher grades in the introductory biology classes than do their non-Biology Fellows counterparts. Analysis of the performance of Biology Fellows shows that the program assists students who are not proficient in certain science process skills and that students who lack these skills are at risk for failing introductory biology. This evaluation provides insight for designing programs that aim to enhance the performance of beginning students of biology, particularly for underrepresented minorities, who want to obtain a life science degree. PMID:17012213

Dirks, Clarissa; Cunningham, Matthew

2006-01-01

357

Teaching English to the medical profession. Developing communication skills and bringing humanities to medicine  

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Full Text Available This is a personal account of teaching English for medical purposes (EMP, explaining my interest in helping health professionals in Majorca improve their English. My main aim has been to enable them to communicate both orally at medical conferences and in written form for journals. The article explains how the teaching has been a twofold experience, with the professionals explaining their different specialities, while I have provided them with the necessary linguistic tools. Presentations have been integral to this, with humanities in medicine being a theme underlying the entire approach. The article concludes with a small section on the future of English in a medical context. ------------------------------------------------------- Enseñar inglés a los médicos: desarrollo de las habilidades de comunicación y acercamiento de las humanidades a la medicina. Este es un relato personal de mi experiencia en la enseñanza de inglés con fines médicos (IFM, en el que explico mi interés en ayudar a los profesionales sanitarios de Mallorca a mejorar su nivel de inglés. Mi objetivo principal ha sido capacitarlos para que pudieran comunicarse verbalmente en conferencias médicas y por escrito en las publicaciones correspondientes. Doy cuenta en él de la dualidad de la experiencia adquirida durante la enseñanza, en la que los profesionales explicaban sus distintas especializaciones mientras yo les proporcionaba las herramientas lingüísticas necesarias. Las presentaciones han sido un elemento crítico del proceso, y las humanidades médicas un tema subyacente al enfoque integral del proyecto. El artículo finaliza con una pequeña sección acerca del futuro del inglés en el contexto médico.

Jonathan McFarland

2009-12-01

358

Teachers’ Perceptions about the Use of Play to Facilitate Development and Teach Prosocial Skills  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers’ perceptions about the use of play to promote social, emotional, and cognitive skills to support planning for a school program aimed at increasing inclusive play for young children. This research was inspired by Vivian Gussin Paley’s book, You Can’t Say You Can’t Play (1992. Participants included undergraduate students and graduate education students in the Teacher Education Program at a small liberal arts college, as well as practicing elementary school teachers. The results indicated that graduate students and practicing teachers had a more accurate understanding about the developmental benefits of incorporating play into the classroom and a greater willingness to embrace the “you can’t say you can’t play” rule to promote inclusive play and acceptance. Implications for designing a preventative program for inclusive play in young children are discussed.

Victor Bissonnette

2011-03-01

359

Research and Teaching: Promoting the Use of Higher-Order Cognitive Skills in Qualitative Problem Solving  

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A study was conducted to promote higher order cognitive skills (HOCS) in a chemistry class using the GOAL (Gather, Organize, Analyze, and Learn) method. Students were assigned four qualitative problems specifically designed to be solved with the method over the course of the semester outside of normal homework and testing. The problems served as a platform to encourage students to use HOCS in their Learn responses. The study focused on students' use of HOCS in these Learn responses regardless of whether HOCS were used in the actual solving of the problems or not. The results of this study suggest that consistent use of the Learn response in problem solving promotes reflection with an accompanied increase in use of HOCS by students during a semester.

Justice, Jason; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria

2008-05-01

360

The effects of covert audio coaching on teaching clerical skills to adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.  

Science.gov (United States)

Employment instruction for secondary students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has received very little attention in the professional literature. However, adults with ASD usually have difficulty maintaining employment for a variety of reasons, including problems with performing work tasks. This study used a multiple baseline design across participants to examine the effects of performance feedback on the participants' ability to independently make photocopies. Feedback was delivered privately through a two-way radio and earbud speaker. The results support the conclusion that the intervention, covert audio coaching, was effective in increasing the participants' accuracy in making photocopies. Specifically, participants demonstrated mastery of the skill within 4-5 sessions, and their improvements maintained for several weeks following intervention. PMID:22798051

Bennett, Kyle D; Ramasamy, Rangasamy; Honsberger, Toby

2013-03-01

 
 
 
 
361

Teaching first-year medical students in basic clinical and procedural skills - A novel course concept at a medical school in Austria  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: Clerkships are still the main source for undergraduate medical students to acquire necessary skills. However, these educational experiences may not be sufficient, as there are significant deficiencies in the clinical experience and practical expertise of medical students. Project description: An innovative course teaching basic clinical and procedural skills to first-year medical students has been implemented at the Medical University of Graz, aiming at preparing students for clerkships and clinical electives. The course is based on several didactic elements: standardized and clinically relevant contents, dual (theoretical and virtual) pre-course preparation, student peer-teaching, small teaching groups, hands-on training, and the use of medical simulation. This is the first course of its kind at a medical school in Austria, and its conceptual design as well as the implementation process into the curriculum shall be described. Evaluation: Between November 2011 and January 2013, 418 students have successfully completed the course. Four online surveys among participating students have been performed, with 132 returned questionnaires. Students’ satisfaction with all four practical course parts was high, as well as the assessment of clinical relevance of contents. Most students (88.6%) strongly agreed/agreed that they had learned a lot throughout the course. Two thirds of the students were motivated by the course to train the acquired skills regularly at our skills laboratory. Narrative feedbacks revealed elements contributing most to course success. Conclusions: First-year medical students highly appreciate practical skills training. Hands-on practice, peer-teaching, clinically relevant contents, and the use of medical simulation are valued most. PMID:24575157

Mileder, Lukas; Wegscheider, Thomas; Dimai, Hans Peter

2014-01-01

362

Teaching first-year medical students in basic clinical and procedural skills ? A novel course concept at a medical school in Austria  

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Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Clerkships are still the main source for undergraduate medical students to acquire necessary skills. However, these educational experiences may not be sufficient, as there are significant deficiencies in the clinical experience and practical expertise of medical students.Project description: An innovative course teaching basic clinical and procedural skills to first-year medical students has been implemented at the Medical University of Graz, aiming at preparing students for clerkships and clinical electives. The course is based on several didactic elements: standardized and clinically relevant contents, dual (theoretical and virtual pre-course preparation, student peer-teaching, small teaching groups, hands-on training, and the use of medical simulation. This is the first course of its kind at a medical school in Austria, and its conceptual design as well as the implementation process into the curriculum shall be described.Evaluation: Between November 2011 and January 2013, 418 students have successfully completed the course. Four online surveys among participating students have been performed, with 132 returned questionnaires. Students’ satisfaction with all four practical course parts was high, as well as the assessment of clinical relevance of contents. Most students (88.6% strongly agreed/agreed that they had learned a lot throughout the course. Two thirds of the students were motivated by the course to train the acquired skills regularly at our skills laboratory. Narrative feedbacks revealed elements contributing most to course success.Conclusions: First-year medical students highly appreciate practical skills training. Hands-on practice, peer-teaching, clinically relevant contents, and the use of medical simulation are valued most.

Mileder, Lukas

2014-02-01

363

Teaching surgical skills in obstetrics using a cesarean section simulator – bringing simulation to life  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Venkata Sujatha Vellanki1, Sarath Babu Gillellamudi21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2Department of General Surgery Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Sreepuram, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, IndiaPurpose: Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in obstetrics. Incorporating a simulation model into training provides a safe, low-stress environment in which students can gain skills and receive feedback. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of obstetrics simulator training for medical students doing their internship.Methods: Twenty-five students posted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology received a formal lecture on cesarean section and demonstration of the procedure on a mannequin in the first week of their internship, The study group (n = 12 practiced their skills on an obstetrics simulator under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The control group received no simulator-based training (n = 13 or further instruction. All students were asked to complete a prevalidated questionnaire to assess their level of confidence in performing the procedure after the educational session.Results: Compared with their peers in the study, students in the simulator group were significantly more likely to define the steps of cesarean section (91% vs 61.5%, and were comfortable in assisting cesarean section (100% vs 46.15% as they were able to identify the layers of abdomen opened during cesarean section. All 12 students reported this as an excellent experience.Conclusion: We were able to construct an inexpensive cesarean section trainer that facilitates instruction in cesarean section technique in a low-stress environment.Keywords: simulation, obstetrics, medical students

Venkata Sujatha Vellanki

2010-12-01

364

Promoting critical thinking skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Educational accountability requires examination and justification of curriculum elements that will promote critical thinking skills. The authors review theoretical components of critical thinking and provides four examples of teaching strategies used to enhance this cognitive skill. PMID:2216066

White, N E; Beardslee, N Q; Peters, D; Supples, J M

1990-01-01

365

Age-Related Changes in Creative Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

Age-related differences in cognitive processes were used to understand age-related declines in creativity. According to the Geneplore model (Finke, Ward, & Smith, 1992), there are two phases of creativity--generating an idea and exploring the implications of the idea--each with different underlying cognitive processes. These two phases are…

Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly; Black, Sheila R.; Mccown, Steven M.

