WorldWideScience
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Teaching Creative Thinking Skills  

OpenAIRE

It is internationally recognized that teachers play a significant role in developing suitable values in their pupils. Students also learn strategies for identifying problems, making decisions, and finding solutions both in and out of school. Among them creative thinking skills play a prominent role in their learning process. Techniques developed specifically to teach creative thinking and examine how they may be applied to the classroom, are precise things to be considered. Awareness with ...

Nagamurali Eragamreddy

2013-01-01

2

The extent to which teachers nurture creative thinking in the Grade 9 Social Sciences classroom through the choice of teaching methods / Byron John Bunt  

OpenAIRE

The nurturing of creative thinking skills is one of the cornerstones of Outcomes-Based Education (OBE). This study investigated to what extent teachers nurture the development of creative thinking through the choice of teaching methods, which include the application of teaching strategies and the utilization of resources, in the Grade 9 Social Sciences classroom. A literature study was undertaken to highlight the importance and nature of the development of creative thinking skills, and to est...

Bunt, Byron John

2012-01-01

3

Creative thinking and teaching for creativity in elementary school science.  

OpenAIRE

While it is important to nurture creativity in young children, it is popularly associated more with the arts than the sciences. This paper reports on a series of studies designed to explore teachers’ conceptions of creative thinking in primary school science. Study #1 examines pre-service primary teachers’ ideas of what constitutes creativity in science lessons, using a phenomenographic analysis. The study found that their conceptions tend to be narrow, focusing on practical investigation...

Newton, L. D.; Newton, D. P.

2010-01-01

4

Creative Thinking in Music.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses the meaning of creativity, focusing on music education. Emphasizes the four "p's" while examining the meaning of creativity: (1) the creative person; (2) the creative process; (3) the creative product; and (4) the creative place. Addresses how creative thinking can be at the center of teaching. (CMK)

Hickey, Maud; Webster, Peter

2001-01-01

5

Creative Thinking with Fairy Tales.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses how creative thinking can be encouraged in students through such classic tools as brainstorming and the productive thinking elements of fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration. It describes how fairy tales can be used to foster these thinking skills and suggests classroom activities. (Contains two references.) (CR)

Flack, Jerry

2001-01-01

6

The Learner-Directed Classroom: Developing Creative Thinking Skills through Art  

Science.gov (United States)

Educators at all levels want their students to develop habits of self-directed learning and critical problem-solving skills that encourage ownership and growth. In "The Learner-Directed Classroom," practicing art educators (PreK-16) offer both a comprehensive framework for understanding student-directed learning and concrete pedagogical strategies…

Jaquith, Diane B., Ed.; Hathaway, Nan E., Ed.

2012-01-01

7

Creativity as Creative Thinking.  

Science.gov (United States)

Identifies four characteristics of the creative endeavor: (1) musical imagination; (2) model of the creative process; (3) measures of creative aptitude; and (4) the observation of creative behavior. Examines the role of technology in creativity, and contends that creative thinking can be measured. Includes suggested readings. (RW)

Webster, Peter R.

1990-01-01

8

Creative Thinking and Music Education.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses several problems confronting education in the United States, argues that music educators are among the most guilty of avoiding and even discouraging creative thinking. Presents a model of creative thinking in music and examines the conditions of motivation and environment that are important for child development. (GEA)

Webster, Peter R.

1988-01-01

9

The effectiveness of teaching strategies for creativity in a nursing concepts teaching protocol on the creative thinking of two-year RN-BSN students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Because of changes in the medical environment, nurses must maintain the ability of divergent thinking to solve the health problems of patients. However, many nurses whose work in clinical practice has become routine have lost the ability of creativity. To cultivate nurses creativity should be a goal of nursing education. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a nursing concepts teaching protocol by utilizing teaching strategies directed toward creativity to promote creativity in two-year RN-BSN students. This study design is a time series and one group experiment utilizing multiple instances of treatment. Teaching strategies for creativity were applied to a teaching unit and 52 two-year RN-BSN students were tested for creativity before the end of each semester. This study was conducted from March, 1999 to May, 2000, but only 30 students completed all tests and reached a 58% return rate. Torrance s (1974) definitions of creativity includ fluency, flexibility, and uniqueness were followed and the instrument, a questionnaire on Creativity in the application of the Nursing Process Tool (CNPT), was designed based on Emerson (1988). The content validity of Chinese-version CNPT was.79. The inter-coder reliability between two researchers was.84 following a coding guide that ten nursing education experts had established. The results indicated that 30 two-year RN-BSN students had improved fluency and flexibility. The improvements reached a significant level after the third semester. Only uniqueness declined. It is suggested that nursing faculty apply teaching strategies uniqueness more often in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts. By utilizing teaching strategies of creativity in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts, it is expected that two-year RN-BSN students can acquire characteristics of creativity for problem-solving skills in clinical settings. PMID:12119595

Ku, Ya-Lie; Kao Lo, Chi-Hui; Wang, Jing-Jy; Lee Hsieh, Jane; Chen, Kuei-Min

2002-06-01

10

Assessing Creative Thinking in Design-Based Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Infusing creative thinking competence through the design process of authentic projects requires not only changing the teaching methods and learning environment, but also adopting new assessment methods, such as portfolio assessment. The participants in this study were 128 high school pupils who have studied MECHATRONICS from 10th to 12th grades…

Doppelt, Yaron

2009-01-01

11

Creative Thinking in Music: The Assessment Question.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper suggests that there are ways to organize the literature, both within music and in related fields of study, so that the interested professional can engage in an active organized study of creative thinking in music. There are also ways of defining musical behaviors that are indicative of creative thinking in children as well as adults.…

Webster, Peter R.

12

Creative Thinking, Technology, and Music Education.  

Science.gov (United States)

Posits that any model of creative thinking in music must deal with how factual content in music serves as the foundation for the creative process. Maintains that music technology is an exciting and meaningful avenue for both convergent and divergent thinking but that creative thinking can occur without technology. (KM)

Webster, Peter R.

1990-01-01

13

Visual Material Effect on Academic Achievement, Creative Thinking and Attitude towards Course  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test the effectiveness of the visual materials’ usage in Social Sciences on students’ academic achievement, creative thinking skills and their attitudes towards the course. The study was based on the Social Sciences unit titled ‘’Geography and Our World’’ and conducted with a total number of 38 students, (18 of them were in the experimental group and 20 of them were in the control group. The participants were 6th grade students of Koç Primary School in Bolu. For data collection, Social Sciences Achievement Test, Torrance Creative Thinking Test and Attitude Scale were used as instruments. In the statistical analysis of data, Mean, Standard Deviation levels and Mann Whitney-U Test were used. The results of the study revealed that the program designed for the experimental group, increased the participants’ academic achievement and creative thinking skills and had a positive impact on their attitudes towards the course.© 2013 IOJES. All rights reserved

Serap Emir.

2013-08-01

14

Using School Gardening as a Vehicle for Critical and Creative Thinking in Health Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This strategy is to provide health education teacher candidates with critical and creative thinking tools to explore gardening as a vehicle to integrate health education content with other subjects. According to the Competency-Based Framework for the Health Education Specialist (2010a), entry-level health educators should have skills and…

Ausherman, Judith A.; Ubbes, Valerie A.; Kowalski, Jacqueline

2014-01-01

15

The Relationship Between Creative Thinking And Empathy With Self-awareness In High School Students In India  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Previous studies revealed that there is moderate to strong correlation between creative thinking and empathy with self-awareness as three important skills in human life and the aim of the present study is to find out the relationship between these three aspects of life skills. The participants in the study contained of 96(54 males and 42 females 10 grade of high school students from Mysore in India. Life skill questionnaire - India (LSQI, carried out on the group sample and date analyzed through Pearson correlation and multiple regression using SPSS soft ware.The results revealed that self-awareness significantly has positive correlation with creative thinking (r=31, p<.01 and empathy(r=36, p<.01. Analysis of regression also shows that multiple relationships between three variables is significant (MR=0.36 and RS = .12, p<.01 and 12 percent of variation of self-awareness can be predicts by empathy and creative thinking.

Ayatollah Karimi

2012-09-01

16

THE CREATIVE THINKING LEVELS OF STUDENTS AT SIXTH CLASS OF PRIMARY EDUCATION  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Today it is necessary to develop an education model that is special to creative individuals and their creativeness. It is also required to discover children and young people who have creative qualities at an early stage and improve creative thinking in their minds. For this aim, it is very important to determine the high-level thinking skills, especially creative thinking levels of children at primary education period. Therefore, there are considerable duties available for the teachers.In this study, the creative thinking levels of two distinct student groups from different primary schools who study at sixth class of primary education are explored and a comparison is made between their levels. The goal of this research is to find out how the fluency, flexibility and originality dimensions of these students differ. In the way of this purpose, there are fourty-three sixth class of primary education students, who study at two different primary schools in ?zmir, formed the research sampling. Twenty-six of these students are female while seventeen students are male. The Torrance Creative Thinking Test Linguistic –A Form is used as a data collecting tool in the study. The application and form evaluation periods have done by the researchers. At the end of the research, there are meaningful differences obtained between the two schools about the fluency, flexibility and originality levels of students attended to the research. When it is considered in terms of total creative levels, it is seen that the fluency points of those two schools attended to this study are the highest while the flexibility points are the lowest. This situation betrays that the students participated in this study can not use their skill of producing many ideas in terms of handling cases from all points of views.

Esen ERSOY

2009-10-01

17

Teaching Analytical Skills  

OpenAIRE

The maintenance of individual practice quality requires that the family physician continually evaluate and improve his performance, selectively using new information. This means that the physician must possess certain basic analytical abilities. The minimum skills necessary for critical appraisal are outlined in the CFPC's educational objectives. These objectives are used as a background to discuss curriculum content and teaching methods. Despite obstacles, there is a growing stimulus to expa...

Anderson, John E.

1981-01-01

18

Teaching Soft Skills Employers Need  

Science.gov (United States)

This study identifies the soft skills community colleges teach in an office technology course and determines whether the skills taught are congruent with the soft skills employers require in today's entry-level office work. A qualitative content analysis of a community college office technology soft skills course was performed using 23 soft…

Ellis, Maureen; Kisling, Eric; Hackworth, Robbie G.

2014-01-01

19

The Effects of Creative Thinking Activities on Learners’ Creative Thinking and Project Development Skills  

OpenAIRE

This research was done on 41 subjects consisted of 6th year students at Mehmet Çelik Primary School in Bolu, Yeniça?a. According to ANCOVA results, pre-test values of the students from different instruction systems compared to the corrected post-test values andcreative thinking average values showed a significant difference in favor of education in which creative course activities were used. In research, two-factored ANNOVA was used for complex measurements for the research question about ...

O?zcan, Seher; Karatas?, Serc?in

2010-01-01

20

The Effects of Creative Thinking Activities on Learners’ Creative Thinking and Project Development Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This research was done on 41 subjects consisted of 6th year students at Mehmet Çelik Primary School in Bolu, Yeniça?a. According to ANCOVA results, pre-test values of the students from different instruction systems compared to the corrected post-test values andcreative thinking average values showed a significant difference in favor of education in which creative course activities were used. In research, two-factored ANNOVA was used for complex measurements for the research question about whether the learners’ cognitiveachievement scores, related to learning environment, change or not, according to groups. According to the findings, cognitive achievement scores showed a significant difference in favor of experimental group.

Seher ÖZCAN

2010-04-01

21

Creative Thinking of Practical Engineering Students During a Design Project  

Science.gov (United States)

Creativity in engineering design had become an economic necessity and not merely the privilege of unique individuals. The search for new, innovative and effective ideas in engineering design stands in center of daily creative performance. This search requires sensitivity to gaps of knowledge and information, and the ability to evoke numerous, different and unique ideas about engineering problems. The source of such information or knowledge can be either extrinsic-such as provided by an instructor or expert or intrinsic, which might involve transformation from one field or context to another. Furthermore, interaction with an exterior source as well as developing an inherent drive, have an impact on the motivation to perform creatively. This article, which is based on a study conducted among Israeli practical engineering students, deals with the variations in creative thinking during various stages of a design project and the relation between creative thinking and motivation factors.

Waks, Shlomo; Merdler, Moti

2003-01-01

22

Teacher and Student Perceptions of Critical and Creative Thinking within a Science Programme for High Ability Females in Singapore: Implications for Classroom Practice and Staff Development  

Science.gov (United States)

It can be rationalised that the education of high ability students is of immense importance to society, based on the principle that many of tomorrow's pioneers within the field of science will originate from this group of individuals. Consequently, these students must be equipped with critical and creative thinking skills to fulfil their…

Slatter, Christopher John

2009-01-01

23

The Relationship Between Creative Thinking And Empathy With Self-awareness In High School Students In India  

OpenAIRE

Previous studies revealed that there is moderate to strong correlation between creative thinking and empathy with self-awareness as three important skills in human life and the aim of the present study is to find out the relationship between these three aspects of life skills. The participants in the study contained of 96(54 males and 42 females) 10 grade of high school students from Mysore in India. Life skill questionnaire - India (LSQI), carried out on the group sample and date analyzed th...

Ayatollah Karimi; Venkatesh Kumar, G.

2012-01-01

24

The Analysing Children's Creative Thinking Framework: Development of an Observation-Led Approach to Identifying and Analysing Young Children's Creative Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

Increased international recognition of the value of supporting creative thinking suggests the value of development of approaches to its identification in children. Development of an observation-led framework, the Analysing Children's Creative Thinking (ACCT) framework, is described, and a case made for the validity of inferring creative…

Robson, Sue

2014-01-01

25

Teaching Information Skills: Appreciation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses teaching students literary appreciation and how to teach the appreciation of other media. Suggests comparing a book and video version of the same story and includes a literary review unit guide for middle school or junior high school students, as well as a sample lesson on comparing stories in two mediums. (LRW)

Pappas, Marjorie L.

2002-01-01

26

Exploratory Examination of Relationships between Learning Styles and Creative Thinking in Math Students  

OpenAIRE

It is believed that identifying any strong relationships between learning styles and creative thinking within the context of the math classroom will help improve instruction by providing course delivery strategies tailored to different learning preferences and promotion of creative thinking. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to identify which (if any) of the cognitive learning dimensions would be related to creative thinking in math students. The major findings of this study indicate ...

Kuan Chen Tsai; Matthew Shirley

2013-01-01

27

Cultivating the College Students’ Creative Thinking in Industrial Design  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper probes into the source of “originality” in developing the creative thinking of the science students majoring in industrial design. The authors believe that the critical factors for the source of “originality” lie in not only the internal cause, but also the external cause. Whether the science students take a great consideration of art and humanity courses, in other words, whether they are aware of the relationship between artistical thought and industrial design or not, it is very important. In addition, creative capacity cannot be taught, and it only results from inspiration and guidance of teachers from multidisciplinary.

