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Sample records for teaching creative-thinking skills

  1. Teaching Creative Thinking Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamurali Eragamreddy

    2013-01-01

    It is internationally recognized that teachers play a significant role in developing suitable values in their pupils. Students also learn strategies for identifying problems, making decisions, and finding solutions both in and out of school. Among them creative thinking skills play a prominent role in their learning process. Techniques developed specifically to teach creative thinking and examine how they may be applied to the classroom, are precise things to be considered. Awareness with ...

  2. Roles of parents in enhancing children’s creative thinking skills

    OpenAIRE

    Pervin Oya Taneri

    2012-01-01

    Since creative thinking is an essential requirement in today’s societies, educational institutions have to make some reforms in order to prepare next generation according to the needs of the societies such as giving more emphasis on creative thinking. The main aims of this paper are to reveal the parents’ opinions about the creative thinking skills, to teach parents the meaning of creative thinking, and to teach parents to create home environments that enhance creative thinking skills. A comb...

  3. [The application of creative thinking teaching in nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Chang, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Sheu, Sheila

    2010-04-01

    Nursing education is increasingly expected to cultivate nursing student creative abilities in line with general Ministry of Education promotion of greater creativity within education and the greater leeway for creativity won domestically for nurses by professional nursing organizations. Creative thinking has been named by education experts in the United States as the third most important goal of nursing education. However, nursing students in Taiwan have been shown to test lower in terms of creativity than students enrolled in business management. Leaders in nursing education should consider methods by which to improve the creative thinking capabilities of nursing students. Articles in the literature indicate that courses in creative studies are concentrated in the field of education, with few designed specifically for nursing. The teaching of constructing creative thinking is particularly weak in the nursing field. The purpose of this article was to review literature on education and nursing in order to explore current definitions, teaching strategies, and evaluation approaches related to creativity, and to develop a foundation for teaching creativity in nursing. The authors hope that an appropriate creative thinking course for nursing students may be constructed by referencing guidance provided in this in order to further cultivate creative thinking abilities in nursing students that will facilitate their application of creative thinking in their future clinical practicum. PMID:20401872

  4. Roles of parents in enhancing children’s creative thinking skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervin Oya Taneri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since creative thinking is an essential requirement in today’s societies, educational institutions have to make some reforms in order to prepare next generation according to the needs of the societies such as giving more emphasis on creative thinking. The main aims of this paper are to reveal the parents’ opinions about the creative thinking skills, to teach parents the meaning of creative thinking, and to teach parents to create home environments that enhance creative thinking skills. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods was employed. Pretest- posttest experimental design was used and qualitative data were collected by an open-ended questionnaire. A 10-hour parent education seminar was used as an intervention for the experimental group. The participants of the research were 80 parents (40 parents in the experimental group, 40 parents in the control group from a primary school in Ankara, Turkey. Content analysis was applied to analyze the qualitative data. The pretest results have indicated that there were no differences between parents groups according to the knowledge level about the creative thinking. According to posttest results, the knowledge levels of parents in the experimental group who were given 10-hour parent education seminar were increased. However, the knowledge levels of the parents who have not given any education in the control group, were remained the same. Besides, experimental group parents have more information about creating home environments that enhance creativity rather than control group parents. According to the findings, parents' perspectives in the experimental group on the creative thinking skills have changed after the parent education seminar. However, the perspectives of the parent in the control group have not changed.

  5. Teaching Design of Cultivating Nursing Students' Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi-wen, Liu; Chun-ping, Ni; Rui, Yang; Xiu-chuan, Li; Cheng, Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Chinese nursing education levels have developed fast over the past few years. Many nursing educators are devoted to the research of nursing teaching. How to cultivate nursing students, creative thinking is one of the principle researches and has received increasing attention. In the course of nursing teaching, we renewed the teaching design based…

  6. The extent to which teachers nurture creative thinking in the Grade 9 Social Sciences classroom through the choice of teaching methods / Byron John Bunt

    OpenAIRE

    Bunt, Byron John

    2012-01-01

    The nurturing of creative thinking skills is one of the cornerstones of Outcomes-Based Education (OBE). This study investigated to what extent teachers nurture the development of creative thinking through the choice of teaching methods, which include the application of teaching strategies and the utilization of resources, in the Grade 9 Social Sciences classroom. A literature study was undertaken to highlight the importance and nature of the development of creative thinking skills, and to est...

  7. Moods, Emotions and Creative Thinking: A Framework for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Douglas P.

    2013-01-01

    When planning and teaching, attention is generally given to cognition while the effect of mood and emotion on cognition is ignored. But students are not emotionless thinkers and the effect can make a difference to their thought. This is particularly evident when attempting to foster creative thinking. This article draws on research to describe…

  8. Drama Education on the Creative Thinking Skills of 61-72 Months Old Pre-School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Munevver Can; Aral, Neriman

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to identify six-year-old pre-school children's creative thinking skill levels and to establish whether there is a difference between the creative thinking skills of children who received drama education and those who did not. The population of the study consisted of six-year-old children who were attending pre-school classes of…

  9. Effect of Collaborative Studies on Prospective Teachers’ Creative Thinking Skills while Designing Computer Based Material

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    Salih B?R??Ç?

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study to examine effect of collaborative studies on prospective teachers? creative thinking skills while designing computer based materials. One group pre-test and post-test design of the pre-experimental model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. This experimental study have been applied to 34 prospective teachers who studied at Artvin Coruh University Facult of Education Primary Education Department in 2009-2010 spring term within the context of “Computer-II” course. “Creative Thinking Skill Scale” was applied at two different stages as pre-test and post-test and opinions of students were gathered about the method in research via interview forms. As a result, it was found that there was a significant difference between the prospective teachers? creative thinking skills and scores taken from scale were increased in favor of post-test. Collaborative group works have a great importance in occurrence of this increase was revealed from student views.

  10. The Effect of Creative Drama Activities Performed at the “Design Studies-1” Studio on Development of Creative Thinking Skills of Architecture Students

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    Levent ARIDA?

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is determining the effectiveness of teaching methods based on creative drama activities performed at the “Design Studies-1” studio on creative thinking and design skills. The research’s work group consisted of 67 students who attended the 15-week Design Studies-1 studio (45 female, 22 male. The research is a one-group pretest-posttest experimental design. The theoretical basis of the research is cognitive creativity. The practices stimulating the imagination and flexible thinking skills with the basis of creative drama were used as the creativity-improving techniques. Based on the assumption that creative thinking is teachable, the hypothesis that the “Design Studies-1” program conducted by the first researcher will improve the students’ creative thinking skills was accepted. The data were collected through Creative Thinking Tests (Form A and B, which was developed by Torrance (1974 and 1984 and whose Turkish version was composed by Aslan (1999, 2006. For the data analysis, SPSS 13 program was used. In data analysis, related group t-test and Mann-Whitney U statistical test were applied. The pretest and posttest scores mean of the students were compared and significant positive results were found in favor of posttest between the means of figural fluency, figural originality, abstractness of the titles, expressiveness of the titles, intrinsic visualization, liveliness of imagery, richness of imagery, fantasy, verbal fluency, verbal flexibility and verbal originality.

  11. Effects of a Program for Developing Creative Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanos, Natalia Larraz; Torres, Pedro Allueva

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to present an intervention program for creative skills development applied to a group of students of lower Secondary Education. Method: This program was applied in a school in Zaragoza (Spain) during the 2008-09 academic year. The study used a repeated-measures, quasi-experimental design with non-equivalent…

  12. The Levels of Creative Thinking and Metacognitive Thinking Skills of Intermediate School in Jordan: Survey Study

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    Majed Mohammad AL-khayat

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available

    This study is aimed at investigating the levels of creative and metacognitive thinking skills among students as well as the effect of student’s gender on creative and metacognitive thinking skills in the intermediate stage at Al-Balqa Province in Jordan. The method of stratifi ed sampling was selected for the purpose of this study. The metacognitive inventory consisted of (52 items, and Torrance test (Figure B, has been Applied on (372 students.The results showed that there were statistical signifi cant differences between the average performance of males and females on the creative and metacognitive thinking for the benefit of males as well as a high level of Metacognitive thinking from the viewpoint of the students. The researcher recommended that further studies should be focus on training programs for students on metacognitive skills and impact on educational achievement and creative thinking.

    Key words: Metacognitive thinking skills; Creative thinking skills; Education; Gender

  13. Enhancing Creative Thinking through Designing Electronic Slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokaram, Al-Ali Khaled; Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Fong, Fook Soon; Abdallah, Andaleeb Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    During the shifting of teaching and learning methods using computer technologies, much emphasis was paid on the knowledge content more than the thinking skills. Thus, this study investigated the effects of a computer application, namely, designing electronic slides on the development of creative thinking skills of a sample of undergraduate…

  14. Enhancing Creative Thinking through Designing Electronic Slides

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ali Khaled Mokaram; Ahmad Mohammad Al-Shabatat; Soon Fook Fong; Ahmad Abdallah Andaleeb

    2011-01-01

    During the shifting of teaching and learning methods using computer technologies, much emphasis was paid on the knowledge content more than the thinking skills. Thus, this study investigated the effects of a computer application, namely, designing electronic slides on the development of creative thinking skills of a sample of undergraduate students. A total number of 50 subjects, 25 in an experimental group and 25 in a control group were selected and a design of pre and post-test with an expe...

  15. Teaching creative thinking in regular science lessons: Potentials and obstacles of three different approaches in an Asian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian M. Y. CHENG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to the recent school creativity reforms in Asian places, this paper studied three different approaches of integrating creative thinking training into regular science lessons. They include developing creative thinking through science process, science content and science scenario. Three teacher case studies were conducted to examine the potentials and obstacles of implementing these approaches in classroom of Hong Kong. This study found that all the approaches were useful in developing student creative thinking, yet teachers experienced different tensions and dilemmas in different approaches. This paper suggests that the science content approach may be more readily accepted by teachers and students in an educational system which is dominated by knowledge content and examinations. However, with the limited skills and experience in creativity, teachers and students may feel that the science process and science scenario approach are easier to start with, as they are less constrained by the rigid content in the syllabus. Among various hindering factors, the most crucial one was found to be the original heavy knowledge-content, which in fact is a common characteristic of secondary science curriculum in many Asian places. In our future research and educational reforms, the dilemma between creative thinking and content learning needs to be seriously considered and solved at both individual and system levels.

  16. The Effects of Educational Multimedia for Scientific Signs in the Holy Quran in Improving the Creative Thinking Skills for Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusaleh, Sumaya; Abdelfattah, Eman; Alabadi, Zain; Sharieh, Ahmad

    This paper investigates the role of the scientific signs in the holy Quran in improving the creative thinking skills for the deaf children using multimedia. The paper investigates if the performance made by the experimental group's individuals is statistically significant compared with the performance made by the control group's individuals on Torrance Test for creative thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality and the total degree) in two cases:

  17. The Development of Critical and Creative Thinking Skills for 21st Century Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missett, Tracy C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three independently conducted studies, linked by investigation into the development of thinking skills deemed necessary for the 21st Century. While educators and policy makers advocate teaching students creative and critical thinking skills to address an increasingly global and complex world, they simultaneously…

  18. A sample study on synectics activities from creative thinking methods: creativity from the perspective of children

    OpenAIRE

    Aysun Öztuna Kaplan; Serhat Ercan

    2011-01-01

    The study was derived from an action research on the use of synectics in creative thinking methods in science and technology teaching. There were three main application steps in the action research, which was designed to help students in gaining creative thinking skills. In the research, which had lasted for one teaching semester, the teacher firstly fulfilled two different applications to make the students get used to the synectics technique. First of these applications was to redefine the c...

  19. The Levels of Creative Thinking and Metacognitive Thinking Skills of Intermediate School in Jordan: Survey Study

    OpenAIRE

    Majed Mohammad AL-khayat

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the levels of creative and metacognitive thinking skills among students as well as the effect of student’s gender on creative and metacognitive thinking skills in the intermediate stage at Al-Balqa Province in Jordan. The method of stratifi ed sampling was selected for the purpose of this study. The metacognitive inventory consisted of (52) items, and Torrance test (Figure B), has been Applied on (372) students.The results showed that there were s...

  20. The Learner-Directed Classroom: Developing Creative Thinking Skills through Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquith, Diane B., Ed.; Hathaway, Nan E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Educators at all levels want their students to develop habits of self-directed learning and critical problem-solving skills that encourage ownership and growth. In "The Learner-Directed Classroom," practicing art educators (PreK-16) offer both a comprehensive framework for understanding student-directed learning and concrete pedagogical strategies…

  1. Teaching creative thinking in regular science lessons: Potentials and obstacles of three different approaches in an Asian context

    OpenAIRE

    Vivian M. Y. CHENG

    2010-01-01

    In response to the recent school creativity reforms in Asian places, this paper studied three different approaches of integrating creative thinking training into regular science lessons. They include developing creative thinking through science process, science content and science scenario. Three teacher case studies were conducted to examine the potentials and obstacles of implementing these approaches in classroom of Hong Kong. This study found that all the approaches were useful in develop...

  2. METHODS FOR IMPROVING INFORMATION CULTURE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF RESEARCH AND CREATIVE SKILLS STUDENTS BASED ON CREATIVE THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teplaya Naila Aligasanovna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses methods to improve the information culture in the development of research and creative abilities of students on the basis of creative thinking. The purpose: consider ways to improve the information culture in the development of research and creative abilities of students on the basis of creative thinking. Method or methodology of carrying out of job: theoretical analysis of the psychological and educational literature. Results: The essence of the methods to improve the information culture, which leads to the development of abilities to work in a multi-factor systems in the face of uncertainty, to the construction of more complex hierarchical structures of their own activities, updating combinatorial abilities, that improve the development process of research and creativity, to generate the highest level IV information Culture - Professionally. Scope of results: preparation of the information for University students.

  3. Effects of Motor Skill Intervention on Gross Motor Development, Creative Thinking and Academic Performance in Preschool Children

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    Judith Jiménez Díaz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate how students (mean= 6.08±0.5 years benefit from a physical education program in motor performance, creative thinking and academic achievement. Students (n = 39 were randomly assigned to comparison group (6 boys and 7 girls who received the regular preschool program (which includes 1 session of 30 minutes per week; intervention group 1 (6 boys and 7 girls who received the regular preschool program plus 1 session of 30 minutes per week of the intervention program; or intervention group 2 (6 boys and 7 girls, who received the regular preschool program plus 1 session of 60 minutes per week of the intervention program; during 8 weeks. All participants performed the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2 and the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT before and after the study. The academic achievement score was given by the school. The ANOVA (Group x Gender x Time pre and post analysis revealed a significant triple interaction in the object control. Significant double interactions in the locomotor subscale and in the gross motor quotient were also found. After the post-hoc analysis, the results suggest that the physical education program benefits the gross motor performance and did not have an effect on the creative thinking or on the academic achievement.

  4. ANALYTICAL, CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING DEVELOPMENT OF THE GIFTED CHILDREN IN THE USA SCHOOLS

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    Anna Yurievna Kuvarzina

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Teachers of the gifted students should not only make an enrichment and acceleration program for them but also pay attention to the development of analytical, critical and creative thinking skills. Despite great interest for this issue in the last years, the topic of analytical and creative thinking is poorly considered in the textbooks for the gifted. In this article some methods, materials and programs of analytical, critical and creative thinking skills development, which are used in the USA, are described.  The author analyses and systematize the methods and also suggests some ways of their usage in the Russian educational system.Purpose: to analyze and systematize methods, materials and programs, that are used in the USA for teaching gifted children analytical, critical and creative thinking, for development of their capacities of problem-solving and decision-making. Methods and methodology of the research: analysis, comparison, principle of the historical and logical approaches unity.Results: positive results of employment of analytical, critical and creative thinking development methods were shown in the practical experience of teaching and educating gifted children in the USA educational system.Results employment field: the Russian Federation educational system: schools, special classes and courses for the gifted children.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-42

  5. AN APPLICATION OF A MODEL OF CREATIVE THINKING TO TEACHING IN A FIRST-GRADE CLASSROOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MANN, JOHN S.

    THE EFFECTS OF TWO TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING CHILDREN'S LITERATURE TO SAMPLES OF FIRST-GRADE CHILDREN WERE INVESTIGATED. THE EXPERIMENTAL TREATMENT WAS BASED ON LAWRENCE KUBIE'S MODEL OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS. THE CONTROL GROUP RECEIVED THE CONVENTIONAL PRESENTATION OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE WITHOUT KUBIE'S EMPHASIS ON METAPHORICAL AND PRECONSCIOUS…

  6. [An experience applying the teaching strategies of cooperative learning and creative thinking in a mental-health nursing practicum for undergraduates at a technical college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsien; Lin, Mei-Feng; Ho, Hsueh-Jen; Chang, Lu-Na; Chen, Shiue

    2015-04-01

    Lack of knowledge and experience is prevalent in undergraduate students who are taking their clinical practicum for mental-health nursing. This issue negatively affects the learning process. This article shares an experience of implementing a practicum-teaching program. This program was developed by the authors to facilitate the cooperative learning and clinical care competence of students. A series of multidimensional teaching activities was designed by integrating the strategies of peer cooperation and creative thinking to promote group and individual learning. Results indicate that the program successfully encouraged the students to participate more actively in the learning process. Additionally, the students demonstrated increased competence in empathetic caring toward patients, stronger friendship relationships with peers, and improved self-growth. The authors hope this teaching program provides a framework to increase the benefits for students of participating in clinical practicums and provides a teaching reference for clinical instructors. PMID:25854950

  7. Physics textbooks: do they promote or inhibit students’ creative thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieger, Aviva; Sherman, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Creativity can be viewed from different perspectives, such as the creative thinking process, the product, the creative environment and the individual. The physics domain, which is based on experiments, research, hypotheses and thinking outside the box, can serve as an excellent grounding for creativity development. This article focuses on creative thinking in physics textbooks. Creative thinking includes divergent thinking, which consists of four core components: fluency, flexibility, novelty and elaboration. The purpose of our study is to understand whether and how physics textbooks (such as the Israeli high-school book Newtonian Mechanics) enable the promotion and development of creative thinking. Findings indicate that they do not, so there is a need to raise physics teachers’ awareness of the importance of creative thinking in learning materials. It is advisable for physics teachers to engage in professional development courses in appropriate teaching strategies for the development of this creativity.

  8. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Melissa C; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creative thinking. We examined creative thinking, as measured by verbal and figural forms of the torrance tests of creative thinking (TTCT), in a group of participants with hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment as well as in a group of demographically matched healthy comparison participants. The patients with bilateral hippocampal damage performed significantly worse than comparison participants on both the verbal and figural portions of the TTCT. These findings suggest that hippocampus plays a role critical in creative thinking, adding to a growing body of work pointing to the diverse ways the hallmark processing features of hippocampus serve a variety of behaviors that require flexible cognition. PMID:24123555

  9. The Effects of Enrichment on Self Concept and Creative Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolloff, Penny Britton; Feldhusen, John F.

    1984-01-01

    An enrichment program based on the Purdue Three-Stage Model (creative thinking abilities, creative problem solving, and independent study and research skills) resulted in no significant differences in self-concept scores for 199 gifted elementary participants compared to control Ss. Participants did, however, show significant differences in…

  10. Assessing Creative Thinking in Design-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppelt, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    Infusing creative thinking competence through the design process of authentic projects requires not only changing the teaching methods and learning environment, but also adopting new assessment methods, such as portfolio assessment. The participants in this study were 128 high school pupils who have studied MECHATRONICS from 10th to 12th grades…

  11. The effectiveness of teaching strategies for creativity in a nursing concepts teaching protocol on the creative thinking of two-year RN-BSN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Kao Lo, Chi-Hui; Wang, Jing-Jy; Lee Hsieh, Jane; Chen, Kuei-Min

    2002-06-01

    Because of changes in the medical environment, nurses must maintain the ability of divergent thinking to solve the health problems of patients. However, many nurses whose work in clinical practice has become routine have lost the ability of creativity. To cultivate nurses creativity should be a goal of nursing education. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a nursing concepts teaching protocol by utilizing teaching strategies directed toward creativity to promote creativity in two-year RN-BSN students. This study design is a time series and one group experiment utilizing multiple instances of treatment. Teaching strategies for creativity were applied to a teaching unit and 52 two-year RN-BSN students were tested for creativity before the end of each semester. This study was conducted from March, 1999 to May, 2000, but only 30 students completed all tests and reached a 58% return rate. Torrance s (1974) definitions of creativity includ fluency, flexibility, and uniqueness were followed and the instrument, a questionnaire on Creativity in the application of the Nursing Process Tool (CNPT), was designed based on Emerson (1988). The content validity of Chinese-version CNPT was.79. The inter-coder reliability between two researchers was.84 following a coding guide that ten nursing education experts had established. The results indicated that 30 two-year RN-BSN students had improved fluency and flexibility. The improvements reached a significant level after the third semester. Only uniqueness declined. It is suggested that nursing faculty apply teaching strategies uniqueness more often in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts. By utilizing teaching strategies of creativity in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts, it is expected that two-year RN-BSN students can acquire characteristics of creativity for problem-solving skills in clinical settings. PMID:12119595

  12. Influence of play on creative thinking.

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    Berretta, S; Privette, G

    1990-10-01

    The immediate influence of flexible and highly structured play on the creative thinking of 184 fourth-grade boys and girls was investigated. Following either flexible or highly structured art, drama, and playground activities, children's performances on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking were evaluated. Children who participated in flexible play experiences showed significantly greater creative thinking than children participating in the highly structured play experiences. No significant differences were found between boys and girls related to effects of flexible and structured play on creative thinking. Implications for curriculum are explored. PMID:2251097

  13. Integrating the Cognitive Research Trust (CoRT) Programme for Creative Thinking into a Project-Based Technology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Moshe; Doppelt, Yaron

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Creative Thinking in Technology (CTT) program in which creative thinking is presented as a synthesis between lateral thinking and vertical thinking. Analyzes student projects in light of this definition of creativity, and explores the role technology can play in developing students' higher order thinking skills. (Contains 37…

  14. Investigating the Synergy of Critical Thinking and Creative Thinking in the Course of Integrated Activity in Taiwan

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    Chang, Yulin; Li, Bei-Di; Chen, Hsueh-Chih; Chiu, Fa-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The relationship lying between critical thinking and creative thinking is opposite or complementary, results of previous relevant researches have not yet concluded. However, most of researches put the effort to compare the respective effect of the thinking methods, either the teaching of creative thinking or that of critical thinking. Less of them…

  15. Collaboration Tools and Patterns for Creative Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Kohls, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Many creativity methods follow similar structures and principles. Design Patterns capture such invariants of proven good practices and discuss why, when and how creative thinking methods match various situations of collaboration. Moreover patterns connect different forms with each other. Once we understand the underlying structures of creative thinking processes we can facilitate digital tools to support them. While such tools can foster the effective application of establis...

  16. Children's creative thinking and color discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, B A; Brown, D M; Carson, D K; Meyer, S S; Bittner, M T

    1993-04-01

    60 children in Grades 3 through 6 from two schools were administered the Farnsworth Munsell 100-Hue Test and teachers provided a measure of different aspects of each child's creative thinking on the Williams Scale of Children's Divergent Thinking. Fluency and imagination scores were positively associated with color discrimination. While other dimensions of creative thinking did not correlate with color discrimination, some correlations suggested thematic connections between color discrimination and other manifestations of creative thinking as evaluated by teachers. Color discrimination was also positively associated with age, as older children differentiated between small differences in colors better than younger children. As intelligence or other variables may be relevant, further study is needed. PMID:8483673

  17. Creative Thinking of Practical Engineering Students during a Design Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Shlomo; Merdler, Moti

    2003-01-01

    Addresses variations in creative thinking during various stages of a design project and the relationship between creative thinking and motivation factors. Based on a study of Israeli practical engineering students. Appendix includes survey instrument. (Contains 37 references.) (Author/NB)

  18. A sample study on synectics activities from creative thinking methods: creativity from the perspective of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysun Öztuna Kaplan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was derived from an action research on the use of synectics in creative thinking methods in science and technology teaching. There were three main application steps in the action research, which was designed to help students in gaining creative thinking skills. In the research, which had lasted for one teaching semester, the teacher firstly fulfilled two different applications to make the students get used to the synectics technique. First of these applications was to redefine the concept of creativity. This was followed by the activity of designing a dynamometer. In the third stage, these students were asked to develop a creative project in three or four-person groups in one semester. The researcher continued synectics activities with the project group one by one in the same period. In the redefinition of the concept of creativity, which was the first stage of the action research, synectics methods were used. The research was made along the moment and action unit, which is the second unit of 7th grade science and technology class, in 2009-2010 teaching year. The population of the research was composed of 43 seventh graders in a public school in Istanbul. In the research, in which the students define the concept of creativity, “making the strange familiar” method (Hummell, 2004, which is one of the two basic implementations and is composed of six stages, was used. The students reached their own definitions of creativity at the end of this process, which started with building direct analogies and ended with creating original end-products. It was seen that the students began to see creativity in a different way and to perceive it as a process at the end of the synectics applications, rather than just an activity aiming at creation of an original product.

  19. Visual Material Effect on Academic Achievement, Creative Thinking and Attitude towards Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Emir.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test the effectiveness of the visual materials’ usage in Social Sciences on students’ academic achievement, creative thinking skills and their attitudes towards the course. The study was based on the Social Sciences unit titled ‘’Geography and Our World’’ and conducted with a total number of 38 students, (18 of them were in the experimental group and 20 of them were in the control group. The participants were 6th grade students of Koç Primary School in Bolu. For data collection, Social Sciences Achievement Test, Torrance Creative Thinking Test and Attitude Scale were used as instruments. In the statistical analysis of data, Mean, Standard Deviation levels and Mann Whitney-U Test were used. The results of the study revealed that the program designed for the experimental group, increased the participants’ academic achievement and creative thinking skills and had a positive impact on their attitudes towards the course.© 2013 IOJES. All rights reserved

  20. TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of learnin...

  1. Improving Science Attitude and Creative Thinking through Science Education Project: A Design, Implementation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Nilay; Türk, Cumhur; Tas, Erol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a science education project implemented in different learning environments on secondary school students' creative thinking skills and their attitudes to science lesson. Within this scope, a total of 50 students who participated in the nature education project in Samsun City in 2014 make up the…

  2. Using School Gardening as a Vehicle for Critical and Creative Thinking in Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausherman, Judith A.; Ubbes, Valerie A.; Kowalski, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    This strategy is to provide health education teacher candidates with critical and creative thinking tools to explore gardening as a vehicle to integrate health education content with other subjects. According to the Competency-Based Framework for the Health Education Specialist (2010a), entry-level health educators should have skills and…

  3. The Pedagogy of Ingenuity in Science: An Exploration of Creative Thinking in the Secondary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink, Allison

    2012-01-01

    The importance of creative thinking in science cannot be overstated. Creativity is integral to the development of knowledge about the natural world and the knowledge, skills and abilities that support it are in need of greater understanding. The Next Generation Science Standards (2012) include practices that implicitly emphasize the creative…

  4. The Effectiveness of the Creative Reversal Act (CREACT) on Students' Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Ugur; Oz, Ozge

    2010-01-01

    A research study using one-group pretest-posttest design was carried out on the effectiveness of the Creative Reversal Act (CREACT) on creative thinking. The CREACT is a new, teaching technique developed based on the theory of the janusian process. The research participants included 34 students who were attending 10th grade at a social studies…

  5. EDUCATIONAL DIMENSIONS OF CREATIVITY AND CREATIVE THINKING

    OpenAIRE

    Beresnevi?ius, Gediminas

    2010-01-01

    Educational dimensions of creativity and creative thinking are researched in the dissertation on theoretical and empirical levels. The research shows that creativity (process and its result) is affected by the following factors: motivation of the author, entirety of personal features and character traits, abilities, thinking, scope of thinking inertia, special and general knowledge, reconstructive and constructive imagination, intuition, author’s behaviour, emotions, physiological and psychol...

  6. Creative thinking in mentally retarded deaf adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R A

    1990-06-01

    30 mentally retarded deaf adolescents were matched with 30 mentally retarded hearing adolescents to evaluate (a) differences in creative thinking as a function of hearing status, (b) the effect of severity of mental retardation on hearing status, and (c) interaction between hearing status and intelligence. A multivariate factorial analysis of variance indicated that the mentally retarded deaf adolescents differed significantly from hearing adolescents on Fluency and Originality. The deaf youth scored higher on Fluency while the hearing scored higher on Originality. No other effects in the analysis reached significance. PMID:2385710

  7. The Relationship Between Creative Thinking And Empathy With Self-awareness In High School Students In India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayatollah Karimi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies revealed that there is moderate to strong correlation between creative thinking and empathy with self-awareness as three important skills in human life and the aim of the present study is to find out the relationship between these three aspects of life skills. The participants in the study contained of 96(54 males and 42 females 10 grade of high school students from Mysore in India. Life skill questionnaire - India (LSQI, carried out on the group sample and date analyzed through Pearson correlation and multiple regression using SPSS soft ware.The results revealed that self-awareness significantly has positive correlation with creative thinking (r=31, p<.01 and empathy(r=36, p<.01. Analysis of regression also shows that multiple relationships between three variables is significant (MR=0.36 and RS = .12, p<.01 and 12 percent of variation of self-awareness can be predicts by empathy and creative thinking.

  8. Teaching Creative Thinking through Architectural Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kijeong; Cotner, Teresa L.

    2010-01-01

    Art and art education are open to broader definitions in the twenty-first century. It is time that teachers seriously think about including built environment design in K-12 art education. The term "built environment" includes interior design, architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning. Due to increased exposure to built environment…

  9. Development of children's creative thinking through the textile collage technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Lyapynova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the development of children's creative thinking through the technique of textile col-lage. The author describes the basic concepts of creative thinking, gives examples of implementation of collage techniques, describes fabrics and methods of their application.

  10. Observing Young Children's Creative Thinking: Engagement, Involvement and Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Sue; Rowe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at young children's creative thinking as inferred through observations of their activities. A total of 52 episodes of child-initiated and adult-initiated activities in 3- to 4-year-olds in an English Children's Centre were analysed using the Analysing Children's Creative Thinking (ACCT) Framework. Results showed that activities…

  11. Level of Student's Creative Thinking in Classroom Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswono, Tatag Yuli Eko

    2011-01-01

    It is reasonable to assume that people are creative, but the degree of creativity is different. The Idea of the level of student's creative thinking has been expressed by experts, such as Gotoh (2004), and Krulik and Rudnick (1999). The perspective of the mathematics creative thinking refers to a combination of logical and divergent thinking which…

  12. Exploring Creative Thinking in Graphically Mediated Synchronous Dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegerif, Rupert; McLaren, Bruce M.; Chamrada, Marian; Scheuer, Oliver; Mansour, Nasser; Miksatko, Jan; Williams, Mriga

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an aspect of the EC funded Argunaut project which researched and developed awareness tools for moderators of online dialogues. In this study we report on an investigation into the nature of creative thinking in online dialogues and whether or not this creative thinking can be coded for and recognized automatically such that…

  13. Teaching Presentation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William H.; Thompson, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Effective teaching of presentation skills focuses on the most important element of the presentation--the message itself. Some instructors place the heaviest emphasis on the messenger (the presenter) and focus their presentation feedback on all the presenter is doing wrong--saying "um," gesturing awkwardly, and so forth. When students receive this…

  14. Unilateral muscle contractions enhance creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Abraham; Revivo, Ketty; Kreitler, Michal; Metuki, Nili

    2010-12-01

    Following the notion of relative importance of the right hemisphere (RH) in creative thinking, we explored the possibility of enhancing creative problem solving by artificially activating the RH ahead of time using unilateral hand contractions. Participants attempted to complete the Remote Associates Test after squeezing a ball with either their left or right hand. As predicted, participants who contracted their left hand (thus activating the RH) achieved higher scores than those who used their right hand and those who did not contract either hand. Our findings indicate that tilting the hemispheric balance toward the processing mode of one hemisphere by motor activation can greatly influence the outcome of thought processes. Regardless of the specific mechanism involved, this technique has the potential for acting as a therapeutic or remedial manipulation and could have wide applications in aiding individuals with language impairments or other disorders that are believed to be related to hemispheric imbalances. PMID:21169586

  15. Neural correlates of creative thinking and schizotypy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Haeme R P; Kirk, Ian J; Waldie, Karen E

    2015-07-01

    Empirical studies indicate a link between creativity and schizotypal personality traits, where individuals who score highly on schizotypy measures also display greater levels of creative behaviour. However, the exact nature of this relationship is not yet clear, with only a few studies examining this association using neuroimaging methods. In the present study, the neural substrates of creative thinking were assessed with a drawing task paradigm in healthy individuals using fMRI. These regions were then statistically correlated with the participants' level of schizotypy as measured by the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE), which is a questionnaire consisting of four dimensions. Neural activations associated with the creativity task were observed in bilateral inferior temporal gyri, left insula, left parietal lobule, right angular gyrus, as well as regions in the prefrontal cortex. This widespread pattern of activation suggests that creative thinking utilises multiple neurocognitive networks, with creative production being the result of collaboration between these regions. Furthermore, the correlational analyses found the Unusual Experiences factor of the O-LIFE to be the most common dimension associated with these areas, followed by the Impulsive Nonconformity dimension. These correlations were negative, indicating that individuals who scored the highest in these factors displayed the least amount of activation when performing the creative task. This is in line with the idea that 'less is more' for creativity, where the deactivation of specific cortical areas may facilitate creativity. Thus, these findings contribute to the evidence of a common neural basis between creativity and schizotypy. PMID:25979607

  16. THE CREATIVE THINKING LEVELS OF STUDENTS AT SIXTH CLASS OF PRIMARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esen ERSOY

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Today it is necessary to develop an education model that is special to creative individuals and their creativeness. It is also required to discover children and young people who have creative qualities at an early stage and improve creative thinking in their minds. For this aim, it is very important to determine the high-level thinking skills, especially creative thinking levels of children at primary education period. Therefore, there are considerable duties available for the teachers.In this study, the creative thinking levels of two distinct student groups from different primary schools who study at sixth class of primary education are explored and a comparison is made between their levels. The goal of this research is to find out how the fluency, flexibility and originality dimensions of these students differ. In the way of this purpose, there are fourty-three sixth class of primary education students, who study at two different primary schools in ?zmir, formed the research sampling. Twenty-six of these students are female while seventeen students are male. The Torrance Creative Thinking Test Linguistic –A Form is used as a data collecting tool in the study. The application and form evaluation periods have done by the researchers. At the end of the research, there are meaningful differences obtained between the two schools about the fluency, flexibility and originality levels of students attended to the research. When it is considered in terms of total creative levels, it is seen that the fluency points of those two schools attended to this study are the highest while the flexibility points are the lowest. This situation betrays that the students participated in this study can not use their skill of producing many ideas in terms of handling cases from all points of views.

  17. Leveling Students’ Creative Thinking in Solving and Posing Mathematical Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Tatag Yuli Eko Siswono

    2010-01-01

    Many researchers assume that people are creative, but their degree of creativity is different. The notion of creative thinking level has been discussed .by experts. The perspective of mathematics creative thinking refers to a combination of logical and divergent thinking which is based on intuition but has a conscious aim. The divergent thinking is focused on flexibility, fluency, and novelty in mathematical problem solving and problem posing. As students have various backgrounds and diffe...

  18. [On the assessment criterion for creative thinking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, R

    1989-04-01

    The quantitative evaluation of creative responses in TCT (Test for Creative Thinking) has elucidated various problems. In order to evaluate responses qualitatively, four basic categories were set up. They were constructed according to the degree of freedom of responses from the task-setting. The category, Td (Task-dependence) refers to responses that are entirely influenced by the task-setting. Tm (Task-modification) is for responses which are produced more flexibly than Td, but still influenced by the task-setting. Responses which are made by attending to only a part of the task-setting and neglecting the rest are judged Ho (Homomorphosis). Moreover, responses which are quite free from the task-setting are called He (Heteromorphosis). This He is thought to be the most creative response, and if it appears rarely. When 123 junior high-school students were tested using TCT, He responses appeared least, in four (only 20.3% of the subjects), while Td's were produced by 99.2% of the subjects. Ho's were lower than Tm's and Td's in frequency. However, the validity of these categories is still to be pursued. PMID:2796036

  19. Leveling Students’ Creative Thinking in Solving and Posing Mathematical Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatag Yuli Eko Siswono

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers assume that people are creative, but their degree of creativity is different. The notion of creative thinking level has been discussed .by experts. The perspective of mathematics creative thinking refers to a combination of logical and divergent thinking which is based on intuition but has a conscious aim. The divergent thinking is focused on flexibility, fluency, and novelty in mathematical problem solving and problem posing. As students have various backgrounds and different abilities, they possess different potential in thinking patterns, imagination, fantasy and performance; therefore, students have different levels of creative thinking. A research study was conducted in order to develop a framework for students’ levels of creative thinking in mathematics. This research used a qualitative approach to describe the characteristics of the levels of creative thinking. Task-based interviews were conducted to collect data with ten 8th grade junior secondary school students. The results distinguished five levels of creative thinking, namely level 0 to level 4 with different characteristics in each level. These differences are based on fluency, flexibility, and novelty in mathematical problem solving and problem posing.