2008-01-01

366

Creative Thinking: Processes, Strategies, and Knowledge  

Science.gov (United States)

Creative achievements are the basis for progress in our world. Although creative achievement is influenced by many variables, the basis for creativity is held to lie in the generation of high-quality, original, and elegant solutions to complex, novel, ill-defined problems. In the present effort, we examine the cognitive capacities that make…

Mumford, Michael D.; Medeiros, Kelsey E.; Partlow, Paul J.

2012-01-01

367

The Scientific Method - Critical and Creative Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

The ``scientific method'' is not just for scientists! Combined with critical thinking, the scientific method can enable students to distinguish credible sources of information from nonsense and become intelligent consumers of information. Professors John Cotton and Randall Scalise illustrate these principles using a series of examples and demonstrations that is enlightening, educational, and entertaining. This lecture/demonstration features highlights from their course (whose unofficial title is ``debunking pseudoscience'' ) which enables students to detect pseudoscience in its many guises: paranormal phenomena, free-energy devices, alternative medicine, and many others.

Cotton, John; Scarlise, Randall

2011-10-01

368

Teaching microsurgery to undergraduate medical students by means of high-definition stereo video microscopy: the Aachen skills lab experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: The master plan for innovative medical education established at RWTH Aachen Medical Faculty helped to set up an inter-disciplinary, interactive teaching environment for undergraduate medical students during their clinical course. This study presents our first experience with teaching microsurgery to medical students by means of highdefinition stereo video monitoring. Material and methods: A plastic model created for ear inspection with a handheld otoscope was modified with an exchangeable membrane resembling an eardrum plus a model of the human cochlea. We attached a 1280×1024 HD stereo camera to an operating microscope, whose images were processed online by a PC workstation. The live image was displayed by two LCD projectors @ 1280×720 pixels on a 1,25m rear-projection screen by polarized filters. Each medical student was asked to perform standard otosurgical procedures (paracentesis and insertion of grommets; insertion of a cochlear implant electrode) being guided by the HD stereoscopic video image. Results: Students quickly adopted this method of training, as all attendants shared the same high-definition stereoscopic image. The learning process of coordinating hand movement with visual feedback was regarded being challenging as well as instructive by all students. Watching the same image facilitated valuable feedback from the audience for each student performing his tasks. All students noted that this course made them feel more confident in their manual skills and that they would consider a career in a microsurgical specialty. Conclusion: High definition stereoscopy provides an easy access to microsurgical techniques for undergraduate medical students. This access not only bears the potential to compress the learning curve for junior doctors during their clinical training but also helps to attract medical students to a career in a microsurgical specialty.

Ilgner, Justus; Park, Jonas Jae-Hyun; Westhofen, Martin

2008-02-01

369

The Use of Art in the Teaching Practice for Developing Communication Skills in Adults  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The use of Art for educational reasons has been recently developing in Greece both in formal education and in Adult Education. Relevant theoretical texts and studies, (Dewey, 1934. Gardner, 1990. Perkins, 1994 pin point that training through the Arts can contribute to an integrated learning, since through systematic observation of works of art, the trainees´ critical thinking, creativity and fantasy can be generated.  The first part of the current paper, examines the reasons that necessitate the use of art in the training practice.The models of approaching and understanding art for educational reasons, as presented and analyzed by Feldman, Brondy, Anderson and Perkins, are presented in the second part.The method “Transformative Learning through an aesthetical experiences”, has been grounded and developed by A. Kokkos, and is presented in the third part. The different stages of this method are also analyzed.In the final part, an example of Kokkos´ method is being analyzed (stage by stage, regarding the training for an organization’s staff development of their communication skills.  Conclusions regarding the use of art in the training praxis, may be found at the final part of this paper.

Niki Phillips

2012-03-01

370

Homeopathy as elective in undergraduate medical education - an opportunity for teaching professional core skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Aim: The evaluation of medical students' perceptions regarding an elective study course in Homeopathy in which small groups have participated annually for six years, at the Institute for General Practice and Family Medicine at the Otto Von Guericke University, Magdeburg. The course was assessed in terms of concept, delivery, and influence on students' professional development. Methodology: Since the autumn term of 2008/09, three group discussions have been conducted with thirty of the course participants (3 total electives). These discussions were semi-structured and guided by central topics; the analysis was qualitative and guided by content. Results: The overall concept and implementation of the course were very successful. The main learning themes, that is, an emphasis on a more holistic and individual view of patients and the importance of a cooperative partnership between doctor and patient, were positively rated, regardless of the students' attitudes towards homeopathy. Their assessment was based on their previous experience and a comparison with conventional medical education. Conclusion: Homeopathy as an elective subject is not only useful for acquiring specific knowledge in integrative medicine, but also important as a means of developing physicians' core skills that are often not well considered in conventional medical education. PMID:24575158

Lehmann, Bianca; Kremer, Brigitte; Werwick, Katrin; Herrmann, Markus

2014-01-01

371

The effects of teacher anxiety and modeling on the acquisition of a science teaching skill and concomitant student performance  

Science.gov (United States)

In a study designed to explore the effects of teacher anxiety and modeling on acquisition of a science teaching skill and concomitant student performance, 69 preservice secondary teachers and 295 eighth grade students were randomly assigned to microteaching sessions. Prior to microteaching, teachers were given an anxiety test, then randomly assigned to one of three treatments; a transcript model, a protocol model, or a control condition. Subsequently both teacher and student performance was assessed using written and behavioral measures. Analysis of variance indicated that subjects in the two modeling treatments significantly exceeded performance of control group subjects on all measures of the dependent variable, with the protocol model being generally superior to the transcript model. The differential effects of the modeling treatments were further reflected in student performance. Regression analysis of aptitude-treatment interactions indicated that teacher anxiety scores interacted significantly with instructional treatments, with high anxiety teachers performing best in the protocol modeling treatment. Again, this interaction was reflected in student performance, where students taught by highly anxious teachers performed significantly better when their teachers had received the protocol model. These results were discussed in terms of teacher concerns and a memory model of the effects of anxiety on performance.

Koran, John J., Jr.; Koran, Mary Lou

372

A Phenomenological Examination of Perceived Skills and Concepts Necessary for Teaching Scientific Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of high stakes testing to improve educational outcomes falls short in many settings. Proposals for improvement include providing more opportunities for students to extend their thinking, gaining experience in the social nature of science, and learning how to interpret, explain, and justify results. This phenomenological qualitative project study took place in a small independent school in the southeastern United States that lacked a cohesive elementary science program and was looking to create a vertically aligned science curriculum based on constructivism. The research question asked what skills and concepts teachers believed should be included in an elementary science program in order for students to learn scientific inquiry to be better prepared for middle and upper school science subjects. Using focus groups, observations, and interviews of a small sample of 4 teachers, data were collected, transcribed, and categorized through open coding. Inductive analysis was employed to look for patterns and emerging themes that painted a picture of how teachers viewed the current science program and what attributes they felt were important in the creation of a new curriculum. The findings revealed that teachers felt there was lack of a vertically aligned science curriculum, availability of resources throughout the school, and consistent support to provide an effective science program. The recommendations called for developing an elementary science program that includes all strands proposed by the National Science Education Standards and would provide students with opportunities to engage in scientific inquiry, conduct detailed observations, and learn to support conclusions using data. The implications for positive social change include development of programs that result in integrated science learning.

Kapetanis, Ana Cristina

373

Building Information Modeling in engineering teaching : Retaining the context of engineering knowledge and skills  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in construction supports business as well as project processes by providing integrated systems for communication, administration, quantity takeoff, time scheduling, cost estimating, progress control among other things. The rapid technological development of ICT systems and the increased application of ICT in industry significantly influence the management and organisation of construction projects, and consequently, ICT has implications for the education of engineers and the preparation of students for their future professional careers. In engineering education there is an obvious aim to provide students with sufficient disciplinary knowledge in science and engineering principles. The implementation of ICT in engineering education requires, however, that valuable time and teaching efforts are spent on adequate software training needed to operate the ICT systems properly. This study takes on the challenge of using ICT in engineering education without diminishing the body of technical disciplinary knowledge and the understanding of the engineering context in which it is taught, practiced, and learned. The objective of the study is to describe and review an extensive role play simulation where students interact with real professional engineers. The role play simulation aims at providing a realistic learning context for the students in order to facilitate the learning objectives of the disciplinary knowledge of the course, which in this case is represented by adopting Building Information Modelling, BIM, for construction management purposes. Course evaluations, a questionnaire and discussions with students confirm a genuinely positive attitude towards the role-play simulation and interaction with industry professionals. The students engage in the role-play and express an increased understanding of the requirements and implicit rules of real-life engineering. The interaction between students and the professional engineers acts as a prime mover for the students to perform their best, which in turn strengthens the learning of the disciplinary subjects.

Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

2010-01-01

374

Postdoctoral Clinical-Research Training in Psychiatry: A Model for Teaching Grant Writing and Other Research Survival Skills and for Increasing Clarity of Mentoring Expectations  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The authors describe a model for teaching grant writing and other research survival skills to postdoctoral clinical-research fellows in psychiatry and for improving research mentoring. Over the past 4 years, the authors have developed a course on writing grant applications for postdoctoral clinical-research fellows, using peer-review processes modeled after a National Institutes of Health study section. At the same time, the authors have clarified expectations of mentors in ways designed to h...

Reynolds, Charles F.; Martin, Christopher; Brent, David; Ryan, Neal; Dahl, Ronald E.; Pilkonis, Paul; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kupfer, David J.

1998-01-01

375

Informing pedagogy through the brain-targeted teaching model.  

Science.gov (United States)

Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, educators need a pedagogical framework that helps them interpret and apply research findings. This article describes the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, a scheme that relates six distinct aspects of instruction to research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences. PMID:23653775

Hardiman, Mariale

2012-01-01

376

Informing Pedagogy Through the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, educators need a pedagogical framework that helps them interpret and apply research findings. This article describes the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, a scheme that relates six distinct aspects of instruction to research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences.

Mariale Hardiman

2012-05-01

377

A Mind of Their Own: Using Inquiry-based Teaching to Build Critical Thinking Skills and Intellectual Engagement in an Undergraduate Neuroanatomy Course.  

Science.gov (United States)

A changing undergraduate demographic and the need to help students develop advanced critical thinking skills in neuroanatomy courses has prompted many faculty to consider new teaching methods including clinical case studies. This study compared primarily conventional and inquiry-based clinical case (IBCC) teaching methods to determine which would produce greater gains in critical thinking and content knowledge. Results showed students in the conventional neuroanatomy course gained less than 3 national percentile ranks while IBCC students gained over 7.5 within one academic term using the valid and reliable California Critical Thinking Skills Test. In addition to 2.5 times greater gains in critical thinking, IBCC teaching methods also produced 12% greater final exam performance and 11% higher grades using common grade performance benchmarks. Classroom observations also indicated that IBCC students were more intellectually engaged and participated to a greater extent in classroom discussions. Through the results of this study, it is hoped that faculty who teach neuroanatomy and desire greater critical thinking and content student learning outcomes will consider using the IBCC method. PMID:24693256

Greenwald, Ralf R; Quitadamo, Ian J

2014-01-01

378

Situated cognition and cognitive apprenticeship: a model for teaching and learning clinical skills in a technologically rich and authentic learning environment.  

Science.gov (United States)

The acquisition of a range of diverse clinical skills is a central feature of the pre-registration nursing curriculum. Prior to exposure to clinical practice, it is essential that learners have the opportunity to practise and develop such skills in a safe and controlled environment under the direction and supervision of clinical experts. However, the competing demands of the HE nursing curriculum coupled with an increased number of learners have resulted in a reduced emphasis on traditional apprenticeship learning. This paper presents an alternative model for clinical skills teaching that draws upon the principles of cognitive apprenticeship [Collins, A., Brown, J.S., Newman, S., 1989. Cognitive Apprenticeship: teaching the crafts of reading, writing and mathematics. In: Resnick, L.B. (Ed.) Knowing. Learning and Instruction: Essays in Honor of Robert Glaser. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey, pp. 453-494] and situated cognition within a technologically rich and authentic learning environment. It will show how high quality DVD materials illustrating clinical skills performed by expert practitioners have been produced and used in conjunction with CCTV and digital recording technologies to support learning within a pedagogic framework appropriate to skills acquisition. It is argued that this model not only better prepares the student for the time they will spend in the practice setting, but also lays the foundation for the development of a clinically competent practitioner with the requisite physical and cognitive skills who is fit for purpose [UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice: The UKCC Commission for Nursing and Midwifery Education. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting, London]. PMID:16624452

Woolley, Norman N; Jarvis, Yvonne

2007-01-01

379

Competencias en los procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje virtual y semipresencial Teaching Skills in Virtual and Blended Learning Environments  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Actualmente las universidades están inmersas en lo que se conoce como el proceso de «convergencia europea» y que llevará al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior (EEES. El objetivo es dotar a Europa de un sistema universitario homogéneo, compatible y flexible que permita a los estudiantes y titulados universitarios europeos una mayor movilidad, así como ofrecer al sistema universitario europeo unos niveles de transparencia y calidad, mediante sistemas de evaluación, que le hagan atractivo y competitivo en el ámbito internacional dentro del actual proceso de globalización. En este artículo, interesa centrar la reflexión en dos de las modalidades de la educación a distancia que asumirán importancia en ese cambio universitario: el e-learning y el b-learning, que consisten básicamente en la virtualización de los procesos de aprendizaje a través del uso de equipos informáticos. Para ello se ha realizado una investigación cualitativa con metodología de estudio de casos. De entre los resultados se destaca el uso de las TIC por parte del profesorado para conseguir un mejor aprendizaje en los estudiantes, de igual forma un porcentaje importante de los profesores 78% utiliza alguna plataforma virtual como apoyo a la docencia. Como conclusión se resalta que las políticas de formación deberían fortalecer las competencias del profesorado universitario en el uso de dispositivos telemáticos, recursos e instrumentos relacionados con el aprendizaje semipresencial y virtual.Universities are currently immersed in what is known as the process of European convergence to create the European Higher Education Area (EHEA. The aim is to establish a standardized, compatible and flexible European university system that enables graduates and undergraduates to move easily from one institution to another within Europe. As a result of evaluation mechanisms, the system will be transparent and of high quality, which will make it attractive and competitive internationally in a globalized world. In this paper, we focus on two distance learning modes that will become more important as a result of this change in universities: e-learning and b-learning. These basically involve the virtualization of learning processes through the use of computer equipment. We carried out a qualitative study using the case study method. The results indicate that teaching staff use information and communication technology (ICT to improve student learning. Similarly, a high percentage (78% of lecturers use some form of digital platform as a support for teaching. In conclusion, training policies should strengthen university teachers’ skills in the use of ICT equipment, tools and resources related to blended and virtual learning.

Francisco Imbernón Muñoz

2011-03-01

380

Examining the Effectiveness of a Program Developed for Teaching Social Skills to Hearing Impaired Students Based on Cooperative Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study is to determine whether a social skill instruction program, prepared according to the cooperative learning method, is effective for children with hearing disability in learning the basic social skills, starting and continuing a relationship, conducting a work with a group, and the generalization of these skills. Nine learning…

Avcioglu, Hasan

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

A Comparison of Case Study and Traditional Teaching Methods for Improvement of Oral Communication and Critical-Thinking Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

This study compares a traditional paper presentation approach and a case study method for the development and improvement of oral communication skills and critical-thinking skills in a class of junior forensic science majors. A rubric for rating performance in these skills was designed on the basis of the oral communication competencies developed…

Noblitt, Lynnette; Vance, Diane E.; Smith, Michelle L. DePoy

2010-01-01

382

Teaching communication and stress management skills to junior physicians dealing with cancer patients: a Belgian Interuniversity Curriculum  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Ineffective physicians' communication skills have detrimental consequences for patients and their relatives, such as insufficient detection of psychological disturbances, dissatisfaction with care, poor compliance, and increased risks of litigation for malpractice. These ineffective communication skills also contribute to everyday stress, lack of job satisfaction, and burnout among physicians. Literature shows that communication skills training programs may significantly improve p...