Hua Cen

2013-08-01

28

Teaching Problem-Solving Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

This webpage offers some basic principles for teaching problem solving that foster critical thinking and decision-­making skills. It includes a 5-step implementation model developed by D.R. Woods and a brief list of references. [The Forshay & Kirkley paper is cataloged separately and linked as a related resource.

2013-01-01

29

Creative thinking in prospective teachers: the status quo and the impact of contextual factors  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english To create unique and appropriate learning opportunities and environments and to nurture the development of creative thinking abilities among learners are some of the demands for creative thinking currently expected of teachers globally and also in South Africa. Creative thinking in academic context [...] assumes, among other things, the ability to generate a variety of original ideas, to see different viewpoints and elaborate on ideas. We report on the findings of a quantitative pilot investigation by means of experimental research utilizing an ex post facto design to determine the status quo regarding the creative thinking abilities of a hetrogeneous group of 207 pre-service teachers studying at a South African university, using the Abbreviated Torrance Test for Adults (ATTA) and a Partial Least Squares (PLS) exploration into the relationship between contextual factors and the students' creative thinking abilities. Strong correlations were found among a variety of contextual factors such as the type of school model and culture and creative thinking abilities and also between specific contextual factors such as the choice of role model and socio economic and acculturation factors and certain creative thinking abilities. This research explores a largely unknown field, namely, the creative thinking abilities of a group of South African pre-service teachers of different cultural groups and creates an awareness of the need for the development of creative thinking abilities among these prospective teachers.

Hannetjie, Meintjes; Mary, Grosser.

30

Hemispheric Specialization and Creative Thinking: A Meta-Analytic Review of Lateralization of Creativity  

Science.gov (United States)

In the last two decades research on the neurophysiological processes of creativity has found contradicting results. Whereas most research suggests right hemisphere dominance in creative thinking, left-hemisphere dominance has also been reported. The present research is a meta-analytic review of the literature to establish how creative thinking…

Mihov, Konstantin M.; Denzler, Markus; Forster, Jens

2010-01-01

31

Designscholar: Examining Creative Thinking in an Online Learning Community for Interior Design Graduate Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the creative thinking of interior design graduate students in an online learning community. This study considered potential changes in creative thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration) about design research resulting from peer-led online discussions. It further studied the learner characteristics of…

Ransdell, Marlo Evelyn

2009-01-01

32

Meeting the Demand: Teaching "Soft" Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document contains four papers (and an introduction by William Wilhelm) on teaching "soft" skills in business education programs. "The Skill Building Challenge: Preparing a Bridge for the Workforce Skills Gap" (Sheila M. Smith) examines the following topics: the workforce skills gap; the importance of academic and behavioral skills; and public…

Wilhelm, William J.; Logan, Joyce; Smith, Sheila M.; Szul, Linda F.

33

Creative thinking in nursing education: preparing for tomorrow's challenges.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present health care environment requires creative change, a thought that evokes both excitement and apprehension and offers a clear challenge for the contemporary nurse. In this era of capitation, re-engineering, and redesign in the health care system, nursing programs must prepare nurses who can successfully perform in an environment that demands innovative problem solving. Integrating creative problem solving into this BSN program has (1) provided students with information and experience in the creative process, (2) fostered the personal creative development of nurses, (3) challenged students to use creative thinking in solving nursing problems, and most important, (4) further established and reinforced a new, higher level of nursing practice--a level that appropriately sees the nurse as a creative and innovative member of the health care team. PMID:10227031

Le Storti, A J; Cullen, P A; Hanzlik, E M; Michiels, J M; Piano, L A; Ryan, P L; Johnson, W

1999-01-01

34

Strategy for teaching communication skills in dentistry  

OpenAIRE

AIM: To develop and evaluate a teaching strategy for teaching communication skills in dentistry. METHODOLOGY: Phase I: Development and implementation of a course in communication skills. Phase II: Implementation of a teaching strategy by means of an experiential learning strategy complemented by a didactic teaching strategy. SUBJECTS: Third year dental students (n = 67). The instruments included the following: (i) Study guide; (ii) Case study; (iii) Assessment rubric; (iv) Two questionnai...

White, John G.

2010-01-01

35

Interactive Teaching in Interpersonal Skills  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Engineers are very much part of the ongoing globalization and they are encountering problems of cross-disciplinary nature. Team working skills respecting other peoples’ qualifications are required so therefore interpersonal skills are becoming more and more important, including communications skills, leadership and awareness. Consequently, educational programs for teaching engineers should work with the fact that the capability of communicating with people with different background competences is important, nevertheless the engineering education has traditionally focused on technical skills rather than on personal development. In order to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers on all levels, the DTU (Technical University of Denmark) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) modified their education according to the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) approach in the autumn of 2008. The CDIO pedagogy encouraged to develop aninteractive course in interpersonal skills, where the students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process. The course consists of various exercises from which the participants will develop their awareness and knowledge of communication. It is the intention to give the students a personal understanding and idea of a different approach to communicating between people. The students evaluated the course, and the four key questions dealing with the quality of the course show a very high satisfaction with the instruction. The grades one and two (1 best/very much, 5 worst/very little) of the responses to these four questions are ranging on average from 69.5% to 88% (on a yearly basis). The positive responses indicate that the students are very satisfied with the course recognizing the need for education on international communication.

Christensen, JØrgen Erik; Karhu, Markku

2013-01-01

36

Robotic Challenges: Robots Bring New Life to Gifted Classes, Teach Students Hands-On Problem Solving, Computer Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Intermediate level academically talented students learn essential elements of computer programming by working with robots at enrichment workshops at Dwight-Englewood School in Englewood, New Jersey. The children combine creative thinking and problem-solving skills to program the robots' microcomputers to perform a variety of movements. (JDD)

Smith, Ruth Baynard

1994-01-01

37

Exploratory Examination of Relationships between Learning Styles and Creative Thinking in Math Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is believed that identifying any strong relationships between learning styles and creative thinking within the context of the math classroom will help improve instruction by providing course delivery strategies tailored to different learning preferences and promotion of creative thinking. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to identify which (if any of the cognitive learning dimensions would be related to creative thinking in math students. The major findings of this study indicate that creative thinking, assessed by RAT, and learning preferences, evaluated by ILS, are not highly correlated. Over all, students in this study show a balanced learning preference across four dimensions. In summary, this study directs a possible path for future researchers to investigate this phenomenon.

Kuan Chen Tsai

2013-08-01

38

Revising Teaching Skills for Professional Empowerment  

Science.gov (United States)

In a technology and media dominated era of education the role of teacher and there by the skills required to be mastered by each teacher need redefinition. The paper attempts to identify the list of essential teaching skills for the present age by retaining the significant ones and including those inevitable for present context. The skills…

Nath, Baiju K.

2009-01-01

39

LANGUAGE SKILLS AND THE CRITICAL THINKING
D?L BECER?LER? VE ELE?T?REL DÜ?ÜNME
 

OpenAIRE

Critical thinking is one of the eight basic skills in the primary school curriculum which has been prepared with a constructivist approach. Teaching critical thinking in Turkish language lessons has an importance in reaching curricular aims. Critical thinking has bonds with skills such as creative thinking, communication, research making, problem solving, using ICT, entrepreneurship, and using Turkish appropriatelyCritical thinking is involved with questioning, interpreting and decision makin...

Karadu?z, Adnan

2010-01-01

40

Teaching Creativity and Inventive Problem Solving in Science  

OpenAIRE

Engaging learners in the excitement of science, helping them discover the value of evidence-based reasoning and higher-order cognitive skills, and teaching them to become creative problem solvers have long been goals of science education reformers. But the means to achieve these goals, especially methods to promote creative thinking in scientific problem solving, have not become widely known or used. In this essay, I review the evidence that creativity is not a single hard-to-measure property...

Dehaan, Robert L.

2009-01-01

41

Teaching and Assessing Engineering Professional Skills  

OpenAIRE

Engineering students are required to have, by the time of graduation, a set of professional skills related to teamwork, oral and written communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and knowledge of contemporary issues. Teaching and assessment of these skills, as part of ABET accreditation, remains problematic. A systematic methodology to integrate these skills and their assessment in the curriculum is described. The method was recently applied in several engineering p...

Al-bahi, Ali M.; Taha, Mahmoud A.; Nedim Turkmen

2013-01-01

42

Teaching Map Skills: Theory, Research, Practice.  

Science.gov (United States)

U. S. students are poorly prepared regarding map skills and the general field of geography. Research suggests that significant improvement can and should be made in map and globe teaching programs. Sources that describe what to cover at different age and grade levels and that recommend teaching ideas are discussed. (RM)

Miller, Jack W.

1985-01-01

43

Effects of trait anxiety and the scamper technique on creative thinking of intellectually gifted students.  

Science.gov (United States)

This work assessed the effect of trait anxiety (measured on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and the Scamper technique on figural creative thinking, measured by the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. An analysis of covariance with 52 gifted students in a summer camp gave no significant main effect of treatment for trait anxiety, or their interaction. Scamper may not effectively improve figural creativity and anxiety may not influence figural creativity the same way it influences verbal creativity, at least as measured. PMID:8332693

Mijares-Colmenares, B E; Masten, W G; Underwood, J R

1993-06-01

44

Instructional Design as Critical and Creative Thinking: A Journey through a Jamestown-Era Native American Village  

Science.gov (United States)

The role of critical and creative thinking has been debated within the field of instructional design. Through an instructional design and development project we have identified how critical and creative thinking are essential to the instructional design process. This paper highlights a recent project focused on a virtual Native American village…

Baum, Liesl M.; Newbill, Phyllis Leary

2010-01-01

45

Teaching pediatric communication skills to medical students  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Delivering effective clinical pediatric communication skills training to undergraduate medical students is a distinct and important challenge. Pediatric-specific communication skills teaching is complex and under-researched. We report on the development of a scenario-based pediatric clinical communication skills program as well as students’ assessment of this module. Methods We designed a pediatric clinical communication skills program and delivered it five times during one academic year via small-group teaching. Students were asked to score the workshop in eight domains (learning objectives, complexity, interest, competencies, confidence, tutors, feedback, and discussion) using 5-point Likert scales, along with free text comments that were grouped and analyzed thematically, identifying both the strengths of the workshop and changes suggested to improve future delivery. Results Two hundred and twenty-one of 275 (80%) student feedback forms were returned. Ninety-six percent of students’ comments were positive or very positive, highlighting themes such as the timing of teaching, relevance, group sizes, and the use of actors, tutors, and clinical scenarios. Conclusion Scenario-based teaching of clinical communication skills is positively received by students. Studies need to demonstrate an impact on practice, performance, development, and sustainability of communications training.

Frost, Katherine A; Metcalf, Elizabeth P; Brooks, Rachel; Kinnersley, Paul; Greenwood, Stephen R; Powell, Colin VE

2015-01-01

46

Teaching and Assessing Engineering Professional Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Engineering students are required to have, by the time of graduation, a set of professional skills related to teamwork, oral and written communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and knowledge of contemporary issues. Teaching and assessment of these skills, as part of ABET accreditation, remains problematic. A systematic methodology to integrate these skills and their assessment in the curriculum is described. The method was recently applied in several engineering programs and proved to be efficient in generating data and evidences for evaluation and continuous improvement of these outcomes.

Ali M. Al-Bahi

2013-05-01

47

Teaching Badminton Based on Student Skill Levels  

Science.gov (United States)

Badminton has been identified as a lifelong activity. It is an inexpensive sport and everyone--children, seniors, and individuals with disabilities--can reach a level of enjoyment in the game after mastering basic skills and tactics. In teaching badminton, teachers need to understand how students develop game play ability from a low level to an…

Wang, Jianyu; Moffit, Jeff

2009-01-01

48

Teaching Higher Order Thinking Skills with Databases.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes a lesson based on Taba's Inductive Thinking Model that offers a set of strategies to enhance the teaching of higher order thinking skills with the use of databases. Analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information are discussed, and strategies for guiding class discussion are presented. (eight references) (LRW)

Watson, Jim; Strudler, Neal

1989-01-01

49

QUEST FOR TEACHING EXPERIMENTAL SKILLS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In Andhra Pradesh, India, chemical experimenting in under graduate college labs by students is neglected because most of the intermediate (10+1 and 10+2 students concentrate on writing competitive exams like EAMCET (Engineering and Medical Common Entrance Test, IIT JEE (Indian Institute of Technology Joint Entrance Test, AIEEE (All India Engineering Entrance Examination, AFMS (Armed Forces Medical Services, AIMS (All India Institute of Medical Science. The students spend most of their time in preparing for competitive exams, practicing bits, and writing many model exams. Even Parents, staff, and management are also motivated and allow the students towards preparation for competitive exams because of the increase in number of engineering seats and demand of medical seats. Ultimately, the quality and quantity of students who join the B.Sc. (Bachelor of Science has been decreasing day by day. Even after joining the B.Sc., the students are motivated towards immediate white collared job oriented courses like M.C.A (Master of Computer Applications and M.B.A (Master Business Administration and spending their time for preparing for competitive exams for those courses. Only a few students are interested to join Post graduation in chemistry and try to learn experimental skills in chemistry laboratory. However, the motivated students towards undergraduate chemistry will be demotivated towards it due to lack of fundamentals in chemistry (in 10+2 level, which are essential for better job market. Ultimately, the students are in confusion and neglect learning the skills in doing experiments in chemistry lab. The present paper focuses on the thorough quest of one such teacher who strives for his own professional development. He has developed his own method of guiding the students for their improvement of skills in doing experiments in lab. The teacher explored solutions to his problems or problems of students by sorting out the critical incidents from his own laboratory experiences, documented through regular journal writing. The teacher cum researcher guided the students to overcome the difficulties in Ø Determination of melting point Ø Determination of Boiling Point Ø Test for Extra elements Ø Ignition Test for Aliphatic/Aromatic/Carbohydrate/Amide andØ Test for Functional groups Quest, Professional development, Organic Practical class, Laboratory Experiences, Experimental Skills.