  20. Teaching Soft Skills Employers Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Maureen; Kisling, Eric; Hackworth, Robbie G.

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies the soft skills community colleges teach in an office technology course and determines whether the skills taught are congruent with the soft skills employers require in today's entry-level office work. A qualitative content analysis of a community college office technology soft skills course was performed using 23 soft…

  1. The Effects of Creative Thinking Activities on Learners’ Creative Thinking and Project Development Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher ÖZCAN

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was done on 41 subjects consisted of 6th year students at Mehmet Çelik Primary School in Bolu, Yeniça?a. According to ANCOVA results, pre-test values of the students from different instruction systems compared to the corrected post-test values andcreative thinking average values showed a significant difference in favor of education in which creative course activities were used. In research, two-factored ANNOVA was used for complex measurements for the research question about whether the learners’ cognitiveachievement scores, related to learning environment, change or not, according to groups. According to the findings, cognitive achievement scores showed a significant difference in favor of experimental group.

  2. Current methodology and methods in psychophysiological studies of creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtereva, N P; Danko, S G; Medvedev, S V

    2007-05-01

    Important points on methodology and detailed description of methods used in polymodal psychophysiological studies of human verbal creative thinking are presented. The psychophysiological studies were conducted with healthy volunteers during implementations of specially developed and adapted psychological tests aimed to bring the subjects into states of verbal creative thinking. Four different task sets ("story composition", "associative chains", "original definitions", "proverb sense flipping") were developed and applied. Positron emission tomography of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and state-related quantitative electroencephalography (power and coherence evaluated) were used. The effectiveness of the methods is illustrated with figures. PMID:17434420

  3. Physics Textbooks: Do They Promote or Inhibit Students' Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieger, Aviva; Sherman, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Creativity can be viewed from different perspectives, such as the creative thinking process, the product, the creative environment and the individual. The physics domain, which is based on experiments, research, hypotheses and thinking outside the box, can serve as an excellent grounding for creativity development. This article focuses on creative…

  4. A Model for the Correlates of Students' Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsani, Mahender Reddy

    2007-01-01

    The present study was aimed to explore the relationships between orgainsational or school variables, students' personal background variables, and cognitive and motivational variables. The sample for the survey included 373 students drawn from nine Government schools in Andhra Pradesh, India. Students' creative thinking abilities were measured by…

  5. The "Mbira" Metaphor: Inspiring Creative Thinking through Folktale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngara, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the author's views on inspiring creative thinking among students through a folktale. The mbira metaphor is this author's interpretation of a unique African (Shona) folktale that has the potential to enrich the pedagogy of giftedness. The mbira metaphor is an informative and thought-provoking folktale originating from previous…

  6. Secondary Teachers' Conceptions of Creative Thinking within the Context of Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskolia, Maria; Dimos, Athanasios; Kampylis, Panagiotis G.

    2012-01-01

    Creative thinking in Environmental Education (EE) remains greatly under researched topic. Research on teachers' conceptions of creative thinking within EE context is also limited, although their role in facilitating creative thinking in students is well documented. The small-scale qualitative study presented here investigates Greek secondary…

  7. Interactive Teaching in Interpersonal Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Karhu, Markku; Christensen, Cecillia

    2013-01-01

    Engineers are very much part of the ongoing globalization and they are encountering problems of cross-disciplinary nature. Team working skills respecting other peoples’ qualifications are required so therefore interpersonal skills are becoming more and more important, including communications skills, leadership and awareness. Consequently, educational programs for teaching engineers should work with the fact that the capability of communicating with people with different background competences i...

  8. Teacher and Student Perceptions of Critical and Creative Thinking within a Science Programme for High Ability Females in Singapore: Implications for Classroom Practice and Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatter, Christopher John

    2009-01-01

    It can be rationalised that the education of high ability students is of immense importance to society, based on the principle that many of tomorrow's pioneers within the field of science will originate from this group of individuals. Consequently, these students must be equipped with critical and creative thinking skills to fulfil their…

  9. Creative Thinking of Practical Engineering Students During a Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Shlomo; Merdler, Moti

    2003-01-01

    Creativity in engineering design had become an economic necessity and not merely the privilege of unique individuals. The search for new, innovative and effective ideas in engineering design stands in center of daily creative performance. This search requires sensitivity to gaps of knowledge and information, and the ability to evoke numerous, different and unique ideas about engineering problems. The source of such information or knowledge can be either extrinsic-such as provided by an instructor or expert or intrinsic, which might involve transformation from one field or context to another. Furthermore, interaction with an exterior source as well as developing an inherent drive, have an impact on the motivation to perform creatively. This article, which is based on a study conducted among Israeli practical engineering students, deals with the variations in creative thinking during various stages of a design project and the relation between creative thinking and motivation factors.

  10. Cultivating the College Students’ Creative Thinking in Industrial Design

    OpenAIRE

    Hua Cen; Chuandong Ma

    2013-01-01

    This paper probes into the source of “originality” in developing the creative thinking of the science students majoring in industrial design. The authors believe that the critical factors for the source of “originality” lie in not only the internal cause, but also the external cause. Whether the science students take a great consideration of art and humanity courses, in other words, whether they are aware of the relationship between artistical thought and industrial design or not, it is very...

  11. The Relationship Between Creative Thinking And Empathy With Self-awareness In High School Students In India

    OpenAIRE

    Ayatollah Karimi; Venkatesh Kumar, G

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that there is moderate to strong correlation between creative thinking and empathy with self-awareness as three important skills in human life and the aim of the present study is to find out the relationship between these three aspects of life skills. The participants in the study contained of 96(54 males and 42 females) 10 grade of high school students from Mysore in India. Life skill questionnaire - India (LSQI), carried out on the group sample and date analyzed th...

  12. Teaching Professional Engineering Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2010-01-01

    Engineering education aims at providing students with sufficient disciplinary knowledge of science and engineering principles in order for them to become successful engineers. However, to fulfil their roles as professional engineers, students also need to develop personal and interpersonal skills, as well as professional skills, in order to implement and apply their theoretical and technical knowledge in a real context. CDIO constitutes a comprehensive approach to engineering education in which ...

  13. The Analysing Children's Creative Thinking Framework: Development of an Observation-Led Approach to Identifying and Analysing Young Children's Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Increased international recognition of the value of supporting creative thinking suggests the value of development of approaches to its identification in children. Development of an observation-led framework, the Analysing Children's Creative Thinking (ACCT) framework, is described, and a case made for the validity of inferring creative…

  14. Teaching for Skill Mastery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepko, Stevie; Doan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on establishing a mastery climate where all students find success and start on the road to physical literacy. Using a five-step approach, physical educators will be offered guidance for developing practice tasks that lead to skill mastery. These steps include creating a mastery environment, designing deliberate practice tasks,…

  15. Teaching Interpersonal Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Marie

    1977-01-01

    A systematic approach to developing and evaluating a course in basic communication skills for beginning nursing students is described. The project results indicated that a sequential introduction to interpersonal relationships through selected audiovisual materials can enhance the student's ability to respond to a variety of clients in an…

  16. The combined effects of neurostimulation and priming on creative thinking. A preliminary tDCS study on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Barbara; Bartesaghi, Noemi; Simonelli, Luisa; Antonietti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The role of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in influencing creative thinking has been investigated by many researchers who, while succeeding in proving an effective involvement of PFC, reported suggestive but sometimes conflicting results. In order to better understand the relationships between creative thinking and brain activation in a more specific area of the PFC, we explored the role of dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC). We devised an experimental protocol using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS). The study was based on a 3 (kind of stimulation: anodal vs. cathodal vs. sham) × 2 (priming: divergent vs. convergent) design. Forty-five healthy adults were randomly assigned to one stimulation condition. Participants' creativity skills were assessed using the Product Improvement subtest from the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT). After 20 min of tDCS stimulation, participants were presented with visual images of common objects. Half of the participants were instructed to visualize themselves using the object in an unusual way (divergent priming), whereas the other half were asked to visualize themselves while using the object in a common way (convergent priming). Priming was aimed at inducing participants to adopt different attitudes toward the creative task. Afterwards, participants were asked to describe all of the possible uses of the objects that were presented. Participants' physiological activation was recorded using a biofeedback equipment. Results showed a significant effect of anodal stimulation that enhanced creative performance, but only after divergent priming. Participants showed lower skin temperature values after cathodal stimulation, a finding which is coherent with studies reporting that, when a task is not creative or creative thinking is not prompted, people show lower levels of arousal. Differences in individual levels of creativity as assessed by the Product Improvement test were not influential. The involvement of DLPFC in creativity has been supported, presumably in association to shift of attention modulated by priming. PMID:26236219

  17. The Combined Effects of Neurostimulation and Priming on Creative Thinking. A Preliminary tDCS Study on Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Colombo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of prefrontal cortex (PFC in influencing creative thinking has been investigated by many researchers who, while succeeding in proving an effective involvement of PFC, reported suggestive but sometimes conflicting results. In order to better understand the relationships between creative thinking and brain activation in a more specific area of the PFC, we explored the role of dorsolateral PFC. We devised an experimental protocol using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS. The study was based on a 3 (kind of stimulation: anodal vs. cathodal vs. sham X 2 (priming: divergent vs. convergent design. Forty-five healthy adults were randomly assigned to one stimulation condition. Participants’ creativity skills were assessed using the Product Improvement subtest from the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. After 20 minutes of tDCS stimulation, participants were presented with visual images of common objects. Half of the participants were instructed to visualize themselves using the object in an unusual way (divergent priming, whereas the other half were asked to visualize themselves while using the object in a common way (convergent priming. Priming was aimed at inducing participants to adopt different attitudes toward the creative task. Afterwards, participants were asked to describe all of the possible uses of the objects that were presented. Participants’ physiological activation was recorded using a biofeedback equipment. Results showed a significant effect of anodal stimulation that enhanced creative performance, but only after divergent priming. Participants showed lower skin temperature values after cathodal stimulation, a findings which is coherent with studies reporting that, when a task is not creative or creative thinking is not prompted, people show lower levels of arousal. The involvement of dorsolateral PFC in creativity has been supported, presumably in association to shift of attention modulated by priming.

  18. Critical and Creative Thinking in the Professional Preparation of Social Pedagogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Novotná

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper acquaints the reader with the status of critical and creative thinking in tertiary education, particularly in the professional preparation of social pedagogues. The authors present the reader with the results of a grant project which focused on examining the level of critical and creative thinking in students of social pedagogy. The paper is complemented by research examining the personality factors of an individual and their relation to the level of critical and creative thinking.

  19. Creative thinking in prospective teachers: the status quo and the impact of contextual factors

    OpenAIRE

    Hannetjie Meintjes; Mary Grosser

    2010-01-01

    To create unique and appropriate learning opportunities and environments and to nurture the development of creative thinking abilities among learners are some of the demands for creative thinking currently expected of teachers globally and also in South Africa. Creative thinking in academic context assumes, among other things, the ability to generate a variety of original ideas, to see different viewpoints and elaborate on ideas. We report on the findings of a quantitative pilot investigation...

  20. Exploratory Examination of Relationships between Learning Styles and Creative Thinking in Math Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan Chen Tsai; Matthew Shirley

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that identifying any strong relationships between learning styles and creative thinking within the context of the math classroom will help improve instruction by providing course delivery strategies tailored to different learning preferences and promotion of creative thinking. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to identify which (if any) of the cognitive learning dimensions would be related to creative thinking in math students. The major findings of this study indicate ...

  1. Creative thinking in prospective teachers: the status quo and the impact of contextual factors

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hannetjie, Meintjes; Mary, Grosser.

    Full Text Available To create unique and appropriate learning opportunities and environments and to nurture the development of creative thinking abilities among learners are some of the demands for creative thinking currently expected of teachers globally and also in South Africa. Creative thinking in academic context [...] assumes, among other things, the ability to generate a variety of original ideas, to see different viewpoints and elaborate on ideas. We report on the findings of a quantitative pilot investigation by means of experimental research utilizing an ex post facto design to determine the status quo regarding the creative thinking abilities of a hetrogeneous group of 207 pre-service teachers studying at a South African university, using the Abbreviated Torrance Test for Adults (ATTA) and a Partial Least Squares (PLS) exploration into the relationship between contextual factors and the students' creative thinking abilities. Strong correlations were found among a variety of contextual factors such as the type of school model and culture and creative thinking abilities and also between specific contextual factors such as the choice of role model and socio economic and acculturation factors and certain creative thinking abilities. This research explores a largely unknown field, namely, the creative thinking abilities of a group of South African pre-service teachers of different cultural groups and creates an awareness of the need for the development of creative thinking abilities among these prospective teachers.

  2. Creative thinking in prospective teachers: the status quo and the impact of contextual factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannetjie Meintjes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To create unique and appropriate learning opportunities and environments and to nurture the development of creative thinking abilities among learners are some of the demands for creative thinking currently expected of teachers globally and also in South Africa. Creative thinking in academic context assumes, among other things, the ability to generate a variety of original ideas, to see different viewpoints and elaborate on ideas. We report on the findings of a quantitative pilot investigation by means of experimental research utilizing an ex post facto design to determine the status quo regarding the creative thinking abilities of a hetrogeneous group of 207 pre-service teachers studying at a South African university, using the Abbreviated Torrance Test for Adults (ATTA and a Partial Least Squares (PLS exploration into the relationship between contextual factors and the students' creative thinking abilities. Strong correlations were found among a variety of contextual factors such as the type of school model and culture and creative thinking abilities and also between specific contextual factors such as the choice of role model and socio economic and acculturation factors and certain creative thinking abilities. This research explores a largely unknown field, namely, the creative thinking abilities of a group of South African pre-service teachers of different cultural groups and creates an awareness of the need for the development of creative thinking abilities among these prospective teachers.

  3. Modern Aspects of Schoolchildren’s Creative Thinking Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanar E. Sarsekeeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is about actual problems of schoolchildren’s creative thinking development. The changes happening in our society show absolutely different requirements to the younger generation than they were before which will become not only an active component of the state, but also the leading force in its further development in the closest future. Pedagogy of ideological dogmas, reproductive training, compounding and regulation of teacher and pupils’ activity corresponded to the society of totalitarian consciousness, priority of a political and ideological orientation in full measure. Nowadays pedagogical technologies differ in the rigid organization of school life, suppression of pupils’ initiative and independence, application of requirements and coercions. The personal focused technologies which gained new development at present moment are characterized by anthropocentricity, humanistic and psychotherapeutic orientation. They are aimed at versatile, free and creative development of the child. Only such active, creative personality is capable to realize in difficult social relationship of modern society. From the carried-out analysis of psychology and pedagogical literature it is possible to note that schoolchildren’s creative thinking development is becoming the priority direction.

  4. Assessing Creativity in Native American Students Using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, Figural Form A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannehill, Rhonda L.

    Creative thinking styles of Native American students were investigated to determine the existence of creativity as a homogeneous trait among this culture. Seventy-nine Cherokee students in grades 4 and 6, attending a small rural school in eastern Oklahoma, were administered the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking--Figural Form A. Thirty-eight…

  5. A Comparative Study of Creative Thinking of American and Japanese College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Noriko; Fan, Xitao; Van Dusen, Lani

    2001-01-01

    Cross-cultural differences in creative thinking were assessed for 51 American and 54 Japanese college students. The American students showed significantly higher scores on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) figural test than the Japanese students. No gender differences were found in either culture. TTCT performance did not correlate…

  6. Designscholar: Examining Creative Thinking in an Online Learning Community for Interior Design Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransdell, Marlo Evelyn

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the creative thinking of interior design graduate students in an online learning community. This study considered potential changes in creative thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration) about design research resulting from peer-led online discussions. It further studied the learner characteristics of…

  7. Comparing Creative Thinking Abilities and Reasoning Ability of Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Fawzy

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on comparing the creative thinking and reasoning abilities of deaf and hearing children. Two groups of deaf (N = 210) and hearing children (N = 200) were chosen based on specific criteria. Two instruments were used in the study: the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking-Figural, Form A and Matrix Analogies Test. Canonical…

  8. The Effects of Computer Use on Creative Thinking among Kindergarten Children in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawareb, Aseel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of early computer experience, using quasi-experimental design, on creative thinking among Jordanian kindergarten children. It intended to answer two main research questions. First, does adding a computer to a kindergarten environment enhance children's creative thinking? Second, does…

  9. Hemispheric Specialization and Creative Thinking: A Meta-Analytic Review of Lateralization of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihov, Konstantin M.; Denzler, Markus; Forster, Jens

    2010-01-01

    In the last two decades research on the neurophysiological processes of creativity has found contradicting results. Whereas most research suggests right hemisphere dominance in creative thinking, left-hemisphere dominance has also been reported. The present research is a meta-analytic review of the literature to establish how creative thinking

  10. The Relationship between Creative Thinking Ability and Creative Personality of Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Hwa

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between creative thinking ability and creative personality of preschoolers. Prior research showed that the correlation coefficient between creative thinking ability and creative personality of teenagers was very low (Hah, 1999), so this research was undertaken to validate the test and to examine how…

  11. Strategy for teaching communication skills in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    White, John G

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To develop and evaluate a teaching strategy for teaching communication skills in dentistry. METHODOLOGY: Phase I: Development and implementation of a course in communication skills. Phase II: Implementation of a teaching strategy by means of an experiential learning strategy complemented by a didactic teaching strategy. SUBJECTS: Third year dental students (n = 67). The instruments included the following: (i) Study guide; (ii) Case study; (iii) Assessment rubric; (iv) Two questionnai...

  12. Project-Based Activity: Root of Research and Creative Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Rambely A. S.; Ahmad R. R.; Majid N.; M-Suradi N. R.; Din U. K. S.; A-Rahman I.; Mohamed F.; Rahim F.; Abu-Hanifah S.

    2013-01-01

    Decreasing of interest in mathematics and science subjects among students in Malaysia has been discussed lately. Applications of mathematics and science in real world settings might be able to facilitate increased interests in the subjects, especially in doing research. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to manifest that learning mathematics through project-based activity would cultivate interest in students towards research and foster research-like skill. Experience of teaching mathematics ...

  13. Domain-General and Domain-Specific Creative-Thinking Tests: Effects of Gender and Item Content on Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; Wu, Junbin

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the effects of gender and item content of domain-general and domain-specific creative-thinking tests on four subscale scores of creative-thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration). Chinese tenth-grade students (234 males and 244 females) participated in the study. Domain-general creative thinking was measured…

  14. Enhanced dynamic complexity in the human EEG during creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölle, M; Marshall, L; Lutzenberger, W; Pietrowsky, R; Fehm, H L; Born, J

    1996-04-12

    This study shows that divergent thinking, considered the general process underlying creative production, can be distinguished from convergent, analytical thought based on the dimensional complexity of ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. EEG complexity over the central and posterior cortex was higher while subjects solved tasks of divergent than convergent thinking, and also higher than during mental relaxation. Over the frontal cortex, EEG complexity was comparable during divergent thinking and mental relaxation, but reduced during convergent thinking. Results indicate that the basic process underlying the generation of novel ideas expresses itself in a strong increase in the EEG's complexity, reflecting higher degrees of freedom in the competitive interactions among cortical neuron assemblies. Frontocortical EEG complexity being comparable with that during mental relaxation, speaks for a loosened attentional control during creative thinking. PMID:8731175

  15. Interactive Teaching in Interpersonal Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, JØrgen Erik; Karhu, Markku

    2013-01-01

    Engineers are very much part of the ongoing globalization and they are encountering problems of cross-disciplinary nature. Team working skills respecting other peoples’ qualifications are required so therefore interpersonal skills are becoming more and more important, including communications skills, leadership and awareness. Consequently, educational programs for teaching engineers should work with the fact that the capability of communicating with people with different background competences is important, nevertheless the engineering education has traditionally focused on technical skills rather than on personal development. In order to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers on all levels, the DTU (Technical University of Denmark) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) modified their education according to the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) approach in the autumn of 2008. The CDIO pedagogy encouraged to develop aninteractive course in interpersonal skills, where the students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process. The course consists of various exercises from which the participants will develop their awareness and knowledge of communication. It is the intention to give the students a personal understanding and idea of a different approach to communicating between people. The students evaluated the course, and the four key questions dealing with the quality of the course show a very high satisfaction with the instruction. The grades one and two (1 best/very much, 5 worst/very little) of the responses to these four questions are ranging on average from 69.5% to 88% (on a yearly basis). The positive responses indicate that the students are very satisfied with the course recognizing the need for education on international communication.

  16. Peer Assessment of Elementary Science Teaching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Gulsen Bagci; Cakan, Mehtap

    2007-01-01

    In this study, peer assessment was applied in assessing elementary science teaching skills. Preservice teachers taught a science topic as a team to their peers in an elementary science methods course. The peers participating in the science lesson assessed teacher-groups' elementary science teaching skills on an assessment form provided by the…

  17. Managerial Skills Teaching: Ten Questions and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnrue, Mary Pat

    2002-01-01

    Presents considerations for design and delivery of management skills courses as sets of questions in three categories: (1) preteaching (understanding and teaching skills, teacher qualities); (2) class (skills learning, learning barriers, cultural elements, learning assessment); and application/evaluation (lifelong learning, course evaluation,…

  18. Revising Teaching Skills for Professional Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Baiju K.

    2009-01-01

    In a technology and media dominated era of education the role of teacher and there by the skills required to be mastered by each teacher need redefinition. The paper attempts to identify the list of essential teaching skills for the present age by retaining the significant ones and including those inevitable for present context. The skills

  19. Teamwork: Effectively Teaching an Employability Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Linda; Roepen, Dean; Santarelli, Bruno; Marchioro, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a case study on improvements to professional teaching practice within an undergraduate university business programme to more effectively teach an employability skill and enhance the student experience of teamwork. Design/methodology/approach: A three-phase approach to teaching teamwork was…

  20. Creativity meets neuroscience: experimental tasks for the neuroscientific study of creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias; Grabner, Roland H; Staudt, Beate; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2007-05-01

    The psychometric assessment of different facets of creative abilities as well as the availability of experimental tasks for the neuroscientific study of creative thinking has replaced the view of creativity as an unsearchable trait. In this article we provide a brief overview of contemporary methodologies used for the operationalization of creative thinking in a neuroscientific context. Empirical studies are reported which measured brain activity (by means of EEG, fMRI, NIRS or PET) during the performance of different experimental tasks. These tasks, along with creative idea generation tasks used in our laboratory, constitute useful tools in uncovering possible brain correlates of creative thinking. Nevertheless, much more work is needed in order to establish reliable and valid measures of creative thinking, in particular measures of novelty or originality of creative insights. PMID:17434417

  1. Exploratory Examination of Relationships between Learning Styles and Creative Thinking in Math Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Chen Tsai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that identifying any strong relationships between learning styles and creative thinking within the context of the math classroom will help improve instruction by providing course delivery strategies tailored to different learning preferences and promotion of creative thinking. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to identify which (if any of the cognitive learning dimensions would be related to creative thinking in math students. The major findings of this study indicate that creative thinking, assessed by RAT, and learning preferences, evaluated by ILS, are not highly correlated. Over all, students in this study show a balanced learning preference across four dimensions. In summary, this study directs a possible path for future researchers to investigate this phenomenon.

  2. Teaching communication skills: beyond wishful thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Sommer, Johanna; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Nendaz, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Communication skills tend to decline with time unless they are regularly recalled and practiced. However, most medical schools still deliver clinical communication training only during pre-clinical years although the clinical environment is considered to be ideal for acquiring and teaching clinical communication. The aim of this article is to review the barriers that prevent communication skills teaching and training from occurring in clinical practice and describe strategies that may help enhance such activities. Barriers occur at several levels: students, junior doctors and clinical supervisors sometimes have negative attitudes towards communication training; structured training in communication skills is often insufficient; clinical supervisors behave as poor role models and lack effective communication and teaching skills; finally, there are organisational constraints such as lack of time, competing priorities, weak hierarchy support and lack of positive incentives for using, training or teaching good communication skills in clinical practice. Given the difficulty of assessing transfer of communication skills in practice, only few studies describe successful educational interventions. In order to optimise communication skills learning in practice, there is need to: (1.) modify the climate and structure of the working environment so that that use, training and teaching of good communication skills in clinical practice becomes valued, supported and rewarded; (2.) extend communication skills training to any field of medicine; (3.) provide regular structured trainings and tailor them to trainees' needs. Practical implications of such findings are discussed at the end of this review. PMID:25664624

  3. Studies of the Turkish form of the Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production

    OpenAIRE

    Aysenur Yontar Togrol

    2012-01-01

    This paper explains the results of multi-year applications of the Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production in a Turkish context with Turkish participants. The purpose of the study is to present the results of several empirical studies conducted by different Turkish samples, using the instrument which was developed by Jellen and Urban for measuring the creative thinking potentials of individuals. The number of the subjects of all the studies described here totaled to 1529. These participa...

  4. Individual differences in verbal creative thinking are reflected in the precuneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun-Lin; Xu, Ting; Yang, Wen-Jing; Li, Ya-Dan; Sun, Jiang-Zhou; Wang, Kang-Cheng; Beaty, Roger E; Zhang, Qing-Lin; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    There have been many structural and functional imaging studies of creative thinking, but combining structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations with respect to creative thinking is still lacking. Thus, the aim of the present study was to explore the associations among inter-individual verbal creative thinking and both regional homogeneity and cortical morphology of the brain surface. We related the local functional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity to verbal creative thinking and its dimensions--fluency, originality, and flexibility--by examining these inter-individual differences in a large sample of 268 healthy college students. Results revealed that people with high verbal creative ability and high scores for the three dimensions of creativity exhibited lower regional functional homogeneity in the right precuneus. Both cortical volume and thickness of the right precuneus were positively associated with individual verbal creativity and its dimensions. Moreover, originality was negatively correlated with functional homogeneity in the left superior frontal gyrus and positively correlated with functional homogeneity in the right occipito-temporal gyrus. In contrast, flexibility was positively correlated with functional homogeneity in the left superior and middle occipital gyrus. These findings provide additional evidence of a link between verbal creative thinking and brain structure in the right precuneus--a region involved in internally--focused attention and effective semantic retrieval-and further suggest that local functional homogeneity of verbal creative thinking has neurobiological relevance that is likely based on anatomical substrates. PMID:26150204

  5. Teaching and Assessing Engineering Professional Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Ali M. Al-Bahi; Mahmoud A. Taha; Nedim Turkmen

    2013-01-01

    Engineering students are required to have, by the time of graduation, a set of professional skills related to teamwork, oral and written communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and knowledge of contemporary issues. Teaching and assessment of these skills, as part of ABET accreditation, remains problematic. A systematic methodology to integrate these skills and their assessment in the curriculum is described. The method was recently applied in several engineering p...

  6. Teaching Quantitative Skills in a Geoscience Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; MacDonald, R. H.; Savina, M.; Andersen, J.; Patterson, S.; Mason, M.

    2002-12-01

    New attention is needed to the ways in which quantitative skills are taught in the geosciences. At the introductory level, geoscience courses play an important role in teaching students the basic abilities needed to use and understand quantitative information. These skills are becoming more important as quantitative information is increasingly used by all citizens to make informed personal choices, for financial success, and to guide our democracy (Mathematics and Democracy, Steen, 2001). Mathematical skills are also becoming increasingly fundamental to success as a practicing geoscientist requiring modification of teaching within the major. An integrated approach developing synergies between mathematics, geoscience and other science courses will be most effective in enhancing students learning in these areas. This summer 40 mathematics and geoscience faculty met at Carleton College for 5 days to explore the ways in which geoscience and mathematical approaches to teaching skills complement each other and to develop materials that reflected the strengths of both approaches. Primary outcomes included 1) new appreciation of the importance of incorporating multiple representations, in-depth problems, contextual examples, and group work in teaching mathematical and quantitative skills, 2) a preliminary list of skills that can form a basic vocabulary for discussions of course content, 3) ten resources developed jointly by mathematicians and geoscientists for use in courses, and 4) new collaborations between geoscientists and mathematicians both on campuses and beyond. Full information about the workshop and its results are available at http://serc.carleton.edu/quantskills/events/NAGT02

  7. Creative thinking and Big Five factors of personality measured in Italian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caroli, Maria Elvira; Sagone, Elisabetta

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the relations of creative thinking with Big Five factors of personality and the differences by sex and age on creativity. A sample of Italian schoolchildren (56 boys, 56 girls), between 8 to 10 years of age, completed the Test of Creative Thinking and the Big Five Questionnaire for Children. Analysis of results indicated that older children obtained significantly higher scores than the younger ones on Elaboration and Production of titles. Girls obtained significantly higher scores than boys on Originality and Elaboration. The results suggested a modest and negative relation of Flexibility with Conscientiousness and Production of titles with Emotional instability. These findings support the need to explore the connection between creativity and personality with developmental age by means of multiple tasks for evaluating creative thinking. PMID:20099541

  8. Teaching Receptive Language Skills: Recommendations for Instructors

    OpenAIRE

    Grow, Laura; LeBlanc, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Receptive language refers to responding appropriately to another person's spoken language. Most curricula dedicate a proportion of early intervention to developing receptive language skills. The specific terms used to refer to the receptive language programs and the recommendations for teaching such skills vary considerably across the early intervention curricula. The present paper will provide a conceptual analysis of the desired controlling variables for different receptive language program...

  9. Effects of trait anxiety and the scamper technique on creative thinking of intellectually gifted students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijares-Colmenares, B E; Masten, W G; Underwood, J R

    1993-06-01

    This work assessed the effect of trait anxiety (measured on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and the Scamper technique on figural creative thinking, measured by the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. An analysis of covariance with 52 gifted students in a summer camp gave no significant main effect of treatment for trait anxiety, or their interaction. Scamper may not effectively improve figural creativity and anxiety may not influence figural creativity the same way it influences verbal creativity, at least as measured. PMID:8332693

  10. Evaluating Creative Thinking of Rn-Bsn Students in the Course of Clinical Case Study and Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ya-Lie

    2015-01-01

    This case study evaluated creative thinking of RN-BSN students in the course of clinical case study and practicum. Study design used quantitative and qualitative evaluations of creative thinking of RN-BSN students by triangulation method in the course of clinical case study and practicum. Sixty RN-BSN students self-perceived the changing levels of…

  11. Instructional Design as Critical and Creative Thinking: A Journey through a Jamestown-Era Native American Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Liesl M.; Newbill, Phyllis Leary

    2010-01-01

    The role of critical and creative thinking has been debated within the field of instructional design. Through an instructional design and development project we have identified how critical and creative thinking are essential to the instructional design process. This paper highlights a recent project focused on a virtual Native American village…

  12. Teaching and Assessing Engineering Professional Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Al-Bahi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Engineering students are required to have, by the time of graduation, a set of professional skills related to teamwork, oral and written communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and knowledge of contemporary issues. Teaching and assessment of these skills, as part of ABET accreditation, remains problematic. A systematic methodology to integrate these skills and their assessment in the curriculum is described. The method was recently applied in several engineering programs and proved to be efficient in generating data and evidences for evaluation and continuous improvement of these outcomes.

  13. Teaching Cooperative Skills through Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glakas, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    Through cooperative games and play, children learn to share, empathize with others' feelings, and get along better. The article makes suggestions to physical educators on how to design games to teach students cooperative behaviors and how to incorporate them into class, noting four important game-design principles. (SM)

  14. Implementation of Teaching Skills and Strategies in the Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choeda, Choeda; Kinley, Kinley

    2013-01-01

    Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ are two core (professional) modules offered at the two colleges of education in Bhutan to develop pedagogical knowledge and skills of student teachers. However, a tracer study (in press) done by Samtse College of Education [SCE] revealed teacher graduates’ (1) confusion over the two concepts, ‘teaching skill’ and ‘teaching strategy’ and (2) the lack of confidence in integrating the two in their daily teaching activities. Therefore, this study was carri...

  15. DEVELOPMENT of CREATIVE THINKING through SPEECH SITUATIONS at the ENGLISH LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alferova Olga Ivanovna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of speech situations created at the English lessons. The purpose is to study one of the most efficient methods to involve pupils into the active speech activity through their imagination and creative thinking and show the essential condition which is pupils’ interest in the topic of speech situations.

  16. Creative Thinking Development Program for Learning Activity Management of Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukdeewut, Sutinan; Chantarasombat, Chalard; Satapornwong, Pattananusorn

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: to design a creative thinking development program for learning activity management of secondary school teachers, and to study the program's efficiency and effectiveness of usage. The results of the study were as follows: the program includes the vision, principles, objectives, content, program development…

  17. Enhancing Children's Artistic and Creative Thinking and Drawing Performance through Appreciating Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate methods of enhancing kindergarteners' artistic creative thinking and expressive drawing through an activity that involved appreciation of picture books. The study was conducted in a public kindergarten in southern Taiwan, with 27 children aged between 4 and 5. The researcher conducted the study in 16…

  18. "Where's the Bear? Over There!"--Creative Thinking and Imagination in Den Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    This small scale research project examines opportunities for creative thinking and imagination through den making in a rural private day nursery with its own woodland area on the borders of England and Wales in the UK. The research is underpinned by sociocultural theory and is an ethnographic study of non-participant observations of children aged…

  19. The Influence of Institutional Experiences on the Development of Creative Thinking in Arts Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Angie L.; Dumford, Amber D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that several different aspects of one's environment can impact creativity. Using data from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP), this study explored whether satisfaction with aspects of the institutional experience contributed to the perceived development of creative thinking in arts alumni, and…

  20. QUEST FOR TEACHING EXPERIMENTAL SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samrajya LAKSHMI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Andhra Pradesh, India, chemical experimenting in under graduate college labs by students is neglected because most of the intermediate (10+1 and 10+2 students concentrate on writing competitive exams like EAMCET (Engineering and Medical Common Entrance Test, IIT JEE (Indian Institute of Technology Joint Entrance Test, AIEEE (All India Engineering Entrance Examination, AFMS (Armed Forces Medical Services, AIMS (All India Institute of Medical Science. The students spend most of their time in preparing for competitive exams, practicing bits, and writing many model exams. Even Parents, staff, and management are also motivated and allow the students towards preparation for competitive exams because of the increase in number of engineering seats and demand of medical seats. Ultimately, the quality and quantity of students who join the B.Sc. (Bachelor of Science has been decreasing day by day. Even after joining the B.Sc., the students are motivated towards immediate white collared job oriented courses like M.C.A (Master of Computer Applications and M.B.A (Master Business Administration and spending their time for preparing for competitive exams for those courses. Only a few students are interested to join Post graduation in chemistry and try to learn experimental skills in chemistry laboratory. However, the motivated students towards undergraduate chemistry will be demotivated towards it due to lack of fundamentals in chemistry (in 10+2 level, which are essential for better job market. Ultimately, the students are in confusion and neglect learning the skills in doing experiments in chemistry lab. The present paper focuses on the thorough quest of one such teacher who strives for his own professional development. He has developed his own method of guiding the students for their improvement of skills in doing experiments in lab. The teacher explored solutions to his problems or problems of students by sorting out the critical incidents from his own laboratory experiences, documented through regular journal writing. The teacher cum researcher guided the students to overcome the difficulties in Ø Determination of melting point Ø Determination of Boiling Point Ø Test for Extra elements Ø Ignition Test for Aliphatic/Aromatic/Carbohydrate/Amide andØ Test for Functional groups Quest, Professional development, Organic Practical class, Laboratory Experiences, Experimental Skills.

  1. Artistic productivity and creative thinking in Parkinson Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Canesi, Margherita; Rusconi, Maria Luisa; Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Creative drive and enhanced artistic-like production may emerge in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during dopaminergic therapy. However, it has not been described to date whether this artistic-like production results from dopaminergic drugs triggering innate skills or it could be considered as a repeated behavior possibly associated with impulse control disorders (ICDs). Methods: We investigated creative drive in a cohort of cognitively preserved patients wit...

  2. Generalizing Effective Teaching Skills: The Missing Link in Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeler, Mary Catherine

    2008-01-01

    A clear need to teach preservice teachers to generalize newly acquired teaching skills across time and settings has been well established in the literature. Few empirical studies exist that inform teacher educators on ways to promote generalization of teaching skills with beginning teachers, however. Programming for generalization continues to be…

  3. Effects of a play program on creative thinking of preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Berrueco, Laura

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a play program in the creative thinking of preschool children. The study used a repeated measures experimental pretest-posttest design with control groups. The sample included 86 participants aged 5 to 6 years (53 experimental and 33 control participants). Before and after administering the program, two evaluation instruments were applied: The Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (Torrance, 1990) and Behaviors and Traits of Creative Personality Scale (Garaigordobil & Berrueco, 2007). The program consisted of a weekly 75-minute play session throughout the school year. ANOVA results showed that the program significantly increased the verbal creativity (fluency, flexibility, originality), graphic creativity (elaboration, fluency, originality), and behaviors and traits of creative personality. In the pretest phase, there were no differences in the creativity of boys and girls, and the program stimulated a similar level of change in both sexes. The discussion focuses on the importance of implementing creative programs with preschool children. PMID:22059307

  4. Creative Thinking Development Program for Learning Activity Management of Secondary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Sutinan Pukdeewut; Chalard Chantarasombat; Pattananusorn Satapornwong

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: to design a creative thinking development program for learning activity management of secondary school teachers, and to study the program’s efficiency and effectiveness of usage. The results of the study were as follows: the program includes the vision, principles, objectives, content, program development process, evaluation of performance and effectiveness. The process development had 5 stages and 8 activities of construction. The efficiency of the devel...