Bragard, Isabelle; Razavi, Darius; Marchal, Serge; Merckaert, Isabelle; Delxaux, Nicole; Libert, Yves; Reynaert, Christine; Boniver, Jacques; Klastersky, Jean; Scalliet, Pierre; Etienne, Anne-marie

2006-01-01

383

Teaching Strategy to Develop the Skill of Certifying Death in Medicine Students Estrategia didáctica para el desarrollo de la habilidad certificar la defunción en estudiantes de Medicina  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available One of the most serious issues higher education faces today is the current inconsistency between the level of requirements and development of skills in future professionals training. Research has proved that there are difficulties in medicine students when developing the skill of certifying death. Therefore, we propose the following objective: to develop a teaching strategy based on the psychopedagogical foundations of skills formation processes in order to develop the skill of certifying death in 5th year medicine students through the study of Legal Medicine and Medical Ethics subjects. Research methods were used at theoretical and empirical levels. Experts’ consultations was conducted in order to assess the relevance and effectiveness of the teaching strategy. We concluded that the implementation of the strategy, including the formation of a generalized procedure as a basis to develop the ability of certifying death, provides a great potential to help developing that skill.Uno de los problemas más acuciantes que afronta la Educación Superior en la actualidad, es la insuficiencia entre el nivel de exigencias y el desarrollo de habilidades en la formación del profesional. Investigaciones realizadas han demostrado que existen dificultades en los estudiantes de Medicina para desarrollar la habilidad, certificar la defunción. Para ello se propone como objetivo en esta investigación: elaborar de una estrategia didáctica, basada en los fundamentos psicopedagógicos del proceso de formación de habilidades para desarrollar la habilidad, certificar la defunción en los estudiantes del 5to año de la carrera, mediante el estudio de la asignatura Medicina Legal y Ética Médica. Se emplearon métodos investigativos del nivel teórico y del nivel empírico. Se realizó consulta a especialistas para valorar la pertinencia y efectividad de la estrategia didáctica. Se arribó a la conclusión de que la puesta en práctica de la estrategia, que incluye la formación de un procedimiento generalizado que sirva de base al desarrollo de la habilidad certificar la defunción, tiene grandes potencialidades para contribuir al desarrollo de dicha habilidad.

Josefa Caridad de la Rosa Chaviano

2012-06-01

384

The nurturing of creativity in the History classroom through teaching methods: the views of teachers and learners  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english Nurturing creative thinking abilities in all learning areas and subjects is one of the cornerstones and ideals of Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) in South Africa. This article reports on the results obtained with a pilot study that set out to determine the extent to which creativity is presently nurt [...] ured in the History classroom. A qualitative study by means of semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with learners (n = 4) and teachers (n = 2) of History at a secondary school was conducted to determine learner and teacher perceptions related to the nurturing of creativity through the instructional practices of teachers applied during teaching and learning. The results revealed that the nurturing of creativity has not yet become reality in the History classroom. It was disconcerting to note that direct instruction dominates the teaching and learning of History and that very little opportunity for practical experience and interaction during teaching and learning exists. The article concludes with recommendations to teachers on how to purposefully enhance creativity during the teaching of History. This pilot study was conducted as partial fulfillment of the requirements for a BEd Honours degree, and to set the scene for a more extended study on creative thinking in History with larger groups of learners and teachers.

Byron, Bunt.

385

A multi-method study to determine the effectiveness of, and student attitudes to, online instructional videos for teaching clinical nursing skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

E-learning is regularly promoted in higher education settings as a way of fostering more flexible approaches to learning. It has been argued however that the 'potential benefits of new information and communication technology instruments in education' have not been subjected to critical scrutiny (Debande, O., 2004. ICTs and the development of e-learning in Europe: the role of the public and private sectors. European Journal of Education 39 (2), 191-208, p. 192). This paper outlines a multi-method evaluation of an e-learning innovation designed to teach clinical skills to student nurses. Responding to the challenges of teaching clinical skills to large class sizes, we developed a set of instructional videos for one undergraduate skills-based module, which are now integral to the module and available online to students on a continuous basis. Evaluation suggests that students' performance outcomes are unchanged. The students view the flexible and self-management aspects of this method of learning positively, with some attitudinal differences between male and female, and mature and non-mature students. However, it is best used to complement rather than replace lecturer demonstration, lending support to a 'blended' model (Collis, B., van der Wende, M., 2002. Models of Technology and Change in Higher Education: An International Comparative Survey on The Current and Future Use of ICT in Higher Education, University of Twente, Center for Higher Education Policy Studies, The Netherlands). PMID:19121875

Kelly, Mary; Lyng, Colette; McGrath, Mary; Cannon, Gerald

2009-04-01

386

"Teach to goal": theory and design principles of an intervention to improve heart failure self-management skills of patients with low health literacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-management is vital for achieving optimal health outcomes for patients with heart failure (HF). We sought to develop an intervention to improve self-management skills and behaviors for patients with HF, especially those with low health literacy. Individuals with low health literacy have difficulty reading and understanding written information and comprehending numerical information and performing calculations, and they tend to have worse baseline knowledge, short-term memory, and working memory compared with individuals with higher health literacy. This paper describes theoretical models that suggest methods to improve the design of educational curricula and programs for low literate audiences, including cognitive load theory and learning mastery theory. We also outline the practical guiding principles for designing our intervention, which includes a multisession educational strategy that teaches patients self-care skills until they reach behavioral goals ("Teach to Goal"). Our intervention strategy is being tested in a randomized controlled trial to determine if it is superior to a single-session brief educational intervention for reducing hospitalization and death. If this trial shows that the "Teach to Goal" approach is superior, it would support the value of incorporating these design principles into educational interventions for other diseases. PMID:21951244

Baker, David W; DeWalt, Darren A; Schillinger, Dean; Hawk, Victoria; Ruo, Bernice; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Weinberger, Morris; Macabasco-O'Connell, Aurelia; Pignone, Michael

2011-01-01

387

Teaching water skills  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In situ production in the oil sector will require water plant operators for steam-based technologies. Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations require water treatment and there is no training program in the industry neither course specific to these operations, in Canada, to train water treatment plant operators. Five major oilsands producers, forming the Oil Sands Leadership Initiative (OSLI), developed a course which will be launched by the Southern Alberta Insitute of Technology in 2012 as a 12-month program including classes on industrial safety, environmental regulations, water chemistry and unit operations. An Internet component will also be accessible for operators working in the industry.

Bentein, Jim

2011-08-15

388

Organic bench model to complement the teaching and learning on basic surgical skills Modelo de bancada orgânico para complementar o ensino-aprendizagem de habilidades cirúrgicas básicas  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available PURPOSE: To propose an organic bench model made with fruits/vegetables as an alternative to complement the arsenal of simulators used in the teaching and learning of basic surgical skills during medical graduation and education. METHODS: They were described the training strategies, through the use of fruits (or vegetables to the learning of different techniques of incision, sutures, biopsies and basic principles of reconstruction. The preparation of bench model, the processes of skill acquisition, feedback and evaluation were also delineated. RESULTS: A proposal for teaching based on an organic model with training delivered in multiple sessions, with increasing levels of difficulty, and with feedback and evaluation during all the process was structured. CONCLUSION: The organic model, being simple, versatile, portable, reproducible, readily available, and having low cost, is another option to complement the existing simulators for teaching and learning of basic surgical skills.OBJETIVO: Propor um modelo de bancada orgânico, confeccionado com legumes/frutas, como alternativa para complementar o arsenal de simuladores aplicados no ensino-aprendizagem das competências cirúrgicas básicas durante a graduação e o ensino médico. MÉTODOS: Foram descritas as estratégias de treinamento, através da utilização de frutas (ou legumes, para a aprendizagem de diferentes técnicas de incisão, suturas, biópsias e princípios básicos de reconstrução. A preparação do modelo de bancada, os processos de aquisição de habilidades e feedback e os métodos deavaliação também foram delineados. RESULTADOS: Estruturou-se uma proposta de ensino baseada em um modelo orgânico com o treinamento distribuído em várias sessões, com níveis crescentes de dificuldade e com feedback e avaliação de todo o processo. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo orgânico, por ser simples, versátil, portátil, reprodutível, disponível, de fácil aquisição e baixo custo é mais uma opção para complementar o arsenal de simuladores de ensino e aprendizagem existentes.

Rafael Denadai

2012-01-01

389

Enhancing Reasoning Skills in the Process of Teaching and Learning Physics via Dynamic Problem Solving Strategies: a Preparation for Future Learning  

CERN Document Server

The large number of published articles in physics journals under the title "Comments on ..." and "Reply to ..." is indicative that the conceptual understanding of physical phenomena is very elusive and hard to grasp even to experts, but it has not stopped the development of Physics. In fact, from the history of the development of Physics one quickly becomes aware that, regardless of the state of conceptual understanding, without quantitative reasoning Physics would have not reached the state of development it has today. Correspondingly, quantitative reasoning and problem solving skills are a desirable outcomes from the process of teaching and learning of physics. Thus, supported by results from published research, we will show evidence that a well structured problem solving strategy taught as a dynamical process offers a feasible way for students to learn physics quantitatively and conceptually, while helping them to reach the state of an Adaptive Expert highly skillful on innovation and efficiency, a desired...