B. Samrajya LAKSHMI

2013-01-01

50

Teaching pediatric communication skills to medical students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Katherine A Frost,1,2 Elizabeth P Metcalf,3 Rachel Brooks,2,3 Paul Kinnersley,3 Stephen R Greenwood,3 Colin VE Powell1,2,4 1Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital for Wales, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Institute of Medical Education, 4Molecular and Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales Background: Delivering effective clinical pediatric communication skills training to undergraduate medical students is a distinct and important challenge. Pediatric-specific communication skills teaching is complex and under-researched. We report on the development of a scenario-based pediatric clinical communication skills program as well as students’ assessment of this module. Methods: We designed a pediatric clinical communication skills program and delivered it five times during one academic year via small-group teaching. Students were asked to score the workshop in eight domains (learning objectives, complexity, interest, competencies, confidence, tutors, feedback, and discussion using 5-point Likert scales, along with free text comments that were grouped and analyzed thematically, identifying both the strengths of the workshop and changes suggested to improve future delivery. Results: Two hundred and twenty-one of 275 (80% student feedback forms were returned. Ninety-six percent of students' comments were positive or very positive, highlighting themes such as the timing of teaching, relevance, group sizes, and the use of actors, tutors, and clinical scenarios. Conclusion: Scenario-based teaching of clinical communication skills is positively received by students. Studies need to demonstrate an impact on practice, performance, development, and sustainability of communications training. Keywords: communication training, undergraduates, pediatrics, actors

Frost KA

2015-01-01

51

Studies of the Turkish form of the Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper explains the results of multi-year applications of the Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production in a Turkish context with Turkish participants. The purpose of the study is to present the results of several empirical studies conducted by different Turkish samples, using the instrument which was developed by Jellen and Urban for measuring the creative thinking potentials of individuals. The number of the subjects of all the studies described here totaled to 1529. These participants were of various ages and at various levels of ability, and they included primary school students, university students, and adults, as well as 369 gifted students, and 64 subjects with neurological problems. The author introduces the evaluation procedures, discusses the culturally fair characteristics of the test, and makes a case for the utility of the instrument in Turkey with a comparison of existing data in the literature related to the instrument.

Aysenur Yontar Togrol

2012-12-01

52

Cogniton-based Enlightenment of Creative Thinking: Examplars in Computer Science  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is reputed that “Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration”, but it can also be noted that “sometimes, 1% inspiration is more important than 99% perspiration.” As this 1% is so important, can it be understood, and even learned? If so, how can cognition be used to enlighten a scientist's inspiration (creative thinking? Both questions are considered on the basis of cognitive theory in the paper. We illustrate our ideas with examples from computer science.

2013-01-01

53

Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills Activity Book  

Science.gov (United States)

With this companion workbook to Judith Birsh's bestselling resource, "Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills, Second Edition," students and practitioners alike will improve their knowledge of multisensory teaching and hone their language and instruction skills. Ideal for both preservice teacher education courses and inservice professional…

Carreker, Suzanne; Birsh, Judith R.

2005-01-01

54

The Teaching of Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Malaysia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined the implementation of a Malaysian program to teach higher-order thinking skills. Data from classroom observations; teacher, student, and administrator interviews; document analyses; and surveys indicated that teachers felt better prepared to teach Malay or English than higher-order thinking skills, finding it difficult to construct the…

Rajendran, Nagappan

2001-01-01

55

TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS : THE CONCEPT OF SOCIAL RISK ANALYSIS  

OpenAIRE

In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of lear...

Andersson, Niclas

2009-01-01

56

Teaching 21st Century Skills: An ASCD Action Tool  

Science.gov (United States)

Any school interested in preparing students for learning and working in 21st century academic and job settings needs this resource to explain to teachers the new skills students need and provide teachers with tools to teach and reinforce these skills. Based on the work of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, this action tool defines what…

Beers, Sue

2011-01-01

57

Temper and Tantrum Tamers. Breakthrough Strategies To Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth: Social Skills, School Skills, Coping Skills Lesson Series.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is one of eight in a series of guides designed to help teach and counsel troubled youth. It presents 20 lessons designed to teach the coping skills necessary to control one's temper. The first lesson teaches students the meaning of aggressive behavior; this lesson and several others throughout the guide focus on helping aggressive…

Wells, Ruth Herman

58

A Comparison of Selected Guilford and Wallach-Kogan Creative Thinking Tests in Conjunction with Measures of Intelligence  

Science.gov (United States)

Guilford's (1967) divergent production tests and Wallach and Kogan's (1965) associative creative thinking tests are designed to measure abilities central to the creative process. However, results with these two batteries have been used to support alternative conceptions of creative ability. This research makes a beginning at studying these tests…

Richards, Ruth L.

1976-01-01

59

THE EFFECT OF TEACHING LIFE SKILLS TO MOTHERS ON IMPROVE SOCIAL SKILLS IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN  

OpenAIRE

The major Purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of life skills education on mothers in improving pre- elementary children’s social skills. The question was, is there a meaningful relationship between teaching life skills to mothers and increasing social skills in pre-elementary children? The method used in this study was Quasi-experimental with pre and post -test groups. The statistics samples include all pre-elementary children in Borujerd that 40 Chil...

Maryam Hassani Goodarzi; Hassan Dinarvand; Mohammad Jafar Mehdian

2014-01-01

60

Using Goldenrod Galls to Teach Science Process Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Emphasizes the importance of using examples from the student's environment to aid in teaching science process skills. The author uses diagrams to aid in discussing the various uses of goldenrod (Solidago sp) galls in the classroom. (ZWH)

Peard, Terry L.

1994-01-01

61

Virtual Reality in the Teaching of Motor Skills: Literature Review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present work is a study aiming to present literature on virtual reality and to inquire the possibility of using virtual reality in the teaching of motor skills. Learning process in physical education and sports, as far as cognitive and physical aspects concern, is an interesting topic, which has been worked out extensively. Nevertheless, the idea of using high technology in the teaching of motor skills is an inviting one, which needs further investigation.

S. Kampiotis

2003-01-01

62

Teaching Transferable Compensatory Skills and Processes to Visually Impaired Adults.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article presents the eight laws of association theory and applies four of them to strategies for teaching transferable skills to individuals with visual impairments. Strategies described include situation forecasting, generalization, sense shifting, performing skills repetitively to facilitate the transfer habit, and assigning an intensity…

Roberts, Alvin

2001-01-01

63

A Multimedia Approach to Teaching Library Research Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes activities and procedures that were developed to teach library research skills to grades five through eight using multimedia instruction, including the use of HyperStudio software. Highlights include library media skills objectives, curriculum objectives, resources, instructional roles, hardware and software requirements, evaluation, and…

Cornelio, Alicia

1994-01-01

64

Effect of teaching context and tutor workshop on tutorial skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Effective faculty development workshops are essential to develop and sustain the quality of faculty's teaching. In an integrated problem-based curriculum, tutors expressed the needs to further develop their skills in facilitating students' content learning and small-group functioning. Based on the authors' prior observations that tutors' performance depends on their teaching context, a workshop was designed not only tailored to the tutors' needs but also organized within their respective teaching unit. The purposes of this study are (1) to evaluate whether this workshop is effective and improves tutors' teaching skills, and (2) to assess whether workshop effectiveness depends on tutors' performance before the workshop and on their teaching unit environment. Workshop effectiveness was assessed using (a) tutors' perception of workshop usefulness and of their improvement in tutorial skills, and (b) students' ratings of tutor performance before and after the workshop. In addition, an analysis of variance model was designed to analyse how tutors' performance before the workshop and their teaching unit influence workshop effectiveness. Tutors judged the workshop as helpful in providing them with new teaching strategies and reported having improved their tutorial skills. Workshop attendance enhanced students' ratings of tutors' knowledge of problem content and ability to guide their learning. This improvement was also long-lasting. The workshop effect on tutor performance was relative: it varied across teaching units and was higher for tutors with low scores before the workshop. A workshop tailored to tutors' needs and adapted to their teaching unit improves their tutorial skills. Its effectiveness is, however, influenced by tutors' level of performance before the workshop and by the environment of their teaching unit. Thus, to be efficient, the design of a workshop should consider not only individual tutors' needs, but also the background of their teaching units, with special attention to their internal organization and tutor group functioning. PMID:16807161

Baroffio, Anne; Nendaz, Mathieu R; Perrier, Arnaud; Layat, Carine; Vermeulen, Bernard; Vu, Nu V

2006-06-01

65

Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills. Second Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

For students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities--and for their peers--creative teaching methods that use two or more senses can dramatically improve language skills and academic outcomes. That is why every current and future educator needs the second edition of this definitive guide to multisensory teaching. A core text for a variety of…

Birsh, Judith R., Ed.

2005-01-01

66

Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills. Third Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

As new research shows how effective systematic and explicit teaching of language-based skills is for students with learning disabilities--along with the added benefits of multisensory techniques--discover the latest on this popular teaching approach with the third edition of this bestselling textbook. Adopted by colleges and universities across…

Birsh, Judith R., Ed.

2011-01-01

67

Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills Activity Book. Revised Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

With the new edition of this activity book--the companion to Judith Birsh's bestselling text, "Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills"--students and practitioners will get the practice they need to use multisensory teaching effectively with students who have dyslexia and other learning disabilities. Ideal for both pre-service teacher…

Carreker, Suzanne; Birsh, Judith R.

2011-01-01

68

Teaching Social Skills and Assertiveness to Students with Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses teaching social skills and assertiveness to students with disabilities. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) content standards for physical education emphasize teaching responsible personal and social behaviors to students of all abilities, to help them develop an understanding of and respect for…

Moffett, Aaron; Alexander, Melissa G. F.; Dummer, Gail M.

2006-01-01

69

The "Strategies-for-Achievement" Approach for Teaching Study Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

An educational psychology-based study skills program called Strategies for Achievement was developed to teach learning and motivation strategies to college students. It involved teaching student four major achievement strategies: take reasonable risk, take responsibility for outcomes, search the environment (for information), and use feedback.…

Tuckman, Bruce W.

70

Teaching Beginning Chess Skills to Students with Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses teaching higher-level thinking skills and concentration to students with disabilities through chess instruction. Guidelines for chess instruction are provided, including: teaching ideas and strategy first rather than specific lines of play, using a variety of instructional modalities, and building in reinforcement for…

Storey, Keith

2000-01-01

71

Heritage in hospitals: Using museum objects to teach communications skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Museum objects can be used to inspire a wide variety of teaching and learning. This paper discusses how museum objects can be used to teach communications skills to medical students as part of a project investigating the benefits of taking museum objects to patients at University College London Hospitals.

Guy Noble

2010-01-01

72

TLC--Teaching, Learning, and Caring: Teaching Interpersonal Problem-Solving Skills to Behaviorally Disordered Adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

The article describes "Teaching, Learning, and Caring" (TLC), a program designed for partially mainstreamed behavior disordered adolescents (ages 14-18). Eight TLC skill areas are the focus of interpersonal skills training: communication mode, empathy, goal identification, cue sensitivity, alternative thinking, skills implementation, consequential…

Vaughn, Sharon

1987-01-01

73

Higher order thinking skills competencies required by outcomes-based education from learners.  

Science.gov (United States)

Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) brought about a significant paradigm shift in the education and training of learners in South Africa. OBE requires a shift from focusing on the teacher input (instruction offerings or syllabuses expressed in terms of content), to focusing on learner outcomes. OBE is moving away from 'transmission' models to constructivistic, learner-centered models that put emphasis on learning as an active process (Nieburh, 1996:30). Teachers act as facilitators and mediators of learning (Norms and Standards, Government Gazette vol 415, no 20844 of 2000). Facilitators are responsible to create the environment that is conducive for learners to construct their own knowledge, skills and values through interaction (Peters, 2000). The first critical cross-field outcome accepted by the South African Qualification Framework (SAQA) is that learners should be able to identify and solve problems by using critical and creative thinking skills. This paper seeks to explore some higher order thinking skills competencies required by OBE from learners such as critical thinking, reflective thinking, creative thinking, dialogic / dialectic thinking, decision making, problem solving and emotional intelligence and their implications in facilitating teaching and learning from the theoretical perspective. The philosophical underpinning of these higher order thinking skills is described to give direction to the study. It is recommended that a study focusing on the assessment of these intellectual concepts be made. The study may be qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods in nature (Creswell 2005). PMID:17131612

Chabeli, M M

2006-08-01

74

Higher order thinking skills competencies required by outcomes-based education from learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Outcomes-Based Education (OBE brought about a significant paradigm shift in the education and training of learners in South Africa. OBE requires a shift from focusing on the teacher input (instruction offerings or syllabuses expressed in terms of content, to focusing on learner outcomes. OBE is moving away from ‘transmission’ models to constructivistic, learner-centered models that put emphasis on learning as an active process (Nieburh, 1996:30. Teachers act as facilitators and mediators of learning (Norms and Standards, Government Gazette vol 415, no 20844 of 2000. Facilitators are responsible to create the environment that is conducive for learners to construct their own knowledge, skills and values through interaction (Peters, 2000. The first critical cross-field outcome accepted by the South African Qualification Framework (SAQA is that learners should be able to identify and solve problems by using critical and creative thinking skills. This paper seeks to explore some higher order thinking skills competencies required by OBE from learners such as critical thinking, reflective thinking, creative thinking, dialogic / dialectic thinking, decision making, problem solving and emotional intelligence and their implications in facilitating teaching and learning from the theoretical perspective. The philosophical underpinning of these higher order thinking skills is described to give direction to the study. It is recommended that a study focusing on the assessment of these intellectual concepts be made. The study may be qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods in nature (Creswell 2005.

MM Chabeli

2006-09-01

75

Teaching Writing Skills for Engineering Students  

OpenAIRE

This research paper focuses on the writing skills of the Engineering students of all the branches especially at the time of placements. Writing in English is almost a prerequisite for the job. Now- a-days testing the writing skills of the students is mandatory before going to attend the interviews. LSRW skills are essential in the acquisition of language. In order to help the students with these writing skills, teacher has to take the initiative to motivate them. Most of the students are ...

Vijaya Lakshmi, D.; Ragini, K.

2014-01-01

76

Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Nontraditional Learners  

OpenAIRE

Different teaching methods should be used when instructing adults versus those used to teach children. Adults have many life experiences, they have a need to know, and they are often highly motivated to learn as it relates to career growth and personal advancement. In this paper, the author discusses andragogy and how adult learning theory affects the learner. The principles of andragogy provide the librarian instructor with a foundation for how to teach the adult learner. Suggestions for how...

Lauren Hays

2014-01-01

77

Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Critical thinking is a learned skill that requires instruction and practice. Business education instructors at both the secondary and post-secondary levels can enhance students' critical thinking skills by (1) using instructional strategies that actively engage students in the learning process rather than relying on lecture and rote memorization,…

Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Snyder, Mark J.