  5. The Shifting Sands of Creative Thinking: Connections to Dual Process Theory and Implications for Creativity Training

    OpenAIRE

    Sowden, Paul; Pringle, Andrew; Gabora, Liane

    2014-01-01

    Dual process models of cognition suggest there are two kinds of thought: rapid, automatic Type 1 processes, and effortful, controlled Type 2 processes. Models of creative thinking also distinguish between two sets of processes: those involved in the generation of ideas, and those involved with their refinement, evaluation and/or selection. Here we review dual process models in both these literatures and delineate the similarities and differences. Both generative and evaluati...

  6. Creative thinking as orchestrated by semantic processing vs. cognitive control brain networks

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is primarily investigated within the neuroscientific perspective as a unitary construct. While such an approach is beneficial when trying to infer the general picture regarding creativity and brain function, it is insufficient if the objective is to uncover the information processing brain mechanisms by which creativity occurs. As creative thinking emerges through the dynamic interplay between several cognitive processes, assessing the neural correlates of these operations would en...

  7. ?he Contribution of Music and Movement Activities to Creative Thinking in Pre-School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Chronopoulou; Vassiliki Riga

    2012-01-01

    As interest in creativity is rising, kindergarten teachers are looking for ways to strengthen the creative potential of young children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music and movement activities to creative thinking in preschool children. A three month educational programme was designed and implemented, using an experimental research method. The effect on fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration of thought of 5 year old children, as well as how the programme...

  8. Creative thinking as orchestrated by semantic processing versus cognitive control brain networks

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is primarily investigated within the neuroscientific perspective as a unitary construct. While such an approach is beneficial when trying to infer the general picture regarding creativity and brain function, it is insufficient if the objective is to uncover the information processing brain mechanisms by which creativity occurs. As creative thinking emerges through the dynamic interplay between several cognitive processes, assessing the neural correlates of these operations would en...

  9. Teaching and Thinking: A Literature Review of the Teaching of Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Mohammad Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to study some of the most famous works in teaching thinking skills. Teaching thinking is an arguable issue in the UAE. Some teachers are in favour of teaching thinking skills implicitly while others support the view that students have to learn thinking skills explicitly. The study aimed at answering two…

  10. Not Just Wanna Have Fun: Teaching Listening Skills with Songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Qistina Abdullah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching listening skills is very challenging to ESL teachers. It involves active participation from both teachers and students to ensure the objectives of teaching listening skills can be achieved. Hence, this presentation provides interesting and exciting strategies to teach listening skills using selected songs.  It is hoped that this would motivate ESL teachers to apply and adapt these strategies in their English language classrooms.  

  11. Right-brain techniques: a catalyst for creative thinking and internal focusing. A study of five writers and six psychotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdenek, M

    1988-09-01

    Comparing the scientific reports of brain researchers such as Sperry, Bogen, Diamond, Geschwind, and Hoppe with the subjective reports of high achievers in various fields of the arts, sciences, and industry reveals that there is a correlation between creative thinking and right hemisphere specialization. Learning how to stimulate right hemisphere activity can be of great benefit to high achievers in fields that require one to be internally focused, to be sensitive to the intonations of voice and body-language, to comprehend symbols and metaphors, to think visually and holistically, to work constructively with affect, or to enhance imaginative thinking. This report is a subjective study of how five writers and six psychotherapists experienced one three-hour session of Inner Vision techniques, which I developed to stimulate creative thinking and inner focusing by enhancing right hemisphere activity. During the session, all of the psychotherapists and all but one of the writers reported that these mental imagery exercises produced a significant increase in the flow of creative ideas and enabled them to gain insights into important personal issues. One writer experienced resistance; two psychotherapists reported feelings of solace; two writers and two psychotherapists indicated that they have gained new perspectives on professional issues--one writer solved a major problem regarding the central character in his book; six psychotherapists and three writers gained new perceptions on important personal issues; five psychotherapists and four writers reported feelings of intense joy, even liberation, during the session. All eleven participants indicated that they had experienced vivid and imaginative imagery. The constructive use of imagination is essential for creative work and mental health. Writers who have the skill to program their imaginations to gain creative insights at times of their own choosing obviously will be more productive than writers who sit around waiting for the benevolent muse. Psychotherapists who use Inner Vision techniques in their own lives find that it is a valuable tool for interior focusing; those who use it with their patients have reported that this is a practical, effective technique for helping patients attain greater psychologic integration. An important way in which this program differs from other imagery techniques is that the vivid imagery of the right-hemisphere work is followed by left-brain analysis and evaluation. The ultimate goal is the transformational intercallosal process of symbollexia--the "magic synthesis" of right-brain and left-brain specialization for an enhanced ability to live and work creatively. PMID:3226966

  12. Relating inter-individual differences in verbal creative thinking to cerebral structures: an optimal voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feifei; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Creativity can be defined the capacity of an individual to produce something original and useful. An important measurable component of creativity is divergent thinking. Despite existing studies on creativity-related cerebral structural basis, no study has used a large sample to investigate the relationship between individual verbal creativity and regional gray matter volumes (GMVs) and white matter volumes (WMVs). In the present work, optimal voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was employed to identify the structure that correlates verbal creativity (measured by the verbal form of Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking) across the brain in young healthy subjects. Verbal creativity was found to be significantly positively correlated with regional GMV in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), which is believed to be responsible for language production and comprehension, new semantic representation, and memory retrieval, and in the right IFG, which may involve inhibitory control and attention switching. A relationship between verbal creativity and regional WMV in the left and right IFG was also observed. Overall, a highly verbal creative individual with superior verbal skills may demonstrate a greater computational efficiency in the brain areas involved in high-level cognitive processes including language production, semantic representation and cognitive control. PMID:24223921

  13. The Oxford Practice Skills Project: teaching ethics, law and communication skills to clinical medical students.

    OpenAIRE

    Hope, T.; Fulford, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the teaching programme in ethics, law and communication skills for clinical medical students which is being developed as part of the Oxford Practice Skills Project. These three elements of practice are approached in an integrated teaching programme which aims to address everyday clinical practice. The role of a central value of patient-centred health care in guiding the teaching is described. Although the final aim of the teaching is to improve actual practice, we have found three...

  14. Teaching Self-Protection Skills to Persons with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseltine, Beth; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    1990-01-01

    A curriculum for teaching self-protection skills was evaluated with eight mildly retarded adults. The curriculum, presented in a small-group format, uses instructions, modeling, rehearsal, feedback, and praise to teach proper responses to abduction and sexual abuse situations. Seven subjects learned the skills and maintained them at six-month…

  15. Using Blended Learning in Developing Student Teachers Teaching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Abanmy, Fahad AbdulAziz; Hussein, Hisham Barakat; Al Saadany, Mohammed Abdelrahman

    2012-01-01

    The research aims to determine the effectiveness of using blended learning Approach in developing student teachers teaching skills, and defining teaching skills that confront students of teachers college at King Saud University need it. The research uses the Quasi- Experimental approach, with four experimental groups (Mathematics (21)--Science…

  16. The Teaching Methodology of Arabic Speaking Skills: Learners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, Sueraya Che

    2013-01-01

    Teaching methodology plays an important role in transmitting knowledge and skills to learners. The effectiveness of both knowledge and skills depends greatly on the methodology used. This paper describes a study to investigate the learners' perspectives on the teaching methodology used by the teachers at the Centre for Foundation Studies,…

  17. Teaching safety skills to children to prevent gun play.

    OpenAIRE

    Himle, Michael B.; Raymond G. Miltenberger; Flessner, Christopher; Gatheridge, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Research has shown that children often engage in gun play when they find a firearm and that this behavior is often involved in unintentional firearm injuries. Previous research has shown existing programs to be ineffective for teaching children safety skills to reduce gun play. This study examined the effectiveness of a behavioral skills training (BST) program supplemented with in situ training for teaching children safety skills to use when they find a gun (i.e., don't touch, leave the area,...

  18. TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS : THE CONCEPT OF SOCIAL RISK ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Niclas

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of lear...

  19. Teaching medical students consultation skills using e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Merete; Witt, Klaus; Fridorff-Jens, Peter Kindt

    2015-01-01

    Teaching consultation skills to medical students using e-learning. Introduction: We have been teaching Family Medicine at the University of Copenhagen for more than twenty years. We wish to develop a method to evaluate the current teaching of consultation skills and the effect of new interventions. During the course each student works eight days as a doctor in a general practice clinic. They see real patients and video their consultations and analyse them in small group sessions at the universit...

  20. Teaching 21st Century Skills: An ASCD Action Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Any school interested in preparing students for learning and working in 21st century academic and job settings needs this resource to explain to teachers the new skills students need and provide teachers with tools to teach and reinforce these skills. Based on the work of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, this action tool defines what…

  1. Collaborating with the unconscious other. The analysand's capacity for creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, L

    2001-06-01

    The analysand's capacity for making use of psychoanalytic treatment has been a subject of importance since the beginning of psychoanalysis. The author addresses an aspect of the difficulty encountered by analysands in achieving a psychic state that allows the creative use of free association, dreams, parapraxes and other spontaneous phenomena occurring during the course of treatment. He suggests that a very specific state of mind is essential to both the psychoanalytic process and the creative process. Using theoretical concepts derived from Freud, Klein and Bion, he develops the idea of an internal object relationship, 'the collaboration with the unconscious other', which forms the basis for both creative thinking and the psychoanalytic function of the personality. Creative thinking is distinguished from artistic endeavour and discussed as a universal potential, on which growth in psychoanalysis depends. The term 'unconscious other' is meant to signify the subjective experience of a foreign presence within oneself from which both spontaneous creative inspiration and involuntary psychic phenomena are felt to emanate. The author presents clinical material to suggest that paranoid-schizoid and depressive anxieties form obstacles to collaborating with the unconscious other, and must be worked through in order to achieve an analytic process. PMID:11436250

  2. Evidence for a left-over-right inhibitory mechanism during figural creative thinking in healthy nonartists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peiyu; Qiu, Lihua; Shen, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Song, Zhe; Qi, Zhiguo; Gong, Qiyong; Xie, Peng

    2013-10-01

    As a complex mental process, creativity requires the coordination of multiple brain regions. Previous pathological research on figural creativity has indicated that there is a mechanism by which the left side of the brain inhibits the activities of the right side of the brain during figural creative thinking, but this mechanism has not been directly demonstrated. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the existence of this inhibitory mechanism in young adults (15 women, 11 men, mean age: 22 years) that were not artists. By making comparisons between brain activity during creative and uncreative tasks, we found increased activity in the left middle and inferior frontal lobe and strong decreases in activity in the right middle frontal lobe and the left inferior parietal lobe. As such, these data suggest that the left frontal lobe may inhibit the right hemisphere during figural creative thinking in normal people. Moreover, removal of this inhibition by practicing artistry or through specific damage to the left frontal lobe may facilitate the emergence of artistic creativity. PMID:22522783

  3. Evaluation Of Behavioral Skills Training For Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills To Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Brigitte M; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Jostad, Candice M; Flessner, Christopher; Gatheridge, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of individual behavioral skills training in conjunction with in situ training in teaching 13 preschool children abduction prevention skills. Children's performance was measured during baseline, training, and at 2-week, 1-month, and 3-month follow-ups using in situ assessments in which abduction prevention skills were measured in naturalistic settings. Results revealed that all the children learned the skills and all the children available at the 2-week an...

  4. Teaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Lingard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To be successful in today's workplace, engineering and computer science students must possess high levels of teamwork skills. Unfortunately, most engineering programs provide little or no specific instruction in this area. This paper outlines an assessment-driven approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Working with the Industrial Advisory Board for the College, a set of performance criteria for teamwork was developed. This set of criteria was used to build an assessment instrument to measure the extent to which students are able to achieve the necessary skills. This set of criteria provides a clear basis for the development of an approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Furthermore, the results from the assessment can be used to adjust the teaching techniques to address the particular skills where students show some weaknesses. Although this effort is in the early stages, the approach seems promising and will be improved over time.

  5. Competence and teaching skills: reflections on the concept and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Guzmán Ibarra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses some concepts of competence, to identify their common elements that can be transferred to educational practices on competition. The intention is to establish levels of consistency among the components of the concept with educational practices and competitions. On this basis, we discuss some strategies for teaching skills to identify and propose strategies and tools that focus on authentic assessment to evaluate teaching skills.

  6. Virtual Reality in the Teaching of Motor Skills: Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kampiotis; K. Theodorakou

    2003-01-01

    The present work is a study aiming to present literature on virtual reality and to inquire the possibility of using virtual reality in the teaching of motor skills. Learning process in physical education and sports, as far as cognitive and physical aspects concern, is an interesting topic, which has been worked out extensively. Nevertheless, the idea of using high technology in the teaching of motor skills is an inviting one, which needs further investigation.

  7. Old dogs and new tricks: teaching computer skills to adults

    OpenAIRE

    Geaorge Geddes

    2006-01-01

    A review of the issues in teaching computer skills to adults, with particular emphasis on the needs of the older adult. Three main areas are considered: adult and lifelong learning, including personal issues and pressures facing the learner; the specific demands of teaching practical computer skills, including the classroom environment; and the particular problems faced by learners as they get older, such as physiological changes.The paper draws on evidence from work in all of these areas, as...

  8. Evaluation of Peer Training for Teaching Abduction Prevention Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, Melissa A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Brower-Breitwieser, Carrie; Bosch, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Child abduction is a serious problem, with approximately 100 children killed each year by nonfamily abductors. Training programs to teach children the correct skills to use if they ever come into contact with a stranger can be effective when they incorporate behavioral skills training (BST) and in-situ training (IST) into their protocol. However,…

  9. Teaching Safety Skills to Children to Prevent Gun Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himle, Michael B.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Flessner, Christopher; Gatheridge, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Research has shown that children often engage in gun play when they find a firearm and that this behavior is often involved in unintentional firearm injuries. Previous research has shown existing programs to be ineffective for teaching children safety skills to reduce gun play. This study examined the effectiveness of a behavioral skills training…

  10. Teaching Play Skills to Young Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunhwa; Sainato, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Play is critical for the development of young children and is an important part of their daily routine. However, children with autism often exhibit deficits in play skills and engage in stereotypic behaviour. We reviewed studies to identify effective instructional strategies for teaching play skills to young children with autism.…

  11. Teaching and learning consultation skills for paediatric practice

    OpenAIRE

    Howells, R J; Davies, H. A.; J. D. Silverman

    2006-01-01

    Effective consultations with patients and their families are important for patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment, and recovery from illness. Communication problems among health professionals are common. Fortunately, the skills of effective communication can be taught and learned. This paper highlights evidence based approaches to teaching these skills with minimal resources.

  12. Strategies for Developing Effective Teaching Skills in the Affective Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps more than any other academic discipline, physical education holds the highest potential for teaching affective skills. By its very nature, the typical physical education setting offers countless teachable moments and opportunities to capitalize on the development of affective skills. The seeming lack of attention given to affective…

  13. Teaching Library Skills to Students with Mild and Moderate Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Caren L.; Keefe, Margaret

    1989-01-01

    A direct instruction model is applied to the teaching of library skills to students with mild/moderate handicaps. The model involves determining students' skill levels, setting objectives, providing instruction, and monitoring student progress. A team approach is recommended, involving the library media specialist and the special education…

  14. Teaching Two Household Safety Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jay; Tarbox, Jonathan; Findel-Pyles, Rachel S.; Wilke, Arthur E.; Bergstrom, Ryan; Williams, W. Larry

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate reactions to potentially hazardous situations may help prevent children from incurring injury or abduction. However, children with autism and other developmental disorders may not develop safety skills without explicit intervention. This study used a simple behavioral skills training package for teaching children with autism to respond…

  15. Creative Thinking and Personality: An Exploratory Study of Their Relationship in Third and Fourth Grade Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank E.

    The results of this study do not indicate any relationship between a child's performance on a creativity test and certain personality factors contributing to creativity, as measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking and the CPQ. At both third and fourth grade levels, scores for the same child on the two tests were independent of each…

  16. How Does Using Philosophy and Creative Thinking Enable Me to Recognise and Develop Inclusive Gifts and Talents in My Pupils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, Ros

    2013-01-01

    In this writing it is my intention to show how using philosophy and creative thinking with junior school children has enabled me to identify gifts and talents of which I might otherwise have been unaware and to show the impact this has had on the children concerned in terms of their own awareness of themselves as learners. I will also question…

  17. Critical and Creative Thinking as Learning Processes at Top-Ranking Chinese Middle Schools: Possibilities and Required Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. K.; He, J.; Li, B.

    2015-01-01

    Fostering and enabling critical and creative thinking of students is considered an important goal, and it is assumed that in particular, talented students have considerable potential for applying such high-level cognitive processes for learning in classrooms. However, Chinese students are often considered as rote learners, and that learning…

  18. An Experimental Study of the Effects of Improvisation on the Development of Children's Creative Thinking in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoupidou, Theano; Hargreaves, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a quasi-experimental study of the effects of improvisation on the development of children's creative thinking in music. The study was conducted in a primary school classroom with two matched groups of 6-year-old children over a period of six months. The music lessons for the experimental group were enriched with a variety of…

  19. Applying MacKinnon's 4Ps to Foster Creative Thinking and Creative Behaviours in Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, Vassiliki; Chronopoulou, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify certain strategies and conditions that should be used by teachers in kindergarten so as to foster creative thinking and creative behaviours to children. We used a quasi-experimental research design for 6 months in a public kindergarten in a suburban area of Greece, and we developed a creative music and…

  20. Habilidades de pensamento criativo em crianças institucionalizadas e não institucionalizadas / Creative thinking abilities in institutionalized and non institutionalized children

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Paulo Gomes de, Sousa Filho; Eunice M. L. Soriano, Alencar.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo examinou diferenças em habilidades de pensamento criativo entre 25 crianças institucionalizadas e 30 crianças não institucionalizadas, sendo 23 do sexo masculino e 32 do sexo feminino. Todas responderam a um teste de natureza verbal da Bateria Torrance de Pensamento Criativo (Torrance, 1 [...] 974) e ao Teste de Pensamento Criativo - Produção Divergente (Urban & Jellen, 1996). Não foram observadas diferenças significativas nas medidas de pensamento criativo entre crianças institucionalizadas e não institucionalizadas. Diferença significativa entre gêneros foi observada no Teste de Pensamento Criativo - Produção Divergente, a favor do gênero masculino, paralelamente a uma interação entre gênero e instituição neste teste. Observou-se também uma relação positiva entre os escores dos dois testes utilizados. Abstract in english This study investigated the differences in creative thinking abilities among 25 institutionalized children and 30 non-institutionalized children, being 23 male and 30 female. These children answered a verbal test of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Torrance, 1974) and the Test of Creative Th [...] inking - Divergent Production (Urban & Jellen, 1996). No significant differences were observed among male and female children in the creative thinking abilities. However, a significant difference between gender was observed in the Test of Creative Thinking - Divergent Production, to the advantage of the male gender as far as an interaction between gender and institutionalization in the same test. It was observed also, a positive relation among the scores of the tests.

  1. Tapping into Multiple Intelligences to Teach Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Sally

    2005-01-01

    One of the major questions that classroom teachers wrestle with is what strategy or method to use when teaching their students. This is a question that plagues school library media specialists also. One of the theories that library media specialists are finding to be effective as they teach information literacy skills is Howard Gardner's theory…

  2. Teaching Social Skills and Assertiveness to Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Aaron; Alexander, Melissa G. F.; Dummer, Gail M.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses teaching social skills and assertiveness to students with disabilities. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) content standards for physical education emphasize teaching responsible personal and social behaviors to students of all abilities, to help them develop an understanding of and respect for…

  3. Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsh, Judith R., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As new research shows how effective systematic and explicit teaching of language-based skills is for students with learning disabilities--along with the added benefits of multisensory techniques--discover the latest on this popular teaching approach with the third edition of this bestselling textbook. Adopted by colleges and universities across…

  4. Instruction dialogues: Teaching new skills to a robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crangle, Colleen; Suppes, P.

    1989-01-01

    Extended dialogues between a human user and a robot system are presented. The purpose of each dialogue is to teach the robot a new skill or to improve the performance of a skill it already has. The particular interest is in natural language dialogues but the illustrated techniques can be applied to any high level language. The primary purpose is to show how verbal instruction can be integrated with the robot's autonomous learning of a skill.

  5. [Internal structure and standardised scores of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Ferrándiz, Carmen; Bermejo, María R; Sánchez, Cristina; Parra, Joaquín; Prieto, María D

    2007-08-01

    The present work sets out to study the internal structure of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT) and to establish standardised scores that will enable the test to be used in both a diagnostic and educational context. 649 students (319 girls and 330 boys), aged 5 to 12 years from various schools in Murcia and Alicante (SE Spain), took part in the study. The findings suggest that the psychometric characteristics of TTCT are satisfactory, and its internal structure can be attributed to three factors that are responsible for a high percentage of the variance (73.8%). The standardised score tables, which are provided for first time in this context, will be useful in the evaluation of creativity and the identification of students with high intellectual abilities. PMID:17617990

  6. Rorschach interpretation with high-ability adolescent females: psychopathology or creative thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, K W; Cornell, D G

    1997-02-01

    Highly intelligent and creative persons have long posed interpretation difficulties for users of the Rorschach Inkblot Test. This study examined Exner's (1993) Schizophrenia, Depression, and Coping Deficit indices as adjustment measures in a sample of 43 female adolescents enrolled in an early college entrance program and a comparison group of 19 girls enrolled in public high school gifted programs. Contrary to conventional interpretation, higher scores on the Rorschach Schizophrenia Index among the accelerants were correlated with healthy emotional adjustment on both the California Psychological Inventory and the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents (SPPA). Further analyses offered support for the hypothesis that among accelerants, elevated scores on the Rorschach constellations did not indicate psychopathology, but rather their creative thinking style. PMID:9018850

  7. Using Children's Books to Teach Inquiry Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackes, Mesut; Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Flevares, Lucia M.

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood teachers realize the importance of inquiry-based instruction for children's science learning and their development of inquiry skills. The term "inquiry skills" refers to the science process skills scientists use to investigate the natural world--observing, inferring, posing questions, recording data, looking for patterns, and…

  8. Evaluation of Behavioral Skills Training for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brigitte M.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Jostad, Candice M.; Flessner, Christopher; Gatheridge, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of individual behavioral skills training in conjunction with in situ training in teaching 13 preschool children abduction prevention skills. Children's performance was measured during baseline, training, and at 2-week, 1-month, and 3-month follow-ups using in situ assessments in which abduction prevention…

  9. Teaching Laundry Skills to High School Students with Disabilities: Generalization of Targeted Skills and Nontargeted Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paula; Collins, Belva C.; Schuster, John W.; Kleinert, Harold

    2002-01-01

    An instructional procedure to teach laundry skills to four high school students with moderate mental disabilities utilized least prompts with multiple exemplars of materials to facilitate generalization of skills across community settings and multiple exemplars of nontargeted information presented as instructive feedback. Students acquired and…

  10. Using Behavioral Skills Training and Video Rehearsal to Teach Blackjack Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Ryan C.; Whiting, Seth W.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A behavioral skills training procedure that consisted of video instructions, video rehearsal, and video testing was used to teach 4 recreational gamblers a specific skill in playing blackjack (sometimes called "card counting"). A multiple baseline design was used to evaluate intervention effects on card-counting accuracy and chips won or…

  11. Teaching Writing Skills for Engineering Students

    OpenAIRE

    D.Vijaya Lakshmi*1; K. Ragini

    2014-01-01

    This research paper focuses on the writing skills of the Engineering students of all the branches especially at the time of placements. Writing in English is almost a prerequisite for the job. Now- a-days testing the writing skills of the students is mandatory before going to attend the interviews. LSRW skills are essential in the acquisition of language. In order to help the students with these writing skills, teacher has to take the initiative to motivate them. Most of the students are ...

  12. The Outcomes of a Social Skills Teaching Program for Inclusive Classroom Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazak Pinar, Elif; Sucuoglu, Bülbin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of a Social Skills Teaching Program (SSTP) prepared for inclusive classroom teachers was investigated. The SSTP gauged (1) teachers' expectations related to social skills of students with special needs, (2) their knowledge levels related to teaching social skills, and (3) their use of social skills teaching

  13. An Interprofessional Approach to Teaching Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Joan; MacLeod, Tanya; Murray, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Recent research suggests that effective interprofessional communication and collaboration can positively influence patient satisfaction and outcomes. Health professional communication skills do not necessarily improve over time but can improve with formal communication skills training (CST). This article describes the development,…

  14. Improving of the teaching methods of chemical subjects by using of teaching tests in high educational institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulzahira Turebekova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the information technologies may cause great pedagogical effect: using of computer opens the opportunity for organization of problem teaching developing the creative thinking, forming research, practical skills of students, creation of the steady positive motivation of the students. Technical facilities of the computer technology allow solving the teaching and research tasks in the chemistry come as original catalyst of creation of different types of information technology systems and projection on their basis the novel ways and methods of their application. Use of computer technology in education helps to support necessary educational level of students and pay attention to their independent work. The article represents that the computer testing can be widely used for control of knowledge and for teaching. Teaching testing arouses interest in subject and develops ability of self-preparation and self – education, provides in-door and out- door work.

  15. Skills and Competencies Set Forth by Bologna Process in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs GÜNE?

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technological advances of today, force the universities to train more qualified individuals. That needs to increase the quality of educational programs and practices, and requires constant updating in universities. So within the framework of the “Bologna Process” higher education programs have been started to be updated in our country. These studies, carried out to develop the skills and competencies of students' knowledge with student-centered educational approach. Besides a variety of knowledge and skills, ability to work independently and assume responsibility, learning, communication and social competence skills, such as domain specific competencies and professional competence is intended to gain to the students. This approach needs to teaching cognitive (logical, intuitive and creative thinking and practical (manual skills, methods, materials, tools to use skills, that is to say language, mental, social and emotional skills in higher education. Teaching of skills is different from teaching of the information in methods and practice. Therefore the universities should be developed for the assessment of teaching and coaching skills. Otherwise, the rote teaching of information will inevitably grow and achieving the goals of higher education will be difficult.

  16. Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Nontraditional Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Hays

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Different teaching methods should be used when instructing adults versus those used to teach children. Adults have many life experiences, they have a need to know, and they are often highly motivated to learn as it relates to career growth and personal advancement. In this paper, the author discusses andragogy and how adult learning theory affects the learner. The principles of andragogy provide the librarian instructor with a foundation for how to teach the adult learner. Suggestions for how to apply the principles of andragogy are listed in the paper. The paper will also benefit those working in public libraries who work with lifelong learners.

  17. TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS : THE CONCEPT OF SOCIAL RISK ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of learning objectives, but realised in practical teaching activities and as an integrated part of the examination. This study aims at presenting and reviewing a practical approach to teaching of interpersonal skills, referred to as the Social Risk Analysis, which has been applied and integrated into the curriculum of two engineering courses. The Social Risk Analysis encourages and imposes a critical review of the social interaction in a small group of students and thus facilitates communication and teamwork operation. Students find the Social Risk Analysis being easy to apprehend and meaningful in engineering teaching, and most significantly, they perceive that the Social Risk Analysis facilitates the work performance. The study found it possible to successfully implement the Social Risk Analysis into the course curriculum of the two engineering courses. The implementation required, however, refinement of the pedagogical approach by integrating the Social Risk Analysis into the learning objectives, teaching activities and assessment of the course, and further, redesign of the engineering work assignments in order to impel cooperation, communication and participation of the students in a team. The establishment of an engineering context provides an important basis for the teaching of interpersonal skill using the Social Risk Analysis.

  18. Teaching job interview skills to retarded clients.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, C; Sheldon-Wildgen, J; Sherman, J A

    1980-01-01

    Six retarded adults were taught job application and interview skills including introducing oneself, filling out a standard job application form, answering questions, and asking questions. A combination of instructions, modeling, role playing, and positive and corrective feedback was used across a multiple baseline experimental design. After training, the clients' performance in each area improved substantially over baseline levels. In addition, the newly taught skills appeared to generalize t...

  19. Proposals for teaching reading skills in standard 8 in Namibia

    OpenAIRE

    Aipanda, Shuuya I.

    1990-01-01

    Reading is central to all learning and should enjoy more attention than any skill associated with learning. Undoubtedly, reading difficulty has an adverse effect on learning and on acquiring of information in general. This dissertation is a proposal of teaching reading skills which enable students to read purposefully, to become self-reliant students and to have a beneficial effect on their command of the English language. Chapter One gives the historical background while Chapter Two identifi...

  20. TEACHING CULTURE AS A FIFTH LANGUAGE SKILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma ÖZÜORÇUN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers like Wang (2008:3 believe that language teaching is culture teaching and foreign language teachers are actually foreign culture teachers. The main reason behind the idea of teaching the culture together with the language is that in many situations it is difficult to simply translate one language into another language especially when either of the languages lack these words or expressions. The foreign language lacks these words simply because the people do not have them in their own cultures. The paper includes examples of words that appear in Turkish and English because of the cultural importance of what they refer to. The present paper also includes reasons and recommendations for language teachers to indicate how important it is to include culture in their teaching.

  1. Teaching Empathy Skills to Children With Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Schrandt, Jessica A; Townsend, Dawn Buffington; Poulson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to teach empathetic responding to 4 children with autism. Instructors presented vignettes with dolls and puppets demonstrating various types of affect and used prompt delay, modeling, manual prompts, behavioral rehearsals, and reinforcement to teach participants to perform empathy responses. Increases in empathetic responding occurred systematically with the introduction of treatment across all participants and response categories. Furthermore, responding general...

  2. Description and Analysis of Educational Facilities Design Criteria Based on Creative thinking from the Perspective of Educational Technology Specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Shahin Valia; Faramarzmalekian; Mehrnaz Foroughinia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is description and analysis of educational facilities design criteria based on creative thinking from the perspective of educational technology specialists. Study's method is descriptive-surveyand it is polling type. Method description - is a survey of surveys. Population consists of full-time faculty members in the field of educational technology at the University of Tehran that are 36 persons. Tools for data collection are questionnaire responses depending on the rese...

  3. Teaching Writing Skills for Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Vijaya Lakshmi*1

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper focuses on the writing skills of the Engineering students of all the branches especially at the time of placements. Writing in English is almost a prerequisite for the job. Now- a-days testing the writing skills of the students is mandatory before going to attend the interviews. LSRW skills are essential in the acquisition of language. In order to help the students with these writing skills, teacher has to take the initiative to motivate them. Most of the students are coming from rural areas and basically from regional medium background. So they require support at every step. Writing becomes a Herculean task to them. Triggering their requirement is a pivotal role of the teacher. Different perspectives of writing skills like free writing, mechanics of writing, vocabulary, grammar, description of a picture, paragraph, essay and summary writing and report, resume, letter and e-mail writings are discussed in this paper. Activities like pair work or group work of all the tasks are added benefit to the students. Interest and command on the identified topic of the student is not identical. Analysis and feedback of each and every activity is an added grace to the teacher and advantage to the student. If the students are trained logically from the beginning of their first year of Engineering they achieve their dream of getting a placement before completing their Bachelor’s degree.

  4. Creative thinking as orchestrated by semantic processing versus cognitive control brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abraham

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is primarily investigated within the neuroscientific perspective as a unitary construct. While such an approach is beneficial when trying to infer the general picture regarding creativity and brain function, it is insufficient if the objective is to uncover the information processing brain mechanisms by which creativity occurs. As creative thinking emerges through the dynamic interplay between several cognitive processes, assessing the neural correlates of these operations would enable the development and characterization of an information processing framework from which to better understand this complex ability. This article focuses on two aspects of creative cognition that are central to generating original ideas. “Conceptual expansion” refers to the ability to widen one’s conceptual structures to include unusual or novel associations, while “overcoming knowledge constraints” refers to our ability to override the constraining influence imposed by salient or pertinent knowledge when trying to be creative. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence is presented to illustrate how semantic processing and cognitive control networks in the brain differentially modulate these critical facets of creative cognition.

  5. Creative thinking as orchestrated by semantic processing vs. cognitive control brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is primarily investigated within the neuroscientific perspective as a unitary construct. While such an approach is beneficial when trying to infer the general picture regarding creativity and brain function, it is insufficient if the objective is to uncover the information processing brain mechanisms by which creativity occurs. As creative thinking emerges through the dynamic interplay between several cognitive processes, assessing the neural correlates of these operations would enable the development and characterization of an information processing framework from which to better understand this complex ability. This article focuses on two aspects of creative cognition that are central to generating original ideas. "Conceptual expansion" refers to the ability to widen one's conceptual structures to include unusual or novel associations, while "overcoming knowledge constraints" refers to our ability to override the constraining influence imposed by salient or pertinent knowledge when trying to be creative. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence is presented to illustrate how semantic processing and cognitive control networks in the brain differentially modulate these critical facets of creative cognition. PMID:24605098

  6. Brain correlates underlying creative thinking: EEG alpha activity in professional vs. novice dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Andreas; Graif, Barbara; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2009-07-01

    Neuroscientific research on creativity has revealed valuable insights into possible brain correlates underlying this complex mental ability domain. However, most of the studies investigated brain activity during the performance of comparatively simple (verbal) type of tasks and the majority of studies focused on samples of the normal population. In this study we investigate EEG activity in professional dancers (n=15) who have attained a high level of expertise in this domain. This group was compared with a group of novices (n=17) who have only basic experience in dancing and completed no comprehensive training in this field. The EEG was recorded during performance of two different dancing imagery tasks which differed with respect to creative demands. In the first task participants were instructed to mentally perform a dance which should be as unique and original as possible (improvisation dance). In the waltz task they were asked to imagine dancing the waltz, a standard dance which involves a sequence of monotonous steps (lower creative demands). In addition, brain activity was also measured during performance of the Alternative Uses test. We observed evidence that during the generation of alternative uses professional dancers show stronger alpha synchronization in posterior parietal brain regions than novice dancers. During improvisation dance, professional dancers exhibited more right-hemispheric alpha synchronization than the group of novices did, while during imagining dancing the waltz no significant group differences emerged. The findings complement and extend existing findings on the relationship between EEG alpha activity and creative thinking. PMID:19269335

  7. [Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT): elements for construct validity in Portuguese adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ema; Almeida, Leandro; Ferrándiz, Carmen; Ferrando, Mercedes; Sainz, Marta; Prieto, María Dolores

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work is to study the unidimensional and multidimensional nature of creativity when assessed through divergent thinking tasks, as proposed in Torrance's battery (Torrance Creative Thinking Test, TTCT). This battery is made up of various tasks with verbal and figurative content, aimed at estimating the level of creativity according to the dimensions or cognitive functions of fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration of the individuals' ideas. This work used a sample of 595 Portuguese students from 5th and 6th grade. The results of confirmatory factor analysis reveals that the unidimensional model (a general factor of creativity) and the model of factors as a function of the cognitive dimensions of creativity, based on task content, do not fit well. The model with the best fit has a hierarchical factor structure, in which the first level comprises the factors for each of the subtests applied and the second level includes verbal or figurative content. The difficulty to verify the structural validity of the TTCT is noted, and the need for further studies to achieve, in practice, better individual creativity scores. PMID:19861099

  8. Construction Business Teaches Critical Work Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Bud

    2006-01-01

    Few students get the opportunity to experience real-life scenarios with all the accompanying complications and loopholes. In Palmetto High School, Florida, students have the chance to practice real life skills through running a business, which affords them the chance to gain the knowledge and understanding that usually only comes from lifelong…

  9. Teaching Advanced SQL Skills: Text Bulk Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, David; Hauser, Karina

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that advanced database skills are important for students to be prepared for today's highly competitive job market. A common task for database administrators is to insert a large amount of data into a database. This paper illustrates how an up-to-date, advanced database topic, namely bulk insert, can be incorporated into a database…

  10. Environmental Modification: Teaching Social Coping Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimi, Joan Kay

    1981-01-01

    Describes environmental modification, social work's response to the practical needs of clients, which emphasizes "doing for" clients and thus may encourage their dependence on the practitioner. Suggests that helping clients to develop their own skills to modify their environment can promote independence while meeting clients' tangible needs.…

  11. Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills. The Classroom Strategies Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Robert J.; Heflebower, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As the 21st century unfolds, the pace of change in the world is accelerating. Teachers and administrators must lead the cultural shift required to ensure their students can survive and thrive in the changing world. In Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills the authors present a model of instruction and assessment based on a combination of…

  12. Can Distance Learning Be Used to Teach Automotive Management Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Teresa L.

    2011-01-01

    Today's automotive college students will shape the future of the automobile industry. The success of college-level automotive programs has long been dependent on the students' ability to participate in hands-on classroom based interactions. In this article, distance learning and how it can be used to teach automotive management skills, as well as…

  13. Teaching Directional Skills to Preschool and Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterritt, Graham M.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Studied a new device and training procedure for teaching the directional orientation and sentence tracking skills used in reading and writing western languages. Left-right and up-down directional confusion were shown to be rapidly corrected in normal children by the use of a simple electronic device providing clear feedback. (Author)

  14. Multimedia Shared Stories: Teaching Literacy Skills to Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Through research, shared stories have demonstrated their effectiveness in teaching literacy skills to students with disabilities, including students who are culturally and linguistically diverse. In an effort to keep pace with ever-changing technology, shared stories can be transformed into a multimedia experience using software that is commonly…

  15. Teaching the Soft Skills: Three Students Break It Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Teaching soft skills (i.e., grit, empathy, collaboration, perseverance, communication, ethics, self-management) is a task that might seem overwhelming to new teachers, but this article offers practical advice from students about how to incorporate the lessons into the classroom.