Rojas, Sergio

2011-01-01

390

Formación de habilidades profesionales en la enseñanza de la pediatría. Evolución histórica y tendencias Training of professional skills in the teaching of pediatrics. Historical development and trends  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Se realizó una investigación observacional analítica, de carácter histórico, sobre las tendencias de la enseñanza de la pediatría, fundamentalmente a partir de 1959 en Cuba; para ello, los indicadores analíticos incluyeron la formación de habilidades profesionales en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje en esa especialidad, atendiendo a la estructuración del modelo de profesional y la visión para el cambio paradigmático de formación en la carrera de medicina (de la tendencia curativa a la sociomédica.An analytical observational research of historical character on the trends of the teaching of pediatrics, primarily from 1959 in Cuba was conducted. Thus, analytical indicators included the training of professional skills in the teaching-learning process in that specialty based on the structure of the professional model and vision for the paradigm change of the training in medical career (from curative to socio-medical tendency.

Emma Aurora Bastart Ortiz

2011-07-01

391

The Comparative Instructional Effectiveness of Print-Based and Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Print-based instructional materials have been more popular than any other medium for teaching practical skills during the delivery of technical and vocational education and training via distance learning. However, the approach has its shortcomings and in recent times alternatives have been sought. The comparative instructional effectiveness of one such alternative is the focus of this paper. The study sought to examine the instructional effectiveness of video-based instructional materials vis-à-vis traditional print-based instructional materials for teaching distance learners of a Block-Laying and Concreting practical skills programme. An experimental design was used and participants were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: Users of video-based instructional materials or users of print-based instructional materials. A researcher-designed performance test and an achievement test of 20 multiple-choice items were used to collect data from 34 participants who used print-based instructional materials and 35 participants who used video-based instructional materials to learn practical skills. The instruments were based on the instructional objectives of lessons on mortar and wall finish. Pilot test data for the achievement test yielded Cronbach’s alpha of 0.84. Descriptive statistics and t-test at a 0.05 level of significance were used to analyse the data. The results indicated that the two instructional materials were pedagogically equivalent in terms of theoretical knowledge acquired. Practical skills acquired, however, were significantly higher among users of video-based instructional materials. Finally, users of video-based instructional materials displayed significantly superior craftsmanship.

Francis Donkor

2010-03-01

392

A Bird in the Hand and a Bird in the Bush: Using Proverbs to Teach Skills and Comprehension.  

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Discusses objectives that can be accomplished through the study of proverbs. Suggests a number of exercises involving proverbs that can be used to improve reading comprehension and hone writing skills and to develop a vocabulary. (RBW)

Holden, Marjorie H.; Warshaw, Mimi

1985-01-01

393

Teaching Energy Science as Inquiry: Reflections on Professional Development as a Tool to Build Inquiry Teaching Skills for Middle and High School Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

A hybrid (face-to-face and online) professional development (PD) course focused on energy science for middle and high school teachers (N = 47) was conducted using the teaching science as inquiry (TSI) framework. Data from the PD indicates that online opportunities enhanced participation and that the TSI structure improved teachers' inquiry…

Seraphin, Kanesa Duncan; Philippoff, Joanna; Parisky, Alex; Degnan, Katherine; Warren, Diana Papini

2013-01-01

394

Consideraciones epistemológicas acerca de la enseñanza de las habilidades profesionales en Pediatría / Epistemological considerations about the teaching of professional skills in Pediatrics  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Fundamento: se realiza una caracterización del estado actual de la formación de las habilidades profesionales para la atención al niño y al adolescente desde la asignatura Pediatría en la Facultad de Medicina No. 2 de la Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de Santiago de Cuba. Objetivo: caracterizar la [...] formación de las habilidades profesionales desde la asignatura Pediatría en la mencionada facultad. Métodos: teóricos: análisis y síntesis, hermenéutico-dialéctico y el sistémico estructural. Empíricos: análisis documental del programa de la asignatura, encuestas a estudiantes y profesores y observación de modos de actuación de profesores y estudiantes en actividades de la educación en el trabajo; y métodos estadísticos. Resultados: se constatan insuficiencias en el plano del microdiseño curricular en lo referido al sistema de habilidades y en la dinámica del proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje en la asignatura Pediatría, relacionadas con las destrezas del profesional de la salud, se observa falta de integralidad del proceso enseñanza aprendizaje, el cual se centra en lo cognoscitivo, se perciben carencias en su realización de modo, que a la vez que instruya, eduque y desarrolle, se evidencia el papel pasivo del estudiante, y las actividades de educación en el trabajo no se estructuran para desarrollar creatividad, reflexión e independencia. Conclusiones: el análisis del objeto de estudio corrobora la pertinencia del tema investigado y la necesidad de una conceptualización del proceso enseñanza aprendizaje del Médico General en la asignatura Pediatría a partir de las inconsistencias que se muestran en el proceso de estructuración de su sistema de habilidades. Abstract in english Background: a characterization is done about the current status in the training of professional skills for the care of children and adolescents in the subject Pediatrics, at the Medical Faculty number 2 of the Medical Sciences University of Santiago de Cuba. Objective: to characterize the training o [...] f professional skills in the subject Pediatrics in the above mentioned Faculty. Methods: theoretical, analysis-synthesis, dialectical-hermeneutical, and structural systemic; empirical, documentary analysis of the subject syllabus, surveys to students and teachers, and observation of the ways of performance of teachers and students in activities of education through work, and statistical methods. Results: insufficiencies were verified at the level of curricular microdesign, regarding the system of skills and the dynamics of the teaching-learning process in the subject Pediatrics, related to the skills of the health professionals; a lack of integrality was detected in the teaching-learning process, centered in the cognitive level; also deficiencies were found in their performance, in respect to not teaching, educating and developing the students simultaneously; it was also detected a passive role of the students, and the activities in the education through work were not structured for developing creativity, reflection and independence. Conclusions: the analysis of the study corroborates the relevance of the research theme and the need of a conceptualization of the teaching-learning process of the General Doctor in the subject Pediatrics, from the inconsistencies that are shown in the process of structuring its system of skills.

Emma Aurora, Bastart Ortiz; Reinaldo, Reyes Mediaceja; Caridad María, Tamayo Reus.

2014-08-01

395

Die ontwikkeling van 'n DBS-reeks ter ondersteuning van leesvaardighede / Development and integration of multimedia teaching and learning support material (LTSM) to support reading skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: Afrikaner Abstract in english The Department of Education, educators, parents and various stakeholders are concerned about the literacy levels of learners in South-African schools. Various national and international studies revealed shockingly low levels and underachievement. In 2006 the Department of Education revealed the dist [...] urbing fact that 61% of South African learners still cannot read by the end of grade 3. Results of a systemic evaluation that was undertaken in 2007 revealed an alarmingly low average of 36% for literacy. The Department of Education launched various investigations to establish why the levels of reading proficiency for South African learners are so poor. The Foundations for Learning Campaign was one of the responses to address these concerns and an effort to assist teachers in facilitating literacy skills effectively. South African educators are experiencing increased pressure to teach literacy skills (including reading) effectively. It is imperative that effective reading instruction should commence in the foundation phase, where the basis for more advanced skills is established. In order to help learners to become better readers, teachers need support to deal with problems typically experienced in South African classrooms. These problems include large classes, a lack of teaching expertise/ training as well as a lack of resources in many classrooms. The purpose of this study was to describe how recently developed multimedia learning and teaching support material (MLTSM) by means of a digital book disc (DBD) can enhance the reading skills of foundation phase learners. It also describes the benefits of the DBD for the South African school context and the potential it has to enrich and support reading instruction in the foundation phase. The DBD is a form of electronic mobile learning facilitated by a DVD player that can be used as MLTSM. The DBD uses multimedia (written and spoken words, visual illustrations or animation) presented in a mobile format (portable DVD players). According to Mayer's cognitive theory of multimedia learning, the working memory includes both visual and auditory channels and learning is enhanced when both these channels are used during multimedia supported learning activities. The proposed model provides guidelines for the development and integration of MTLSM on a DBD to enable learners to become skilled in reading and writing, while enjoying the process of becoming literate. The DBD focuses on phonemic awareness, word recognition, reading comprehension and fluency as important components of reading instruction. Shared reading instruction activities where learners follow the text and join in when they are able to do so, improves motivation. Stories, poems and songs that relate to the themes (context) in the classroom, are examples of the different kinds of text used on the DBD. Relevant teaching and learning principles that support reading proficiency while using the DBD, are discussed. These include active learner participation, motivation, reinforcement of positive attitudes, self assessment and immediate feedback. The study also demonstrates how relevant learning material that relate to the learner's experience, edutainment and scaffolding can contribute to effective reading instruction. Different multimedia principles that support and enhance reading profi ciency are also explained. The DBD enables the teacher to facilitate enrichment (additional stories) as well as remedial activities, where learners experiencing difficulties/problems, can repeat learning activities according to their individual needs. The differentiated stories allow learners with varying abilities to choose activities that relate to their developmental level providing the appropriate level of challenge. Thematic stories and other reading material can also be produced by individual teachers to enhance the relevancy of the content for the learner's world, experience and interest. The DBD addresses some of the problems typical of South African sc

Audrey, Klopper; Carisma, Nel.