2008-01-01

78

An Interprofessional Approach to Teaching Communication Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: Recent research suggests that effective interprofessional communication and collaboration can positively influence patient satisfaction and outcomes. Health professional communication skills do not necessarily improve over time but can improve with formal communication skills training (CST). This article describes the development,…

Sargeant, Joan; MacLeod, Tanya; Murray, Anne

2011-01-01

79

Creative thinking as orchestrated by semantic processing versus cognitive control brain networks  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Creativity is primarily investigated within the neuroscientific perspective as a unitary construct. While such an approach is beneficial when trying to infer the general picture regarding creativity and brain function, it is insufficient if the objective is to uncover the information processing brain mechanisms by which creativity occurs. As creative thinking emerges through the dynamic interplay between several cognitive processes, assessing the neural correlates of these operations would enable the development and characterization of an information processing framework from which to better understand this complex ability. This article focuses on two aspects of creative cognition that are central to generating original ideas. “Conceptual expansion” refers to the ability to widen one’s conceptual structures to include unusual or novel associations, while “overcoming knowledge constraints” refers to our ability to override the constraining influence imposed by salient or pertinent knowledge when trying to be creative. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence is presented to illustrate how semantic processing and cognitive control networks in the brain differentially modulate these critical facets of creative cognition.

Anna Abraham

2014-02-01

80

Patterns for Thinking: Patterns for Transfer. A Cooperative Team Approach for Critical and Creative Thinking in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

This guide is part of a program designed to teach both cognitive skills (thinking skills) and cognitive strategies (thinking procedures) necessary for productive problem solving, mindful decision making, and creative ideation by all students in kindergarten through grade 12 settings. The program is a comprehensive staff development model in which…

Fogarty, Robin; Bellanca, James

81

THE EFFECT OF TEACHING LIFE SKILLS TO MOTHERS ON IMPROVE SOCIAL SKILLS IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The major Purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of life skills education on mothers in improving pre- elementary children’s social skills. The question was, is there a meaningful relationship between teaching life skills to mothers and increasing social skills in pre-elementary children? The method used in this study was Quasi-experimental with pre and post -test groups. The statistics samples include all pre-elementary children in Borujerd that 40 Childs were chosen using multi stage randomly sampling.

Maryam Hassani Goodarzi

2014-10-01

82

Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Nontraditional Learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Different teaching methods should be used when instructing adults versus those used to teach children. Adults have many life experiences, they have a need to know, and they are often highly motivated to learn as it relates to career growth and personal advancement. In this paper, the author discusses andragogy and how adult learning theory affects the learner. The principles of andragogy provide the librarian instructor with a foundation for how to teach the adult learner. Suggestions for how to apply the principles of andragogy are listed in the paper. The paper will also benefit those working in public libraries who work with lifelong learners.

Lauren Hays

2014-02-01

83

TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS : THE CONCEPT OF SOCIAL RISK ANALYSIS  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of learning objectives, but realised in practical teaching activities and as an integrated part of the examination. This study aims at presenting and reviewing a practical approach to teaching of interpersonal skills, referred to as the Social Risk Analysis, which has been applied and integrated into the curriculum of two engineering courses. The Social Risk Analysis encourages and imposes a critical review of the social interaction in a small group of students and thus facilitates communication and teamwork operation. Students find the Social Risk Analysis being easy to apprehend and meaningful in engineering teaching, and most significantly, they perceive that the Social Risk Analysis facilitates the work performance. The study found it possible to successfully implement the Social Risk Analysis into the course curriculum of the two engineering courses. The implementation required, however, refinement of the pedagogical approach by integrating the Social Risk Analysis into the learning objectives, teaching activities and assessment of the course, and further, redesign of the engineering work assignments in order to impel cooperation, communication and participation of the students in a team. The establishment of an engineering context provides an important basis for the teaching of interpersonal skill using the Social Risk Analysis.

Andersson, Niclas

2009-01-01

84

Science teaching techniques associated with higher-order thinking skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Science teachers are encouraged to emphasize higher-order thinking skills, but little is known about the use and relationships of teaching techniques related to these skills. This study reports on a recent survey in Minnesota designed to provide a picture of the instructional styles that are used by seventh and eighth grade science teachers. Further, the data were factor analyzed to identify underlying structure and the resulting factors were correlated to examine the relationships between the factors. Although relationships do exist, it appears that seventh and eighth grade science teachers are individualistic and diverse in their reported teaching technique preferences.

Lawrenz, Frances

1990-12-01

85

Teaching intercultural negotiation and communication skills: an international experiment  

OpenAIRE

This paper reports on the initial phase of an international teaching experiment involving the use of videoconferencing for the teaching of intercultural business communication and negotiation skills. The experiment has the following aims: (a) to give insight into how students from different cultures operate in nearly identical situations, (b) to give students exposure to intercultural communication through videoconferencing, (c) to allow students to assess videoconferencing as a tool for inte...

Poncini, Gina; Charles, Mirjaliisa

2005-01-01

86

Teaching Writing Skills for Engineering Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This research paper focuses on the writing skills of the Engineering students of all the branches especially at the time of placements. Writing in English is almost a prerequisite for the job. Now- a-days testing the writing skills of the students is mandatory before going to attend the interviews. LSRW skills are essential in the acquisition of language. In order to help the students with these writing skills, teacher has to take the initiative to motivate them. Most of the students are coming from rural areas and basically from regional medium background. So they require support at every step. Writing becomes a Herculean task to them. Triggering their requirement is a pivotal role of the teacher. Different perspectives of writing skills like free writing, mechanics of writing, vocabulary, grammar, description of a picture, paragraph, essay and summary writing and report, resume, letter and e-mail writings are discussed in this paper. Activities like pair work or group work of all the tasks are added benefit to the students. Interest and command on the identified topic of the student is not identical. Analysis and feedback of each and every activity is an added grace to the teacher and advantage to the student. If the students are trained logically from the beginning of their first year of Engineering they achieve their dream of getting a placement before completing their Bachelor’s degree.

D.Vijaya Lakshmi*1

2014-04-01

87

[Gender differences in EEG coherence changes during figural creative thinking: the efficacy coupling].  

Science.gov (United States)

The study was aimed to explore the features of interaction between cortical areas during figural creative task performance in high- and low-creative men and women. We divided the participants into two groups with high and low creativity by the median of originality score. EEG was recorded at rest and during task performance (Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking "Incomplete figures"). The EEG coherence was computed in six frequency bands from theta1 to beta2. We analyzed the total values of coherence for each of 16 sites, calculated separately for intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connections. In the theta2, alphal, and alpha2 bands, coherence values decreased in task performance as compared to baseline in subjects with lower originality scores, whereas in subjects with higher scores, they increased in the theta2 and alpha1 bands. The decrease in the alpha2 band in the higher-creativity group was significantly lower in comparison with the decrease in the lower-score group. In the alpha2 band, the interaction of gender, creativity, laterality, and electrode position factors was also found during analysis of task-induced coherence changes. Further examination of the interaction showed the similarity of EEG coherence patterns in men and women with opposite creative abilities and higher values of task-induced coherence changes in the anterior regions of the left hemisphere and posterior regions of the right hemisphere in high-creative in comparison with low-creative men. The findings are discussed in terms of different cognitive strategies used by men and women that may have the same results in creative problem solving. PMID:19795805

Vol'f, N V; Tarasova, I V; Razumnikova, O M

2009-01-01

88

Using professional interpreters in undergraduate medical consultation skills teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aarti Bansal,1 Jennifer Swann,1 William Henry Smithson2 1Academic Unit of Primary Medical Care, University of Sheffield, UK; 2Department of General Practice, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Abstract: The ability to work with interpreters is a core skill for UK medical graduates. At the University of Sheffield Medical School, this teaching was identified as a gap in the curriculum. Teaching was developed to use professional interpreters in role-play, based on evidence that professional interpreters improve health outcomes for patients with limited English proficiency. Other principles guiding the development of the teaching were an experiential learning format, integration to the core consultation skills curriculum, and sustainable delivery. The session was aligned with existing consultation skills teaching to retain the small-group experiential format and general practitioner (GP tutor. Core curricular time was found through conversion of an existing consultation skills session. Language pairs of professional interpreters worked with each small group, with one playing patient and the other playing interpreter. These professional interpreters attended training in the scenarios so that they could learn to act as patient and family interpreter. GP tutors attended training sessions to help them facilitate the session. This enhanced the sustainability of the session by providing a cohort of tutors able to pass on their expertise to new staff through the existing shadowing process. Tutors felt that the involvement of professional interpreters improved student engagement. Student evaluation of the teaching suggests that the learning objectives were achieved. Faculty evaluation by GP tutors suggests that they perceived the teaching to be worthwhile and that the training they received had helped improve their own clinical practice in consulting through interpreters. We offer the following recommendations to others who may be interested in developing teaching on interpreted consultations within their core curriculum: 1 consider recruiting professional interpreters as a teaching resource; 2 align the teaching to existing consultation skills sessions to aid integration; and 3 invest in faculty development for successful and sustainable delivery. Keywords: interpreter, communication skills, curriculum

Bansal A

2014-11-01

89

The Integrative Nature of BE Teaching: Knowledge and Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the great development of the international trade and communication after China s entry into the WTO, the demand for talents qualified in both English and business is increasing, so more universities or colleges have paid their attention to the fostering and cultivation of business talents. Starting with the status quo of the market need for BE (Business English talents and the required knowledge and skills for them, this paper intends to explore effective BE teaching ways from the perspectives of teachers qualifications, course designs, teaching models and teaching methodologies.

Tingting Guo

2009-10-01

90

Teaching Children Social Skills: A Game Format.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes a program which uses the natural structure of a game and integrates principles of group work with cognitive and skill-oriented strategies to help children (ages 8-11) develop effective social competencies. Includes evaluation of the game's effectiveness. (ABL)

LeCroy, Craig Winston

1987-01-01

91

Teaching the Soft Skills: Three Students Break It Down  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching soft skills (i.e., grit, empathy, collaboration, perseverance, communication, ethics, self-management) is a task that might seem overwhelming to new teachers, but this article offers practical advice from students about how to incorporate the lessons into the classroom.

Merz, Sandy

2015-01-01

92

Reciprocal Teaching of Lecture Comprehension Skills in College Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the effects of a reciprocal teaching intervention designed to enhance the lecture comprehension skills of college students. Forty low-verbal ability students and 40 high-verbal ability students (as measured by SAT scores) were chosen for the study and randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental groups…

Spivey, Norman R.; Cuthbert, Andrea

2006-01-01

93

A Computer-Based Strategy for Practical Skills Teaching  

OpenAIRE

An adaptive learning technology embedded in e-learning environments ensures choice of the structure, content, and activities for each individual learner according to the teaching team’s domain and didactic knowledge and skills. In this paper a computer-based scenario for application of an adaptive navigation technology is proposed and demonstrated on an example course topic.

Atanasova, Polina; Zheliazkova, Irina; Levi, Avram

2008-01-01

94

Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills. The Classroom Strategies Series  

Science.gov (United States)

As the 21st century unfolds, the pace of change in the world is accelerating. Teachers and administrators must lead the cultural shift required to ensure their students can survive and thrive in the changing world. In Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills the authors present a model of instruction and assessment based on a combination of…

Marzano, Robert J.; Heflebower, Tammy

2012-01-01

95

Teaching Job Interviewing Skills with the Help of Television Shows  

Science.gov (United States)

Because of its potential for humor and drama, job interviewing is frequently portrayed on television. This article discusses how scenes from popular television series such as "Everybody Loves Raymond," "Friends," and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" can be used to teach effective job interview skills in business communication courses. Television…

Bloch, Janel

2011-01-01

96

Involving Parents in Teaching Social Communication Skills to Young Children  

Science.gov (United States)

This article focuses on why and how speech-language pathologists and other professionals can encourage the involvement of parents in teaching social communication skills to their young children. Four main topics are explored: (1) the evidence that many of the children with special needs served by speech-language pathologists and other…

Weiss, Amy L.; Theadore, Geraldine

2011-01-01

97

Evaluating Referential Communication Games for Teaching Speaking and Listening Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses communication games and activities which can be used to teach speaking and listening skills. Proposes and applies a set of criteria for evaluating such curriculum materials. Examines communication games used in referential communication research and suggests their inclusion in the curriculum. (JMF)

Dickson, W. Patrick; Patterson, Janice H.

1981-01-01

98

Teaching Listening Comprehension Skills: A Test-orientated Approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Attributed to a “receptive skill” in the communicative process, listening comprehension would be the most arduous task of all four language skills. It is likely that EFL (English as a foreign language students encounter various predicaments, of e.g. grasping main ideas of the dialogues in contexts, and in turn suffer from learning anxiety. The issue of how to assist the students in improving their listening competency is worth attention. This article is, therefore, intended for illustrating a test-orientated approach to teaching listening comprehension skills to EFL students through an analysis of sample questions about listening comprehension (i.e. Choosing the Right Picture, Short Questions, and Short Conversations on GEPT tests at the elementary level and through provision of tips (i.e. Skim, Scan, Listen, Guess/Infer, Choose & Write and Check on how to answer the questions effectively. Implications for teaching listening comprehension are also made at the end of the paper.

Shao-Wen Su

2012-05-01

99

Improvement of teaching skills in a clinical setting.  

Science.gov (United States)

The article describes the efforts of the faculty members in the Department of Community Medicine at the Rockford School of Medicine to improve their clinical teaching skills in the Primary Care Experience (formerly the Basic Ambulatory Experience). Faculty members opted for an instructional development program under the direction of an educational consultant as a result of their problems with clinical teaching in a new medical school. Each faculty member's teaching was videotaped and analyzed by the consultant, who met with the instructor to discuss the videotape, From this initial discussion problem areas were defined to be discussed at large group meetings. Faculty members will be videotaped in the present academic year to ascertain improvement in their clinical teaching. PMID:660599

Bazuin, C H; Yonke, A M

1978-05-01

100

Should we teach thinking skills to deaf children?  

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Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to identify the benefits of developing thinking skills with KS1 deaf children who used British Sign Language (BSL. It arose as a response to the findings of a variety of researches who had reported a number of ‘failings’ apparent in the educational and learning activity of deaf children. It used a case study approach involving five profoundly deaf Key stage 1 children and explored the extent to which, using materials grounded in the Somerset Thinking Skills Course, the teaching of thinking skills in a supportive environment could remediate some of these issues. The strongly visual nature of the material supported pupil exchanges mediated by the use of sign language. Analysis of video film was used to plot individual pupil development of scanning skills, their use of nouns versus adjectives, micro-skills and macro-abilities. Pupil reasoning skills, how they were supported, their ownership and role of the facilitator were also examined. The results showed that within eight weeks (equivalent to four hours in total the children were more able to express their perceptions. They watched other children in order to access their signed information and appeared to use this to develop, elaborate, extend and provide reasons when it was their turn to present. There was also evidence of enhanced creativity and originality in their contributions. This pilot study urges the need for further research and suggests that a priority should be given to developing this approach in the teaching of deaf children. Due to the complexity of thinking skills it further recommends that this area should be taught as a separate topic that can inform other subjects.