  16. Involving Parents in Teaching Social Communication Skills to Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Amy L.; Theadore, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on why and how speech-language pathologists and other professionals can encourage the involvement of parents in teaching social communication skills to their young children. Four main topics are explored: (1) the evidence that many of the children with special needs served by speech-language pathologists and other…

  17. ACCESS! Teaching Writing Skills to Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I.; Konrad, Moira; Pennington, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide teachers with tools that they can use to teach written expression to school-age students with intellectual disabilities. These tools are presented around the mnemonic ACCESS: accommodations and assistive technologies, concrete topics, critical skills, explicit instruction, strategy instruction, systematic…

  18. Teaching Job Interviewing Skills with the Help of Television Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Janel

    2011-01-01

    Because of its potential for humor and drama, job interviewing is frequently portrayed on television. This article discusses how scenes from popular television series such as "Everybody Loves Raymond," "Friends," and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" can be used to teach effective job interview skills in business communication courses. Television…

  19. Teaching Creative Thinking and Transitioning Students to the Workplace in an Academic Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senra, Michael; Fogler, H. Scott

    2014-01-01

    In their collegiate studies, students are given a wide range of concepts, theories, and equations to assist them in their future endeavors. However, students have not been sufficiently exposed to practical critical thinking methodologies that will benefit them as they encounter open-ended problems. A course developed at the University of Michigan…

  20. Using Music Sampling to Teach Research Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Sarah R.

    2006-01-01

    One way to teach the research paper is by first discussing sampling, the musical practice of using other artists' work. By studying the lyrics of Sean "P. Diddy" Combs, a widely known hip-hop sampler, students gain an understanding of quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing sources.

  1. Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in Business Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Beryl C.

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 67 North Carolina high school business teachers (41% response) identified the best methods of teaching critical thinking: case studies, problem solving, simulations, projects, and group discussion. The best testing methods were practical task completion, case studies, and argumentative essays. (SK)

  2. Teaching Chinese Engineering Students Oral Presentation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Elizabeth Ann

    This paper is a virtual transcript of a conference presentation. It discusses the context of the course: the students, the expectations of the faculty and employers and the administrative constraints, and the course itself at the University of Hong Kong, an English-medium institution. Teaching non-native speakers to make effective oral…

  3. Effects of Peer Teaching and Microteaching on Teaching Skills of Pre-Service Physics Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    ?en, Ahmet ?lhan; University of Hacettepe, Faculty of Education, Department of  Secondary Science and Mathematics Education

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effects of peer teaching and microteaching on pre-service physics teachers’ teaching skills. Peer and microteaching applications are conducted with thirty-nine pre-service physics teachers during the academic years 2005–2006 and 2006–2007. The data were collected through the “Teacher Performance Evaluation Form” which was particulary developed for this study. The findings of the study indicated that peer teaching/microteaching applications positively contributed to the...

  4. A Preliminary Evaluation of Two Behavioral Skills Training Procedures for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Schoolchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Brigitte M; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Knudson, Peter; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Kelso, Pamela; Jostad, Candice; Langley, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although child abduction is a low-rate event, it presents a serious threat to the safety of children. The victims of child abduction face the threat of physical and emotional injury, sexual abuse, and death. Previous research has shown that behavioral skills training (BST) is effective in teaching children abduction-prevention skills, although not all children learn the skills. This study compared BST only to BST with an added in situ training component to teach abduction-prevention skills in...

  5. [Gender differences in EEG coherence changes during figural creative thinking: the efficacy coupling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vol'f, N V; Tarasova, I V; Razumnikova, O M

    2009-01-01

    The study was aimed to explore the features of interaction between cortical areas during figural creative task performance in high- and low-creative men and women. We divided the participants into two groups with high and low creativity by the median of originality score. EEG was recorded at rest and during task performance (Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking "Incomplete figures"). The EEG coherence was computed in six frequency bands from theta1 to beta2. We analyzed the total values of coherence for each of 16 sites, calculated separately for intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connections. In the theta2, alphal, and alpha2 bands, coherence values decreased in task performance as compared to baseline in subjects with lower originality scores, whereas in subjects with higher scores, they increased in the theta2 and alpha1 bands. The decrease in the alpha2 band in the higher-creativity group was significantly lower in comparison with the decrease in the lower-score group. In the alpha2 band, the interaction of gender, creativity, laterality, and electrode position factors was also found during analysis of task-induced coherence changes. Further examination of the interaction showed the similarity of EEG coherence patterns in men and women with opposite creative abilities and higher values of task-induced coherence changes in the anterior regions of the left hemisphere and posterior regions of the right hemisphere in high-creative in comparison with low-creative men. The findings are discussed in terms of different cognitive strategies used by men and women that may have the same results in creative problem solving. PMID:19795805

  6. Developing Creative Teaching Module: Business Simulation in Teaching Strategic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nor Liza; Hanafiah, Mohd Hizam; Hashim, Noor Azuan

    2013-01-01

    Globalization and liberalization in the business environment have changed the requirements of types and qualities of human capital needed by the corporate sector. In relation to this, business graduates not only need to have theoretical understanding, but they also need to have creative thinking, communication skills and decision making skills

  7. Should we teach thinking skills to deaf children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Tamsin Kelty

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to identify the benefits of developing thinking skills with KS1 deaf children who used British Sign Language (BSL. It arose as a response to the findings of a variety of researches who had reported a number of ‘failings’ apparent in the educational and learning activity of deaf children. It used a case study approach involving five profoundly deaf Key stage 1 children and explored the extent to which, using materials grounded in the Somerset Thinking Skills Course, the teaching of thinking skills in a supportive environment could remediate some of these issues. The strongly visual nature of the material supported pupil exchanges mediated by the use of sign language. Analysis of video film was used to plot individual pupil development of scanning skills, their use of nouns versus adjectives, micro-skills and macro-abilities. Pupil reasoning skills, how they were supported, their ownership and role of the facilitator were also examined. The results showed that within eight weeks (equivalent to four hours in total the children were more able to express their perceptions. They watched other children in order to access their signed information and appeared to use this to develop, elaborate, extend and provide reasons when it was their turn to present. There was also evidence of enhanced creativity and originality in their contributions. This pilot study urges the need for further research and suggests that a priority should be given to developing this approach in the teaching of deaf children. Due to the complexity of thinking skills it further recommends that this area should be taught as a separate topic that can inform other subjects.

  8. The Integrative Nature of BE Teaching: Knowledge and Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Tingting Guo; Wenzhong Zhu

    2009-01-01

    With the great development of the international trade and communication after China’s entry into the WTO, the demand for talents qualified in both English and business is increasing, so more universities or colleges have paid their attention to the fostering and cultivation of business talents. Starting with the status quo of the market need for BE (Business English) talents and the required knowledge and skills for them, this paper intends to explore effective BE teaching ways from the persp...

  9. Teaching medical students consultation skills using e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØrgensen, Merete; Witt, Klaus

    Teaching consultation skills to medical students using e-learning. Introduction: We have been teaching Family Medicine at the University of Copenhagen for more than twenty years. We wish to develop a method to evaluate the current teaching of consultation skills and the effect of new interventions. During the course each student works eight days as a doctor in a general practice clinic. They see real patients and video their consultations and analyse them in small group sessions at the university with their teacher and fellow students. We teach them patient centred medicine [1].The final evaluation of a student includes a test-video of a consultation with the student in the doctor role, seeing a real patient, and the student´s skills in the subsequent analysis of the communication process according to its patientcentredness. The aim of the study is to measure the effect of adding access to 16 video cases on-line and comparing the answers in the intervention group to the usual course? [2] Material and Method All students at the course in 2013 were included in the project (n=351), approximately half constituted the control group. For the on-line teaching we use different short video-cases of consultations between a GP and an actor. They are accompanied by on-line questions. On the first and last day of the course the whole group of students watch the same test-video of a consultation with a GP and an actor. After watching the video they fill in a ten item questionnaire, designed with the purpose of structuring the analysis (DanSCORE: Danish Structured Observation Registration and Evaluation) [3

  10. Utilizing Teaching Interactions to Facilitate Social Skills in the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassardjian, Alyne; Taubman, Mitchell; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.; Edwards, Andrew; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ron; Schulze, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in social skills. While research has shown behavioral interventions to be effective in teaching and/or increasing a variety of appropriate social skills, limited research has shown generalization of these skills to the natural setting. The Teaching Interaction procedure…

  11. Effects of Student Teaching on the Classroom Management Beliefs and Skills of Music Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Manny

    1982-01-01

    Does the music student teaching experience affect student teachers' classroom management beliefs and skills, and as a result of student teaching, do the classroom management beliefs and skills of music student teachers and their cooperating teachers become more congruent? Research indicates that student teaching does not affect student teacher…

  12. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SADIA AHSIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department of Medical Education through multidisciplinary faculty of Foundation University Medical College, Pakistan. A total of 102 last year medical students participated in this workshop. The students were divided into 8 groups each containing 12 students. A team of pre trained facilitators for each group conducted the group activities. Teaching strategies including interactive discussions on basic principles of doctor-patient relationship, power point presentations, day to day case scenarios, video clips and presentations involving students in role plays were used. Pre and post workshop self evaluation proformas about knowledge and skills of communication and medical ethics were rated (0=none, 1=below average, 2=average, 3=above average, 4=very good, 5=excellent by the students. Results: 89 out of 102 participants returned the proformas. A significant percentage of students (%82 showed improvement in their knowledge and skills of appreciating bioethical issues like valid informed consent, patient confidentiality, end of life issues and breaking bad news by rating as “very good” after participation in the workshop. More than %70 students recommended this activity for other students. Conclusion: Teaching through interactive workshops was found to be an effective method as reflected by students’ feedback. Therefore, the program will be continued in future.

  13. Development and Validation of Teaching Practice Evaluation Instrument for Assessing Chemistry Students' Teaching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeudu, F. O.; Chiaha, G. T. U.; Eze, J. U.

    2013-01-01

    The study was designed to develop and factorially validate an instrument for measuring teaching practice skills of chemistry student-teachers in University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Two research questions guided the study. The design of the study was instrumentation. All the chemistry student-teachers in the Department of Science Education, University…

  14. Teaching Safety Skills to Children to Prevent Gun Play: An Evaluation of in Situ Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Gatheridge, Brian J.; Satterlund, Melisa; Egemo-Helm, Kristin R.; Johnson, Brigitte M.; Jostad, Candice; Kelso, Pamela; Flessner, Christopher A.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated behavioral skills training with added in situ training for teaching safety skills to prevent gun play. Following baseline, each child received two sessions of behavioral skills training and one in situ training session. Additional in situ training sessions were conducted until the child exhibited the safety skills (don't touch…

  15. Developing essential professional skills: a framework for teaching and learning about feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson-Smith Anne C; Henderson Penny; Johnson Martin H

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The ability to give and receive feedback effectively is a key skill for doctors, aids learning between all levels of the medical hierarchy, and provides a basis for reflective practice and life-long learning. How best to teach this skill? Discussion We suggest that a single "teaching the skill of feedback" session provides superficial and ineffective learning in a medical culture that often uses feedback skills poorly or discourages feedback. Our experience suggests that b...

  16. A Brief Analysis of Large Classroom’s English Teaching Management Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Weixuan Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Classroom is the basic place of teaching, where intertwined with a variety of teaching factors, and all these factors forms various kinds of connections. Scientific and effective class teaching management is the necessary and powerful measure of improving the teaching quality. Effective English teaching management skills are parts of the elements of successful large classroom teaching. Under the new educational situation, how to organize, regulate, manage large classrooms in order to train th...

  17. The Effects of Two Instructional Models--Tactical and Skill Teaching--On Skill Development and Game Play, Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Student Perceptions in Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joyce M.; Blakemore, Connie L.; Richards, Robert P.; Oliver, Jon; Wilkinson, Carol; Fellingham, Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Skill Teaching and Tactical approaches on skill development, game play, knowledge, and self-efficacy for 169 high- and low-skilled players of 182 beginning university Volleyball students. Three instructors each taught one Tactical and one Skill Teaching class two days a week for 16 weeks. A random coefficients…

  18. Inquiry-Based Learning through the Creative Thinking and Expression in Early Years Education

    OpenAIRE

    Aikaterini Michalopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Many different skills make up inquiry-based learning for children, and children need many opportunities to develop and use these skills as they progress through the Kindergarten years. Inquiry skills should not be taught in isolation, but integrated into interesting topics and ideas. Children need many opportunities to generate and discuss ideas, make plans, brainstorm solutions to problems, reflect and give reasons for their choices. The aim of the research conducted a...

  19. Teaching Safety Skills to Children: Prevention of Firearm Injury as an Exemplar of Best Practice in Assessment, Training, and Generalization of Safety Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Miltenberger, Raymond G

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on teaching safety skills to children with an emphasis on recent research on behavioral skills training for the prevention of firearm injury. Following a discussion of safety skills and methods for assessing these skills, the paper reviews recent research on behavioral skills training and in situ training for teaching safety skills to prevent firearm injury. Strategies for promoting generalization and increasing the efficiency of training are then discussed, along w...

  20. RADPED: an approach to teaching communication skills to radiology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandates that radiology residency programs teach communication skills to residents. The purpose of this paper is to present a mnemonic, RADPED, that can be used to enhance communication in the radiology setting. It reminds the resident of the salient points to address during an imaging encounter with pediatric patients and their families for the purpose of enhancing communication. Recent history and research in medical communication are reviewed. Various communication guides used by primary care physicians, such as SEGUE, and the Kalamazoo consensus statement are discussed. This methodology was adapted into a format that could be used to teach communication skills to radiology residents in the context of an imaging encounter. RADPED reminds the resident to establish rapportwith the patient, ask questionsas to why the patient and family are presenting for the study, discuss the exam, perform the procedure, use exam distractions, and discussthe results with the referring physician and family when appropriate. This guide is available with movie clips as part of an on-line pediatric radiology curriculum. This simple memory aid promotes the key points necessary to optimize the radiology resident's encounter with pediatric patients and their families. (orig.)

  1. The Effect of Blended Learning Approach on Fifth Grade Students' Academic Achievement in My Beautiful Language Textbook and the Development of Their Verbal Creative Thinking in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Madani, Feras Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the effect of Blended Learning approach compared to the traditional learning approach on fifth grade students' achievement in My Beautiful Language Textbook and the development of their verbal creative thinking. The study consisted of 49 students among which 25 are males in the Experimental Group and 24 females in…

  2. The Effect of the Van Hiele Model Based Instruction on the Creative Thinking Levels of 6th Grade Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Tolga; Akkaya, Recai; Celebi Akkaya, Sibel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of the Van Hiele model based instruction process on the creative thinking levels of 6th grade primary school students. Pre test-post test matching control group quasi-experimental design was used in the study. Fifty five students enrolled in sixth grades during the 2005-2006 educational year formed…

  3. A Preliminary Evaluation of Two Behavioral Skills Training Procedures for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brigitte M.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Knudson, Peter; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Kelso, Pamela; Jostad, Candice; Langley, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although child abduction is a low-rate event, it presents a serious threat to the safety of children. The victims of child abduction face the threat of physical and emotional injury, sexual abuse, and death. Previous research has shown that behavioral skills training (BST) is effective in teaching children abduction-prevention skills, although not…

  4. Evaluating Behavioral Skills Training with and without Simulated in Situ Training for Teaching Safety Skills to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Raymond; Gross, Amy; Knudson, Peter; Bosch, Amanda; Jostad, Candice; Breitwieser, Carrie Brower

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST) to BST plus simulated in situ training (SIT) for teaching safety skills to children to prevent gun play. The results were evaluated in a posttest only control group design. Following the first assessment, participants in both training groups and the control group who did not…

  5. Description and Analysis of Educational Facilities Design Criteria Based on Creative thinking from the Perspective of Educational Technology Specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Valia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is description and analysis of educational facilities design criteria based on creative thinking from the perspective of educational technology specialists. Study's method is descriptive-surveyand it is polling type. Method description - is a survey of surveys. Population consists of full-time faculty members in the field of educational technology at the University of Tehran that are 36 persons. Tools for data collection are questionnaire responses depending on the research questions that the research was conducted on the Likert scale. Questionnaire's reliability obtained based on Cronbach's alpha coefficient that was 74%. To analyze data in statistical methods frequency distribution, percentage, frequency, mean, and statistical tables were used. Results of one-sample z-test were used for statistical analysis. Based on the results, obtained z for standard colors equals to 8.98, because the subjects' average (27.38 and compare it with the hypothetical average of (15 it can be said that obtained average by hypothetical population mean has significant difference. For sound scale (phoneme equals 3.52 based on testees' mean (27.77 and to compare it with society's hypothetical average (17.5 it can be said that that obtained average has significant difference with society's hypothetical average. For thermal condition scale (heat it was equal to 2,.26 because regarding testee's average ( 14.77 and to compare with society's hypothetical average (10 it can be said that obtained average has significant difference with society's hypothetical mean. Therefore it can be concluded that there is a significant relationshipbetween design criteria of educational facilities and increase in students' creative thinking from the perspective of educational technology specialists at the 5% level.

  6. Thinking skills and communicative language teaching: a curriculum perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann J. Swatz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Second Language teaching in South Africa and concludes that many L2 teachers have resisted using this approach. This may be attributed to a misunderstanding of the basic principles of communicative language teaching (CLT, as well as to uncertainty regarding its practical application. He proposes an innovative way of implementing CLT, involving the integration of thinking skills with selected language content within a communicative framework To demonstrate this, he gives a detailed description of a language teaching module for senior secondary pupils. He then discusses the communicative nature of the activities contained in the module and points out what additional benefits this approach may offer L2 pupils. Die skrywer evalueer die impak wat die kommunikatiewe benadering op Engels tweede taalonderrig in Suid-Afrika gehad het en kom tot die gevolgtrekking dat menige tweede taalonderwysers teenstand bied teen die gebruik van die benadering. Dit kan toegeskryf word aan die feit dat daar 'n wanbegrip bestaan van die basiese beginsels van kommunikatiewe taalonderrig, asook 'n onsekerheid rakende die praktiese toepassing daarvan. Hy stel 'n innoverende uyse van aanbieding voor wat die integrasie van denkvaardighede met geselekteerde taalinhoude binne 'n kommunikatiewe raamwerk behels. Om dit te demonstreer gee hy 'n gedetailleerde beskrywing van 'n taalonderrigmodule vir senior sekondere leerlinge. Daama bespreek hy die kommunikatiewe aard van die aktiwiteite wat die module bevat en dui oak aan watter addisionele voordele hierdie benadering vir tweede taal-leerlinge inhou.

  7. Teaching Safety Skills to Children to Prevent Gun Play: an Evaluation of in Situ Training

    OpenAIRE

    Miltenberger, Raymond G; Gatheridge, Brian J; Satterlund, Melisa; Egemo-Helm, Kristin R; Johnson, Brigitte M; Jostad, Candice; Kelso, Pamela; Flessner, Christopher A.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated behavioral skills training with added in situ training for teaching safety skills to prevent gun play. Following baseline, each child received two sessions of behavioral skills training and one in situ training session. Additional in situ training sessions were conducted until the child exhibited the safety skills (don't touch the gun, get away, and tell an adult). All children acquired and maintained the safety skills at a 3-month follow-up. In addition, of the 7 childre...

  8. Teaching safety skills to children: prevention of firearm injury as an exemplar of best practice in assessment, training, and generalization of safety skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Raymond G

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on teaching safety skills to children with an emphasis on recent research on behavioral skills training for the prevention of firearm injury. Following a discussion of safety skills and methods for assessing these skills, the paper reviews recent research on behavioral skills training and in situ training for teaching safety skills to prevent firearm injury. Strategies for promoting generalization and increasing the efficiency of training are then discussed, along with a summary of conclusions that can be drawn from the research and guidelines for best practices in teaching safety skills to children. PMID:22477677

  9. Determining the Critical Skills Beginning Agriculture Teachers Need to Successfully Teach Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Michael L.; Warnick, Brian K.; Meyers, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    Using the Delphi technique, agriculture teachers with significant experience teaching welding were asked to help determine the critical skills beginning agriculture teachers need to successfully teach welding. The study's objectives sought to (1) identify the knowledge and technical skill competencies that beginning agriculture teachers need to…

  10. Teaching Sexual History-Taking Skills Using the Sexual Events Classification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Donald C.; Petri, Justin Daniel; Chapman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the literature about educational programs for teaching sexual history-taking skills and describe novel techniques for teaching these skills. Methods: Psychiatric residents enrolled in a brief sexual history-taking course that included instruction on the Sexual Events Classification System, feedback on residents'…

  11. Using Systematic Feedback and Reflection to Improve Adventure Education Teaching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rick; Kalvaitis, Darius; Delparte, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how adventure educators could use systematic feedback to improve their teaching skills. Evaluative instruments demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in teaching skills when applied at an outdoor education center in Western Canada. Concurrent focus group interviews enabled instructors to reflect on student…

  12. Investigating the Efficacy of Practical Skill Teaching: A Pilot-Study Comparing Three Educational Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Storr, Michael; Paynter, Sophie; Morgan, Prue; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Effective education of practical skills can alter clinician behaviour, positively influence patient outcomes, and reduce the risk of patient harm. This study compares the efficacy of two innovative practical skill teaching methods, against a traditional teaching method. Year three pre-clinical physiotherapy students consented to participate in a…

  13. Teaching Skills and Health-Related Fitness through a Preservice Gymnastics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donham-Foutch, Shae

    2007-01-01

    Children who do not develop a foundation of basic motor skills are less likely to participate in regular physical activity. An excellent way of teaching basic motor skills, as well as health-related fitness, is through gymnastics. Many young teachers, however, think that teaching gymnastics is too challenging and do not know how to incorporate it…

  14. The Relation of Achievement and Attitude Towerd Teaching Skills for Islamic Studies Student Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    AI-Ayasirah, Mohammed [???? ??? ?????? ????????

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating Islamic studies student teachers' teaching skills and its relation to their achievement and teaching. The sample of this study consisted of (45) senior - student teachers majoring in Islamic studies who are involved in their field-teaching practice. Three scales were used for the purpose of this study; The Teaching Sills Observation sheet consisting of (30) items, Attitudes Toward Teaching Islamic Studies Scale comprising (20) items, and Achievement Gra...

  15. Practice Teaching in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Escalante Rivera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research project entitled Teaching Exercises in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills, which was conducted during 2011-2012 by the Department of Teaching Research and Studies from the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education (Escalante, Fernández and Gaete, 2012, in order to explore cultural diversity in classrooms and educational institutions in Costa Rica. This multicultural phenomenon has forced authorities to pay special attention to the educational services provided, particularly in elementary. In addition, it has sparked a discussion regarding the teachers’ conceptual and pedagogical void and a gap in their teaching skills to deal with student populations of different origins. Similarly, it leads to a reflection about the basic national educational curriculum. The research was conducted in 12 elementary schools from different educational districts, which have a high cultural diversity among students. Using qualitative research techniques, the opinions of principals, teachers and students regarding this topic are explored. The most important conclusion reached in this study is the absence of an intercultural pedagogy in the country’s classrooms and the need to prepare teachers in this respect.

  16. Sequential bilingualism and the teaching of language skills to early primary school pupils in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    ADEGBITE, Wale

    2000-01-01

    This paper argues that the poor mastery of language skills in Nigeria's educational system can be attributed partly to the poor methods of teaching language skills in the system, especially in early primary education. Given the fact that the bilingual concept is entrenched in the 1977 (revised 1981) Nigeria National Policy on Education, the approach of ‘simultaneous’ bilingualism has been utilised in teaching mother tongue and English language skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing...

  17. Using peer-assisted learning to teach basic surgical skills: medical students’ experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Mahdi; Sinha, Yashashwi; Weinberg, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Standard medical curricula in the United Kingdom (UK) typically provide basic surgical-skills teaching before medical students are introduced into the clinical environment. However, these sessions are often led by clinical teaching fellows and/or consultants. Depending on the roles undertaken (e.g., session organizers, peer tutors), a peer-assisted learning (PAL) approach may afford many benefits to teaching surgical skills. At the University of Keele's School of Medicine, informal PAL is use...

  18. The Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Teaching ESL Writing Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Melor Md. Yunus; Norazah Nordin; Hadi Salehi; Mohamed Amin Embi; Zeinab Salehi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of many studies showing positive effects of using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the teaching and learning process in general, the use of ICT in teaching writing skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) classrooms is still not very encouraging. This study attempts to seek findings on the use of ICT in the teaching of ESL writing skills in Malaysian secondary schools. This paper just reports one part of the findings obtained from a big project which...

  19. Killing Two Birds with the Same Stone. Higher Order Skills Embedded in E-teaching Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Giuchici

    2011-01-01

    Meta-cognitive skills have become a sine qua non in any 21st century teaching approach from primary, lower- and upper-secondary education, tertiary or university level. Whilst the traditional recipe of instruction based on “what to teach” has consumed so much effort, time, and energies meant at transmitting and acquiring knowledge, little or no attention has been allotted to higher-order skills which, once embedded in a curriculum and further-on released within a teaching-learning-evaluating ...

  20. Teaching Abuse-Protection Skills to People with Intellectual, Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Adam H.; Kane, Lindsey M.

    2010-01-01

    Lumley and Miltenberger (1997) noted the paucity of empirical investigations involving teaching sexual-abuse-protection skills to people with intellectual disabilities. We reviewed relevant empirical investigations since 1997. Six studies trained sexual-abuse-protection skills, and two also included protection skills related to physical and verbal…

  1. A Review of Research on Procedures for Teaching Safety Skills to Persons with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Dennis R.; Bergstrom, Ryan; Smith, Marlena N.; Tarbox, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Safety skills are an important but often neglected area of training for persons with developmental disabilities (DD). The present study reviewed the literature on teaching safety skills to persons with DD. Safety skills involve a variety of behaviors such as knowing how to cross the street or what to do in case of a house fire. A number of studies…

  2. Using Video Strategies To Teach Functional Skills to Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Belva C.

    This paper provides guidelines for the use of videotape recordings for systematic instruction in functional skills for students with moderate to severe disabilities. Four examples illustrate use of videotapes to teach community skills (e.g., crossing a street) to secondary students with moderate disabilities; self care skills (e.g., zipping a…

  3. Effects of Training and Feedback on Discrete Trial Teaching Skills and Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Andrew; Downs, Robyn Conley; Rau, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of training and feedback on instructor performance of Discrete Trial Teaching (DTT) and support skills. This included an examination of the generalization and maintenance of instructor skills, and the impact of instructor skills on student performance. Six undergraduate research assistants received an 8-hour…

  4. Teaching Independent Community Social Skills to the Multihandicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulac, Pauline F.

    Ten multihandicapped high-school students in the Dayton (Ohio) Public Schools were trained using a curriculum of independent community social skills, focusing specifically on restaurant skills, travel skills, shopping skills, self-care skills, and skills for visiting a business or government agency. The students made weekly trips into the…

  5. Teaching effective problem solving skills to radiation protection students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Problem solving skills are essential for all radiation protection personnel. Although some students have more natural problem solving skills than others, all students require practice to become comfortable using these skills. At the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), a unique one-semester course was developed as part of the core curriculum to teach students problem solving skills and elements of modelling and simulation. The underlying emphasis of the course was to allow students to develop their own problem solving strategies, both individually and in groups. Direction was provided on how to examine problems from different perspectives, and how to determine the proper root problem statement. A five-point problem solving strategy was presented as: 1) Problem definition; 2) Solution generation; 3) Decision; 4) Implementation; 5) Evaluation. Within the strategy, problem solving techniques were integrated from diverse areas such as: De Bono 's six thinking hats, Kepner-Tregoe decision analysis, Covey's seven habits of highly effective people, Reason's swiss cheese theory of complex failure, and Howlett's common failure modes. As part of the evaluation step, students critically explore areas such as ethics and environmental responsibility. In addition to exploring problem solving methods, students learn the usefulness of simulation methods, and how to model and simulate complex phenomena of relevance to radiation protection. Computational aspects of problem solving are explored using the commercially available MATLAB computer code. A number of case studies are presented as both examples and problems to the students. Emphasis was placed on solutions to problems of interest to radiation protection, health physics and nuclear engineering. A group project, pertaining to an accident or event related to the nuclear industry is a course requirement. Students learn to utilize common time and project management tools such as flowcharting, Pareto analysis, Fishbone diagrams and Gantt charts. It has been found that the tools learned in this course are used through all subsequent courses. In addition, early student and employer feedback suggests that the problem solving, modeling and simulation skills of the undergraduate students make them extremely valuable in the workplace. (author)

  6. A Brief Analysis of Large Classroom’s English Teaching Management Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixuan Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Classroom is the basic place of teaching, where intertwined with a variety of teaching factors, and all these factors forms various kinds of connections. Scientific and effective class teaching management is the necessary and powerful measure of improving the teaching quality. Effective English teaching management skills are parts of the elements of successful large classroom teaching. Under the new educational situation, how to organize, regulate, manage large classrooms in order to train the students' English proficiency within certain time, which is very important to improve English classes management efficiency and teaching quality.

  7. Teaching physiotherapy skills in culturally-diverse classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimmer-Somers Karen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultural competence, the ability to work in cross-cultural situations, has been acknowledged as a core skill for physiotherapists and other health professionals. Literature in this area has focused on the rationale for physiotherapists to provide culturally-competent care and the effectiveness of various educational strategies to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge about cultural competence by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students. However, there is a paucity of research on how students with different cultural needs, who are attending one university class, can be accommodated within a framework of learning core physiotherapy skills to achieve professional standards. Results This paper reports on steps which were taken to resolve the specific needs of a culturally-diverse body of first year physiotherapy students, and the impact this had on teaching in a new physiotherapy program located in Greater Western Sydney, Australia. Physiotherapy legislative, accreditation and registration requirements were considered in addition to anti-discrimination legislation and the four ethical principles of decision making. Conclusions Reflection on this issue and the steps taken to resolve it has resulted in the development of a generic framework which focuses on providing quality and equitable physiotherapy education opportunities to all students. This framework is generalizable to other health professions worldwide.

  8. Mingle Model for Teaching English Speaking Skill for College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmayenti darmayenti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a report of a research and development project conducted in a speaking skill for the first-year students of State Institute for Islamic Studies Imam Bonjol Padang, academic year 2012/2013. Mingle as a technique in teaching speaking proposed by Pollard and Hess in 1997 was developed into a new model. Using ADDIE model as proposed by Dick and Carey in 1996, we collected the intended data through observation, questionnaire, and test. The result of the research showed that the implementation of model gave a significant difference in term of the students-learning outcome between the students who are taught through Mingle model and by traditional one or without Mingle model. The development of Mingle model included preparation, warming up, set the rule, act Mingle model, presentation, review and discussion. It is concluded that Mingle model is more effective to improve students on all components of speaking skill. Therefore, it is recommended that this model can be implemented at IAIN Imam Bonjol Padang. Copyright © 2015 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  9. Creative Thinking in Schools: Finding the "Just Right" Challenge for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Tina Sue

    2011-01-01

    Spurred on by explosive technological developments and unprecedented access to information, leaders in the fields of business, industry, and education are all calling for creative, innovative workers. In an atmosphere of high-stakes testing and global competitiveness, educators around the world are examining their teaching methods to determine…

  10. Developing essential professional skills: a framework for teaching and learning about feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson-Smith Anne C

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to give and receive feedback effectively is a key skill for doctors, aids learning between all levels of the medical hierarchy, and provides a basis for reflective practice and life-long learning. How best to teach this skill? Discussion We suggest that a single "teaching the skill of feedback" session provides superficial and ineffective learning in a medical culture that often uses feedback skills poorly or discourages feedback. Our experience suggests that both the skill and the underlying attitude informing its application must be addressed, and is best done so longitudinally and reiteratively using different forms of feedback delivery. These feedback learning opportunities include written and oral, peer to peer and cross-hierarchy, public and private, thereby addressing different cognitive processes and attitudinal difficulties. Summary We conclude by asking whether it is possible to build a consensus approach to a framework for teaching and learning feedback skills?

  11. Beyond the bounds of the dogmatic image of thought: the development of critical, creative thinking in the mental health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M

    2014-05-01

    Reflections upon what it might mean to think, and about what inherited presuppositions or images might influence what thinking is thought to consist of, are not readily considered in the mental health care literature. However, the work of the 20th century French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and, in particular, his account of 'the dogmatic image of thought' can be employed to illustrate how such considerations can be of relevance to the theoretical and practical concerns of mental health professionals. In doing so, Deleuze's work can be understood as seeking to sensitize mental health professionals to the dangers of unreflectively adopting a restrictive notion of what it means to think, as well as an exhortation to develop critical, creative thinking in the mental health professions that moves beyond the bounds of the traditional, dogmatic image of thought. Considerations about what it might mean to think, and about what inherited presuppositions determine what thinking is thought to consist of, are not readily reflected upon in the mental health care literature. However, this paper will propose that such considerations are of relevance to, and possess important implications for, the mental health professions, and it will do so within the context of the work of the 20th century philosopher Gilles Deleuze. In particular, the paper will provide an accessible exposition of what Deleuze refers to as the 'dogmatic image of thought', along with an examination of his suggestion that this traditional image, and its associated presuppositions, not only determine what is considered to be the ostensible 'nature' of thought, but also delineate what the activity of thinking ought to be concerned with. Moreover, it will be argued that Deleuze's exposition and critique of the image of thought can be understood as seeking to sensitize mental health professionals to the dangers of unreflectively perpetuating a restrictive notion of what it means to think, as well as being an exhortation to develop critical, creative thinking in the mental health professions that moves beyond the bounds of that traditional, dogmatic image of thought. PMID:23786235

  12. The Relationship between Multiple Intelligences with Preferred Science Teaching and Science Process Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ali Samsudin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to identify the relationship between multiple intelligences with preferred science teaching and science process skills. The design of the study is a survey using three questionnaires reported in the literature: Multiple Intelligences Questionnaire, Preferred Science Teaching Questionnaire and Science Process Skills Questionnaire. The study selected 300 primary school students from five (5 primary schools in Penang, Malaysia. The findings showed a relationship between kinesthetic, logical-mathematical, visual-spatial and naturalistic intelligences with the preferred science teaching. In addition there was a correlation between kinesthetic and visual-spatial intelligences with science process skills, implying that multiple intelligences are related to science learning.

  13. The Effectiveness of the Constant Time Delay Procedure in Teaching Pre-School Academic Skills to Children with Developmental Disabilities in a Small Group Teaching Arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, Ozgul; Gursel, Oguz

    2014-01-01

    Children with developmental disabilities are trained using different teaching arrangements. One of these arrangements is called small-group teaching. It has been ascertained that a small-group teaching arrangement is more effective than a one-to-one teaching arrangement. In that sense, teaching academic skills to pre-school children in small-group…

  14. [The impact of experimental instruction on changes in EEG power during verbal creative thinking in men and women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, I V; Razumnikova, O M; Vol'f, N V

    2006-01-01

    Features of EEG pattern during verbal creative thinking depending on experimental instruction were studied in men and women. Spectral power density was analyzed in six frequency bands (4-30 Hz). Performance of a creative task produced an increase in the power of theta (4-6 Hz) and beta2 (20-40 Hz) components and decrease in the power of alpha (8-13 Hz) and betal (13-20 Hz). Changes in the alpha and betal bands were observed, predominantly, in the posterior areas, whereas power of the thetal and beta2 bands increased in the anterior areas. Independently of instruction, women demonstrated greater synchronization in the theta1 band than men, whereas in men the desynchronization in the alpha2 band (10-13 Hz) was more pronounced. When the subjects were instructed to create original sentences, a widespread decrease in the EEG power was observed in the band of 8-30 Hz as compared to instruction "to create sentences". Thus, the instruction-related changes in EEG power were not gender-specific. They may reflect neural activity mediating selective attention. PMID:17147202

  15. TEACHING ABDUCTION-PREVENTION SKILLS TO CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

    OpenAIRE

    Gunby, Kristin V; Carr, James E; LeBlanc, Linda A

    2010-01-01

    Three children with autism were taught abduction-prevention skills using behavioral skills training with in situ feedback. All children acquired the skills, which were maintained at a 1-month follow-up assessment. In addition, 1 of the children demonstrated the skills during a stimulus generalization probe in a community setting.

  16. Teaching and Assessing Manipulative Motor Skills in High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article provides new ways to teach and assess motor skills in various lifetime sports such as tennis, golf, badminton, and other sports that students are likely to play as adults by focusing on five basic biomechanical principles.