2010-12-01

396

Die ontwikkeling van 'n DBS-reeks ter ondersteuning van leesvaardighede / Development and integration of multimedia teaching and learning support material (LTSM) to support reading skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: Afrikaner Abstract in english The Department of Education, educators, parents and various stakeholders are concerned about the literacy levels of learners in South-African schools. Various national and international studies revealed shockingly low levels and underachievement. In 2006 the Department of Education revealed the dist [...] urbing fact that 61% of South African learners still cannot read by the end of grade 3. Results of a systemic evaluation that was undertaken in 2007 revealed an alarmingly low average of 36% for literacy. The Department of Education launched various investigations to establish why the levels of reading proficiency for South African learners are so poor. The Foundations for Learning Campaign was one of the responses to address these concerns and an effort to assist teachers in facilitating literacy skills effectively. South African educators are experiencing increased pressure to teach literacy skills (including reading) effectively. It is imperative that effective reading instruction should commence in the foundation phase, where the basis for more advanced skills is established. In order to help learners to become better readers, teachers need support to deal with problems typically experienced in South African classrooms. These problems include large classes, a lack of teaching expertise/ training as well as a lack of resources in many classrooms. The purpose of this study was to describe how recently developed multimedia learning and teaching support material (MLTSM) by means of a digital book disc (DBD) can enhance the reading skills of foundation phase learners. It also describes the benefits of the DBD for the South African school context and the potential it has to enrich and support reading instruction in the foundation phase. The DBD is a form of electronic mobile learning facilitated by a DVD player that can be used as MLTSM. The DBD uses multimedia (written and spoken words, visual illustrations or animation) presented in a mobile format (portable DVD players). According to Mayer's cognitive theory of multimedia learning, the working memory includes both visual and auditory channels and learning is enhanced when both these channels are used during multimedia supported learning activities. The proposed model provides guidelines for the development and integration of MTLSM on a DBD to enable learners to become skilled in reading and writing, while enjoying the process of becoming literate. The DBD focuses on phonemic awareness, word recognition, reading comprehension and fluency as important components of reading instruction. Shared reading instruction activities where learners follow the text and join in when they are able to do so, improves motivation. Stories, poems and songs that relate to the themes (context) in the classroom, are examples of the different kinds of text used on the DBD. Relevant teaching and learning principles that support reading proficiency while using the DBD, are discussed. These include active learner participation, motivation, reinforcement of positive attitudes, self assessment and immediate feedback. The study also demonstrates how relevant learning material that relate to the learner's experience, edutainment and scaffolding can contribute to effective reading instruction. Different multimedia principles that support and enhance reading profi ciency are also explained. The DBD enables the teacher to facilitate enrichment (additional stories) as well as remedial activities, where learners experiencing difficulties/problems, can repeat learning activities according to their individual needs. The differentiated stories allow learners with varying abilities to choose activities that relate to their developmental level providing the appropriate level of challenge. Thematic stories and other reading material can also be produced by individual teachers to enhance the relevancy of the content for the learner's world, experience and interest. The DBD addresses some of the problems typical of South African sc

Audrey, Klopper; Carisma, Nel.

397

Consideraciones epistemológicas acerca de la enseñanza de las habilidades profesionales en Pediatría / Epistemological considerations about the teaching of professional skills in Pediatrics  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Fundamento: se realiza una caracterización del estado actual de la formación de las habilidades profesionales para la atención al niño y al adolescente desde la asignatura Pediatría en la Facultad de Medicina No. 2 de la Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de Santiago de Cuba. Objetivo: caracterizar la [...] formación de las habilidades profesionales desde la asignatura Pediatría en la mencionada facultad. Métodos: teóricos: análisis y síntesis, hermenéutico-dialéctico y el sistémico estructural. Empíricos: análisis documental del programa de la asignatura, encuestas a estudiantes y profesores y observación de modos de actuación de profesores y estudiantes en actividades de la educación en el trabajo; y métodos estadísticos. Resultados: se constatan insuficiencias en el plano del microdiseño curricular en lo referido al sistema de habilidades y en la dinámica del proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje en la asignatura Pediatría, relacionadas con las destrezas del profesional de la salud, se observa falta de integralidad del proceso enseñanza aprendizaje, el cual se centra en lo cognoscitivo, se perciben carencias en su realización de modo, que a la vez que instruya, eduque y desarrolle, se evidencia el papel pasivo del estudiante, y las actividades de educación en el trabajo no se estructuran para desarrollar creatividad, reflexión e independencia. Conclusiones: el análisis del objeto de estudio corrobora la pertinencia del tema investigado y la necesidad de una conceptualización del proceso enseñanza aprendizaje del Médico General en la asignatura Pediatría a partir de las inconsistencias que se muestran en el proceso de estructuración de su sistema de habilidades. Abstract in english Background: a characterization is done about the current status in the training of professional skills for the care of children and adolescents in the subject Pediatrics, at the Medical Faculty number 2 of the Medical Sciences University of Santiago de Cuba. Objective: to characterize the training o [...] f professional skills in the subject Pediatrics in the above mentioned Faculty. Methods: theoretical, analysis-synthesis, dialectical-hermeneutical, and structural systemic; empirical, documentary analysis of the subject syllabus, surveys to students and teachers, and observation of the ways of performance of teachers and students in activities of education through work, and statistical methods. Results: insufficiencies were verified at the level of curricular microdesign, regarding the system of skills and the dynamics of the teaching-learning process in the subject Pediatrics, related to the skills of the health professionals; a lack of integrality was detected in the teaching-learning process, centered in the cognitive level; also deficiencies were found in their performance, in respect to not teaching, educating and developing the students simultaneously; it was also detected a passive role of the students, and the activities in the education through work were not structured for developing creativity, reflection and independence. Conclusions: the analysis of the study corroborates the relevance of the research theme and the need of a conceptualization of the teaching-learning process of the General Doctor in the subject Pediatrics, from the inconsistencies that are shown in the process of structuring its system of skills.

Emma Aurora, Bastart Ortiz; Reinaldo, Reyes Mediaceja; Caridad María, Tamayo Reus.

398

Segments of marketers based on a perceived importance of marketing knowledge and skills  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to define and empirically verify a range of knowledge and skills which are necessary in order to segment marketers, based on their perceptions of the importance of such marketing knowledge and skills. To empirically verify the importance of marketing knowledge and skills, a 28-item measurement instrument was developed. Responses from 235 marketing vice-presidents, marketing directors, sales directors or company presidents/owners in Slovenia were obtained (an 11.8% total response rate. The results reveal four clusters of marketers: marketing specialists, marketing generalists, non-marketers and marketing generals. General and leadership skills are highly evaluated, together with the knowledge and skills related to competition and the company’s market position. Consistent with the general prejudice about marketing people, creative thinking skills and imagination are very important, especially to marketing generalists in our survey. Yet, the knowledge and skills related to consumer behaviour and marketing communication are less important, especially to marketing generals and non-marketers. Certain implications for marketing education and practice arise from the survey.

Vesna Žabkar

2009-07-01

399

Uniting Active and Deep Learning to Teach Problem-Solving Skills: Strategic Tools and the Learning Spiral  

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This article describes an innovative strategic tools course designed to enhance the problem-solving skills of marketing majors. The course serves as a means of preparing students to capitalize on opportunities afforded by a case-based capstone course and to better meet the needs and expectations of prospective employers. The course format utilizes…

Diamond, Nina; Koernig, Stephen K.; Iqbal, Zafar

2008-01-01

400

The Use of Drama to Teach Social Skills in a Special School Setting for Students with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

For children with autism, social challenges may be both part of the disability and a barrier to accessing education. This article reports on a project that used drama to address such challenges by drawing on the social skills of non-autistic peers in a special school setting. The article demonstrates how drama's flexibility may be harnessed in…

Kempe, Andy; Tissot, Cathy

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
401

Soft skills and dental education.  