Emma Tamsin Kelty

2006-04-01

101

Effects of “Teaching Method Workshop” on general surgery residents’ teaching skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: Residents have an important role as teachers and need to know about teaching, teaching methods and skills. In developed countries, “resident-as-teacher” programs have been implemented progressively; but there is little information about this theme in developing countries such as Iran. This study aimed to determine effects of “teaching method” workshop on surgical residents’ teaching skills in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 18 residents in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd years of surgical residency in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences have attended in a 10-hour workshop. Two questionnaires (validity and reliability) was verified: Clinical teaching self-assessment and clinical teaching evaluation was completed before and after the intervention (“teaching method” workshop) by attending residents and rater interns, respectively. Paired-samples T-test was used to analyze collecting data. Results: After intervention, Self-assessment mean scores were increased in two categories: feedback from 3.34 to 3.94 (P = 0.011) and promoting self- directed learning from 3.53 to 4.02 (P = 0.009); whereas, there was no significant differences in evaluation mean scores. Conclusion: Statistical results from self-assessment and evaluation scores show little improvement in residents’ teaching skills after the intervention, but residents assessed the workshop as useful. Lack of motivation in interns and little reward for residents who attend in educational activities could be responsible for these results. So, to promote role of residents’ as teachers, we offer revision in residency curriculum and residents’ formal duties as well as designing educational programs in teaching theme based on our needs and resources. PMID:23555141

Haghani, Fariba; Eghbali, Batool; Memarzadeh, Mehrdad

2012-01-01

102

Utilizing Teaching Interactions to Facilitate Social Skills in the Natural Environment  

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Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in social skills. While research has shown behavioral interventions to be effective in teaching and/or increasing a variety of appropriate social skills, limited research has shown generalization of these skills to the natural setting. The Teaching Interaction procedure…

Kassardjian, Alyne; Taubman, Mitchell; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.; Edwards, Andrew; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ron; Schulze, Kim

2013-01-01

103

Decision story strategy: a practical approach for teaching decision making.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers are usually very enthusiastic in their evaluations of decision stories. Decision Story Strategies offer a change of pace, promote student involvement and stimulate creative thinking, problem solving and everpresent creative teaching-learning opportunities. The real-life problems presented within the structure of a decision story provide meaningful learning opportunities for students. Students begin to think in a broader perspective when considering other points of view and information sources. The Decision Story Strategy used with the Decision-Making Model provides a powerful tool for health educators to develop skills for making and evaluating decisions in an interesting and meaningful context. It may not be a panacea for all health educators, but is an effective strategy for the teacher concerned with developing independent decision makers. Most importantly, students are provided opportunities to solve their present problems as well as develop decision-making skills for the future. PMID:6916032

Smith, D L; Hamrick, M H; Anspaugh, D J

1981-12-01

104

Development and Validation of Teaching Practice Evaluation Instrument for Assessing Chemistry Students' Teaching Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

The study was designed to develop and factorially validate an instrument for measuring teaching practice skills of chemistry student-teachers in University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Two research questions guided the study. The design of the study was instrumentation. All the chemistry student-teachers in the Department of Science Education, University…

Ezeudu, F. O.; Chiaha, G. T. U.; Eze, J. U.

2013-01-01

105

The influence of teaching hardwriting, reading and spelling skills on the accuracy of world level reading  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of THRASS (Teaching Handwriting, Reading and Spelling Skills) on the word level accuracy skills of a group of grade 2 learners. Word level accuracy is one sub skill in learning to read and is an indicator of the word recognition abilities of the child. THRASS is a program that has been designed to systematically teach phonics and, thus, teaches the basic building blocks of word sounds and structure so as to improve th...

Stark, Robert John Alexander

2010-01-01

106

Let's Have Fun! Teaching Social Skills through Stories, Telecommunications, and Activities  

Science.gov (United States)

This article concerns social skills interventions for children with emotional/behavioral disorders. Drawing on the author's teaching experience and the findings of research on social skills training in schools, and exploring effective ways to facilitate children's social skill development, the paper describes how social skills interventions can be…

Zhang, Kaili Chen

2011-01-01

107

Discovering the Learning and Teaching Approaches of Transferable Skills to Engage Students  

OpenAIRE

Given the growing attention among students, teachers and employers on the importance of transferable skills for both education and employment, there is a need to understand students’ perception of these skills before effective teaching approaches and assessment strategies can be developed to improve the teaching and learning of transferable skills. Studies on students’ perception of transferable skills have found that students’ perceived importance of an...

Luk, Yyl; Zhao, Y.; Chan, Cky

2014-01-01

108

A Brief Analysis of Large Classroom’s English Teaching Management Skills  

OpenAIRE

Classroom is the basic place of teaching, where intertwined with a variety of teaching factors, and all these factors forms various kinds of connections. Scientific and effective class teaching management is the necessary and powerful measure of improving the teaching quality. Effective English teaching management skills are parts of the elements of successful large classroom teaching. Under the new educational situation, how to organize, regulate, manage large classrooms in order to train th...

Weixuan Zhong

2014-01-01

109

The Effects of Two Instructional Models--Tactical and Skill Teaching--On Skill Development and Game Play, Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Student Perceptions in Volleyball  

Science.gov (United States)

This study evaluated the effects of Skill Teaching and Tactical approaches on skill development, game play, knowledge, and self-efficacy for 169 high- and low-skilled players of 182 beginning university Volleyball students. Three instructors each taught one Tactical and one Skill Teaching class two days a week for 16 weeks. A random coefficients…

Harrison, Joyce M.; Blakemore, Connie L.; Richards, Robert P.; Oliver, Jon; Wilkinson, Carol; Fellingham, Gilbert

2004-01-01

110

Thinking skills and communicative language teaching: a curriculum perspective  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Second Language teaching in South Africa and concludes that many L2 teachers have resisted using this approach. This may be attributed to a misunderstanding of the basic principles of communicative language teaching (CLT, as well as to uncertainty regarding its practical application. He proposes an innovative way of implementing CLT, involving the integration of thinking skills with selected language content within a communicative framework To demonstrate this, he gives a detailed description of a language teaching module for senior secondary pupils. He then discusses the communicative nature of the activities contained in the module and points out what additional benefits this approach may offer L2 pupils. Die skrywer evalueer die impak wat die kommunikatiewe benadering op Engels tweede taalonderrig in Suid-Afrika gehad het en kom tot die gevolgtrekking dat menige tweede taalonderwysers teenstand bied teen die gebruik van die benadering. Dit kan toegeskryf word aan die feit dat daar 'n wanbegrip bestaan van die basiese beginsels van kommunikatiewe taalonderrig, asook 'n onsekerheid rakende die praktiese toepassing daarvan. Hy stel 'n innoverende uyse van aanbieding voor wat die integrasie van denkvaardighede met geselekteerde taalinhoude binne 'n kommunikatiewe raamwerk behels. Om dit te demonstreer gee hy 'n gedetailleerde beskrywing van 'n taalonderrigmodule vir senior sekondere leerlinge. Daama bespreek hy die kommunikatiewe aard van die aktiwiteite wat die module bevat en dui oak aan watter addisionele voordele hierdie benadering vir tweede taal-leerlinge inhou.

Johann J. Swatz

2013-02-01

111

Investigating the Efficacy of Practical Skill Teaching: A Pilot-Study Comparing Three Educational Methods  

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Effective education of practical skills can alter clinician behaviour, positively influence patient outcomes, and reduce the risk of patient harm. This study compares the efficacy of two innovative practical skill teaching methods, against a traditional teaching method. Year three pre-clinical physiotherapy students consented to participate in a…

Maloney, Stephen; Storr, Michael; Paynter, Sophie; Morgan, Prue; Ilic, Dragan

2013-01-01

112

Teaching Advanced Skills to Educationally Disadvantaged Students. Data Analysis Support Center (DASC) Task 4. Final Report.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document comprises six papers that discuss teaching advanced skills to educationally disadvantaged students. An introductory paper, "Models for Teaching Advanced Skills to Educationally Disadvantaged Children" (B. Means and M. S. Knapp), synthesizes the themes that characterize the collection of papers as a whole, and discusses general issues…

Means, Barbara, Ed.; Knapp, Michael S., Ed.

113

Teaching Skills and Health-Related Fitness through a Preservice Gymnastics Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Children who do not develop a foundation of basic motor skills are less likely to participate in regular physical activity. An excellent way of teaching basic motor skills, as well as health-related fitness, is through gymnastics. Many young teachers, however, think that teaching gymnastics is too challenging and do not know how to incorporate it…

Donham-Foutch, Shae

2007-01-01

114

Surveying Colorado Band Directors' Opinions of Skills and Characteristics Important to Successful Music Teaching  

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This study was designed to (a) gather band directors' opinions of skills and characteristics important to teaching and (b) examine the relative effectiveness of electronic versus paper survey methods. Survey respondents ranked lists of music, teaching, and personal skills or characteristics in order of importance and answered open-ended items…

Miksza, Peter; Roeder, Matthew; Biggs, Dana

2010-01-01

115

Practice Teaching in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research project entitled Teaching Exercises in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills, which was conducted during 2011-2012 by the Department of Teaching Research and Studies from the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education (Escalante, Fernández and Gaete, 2012, in order to explore cultural diversity in classrooms and educational institutions in Costa Rica. This multicultural phenomenon has forced authorities to pay special attention to the educational services provided, particularly in elementary. In addition, it has sparked a discussion regarding the teachers’ conceptual and pedagogical void and a gap in their teaching skills to deal with student populations of different origins. Similarly, it leads to a reflection about the basic national educational curriculum. The research was conducted in 12 elementary schools from different educational districts, which have a high cultural diversity among students. Using qualitative research techniques, the opinions of principals, teachers and students regarding this topic are explored. The most important conclusion reached in this study is the absence of an intercultural pedagogy in the country’s classrooms and the need to prepare teachers in this respect.

Cristina Escalante Rivera

2014-05-01

116

Practice Schedule and the Learning of Motor Skills in Children and Adults: Teaching Implications  

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Understanding how motor skills are learned influences how one teaches effective motor skill attainment. Educators must ask, "Does repetitive practice of the same task make for better performance or does contextual variability (random practice) offer some benefit when learning motor skills?" Studies on the effects of Contextual Interference may…

Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Gentile, A. M.

2010-01-01

117

A PBL Approach for Teaching Complex Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Skills in Higher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the use of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach for teaching information and communication technology (ICT) skills to first-year students. Two questions were posed. The first addressed the ICT skill needs of 20 students enrolled in a first-year composition course. The second focused on the use of PBL to facilitate ICT skill…

Macklin, Alexis Smith

2008-01-01

118

Killing Two Birds with the Same Stone. Higher Order Skills Embedded in E-teaching Strategies  

OpenAIRE

Meta-cognitive skills have become a sine qua non in any 21st century teaching approach from primary, lower- and upper-secondary education, tertiary or university level. Whilst the traditional recipe of instruction based on “what to teach” has consumed so much effort, time, and energies meant at transmitting and acquiring knowledge, little or no attention has been allotted to higher-order skills which, once embedded in a curriculum and further-on released within a teaching-learning-evaluat...

Monica Giuchici

2011-01-01

119

Teaching physiotherapy skills in culturally-diverse classes  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultural competence, the ability to work in cross-cultural situations, has been acknowledged as a core skill for physiotherapists and other health professionals. Literature in this area has focused on the rationale for physiotherapists to provide culturally-competent care and the effectiveness of various educational strategies to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge about cultural competence by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students. However, there is a paucity of research on how students with different cultural needs, who are attending one university class, can be accommodated within a framework of learning core physiotherapy skills to achieve professional standards. Results This paper reports on steps which were taken to resolve the specific needs of a culturally-diverse body of first year physiotherapy students, and the impact this had on teaching in a new physiotherapy program located in Greater Western Sydney, Australia. Physiotherapy legislative, accreditation and registration requirements were considered in addition to anti-discrimination legislation and the four ethical principles of decision making. Conclusions Reflection on this issue and the steps taken to resolve it has resulted in the development of a generic framework which focuses on providing quality and equitable physiotherapy education opportunities to all students. This framework is generalizable to other health professions worldwide.

Grimmer-Somers Karen

2011-06-01

120

A Brief Analysis of Large Classroom’s English Teaching Management Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Classroom is the basic place of teaching, where intertwined with a variety of teaching factors, and all these factors forms various kinds of connections. Scientific and effective class teaching management is the necessary and powerful measure of improving the teaching quality. Effective English teaching management skills are parts of the elements of successful large classroom teaching. Under the new educational situation, how to organize, regulate, manage large classrooms in order to train the students' English proficiency within certain time, which is very important to improve English classes management efficiency and teaching quality.

Weixuan Zhong

2014-05-01

121

Measurement Invariance of Torrance Test of Creative Thinking Figural Scores across Age: A study in Spanish-Speaking Children and Adolescents.  

OpenAIRE

On the basis of a previous study carried out with Spanish-speaking children which indicates that the Creativity construct, operationalized by means of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT)-Figural, consists of two factors –Innovation and Adaptation– (Krumm, Lemos & Arán Filippetti, in press), the objective of the present work was to prove whether this structure is invariant across age. A sample of 652 Spanish-speaking children and adolescents aged 9-17 years of both sexes was te...

Krumm, Gabriela L.; Vanessa Arán Filippetti; María Aranguren; Viviana Lemos; Jael Vargas Rubilar

2013-01-01

122

What instructional skills and strategies do competent mathematics teachers use in teaching statistics in school mathematics during PCK development  

OpenAIRE

Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) comprises subject matter, content knowledge, instructional skills and strategies, conceptions in statistics teaching, and learners’ learning difficulties. This study focuses on the instructional skills and strategies used for teaching statistics during PCK development. Research findings show that these skills and strategies are not always apparent. A clear understanding of these skills and strategies, however, would be useful for mathematics teac...

Ijeh, Sunday Bomboi; Onwu, Gilbert O. M.

2013-01-01

123

The Relationship between Multiple Intelligences with Preferred Science Teaching and Science Process Skills  

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Full Text Available This study was undertaken to identify the relationship between multiple intelligences with preferred science teaching and science process skills. The design of the study is a survey using three questionnaires reported in the literature: Multiple Intelligences Questionnaire, Preferred Science Teaching Questionnaire and Science Process Skills Questionnaire. The study selected 300 primary school students from five (5 primary schools in Penang, Malaysia. The findings showed a relationship between kinesthetic, logical-mathematical, visual-spatial and naturalistic intelligences with the preferred science teaching. In addition there was a correlation between kinesthetic and visual-spatial intelligences with science process skills, implying that multiple intelligences are related to science learning.