  17. Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

  18. Case study teaching in high school biology: Effects on academic achievement, problem solving skills, teamwork skills, and science attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Ronald

    The purpose of this study was to examine the constructivist-based " case study teaching methodology" in High School Biology classes, specifically investigating the effect this methodology had on Academic Achievement, Science Attitudes, Problem Solving Skills, and Teamwork Skills. The effect of Teacher Beliefs toward constructivist learning environments was also explored and investigated, using a quantitative measure (the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey, or CLES). A quasi-experimental design used eleven classes, five teachers, and two hundred fifty two high school biology students over two separate, consecutive quarters of a school year. Two researcher-made instruments measured Academic Achievement after each study quarter. T-Tests were used to compare the Experimental Group (Case Study Teaching Methodology) to the Control Group (Traditional Teaching) during each study quarter. Otis-Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT) scores were used as a covariate for ANCOVA tests. Case Study Teaching Methodology had a statistically significant improvement on Academic Achievement during the first study quarter, but not the second quarter. Case Study Teaching Methodology had a statistically significant improvement on four of seven Science Attitudes, Problem Solving Skills, and Teamwork Skills during the second quarter of the study. This study is significant in that it addresses a knowledge gap regarding the effects of the constructivist-based case study teaching methodology on secondary science education. The theoretical implications of this study are meaningful: empirical evidence is added to the growing knowledge base regarding the benefits of constructivist theory. The practical implications are equally meaningful: case study teaching methodology is supported as an effective application of constructivist theory in the secondary science classroom.

  19. A tool for using the control of character animation to help teach children communication skills

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Liangzhong

    2012-01-01

    Effective Communication is an integral part of everyday life but recent studies show that in the UK many children fail to obtain this essential skill. The traditional approach to teaching communication skills is still important in school but new developments and the increasing availability of technology in the classroom, offer the potential for new ways to approach this teaching. A number of research institutions in the UK, for example the British Film Institute, are investigating how to use ...

  20. Using video modeling and reinforcement to teach perspective-taking skills to children with autism.

    OpenAIRE

    LeBlanc, Linda A; Coates, Andrea M; Daneshvar, Sabrina; Charlop-Christy, Marjorie H.; Morris, Caroline; Lancaster, Blake M

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated video modeling and reinforcement for teaching perspective-taking skills to 3 children with autism using a multiple baseline design. Video modeling and reinforcement were effective; however, only 2 children were able to pass an untrained task, indicating limited generalization. The findings suggest that video modeling may be an effective technology for teaching perspective taking if researchers can continue to develop strategies for enhancing the generalization of these new skills.

  1. Teaching Efficacy in the Classroom: Skill Based Training for Teachers’ Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Mansoureh Karimzadeh; Hadi Salehi; Mohamed Amin Embi; Mehdi Nasiri; Mohammad Shojaee

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to use an experimental research design to enhance teaching efficacy by social-emotional skills training in teachers. The statistical sample comprised of 68 elementary teachers (grades 4 and 5) with at least 10 years teaching experience and a bachelor’s degree who were randomly assigned into control (18 female, 16 male) and experimental (20 female, 14 male) groups. During ten weekly sessions of training the experimental groups learned a set of social-emotional skills (interpers...

  2. Developing Creative Teaching Module: Business Simulation in Teaching Strategic Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nor Liza Abdullah; Mohd Hizam Hanafiah; Noor Azuan Hashim

    2013-01-01

    Globalization and liberalization in the business environment have changed the requirements of types and qualities of human capital needed by the corporate sector. In relation to this, business graduates not only need to have theoretical understanding, but they also need to have creative thinking, communication skills and decision making skills based on multidisciplinary knowledge. Simulation game in business education is suggested to fill the gap by exposing students to real business situatio...

  3. Perceptions and practices of adapted physical educators on the teaching of social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalot-Rivera, Amaury; Poretta, David L

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine adapted physical educators' perceptions and practices about teaching social skills to students with disabilities. A questionnaire based on Bandura's social learning theory concept of modeling was developed and mailed to an entire frame of 426 adapted physical education teachers in the state of Ohio. Face and content validity as well as test/retest reliability (0.89) were established. Of those that were surveyed, 53% (225 teachers; 148 females and 77 males) responded. Results indicate that 93% (209) believe it is important to explicitly teach social skills in PE; however, 60% (135) expressed not feeling properly prepared to teach them. Teachers with more than 20 years of teaching experience were more likely to actually teach social skills. When compared with other teachers with less years teaching, however, they identified a greater need for training in the teaching of social skills. Results are discussed relative to teacher preparation and practices as well as social skills taught for general education and community integration. PMID:19478348

  4. Teaching Clinical Reasoning and Problem-solving Skills Using Human Patient Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Deepti; Ottis, Erica J.; Caligiuri, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses using human patient simulation (HPS) to expose students to complex dynamic patient cases that require clinical judgment, problem-solving skills, and teamwork skills for success. An example of an HPS exercise used to teach multifaceted clinical concepts in a therapeutics course also is provided.

  5. Using a Constant Time Delay Procedure to Teach Foundational Swimming Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Laura; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Wolery, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a constant time delay procedure to teach foundational swimming skills to three children with autism. The skills included flutter kick, front-crawl arm strokes, and head turns to the side. A multiple-probe design across behaviors and replicated across participants was used.…

  6. SKILL--A Scalable Internet-Based Teaching and Learning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gustaf; Zirvas, Jana

    This paper describes the architecture and discusses implementation issues of a scalable Internet-based teaching and learning system (SKILL) being developed at the University of Essen (Germany). The primary objective of SKILL is to cope with the different knowledge levels and learning preferences of the students, providing them with a collaborative…

  7. Teaching Skills to Second and Third Grade Children to Prevent Gun Play: A Comparison of Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Pamela D.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Waters, Marit A.; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Bagne, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    A posttest only control group design was used to investigate the effects of two programs to teach firearm injury prevention skills to second and third grade children. Children were taught the safety skills "Stop. Don't touch. Leave the area. Tell an adult." should they ever find a firearm. The effectiveness of the National Rifle Association's…

  8. Assessment and Teaching of Science Skills: Whole of Programme Perceptions of Graduating Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Varsavsky, Cristina; Matthews, Kelly E.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on science student perceptions of their skills (scientific knowledge, oral communication, scientific writing, quantitative skills, teamwork and ethical thinking) as they approach graduation. The focus is on which teaching activities and assessment tasks over the whole programme of study students thought utilised each of the six…

  9. Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

    2010-01-01

    Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching

  10. College Instructors' Implicit Theories about Teaching Skills and Their Relationship to Professional Development Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadani, V.; Breland, W.; Dewar, J.

    2010-01-01

    Implicit theories about the malleability of skills/abilities have been shown to predict learners' willingness to participate in learning opportunities. The authors examined whether college professors' implicit theories about the malleability of teaching skills predicted their willingness to engage in professional development (PD) related to…

  11. PRABODH: An Intelligent Tutor for Teaching Language Skills to Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govil, Rekha; Saxena, Madhavi

    1997-01-01

    Describes the architecture of PRABODH, an intelligent tutoring system with six components, designed for teaching language skills to young children and for providing them meaningful practice for developing grammar skills. Discusses PRABODH's language-learning philosophy, results of formative evaluation of its knowledge component, and overall impact…

  12. Bridging the Generation Gap across the Digital Divide: Teens Teaching Internet Skills to Senior Citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodinsky, Jane; Cranwell, Michele; Rowe, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    The Teens Teaching Internet Skills Pilot Project engaged youth from 4-H Technology Teams in training senior citizens to obtain information from the Medicare website. The teens perceived an improvement in working with seniors, project management, teaching, public speaking, and leadership. The workshops had a positive effect on seniors' comfort and…

  13. Teaching Phonological Skills to a Deaf First Grader: A Promising Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syverud, Susan M.; Guardino, Caroline; Selznick, Dana N.

    2009-01-01

    The researchers analyzed the effectiveness of teaching phonological skills to a deaf child using the Direct Instruction curriculum titled "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" (Engelmann, Haddox, & Bruner, 1983). There are few studies that support the use of phonological interventions with students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The…

  14. Searching for the Formula: How Librarians Teach Chemistry Graduate Students Research Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted in Summer 2012 in an effort to determine what librarians in the United States are doing to teach chemistry graduate students research skills. Chemistry librarians at ARL (Association of Research Libraries) institutions were surveyed about the content they teach; when, where, and how they present it; and what…

  15. Impact of Milieu Teaching on Communication Skills of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Sandfort, Robyn J.; Whinnery, Stacie B.

    2013-01-01

    This 5-month study examined the impact of a behaviorally based naturalistic teaching strategy, milieu teaching, on the communication skills of preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in an early childhood special education (ECSE) classroom. A multiple baseline across participants design was used. Communication targets were…

  16. Developing Student Critical Thinking Skills through Teaching Psychology: An Interview with Claudio S. Hutz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Claudio S. Hutz, who is dean of Instituto de Psicologia at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil, where he has been teaching psychology since 1977. Discusses topics such as teaching psychology in Brazil and developing critical thinking skills. (CMK)

  17. A Suggested Syllabus for Advanced Writing Skills at English Language Teaching Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Ismail Firat

    2010-01-01

    As is known, writing is an indispensable part of language education. As far as English Language Teaching Departments are concerned, writing courses, especially Advanced Writing Skills, are taken as a course of higher importance. However, forming a syllabus for Advanced Writing Course for English Language Teaching Departments is not an easy matter.…

  18. Teaching Vocational, Functional Language and Reading Skills to the Adolescent Hispanic Severely Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Elva

    Vocational and language skill development of severely retarded and autistic adolescent Hispanics is a training focus at the University of Texas, El Paso. University students and parents of the handicapped are trained in the following areas: teaching grocery shopping and how to order from fast food restaurants, teaching use of public…

  19. The Opinions of Instructors Teaching Turkish to Foreigners about the Writing Skills of Syrian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengül, Murat

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the difficulties experienced by the instructors while teaching writing skill to Arabians from Syria, and how these difficulties could be overcome. The study group of the research includes 11 instructors working in Turkish Teaching Centers (TTCs) of Cukurova University and Adana Science and Technology University. The data…

  20. Teaching Residents Practice-Management Knowledge and Skills: An "in Vivo" Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laurel Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the relevant data regarding teaching psychiatric residents practice management knowledge and skills. This article also introduces a unique program for teaching practice management to residents. Methods: A literature search was conducted through PubMed and "Academic Psychiatry". Additionally residents involved in…

  1. An Analysis of the Use of Social Stories in Teaching Social Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani Bozkurt, Sunagul; Vuran, Sezgin

    2014-01-01

    Social stories play a significant part in the teaching skills and behaviors to children with ASD who lack social skills. The purpose of this study is to analyze studies in which social stories were used for teaching social skills to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The present study includes a descriptive review and meta-analysis…

  2. Define and Teach Employability Skills to Guarantee Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Vicki A.; Zahn, Donald K.

    1993-01-01

    Studies and identifies characteristics and attitudes most desired by employers. Provides a rationale for educators to take an aggressive role in adding employability skills instruction to their school's curriculum. Includes four brief sample employability skills activities. (HB)

  3. Implementation of Teaching Skills and Strategies in the Schools : A study of graduates of a teacher education program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choeda, Choeda; Kinley, Kinley

    2013-01-01

    Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ are two core (professional) modules offered at the two colleges of education in Bhutan to develop pedagogical knowledge and skills of student teachers. However, a tracer study (in press) done by Samtse College of Education [SCE] revealed teacher graduates’ (1) confusion over the two concepts, ‘teaching skill’ and ‘teaching strategy’ and (2) the lack of confidence in integrating the two in their daily teaching activities. Therefore, this study was carried out to find out the graduates’ understanding of the concepts and implementation of ‘Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ in the classroom. Further, it was aimed to find lapses, inappropriateness and irrelevancies in the two professional modules in which pedagogical concepts and skills were taught. Survey questionnaire, interview and participant observation were used to gather data to find out the use of teaching skills and strategies in the schools. Teacher graduates, both male and female having working experience of three years and above, teaching in Middle Secondary and Higher Secondary Schools, were selected as the participants in the study. Samples were drawn from the different parts of the country covering seventeen Dzongkhags. The study revealed adequate understanding of the concepts of professional modules. However, teachers were found to be grappling with the extra responsibilities affecting their planning to integrate skills and strategies into their teaching. Key words: Teaching skills, Teaching strategies, Microteaching

  4. Children's Teaching Skills: The Role of Theory of Mind and Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Unger, Angela C.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2008-01-01

    Teaching others effectively may rely on knowledge about the mind as well as self-control processes. The goal of this investigation was to explore the role of theory of mind (ToM) and executive function (EF) in children's developing teaching skills. Children 3.5-5.5 years of age (N = 82) were asked to teach a confederate learner how to play a board…

  5. Teaching Students to Learn and to Work Well with 21st Century Skills: Unpacking the Career and Life Skills Domain of the New Learning Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In "Do You Want Your Students to Be Job-Ready With 21st Century Skills?" Kivunja (2014a) draws on the work by the Partnership For Teaching 21st Century Skills (P21) reported by Trilling and Fadel (2009), to articulate that the skills that young people need to succeed as individuals, citizens and workers in the 21st century fall into four…

  6. Teaching pervasive skills to South African accounting students

    OpenAIRE

    Barac, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Professional accountants need to retain and maintain a broad skills set. In response to this need, the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) emphasises the mastering of pervasive skills in its competency framework and expects South African universities offering its accredited programmes to produce graduates able to demonstrate such skills at acceptable levels of competence upon entry into the workplace. This study investigates the manner in which SAICA-accredited South Afri...

  7. Teaching the "Soft Skills": A Professional Development Curriculum to Enhance the Employability Skills of Business Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstead, Ann S.; Adams, Barbara L.; Sillah, Marion Rogers

    2009-01-01

    Today's business climate requires that management recruits not only know the technical aspects of their jobs, but also possess communication, teambuilding and leadership skills. Most business school curricula, however, focus only on technical skills, and do not address the "soft skills" in a formal setting or on a consistent basis. As…

  8. The need for professional training programs to improve faculty members teaching skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail A. Elmahdi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that the large majority of faculty members are expert and knowledgeable in their specializations. Yet, we still find that university graduates are not as qualified as they are supposed to be. The poorer university students are, the more likely they are taught by unskilled teachers. Ironically, many studies have concluded that faculty members tend to believe that students lack the basic skills for college-level work (UCLA Survey, 2005, ignoring that they themselves lack the effective teaching skills. The Saudi government as such has realized that 21st century requires generic skills to be integrated in the curriculum which in turn obligates faculty members to improve their teaching skills accordingly. Saudi universities expect the Deanships for Academic Development across all universities to provide trainings on different teaching and learning skills to improve the quality of their faculty members. The purpose of this study was to investigate the need and the competencies that are required by facultymembers to acquire in Saudi universities to enable them achieve the standards stated by the NCAAA. A questionnaire and semistructured interviews were utilized to get the data. The sample consisted of 882 participants (students, faculty members, chairmen and colleges boards, colleges’ deans, and deanships’ deans from some universities in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The results showed the great need and importance of providing training programs to enhance and elevate faculty members' professional abilities in teaching. Many participants emphasized that in-service trainings should be mandated to ensure quality teaching.

  9. LANGUAGE SKILLS AND THE CRITICAL THINKING D?L BECER?LER? VE ELE?T?REL DÜ?ÜNME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan KARADÜZ

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is one of the eight basic skills in the primary school curriculum which has been prepared with a constructivist approach. Teaching critical thinking in Turkish language lessons has an importance in reaching curricular aims. Critical thinking has bonds with skills such as creative thinking, communication, research making, problem solving, using ICT, entrepreneurship, and using Turkish appropriatelyCritical thinking is involved with questioning, interpreting and decision making skills in a skeptical approach. It contains sub-skills such as identifying cause and effect relations, catching similarities and differences, making classifications using certain criteria, determining validity of information, making analysis, evaluation, and inferencesTo develop and conserve language skills, teaching critical thinking skills is a very important task. Developing students’ critical thinking skills is essential in order to develop language skills such as listening, speaking, and writing. Curricular aims involved with critical reading, critical listening, and critical writing depend on critical thinking. Instructional methods which foster critical thinking skills should be employed in educational settings to develop basic language skills. Teacher’s role, approach and competency in critical thinking are also essential to create a critical thinking atmosphere.Connecting language skills with general skills is a part of learning philosophy in a constructivist approach. The goal of language teaching, the main mean of thinking that preparing students who can critically think become also one of the main goals of learning. When the expected achievement in language skills occurs in critical thinking, language development could be affected with individuals’ thinking development symmetrically. Critical reading, listening, speaking and creative writing could support development of such foundational skills; students’ creative thinking, communication skills, problem solving, and researching and decision making. For the purpose of what to do and what decision to make, individuals have to be problem solver, conscious to assessment and judgments, and explaining these judgments. The foundation of critical thinking is based on healthy, disciplined, systematic and queried thinking and for the development of critical thinking skills individuals should have enough thinking previously. The development of thinking and learning thinking help individuals to become themselves and structuring their own ideas. When the development in students’ reading skills turn to critical thinking for the students, they are more able to understand what they read and come to conclusion easily. Critical readers judge what they read and they may make comments and critics about what they read. They try to find implementation of the ideas that the writer explains in the content. Individuals’ understanding skills can occur both with reading and with listening. Critical listening is, in another way, a process of checking the accuracy of the information, understanding of this information, and discussing it. Speaking and writing skills which are part of explanation skills also helps the development of critical thinking. People who do critical explanations also have social skills, ability to be in groups, and ability to collaborate. In a learning setting where critical approach is used, students are more able to express their ideas in oral and in writings and these students are able to make comment about issues and provide solutions for these issues. During the process of critical writing, individuals come up with new ideas and start to have a broader perspective. The model of this study is literature review. Literature about critical thinking skills has been reviewed. Afterwards methods that should be employed in Turkish language lessons to foster critical thinking skills have been studied Yap?land?rmac? ö?renme yakla??m?na göre olu?turulan ilkö?retim program?nda yer verilen sekiz temel beceriden birisi de ele?tirel dü?ün

  10. Skill Development: How Brain Research Can Inform Music Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald J.; Walter, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Practice is a major element in cultivating musical skill. Some psychologists have proposed that deliberate practice, a specific framework for structuring practice activities, creates the kind of practice necessary to increase skill and develop expertise. While psychologists have been observing behavior, neurologists have studied how the brain…

  11. Teaching Vocational Skills with a Faded Auditory Prompting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J.; Schuster, John W.; Collins, Belva C.; Gassaway, Linda J.

    2000-01-01

    Three students (ages 14-16) with mild mental retardation were taught to use an auditory prompting system to complete the vocational tasks of cleaning a bathroom in a classroom setting. Students acquired the skills and generalized them to a novel setting. There were mixed results concerning maintenance of the skills. (Contains 10 references.)…

  12. Teaching Comments: Intercultural Communication Skills in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Paige

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the pedagogical and conceptual issues that accompany the integration of intercultural communication skills into the secondary curriculum by analyzing the interactions of 102 adolescents in Spain and the USA during a 15-week, classroom-based, international online exchange. Focusing on the skills of discovery and interaction…

  13. Parents as Teachers: Teaching Parents How to Teach Toilet Skills to Their Children with Autism and Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Nihal; Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a parent training program for teaching toilet skills to children with autism and mental retardation. The study was conducted with three mothers and their children. A multiple probe design using probe sessions across subjects was used. The experimental procedure consisted of two…

  14. Adivinanzas audiovisuales para ejercitar el pensamiento creativo infantil Audiovisual Riddles to Stimulate Children’s Creative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Montalvo Castro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Para resolver una adivinanza hay que asociar ideas, analizar metáforas, descubrir analogías. Por eso, impulsar esta forma de entretenimiento infantil es un modo de ejercitar el pensamiento creativo. Sin embargo, existe un problema: las adivinanzas tradicionales son formas literarias que corresponden a una época pre-digital. ¿Cómo lograr, entonces, que tengan mayor aceptación entre los nativos digitales? Una posible solución sería crear adivinanzas audiovisuales diseñadas especialmente para YouTube. En esta investigación se realizaron cinco prototipos de adivinanzas audiovisuales con características creativas diferentes y se validaron con estudiantes de tercero a sexto grado de educación primaria. Los resultados de la validación permitieron identificar las actitudes, reacciones, interpretaciones y modos de razonamiento de los niños y niñas cuando intentan resolver este tipo de adivinanzas. También se identificaron los recursos de lenguaje y formatos creativos que funcionan mejor en una adivinanza audiovisual. En las conclusiones se destaca la necesidad de formular correctamente los enunciados de las adivinanzas audiovisuales y sus respectivas «pistas» para que los niños y niñas tengan la satisfacción intelectual y emocional de resolverlas. Se precisa, además, que leer o escuchar una adivinanza tradicional representa una experiencia cognitiva y sensorial muy distinta que interactuar con esa misma adivinanza en un lenguaje multimedia. Finalmente, se discute y analiza el rol mediador del docente y la importancia del aprendizaje colaborativo en los proyectos educativos que emplean tecnologías digitales.Solving riddles involves association of ideas, analysis of metaphors, and discovery of analogies. Therefore, promoting this type of children’s entertainment is a way to develop creative thinking. However, there is a problem: traditional riddles are literary forms that correspond to a pre-digital era. How can we increase its acceptance among the digital natives? One way might be creating audiovisual riddles specially designed for YouTube. In this research we made five prototypes of audiovisual riddles with different creative characteristics and validated them among 8-12 years old students. The validation results helped us to identify the attitudes, reactions, interpretations and ways of thinking of children when they try to solve such riddles. We also identified the resources of language and creative formats that fit best in audio-visual riddles. The outcome of this research emphasizes the need to correctly formulate the audiovisual riddle statements and their «clues» for children; this way we assure an intellectual and emotional satisfaction when solving them. It also concludes that reading or listening to traditional riddles are cognitive and sensory experiences that are very different from interacting with the same riddle in a multimedia language. Finally, we discuss and analyze the mediating role of the teacher and the importance of collaborative learning in educational projects using digital technologies.

  15. Nurturing Creative, Thinking Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some ideas and experiences with training student engineers in creativity and critical thinking. In our survey, a large majority (82%) of respondents felt that as compared to all other kind of academic engagements, their projects had contributed most to develop their creativity. About 50% had also felt that their projects were…

  16. We Should Be Teaching Leadership Skills and Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Makes a case for leadership training for students and lists course objectives, including defining leadership, identifying situations for practicing leadership, analyzing and practicing leadership skills, and distinguishing among leadership styles. (Author/JM)

  17. Teaching interpersonal skills in an international design-build course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Karhu, Markku; Christensen, Cecillia

    2011-01-01

    The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) started the CDIO concept in the autumn of 2008. The aim with this was to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers. The working conditions of a typical engineer involve many other fields than just those requiring technical skills. Interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important, including communication, teamwork and leadership. The ...

  18. The teaching of non-technical skills through medical simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Juliana Andreia da Costa e

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: To meet society‘s expectations that physicians ?can and will attend equally to all aspects of health care,? the Association of American Medical Colleges‘ Medical School Objectives Project Report I has stated that physicians must be altruistic, knowledgeable, skillful, and dutiful. Considering that skills may be defined as actions and reactions performed by an individual in a competent way in order to achieve a goal, there is no doubt that this goal will be better managed the gre...

  19. Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Sophomore-Level Biology Majors

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Leigh; Blankinship, Lisa Ann

    2015-01-01

    Many undergraduate students lack a sound understanding of information literacy. The skills that comprise information literacy are particularly important when combined with scientific writing for biology majors as they are the foundation skills necessary to complete upper-division biology course assignments, better train students for research projects, and prepare students for graduate and professional education. To help undergraduate biology students develop and practice information literacy ...

  20. Criteria of Total Quality Management of Faculty Teaching Skills: Perceptions of University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Awatif M. Abu-Al-Sha'r; Mohammad Aboud AL-Harahsheh

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the degree of faculty members' practice of the teaching skills in the light of the criteria of Total Quality Management (TQM) from the university students' perceptions at Al al-Bayt University. The study focuses on the impact of gender, college and degree of the faculty members' practice of the teaching skills in the light of TQM. The sample of the study consisted of (451) male and female students. A questionnaire of 72 items in four areas (planning, implementatio...

  1. The Impact of Active Learning Approach on Improving the Reading Skills in Native Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Güneyli

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the effectiveness of active learning approach in native language education has been emphasized. This research is an experimental one that is used by Turkish Teaching organized by active learning approach for determining learning levels of the students concerning their reading comprehension skills. Data have been obtained by utilizing “Turkish Reading Comprehension Skill Test”. The research was conducted at fifth class level in ªehit Tuncer and Geçitkale primary schools by ge...

  2. Evaluation of home-based programs for teaching personal safety skills to children

    OpenAIRE

    Miltenberger, Raymond G; Thiesse-Duffy, Ellyn

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a commercially available program, the Red Flag, Green Flag Prevention Book, used by parents to teach their children personal safety skills. Children's knowledge and skills regarding the prevention of sexual abuse and abduction were assessed prior to, during, and after training. In one group, training consisted of parents using the prevention book to train their children. Parents of children in the second group used the prevention book with added instructions. Chil...

  3. Importance of Laboratory Skills Necessary for Teaching Chemistry in Secondary Schools As Percieved by Chemistry Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Al Faleh, Nasser A. [???? ??? ?????? ??????

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the importance Importance of Laboratory Skills Necessary for Teaching Chemistry in Secondary Schools As Percieved by Chemistry Teachers. A questionnaire consisting of ( 74 ) items were distributed to a random sample of (171) chemistry teachers . The results revealed the following: - (73) skills obtained a mean range between 3.28 - 3.90. - There were no statistically significant differences in the mean scores between the secondary school c...

  4. Vocational trainees’ views and experiences regarding the learning and teaching of communication skills in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Van Nuland, Marc; Thijs, Gaby; Van Royen, Paul; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goedhuys, Jo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the views and experiences of general practice (GP) vocational trainees regarding communication skills (CS) and the teaching and learning of these skills. METHODS: A purposive sample of second and third (final) year GP trainees took part in six focus group (FG) discussions. Transcripts were coded and analysed in accordance with a grounded theory approach by two investigators using Alas-ti software. Finally results were triangulated by means of semi-structured telephone in...

  5. Teaching Communication Skills: A five year experience from a private medical school of Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Indrajit Banerjee, MBBS, MD

    2013-01-01

    Communication with the patient is an art. A medical professional can earn a lot of degrees but communicating with the patient always remains a problem for some of them. Communication plays a key role to make him/her successful in Life .Communication Skill is an important part of the pharmacology teaching and learning session followed at Manipal College of Medical Sciences. Most of the textbooks that are commonly followed in Nepal merely tell about communication skills. In Communication Skil...

  6. Teaching evaluation: putting anthropological research skills to work

    OpenAIRE

    Blum-Ross, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    In this essay I reflect on the process of teaching evaluation not only as a general theoretical principle, but also as a form of practice. I describe and analyse how I have incorporated evaluation strategies within my first few years of teaching. My views are grounded in my recent experience as an undergraduate tutor at the University of Oxford, as well as my previous professional experience working as a project evaluator and facilitator for arts and media organizations. I begin this essay by...

  7. Using mother delivered simultaneous prompting for teaching independent toileting skills to a child with developmental disability

    OpenAIRE

    Nesrin Sönmez; Ç???l Aykut

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to give a sample of an application that a mother delivered home-based instruction via simultaneous prompting for teaching independent toilet skill to her child with developmental disability. Simultaneous prompting (SP) is one of the systematic teaching methods, and studies showing the effectiveness of this method has increased in recent years in literature. Although many studies have showed an increase in development and learning of the children with disability if ...

  8. An Alternative Approach for Designing and Teaching Communication Skills to University of Technology Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ernest Pineteh

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the contents and teaching strategies of communication skills courses at a South African higher institution: Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT). It seeks to understand why the courses have not been very responsive to increasing academic and professional challenges undergraduate students’ experience at this university. Also, it proposes alternative contents and methods of teaching that can ensure that these courses remain relevant to the diversity of vocational...

  9. The Use of Video Role Play for Teaching Therapeutic Communication Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Ng; Anthony O’Brien; Sandra Mackey; Hong-Gu He; David G. Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Background: Effective Communication is a fundamental skill for practice across health care settings and is a component ofundergraduate nursing programs around the world. Resource materials appropriate for the teaching of communication in an Asiancontext are lacking.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a self-developed video using role play in facilitating teaching andlearning associated with therapeutic communication.Methods: Videos were produced which demonstrated the...

  10. The effects of behavioral skills training on staff implementation of discrete-trial teaching.

    OpenAIRE

    Sarokoff, Randi A; Sturmey, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A behavioral skills training package was used to train 3 teachers to correctly implement discrete-trial teaching. The mean baseline proportion of possible correct teaching responses for Teachers 1, 2, and 3 increased from 43%, 49%, and 43%, respectively, during baseline to 97%, 98%, and 99%, respectively, following training. These data indicate that the training package consisting of instructions, feedback, rehearsal, and modeling produced rapid and large improvements in the teachers' impleme...

  11. TEACHING EARLY BRAILLE LITERACY SKILLS WITHIN A STIMULUS EQUIVALENCE PARADIGM TO CHILDREN WITH DEGENERATIVE VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Toussaint, Karen A.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the need for braille literacy, there has been little attempt to systematically evaluate braille-instruction programs. The current study evaluated an instructive procedure for teaching early braille-reading skills with 4 school-aged children with degenerative visual impairments. Following a series of pretests, braille instruction involved providing a sample braille letter and teaching the selection of the corresponding printed letter from a comparison array. Concomitant with increases ...

  12. Implementing a Holistic Teaching in Modern ELT Classes: Using Technology and Integrating Four Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut ARSLAN

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual paper explores the framework of which language teaching approaches are required to integrate the recent technologies in modern English Language Teaching (ELT classes. Driven on the relevant literature of ELT and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL, we argue that integration of language skills in a holistic way and the technology as the enabler can facilitate the learners’ obtaining the knowledge of the language and the knowledge about how to use the language appropriately in communicative situations.

  13. Evaluation of a learner-designed course for teaching health research skills in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Agbenyega Tsiri; Bedu-Addo George; Ansong Daniel; Bates Imelda; Akoto Alex; Nsiah-Asare Anthony; Karikari Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In developing countries the ability to conduct locally-relevant health research and high quality education are key tools in the fight against poverty. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel UK accredited, learner-designed research skills course delivered in a teaching hospital in Ghana. Methods Study participants were 15 mixed speciality health professionals from Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. Effectiveness measures included...

  14. ?????????????????????????????????? The Effect of the Sufficiency and Timing of Physical Exercise on High School Students’ Physical Fitness, Creative Thinking, and Mathematics Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ??? Pin-Chun Wu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????113??????????????????—????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? This paper explores the impact of the sufficiency and timing of physical exercise on physical fitness, creative thinking, and mathematics achievement. A pretestposttest quasi-experimental design involved 113 tenth grade students from three senior high school classes in the Taipei metropolitan area to investigate the effects of three instructional strategies-traditional physical education (comparison group, sufficient exercise earlier in the day (experimental group 1, and sufficient exercise immediately before mathematics class (experimental group 2. The collected data were analyzed by ANCOVA and MANCOVA to evaluate any differences among total and sub-scale scores for the three research groups. Our findings demonstrate: (1 Total physical fitness scores were higher for both experimental groups than for the comparison group. Both experimental groups’ subscales scores for muscular endurance, power, and cardiorespiratory endurance outperformed those of the comparison group. (2 Total creative thinking scores for experimental group 2 were higher than those of experimental group 1 and the comparison group. Both experimental groups’ subscale scores for fluency, abstractness of titles, elaboration and resistance to premature closure were higher than those of the comparison group. (3 Math achievement scores, including the lower level cognitive domain subscales of knowledge and comprehension, were higher for experimental group 2 than experimental group 1 and the comparison group. However, no differences were found among the three groups for higher level cognitive domain subscales, including analysis and synthesis. Based these findings, suggestions for further implementation of educational policies and research are proposed.

  15. Learning Clinical Skills during Bedside Teaching Encounters in General Practice: A Video-Observational Study with Insights from Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjawi, Rola; Rees, Charlotte; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how opportunities for learning clinical skills are negotiated within bedside teaching encounters (BTEs). Bedside teaching, within the medical workplace, is considered essential for helping students develop their clinical skills. Design/methodology/approach: An audio and/or video observational study examining…

  16. Comparing Video Modeling and Graduated Guidance Together and Video Modeling Alone for Teaching Role Playing Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmanoglu, Nurgul; Yanardag, Mehmet; Batu, E. Sema

    2014-01-01

    Teaching play skills is important for children with autism. The purpose of the present study was to compare effectiveness and efficiency of providing video modeling and graduated guidance together and video modeling alone for teaching role playing skills to children with autism. The study was conducted with four students. The study was conducted…

  17. An Application of Educational Theories and Principles of Teaching and Learning Communication Skills for General Practitioners in Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wahaibi, Ahmed; Almahrezi, Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the crucial role of teaching and learning communication skills for general practitioners, based on the theory of experiential and self-directed learning. It also outlines the proposed ways and methods to teach these communication skills in this project.

  18. The Role of Emotional Intelligence Skills in Teaching Excellence: The Validation of a Behavioral Skills Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harville, Pamela Cherie

    2012-01-01

    The role of emotional intelligence in effective teaching can be developed and enhanced through the use of an assessment instrument as a new evaluation and learning process for teachers. This involves a formative learning process for the qualities associated with excellent teaching characteristics and behaviors for use with teacher evaluation…

  19. Manifestation of critical thinking skills in the English textbooks employed by language institutes in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birjandi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholars in the field of education have unanimously subscribed to the pivotal role of critical thinking in individuals' life in general and their academic life in particular (Bloom, 1956; Ennis, 2003; Dewey, 1933. The thrust of the current study was to investigate the extent to which the books employed for Teaching English as Foreign Language include critical thinking skills. To attain this goal, 3 series of English books, namely, Top notch, Interchange, and English files series utilized by language institutes in Iran were targeted. Next, a seventy two-item critical thinking checklist based on Likert-scale and consisting of twelve skills; namely, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, deduction, induction, balanced-thinking, multiple perspective-taking, creative thinking, building community of thinkers, and knowledge was developed. The target skills on the checklist were mainly based on Bloom's taxonomy and the related literature on critical thinking. The checklist was validated by the researchers themselves and some experts in the field and the reliability coefficient was also estimated at 0.86. Then, two raters conducted a content analysis on the books and determined the magnitude of each skill. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and inferential statistics (Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis Non-parametric tests. Findings of the study revealed that the books mainly tapped knowledge, comprehension, application and building community of thinkers skills and failed to acceptably include other skills reported to be of utmost importance for students' academic success. The comparison of the mean rank of the skills in the three books also disclosed that as for lower order thinking skills there wasn’t a significant difference among the books; however, as for other skills Top notch was marginally higher. The paper also discusses the lack of critical thinking in the classroom and materials and proposes some ways to include more critical thinking skills in the materials. The results of the study have significant implications for material developers, educational policy makers and teachers.

  20. Teaching information literacy skills to sophomore-level biology majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Leigh; Blankinship, Lisa Ann

    2015-05-01

    Many undergraduate students lack a sound understanding of information literacy. The skills that comprise information literacy are particularly important when combined with scientific writing for biology majors as they are the foundation skills necessary to complete upper-division biology course assignments, better train students for research projects, and prepare students for graduate and professional education. To help undergraduate biology students develop and practice information literacy and scientific writing skills, a series of three one-hour hands-on library sessions, discussions, and homework assignments were developed for Biological Literature, a one-credit, one-hour-per-week, required sophomore-level course. The embedded course librarian developed a learning exercise that reviewed how to conduct database and web searches, the difference between primary and secondary sources, source credibility, and how to access articles through the university's databases. Students used the skills gained in the library training sessions for later writing assignments including a formal lab report and annotated bibliography. By focusing on improving information literacy skills as well as providing practice in scientific writing, Biological Literature students are better able to meet the rigors of upper-division biology courses and communicate research findings in a more professional manner. PMID:25949754

  1. Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Sophomore-Level Biology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Leigh; Blankinship, Lisa Ann

    2015-01-01

    Many undergraduate students lack a sound understanding of information literacy. The skills that comprise information literacy are particularly important when combined with scientific writing for biology majors as they are the foundation skills necessary to complete upper-division biology course assignments, better train students for research projects, and prepare students for graduate and professional education. To help undergraduate biology students develop and practice information literacy and scientific writing skills, a series of three one-hour hands-on library sessions, discussions, and homework assignments were developed for Biological Literature, a one-credit, one-hour-per-week, required sophomore-level course. The embedded course librarian developed a learning exercise that reviewed how to conduct database and web searches, the difference between primary and secondary sources, source credibility, and how to access articles through the university’s databases. Students used the skills gained in the library training sessions for later writing assignments including a formal lab report and annotated bibliography. By focusing on improving information literacy skills as well as providing practice in scientific writing, Biological Literature students are better able to meet the rigors of upper-division biology courses and communicate research findings in a more professional manner. PMID:25949754

  2. Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Sophomore-Level Biology Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Thompson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many undergraduate students lack a sound understanding of information literacy. The skills that comprise information literacy are particularly important when combined with scientific writing for biology majors as they are the foundation skills necessary to complete upper-division biology course assignments, better train students for research projects, and prepare students for graduate and professional education. To help undergraduate biology students develop and practice information literacy and scientific writing skills, a series of three one-hour hands-on library sessions, discussions, and homework assignments were developed for Biological Literature, a one-credit, one-hour-per-week, required sophomore-level course. The embedded course librarian developed a learning exercise that reviewed how to conduct database and web searches, the difference between primary and secondary sources, source credibility, and how to access articles through the university’s databases. Students used the skills gained in the library training sessions for later writing assignments including a formal lab report and annotated bibliography. By focusing on improving information literacy skills as well as providing practice in scientific writing, Biological Literature students are better able to meet the rigors of upper-division biology courses and communicate research findings in a more professional manner.