Science.gov (United States)

Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses the different soft skills, how they are taught and assessed and the issues that need to be addressed in their teaching and assessment. The use of the module by the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya for development of soft skills for institutions of higher learning introduced by the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. PMID:23574183

Gonzalez, M A G; Abu Kasim, N H; Naimie, Z

2013-05-01

402

Problem Solving Skills and Learning Achievements through Problem-Based Module in teaching and learning Biology in High School  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of using problem-based module (PBM in the subject of Biology on high school students’ problem-solving skill and achievement. This research used the quasi-experiment method with Non-Equivalent Pretest and Posttest Control Group Design, which involved two science classes, in which one group was assigned as control group and another one as experiment group, in a high school in Pekan Baru, Indonesia. The problem-solving ability and the product of learning were descriptively analyzed before being inferentially analyzed. To find out whether or not there is any difference in their problem-solving skill, t-Test and N-gain test was conducted on the experimental group’s and control group’s concept mastery level and product of learning. The result shows that the problem-solving skill percentage of the experimental group was 95.47% (very good, whereas that of the control group was 25.12% (low. The average of student’s achievement in the experimental group was 84.26% (good, while that of the control group equaled 79.08% (moderate. The average of the product of learning was 89.89% (good for the experimental group, whereas that of the control group was 52.10% (low. The findings showed that PBM can actually increase problem-solving skill, students’ achievement, and students’ learning product, with the experimental group getting higher percentage in all three aspects compared to the control group by using PBM in their Biology class. The implication of this study is the increase in the quality of learning through learning innovation using learning module. The panned and organized implementation of this module by teachers will not only improve students’ thinking skills, but also increase the quality of science and technology, consistent with the aim of Indonesia education.

Wan Syafii

2013-08-01

403

The Value of Teaching Creativity in Adult Education  

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Full Text Available In today’s postmodern world, change is the only thing for sure. As a result, creative capacity is the key. Learning creative thinking in fact is a useful vehicle for adult learners to polish their abilities and orientate the world around them. This article attempts to review creativity-related literature and to provide some salient considerations for adult educators with the desire to promote creativity in the classrooms. To begin, the definition of creativity was disclosed. Then the process of creativity was reviewed. Following this line, several factors, including personality traits, knowledge and expertise, motivation and self-efficacy, learning style and thinking style, teaching approaches, assessment and reward, and environment, that might facilitate or stifle creativity were discussed. Finally, some suggestions for adult educators were provided.      

Kuan Chen Tsai

2012-06-01

404

Teaching  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The analysis presented here is a continuation of the author’s research and teaching activities directed toward a better understanding of critical thinking processes among undergraduate students in the philosophy of the social sciences. Over a span of ten or more years, what I have been basically concerned with is the use of overlapping intellectual domains (e.g., sociology, philosophy of social science, and cognitive psychology) as a means of identifying both issues and pedagogical strategi...

Miller, Steven I.

1999-01-01

405

Peer-teaching in the food chemistry laboratory: student-produced experiments, peer and audio feedback, and integration of employability skills  

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Full Text Available This paper describes the author’s experience over the last several years of implementing an alternative Food Chemistry laboratory practical model for a group of third-year BSc Nutraceuticals students. The initial main objectives were to prepare students for the more independent final-year research project; to incorporate innovative approaches to feedback; and to integrate key employability skills into the curriculum. These were achieved through building the skills required to ultimately allow students working in groups to research, design and run a laboratory for their class. The first year of the project involved innovative approaches to feedback, including weekly feedback sessions, report checklists and audio feedback podcasts. Student evaluation after one year suggested the case group felt more prepared for final-year research projects and work placement owing to the redesign of the laboratory assessment. This, together with general positive feedback across several indicators, was proof of concept, and was a foundation for an improved model. The improvements related to the organisation and management of the project, but the same pedagogical approach has been retained. The second year saw the introduction of a more rigorous and easier to manage peer evaluation though use of the online Comprehensive Assessment for Team-Member Effectiveness (CATME tool. The most recent revision has included a Project Wiki hosted on Blackboard to facilitate the organisation, communication, assessment and feedback of student-generated resources.More recently, the final-year students who had participated in the peer-teaching Food Chemistry labs when in third year have been evaluated. This evaluation took place following their research projects, and suggests that the peer-teaching model better prepared them for these activities, compared to traditional laboratories.

Julie Lisa Dunne

2014-10-01

406

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Teacher-Implemented Video Prompting on an iPod Touch to Teach Food-Preparation Skills to High School Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

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A multiple-probe-across-behaviors design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of video prompts delivered on an iPod Touch to teach food-preparation skills to two high school students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and intellectual disability. The special education teacher implemented the procedure in the high school classroom. Student data…

Johnson, Jesse W.; Blood, Erika; Freeman, Amy; Simmons, Karen

2013-01-01

407

The Impact of Teaching Two Courses ( Electronic Curriculum Design and Multimedia on The Acquistion of Electronic Content Design Skills  

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Full Text Available The use of Multimedia applications in Learning provides useful concepts for Instructional Content Design.This study aimed to investigate the effect of design electronic curriculum and multimedia applications onacquiring e-content design skills, and improving their attitudes towards e-learning. To achieve theobjective of the study, the researchers developed a test to measure the efficiencies of designing electroniccontent and the measure of attitudes towards e-learning, The results showed that study of both coursescontributed positively to the acquisition of design skills of e-content , The results revealed that there arestatistical significant differences between the scores of the students in the two applications (pre and poston the total score of the attitude measure and three areas of it.

Natheer K Gharaibeh

2013-01-01

408

Knowledge and skills of neonatal resuscitation of health professionals at a university teaching hospital of Northwest Ethiopia  

Science.gov (United States)

BACKGROUND: Competency in neonatal resuscitation is critical in the delivery rooms, neonatology units and pediatrics intensive care units to ensure the safety and health of neonates. Each year, millions of babies do not breathe immediately at birth, and among them the majority require basic neonatal resuscitation. Perinatal asphyxia is a major contributor to neonatal deaths worldwide in resource-limited settings. Neonatal resuscitation is effective only when health professionals have sufficient knowledge and skills. But malpractices by health professionals are frequent in the resuscitation of neonates. The present study was to assess the knowledge and skills of health professionals about neonatal resuscitation. METHODS: An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in our hospital from February15 to April 30, 2014. All nurses, midwives and residents from obstetrics-gynecology (obs-gyn), midwifery and pediatric departments were included. The mean scores of knowledge and skills were compared for sex, age, type of profession, qualification, year of service and previous place of work of the participants by using Student’s t test and ANOVA with Scheffe’s test. A P value neonatal resuscitation were substandardized. Training of neonatal resuscitation for midwives, nurses and residents should be emphasized.

Gebreegziabher, Endale; Aregawi, Adugna; Getinet, Habtamu

2014-01-01

409

Estetoscópio digital como ferramenta inovadora no ensino da ausculta cardíaca / Digital stethoscope as an innovative tool on the teaching of auscultatory skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese O exame físico cardiovascular, em particular a ausculta cardíaca, é uma das habilidades clínicas mais difíceis para os alunos durante seu treinamento médico. Estudos sugerem que o uso de tecnologias, como o estetoscópio digital, aumente a acurácia do exame clínico, entretanto, seu impacto no ensino [...] da propedêutica da ausculta cardíaca em alunos de graduação de Medicina não é conhecido. O objetivo é demonstrar a utilidade do estetoscópio digital, em comparação com métodos tradicionais, como instrumento de ensino da ausculta cardíaca. Estudo de intervenção, longitudinal, controlado, unicêntrico e randomizado. Foram inscritos 38 alunos de medicina para um curso de semiologia cardiovascular com duração de oito semanas. Definiu-se um programa com aulas expositivas e à beira do leito nas enfermarias de Cardiologia. Nas aulas práticas, os alunos foram randomizados em dois grupos: 1) (n = 21) estetoscópio digital (Littmann® modelo 3200, 3M); e 2) (n = 17) estetoscópios convencionais. Foi realizada uma avaliação pré-treinamento, através de um teste utilizando o software Heart Sounds®, que foi repetida ao final do curso. As médias das avaliações foram comparadas pelo teste T pareado e não pareado. Observa-se que, ao final do curso, houve uma melhora significativamente maior no grupo que utilizou o estetoscópio digital (51,9%) quando comparado ao grupo que utilizou o estetoscópio convencional (29,5%). Intervenções de curta duração para o ensino de semiologia cardíaca são capazes de contribuir de modo significativo para melhora da proficiência da identificação dos sons cardíacos. O uso do estetoscópio digital demonstrou ser um fator positivo no ensino dessas habilidades. Abstract in english Physical cardiovascular examination, particularly cardiac auscultation, is one of the most difficult clinical skills for students during their medical training. Studies suggest that the use of technologies such as digital stethoscope increase the accuracy of clinical examination, however, its impact [...] on the teaching of cardiac auscultation for undergraduate students of medicine is not known. The objective is to demonstrate the usefulness of the digital stethoscope compared to traditional methods as a tool in the teaching of auscultatory skills. nterventional, longitudinal, controlled, unicenter and randomized study. Thirty-eight medicine students were enrolled for a cardiovascular semiology course lasting eight weeks. The course program included lectures and bedside practice in Cardiology wards. In the practical lessons, the students were randomized into two groups: 1) (n = 21) digital stethoscope (Littmann® Model 3200, 3M); and 2) (n = 17) conventional stethoscopes. A pre-training evaluation was conducted through a test using the software Heart Sounds®, which was repeated after the course. The average scores were compared by paired T test and unpaired T test. It is observed that, at the end of the course, there was a significantly greater improvement in the group that used the digital stethoscope (51.9%) compared to the group using the conventional stethoscope (29.5%). Short-term interventions for cardiac semiology teaching are able to contribute significantly to improving proficiency in the identification of heart sounds. The use of digital stethoscope proved to be a positive factor in teaching these skills.