Mohd Ali Samsudin

2015-02-01

124

The evaluation of a training program for improving residents' teaching skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

As a response to the growing recognition of the need for improvement in medical instructional practices, a training program on teaching skills for resident physicians in the East Tennessee State University College of Medicine was implemented. The program consisted of 13 weekly, one-hour, small-group sessions attended by 20 residents. The microteaching method was utilized for practicing instructional techniques. Significant gains in teaching performance and in attitude toward participating in a teaching skills program were demonstrated, on the basis of videotaped teaching performances and a written questionnaire, indicating that short training programs can assist physicians in the process of instructional improvement. PMID:7452703

Lawson, B K; Harvill, L M

1980-12-01

125

Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

AIM: The aim of this study is to compare student teachers and clinical associate professors regarding the quality of procedural skills teaching in terms of participants' technical skills, knowledge and satisfaction with the teaching. METHODS: This is an experimental, randomized, controlled study comparing the teaching of student teachers and associate professors regarding participants' learning outcome and satisfaction with the teaching. Two skills are chosen for the experiment, i.v.-access and bladder catheterization. Learning outcome is assessed by a pre- and post testing of the participants' knowledge and skills. Participants evaluate satisfaction with teaching on nine statements immediately after the teaching. RESULTS: In total 59 first year medical students are included as participants in the experiment. The students taught by student teachers perform just as well as the students taught by associate professors and in one skill--catheterization--they perform even better, mean post- minus pre-test scores 65.5 (SD 12.9) vs. 35.0 (SD 23.3), One-way ANOVA, p < 0.0001, effect size 1.62. Student teachers receive significantly more positive evaluations than associate professors on several statements. CONCLUSION: Trained student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep

Tolsgaard, Martin G; Gustafsson, Amandus

2007-01-01

126

The Effectiveness of the Constant Time Delay Procedure in Teaching Pre-School Academic Skills to Children with Developmental Disabilities in a Small Group Teaching Arrangement  

Science.gov (United States)

Children with developmental disabilities are trained using different teaching arrangements. One of these arrangements is called small-group teaching. It has been ascertained that a small-group teaching arrangement is more effective than a one-to-one teaching arrangement. In that sense, teaching academic skills to pre-school children in small-group…

Aldemir, Ozgul; Gursel, Oguz

2014-01-01

127

Developing Creative Teaching Module: Business Simulation in Teaching Strategic Management  

OpenAIRE

Globalization and liberalization in the business environment have changed the requirements of types and qualities of human capital needed by the corporate sector. In relation to this, business graduates not only need to have theoretical understanding, but they also need to have creative thinking, communication skills and decision making skills based on multidisciplinary knowledge. Simulation game in business education is suggested to fill the gap by exposing students to real business situatio...

Nor Liza Abdullah; Mohd Hizam Hanafiah; Noor Azuan Hashim

2013-01-01

128

Implementation of teaching Skills & Strategies in the Schools: A study of graduates of a teacher education program : Implementation of teaching Skills & Strategies in the Schools: A study of graduates of a teacher education program  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

‘Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ are two core (professional) modules offered at the two colleges of education in Bhutan to develop pedagogical knowledge and skills of student teachers. However, a tracer study (in press) done by Samtse College of Education [SCE] revealed teacher graduates’ (1) confusion over the two concepts, ‘teaching skill’ and ‘teaching strategy’ and (2) the lack of confidence in integrating the two in their daily teaching activities. Therefore, this study was carried out to find out the graduates’ understanding of the concepts and implementation of ‘Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ in the classroom. Further, it was aimed to find lapses, inappropriateness and irrelevancies in the two professional modules in which pedagogical concepts and skills were taught. Survey questionnaire, interview and participant observation were used to gather data to find out the use of teaching skills and strategies in the schools. Teacher graduates, both male and female having working experience of three years and above, teaching in Middle Secondary and Higher Secondary Schools, were selected as the participants in the study. Samples were drawn from the different parts of the country covering seventeen Dzongkhags. The study revealed adequate understanding of the concepts of professional modules. However, teachers were found to be grappling with the extra responsibilities affecting their planning to integrate skills and strategies into their teaching. Key words: Teaching skills, Teaching strategies, Microteaching

Kinley, Kinley; Choeda, Choeda

2013-01-01

129

Teaching Clinical Reasoning and Problem-solving Skills Using Human Patient Simulation  

OpenAIRE

This paper discusses using human patient simulation (HPS) to expose students to complex dynamic patient cases that require clinical judgment, problem-solving skills, and teamwork skills for success. An example of an HPS exercise used to teach multifaceted clinical concepts in a therapeutics course also is provided.

Vyas, Deepti; Ottis, Erica J.; Caligiuri, Frank J.

2011-01-01

130

Kindergarten Teachers Adjust Their Teaching Practices in Accordance with Children's Academic Pre-Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the extent to which kindergarten children's academic pre-skills are associated with their teachers' subsequent teaching practices. The pre-skills in reading and math of 1268 children (655 boys, 613 girls) were measured in kindergarten in the fall. A pair of trained observers used the Classroom Assessment Scoring System…

Pakarinen, Eija; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Siekkinen, Martti; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

2011-01-01

131

Mandating and Standardizing the Teaching of Critical Literacy Skills: A Cautionary Tale  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, I critique a component of the highly structured Open Court Reading curriculum designed to teach elementary children "inquiry and higher-order thinking" skills. The intended outcome of this component is, I argue, the production of critically literate and informed consumers of information. However, both the critical thinking skills…

Pandya, Jessica Zacher

2012-01-01

132

Teaching Leisure Skills to an Adult with Developmental Disabilities Using a Video Prompting Intervention Package  

Science.gov (United States)

The current study used a video prompting plus least-to-most prompting treatment package to teach a 35-year-old Caucasian man with Down Syndrome three leisure skills. Each leisure skill was task analyzed and the researchers created brief videos depicting the completion of individual steps. Using a multiple probe across behaviors design, the video…

Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Lambdin, Lindsay; Van Laarhoven, Toni; Johnson, Jesse W.

2013-01-01

133

Using Simultaneous Prompting to Teach Independent Living and Leisure Skills to Adults with Severe Intellectual Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

The acquisition of independent living and leisure skills enables adults to experience an enhanced quality of life by increasing competence, self-reliance, and the development of autonomy. This study examined the effectiveness of simultaneous prompting to teach behavior chains (i.e., independent living and leisure skills) to adults with SID…

Dollar, Chad A.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Alberto, Paul A.; Luke, Jaye K.

2012-01-01

134

Using a Constant Time Delay Procedure to Teach Foundational Swimming Skills to Children with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a constant time delay procedure to teach foundational swimming skills to three children with autism. The skills included flutter kick, front-crawl arm strokes, and head turns to the side. A multiple-probe design across behaviors and replicated across participants was used.…

Rogers, Laura; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Wolery, Mark

2010-01-01

135

THE TEACHING OF FUNCTIONAL LANGUAGE SKILLS IN A SECOND LANGUAGE TO A CHILD WITH AUTISM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article examined the rate of self-initiated communication acquisition, in a second language, of a child with autism. The language treatment objective was to teach functional communication skills in English through the use of Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS. The findings of this study show that it is possible for a child with autism to acquire functional communication skills in his second language even though he did not possess such communication skills in his first language.

Renee Chong

2006-01-01

136

Developing Student Critical Thinking Skills through Teaching Psychology: An Interview with Claudio S. Hutz.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents an interview with Claudio S. Hutz, who is dean of Instituto de Psicologia at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil, where he has been teaching psychology since 1977. Discusses topics such as teaching psychology in Brazil and developing critical thinking skills. (CMK)

McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri

2001-01-01

137

Teaching Residents Practice-Management Knowledge and Skills: An "in Vivo" Experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: This article explores the relevant data regarding teaching psychiatric residents practice management knowledge and skills. This article also introduces a unique program for teaching practice management to residents. Methods: A literature search was conducted through PubMed and "Academic Psychiatry". Additionally residents involved in…

Williams, Laurel Lyn

2009-01-01

138

The Strategies-for-Achievement Approach (stACH) for Teaching "Study Skills."  

Science.gov (United States)

A complete course, curriculum, and textbook were developed to teach college level "study skills" using an educational, psychology-based strategies-for-achievement (stACH) approach. The approach involved teaching students four major achievement strategies: (1) taking reasonable risk; (2) taking responsibility for outcomes; (3) searching the…

Tuckman, Bruce W.

139

Providing a Less Restrictive Environment for Profoundly Retarded Persons by Teaching Independent Walking Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Procedures were evaluated for teaching four institutionalized adult males with profound retardation necessary skills to increase their individual freedom of movement. Following baseline, a travel training program with a backward chaining format was implemented to teach each person to walk independently from his living area to school. (Author)

Gruber, Barbara; And Others

1979-01-01

140

Children's Teaching Skills: The Role of Theory of Mind and Executive Function  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching others effectively may rely on knowledge about the mind as well as self-control processes. The goal of this investigation was to explore the role of theory of mind (ToM) and executive function (EF) in children's developing teaching skills. Children 3.5-5.5 years of age (N = 82) were asked to teach a confederate learner how to play a board…

Davis-Unger, Angela C.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

2008-01-01

141

How to teach practical skills in medicine: out of hospital training  

OpenAIRE

“See one, do one, teach one” is the traditional paradigm for teaching medicine while working, the apprenticeship model. This paradigm is based on training during long working hours and with evaluation by mentors1. More recently, medical education is turning towards more structured programmes of teaching skills, where formal training can be objectively assessed using competency-based assessment2. At an undergraduate level this is driven by the requirement of a newly-qu...

Higgins, M. F.; Macken, Alan P.; Coyle, O.; Cullen, Walter; Mcgrath, D.; O Gorman, Clodagh S.

2013-01-01

142

Adivinanzas audiovisuales para ejercitar el pensamiento creativo infantil Audiovisual Riddles to Stimulate Children’s Creative Thinking  

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Full Text Available Para resolver una adivinanza hay que asociar ideas, analizar metáforas, descubrir analogías. Por eso, impulsar esta forma de entretenimiento infantil es un modo de ejercitar el pensamiento creativo. Sin embargo, existe un problema: las adivinanzas tradicionales son formas literarias que corresponden a una época pre-digital. ¿Cómo lograr, entonces, que tengan mayor aceptación entre los nativos digitales? Una posible solución sería crear adivinanzas audiovisuales diseñadas especialmente para YouTube. En esta investigación se realizaron cinco prototipos de adivinanzas audiovisuales con características creativas diferentes y se validaron con estudiantes de tercero a sexto grado de educación primaria. Los resultados de la validación permitieron identificar las actitudes, reacciones, interpretaciones y modos de razonamiento de los niños y niñas cuando intentan resolver este tipo de adivinanzas. También se identificaron los recursos de lenguaje y formatos creativos que funcionan mejor en una adivinanza audiovisual. En las conclusiones se destaca la necesidad de formular correctamente los enunciados de las adivinanzas audiovisuales y sus respectivas «pistas» para que los niños y niñas tengan la satisfacción intelectual y emocional de resolverlas. Se precisa, además, que leer o escuchar una adivinanza tradicional representa una experiencia cognitiva y sensorial muy distinta que interactuar con esa misma adivinanza en un lenguaje multimedia. Finalmente, se discute y analiza el rol mediador del docente y la importancia del aprendizaje colaborativo en los proyectos educativos que emplean tecnologías digitales.Solving riddles involves association of ideas, analysis of metaphors, and discovery of analogies. Therefore, promoting this type of children’s entertainment is a way to develop creative thinking. However, there is a problem: traditional riddles are literary forms that correspond to a pre-digital era. How can we increase its acceptance among the digital natives? One way might be creating audiovisual riddles specially designed for YouTube. In this research we made five prototypes of audiovisual riddles with different creative characteristics and validated them among 8-12 years old students. The validation results helped us to identify the attitudes, reactions, interpretations and ways of thinking of children when they try to solve such riddles. We also identified the resources of language and creative formats that fit best in audio-visual riddles. The outcome of this research emphasizes the need to correctly formulate the audiovisual riddle statements and their «clues» for children; this way we assure an intellectual and emotional satisfaction when solving them. It also concludes that reading or listening to traditional riddles are cognitive and sensory experiences that are very different from interacting with the same riddle in a multimedia language. Finally, we discuss and analyze the mediating role of the teacher and the importance of collaborative learning in educational projects using digital technologies.

Jorge Montalvo Castro

2011-03-01

143

Teaching Condom Use Skills: Practice is Superior to Observation  

OpenAIRE

Men exposed to a condom skills practice exercise were hypothesized to perform better on condom skills measures than those exposed only to a demonstration or to no intervention. As part of a larger NIDA Clinical Trials Network HIV Prevention protocol men in substance abuse treatment were administered male and female condom use skills measures (MCUS, FCUS) at pre-intervention, two weeks, 3 months and 6 months post-intervention. The MCUS and FCUS scores were compared for three intervention expos...

Calsyn, Donald A.; Hatch-maillette, Mary A.; Doyle, Suzanne R.; Cousins, Sarah; Chen, Techieh; Godinez, Melinda

2010-01-01

144

Teaching Information Evaluation and Critical Thinking Skills in Physics Classes  

Science.gov (United States)

The physics curriculum at all educational levels can be enriched to include tools for strengthening students' information evaluation skills. The "Report of the Joint APS-AAPT Task Force on Graduate Education in Physics" calls for such training to be part of graduate programs, but training to acquire these lifetime skills can be incorporated in the…

Popescu, Adriana; Morgan, James

2007-01-01

145

The need for professional training programs to improve faculty members teaching skills  

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Full Text Available There is no doubt that the large majority of faculty members are expert and knowledgeable in their specializations. Yet, we still find that university graduates are not as qualified as they are supposed to be. The poorer university students are, the more likely they are taught by unskilled teachers. Ironically, many studies have concluded that faculty members tend to believe that students lack the basic skills for college-level work (UCLA Survey, 2005, ignoring that they themselves lack the effective teaching skills. The Saudi government as such has realized that 21st century requires generic skills to be integrated in the curriculum which in turn obligates faculty members to improve their teaching skills accordingly. Saudi universities expect the Deanships for Academic Development across all universities to provide trainings on different teaching and learning skills to improve the quality of their faculty members. The purpose of this study was to investigate the need and the competencies that are required by facultymembers to acquire in Saudi universities to enable them achieve the standards stated by the NCAAA. A questionnaire and semistructured interviews were utilized to get the data. The sample consisted of 882 participants (students, faculty members, chairmen and colleges boards, colleges’ deans, and deanships’ deans from some universities in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The results showed the great need and importance of providing training programs to enhance and elevate faculty members' professional abilities in teaching. Many participants emphasized that in-service trainings should be mandated to ensure quality teaching.