  3. Ex-vivo porcine organs with a circulation pump are effective for teaching hemostatic skills

    OpenAIRE

    Izawa Yoshimitsu; Hishikawa Shuji; Muronoi Tomohiro; Yamashita Keisuke; Suzukawa Masayuki; Lefor Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Surgical residents have insufficient opportunites to learn basic hemostatic skills from clinical experience alone. We designed an ex-vivo training system using porcine organs and a circulation pump to teach hemostatic skills. Residents were surveyed before and after the training and showed significant improvement in their self-confidence (1.83 ± 1.05 vs 3.33 ± 0.87, P < 0.01) on a 5 point Likert scale. This training may be effective to educate residents in basic hemostatic skills.

  4. A study on the current status of teaching and learning science process skills in Anhui Province secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Xian-wei FANG; Chen, Zhi-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Using 2 sets of questionnaire instrument on the current status of teaching and learning science process skills, we carried out a survey in some Anhui Province secondary schools. The findings of this survey reveals that science teachers’ pedagogical knowledge level on the teaching of science process skills in secondary schools is not quite high. Students’ science process skills are generally not quite high too. Some suggestions are put forward as based on the findings of this study.

  5. A First-Year Course That Teaches Research Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarneski, Debra

    2013-01-01

    In the Fall semester of 2009, I taught a first-year course that focused on skills required to successfully complete undergraduate research. This paper will discuss the Simpson College first-year course requirements, my course goals, the graph theory topics covered, student feedback, and instructor reflection.

  6. Teaching Leisure Skills to Adolescents with Moderate Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Belva C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Four leisure skills (playing cards, selecting a television program, playing a sports videotape, and playing a computer game) were taught to four secondary students with moderate mental retardation by using least prompts procedures. Nondisabled peers assessed generalization across persons. Benefits were shown to the students with disabilities and…

  7. Teaching Problem Solving Skills to Elementary Age Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Barnett, Crystal; Pavelek, Karin; Nguyen, Hoang; Sparks, Shannon L.

    2014-01-01

    Students with disabilities need problem-solving skills to promote their success in solving the problems of daily life. The research into problem-solving instruction has been limited for students with autism. Using a problem-solving intervention and the Self Determined Learning Model of Instruction, three elementary age students with autism were…

  8. Teaching Movable "Du": Guidelines for Developing Enrhythmic Reading Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Reading music notation with fluency is a complex skill requiring well-founded instruction by the music teacher and diligent practice on the part of the learner. The task is complicated by the fact that there are multiple ways to notate a given rhythm. Beginning music students typically have their first encounter with enrhythmic notation when they…

  9. Strategic Teaching: Fostering Communication Skills in Diverse Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennifer J.; Shire, Suzanne H.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication is essential for young children's academic and social competence. During the preschool years, children acquire the language and communication skills necessary to express their needs, thoughts, and feelings in social interactions, and they learn to respond appropriately to others. Through effective communication, they also…

  10. The Internet and Student Research: Teaching Critical Evaluation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Delilah

    2005-01-01

    To use the Internet effectively, students need to be taught critical evaluation skills that they can apply to each Web site they use for research. The action research report discussed in this article exemplifies the collaborative teamwork involved in creating a critical-evaluation unit for Internet sites to be used with middle school students.

  11. Teaching Professional Engineering Skills : Industry Participation in Realistic Role Play Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2010-01-01

    Engineering education aims at providing students with sufficient disciplinary knowledge of science and engineering principles in order for them to become successful engineers. However, to fulfil their roles as professional engineers, students also need to develop personal and interpersonal skills, as well as professional skills, in order to implement and apply their theoretical and technical knowledge in a real context. CDIO constitutes a comprehensive approach to engineering education in which these additional skills represent fundamental principles besides the predominant technical knowledge. The implementation of professional skills as well as personal and interpersonal skills in engineering teaching must be done, however, without reducing the existing curriculum of technical disciplines and still allow for the continuous acquisition of new technical knowledge. The general purpose of this study is to discuss how to facilitate the teaching of professional skills in engineering education in parallel with thetechnical disciplines. The objective is to test and evaluate extensive role play simulation in which the students interact with professional engineers in a realistic, industrial context. The underlying argument for this approach is to establish a realistic learning environment that will foster the learning of professional skills. The role play simulation has been applied and reviewed in two engineering courses, i.e. at Lund University in Sweden and at the Technical University of Denmark. Course evaluations, a questionnaire, and discussions with students confirm a genuinely positive attitude towards the role play simulation. The students engage in the role play and express an increased understanding of the requirements and the implicit rules of real-life engineering. The interaction between students and the professional engineers act as a prime mover for the students to perform their best, which in turn strengthens the learning of the technical content. The study concludes that role play with participation ofrepresentatives from the industry can facilitate the teaching of professional skills in engineering education.

  12. Learning 21st-Century Skills Requires, 21st-Century Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Anna Rosefsky; Opfer, V. Darleen

    2012-01-01

    For students to learn 21st-century skills, we will have to teach them differently than we have in the past. The outdated, transmission model, through which teachers transmit factual knowledge to students via lectures and textbooks, remains the dominant approach to compulsory education in much of the world, yet it is not the most effective way to…

  13. A PBLT Approach to Teaching ESL Speaking, Writing, and Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahini, Gholamhossein; Riazi, A. Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces Philosophy-based Language Teaching (PBLT) as a new approach to developing productive language and thinking skills in students. The approach involves posing philosophical questions and engaging students in dialogues within a community of enquiry context. To substantiate the approach, the paper reports a study in which 34…

  14. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  15. Teaching Early Braille Literacy Skills within a Stimulus Equivalence Paradigm to Children with Degenerative Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Karen A.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the need for braille literacy, there has been little attempt to systematically evaluate braille-instruction programs. The current study evaluated an instructive procedure for teaching early braille-reading skills with 4 school-aged children with degenerative visual impairments. Following a series of pretests, braille instruction involved…

  16. Clinically Oriented Physiology Teaching: Strategy for Developing Critical-Thinking Skills in Undergraduate Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Upadhya, Subramanya; Torke, Sharmila; Ramnarayan, K.

    2004-01-01

    Medicine is an applied science, interpreting evidence and applying it to real life by using clinical reasoning skills and experience. COPT (clinically oriented physiology teaching) was incorporated in physiology instruction aiming to relate the study of physiology to real-life problems, to generate enthusiasm and motivation for learning, and to…

  17. Effects of Most to Least Prompting on Teaching Simple Progression Swimming Skill for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ilker; Konukman, Ferman; Birkan, Binyamin; Yanardag, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    Effects of most to least prompting on teaching simple progression swimming skill for children with autism were investigated. A single subject multiple baseline model across subjects with probe conditions was used. Participants were three boys, 9 years old. Data were collected over a 10-week with session three times a week period using the single…

  18. Teaching a Course in Abnormal Psychology and Behavior Intervention Skills for Nursing Home Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenwick, David S.; Slutzsky, Mitchel R.; Garfinkel, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes an 11-week course given at a nursing home to nursing home aides that focused on abnormal psychology and behavior intervention skills. Discusses the course goals, class composition, and course description. Addresses the problems and issues encountered with teaching this course to a nontraditional population in an unconventional setting.…

  19. Could MOOCs Answer the Problems of Teaching AQF-Required Skills in Australian Tertiary Programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2013-01-01

    From 2015, Australian universities will be required to demonstrate that their programmes explicitly teach and assess achievement of, knowledge and skills, and the application of both as specified by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF). Over the last twenty years, the sector has applied significant effort and resources to embedding the…

  20. Pre-Service Geography Teachers' Confidence in Geographical Subject Matter Knowledge and Teaching Geographical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Wendy; Reitano, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This research tracked the confidence of 16 undergraduate and postgraduate pre-service geography teachers as they completed a single semester, senior phase geography curriculum course. The study focused specifically on the pre-service teachers' confidence in geographical subject matter knowledge and their confidence in teaching geographical skills.…

  1. Effectiveness of the Modified Intensive Toilet Training Method on Teaching Toilet Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiç, Avsar; Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effectiveness of a modified version of Azrin and Foxx's (1971) intensive toilet training method on teaching of toilet skills to children with autism. This method consists of administering extra fluids and a time schedule, but does not use overcorrection procedures. Implementation requires a study of…

  2. Teaching Play Skills to Children with Autism through Video Modeling: Small Group Arrangement and Observational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Arzu; Batu, Sema; Birkan, Binyamin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine if video modeling was an effective way of teaching sociodramatic play skills to individuals with autism in a small group arrangement. Besides maintenance, observational learning and social validation data were collected. Three 9 year old boys with autism participated in the study. Multiple probe…

  3. The Implementation of Interactive Multimedia Learning Materials in Teaching Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampa, Andi Tenri

    2015-01-01

    One of the factors that may affect the success of the learning process is the use of learning media. Therefore, this research aimed to implement and evaluate the interactive multimedia learning materials using Wondershare Quizcreator program and audio materials in teaching "English listening skills". The research problem was whether or…

  4. Effectiveness of Teacher Education Programmes in Developing Teaching Skills for Secondary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, S. Zia; Farooq, M. S.; Memon, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of secondary school teacher education programme in terms of development of selected teaching skills and suggesting ways and means to improve the programme. The population of the study comprised of the pre-service teachers of all the government colleges of education for men and women in…

  5. An Alternative Approach for Designing and Teaching Communication Skills to University of Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineteh, Ernest A.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the contents and teaching strategies of communication skills courses at a South African higher institution: Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT). It seeks to understand why the courses have not been very responsive to increasing academic and professional challenges undergraduate students experience at this…

  6. National Curriculum Tests and the Teaching of Thinking Skills at Primary Schools--Parallel or Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hanneke

    2010-01-01

    The drive to raise standards in core curriculum subjects, and the teaching of thinking skills, are both aspects of the UK government's education policy for England. This article is based on findings from a questionnaire-based research project which investigated the relationship between National Curriculum tests, which are an important element of…

  7. Measuring Graduate Students' Teaching and Research Skills through Self-Report: Descriptive Findings and Validity Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Joanna; Feldon, David

    2010-01-01

    This study extends research on graduate student development by examining descriptive findings and validity of a self-report survey designed to capture graduate students' assessments of their teaching and research skills. Descriptive findings provide some information about areas of growth among graduate students' in the first years of their…

  8. Integrating Problem-Based Learning with ICT for Developing Trainee Teachers' Content Knowledge and Teaching Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Mehdi; Karami, Zohreh; Attaran, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Professional teachers can guarantee the progress and the promotion of society because fostering the development of next generation is up to them and depends on their professional knowledge which has two kinds of sources: content knowledge and teaching skill. The aim of the present research was studying the effect of integrating problem-based…

  9. Evaluating New Approaches to Teaching of Sight-Reading Skills to Advanced Pianists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates three teaching approaches to improving sight-reading skills against a control in a large-scale study of advanced pianists. One hundred pianists in four equal groups participated in newly developed training programmes (accompanying, rhythm, musical style and control), with pre- and post-sight-reading tests analysed using…

  10. Learning and Teaching about the Nature of Science through Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget K.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation, a three-paper set, explored whether the process skills-based approach to nature of science instruction improves teachers' understandings, intentions to teach, and instructional practice related to the nature of science. The first paper examined the nature of science views of 53 preservice science teachers before and after a…

  11. Understanding the Relations between Dimensions of Literacy Teaching and Preschool Children's Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi

    2013-01-01

    Preschool teachers' literacy instruction during classroom activity is important to young children's early development of literacy skills. The present study employed repeated measure ANOVAs to examine the dimensions of 42 Head Start teachers' literacy instruction (i.e., literacy content, teaching process, and lexical characteristics) during large…

  12. The Use of Music to Teach Life Skills to Students with Emotional Disabilities in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiozor, Williams Emeka

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the teaching of life skills to urban American youths who are highly fascinated with the hip-hop culture--songs, raps, miming, lyrics, dressing and musical rhythms, especially individuals with emotional disabilities in the public schools. This is an instructional curriculum strategy to encourage positive and active…

  13. Using Video Prompting to Teach Cooking Skills to Secondary Students with Moderate Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Tara B.; Collins, Belva C.; Schuster, John W.; Kleinert, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Three secondary students with moderate disabilities acquired cooking skills through a constant time delay procedure used with video prompting. A multiple probe design was used to evaluate effectiveness of the procedure to teach preparation of a food item (a) on a stove, (b) in a microwave, and (c) on a counter top. The procedure was effective for…

  14. Teaching Interpersonal Social Skills: A Prototype Manual of Activities; 1974-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Diego County Dept. of Education, CA.

    The manual presents activities designed to teach educationally handicapped children (K-6) interpersonal social skills. Group problem solving and individual behavior control techniques are emphasized. Described are approximately 45 games, role playing situations, critical incident simulations, and cartoon discussions. Entries usually contain…

  15. Responding to Technological Change: IT Skills and the Academic Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Philip; Ip, Ken; Saintas, Patrick; Stanier, Stan; Palmer, Helen; Thomas, Nicola; Reast, Gareth; Barlow, Joyce; Maillardet, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Six academics in a new university were seconded to the role of part-time learning technology support. It was necessary to have an informed view of the IT skills level of all academic teaching staff. A selfassessment questionnaire was designed based on the core competencies in the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL). The results were used to…

  16. The Effect of Simulation-Based Learning on Prospective Teachers' Inference Skills in Teaching Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koparan, Timur; Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli

    2015-01-01

    The effect of simulation-based probability teaching on the prospective teachers' inference skills has been examined with this research. In line with this purpose, it has been aimed to examine the design, implementation and efficiency of a learning environment for experimental probability. Activities were built on modeling, simulation and the…

  17. Can Student Teachers Acquire Core Skills for Teaching from Part-Time Employment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ken; Cummins, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Part-time employment among university students has become commonplace internationally. Research has largely focused on the impact of part-time employment on academic performance. This research takes an original approach in that it poses the question whether students can acquire core skills relevant to teaching from their part-time employment. The…

  18. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  19. Teaching Thinking Skills in Context-Based Learning: Teachers' Challenges and Assessment Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avargil, Shirly; Herscovitz, Orit; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2012-01-01

    For an educational reform to succeed, teachers need to adjust their perceptions to the reform's new curricula and strategies and cope with new content, as well as new teaching and assessment strategies. Developing students' scientific literacy through context-based chemistry and higher order thinking skills was the framework for establishing a new…

  20. Teaching Social Skills to Children with Autism Using the Cool versus Not Cool Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Tsuji, Kathleen H.; Griggs, Brandy; Edwards, Andrew; Taubman, Mitchell; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ronald; Oppenheim-Leaf, Misty L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the cool versus not cool procedure for teaching three children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder eight social skills. The cool versus not cool procedure is a social discrimination program used to increase children's ability to display appropriate social behaviors. In this study, the cool versus not cool…

  1. Training residential supervisors to provide feedback for maintaining staff teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, M B; Reid, D H

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated procedures for training supervisors in a residential setting to provide feedback for maintaining direct-service staff members ' teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities. Using classroom-based instruction and on-the-job observation and feedback, 10 supervisors were initially trained to implement teaching programs themselves. The training improved supervisors' teaching skills but was insufficient to improve the quality of feedback they provided to direct-service sta...

  2. Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Jennifer; Dimeff, Linda A.; Koerner, Kelly; Linehan, Marsha M.; Taylor, Laura; Miller, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to…

  3. Using Simultaneous Prompting within an Activity-Based Format to Teach Dressing Skills to Preschoolers with Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Teena J.; Collins, Belva C.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Schuster, John W.

    1998-01-01

    A multiple probe across skills, single-subject research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a simultaneous prompting procedure with a physical guidance controlling prompt to teach three dressing skills to two preschoolers with disabilities. Both students maintained skills with 90% accuracy up to six weeks following acquisition.…

  4. A Brief Group Intervention Using Video Games to Teach Sportsmanship Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Bill R.; Gillis, Jennifer M.; Sevlever, Melina

    2013-01-01

    Impaired social skills represent a fundamental deficit for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Despite the potential importance of "good sportsmanship," this social skill has received relatively little attention in the literature. The current study utilized a Behavioral Skills Training (BST) approach to teach three…

  5. Contextualized Teaching & Learning: A Promising Approach for Basic Skills Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Elaine DeLott; Hope, Laura; Karandjeff, Kelley

    2009-01-01

    Contextualized teaching and learning (CTL), or the concept of relating subject matter content to meaningful situations that are relevant to students' lives, offers one promising approach to helping students learn more effectively. This brief offers instructors, college leaders, policy makers and funders a high-level summary of the CTL…

  6. Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

  7. Teaching Emotion Recognition Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Christian; Charragain, Caitriona Ni

    2010-01-01

    Autism is associated with difficulty interacting with others and an impaired ability to recognize facial expressions of emotion. Previous teaching programmes have not addressed weak central coherence. Emotion recognition training focused on components of facial expressions. The training was administered in small groups ranging from 4 to 7…

  8. PILOTing Undergraduate Students to Hands-On Teaching and Research Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Borgon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate research can make a positive impact on science education. Unfortunately, the one studentone mentor paradigm of undergraduate research generates a wide range of variability in the student’s experience and further limits its availability to a select few students. In contrast, a single faculty member can offer multiple undergraduate teaching positions that provide a consistent experience for the student. We attempted to combine the undergraduate research and teaching experiences in an internship practicum called Peer Instruction and Laboratory Occupational Training (PILOT. Students enrolled in PILOT served as teaching assistants for the upper division Quantitative Biological Methods (QBM laboratory course. In addition, PILOT students worked on an independent lab project that provided them with hands-on training and supported the QBM course. The development of presentation and teaching skills was also emphasized in PILOT. These activities were designed to improve student communication skills, lab skills, and knowledge of molecular biology content. Here, we describe the PILOT curriculum and report the results of an anonymous assessment survey administered to 75 students who had completed PILOT in the previous five semesters. Our data indicate that PILOT provides an effective format to expand undergraduate opportunities for research and teaching experiences.

  9. Using peer-assisted learning to teach and evaluate residents' musculoskeletal skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Johanna; Harris, Christina; Jalali, Cathy; Tung, Judy; Meyer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Although direct observation and corrective feedback are established methods of increasing select aspects of residents' musculoskeletal (MSK) clinical skills, the evaluation and management of patients with MSK complaints remains an underemphasized part of internal medicine training. This paper reports on the development of an innovative peer-assisted learning (PAL) model to teach five MSK areas (back, knee, shoulder, neck, or hip pain). Based on data from 42 participating interns and 44 senior residents from an urban US academic medical center, results from an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) demonstrate gains in both knowledge and self-reported confidence in MSK skills. Moreover, subsequent focus group results reveal a strong preference for the PAL model. In conclusion, an educational module that utilizes the OSCE format holds much promise for teaching MSK skills to both intern and senior residents. PMID:26028495

  10. Using peer-assisted learning to teach and evaluate residents’ musculoskeletal skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Martinez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Although direct observation and corrective feedback are established methods of increasing select aspects of residents’ musculoskeletal (MSK clinical skills, the evaluation and management of patients with MSK complaints remains an underemphasized part of internal medicine training. This paper reports on the development of an innovative peer-assisted learning (PAL model to teach five MSK areas (back, knee, shoulder, neck, or hip pain. Based on data from 42 participating interns and 44 senior residents from an urban US academic medical center, results from an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE demonstrate gains in both knowledge and self-reported confidence in MSK skills. Moreover, subsequent focus group results reveal a strong preference for the PAL model. In conclusion, an educational module that utilizes the OSCE format holds much promise for teaching MSK skills to both intern and senior residents.

  11. The Use of Video Role Play for Teaching Therapeutic Communication Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective Communication is a fundamental skill for practice across health care settings and is a component ofundergraduate nursing programs around the world. Resource materials appropriate for the teaching of communication in an Asiancontext are lacking.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a self-developed video using role play in facilitating teaching andlearning associated with therapeutic communication.Methods: Videos were produced which demonstrated the fundamental communication skills of listening, understanding,exploring and comforting/supporting, using role play. These were shown to Year 1 nursing students in tutorials over four weeks.Their usefulness was evaluated using a self-developed questionnaire. Among 74 questionnaires distributed at the end of thefourth tutorial, 72 were returned, with a 97% response rate.Results: Most students agreed that the video clips provided useful examples for role-playing the communication skills (89%,helped trigger them to perform role-playing (74%, were useful to improve understanding of different communication skills(93% and helped them learn from other students’ role-playing performance (87%. Overall impression of using the videos in thetutorial teaching was very useful (27% and useful (68%.Conclusions: Most students valued the videos developed purposely for teaching therapeutic communication and recommendedthat the videos be used in the future. Using video role plays facilitated the teaching and learning process and enhancedundergraduate nursing students’ understanding and application of communication skills. More video clips will be developed inthe future, with improved quality and with a broader range of health care communication scenarios demonstrated in order to beused more widely.

  12. Educational Technologies in Health Science Libraries: Teaching Technology Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many. To appeal to their users, many health sciences li...

  13. Teaching physiotherapy skills in culturally-diverse classes

    OpenAIRE

    Grimmer-Somers Karen; Wells Cherie; Bialocerkowski Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cultural competence, the ability to work in cross-cultural situations, has been acknowledged as a core skill for physiotherapists and other health professionals. Literature in this area has focused on the rationale for physiotherapists to provide culturally-competent care and the effectiveness of various educational strategies to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge about cultural competence by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students. However, there is a paucity of ...

  14. Teaching Intercultural Communicative Competence through the Four Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Usó Juan, Esther; Martínez Flor, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, the most accepted instructional framework in second or foreign language (L2) programs is Communicative Language Teaching, whose main goal is to increase learners’ communicative competence. This theoretical term means being able to use the linguistic system effectively and appropriately in the target language and culture. However, the implementation of a communicative methodology is not an easy task since it requires an understanding of the integrated nature of the ...

  15. Station-based deconstructed training model for teaching procedural skills to medical students: a quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Panah Khahi; Mojgan Karbakhsh; Razavi, Seyyed M; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Seyyed M Razavi1, Mojgan Karbakhsh1, Mahdi Panah Khahi2, Soheila Dabiran1, Sara Asefi3, GhamarH Zaker Shahrak4, Ali R Bad Afrooz41Department of Community Medicine, 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Department of General Practice, 4Clinical Skills Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IranBackground: Every procedural skill consists of some microskills. One of the effective techniques for teaching a main procedural skill is to deconstruct the skill into a series of microskills and train ...

  16. On Cultivation of Cross-cultural Awareness in College English Teaching:Take Integrated Skills of English as an Example

    OpenAIRE

    YANG, YING

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Language is an indispensable part of culture. To understand language means knowing about culture first. Culture teaching plays an essential role in English language teaching. The cultural orientation in language communication should be highly valued and the relevant cultural background should be led in where necessary. This paper discusses the training of cross-cultural awareness in college English teaching by taking Integrated Skills of English as an example. Besides teaching langu...

  17. A case study for teaching information literacy skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley Karl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet has changed contemporary workplace skills, resulting in a need for proficiency with specific digital, online and web-based technologies within the fields of medicine, dentistry and public health. Although younger students, generally under 30 years of age, may appear inherently comfortable with the use of technology-intensive environments and digital or online search methods, competence in information literacy among these students may be lacking. Methods This project involved the design and assessment of a research-based assignment to help first-year, graduate-level health science students to develop and integrate information literacy skills with clinical relevance. Results One cohort of dental students (n = 78 was evaluated for this project and the results demonstrate that although all students were able to provide the correct response from the content-specific, or technology-independent, portion of the assignment, more than half (54% were unable to demonstrate competence with a web-based, technology-dependent section of this assignment. No correlation was found between any demographic variable measured (gender, age, or race. Conclusion More evidence is emerging that demonstrates the need for developing curricula that integrates new knowledge and current evidence-based practices and technologies, traditionally isolated from graduate and health-care curricula, that can enhance biomedical and clinical training for students. This study provides evidence, critical for the evaluation of new practices, which can promote and facilitate the integration of information literacy into the curriculum.

  18. Teaching of reading and writing skills: Process syllabus and global issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezgi Sarac

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present a suggested syllabus that can set an example for process and task based syllabus applications for the teaching of reading and writing skills in a foreign language. It proposes a teaching model and the related evaluative data analysis. In the spring term of 2006-2007 academic year, 50 first year pre-service teachers at Hacettepe University, Division of English Language Teaching attended the course ‘Reading and Writing Skills II’. The course was designed in line with process and task based syllabus. While desinging the course syllabus, the aim was to develop an alternative teaching model. Therefore, the main goals were identified as improving critical reading skills, achieving student autonomy and focusing on global issues. To achieve these goals, the participants identified 5 global issues to do research and reading/writing activities on. Hence, these issues composed the syllabus and its sequence. The course work and materials were collected in personal portfolios which took the place of the coursebook and encouraged library and the Internet search and written personal reflections. Those subjects identified by the participants were terorism, great middle east project, freedom of expression, multi-lingualism/culturalism and sexism. The qualitative data gathered during and after the application and also the quantitative data and feedback collected at the end of the application provided sound findings on both the syllabus and its evaluation. In these findings, it is observable that the syllabus/teaching model encouraging the students to choose the reading texts on their own, to compose portfolios and to manage the teaching/learning process appreciated by the participants and achieved student participation and motivation.

  19. Teaching of reading and writing skills: Process syllabus and global issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezgi Sarac

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present a suggested syllabus that can set an example for process and task based syllabus applications for the teaching of reading and writing skills in a foreign language. It proposes a teaching model and the related evaluative data analysis. In the spring term of 2006-2007 academic year, 50 first year pre-service teachers at Hacettepe University, Division of English Language Teaching attended the course ‘Reading and Writing Skills II’. The course was designed in line with process and task based syllabus. While desinging the course syllabus, the aim was to develop an alternative teaching model. Therefore, the main goals were identified as improving critical reading skills, achieving student autonomy and focusing on global issues. To achieve these goals, the participants identified 5 global issues to do research and reading/writing activities on. Hence, these issues composed the syllabus and its sequence. The course work and materials were collected in personal portfolios which took the place of the coursebook and encouraged library and the Internet search and written personal reflections. Those subjects identified by the participants were terorism, great middle east project, freedom of expression, multi-lingualism/culturalism and sexism. The qualitative data gathered during and after the application and also the quantitative data and feedback collected at the end of the application provided sound findings on both the syllabus and its evaluation. In these findings, it is observable that the syllabus/teaching model encouraging the students to choose the reading texts on their own, to compose portfolios and to manage the teaching/learning process appreciated by the participants and achieved student participation and motivation.  

  20. Teaching interpersonal skills in an international design-build course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, JØrgen Erik; Karhu, Markku

    2011-01-01

    The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) started the CDIO concept in the autumn of 2008. The aim with this was to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers. The working conditions of a typical engineer involve many other fields than just those requiring technical skills. Interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important, including communication, teamwork and leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the co-operation between DTU and Metropolia on the development of an International Communication Course for the engineering students and to emphasize the importance of including a course like this into the CDIO concept, to be worked on in the process of further development. The course described in this paper is a strictly non-engineering course in communication; it is special in that its chief purpose is to bring into focus the fact that students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process. This is in stark contrast to a teacher giving lectures about communication, leaving the students passive listeners. The personal involvement aroused a negative reaction from several students at the beginning of the course however, during the one- week course the students gained a better understanding of the importance of learning how to communicate appropriately. Altogether, the four key questions dealing with the quality of the course show a very high satisfaction with the instruction. The grades one and two (1 best/very much, 5 worst/very little) of the responses to these four questions are ranging on average from 69.5% to 88% (on a yearly basis). The positive responses indicate that the students are very satisfied with the course recognising the need for education on international communication.

  1. Teaching Reading Skills in the EFL Class. A Practical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Aniculaese

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching reading first requires careful consideration regarding the choice of text that may yield the richest and most relevant exposure to language. Reading is most effective through a top-down approach and students must develop speed and efficiency by avoiding sub-vocalisation, focusing on key words and taking in clusters of meaning at one time. Pre-reading for gist speeds up understanding by discovery of the text’s structure and of the type of paragraph in question. Explanatory paraphrasing and context clues should be sought when difficult vocabulary is encountered. Correct answers to comprehension questions may come from an awareness of the range of distracters possible, the writer’s attitude and the focus of the question.

  2. The effect of different teaching systems in learning Rhythmic Gymnastics apparatus motor skills

    OpenAIRE

    TINTO, Amalia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine which of the two teaching systems, the Current Teaching System (CTS) and the Serial Organization System (SOS), is more effective in the learning rhythmic gymnastics skills in this novice (basic) level of students. The sample that consisted of 84 novices female students of physical education of Athens, aged 18-20 years old (19.02±0.77) who volunteered to participate in this study separated in two groups (n1=39, n2=43). At first, a pre test wad done to a...

  3. Learning theories and skills in online second language teaching and learning : dilemmas and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    For decades foreign and second language teachers have taken advantage of the technology development and ensuing possibilities to use e-learning facilities for language training. Since the 1980s, the use of computer assisted language learning (CALL), Internet, web 2.0, and various kinds of e-learning technology has been developed and researched comprehensively to extend predominantly communicative language teaching approaches focusing on training language skills. While international, in the 2000s the use of web 2.0 technologies in particular has been introduced for developing reading and writing skills in Denmark with special attention towards the development of web-based materials for Danish pronunciation. This paper sets out to introduce differences between the international and Danish use of web-based language learning and teaching. Finally, dilemmas and challenges for the use of CALL, IT, and web 2.0 in

  4. Perception of Teachers and Administrators on the Teaching Methods that Influence the Acquisition of Generic Skills

    OpenAIRE

    R. Audu; Yusri Bin Kamin; Aede Hatib Bin Musta’amal; Muhammad Sukri Bin Saud; Mohd. Zolkifli Abd. Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This study is designed to identify the most significant teaching methods that influence the acquisition of generic skills of mechanical engineering trades students at technical college level. Descriptive survey research design was utilized in carrying out the study. One hundred and ninety (190) respondents comprised of mechanical engineering trades’ teachers and the administrators in the technical colleges in north central states of Nigeria responded to a structured questionnaire which addres...

  5. Learning theories and skills in online second language teaching and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    For decades foreign and second language teachers have taken advantage of the technology development and ensuing possibilities to use e-learning facilities for language training. Since the 1980s, the use of computer assisted language learning (CALL), Internet, web 2.0, and various kinds of e-learning technology has been developed and researched comprehensively to extend predominantly communicative language teaching approaches focusing on training language skills. While international, in the 2000s...

  6. A personalized system of instruction for teaching checking account skills to adults with mild disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Zencius, A H; Davis, P K; Cuvo, A J

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a personalized system of instruction to teach checking account skills to persons with mild disabilities. Using a self-paced manual, 8 participants in two groups were taught to write checks, complete deposit slips, and reconcile monthly bank statements. Four participants were assessed for generalization from the classroom to community sites and demonstrated nearly perfect performance. A multiple probe design showed that acquisition occurred sequentially for...

  7. Developing teaching skills for the internationalized university: A Danish project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.; Cozart, Stacey Marie

    As an increasing number of higher education institutions offer degree programs taught in English, university management as well as teachers on the ground realize that while the English proficiency of faculty and students is important, there is more to it than just that; students and faculty not only have different first languages, they also come from different cultures, with tacit knowledge and expectations about what is expected in the multilingual and multicultural classroom in which English is the one language shared by all, and in which linguistic, cultural and educational issues all play complex and interlocking roles. This has created a pressing need to explore, develop and share strategies for addressing the needs of English-medium lecturers faced with the challenges and opportunities presented by the multicultural classroom. This poster will present the outcomes of a major project that has attempted to address these needs by designing, piloting and revising a set of resources available online for lecturers teaching through the medium of English in multicultural university settings.

  8. Informing Pedagogy Through the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model

    OpenAIRE

    Mariale Hardiman

    2012-01-01

    Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, ed...

  9. A Comparison of Discrete Trial Teaching with and without Gestures/Signs in Teaching Receptive Language Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Onur

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of two discrete trial teaching procedures for teaching receptive language skills to children with autism. While verbal instructions were delivered alone during the first procedure, all verbal instructions were combined with simple gestures and/or signs during the second…

  10. Evidence Regarding Teaching and Assessment of Record-Keeping Skills in Training of Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kate J; Bearman, Margaret; Palermo, Claire

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the literature on teaching and assessing dental students' record-keeping skills prior to qualification to practice independently as a dentist. A systematic literature review was performed using Ovid MEDLINE and SCOPUS. Keywords used in the search included dental, record, audit, education, and assessment. Electronic search results were screened for publications that targeted undergraduate dental training, related to a record-keeping education intervention, and were published in English and available in full text. Six studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed, and research findings were compared across the included studies. These six articles addressed the techniques used to teach and assess record-keeping skills in a pre-qualification context. The techniques included supervisor audits, peer audits, lectures, tutorials, research assignments, case reports, record-keeping templates, and checklists of required record components. The use of record audit as part of teaching and evaluation dominated these articles; it was used as the assessment method in five of the six studies. All methods of record-keeping training in studies published to date were found effective in improving student record-keeping skills. However, there was insufficient evidence to determine whether certain methods were more effective than others. PMID:26427782

  11. Effectiveness Of Value Analysis Model Of Teaching In Developing Value Processing Skills Among Secondary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lokanadha Reddy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Value education is of having great significance as it helps in the full development of child's personality in its physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects, and inculcate good manners and responsibility and cooperative citizenship and develop respect for the individual and society. Such value education should help to eliminate obscurantism, religious fanaticism, violence, superstitions and fatalism. In every individual, there is not one value but many and often in contradiction. When different values make claim on man at the same time and in the same situation, then he makes use of processing of values. The value processing skills in this study are; choosing freely, choosing from alternatives, choosing after consideration of consequences, prizing and cherishing, publicly affirming when appropriate, acting when situation demands, and acting with consistency and repetition. The experimental method was carried out for a sample of 248 secondary school students. The tools used in this study are the comprehensive instructional material based on value analysis model of teaching, worksheet for this model, and value processing skills scale. The major findings of the study revealed the comprehensive instructional material based on value analysis model of teaching is effective in developing value processing skills of secondary school students than activity oriented method of teaching.

  12. IDENTIFYING RELATIONSHIP INVOLVING LEARNING STYLES AND PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS AMONG VOCATIONAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rashid Rajuddin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between students’ learning styles and problem solving skills among students in Building Construction Course at Vocational School. This study also investigated the differences between the students’ type of learning styles and their ability to solve the problem using their creative thinking. A survey was carried out on 68 vocational students in Building Construction Course from two Vocational Schools. Felder-Soloman’s Index of Learning Styles (ILS and elements of creative thinking in problem solving for Vocational Education were the tools used in this study. Creative thinking in problem solving elements was categorized from the subject specification used in Building Construction curriculum. In brief, the ILS have five dimension; Processing, Perception, Input, Understanding and Perception. The results show that the Input style dominates the learning styles of Building Construction’s students in Vocational School and manipulating idea is the dominant creative thinking elements to solve the problem which students preferred. In conclusion, type of students’ learning styles will influence how they can cater their learning to improve their academic achievement and how they can use their creativity to solve the problem in actual situation in Building Construction work. However, learning styles are not main indicator to predict how students excellent are.

  13. Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamora Javier

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor' on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Methods Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC. Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Results Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part of their career. However, whilst a number of students reported that their views of teachers and teaching had changed as a result of participation, this did not translate into significant changes in responses to questions that explored their views of the roles and qualities required of a good clinical teacher. Conclusion Findings affirm the benefits to volunteer tutors of cross-year peer tutoring, particularly in terms of skills enhancement and reinforcement of positive attitudes towards future teaching responsibilities, and have implications for the design and organisation of such programmes.

  14. A Novel Educational Game for teaching Emotion Identification Skills to Preschoolers with Autism Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christinaki, Eirini; Vidakis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Emotion recognition is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in understanding and expressing emotions. Those deficits seem to be rather permanent so intervention tools for improving those impairments are desirable. Educational interventions for teaching emotion recognition should occur as early as possible. It is argued that Serious Games can be very effective in the areas of therapy and education for children with autism. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Before the age of 6, most children with autism do not have such basic motor skills in order to manipulate a mouse or a keyboard. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game, which provides physical interaction with natural user interface (NUI), we aim to support early intervention and to enhance emotion recognition skills.

  15. Preparing Teachers and Librarians to Collaborate to Teach 21st Century Skills: Views of LIS and Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Don; Gross, Melissa; Witte, Shelbie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the results of an exploratory research project in which library and information studies (LIS) faculty and education faculty were asked about their views on teaching pre-service school librarians and teachers 21st Century Skills (as defined by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills) and librarian-teacher collaboration.…

  16. Using a System of Least Prompts Procedure to Teach Telephone Skills to Elementary Students with Cognitive Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Kelly; Collins, Belva C.; Stenhoff, Donald M.; Kleinert, Harold

    2008-01-01

    Using the telephone to contact others can be an important skill in maintaining friendships with peers. This investigation used a system of least prompts (SLP) procedures to teach two telephone skills to 3 elementary students with cognitive disabilities: (a) placing phone calls and (b) leaving recorded voicemail messages. The SLP procedure was…

  17. Presenting Chained and Discrete Tasks as Non-Targeted Information when Teaching Discrete Academic Skills through Small Group Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenstine, Karen Jones; Collins, Belva C.; Schuster, John W.; Kleinert, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Special education teachers often search for effective strategies to teach a variety of skills to students with moderate to severe disabilities through small group instruction. The investigators examined the acquisition of academic skills as well as chained and discrete tasks presented as nontargeted information by a small group of students with…

  18. The Calm and Alert Class: Using Body, Mind and Breath to Teach Self-Regulation of Learning Related Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlauflin, Helene M.