Claudio Tinoco, Mesquita; Jader Costa dos, Reis; Luciana Silveira, Simões; Eduardo Cardoso de, Moura; Gustavo Amarante, Rodrigues; Carolina Cunto de, Athayde; Hugo Lima, Machado; Pedro Gemal, Lanzieri.

410

Creativity in the Science Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Though many teachers would like to incorporate creative activities into their teaching, there are few practical suggestions to help them accomplish this goal (Yager 2000). In this article, the authors introduce four strategies to help integrate creative-thinking skills into high school science instruction: SCAMPER; Six Thinking Hats; Agreement, Disagreement, and Irrelevance; and Creative Problem Solving.

Seung, Eulsun; Park, Soonhye

2008-09-01

411

Seeing (and Inferring) is Believing: Using the Nature of Science to reinforce process skills and teach relevant science content.  

Science.gov (United States)

If science education can be compared to building a house, then conceptually it can be divided into three parts: content knowledge, process skills, and nature of science or science as a way of thinking. The basis of understanding any discipline begins with the accumulation of facts, theories and concepts. These are the building blocks which are used to construct and strengthen a foundation. Next are the investigatory processes and the methods; these are the tools necessary to create new knowledge and enable students to strengthen and expand their foundation. Closely linked with processes and methods are the values and assumptions that are intertwined with interpretations and conclusions. Students must be taught that science is not infallible or an absolute field. Theories and relationships are created and refuted based on the availability of data, and are heavily laden with personal and cultural bias. Teachers need to emphasize the importance of the different aspects of the nature of science—for example the connection between creativity and science—so that students will know there is not merely a single set of blueprints to build the house but an infinite number that merely await discovery. In the United States, the National Science Education Standards recognize the importance of the nature of science as an instructional objective. As a consequence many states have incorporated the nature of science into their standards. In this presentation we will clarify what is meant by "nature of science" and relate it to the more traditional topics of science content and process skills. The focus of the presentation will be on introducing a sequence of teacher-tested activities designed for middle and secondary school students. These activities address specific aspects of the nature of science; they are designed to be engaging and student-centered and to link abstract concepts of the nature of science to more familiar science process-skills.

Egge, Noah; Bell, Randy

2010-05-01

412

Problem Solving Skills and Learning Achievements through Problem-Based Module in teaching and learning Biology in High School  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of using problem-based module (PBM) in the subject of Biology on high school students’ problem-solving skill and achievement. This research used the quasi-experiment method with Non-Equivalent Pretest and Posttest Control Group Design, which involved two science classes, in which one group was assigned as control group and another one as experiment group, in a high school in Pekan Baru, Indonesia. The problem-solving ability and the produ...

Wan Syafii; Ruhizan Mohd Yasin

2013-01-01

413

Language Skills Approach to Writing.  

Science.gov (United States)

The writing course described in this paper is designed to utilize the existing listening, reading, and speaking skills of educationally disadvantaged students to teach writing skills on the college level. The paper discusses the rationale of the course, describes the content briefly, outlines the language skills employed in a typical week's…

Halloran, Karyn J.

414

Computational Skills for Biology Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This interview with Distinguished Science Award recipient Louis J. Gross highlights essential computational skills for modern biology, including: (1) teaching concepts listed in the Math & Bio 2010 report; (2) illustrating to students that jobs today require quantitative skills; and (3) resources and materials that focus on computational skills.

Gross, Louis J.

2008-01-01

415

Teaching Self-Management Skills in Persons with Chronic Lower Limb Swelling and Limited Mobility: Evidence for Usability of Telerehabilitation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usability of telerehabilitation as a method of teaching self-management for chronic swelling of the lower limbs in persons with limited mobility. An in-home telerehabilitation self-management education protocol for chronic swelling of the lower limbs, termed Telerehabilitation to Empower You to Manage and Prevent Swelling (TR-PUMPS, was implemented using the Versatile and Integrated System for Telerehabilitation (VISYTER software platform. Participants (n=11 were 36-79 years old, predominately female (72.7% and diagnosed with a variety of health conditions. Participants’ perceived usability scores of the remote delivery of TR-PUMPS was high with a median score of 6.67 (range 4.90 - 7.00 on a Likert scale: 1= disagree to 7= agree. There was no correlation between participants’ familiarity with information technology and their perception of telerehabilitation usability. These results support telerehabilitation as a viable method for teaching a home-based, self-management

Becky L. Faett

2013-06-01

416

ViSTREET: An Educational Virtual Environment for the Teaching of Road Safety Skills to School Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Virtual reality (VR) has been prevalently used as a tool to help students learn and to simulate situations that are too hazardous to practice in real life. The present study aims to explore the capability of VR to achieve these two purposes and demonstrate a novel application of the result, using VR to help school students learn about road safety skills, which are impractical to be carried out in real-life situations. This paper describes the system design of the VR-based learning environment known as Virtual Simulated Traffics for Road Safety Education (ViSTREET) and its various features. An overview of the technical procedures for its development is also included. Ultimately, this paper highlights the potential use of VR in addressing the learning problem concerning road safety education programme in Malaysia.

Chuah, Kee Man; Chen, Chwen Jen; Teh, Chee Siong

417

Las Competencias Docentes en los Programas de Posgrado en Administración: Un Estudio de Diagnóstico / Teaching Skills in Graduate Administration Programs: A Diagnosis Study  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El objetivo de la investigación que se presenta fue diagnosticar las competencias docentes en los posgrados en administración. El estudio fue una investigación no experimental cuantitativa con un alcance exploratorio. Como instrumento para recopilar la información se utilizó un cuestionario organiza [...] do por los factores de docencia, investigación, planeación y evaluación. La muestra total fue de 59 docentes distribuidos en cuatro programas de maestría: a) en Administración Pública; b) en Administración de Negocios; c) en Alta Dirección y d) en Administración. Las principales conclusiones de la investigación fueron que el análisis ha mostrado que una estructura tetra-factorial es viable y adecuada. También se muestra que profesores le dan importancia al desarrollo de proyectos de investigación que les permitan avanzar en el conocimiento científico y a la publicación de sus resultados. Abstract in english The objective of the research presented in this paper was to determine the teaching skills in the graduate administration programs. The study was a non-experimental quantitative research with an exploratory range. A test organized by factors such as teaching, research, planning and evaluation was us [...] ed as an instrument to gather information. The total sample comprised 59 teachers assigned in four Master programs: a) Public Administration; b) Business Administration; c) Senior Management; and d) Administration. The main conclusions of this research were the viability and adequacy of a tetra-factorial structure. It is also shown that professors give special importance to research projects development and the publications of the results through publications allowing them to improve scientific knowledge.

Edgar O, Cardoso; María T, Cerecedo; Eduardo A, Vanegas.

418

Ver, oír y aprender: una filmación educativa para la enseñanza de habilidades en exploración física / Watch, listen and learn: an educational film for teaching physical examination skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción. Hemos desarrollado un cortometraje educativo para la formación en exploración física de estudiantes de medicina de tercer año, sin experiencia previa en habilidades clínicas. Materiales y métodos. El estudio se ha realizado en el Servicio de Medicina Interna del Hospital Universitari S [...] agrat Cor de Barcelona durante dos años consecutivos. Se efectuaron evaluaciones sobre exploración física de los estudiantes antes y después de ver la película. La primera evaluación se llevó a cabo el primer día de estancia de los estudiantes en el hospital. A continuación, visualizaron la filmación y se les informó de que al cabo de 48 horas se efectuaría una segunda evaluación en la que deberían realizar una exploración física de acuerdo con lo que hab