Ismail A. Elmahdi

2013-07-01

146

Criteria of Total Quality Management of Faculty Teaching Skills: Perceptions of University Students  

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Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the degree of faculty members' practice of the teaching skills in the light of the criteria of Total Quality Management (TQM from the university students' perceptions at Al al-Bayt University. The study focuses on the impact of gender, college and degree of the faculty members' practice of the teaching skills in the light of TQM. The sample of the study consisted of (451 male and female students. A questionnaire of 72 items in four areas (planning, implementation, evaluation, communication followed a five–point Likert scale was answered. Software package of Statistical Sciences (SPSS was used to analyze the collected data. The results revealed that the faculty members' practice of teaching skills in light of the criteria of TQM is at a medium degree. However, the results showed no statistically significant differences in effect of the faculty members of the teaching skills in the light of the criteria of TQM in the fields of implementation, evaluation, and communication due to the variable of gender. Recommendations on applying TQM in teaching skills were included.

Awatif M. Abu-Al-Sha'r

2013-07-01

147

Reported goals of instructors of responsible conduct of research for teaching of skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) training grant requirement to provide training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) is now more than 20 years old. Implicit in the requirement is that this training will have an impact not only on what trainees know, but on what they know how to do. There is, however, a range of responses about what skills are seen to be necessary for the ethical practice of science. As part of a larger, earlier study examining RCR instructors' overall goals in teaching RCR, we asked 50 RCR instructors from 37 different institutions what their goals were for teaching skills in their RCR courses. The responses about what constituted necessary skills were wide ranging, from a focus on teaching the skill of ethical decision making to the perceived importance of ensuring that trainees understand the importance of the community in some research relationships. This diversity in responses about what skills should be taught in RCR courses is not especially surprising, given the variation in instructors, formats, instruction, goals, and outcome measures for RCR courses, but it does reinforce the necessity of giving more thought to what goals are to be achieved. This is true not only of skills to be learned, but of any other objectives one might have for research ethics teaching and learning. PMID:23651933

Plemmons, Dena K; Kalichman, Michael W

2013-04-01

148

Parents as Teachers: Teaching Parents How to Teach Toilet Skills to Their Children with Autism and Mental Retardation  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a parent training program for teaching toilet skills to children with autism and mental retardation. The study was conducted with three mothers and their children. A multiple probe design using probe sessions across subjects was used. The experimental procedure consisted of two…

Ozcan, Nihal; Cavkaytar, Atilla

2009-01-01

149

Teaching "Yes, And" … Improv in Sales Classes: Enhancing Student Adaptive Selling Skills, Sales Performance, and Teaching Evaluations  

Science.gov (United States)

In an application of experiential learning, assessment, and career development, this article reports a field experiment of teaching sales students adaptive selling skills via an "Improvisational (Improv) Comedy" technique: "Yes, And." Students learn this well-established theatrical improv method via classroom lecture,…

Rocco, Richard A.; Whalen, D. Joel

2014-01-01

150

LANGUAGE SKILLS AND THE CRITICAL THINKING D?L BECER?LER? VE ELE?T?REL DÜ?ÜNME  

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Full Text Available Critical thinking is one of the eight basic skills in the primary school curriculum which has been prepared with a constructivist approach. Teaching critical thinking in Turkish language lessons has an importance in reaching curricular aims. Critical thinking has bonds with skills such as creative thinking, communication, research making, problem solving, using ICT, entrepreneurship, and using Turkish appropriatelyCritical thinking is involved with questioning, interpreting and decision making skills in a skeptical approach. It contains sub-skills such as identifying cause and effect relations, catching similarities and differences, making classifications using certain criteria, determining validity of information, making analysis, evaluation, and inferencesTo develop and conserve language skills, teaching critical thinking skills is a very important task. Developing students’ critical thinking skills is essential in order to develop language skills such as listening, speaking, and writing. Curricular aims involved with critical reading, critical listening, and critical writing depend on critical thinking. Instructional methods which foster critical thinking skills should be employed in educational settings to develop basic language skills. Teacher’s role, approach and competency in critical thinking are also essential to create a critical thinking atmosphere.Connecting language skills with general skills is a part of learning philosophy in a constructivist approach. The goal of language teaching, the main mean of thinking that preparing students who can critically think become also one of the main goals of learning. When the expected achievement in language skills occurs in critical thinking, language development could be affected with individuals’ thinking development symmetrically. Critical reading, listening, speaking and creative writing could support development of such foundational skills; students’ creative thinking, communication skills, problem solving, and researching and decision making. For the purpose of what to do and what decision to make, individuals have to be problem solver, conscious to assessment and judgments, and explaining these judgments. The foundation of critical thinking is based on healthy, disciplined, systematic and queried thinking and for the development of critical thinking skills individuals should have enough thinking previously. The development of thinking and learning thinking help individuals to become themselves and structuring their own ideas. When the development in students’ reading skills turn to critical thinking for the students, they are more able to understand what they read and come to conclusion easily. Critical readers judge what they read and they may make comments and critics about what they read. They try to find implementation of the ideas that the writer explains in the content. Individuals’ understanding skills can occur both with reading and with listening. Critical listening is, in another way, a process of checking the accuracy of the information, understanding of this information, and discussing it. Speaking and writing skills which are part of explanation skills also helps the development of critical thinking. People who do critical explanations also have social skills, ability to be in groups, and ability to collaborate. In a learning setting where critical approach is used, students are more able to express their ideas in oral and in writings and these students are able to make comment about issues and provide solutions for these issues. During the process of critical writing, individuals come up with new ideas and start to have a broader perspective. The model of this study is literature review. Literature about critical thinking skills has been reviewed. Afterwards methods that should be employed in Turkish language lessons to foster critical thinking skills have been studied Yap?land?rmac? ö?renme yakla??m?na göre olu?turulan ilkö?retim program?nda yer verilen sekiz temel beceriden birisi de ele?tirel dü?ün

Adnan KARADÜZ

2010-07-01

151

Facilitating higher order thinking skills in nurse education: a prototype database for teaching wound assessment and management skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The introduction of university based nurse education in Australia has nursing students spending more time in the classroom and less time in clinical settings. This decrease in clinical exposure may result in reduced opportunities for students to develop pertinent patient assessment and management skills. This is particularly true of skills required for effective wound assessment and management. Computerised databases offer an innovative method of teaching or refining these skills in a cost and time-effective manner without risk to patients or students. Such technology can also provide important grounding in data identification, hypothesis testing, problem solving and clinical decision making skills. This paper explores the underlying pedagogical principles of database use and describes the development of the prototype closed database, DECUBITUS. The prototype database included the following data fields; physical assessment, clinical diagnosis, risk assessment, wound assessment and treatment modality. The introduction of more sophisticated databases will permit the storage of visual images of actual wounds thus providing an additional dimension to the teaching of wound assessment and management. PMID:10175429

Ribbons, R M; McKenna, L G

1997-01-01

152

Teaching creativity and inventive problem solving in science.  

Science.gov (United States)

Engaging learners in the excitement of science, helping them discover the value of evidence-based reasoning and higher-order cognitive skills, and teaching them to become creative problem solvers have long been goals of science education reformers. But the means to achieve these goals, especially methods to promote creative thinking in scientific problem solving, have not become widely known or used. In this essay, I review the evidence that creativity is not a single hard-to-measure property. The creative process can be explained by reference to increasingly well-understood cognitive skills such as cognitive flexibility and inhibitory control that are widely distributed in the population. I explore the relationship between creativity and the higher-order cognitive skills, review assessment methods, and describe several instructional strategies for enhancing creative problem solving in the college classroom. Evidence suggests that instruction to support the development of creativity requires inquiry-based teaching that includes explicit strategies to promote cognitive flexibility. Students need to be repeatedly reminded and shown how to be creative, to integrate material across subject areas, to question their own assumptions, and to imagine other viewpoints and possibilities. Further research is required to determine whether college students' learning will be enhanced by these measures. PMID:19723812

DeHaan, Robert L

2009-01-01

153

Office Skills: Junk Mail: Added Dimension to Teaching Records Management  

Science.gov (United States)

A junk mail filing simulation is described as a simple but effective approach to teaching records management. Implementation of the approach is described in sixteen steps. Eight objectives and five variations to the simulation are included. (SH)

Klemin, Wayne

1977-01-01

154

The teaching of interviewing skills: comparison of experienced and novice trainers.  

Science.gov (United States)

During a clerkship in psychiatry thirty-six medical students were randomly allocated to one of three teachers who differed widely in their experience of teaching essential interviewing skills. Each teacher taught two groups of six medical students using videotape feedback and discussion of practice interviews. Independent raters who were blind to the teachers to whom the students had been assigned rate pre- and post-training interviews. All three teachers proved effective in teaching interviewing skills and it is concluded that most teachers could probably be taught to carry out this training. PMID:6621429

Fairbairn, S; Maguire, P; Chambers, H; Sanson-Fisher, R

1983-09-01

155

Criteria of Total Quality Management of Faculty Teaching Skills: Perceptions of University Students  

OpenAIRE

This study aimed to identify the degree of faculty members' practice of the teaching skills in the light of the criteria of Total Quality Management (TQM) from the university students' perceptions at Al al-Bayt University. The study focuses on the impact of gender, college and degree of the faculty members' practice of the teaching skills in the light of TQM. The sample of the study consisted of (451) male and female students. A questionnaire of 72 items in four areas (planning, implementa...

Awatif M. Abu-Al-Sha'r; Mohammad Aboud AL-Harahsheh

2013-01-01

156

Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Bahia Abdallah,1 Jihad Irani,2 Silva Dakessian Sailian,1 Vicky George Gebran,1 Ursula Rizk1 1Nursing Program at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Balamand, 2Faculty of Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon Abstract: Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. Keywords: cross-professional education, CPE, clinical skills, medical education, nursing faculty, clinical performance

Abdallah B

2014-11-01

157

Teaching evaluation: putting anthropological research skills to work  

OpenAIRE

In this essay I reflect on the process of teaching evaluation not only as a general theoretical principle, but also as a form of practice. I describe and analyse how I have incorporated evaluation strategies within my first few years of teaching. My views are grounded in my recent experience as an undergraduate tutor at the University of Oxford, as well as my previous professional experience working as a project evaluator and facilitator for arts and media organizations. I begin this essay by...

Blum-ross, Alicia

2011-01-01

158

Evaluation of a learner-designed course for teaching health research skills in Ghana  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background In developing countries the ability to conduct locally-relevant health research and high quality education are key tools in the fight against poverty. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel UK accredited, learner-designed research skills course delivered in a teaching hospital in Ghana. Methods Study participants were 15 mixed speciality health professionals from Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. ...

Agbenyega Tsiri; Bedu-Addo George; Ansong Daniel; Bates Imelda; Akoto Alex; Nsiah-Asare Anthony; Karikari Patrick

2007-01-01

159

Developing Students’ Critical Thinking Skills by Task-Based Learning in Chemistry Experiment Teaching  

OpenAIRE

Task-Based Learning (TBL) is a student-centered, teacher-guided and task-performed teaching approach. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of task-based learning (TBL) in chemistry experiment teaching on promoting high school students’ critical thinking skills in Xi’an, China. To achieve the aims, a pre-test and post-test experimental design with an experimental group and a control group was employed. Stu...

Qing Zhou; Qiuyan Huang; Hong Tian

2013-01-01

160

A First-Year Course That Teaches Research Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

In the Fall semester of 2009, I taught a first-year course that focused on skills required to successfully complete undergraduate research. This paper will discuss the Simpson College first-year course requirements, my course goals, the graph theory topics covered, student feedback, and instructor reflection.

Czarneski, Debra

2013-01-01

161

Learning through Writing: Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in Writing Assignments  

Science.gov (United States)

Traditional writing assignments often fall short in addressing problems in college students' writing as too often these assignments fail to help students develop critical thinking skills and comprehension of course content. This article reports the use of a two-part (staged) writing assignment with postscript as a strategy for improving critical…

Cavdar, Gamze; Doe, Sue

2012-01-01

162

Teaching Problem Solving Skills to Elementary Age Students with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

Students with disabilities need problem-solving skills to promote their success in solving the problems of daily life. The research into problem-solving instruction has been limited for students with autism. Using a problem-solving intervention and the Self Determined Learning Model of Instruction, three elementary age students with autism were…

Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Barnett, Crystal; Pavelek, Karin; Nguyen, Hoang; Sparks, Shannon L.

2014-01-01

163

Skill Generalisation in Teaching Spelling to Children with Learning Difficulties  

Science.gov (United States)

A central focus in remedial teaching is the generalisation of responses to contexts in which a student has never been explicitly instructed. Remarkably little is known about how and when generalisation occurs. In this article we examine generalisation effects in the context of spelling. Three areas are discussed: generalisation between spelling…

Kohnen, Saskia; Nickels, Lyndsey; Coltheart, Max

2010-01-01

164

Teaching Critical Literacy Skills through the Natural Environment "as" Text  

Science.gov (United States)

Utilizing ecosocial theory and the notion of the environment as text, two teachers, the vice principal and a university researcher, engaged in a year-long, place-based, qualitative action research project in which they used the environment as the integrating context for teaching critical literacy, mathematics, and science. The project revealed…

Chambers, Joan M.; Radbourne, Christy

2014-01-01

165

The Benefits of Teaching Self-Management Skills to Students of Psychology  

Science.gov (United States)

The various student gains and reported satisfaction with self-management projects have been well documented. However, we found that few psychology programs explicitly teach these skills. In this paper we demonstrate how self-management projects can meet nine out of the ten undergraduate student learning goals outlined by the APA Task Force (2002).…

Kazemi, Ellie; Rice, Brian; Rylander, Alyssa; Morgan, Shannon F.

2011-01-01

166

The geriatrics excellence in teaching series: an integrated educational skills curriculum for faculty and fellows development.  