    2010-01-01

    This article documents an action research pilot study called "The Calm and Alert Class" which utilized the body, mind and breath of students to teach the self-regulation of learning related social skills. Sixty first graders in four classrooms at a public elementary school were offered a 30 minute class for 28 weeks, which taught explicit skills

  19. Developing a Constructivist Proposal for Primary Teachers to Teach Science Process Skills: "Extended" Simple Science Experiments (ESSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirça, Necati

    2015-01-01

    Although science experiments are the basis of teaching science process skills (SPS), it has been observed that a large number of prospective primary teachers (PPTs), by virtue of their background, feel anxious about doing science experiments. To overcome this problem, a proposal was suggested for primary school teachers (PSTs) to teach science and…

  20. Is the use of videotape recording superior to verbal feedback alone in the teaching of clinical skills?

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim Ediz; Gunvar Tolga; Guldal Dilek; Mevsim Vildan; Ozcakar Nilgun; Sisli Zafer; Semin Ilgi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent times, medical schools have committed to developing good communication and history taking skills in students. However, there remains an unresolved question as to which constitutes the best educational method. Our study aims to investigate whether the use of videotape recording is superior to verbal feedback alone in the teaching of clinical skills and the role of student self-assessment on history taking and communication skills. Methods A randomized controlled t...

  1. Teacher-Made Tactile Science Materials with Critical and Creative Thinking Activities for Learners Including Those with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Jolene K.; Gray, Phyllis; Kuhn, Mason A.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Smith, Latisha L.; Alsubia, Sukainah A.; Ghayoorad, Maryam; Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean Suchsland

    2014-01-01

    Gifted students with visual impairments are twice exceptional learners and may not evidence their advanced science aptitudes without appropriate accommodations for learning science. However, effective tactile science teaching materials may be easily made. Recent research has shown that when tactile materials are used with "all" students…

  2. WWC Review of the Report "The Iterative Development and Initial Evaluation of We Have Skills!, an Innovative Approach to Teaching Social Skills to Elementary Students." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For the 2014 study, "The Iterative Development and Initial Evaluation of We Have Skills!, an Innovative Approach to Teaching Social Skills to Elementary Students", researchers examined the effects of We Have Skills! (WHS), a supplemental, video-based social skills program for early elementary students. WHS consists of three components:…

  3. Rapid Training of a Community Job Skill to Nonvocal Adults with Autism: An Extension of Intensive Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Lattimore, L. Perry; Parsons, Marsha B.; Reid, Dennis H.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated an intensive program in a simulated format for rapidly teaching a job skill to nonvocal adults with autism. Following baseline probes with a new work task of assembling mailing boxes at a publishing company, 3 supported workers individually received repeated teaching sessions at a simulated work site. All workers met criterion with 1 day of simulation teaching, with subsequent criterion level performance upon returning to the job (1 worker required booster trials). Intensive teac...

  4. Effects of training and feedback on Discrete Trial Teaching skills and student performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Andrew; Downs, Robyn Conley; Rau, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of training and feedback on instructor performance of Discrete Trial Teaching (DTT) and support skills. This included an examination of the generalization and maintenance of instructor skills, and the impact of instructor skills on student performance. Six undergraduate research assistants received an 8-h training in DTT and taught a variety of skills and behaviors to four preschool students who had developmental disabilities. A multiple-baseline design was used to assess instructor performance following training alone, during implementation of oral and written performance feedback, and at 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks follow-up. Instructors demonstrated correct use of DTT and related skills at a rate of 63-80% following training. When performance feedback was provided, all instructors attained proficiency ratings of 90% by the second session and 97-100% by the fourth session. High levels of instructor proficiency were maintained at follow-up and generalized across students and learning tasks. Student learning and instructional efficiency were superior in the feedback and follow-up conditions compared to baseline. The results highlight the need for training programs that allow school personnel to correctly use DTT to effectively facilitate learning and development in students who have developmental disabilities. PMID:17582740

  5. Using mother delivered simultaneous prompting for teaching independent toileting skills to a child with developmental disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Sönmez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed that to give a sample of an application that a mother delivered home-based instruction simultaneous prompting for teaching independent toilet skill to her child with developmental disability. Simultaneous prompting (SP is one of the  systematic teaching methods, and studies showing the effectiveness of this method has increased in recent years in literature. Although many studies showed an increase in individual’s development and learning if the parents of individuals affected a disability participate in the education of them, in effective teaching literature parent participation was found in very few. This study is a sample of an application for using SP by parents. Training processes of the study offered to the mother and used measuring instruments are reported in detail. At the end of the study SP used by mother was caused the child toilet independently and he maintained this skill. More studies are need to be conducted by the SP delivered by parents of the chidren with developmental disability.

  6. Creative and Computational Thinking in the Context of New Literacies: Working with Teachers to Scaffold Complex Technology-Mediated Approaches to Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSchryver, Michael D.; Yadav, Aman

    2015-01-01

    For too long, creativity in schools has been almost solely associated with art, music, and writing classes. Now, creative thinking skills are increasingly emphasized across the disciplines. At the same time, technological progress has brought about calls for the integration of new literacies and computational thinking to prepare students as…

  7. How we enhanced medical academics skills and reduced social inequities using an academic teaching program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Antonio Camargo; Oliveira, Felipe Renê Alves; Delfino, Breno Matos; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; de Moraes, Fabio Henrique Pinto; Barbosa, Guilherme Viana; de Macedo, Lucas Felipe; Domingos, Tayna Da Silva; Da Silva, Dyemisson Pinheiro; Menezes, Charlene Cristine Rodrigues; Oliveira Filho, Edmar Santana; Pereira, Thales Augusto Da Silva; Piccirilli, Elizabeth Souza; Pinto, Wagner De Jesus

    2015-11-01

    The training of future physicians should be concurrent with the development of different skills and attitudes. This warrants the need to regularly provide students with opportunities for self-development throughout their academic career. This approach was exemplified in a medical school in the Brazilian Amazon, where students were allowed to play the role of high school teachers. As part of this exercise, they conducted reinforcement classes for high school students to increase the number of university admissions. The medical students were solely responsible for organizing and implementing this project, giving them the opportunity to develop teaching and leadership skills, enhance their understanding of communication and administration and contribute toward the society. PMID:25301145

  8. Measurement Invariance of Torrance Test of Creative Thinking Figural Scores across Age: A study in Spanish-Speaking Children and Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela L. Krumm

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a previous study carried out with Spanish-speaking children which indicates that the Creativity construct, operationalized by means of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT-Figural, consists of two factors –Innovation and Adaptation– (Krumm, Lemos & Arán Filippetti, in press, the objective of the present work was to prove whether this structure is invariant across age. A sample of 652 Spanish-speaking children and adolescents aged 9-17 years of both sexes was tested. It was in turn divided into three age groups: (a 9-10, (b 11-13 and (c 16 -17 years. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA showed that in each group of the sample, the structure of the TTCT is composed of two correlated factors, namely Innovation and Adaptation. In addition, Multigroup CFA demonstrated that the two-factor solution was actually invariant (configural and metric across age, meaning that children and adolescents equally conceptualize the Creativity construct. Finally, MANOVA showed a significant age effect on every subscale. These data suggest the relevance of considering the age factor when assessing the creative potential through the TTCT-Figural.

  9. Teaching citizen science skills online: Implications for invasive species training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, G.; Crall, A.; Laituri, M.; Graham, J.; Stohlgren, T.; Moore, J.C.; Kodrich, K.; Holfelder, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Citizen science programs are emerging as an efficient way to increase data collection and help monitor invasive species. Effective invasive species monitoring requires rigid data quality assurances if expensive control efforts are to be guided by volunteer data. To achieve data quality, effective online training is needed to improve field skills and reach large numbers of remote sentinel volunteers critical to early detection and rapid response. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of online static and multimedia tutorials to teach citizen science volunteers (n = 54) how to identify invasive plants; establish monitoring plots; measure percent cover; and use Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Participants trained using static and multimedia tutorials provided less (p skills. Overall, the online approach used did not influence conferred field skills and abilities. Traditional or multimedia online training augmented with more rigorous, repeated, and hands-on, in-person training in specialized skills required for more difficult tasks will likely improve volunteer abilities, data quality, and overall program effectiveness. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  10. The rise of simulation in technical skills teaching and the implications for training novices in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanelli, D J

    2009-11-01

    Changes in work practices have led to a decline in the opportunities for anaesthetic trainees to learn technical procedures in supervised practice. Efforts to mitigate medical error and other changes have coincided with the development of alternative training methods so that it is increasingly difficult to justify the traditional model of teaching technical procedures. The range of simulators available for training in technical procedures in anaesthesia continues to expand. While simulation has been widely adopted in anaesthesia for crisis management training, there is little documented evidence of its use for technical skills training. The theoretical basis for the use of simulation to aid the acquisition of psychomotor skills and the development of expertise is now well established. In addition, practical frameworks that allow this theory to be applied in a systematic fashion have been developed and successfully used in other specialties. Using the available simulation equipment and educational tools, trainees can be prepared to begin supervised practice having demonstrated adequate procedural knowledge and expertise in simulation. With the use of simulated patients there is also the opportunity to integrate non-technical skills as well where appropriate. This review summarises the justification for the use of simulation in technical skills training in anaesthesia and the educational theory that supports its use, and outlines one of the available frameworks that can be used to aid its application. PMID:20014595

  11. Investigation on Requirements of Robotic Platforms to Teach Social Skills to Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Chris; Kuester, Deitra; Sheehan, Mark; Dhanya, Sneha

    This paper reports on some of the robotic platforms used in the project AUROSO which investigates the use of robots as educationally useful interventions to improve social interactions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Our approach to treatment uses an educational intervention based on Socially Assistive Robotics (SAR), the DIR/Floortime intervention model and social script/stories. Requirements are established and a variety of robotic models/platforms were investigated as to the feasibility of an economical, practical and efficient means of helping teach social skills to individuals with ASD for use by teachers, families, service providers and other community organizations.

  12. Skype™ Conference Calls: A Way to Promote Speaking Skills in the Teaching and Learning of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeferson Romaña Correa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a research project on the teaching and learning of English through the use of Skype™ conference calls. The research was carried out with a group of 12 English as a foreign language adult learners in the language institute of Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Bogotá, Colombia. The findings of this study suggest that Skype™ conference calls might be considered as an influential computer-mediated communication tool in order to promote English as a foreign language adult A1 learners’ speaking skill, especially for social interaction purposes and oral reinforcement of both language fluency and course contents outside of classroom settings.

  13. Teaching child psychiatric assessment skills: Using pediatric mental health screening tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, T M; Arthur, M E

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the workshop "Teaching Child Psychiatric Assessment Skills: Using Mental Health Screening Instruments," presented at the 35th Forum for Behavioral Sciences in Family Medicine on 20 September 2014. The goals of the presentation were (1) to teach family medicine behavioral health educators to use both general and problem-specific mental health screening tools (MHSTs) in their work with trainees to help satisfy the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate for behavioral and mental health experience during family medicine residency, (2) to reflect on how MHSTs might be integrated into the flow of family medicine teaching practices, and (3) to exemplify how evidence-based methods of adult education might be used in teaching such content. One general MHST, the Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 and one problem-specific MHST for each of the four commonest pediatric mental health issues: for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the Vanderbilt; for Anxiety, the Screen for Childhood Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorders; for Depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for teens; and for Aggression, the Retrospective-Modified Overt Aggression Scale, were practiced at least twice in the context of a clinical vignette. All of the selected MHSTs are free in the public domain and available for download from the website: www.CAPPCNY.org. Participants were asked to reflect on their own office practice characteristics and consider how MHSTs might be integrated into their systems of care. This workshop could be replicated by others wishing to teach the use of MHSTs in primary care settings or teaching programs. PMID:26116547

  14. The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Design in Training Writing Skills Physics Teaching Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parlindungan Sinaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Result of field studies showed low writing skill of teachers in teaching material. The root of the problem lies in their inability on translating description of teaching material into writing. This research focused on the effectiveness of scaffolding design. The scaffolding design was tested in the selected topics of physics courses for pre-service teachers through learning to write activity approach. The treatment effectiveness was determined by considering the effect size and normalized gain percentage, while the hypothesis was tested using “the Kruskal-Wallis test”. The research results showed that scaffolding between the stages of planning and translating plans into text was effective in improving pre-service physics teachers’ ability of writing physics teaching materials and was similarly effective in improving their conceptual understanding of the topics of electromagnetism, waves, and optics. Learning to write activity implemented in the course of physics with selected topics was effective in improving the ability of pre-service teachers in translating among different modes of representation and making multiple concept representations. The hypothesis test demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the abilities of writing teaching materials and conceptual understanding between experimental and control classes.

  15. Learning and teaching about the nature of science through process skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget K.

    This dissertation, a three-paper set, explored whether the process skills-based approach to nature of science instruction improves teachers' understandings, intentions to teach, and instructional practice related to the nature of science. The first paper examined the nature of science views of 53 preservice science teachers before and after a year of secondary science methods instruction that incorporated the process skills-based approach. Data consisted of each participant's written and interview responses to the Views of the Nature of Science (VNOS) questionnaire. Systematic data analysis led to the conclusion that participants exhibited statistically significant and practically meaningful improvements in their nature of science views and viewed teaching the nature of science as essential to their future instruction. The second and third papers assessed the outcomes of the process skills-based approach with 25 inservice middle school science teachers. For the second paper, she collected and analyzed participants' VNOS and interview responses before, after, and 10 months after a 6-day summer professional development. Long-term retention of more aligned nature of science views underpins teachers' ability to teach aligned conceptions to their students yet it is rarely examined. Participants substantially improved their nature of science views after the professional development, retained those views over 10 months, and attributed their more aligned understandings to the course. The third paper addressed these participants' instructional practices based on participant-created video reflections of their nature of science and inquiry instruction. Two participant interviews and class notes also were analyzed via a constant comparative approach to ascertain if, how, and why the teachers explicitly integrated the nature of science into their instruction. The participants recognized the process skills-based approach as instrumental in the facilitation of their improved views. Additionally, the participants saw the nature of science as an important way to help students to access core science content such as the theory of evolution by natural selection. Most impressively, participants taught the nature of science explicitly and regularly. This instruction was student-centered, involving high levels of student engagement in ways that represented applying, adapting, and innovating on what they learned in the summer professional development.

  16. Poetry: It's Not Just for English Class Anymore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.; Young, Art; Paul, Catherine; Murdoch, Janice W.

    2005-01-01

    Higher level thought involves both critical and creative thinking skills. Although the psychological literature is rich with research on teaching critical thinking, relatively little published work addresses ways of promoting creative thinking. In this article we describe the use of poetry writing in an abnormal psychology class to encourage…

  17. Communicating with first year medical students to improve Communication Skills teaching in The University of the West Indies

    OpenAIRE

    Stella Williams; Bidyadhar Sa; Paula Nunes; Keith Stevenson

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This paper reports first year Caribbean medical students' preferred and least preferred Communication Skills teaching styles. It also reports their views on assessment and what qualities they valued in a good Communication Skills teacher. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to first year students at the end of Semester One and the data compared with the results of a study using the same questionnaire format in the UK. Results: Caribbean medical students favoured interactive ...

  18. Effectiveness and Efficiency of Constant-Time Delay and Most-to-Least Prompt Procedures in Teaching Daily Living Skills to Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Cigil

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of constant-time delay and most-to-least prompt procedures in teaching daily living skills to children with mental retardation. Adapted alternating treatment design was used. The outcome shows that both procedures were equally effective in teaching the daily living skills. However,…

  19. Desarrollo del pensamiento creativo en la formación laboral juvenil / Developement of creative thinking in youth work training

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rosa, Pérez del Viso de Palou.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Proyecto de investigación que analiza las representaciones educativo-laborales sobre las atribuciones de valor a la creatividad, motivación e innovación en jóvenes de la educación formal y no formal que se preparan para el mundo del trabajo. La desarticulación educativa entre oferta, demanda y neces [...] idad, exige búsquedas que complementen la didáctica homogénea de un pensamiento convergente con otras vertientes que favorecen el pensamiento divergente. Se asume la creatividad como un concepto teórico, no observable, que difícilmente se da en forma espontánea y se reconoce solo como atributo exclusivo de artistas, siendo necesario generarla en todos los sujetos y disciplinas para una construcción de valores y desarrollo a escala humana. Avanza sobre nuevas aristas didácticas integradoras que cubren un extenso espectro de pertenencias culturales, con disimilitudes de conocimientos, de abstracción, de lenguajes e ideologías. Se opta por una integración metodológica para ampliar las posibilidades de los contextos de descubrimiento y validación priorizando el primero. La metodología comprensivista apunta más directamente a las metas propuestas con los aportes de la etnografía, interaccionismo simbólico y la etnometodología. Los primeros resultados parciales evidencian que las actitudes y motivaciones de los jóvenes, dentro y fuera de las aulas e instituciones, cambian radicalmente, apareciendo estrategias creativas e innovadoras para actividades que responden a intereses diferentes a los contenidos curriculares. En jóvenes alumnos de posgrado en educación, se relevan dificultades para enseñar y desconocimiento de didácticas orientadas al pensamiento divergente, pero interés por interiorizarse en la teoría e instrumentación de las mismas. Abstract in english This research project analyzes the education-labour representations on value attributions to creativity, motivation and innovation in youth with formal and non-formal education that are training for the job world. The educational detachment between offer, demand and need, requests a search that can [...] complement the homogeneous didactics of a converging line of thought with other currents that favour divergent thinking. Creativity is considered a theoretical concept, non observable, that can hardly happen in a spontaneous way and is solely an attribute of artists, but also necessary to be generated in all individuals and disciplines for a construction of values and development at a human scale. It makes progress over new integrating didactic aspects that cover a wide spectrum of cultural belongings, with dissimilar knowledge, of abstraction, of languages and ideologies. A methodological integration is chosen to enlarge the possibilities of the discovery and validation contexts prioritizing the former. The comprehensive methodology aims more directly to intended goals with contributions from ethnography, symbolic interaction and ethnomethodology. The first partial results show that attitudes and motivation in youngsters, inside and outside classrooms and institutions, change radically, giving rise to creative and innovative strategies that respond to different interests to those in curricular contents. Among young postgraduate students in education, difficulties in teaching and both an ignorance but also an interest in didactics oriented to diverging thought are shown.

  20. Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Zamora Javier; Buckley Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers...

  1. Problem-Based Learning on Students' Critical Thinking Skills in Teaching Business Education in Malaysia: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabit, Mohd Nazir Md

    2010-01-01

    This review forms the background to explore and to gain empirical support among lecturers to improve the students' critical thinking skills in business education courses in Malaysia, in which the main teaching and learning methodology is Problem-Based Learning (PBL). The PBL educational approach is known to have maximum positive impacts in…

  2. Effectiveness of Parent and Therapist Collaboration Program (PTCP) for Teaching Self-Care and Domestic Skills to Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavkaytar, Atilla; Pollard, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and determine the effectiveness of a Parent and Therapist Collaboration Program for teaching self care and domestic skills to individuals with autism with varying educational needs, age, and severity of disability. Three individuals with autism, one habilitation provider, and three parents participated in…

  3. Putting It All Together: Incorporating "SoTL Practices" for Teaching Interpersonal and Critical Thinking Skills in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Randall E.; Kriese, Paul; Tobey, Heather; Johnson, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Views of critical thinking were culled from the literature and developed into a scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) model that was implemented into the Internet course, "The Politics and Psychology of Hatred." Assessment of student course postings demonstrated a strong relationship between interpersonal skills (referred to in the…

  4. Computer Assisted Instruction for Teaching Basic Money Handling Skills to Mentally Handicapped Students at Christine Meikle School in Calgary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Else; And Others

    The study involving 32 trainable mentally handicapped students (7 to 20 years old) investigated the effectiveness of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in teaching the necesary arithmetic skills for handling small amounts of money. Equipment used consisted of a Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) terminal interfaced with a random access slide projector, and a…

  5. Comparison of Direct Instruction and Problem Solving Approach in Teaching Social Skills to Children with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagseven Emecen, Deniz

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of direct instruction and problem solving approaches in teaching social skills to children with mental retardation. The design was adapted alternating treatment design. The subjects of the study consist of a girl and a boy between the ages of 11 and 13 who are mentally retarded. In…

  6. The Relevance of Multi Media Skills in Teaching and Learning of Scientific Concepts in Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okedeyi, Abiodun S.; Oginni, Aderonke M.; Adegorite, Solomon O.; Saibu, Sakibu O.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relevance of multi media skills in teaching and learning of scientific concepts in secondary schools. Self constructed questionnaire was administered to 120 students randomly selected in four secondary schools in Ojo Local Government Area of Lagos state. Data generated were analyzed using chi-square statistical…

  7. Teaching Academic Skills as an Answer to Behavioural Problems of Students with Emotional or Behavioural Disorders: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2014-01-01

    Academic learning has always been a serious issue for students with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) and their teachers. However, teaching academic skills could be an important protective and curative factor for the problem behaviour of these students. The current review was conducted to study the effect of interventions developed to…

  8. Using Simultaneous Prompting and Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Narrative Writing Skills to Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Robert C.; Collins, Belva C.; Stenhoff, Donald M.; Turner, Kennedy; Gunselman, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of written expression to the lives of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there is limited research on teaching writing skills to this population. In the current study, we used a multiple probe across behaviors design to evaluate the effects of simultaneous prompting (SP) and computer-assisted instruction (CAI)…

  9. Using an Instructional Package Including Video Technology To Teach Self-Help Skills to Elementary Students with Mental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jacqueline M.; Collins, Belva C.; Schuster, John W.

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of a treatment package that included video technology (e.g., video modeling and video prompting) to teach 3 self-help skills (cleaning sunglasses, putting on a wrist watch, and zipping a jacket) to 3 elementary students with mental disabilities. Results indicate the treatment package was effective. (Contains…

  10. Teaching Elementary Students with Cognitive Disabilities Food Preparation Skills while Embedding Instructive Feedback in the Prompt and Consequence Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscus, Renee S.; Schuster, John W.; Morse, Timothy E.; Collins, Belva C.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated whether four students with moderate to severe cognitive disabilities would acquire related and unrelated instructive feedback stimuli embedded in the prompt and consequent event using a constant time delay to teach three food preparation skills. Analysis found the intervention effective with three students who also acquired…

  11. Use of Computer-Based Interventions to Teach Communication Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdoss, Sathiyaprakash; Lang, Russell; Mulloy, Austin; Franco, Jessica; O'Reilly, Mark; Didden, Robert; Lancioni, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a systematic analysis of studies involving the use of computer-based interventions (CBI) to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This review evaluates intervention outcomes, appraises the certainty of evidence, and describes software and system requirements for each…

  12. Clarity in Mathematics Instruction: The Impact of Teaching Number Sense and Place Value Skills on Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Molly E.; Fleming, Megan R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a concern among educators in schools with high levels of poverty that students are lacking certain academic strategies, especially in mathematics. These students struggle to explore data systematically and procedurally. The purpose of this pre-posttest design study is to intentionally teach number sense skills in order to increase…

  13. Opportunities to Improve Skills and to Teach and Train Others: Employee Outcomes in the United States and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HaeNim; McNamara, Tay K.; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Lee, Jungui

    2014-01-01

    Opportunities to improve skills and opportunities to teach or train others may be associated with job satisfaction, work engagement and organizational commitment. The analysis reported in this paper used a subsample of 823 employees within two Japanese and three American worksites. We tested not only the direct relationships of each type of…

  14. A gesture-controlled Serious Game for teaching emotion recognition skills to preschoolers with autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christinaki, Eirini; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    The recognition of facial expressions is important for the perception of emotions. Understanding emotions is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in the recognition of affective expressions. With the appropriate intervention, elimination of those deficits can be achieved. Interventions are proposed to start as early as possible. Computer-based programs have been widely used with success to teach people with autism to recognize emotions. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Such abilities are beyond very young children with autism as they have major restriction in their ability to interact with computers. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game which provides physical interaction, we aim to support early intervention and to foster emotion learning.

  15. Trigger Points: Enhancing Generic Skills in Accounting Education Through Changes to Teaching Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Watts

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2001 a small Australian university implement particular intervention strategies designed to improvespecific educational outcomes in its accounting degree program. These outcomes mirrored the three coreareas of the Graduate Careers Council of Australia’s Course Experience Questionnaire: (1 good teaching,(2 overall satisfaction, and (3 generic skills. Five areas were identified for intervention: (1 the effectiveallocation of full-time staff, (2 the effective use of sessional staff, (3 greater commitment by sessional staff,(4 the introduction of common subject outlines, and (5 the proactive response to student evaluations. Theresults indicate a statistically significant improvement in 2003 in the three core areas, supporting theargument that improving student satisfaction with their educational experience will improve studentoutcomes. A similar, but less significant, improvement of grades in the three final year accounting subjectswas identified. Suggestions for the decline from 2004 are also explored.

  16. A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Teachers' and Reporting Officers' Self-Ratings on Teaching and Leadership Skills across Singapore and Bahrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, Wee Pin Goh; Kim, Lee Ong; Salleh, Hairon

    2009-01-01

    Self-rating bias is particularly likely in organizational behavior research as individuals tend to inflate their expertise, skills and character. This study aims to examine how two culturally diverse groups of teachers and their reporting officers respond to self-ratings of their own teaching skills and leadership skills respectively. It is…

  17. Structural and social constraints in the teaching of Life Skills for HIV/AIDS prevention in Malawi primary schools

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Grames, Chirwa; Devika, Naidoo.

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Education in Malawi introduced a life skills education program with the intention to empower children with appropriate information and skills to deal with social and health problems affecting the nation, including the fight against HIV infections. This study investigated factors affe [...] cting the teaching of the life skills education in four primary schools in the Zomba district, Malawi. Cornbleth's (1990) notions of the structural and social contexts and Whitaker's (1993) identification of key role players in curriculum implementation framed the study. Data was collected through interviews with teachers and principals and observations of teachers' lessons. Findings suggest that the teaching of life skills is constrained by a variety of social and structural contextual factors such as the poor conditions under which teachers are working; greater attention given to subjects such as maths and languages; the cascade model of training teachers and the short duration of training; the inaccessible language in teachers guides; hunger and poverty of learners; lack of community support for sex education; both teachers and learners being infected or affected by the AIDS/HIV pandemic; teachers felt it is inappropriate to teach sexual education to 9 and 10 year old learners. The structural and social barriers to effective life skills education within the current framework indicate the need for alternative sex HIV/AIDS education complementary to the primary school curriculum.

  18. Evaluation of a learner-designed course for teaching health research skills in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbenyega Tsiri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developing countries the ability to conduct locally-relevant health research and high quality education are key tools in the fight against poverty. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel UK accredited, learner-designed research skills course delivered in a teaching hospital in Ghana. Methods Study participants were 15 mixed speciality health professionals from Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. Effectiveness measures included process, content and outcome indicators to evaluate changes in learners' confidence and competence in research, and assessment of the impact of the course on changing research-related thinking and behaviour. Results were verified using two independent methods. Results 14/15 learners gained research competence assessed against UK Quality Assurance Agency criteria. After the course there was a 36% increase in the groups' positive responses to statements concerning confidence in research-related attitudes, intentions and actions. The greatest improvement (45% increase was in learners' actions, which focused on strengthening institutional research capacity. 79% of paired before/after responses indicated positive changes in individual learners' research-related attitudes (n = 53, 81% in intention (n = 52 and 85% in action (n = 52. The course had increased learners' confidence to start and manage research, and enhanced life-long skills such as reflective practice and self-confidence. Doing their own research within the work environment, reflecting on personal research experiences and utilising peer support and pooled knowledge were critical elements that promoted learning. Conclusion Learners in Ghana were able to design and undertake a novel course that developed individual and institutional research capacity and met international standards. Learning by doing and a supportive peer community at work were critical elements in promoting learning in this environment where tutors were scarce. Our study provides a model for delivering and evaluating innovative educational interventions in developing countries to assess whether they meet external quality criteria and achieve their objectives.

  19. Getting it right in the mix: Teaching social work practice skills inclusively to diverse student groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Jennifer Goldingay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Social work has traditionally attracted a diverse mix of students with varying levels of academic preparedness and practice skill experience. Current trends in higher education indicate the possibility of further challenges for academic staff in social work as universities seek to both widen participation from university graduates and, at the same time, prioritise practice and academic excellence among students. Drawing on reflective journal entries by the author, this paper examines the challenges that social work academics might face in teaching social work practice skills effectively to the increasingly diverse student cohorts enrolled across Bachelor and Masters of Social Work (Qualifying degrees. The reflective process adopted in this study explores the gaps between the author’s intentions and the reality of the classroom experience. Key observations included language barriers impeding engagement with the material and cultural differences in relating to others and conceptualising practice. These problems were apparent in both the process of delivery (pedagogy and content (curriculum. The reflective process highlighted the need for further research in order to optimally respond to the diversity in social work education.

  20. Using television shows to teach communication skills in internal medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Irene

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To address evidence-based effective communication skills in the formal academic half day curriculum of our core internal medicine residency program, we designed and delivered an interactive session using excerpts taken from medically-themed television shows. Methods We selected two excerpts from the television show House, and one from Gray's Anatomy and featured them in conjunction with a brief didactic presentation of the Kalamazoo consensus statement on doctor-patient communication. To assess the efficacy of this approach a set of standardized questions were given to our residents once at the beginning and once at the completion of the session. Results Our residents indicated that their understanding of an evidence-based model of effective communication such as the Kalamazoo model, and their comfort levels in applying such model in clinical practice increased significantly. Furthermore, residents' understanding levels of the seven essential competencies listed in the Kalamazoo model also improved significantly. Finally, the residents reported that their comfort levels in three challenging clinical scenarios presented to them improved significantly. Conclusion We used popular television shows to teach residents in our core internal medicine residency program about effective communication skills with a focus on the Kalamazoo's model. The results of the subjective assessment of this approach indicated that it was successful in accomplishing our objectives.

  1. Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians and medical educators have repeatedly acknowledged the inadequacy of communication skills training in the medical school curriculum and opportunities to improve these skills in practice. This study of a controlled intervention evaluates the effect of teaching practicing physicians the skill of "agenda-setting" on patients' experiences with care. The agenda-setting intervention aimed to engage clinicians in the practice of initiating patient encounters by eliciting the full set of concerns from the patient's perspective and using that information to prioritize and negotiate which clinical issues should most appropriately be dealt with and which (if any should be deferred to a subsequent visit. Methods Ten physicians from a large physician organization in California with baseline patient survey scores below the statewide 25th percentile participated in the agenda-setting intervention. Eleven physicians matched on baseline scores, geography, specialty, and practice size were selected as controls. Changes in survey summary scores from pre- and post-intervention surveys were compared between the two groups. Multilevel regression models that accounted for the clustering of patients within physicians and controlled for respondent characteristics were used to examine the effect of the intervention on survey scale scores. Results There was statistically significant improvement in intervention physicians' ability to "explain things in a way that was easy to understand" (p = 0.02 and marginally significant improvement in the overall quality of physician-patient interactions (p = 0.08 compared to control group physicians. Changes in patients' experiences with organizational access, care coordination, and office staff interactions did not differ by experimental group. Conclusion A simple and modest behavioral training for practicing physicians has potential to positively affect physician-patient relationship interaction quality. It will be important to evaluate the effect of more extensive trainings, including those that work with physicians on a broader set of communication techniques.

  2. Improving the teaching skills of residents as tutors/facilitators and addressing the shortage of faculty facilitators for PBL modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morahan Page S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residents play an important role in teaching of medical undergraduate students. Despite their importance in teaching undergraduates they are not involved in any formal training in teaching and leadership skills. We aimed to compare the teaching skills of residents with faculty in facilitating small group Problem Based Learning (PBL sessions. Methods This quasi experimental descriptive comparative research involved 5 postgraduate year 4 residents and five senior faculty members. The study was conducted with all phase III (Final year students rotating in Gastroenterology. The residents and faculty members received brief training of one month in facilitation and core principles of adult education. Different aspects of teaching skills of residents and faculty were evaluated by students on a questionnaire (graded on Likert Scale from 1 to 10 assessing i Knowledge Base-content Learning (KBL, ii PBL, iii Student Centered Learning (SCL and iv Group Skills (GS. Results There were 33 PBL teaching sessions in which 120 evaluation forms were filled; out of these 53% forms were filled for residents and 47% for faculty group. The faculty showed a statistically greater rating in "KBL" (faculty 8.37 Vs resident 7.94; p-value 0.02, "GS" (faculty 8.06 vs. residents 7.68; p-value 0.04. Differences in faculty and resident scores in "the PBL" and "SCL" were not significant. The overall score of faculty facilitators, however, was statistically significant for resident facilitators. (p = .05. Conclusion 1 Residents are an effective supplement to faculty members for PBL; 2 Additional facilitators for PBL sessions can be identified in an institution by involvement of residents in teacher training workshops.

  3. Motivation of Professional Creative Thinking

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    Mergal??s M. Kashapov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reveal correlation between motivation and creative professional thinking. Four hundred and seventy-one Russians of different trades participated in the study. It was supposed that motivational structure and level of creative professional thinking were interrelated. The connection between motivational components and professional thinking was revealed. Tendencies of transition form situational level of thinking to oversituational one were determined. It was found out that motivational structure of workers with situational thinking was much more consistent than that of workers with oversituational thinking.

  4. Motivation of Professional Creative Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Mergal??s M. Kashapov; Anna V. Leybina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal correlation between motivation and creative professional thinking. Four hundred and seventy-one Russians of different trades participated in the study. It was supposed that motivational structure and level of creative professional thinking were interrelated. The connection between motivational components and professional thinking was revealed. Tendencies of transition form situational level of thinking to oversituational one were determined. It was found ou...

  5. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Duff, Melissa C.; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J.; TRANEL, DANIEL

    2013-01-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creati...

  6. Effective teaching values and strategies under the support of digital education resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-zhi TONG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is of great importance and practical value to explore the connotation, the value and the implementing methods under the condition of digital teaching resources . This kind of teaching style is helpful to accelerate role transformation of the teachers, the construction of a new teaching mode, the students' learning style, and the cultivation of the students' creative thinking. We hope to promote the common development of teachers and students, and vigorously promote the reform of education and teaching to a higher level by putting this teaching style into practice.

  7. A taxonomy for teaching transfer skills in the Danish VET system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Vibe

    2011-01-01

    The educational system is grounded in the belief that you can teach people in one setting — the school — in order that they will be able to perform in other settings outside school. The vital process of applying knowledge and skills acquired in an educational situation to working life is known as ‘transfer’. The transfer process poses a continual challenge to all spheres of education and training, for while transfer is positively influenced by identical elements shared by the training and transfer situations, more often than not, the two are markedly dissimilar. This discussion is confined to the transfer process solely within the specialised vocational and education and training (VET) stream in Denmark. The existence of many identical elements in both training and transfer situations is known as ‘near transfer’, and is most readily achieved when training is conducted within company premises. Students find the relevance of their theoretical training to in-house application highly motivating. Cognitively, transfer is facilitated by the concrete similarities between training and its application. However, the purpose of school-based education is to develop the students’ mastery of ‘far transfer’; in other words, their ability to apply knowledge and skills to a broad range of situations. To adapt to frequent changes in the labour market, students need to develop general competences that will enable them to move to other jobs and other companies. Therefore the pedagogy of VET should provide a progression from near to far transfer. The aim of this article is to describe and discuss some of the pedagogical challenges for VET of near and far transfer.

  8. Explicitly Teaching Social Skills Schoolwide: Using a Matrix to Guide Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Brandi; Myers, Diane; Everett, Susannah; Sugai, George; Spencer, Rebecca; LaBreck, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Socially skilled students are more successful in school. Just like academic skills, social skills need to be explicitly taught. Students, including students who display at-risk behavior, benefit when social skills instruction is delivered schoolwide as part of a comprehensive intervention approach. This article presents a seven-step action…

  9. Effectiveness of teaching general practitioners skills in brief cognitive behaviour therapy to treat patients with depression: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    king, M.; Davidson, O; Taylor, F.; Haines, A.; Sharp, D; TURNER, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of teaching general practitioners skills in brief cognitive behaviour therapy.Design Parallel group, cluster randomised, controlled trial of an educational package on cognitive behaviour therapy.Setting General practices in north London.Participants 84 general practitioner principals and 272 patients attending their practices who scored above the threshold for psychological distress on the hospital anxiety and depression scale.Intervention A training pack...

  10. Analysis of the Roles of “Serious Games” in Helping Teach Health-Related Knowledge and Skills and in Changing Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Matthew W.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers are developing sophisticated games specifically targeted to teach health-related knowledge and skills and to change health-related behaviors. Although these interventions, generally called “serious games,” show promise, there has been limited evaluation of their effectiveness. This article offers a broad “consumer guide” for evaluating such health education interventions. Improving the development and evaluation of healthrelated serious games and educating potential purchasers of ...

  11. Teaching clinical ethics as a professional skill: bridging the gap between knowledge about ethics and its use in clinical practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Myser, C; Kerridge, I H; Mitchell, K R

    1995-01-01

    Ethical reasoning and decision-making may be thought of as 'professional skills', and in this sense are as relevant to efficient clinical practice as the biomedical and clinical sciences are to the diagnosis of a patient's problem. Despite this, however, undergraduate medical programmes in ethics tend to focus on the teaching of bioethical theories, concepts and/or prominent ethical issues such as IVF and euthanasia, rather than the use of such ethics knowledge (theories, principles, concepts...

  12. How do secondary school music teachers view creativity? A report on educators' views of teaching composing skills

    OpenAIRE

    Odena, O.

    2001-01-01

    This paper explores secondary school music teachers' views of creativity and some of their ideas about teaching composing skills. In order to do this, firstly an initial explanation of past and present controversies surrounding the meaning of the term creativity is given. The centralised production of music curricula during the 1990s has unified the knowledge pupils are expected to ‘attain’. However, issues concerning creativity, its meanings and their interpretation remain because they have ...

  13. The Effects of Two Direct Instruction Teaching Procedures to Basic Skills to Two Students with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelie Fjortoft

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first study focused on increasing her ability to identify letters and to write these letters. The research was conducted in a resource room setting located in a public school in a large urban school district. The effects of employing DI flashcards on letter recognition and letter writing were evaluated in a multiple baseline design. Overall the effects of the experiment were positive; the participant improved her accuracy letter identification accuracy and her skills at writing her letters from the alphabet. The time, cost, and effort needed for Experiment I was minimal and the student enjoyed the procedures. A second study was conducted with a first grade boy. We wanted to determine the effectiveness of Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons along with a DI flashcard procedure to improve a first grade student’s ability to identify sounds and sight words within a public school behavior intervention (BI classroom setting. Overall the effects of the second experiment were also quite positive. The participant improved his accuracy and ability to say the letter-sounds and target words. Suggestions for future research were made.

  14. Perceptions of teachers of the application of science process skills in the teaching of geography in secondary schools in the Free State province

    OpenAIRE

    Rambuda, A.M.; Fraser, William John

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on teachers’ perceptions of the application of science process skills in the teaching of geography in secondary schools in the Free State province. A teachers’ questionnaire on the application of the science process skills in the teaching of geography was constructed and the questionnaire was content validated against the theoretical assumptions supported by the literature and practical applications of the subject. The questionnaires were distributed to 150 respondents...

  15. Report on Information Literacy and the Mic: Teaching Higher Education Students Critical Research Skills Using Hip Hop Lyricism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker, Dara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many professors expect undergraduate students to have basic research skills. However, they soon lear that their students are unable to find, sort, and analyze information for research papers and projects. To help students attain these skills, university librarians develop course-related information literacy (IL sessions for both undergraduate and graduate classes. In this study, I explored the differences and similarities in the objectives, teaching aides, ad final assignments of information literacy instruction which uses the thematic content in conscious hip hop lyricism to reinforce skills learned as compared to other methods. Understanding the differences and similarities may encourage librarians to make instruction through hip hop a part of their repertoire. The similarities express hip hop's ability to join the range of other methods while the differences point to the many contributions it can make to the current array of techniques.

  16. Interpersonal Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat NG

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONInterpersonal skills are becoming more and more a necessity in the medical profession. The expectation from health care professionals is beyond just knowledge of the medical facts. To practice medicine effectively, doctors need to develop interpersonal skills in communication, leadership, management, teaching and time management. All of these are vital tools and are becoming increasingly essential subjects in teaching both undergraduate students and postgraduate doctors. However, a degree of self-motivation and personal initiative is needed to develop these skills. In this article, I will give an overview on interpersonal skills and will be follow this by a series of articles, in future issues, dealing with these skills.

  17. The Effects of "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" on the Acquisition and Generalization of Reading Skills with a Primary Student with ADHD/PI

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Debra; Weber, Kimberly; Derby, K. Mark; McLaughlin, T. F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" (Engelmann, Haddox, & Bruner, 1983), on the acquisition and maintenance of reading skills by a six-year-old female with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Cognitive Disorder, and Mixed Receptive Language Disorder. The skills evaluated for…

  18. Rethinking Teacher Education: Synchronizing Eastern and Western Views of Teaching and Learning to Promote 21st Century Skills and Global Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith; Hu, Ran

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to share findings with educators across disciplines of how to incorporate an eastern and western blended philosophy of teaching and learning to promote 21st century skills and global perspectives. Drawing from a previous self-study of their views of teaching and learning between Chinese and American cultures, the two…

  19. The effects of teaching stress management skills on the quality of life in ICU nurses

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    FARIBA GHODSBIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job stress is one of the main factors in decreasing productivity in organizations and the leading cause of psychosomatic disorders in personnel. Since job stress of nurses working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs is considered as an important segment in health and medical systems, it significantly affects the quality of care and the nurse’s quality of life. To this end, the purpose of this research is to examine the effects of teaching stress management skills on the quality of life of the nurses working at ICU of the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The subjects of the study consisted of 60 ICU nurses with the average stress score in Osipow job stress exam working at the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups (30 in the case and 30 in the control group. The intervention was performed as a teaching stress management workshop for eight hours throughout two-days (four hours per day, and the nurses were followed up for two months. The data were collected through a two part questionnaire including demographic characteristics and WHO Quality of life BREF and were analyzed in SPSS software using paired t test, and t-test. Results: The findings showed that the nurses of both the case and control groups were homogeneous considering the demographic data such as age, sex, marital status, number of children, shift position, job satisfaction, number of working hours per week, work experience and the amount of income. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the mean score of the life quality before the intervention in both groups. But after the intervention, a significant increase was revealed in the mean score of the life quality of the case group as compared to that of the control group (P<0.0001. Conclusion: The findings revealed the efficacy of the stress management workshop in improving the life quality of ICU nurses. During one and two months after the intervention, the mean score of the quality of life had a significance increase compared to the stage before the intervention

  20. Teaching Good Communication/Proposal-Writing Skills: Overcoming One Deficit of Our Educational System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif-Lehrer, Liane

    1992-01-01

    Author explains that good communication skills require the following: an understanding of the audience and subtle interactions between writer and reader, organization skills, and certain basic communication skills. The task of writing a grant proposal in response to a specific set of instructions is used to illustrate the analysis and responses…

  1. An Individualised Curriculum to Teach Numeracy Skills to Children with Autism: Programme Description and Pilot Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanakaki, Pagona; Grindle, Corinna Fay; Saville, Maria; Hastings, Richard Patrick; Hughes, John Carl; Huxley, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Teaching mathematics to children with autism is an area with limited research evidence. In this study we developed a teaching manual based on Maths Recovery, a numeracy programme designed for typically developing children. Six children with autism participated in the study and received daily numeracy teaching over a 20-week period. Our aims were…

  2. Computers in the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language: Access to the Diversity of Textual Genres and Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Roberto-Márcio; Sobrinho, Jerônimo Coura

    In the area of language teaching both language skills and textual genres can be worked with simultaneously (thus responding to the Brazilian Curricular Parameters and to the trends in contemporary education, which emphasize contextualized teaching) by means of computers. Computers can make the teaching process dynamic and rich, since they enable the access to the foreign language through virtual environments, which creates a larger number of learning contexts, with all their specific vocabulary and linguistic features in real communication. This study focuses on possible applications of this kind of approach. The computer online is a resource of diverse textual genres and can be an important tool in the language classroom as well as an access to authentic material produced in contextualized practice close to real-life communication. On the other hand, all these materials must be appropriately used without ever worshipping the technology as if it were a miraculous solution. After all, the professional pedagogic skills of the teacher should never be forgotten or taken for granted. In this study, a series of interviews with teachers was carried out - both with Brazilian teachers of the public sector (basic education) and language institutes (private English courses) as well as teacher trainers (university professors), in order to verify if the teachers were prepared to work with informatics in teaching practices, and check the professionals’ views on the subject. The ideas of Maingueneau and Marcuschi about textual genres are a theoretical base in this work, besides the concept of cognitive economy. The text and its typology are focused here as the basic material for teaching English, through digital technologies and hypermedia. The study is also based on Sharma and Barrett’s notion of blended learning as a balanced combination of technological resources and traditional practices in the classroom. Thus, this is an attempt to investigate the relevance of information and communication technologies in the education and professional practice of English teachers in Brazil in the context of the 21st century.

  3. Using Content Reading Assignments in a Psychology Course to Teach Critical Reading Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Debbie Van Camp; Wesley Van Camp

    2013-01-01

    Liberal arts students are expected to graduate college with fully developed critical reading and writing skills. However, for a variety of reasons these skills are not always as well developed as they might be - both during and upon completion of college. This paper describes a reading assignment that was designed to increase students’ discipline-specific critical reading and writing skills. The assignment was piloted in a mid-level social psychology class. Pre-test/post-test comparisons indi...

  4. Teaching functional community skills to autistic children using nonhandicapped peer tutors.

    OpenAIRE

    Blew, P A; Schwartz, I S; Luce, S C

    1985-01-01

    In this study, two autistic children were paired with normal peers who, after pretraining sessions, taught community skills to the autistic children. Data were collected during three conditions: baseline, modeling, and peer tutoring. Results demonstrated that no identified skills were acquired during the baseline and modeling conditions. However, direct instruction of each child by a peer tutor resulted in the learning and maintenance of functional community skills.

  5. Tapping the Potential of Skill Integration as a Conduit for Communicative Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Shu-hua Wu; Sulaiman Alrabah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this classroom-based study was to discover the kinds of skill integration tasks that were employed by English teachers in Kuwait and to measure their attitudes toward implementing the skill integration technique in their classrooms. Data collection involved recording 25 hours of classroom-based observations, conducting interviews with the same group of teachers, and distributing a survey to further explore the teachers’ attitudes toward the skill integration technique. Data ana...

  6. Precambrian Field Camp at the University of Minnesota Duluth - Teaching Skills Applicable to Mapping Glaciated Terranes of the Canadian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. D.; Hudak, G. J.; Peterson, D.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2007, the central program of the Precambrian Research Center (PRC) at the University of Minnesota Duluth has been a six-week geology field camp focused on the Precambrian geology of the Canadian Shield. This field camp has two main purposes. First and foremost is to teach students specialized field skills and field mapping techniques that can be utilized to map and interpret Precambrian shield terranes characterized by sparse outcrop and abundant glacial cover. In addition to teaching basic outcrop mapping technique , students are introduced to geophysical surveying (gravity, magnetics), glacial drift prospecting, and drill core logging techniques in several of our geological mapping exercises. These mapping methodologies are particularly applicable to minerals exploration in shield terranes. The second and equally important goal of the PRC field camp is to teach students modern map-making and map production skills. During the fifth and sixth weeks of field camp, students conduct "capstone" mapping projects. These projects encompass one week of detailed bedrock mapping in remote regions of northern Minnesota that have not been mapped in detail (e.g. scales greater than 1:24,000) and a second week of map-making and map generation utilizing geographic information systems (currently ArcGIS10), graphics software packages (Adobe Illustrator CS4), and various imaging software for geophysical and topographic data. Over the past five years, PRC students and faculty have collaboratively published 21 geologic maps through the Precambrian Research Center Map Series. These maps are currently being utilized in a variety of ways by industry, academia, and government for mineral exploration programs, development of undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research projects, and for planning, archeological studies, and public education programs in Minnesota's state parks. Acquisition of specialized Precambrian geological mapping skills and geologic map-making proficiencies has enabled our students to be highly sought after for employment and/or subsequent graduate studies.

  7. Approaches to Curriculum and Teaching Materials to Bring Out Better Skilled Software Engineers-An Indian Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Padmini, H A; Nair, T R Gopalakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Development of Curriculum and delivery materials has undergone changes over a period of time, in undergraduate engineering degree system in Indian universities. However, there exists a gap between industry expectations in IT field and skills and knowledge that the graduating engineers possess and this continues to grow. A similar situation has been seen in the developed countries like USA, UK and Australia. Several researchers and practitioners have discussed and tried to come up with innovative approaches to teaching software engineering and IT as a whole. In India, it is of vital importance that steps be taken to address this issue seriously. This paper discusses some of the measures that have been implemented so that this gap is reduced and software engineers with better skills are produced. Changes to curriculum, industry-academia collaboration through conferences, sabbaticals etc., industry internships and live projects for final year students are some of the measures that have been discussed in this pap...

  8. Is the use of videotape recording superior to verbal feedback alone in the teaching of clinical skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildirim Ediz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent times, medical schools have committed to developing good communication and history taking skills in students. However, there remains an unresolved question as to which constitutes the best educational method. Our study aims to investigate whether the use of videotape recording is superior to verbal feedback alone in the teaching of clinical skills and the role of student self-assessment on history taking and communication skills. Methods A randomized controlled trial was designed. The study was conducted with 52 of the Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine second year students. All students' performances of communication and history taking skills were assessed twice. Between these assessments, the study group had received both verbal and visual feedback by watching their video recordings on patient interview; the control group received only verbal feedback from the teacher. Results Although the self-assessment of the students did not change significantly, assessors' ratings increased significantly for videotaped interviews at the second time. Conclusions Feedback based on videotaped interviews is superior to the feedback given solely based on the observation of assessors.

  9. Teaching high-performance skills using above-real-time training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckenberger, Dutch; Uliano, Kevin C.; Lane, Norman E.

    1993-01-01

    The above real-time training (ARTT) concept is an approach to teaching high-performance skills. ARTT refers to a training paradigm that places the operator in a simulated environment that functions at faster than normal time. It represents a departure from the intuitive, but not often supported, feeling that the best practice is determined by the training environment with the highest fidelity. This approach is hypothesized to provide greater 'transfer value' per simulation trial, by incorporating training techniques and instructional features into the simulator. Two related experiments are discussed. In the first, 25 naive male subjects performed three tank gunnery tasks on a simulator under varying levels of time acceleration (i.e., 1.0x, 1.6x, 2.0x, sequential, and mixed). They were then transferred to a standard (1.0x) condition for testing. Every accelerated condition or combination of conditions produced better training and transfer than the standard condition. Most effective was the presentation of trials at 1.0x, 1.6x, and 2.0x in a random order during training. Overall, the best ARTT group scored about 50 percent higher and trained in 25 percent less time compared to the real-time control group. In the second experiment, 24 mission-capable F-16 pilots performed three tasks on a part-task F-16A flight simulator under varying levels of time compression (i.e., 1.0x, 1.5x, 2.0x, and random). All subjects were then tested in a real-time environment. The emergency procedure (EP) task results showed increased accuracy for the ARTT groups. In testing (transfer), the ARTT groups not only performed the EP more accurately, but dealt with a simultaneous enemy significantly better than a real-time control group. Although the findings on an air combat maneuvering task and stern conversion task were mixed, most measures indicated that the ARTT groups performed better and faster than a real-time control group. Other implications for ARTT are discussed along with future research directions.

  10. A Review of Self-Help Skills for People with Autism: A Systematic Teaching Approach, by Stephen R. Anderson, Amy L. Jablonski, Marcus L. Thomeer, and Vicki Madaus Knapp

    OpenAIRE

    Lucker, Kim D

    2009-01-01

    An overriding goal for all children on the autism spectrum is for them to function independently in their completion of daily routine skills, such as getting dressed, eating, and using the toilet. Unfortunately, most published curricula and teaching guidelines have focused on communication and academic skills rather than on self-help skills. The book, Self-help skills for people with autism: A systematic teaching approach, by Anderson and colleagues, provides parents and professionals with a ...

  11. Autismo e ensino de habilidades acadêmicas: adição e subtração / Autism and teaching academic skills: addition and subtraction

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Camila Graciella Santos, Gomes.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O ensino de habilidades acadêmicas para pessoas com autismo tem recebido pouca atenção de estudos, provavelmente porque os comprometimentos clássicos do transtorno relacionados à comunicação, interação social e comportamentos são vistos como prioritários no desenvolvimento de pesquisas. Porém, o des [...] envolvimento de tecnologias para o ensino de habilidades acadêmicas que atinjam esse público é fundamental, principalmente na realidade brasileira em que, com o advento da filosofia de inclusão escolar, a educação de pessoas com necessidades educacionais especiais, incluindo autistas, passou a ser direcionada para a escola regular. Assim, crianças com autismo estão cada vez mais expostas aos conteúdos acadêmicos nas salas de aula regulares e estratégias de ensino adequadas às suas necessidades são fundamentais para a entrada, permanência e progresso destas pessoas na escola. Assim, este trabalho descreve o ensino de habilidades de adição e subtração para uma adolescente com autismo e utilizou procedimentos adaptados com base em descrições sobre o quadro de autismo, princípios de aprendizagem da análise experimental do comportamento, técnicas de ensino e observação direta do repertório da participante. Para as tarefas acadêmicas foram utilizados estímulos visuais - gráficos e uso das mãos - que indicavam relações visualmente óbvias para explicar à participante como as operações aritméticas deveriam ser realizadas. Gradualmente, aumentou-se a complexidade das operações ensinadas, à medida que ia aumentando o número de acertos dela nas tarefas. Esses procedimentos foram realizados no decorrer de nove sessões. Os erros e acertos foram computados e serviram para representação gráfica. Os resultados demonstram a aprendizagem gradativa das habilidades ensinadas à medida que a intervenção ocorreu. Abstract in english The teaching of academic skills to individuals with autism has received little attention from research literature, probably because the classical deficits in communication, reciprocal social interaction and behaviors are seen as priorities in scientific investigations. Nevertheless, the development [...] of technologies for teaching academic skills to this population is necessary, mainly in the context of Brazilian school inclusion. People with autism are being included with greater frequency in regular classes and, consequently, need adequate strategies to learn academic contents for their entrance, permanence and progress in the schools. Many studies describe characteristics and difficulties that people with autism have, which can influence the way they learn. These variables need to be considered when planning appropriate teaching strategies for this population. Among these variables are the ways in which these individuals respond to environmental stimuli, the way they think and their typical behaviors. This study describes strategies for teaching addition and subtraction to an adolescent with autism. These teaching procedures were elaborated based on the general characteristics of autism, principles derived from Applied Behavior Analysis, and the repertoire of the participant. The results show gradual learning of the taught skills.

  12. Prevention of Problem Behavior by Teaching Functional Communication and Self-Control Skills to Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, Kevin C.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the preschool life skills program (PLS; Hanley, Heal, Tiger, & Ingvarsson, 2007) on the acquisition and maintenance of functional communication and self-control skills, as well as its effect on problem behavior, of small groups of preschoolers at risk for school failure. Six children were taught to request teacher…

  13. Teaching 21st Century Process Skills to Strengthen and Enhance Family and Consumer Sciences Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenson, Andrea B.; Fox, Wanda S.

    2011-01-01

    Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals need to be equipped with a set of strategies and tools to prepare their students for the challenges they will face in the 21st century. Nationwide, educators are integrating a set of skills deemed essential for student success in college and a career. Building upon these skills and the process areas…

  14. Using Emergence Theory-Based Curriculum to Teach Compromise Skills to Students with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, Lance; Jones, Don

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the compromise skills that are taught to students diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and related social and communication deficits. A private school in the southeastern United States implemented an emergence theory-based curriculum to address these skills, yet no formal analysis was conducted to determine its…

  15. Using Content Reading Assignments in a Psychology Course to Teach Critical Reading Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, Debbie; Van Camp, Wesley

    2013-01-01

    Liberal arts students are expected to graduate college with fully developed critical reading and writing skills. However, for a variety of reasons these skills are not always as well developed as they might be--both during and upon completion of college. This paper describes a reading assignment that was designed to increase students'…

  16. Teaching Self-Advocacy Skills to Middle School Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meglemre, Jennifer Susan

    2010-01-01

    Students with learning disabilities are entering postsecondary education in larger numbers, yet many lacks the self-advocacy skills needed to access services available to them. Explicit instruction in self-advocacy must begin in time for students to practice these skills before leaving high school. Currently, too many students with learning…

  17. Evaluation of Home-Based Programs for Teaching Personal Safety Skills to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Thiesse-Duffy, Ellyn

    1988-01-01

    A commercially available sexual abuse and abduction training program did not produce changes in personal safety knowledge or skills in two groups of preschoolers (N=24), whether or not added instructions were given. Subsequent behavioral skills training (instructions, rehearsal, modeling, praise, feedback) produced criterion performance in all…

  18. LIS Students' ICT Skills in Kuwait: Perspectives of Employers, Teaching Staff and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buarki, Hanadi; Hepworth, Mark; Murray, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In Kuwait and elsewhere, developments in electronic information resources have led to the demand for employees with ICT (information and communication technology) skills especially in information handling institutions. There is, therefore, a need to prepare the students for this workplace. As a result, the ICT skills of current LIS (library and…

  19. Using an Interdisciplinary Approach to Teach Undergraduates Communication and Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkelman, Andrea L.; Aune, Jeanine E.; Nonnecke, Gail R.

    2010-01-01

    For successful and productive careers, undergraduate students need effective communication and critical thinking skills; information literacy is a substantial component in the development of these skills. Students often perceive communication courses as distinct and separate from their chosen discipline. Faculty from the Departments of English and…

  20. The Effectiveness of Using Virtual Laboratories to Teach Computer Networking Skills in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampi, Evans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in computer networking skills, when real equipment is limited or unavailable, is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in the acquisition of computer network configuration and troubleshooting skills. The study was…

  1. Applications of Technology to Teach Social Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.; Hyman, Sarah R.; Hirst, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder show deficits in social skills such as initiating conversation, responding in social situations, social problem-solving, and others. These deficits are targeted through the use of social skills interventions, some of which use a technology-based approach as a resource-efficient alternative to common forms of…

  2. Cognitive Strategies to Teach Motor Skills to Elderly Learners in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Mark H.

    Researchers have found that the elderly are as capable of learning motor skills as younger persons but perform better under some conditions than others. For example, the elderly learn and perform motor skills more efficiently when there is additional time to respond to stimulus. Tasks which are self-regulated rather than directed by an external…

  3. Improving the Teaching of Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Lingard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important that engineering and computer science students learn teamwork skills as an integral part of their educational development. These skills are often not explicitly taught, but rather it is expected that students learn them on their own through participation in various team projects. Furthermore, the actual skills that students are expected to learn are usually not well articulated, or even understood. The approach outlined here attempts to address these problems by first establishing a process for defining what is meant by teamwork, by using this definition to assess the extent to which students are learning teamwork skills, and by using the assessment results to formulate approaches to improve student learning with respect to these skills. Specific attempts at the definition, assessment, and instruction improvement process are discussed.

  4. Using Content Reading Assignments in a Psychology Course to Teach Critical Reading Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Van Camp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Liberal arts students are expected to graduate college with fully developed critical reading and writing skills. However, for a variety of reasons these skills are not always as well developed as they might be - both during and upon completion of college. This paper describes a reading assignment that was designed to increase students’ discipline-specific critical reading and writing skills. The assignment was piloted in a mid-level social psychology class. Pre-test/post-test comparisons indicate substantial improvement in students’ ability to identify thesis statements, recognize and interpret evidence, and other critical reading skills. Furthermore, students themselves rate the assignment as efficacious in helping them with both their reading and writing skills.

  5. An Exploratory Study of Factors Influencing the Development of STEM Graduate Students' Teaching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Joanna; Hurst, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Graduate students in the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, represent an important link in current reforms emphasizing inquiry-based learning and teaching, as they represent the future of the STEM professoriate. Although graduate students commonly hold teaching assistantships, they rarely receive training on how to…

  6. Zur Fertigkeit des Hoerverstehens im neusprachlichen Unterricht (The Skill of Aural Comprehension in Modern Language Teaching)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhaus, Wilhelm

    1975-01-01

    Maintains that aural comprehension does not develop automatically in FL teaching, but must and can be systematically trained and improved. The inner processes in aural comprehension are set forth. Suggestions are given for the actual teaching situation. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  7. Teaching about Contemporary Germany: Instructional Materials for the Social Studies Classroom. Correlation Charts, Content and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Glen

    This manual contains a description of each of the instructional kits for teaching about Germany offered by the Goethe Institute. Each kit contains lessons plans, handouts, worksheets, color transparencies, and other support materials. This teaching packet provides information regarding the "best fit" of each lesson in the instructional materials…

  8. Developing clinical piano improvisation skills : a structured approach to teaching and using musical techniques and therapeutic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Teaching piano improvisation skills for use in clinical work relies on the development of a range of musical techniques and therapeutic methods that are combined and integrated. Simple musical styles of playing such as melody dialogues, two chord accompaniments, walking basses (tonal and atonal), 6ths with octave grounds, pentatonic and Spanish style frameworks are easily learnt and applied through in combination with therapeutic approaches such as matching, supporting, frame-working grounding ? and many others. The use of transitions in therapeutic improvisation are a primary and musically skilful way of helping a client or group of clients move, or develop their musical expression (Wigram & Bonde 2002 pp 278-279). Frame-working is a method that offers a musical structure to the music of a client. This structure could have the goal of enhancing the music aesthetically, or guiding the client in a new direction. Structure and lack of structure play a balanced role in the clinical process, and reflects the skills of the therapist to musically meet the needs of the client. This workshop will provide teaching and practice tools for the participants that are intended to sustain the creativity of improvisation while adding some clear structure and method to it?s clinical application

  9. LA EVALUACIÓN DE COMPETENCIAS DOCENTES EN EL MODELO DECA: ANCLAJES TEÓRICOS / ASSESSMENT OF TEACHING SKILLS IN THE DECA MODEL: THEORETICAL ANCHORS

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rigoberto, Marín; Isabel, Guzmán; Amelia, Márquez; Manuel, Peña.

    Full Text Available En este artículo se analizan algunos anclajes teóricos del Modelo para el Desarrollo y Evaluación de Competencias Académicas. Inicialmente se revisa el concepto de competencias y sus posibilidades de trasladarlo a momentos de práctica docente y de evaluación de competencias. Específicamente, se abor [...] dan conceptos relacionados con competencias y competencias docentes. De los dos dispositivos que el modelo integra, aquí se aborda el de evaluación de competencias docentes, concebido como un momento más de su desarrollo y se proponen estrategias e instrumentos centrados en la evaluación auténtica de competencias docentes que permitan evaluar profesores en procesos de formación centrados en sus producciones. Dentro del modelo, se destaca al portafolio docente como una estrategia para la formación y evaluación de profesores y como un dispositivo de práctica reflexiva que contribuye a los procesos de formación y evaluación de competencias docentes. Abstract in english This article discusses some theoretical anchors of the Model for Development and Assessment of Academic Skills. It initially reviews the concept of skills and the possibility of going to moments of teaching practice and skill assessment. It specifically addresses concepts related to skills and teach [...] ing skills. We herein address one of the two devices included in the model: the assessment of teaching skills, conceived as one more moments of their development; strategies and tools are proposed focused on an authentic assessment of teaching skills to evaluate teachers in their training processes, focusing on their productions. Within this model, the Teaching Portfolio is stressed as a strategy to train and evaluate teachers.

  10. Teaching the U.S. History Survey Course: A Staff and Skills Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Marshall; Stoler, Mark A.

    1982-01-01

    A team-taught, skills-oriented approach is used to introduce freshmen to United States history at the University of Vermont. Constant feedback has identified course strengths and weaknesses. The appendix lists course topics and workbook assignments. (AM)

  11. The Digital Microscope: A Tool for Teaching Laboratory Skills in Distance Learning Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Dommett, Eleanor J.; Leys, Katherine S.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of undergraduate students studying for a science degree will at some point carry out experiments in a laboratory setting, thus developing their practical skills and understanding of experimental principles. For distance learning students, there is no laboratory setting available for them to complete such work and as such there is a risk that they will lack these key skills. The Open University has developed a computerized tool, in the form of a Digital Microscope, to allow studen...

  12. Teaching of new sport skill to weightlifters: problem in performance and motor learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kordi, Hassan; Mohamadi, Jafar; Ghotbi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    This study would report about one of the problems (learning of a new sport skill) that occurs probably following weightlifting and decrease range of motion (ROM). Weightlifters (WLs) group (n=20) and Non-Weightlifters (NWs) group (n=20) were trained overhand serve volleyball based on a similar schedule program. The Results of performance accuracy showed, WLs didn’t learn the skill, but NWs learned did. When ROM had been controlled, performance of WLs and NWs were not different. We observed, W...

  13. Teaching the handicapped to eat in public places: acquisition, generalization and maintenance of restaurant skills.

    OpenAIRE

    van den Pol, R A; Iwata, B A; Ivancic, M T; Page, T J; Neef, N A; Whitley, F P

    1981-01-01

    This study examined classroom-based instruction in restaurant skills for handicapped persons. Three male students were taught each of four skill components in sequential order: locating, ordering, paying, and eating and exiting. Training was implemented in a multiple baseline design across subjects and consisted of modeling and role playing in conjunction with photo slide sequences and a simulated ordering counter. The use of a menu containing general item classes and a finger matching proced...

  14. Comparison the Effect of Teaching of SBAR Technique with Role Play and Lecturing on Communication Skill of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Toghian Chaharsoughi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ineffective communication is a main factor in engender of unwanted hospital errors and impede suitable patient care. SBAR technique (Situation-Background- Assessment- Recommendation is a standard tool for building communication among healthcare professionals. While educating the SBAR technique requires appropriate educational methods, but this issue has been less investigated. So, the aim of present study was to compare the effect of educating the SBAR technique with role play and lecturing on communication skills of nurses in transferring patients to next shift. Methods: This quasi-experimental study conducted by participating 78 nurses who assigned to role play and lecturing groups randomly. SBAR technique was educated to each group separately. At the end of the learning session in each group, the skills of the participants in performing SBAR technique were investigated by the standard SBAR scale. Data analysis was performed by using SPSS statistical software version 11.5. Results: Comparison the total score of performing SBAR technique using independent samples t-test showed statistical differences between mean score of role play and lecturing groups. Similarly, comparison the scores of skill in performing each four parts of SBAR technique showed statistical differences between two groups.Conclusion: Role play is an effective educational method in teaching SBAR technique for nurses and it can be used as a tool for build effective communication between healthcare professionals.

  15. Comparison the Effect of Teaching of SBAR Technique with Role Play and Lecturing on Communication Skill of Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toghian Chaharsoughi, Narges; Ahrari, Shahnaz; Alikhah, Shahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Ineffective communication is a main factor in engender of unwanted hospital errors and impede suitable patient care. SBAR technique (Situation-Background- Assessment- Recommendation) is a standard tool for building communication among healthcare professionals. While educating the SBAR technique requires appropriate educational methods, but this issue has been less investigated. So, the aim of present study was to compare the effect of educating the SBAR technique with role play and lecturing on communication skills of nurses in transferring patients to next shift. Methods: This quasi-experimental study conducted by participating 78 nurses who assigned to role play and lecturing groups randomly. SBAR technique was educated to each group separately. At the end of the learning session in each group, the skills of the participants in performing SBAR technique were investigated by the standard SBAR scale. Data analysis was performed by using SPSS statistical software version 11.5. Results: Comparison the total score of performing SBAR technique using independent samples t-test showed statistical differences between mean score of role play and lecturing groups. Similarly, comparison the scores of skill in performing each four parts of SBAR technique showed statistical differences between two groups. Conclusion: Role play is an effective educational method in teaching SBAR technique for nurses and it can be used as a tool for build effective communication between healthcare professionals. PMID:25276757

  16. Developing questionnaires for students? evaluation of individual faculty?s teaching skills: A Saudi Arabian pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Rubaish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Commission for Academic Accreditation and Assessment is responsible for the academic accreditation of universities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Requirements for this include evaluation of teaching effectiveness, evidence-based conclusions, and external benchmarks. Aims: To develop a questionnaire for students? evaluation of the teaching skills of individual instructors and provide a tool for benchmarking. Setting: College of Nursing, University of Dammam [UoD], May-June 2009. Materials and Methods: The original questionnaire was "Monash Questionnaire Series on Teaching (MonQueST - Clinical Nursing. The UoD modification retained four areas and seven responses, but reduced items from 26 to 20. Outcome measures were factor analysis and Cronbach?s alpha coefficient. Results: Seven Nursing courses were studied, viz.: Fundamentals, Medical, Surgical, Psychiatric and Mental Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Family and Community Health. Total number of students was 74; missing data ranged from 5 to 27%. The explained variance ranged from 66.9% to 78.7%. The observed Cornbach?s ? coefficients ranged from 0.78 to 0.93, indicating an exceptionally high reliability. The students in the study were found to be fair and frank in their evaluation.

  17. PILOTing Undergraduate Students to Hands-On Teaching and Research Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Borgon, Robert A.; Nicole Verity; Ken Teter

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate research can make a positive impact on science education. Unfortunately, the one student-one mentor paradigm of undergraduate research generates a wide range of variability in the student’s experience and further limits its availability to a select few students. In contrast, a single faculty member can offer multiple undergraduate teaching positions that provide a consistent experience for the student. We attempted to combine the undergraduate research and teaching experiences i...

  18. Práctica docente en contextos multiculturales:: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales / Practice Teaching in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cristina, Escalante Rivera; David, Fernández Obando; Marcelo, Gaete Astica.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo proviene de una investigación titulada Ejercicios docentes en contextos multiculturales: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales, realizada durante el 2011-2012, por el Departamento de Estudios e Investigación Educativa del Ministerio de Educación Pú [...] blica (Escalante, Fernández y Gaete, 2012), con la finalidad de explorar la diversidad cultural en las aulas e instituciones educativas en Costa Rica. Este fenómeno multicultural ha obligado a prestar especial atención a la oferta educativa que se brinda, principalmente, en primaria. Además, ha generado la discusión con respecto a los vacíos conceptuales y pedagógicos en el personal y en sus habilidades y destrezas en el proceso de enseñanza de estas poblaciones de origen distinto. De igual manera se impone una reflexión de los currículos educativos, los que resultan mayoritariamente nacionales y básicos. El estudio se realizó en 12 instituciones de primaria de diferente direcciones regionales, que tienen una alta diversidad cultural entre el alumnado. Por medio de técnicas cualitativas de investigación se explora las opiniones de directores, docentes y estudiantes al respecto. La conclusión más importante a la que se ha llegado es la ausencia de una pedagogía intercultural en las aulas nacionales y la necesidad de preparar al cuerpo docente en este sentido. Abstract in english This paper presents the results of a research project entitled Teaching Exercises in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills, which was conducted during 2011-2012 by the Department of Teaching Research and Studies from the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education [...] (Escalante, Fernández and Gaete, 2012), in order to explore cultural diversity in classrooms and educational institutions in Costa Rica. This multicultural phenomenon has forced authorities to pay special attention to the educational services provided, particularly in elementary. In addition, it has sparked a discussion regarding the teachers’ conceptual and pedagogical void and a gap in their teaching skills to deal with student populations of different origins. Similarly, it leads to a reflection about the basic national educational curriculum. The research was conducted in 12 elementary schools from different educational districts, which have a high cultural diversity among students. Using qualitative research techniques, the opinions of principals, teachers and students regarding this topic are explored. The most important conclusion reached in this study is the absence of an intercultural pedagogy in the country’s classrooms and the need to prepare teachers in this respect.

  19. Teaching patient-centered communication skills: a telephone follow-up curriculum for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Saba

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To encourage medical students’ use of patient-centered skills in core clerkships, we implemented and evaluated a Telephone Follow-up Curriculum focusing on three communication behaviors: tailoring education to patients’ level of understanding, promoting adherence by anticipating obstacles, and ensuring comprehension by having patients repeat the plans. Methods: The intervention group consisted of two different cohorts of third-year medical students in longitudinal clerkships (n=41; traditional clerkship students comprised the comparison group (n =185. Intervention students telephoned one to four patients 1 week after seeing them in outpatient clinics or inpatient care to follow up on recommendations. We used surveys, focus groups, and clinical performance examinations to assess student perception, knowledge and skills, and behavior change. Results: Students found that the curriculum had a positive impact on patient care, although some found the number of calls excessive. Students and faculty reported improvement in students’ understanding of patients’ health behaviors, knowledge of patient education, and attitudes toward telephone follow-up. Few students changed patient education behaviors or called additional patients. Intervention students scored higher in some communication skills on objective assessments. Conclusion: A patient-centered communication curriculum can improve student knowledge and skills. While some intervention students perceived that they made too many calls, our data suggest that more calls, an increased sense of patient ownership, and role modeling by clerkship faculty may ensure incorporation and application of skills.

  20. Teaching communication and therapeutic relationship skills to baccalaureate nursing students: a peer mentorship simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Leslie W; Mabey, Linda; Leggett, Sarah; Stansfield, Katie

    2014-10-01

    The literature on techniques for improving student competency in therapeutic communication and interpersonal skills is limited. A simulation approach to enhance the learning of communication skills was developed to address these issues. Second-semester and senior nursing students participated in videorecorded standardized patient simulations, with senior students portraying the patient. Following simulated interactions, senior students provided feedback to junior students on their use of communication skills and other therapeutic factors. To integrate the learning experience, junior students completed a written assignment, in which they identified effective and noneffective communication; personal strengths and weaknesses; and use of genuineness, empathy, and positive regard. A videorecording of each student interaction gave faculty the opportunity to provide formative feedback to students. Student evaluations have been positive. Themes identified in student evaluations include the impact of seeing oneself, significance of practicing, getting below the surface in communication, and moving from insight to goal setting. PMID:25207556