Science.gov (United States)

Geriatricians need to acquire skills in teaching and curriculum development to educate physicians caring for the growing population of adults aged 65 and older. To meet this challenge, educators in the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development introduced a monthly seminar series to promote the development of geriatrics faculty and fellows as clinician educators. Ten educational skills development seminars were incorporated into geriatrics grand rounds in the first year of the program. These sessions were implemented using a variety of active learning strategies to expose participants to innovative adult learning-centered approaches for enhancing learning and instruction in medical education. Participants assessed all sessions using a feedback form and were surveyed at the end of the series to measure their overall satisfaction with the program and ascertain its effect on their roles as educators. Participants rated individual sessions highly, and respondents to the survey at the end of the course agreed that the Geriatrics Excellence in Teaching Series provided them with resources for use in their teaching practices and attested to having already applied knowledge and skills learned in the series in their teaching practices. Key elements for the program's success included an upfront needs assessment to prioritize topics, interactive sessions promoting skill development through actual practice of various strategies, open discussions to identify challenges and solutions, and a convenient and customary time slot. This format can be replicated with other geriatrics programs, providing a needed opportunity for faculty and fellows to learn about education principles. PMID:18312312

Pinheiro, Sandro O; Heflin, Mitchell T

2008-04-01

167

Teaching Communication and Listening Skills to Medical Students Using Life Review with Older Adults  

Science.gov (United States)

The University of South Carolina School of Medicine introduced a seminar in 2003 to teach communication and listening skills to third year medical students. The students learned a structured communication format called "L-I-S-T-E-N" which they utilized to conduct a life review with an adult over age 65. The faculty evaluated this educational…

McFarland, Kay; Rhoades, Donna; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, Paul

2006-01-01

168

Purposely Teaching for the Promotion of Higher-Order Thinking Skills: A Case of Critical Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

This longitudinal case-study aimed at examining whether purposely teaching for the promotion of higher order thinking skills enhances students' critical thinking (CT), within the framework of science education. Within a pre-, post-, and post-post experimental design, high school students, were divided into three research groups. The experimental…

Miri, Barak; Ben-Chaim, David; Zoller, Uri

2007-01-01

169

Effectiveness of the Modified Intensive Toilet Training Method on Teaching Toilet Skills to Children with Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to determine effectiveness of a modified version of Azrin and Foxx's (1971) intensive toilet training method on teaching of toilet skills to children with autism. This method consists of administering extra fluids and a time schedule, but does not use overcorrection procedures. Implementation requires a study of…

Ardiç, Avsar; Cavkaytar, Atilla

2014-01-01

170

Teaching a Course in Abnormal Psychology and Behavior Intervention Skills for Nursing Home Aides.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes an 11-week course given at a nursing home to nursing home aides that focused on abnormal psychology and behavior intervention skills. Discusses the course goals, class composition, and course description. Addresses the problems and issues encountered with teaching this course to a nontraditional population in an unconventional setting.…

Glenwick, David S.; Slutzsky, Mitchel R.; Garfinkel, Eric

2001-01-01

171

Movement Exploration as a Technique for Teaching Pre-Swimming Skills to Students with Developmental Delays.  

Science.gov (United States)

Background, rationale, and techniques for using movement exploration to teach preswimming skills to developmentally delayed persons are given. Objectives (beyond the primary one of safety) of such a program include body awareness, spatial awareness, movement, and perceptual motor functions. Guidelins for activity selection and adaptation are…

Buis, Joyce M.; Schane, Catherine S.

1980-01-01

172

Teaching Interview Skills to Undergraduate Engineers: An Emerging Area of Library Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Librarianship is one of a limited number of disciplines that deliberately learn and practice the art of the interview. For engineering librarians, this gives expertise and a role in teaching professional skills that are increasingly expected in the engineering profession. The reference interview and design interview have many similarities. Some…

Nelson, Megan Sapp

2009-01-01

173

The Million Dollar Difference and 21st Century Teaching Skills Project  

Science.gov (United States)

With a limited budget, but a critical need to develop 21st century marketplace skills, Georgia Perimeter College (GPC) developed the Million Dollar Difference Campaign. Focusing on how quality instruction affects retention and student outcomes, GPC re-energized a 1000-faculty workforce in one year through a series of innovative teaching…

Moon, Debi; Moolenaar-Wirsiy, Pamela

2008-01-01

174

Learning 21st-Century Skills Requires, 21st-Century Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

For students to learn 21st-century skills, we will have to teach them differently than we have in the past. The outdated, transmission model, through which teachers transmit factual knowledge to students via lectures and textbooks, remains the dominant approach to compulsory education in much of the world, yet it is not the most effective way to…

Saavedra, Anna Rosefsky; Opfer, V. Darleen

2012-01-01

175

Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model  

Science.gov (United States)

Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

Santana Arroyo, Sonia

2013-01-01

176

The Use of Computer-Generated Speech in Training Basic Teaching Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Description of microcomputer-based simulations used to help teachers-in-training acquire basic teaching and classroom intervention skills highlights the Speech Synthesizing Simulation, which is designed to train speech language clinicians. Computer-generated verbal exchanges between a teacher and a class of computer-defined pupils during a…

Strang, Harold R.; And Others

1988-01-01

177

The Impact of Faculty Teaching Practices on the Development of Students' Critical Thinking Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Colleges and universities recognize that one of the primary goals of higher education is to promote students' ability to think critically. Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education (WNS), this study examined the relationship between faculty teaching practices and the development of students' critical thinking skills

Shim, Woo-jeong; Walczak, Kelley

2012-01-01

178

Teaching Critical Thinking for Transfer across Domains: Dispositions, Skills, Structure Training, and Metacognitive Monitoring.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents four-part empirical model for teaching and learning critical thinking. Model consists of dispositional or attitudinal component, instruction in and practice with critical-thinking skills, structure-training activities designed to facilitate transfer across contexts, and metacognitive component used to direct and assess thinking. Contains…

Halpern, Diane F.

1998-01-01

179

Using Classwide Peer Tutoring To Teach Beginning Algebra Problem-Solving Skills in Heterogeneous Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study compared the effectiveness of using classwide peer tutoring (CWPT) in 14 heterogeneous eighth-grade math classrooms with traditional independent student practice to teach problem-solving skills to students in beginning algebra. Both CWPT and independent practice were equally effective strategies with students identified as at risk or…

Allsopp, David H.

1997-01-01

180

Examining the Epistemological Beliefs and Problem Solving Skills of Preservice Teachers during Teaching Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aims to examine the development of preservice teachers' epistemological beliefs and problem solving skills in the process of teaching practice. Participants of this descriptive study were senior students from Gazi University's Faculty of Vocational Education ("n" = 189). They completed the Epistemological Belief…

Erdamar, Gurcu; Alpan, Gulgun

2013-01-01

181

Considerations in Teaching Higher Order Thinking Skills to Students with Mild Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews special considerations in teaching higher order thinking skills to students with mild disabilities, focusing on curriculum implications; principles of instruction (prior knowledge, connections between new and existing knowledge, self-regulated learning, and impact of social setting); the use of an anchored instructional…

Moore, Prisca R.; And Others

1993-01-01

182

Could MOOCs Answer the Problems of Teaching AQF-Required Skills in Australian Tertiary Programmes?  

Science.gov (United States)

From 2015, Australian universities will be required to demonstrate that their programmes explicitly teach and assess achievement of, knowledge and skills, and the application of both as specified by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF). Over the last twenty years, the sector has applied significant effort and resources to embedding the…

Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

2013-01-01

183

Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder  

Science.gov (United States)

This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to…

Waltz, Jennifer; Dimeff, Linda A.; Koerner, Kelly; Linehan, Marsha M.; Taylor, Laura; Miller, Christopher

2009-01-01

184

An Alternative Approach for Designing and Teaching Communication Skills to University of Technology Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article examines the contents and teaching strategies of communication skills courses at a South African higher institution: Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT. It seeks to understand why the courses have not been very responsive to increasing academic and professional challenges undergraduate students’ experience at this university. Also, it proposes alternative contents and methods of teaching that can ensure that these courses remain relevant to the diversity of vocational diploma programmes offered by the university. The article is written against the backdrop of conceptions of ‘unpreparedness’ and ‘disadvantage’ repeatedly used by academics of this institution to justify the poor academic performance of students.The article draws on data gleaned from sustained one-on-one interviews with fifteen students and four communication skills lecturers as well as on course reflections with 1st year students collected during one academic year. This empirical data revealed that Communication courses provide a unique space for the development of generic cognitive skills which are critical for academic development and which can put graduates at a competitive advantage in the workplace. However it argues that for these courses to provide students with lifelong academic and professional skills, existing curricula and teaching approaches should be revised. This is because the current delivery methods are seemingly very pedantic, less stimulating and do not promote higher-order thinking in students. This piece therefore recommends a model, which focuses on the development of metacognitive skills such as critical thinking, creative and innovative thinking as well as problem solving.

Ernest Pineteh

2014-03-01

185

PILOTing Undergraduate Students to Hands-On Teaching and Research Skills  

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Full Text Available Undergraduate research can make a positive impact on science education. Unfortunately, the one studentone mentor paradigm of undergraduate research generates a wide range of variability in the student s experience and further limits its availability to a select few students. In contrast, a single faculty member can offer multiple undergraduate teaching positions that provide a consistent experience for the student. We attempted to combine the undergraduate research and teaching experiences in an internship practicum called Peer Instruction and Laboratory Occupational Training (PILOT. Students enrolled in PILOT served as teaching assistants for the upper division Quantitative Biological Methods (QBM laboratory course. In addition, PILOT students worked on an independent lab project that provided them with hands-on training and supported the QBM course. The development of presentation and teaching skills was also emphasized in PILOT. These activities were designed to improve student communication skills, lab skills, and knowledge of molecular biology content. Here, we describe the PILOT curriculum and report the results of an anonymous assessment survey administered to 75 students who had completed PILOT in the previous five semesters. Our data indicate that PILOT provides an effective format to expand undergraduate opportunities for research and teaching experiences.

Robert A. Borgon

2013-01-01

186

Information Literacy – a New Approach Supporting Teaching Skills Development  

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Full Text Available Information literacy represents a determining factor in the development of the information society because a society based on lifelong training cannot be imagined without an adequate information literacy. In this sense, it becomes the primordial condition of the professionalism and success of the future specialist in any domain. This is why, simultaneously to his professional training, a student must acquire habits of scientific information and his own experience related to scientific information. Information literacy skills constitute the key factor in lifelong learning, being the first step on the road towards the realization of the educational goals. In the present paper, we aim to highlight the primordial role played by information literacy in the education of any individual in the society and also the help it provides to academics in the development of their didactic skills.

Agnes Erich

2012-01-01

187

A case study for teaching information literacy skills  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background The Internet has changed contemporary workplace skills, resulting in a need for proficiency with specific digital, online and web-based technologies within the fields of medicine, dentistry and public health. Although younger students, generally under 30 years of age, may appear inherently comfortable with the use of technology-intensive environments and digital or online search methods, competence in information literacy among these students may be lackin...

Kingsley Karl; Kingsley Karla V

2009-01-01

188

Killing Two Birds with the Same Stone. Higher Order Skills Embedded in E-teaching Strategies  

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Full Text Available Meta-cognitive skills have become a sine qua non in any 21st century teaching approach from primary, lower- and upper-secondary education, tertiary or university level. Whilst the traditional recipe of instruction based on “what to teach” has consumed so much effort, time, and energies meant at transmitting and acquiring knowledge, little or no attention has been allotted to higher-order skills which, once embedded in a curriculum and further-on released within a teaching-learning-evaluating paradigm, could make a qualitative difference. This paper aims at providing a scaffolding strategy of launching a blended learning curriculum online,as any specialist in education would love to “kill two birds with the same stone”.

Monica Giuchici

2011-11-01

189

Activities to Enhance Social, Emotional, and Problem-Solving Skills: Seventy-Six Activities that Teach Children, Adolescents, and Adults Skills Crucial to Success in Life. Second Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

This book provides descriptions of 76 engaging activities that can be used to teach children, adolescents, and adults valuable social, emotional, and problem-solving skills. Some of the skills taught include identifying and expressing one's own emotions, identifying emotions in others, coping with stressors, making and keeping friends, setting…

Malouff, John M.; Schutte, Nicola S.

2007-01-01

190

The Use of Video Role Play for Teaching Therapeutic Communication Skills  

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Full Text Available Background: Effective Communication is a fundamental skill for practice across health care settings and is a component ofundergraduate nursing programs around the world. Resource materials appropriate for the teaching of communication in an Asiancontext are lacking.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a self-developed video using role play in facilitating teaching andlearning associated with therapeutic communication.Methods: Videos were produced which demonstrated the fundamental communication skills of listening, understanding,exploring and comforting/supporting, using role play. These were shown to Year 1 nursing students in tutorials over four weeks.Their usefulness was evaluated using a self-developed questionnaire. Among 74 questionnaires distributed at the end of thefourth tutorial, 72 were returned, with a 97% response rate.Results: Most students agreed that the video clips provided useful examples for role-playing the communication skills (89%,helped trigger them to perform role-playing (74%, were useful to improve understanding of different communication skills(93% and helped them learn from other students’ role-playing performance (87%. Overall impression of using the videos in thetutorial teaching was very useful (27% and useful (68%.Conclusions: Most students valued the videos developed purposely for teaching therapeutic communication and recommendedthat the videos be used in the future. Using video role plays facilitated the teaching and learning process and enhancedundergraduate nursing students’ understanding and application of communication skills. More video clips will be developed inthe future, with improved quality and with a broader range of health care communication scenarios demonstrated in order to beused more widely.

Elaine Ng

2011-01-01

191

Teaching Reading Skills in the EFL Class. A Practical Approach  

OpenAIRE

Teaching reading first requires careful consideration regarding the choice of text that may yield the richest and most relevant exposure to language. Reading is most effective through a top-down approach and students must develop speed and efficiency by avoiding sub-vocalisation, focusing on key words and taking in clusters of meaning at one time. Pre-reading for gist speeds up understanding by discovery of the text’s structure and of the type of paragraph in question. Explanatory paraphras...

Ovidiu Aniculaese

2008-01-01

192

The design, delivery and evaluation of an essential teaching skills course for preceptors in family medicine  

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Full Text Available Objectives: This paper outlines the design, delivery and evaluation of a hybrid face-to-face/online Essential Teaching Skills for Preceptors in Family Medicine course. Methods: Eighty-six preceptors attended one of ten four-hour Essential Teaching Skills for Preceptors course workshops. Data were collected through post-workshop evaluation surveys, post-module online evaluation surveys, post-workshop focus groups, and a final online reflective exercise. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed by grouping common codes together to form themes. Evaluation surveys were analyzed using descriptive statistics and response frequencies. Results: A total of 79(68/86 workshop participants completed the post-workshop evaluation survey. However, only 36(31/86 of workshop participants completed the online modules and online evaluation surveys. Preceptors' responses from the focus groups and open-ended questions on the workshop evaluation survey emerged into seven themes: Sharing, Content, Support, Learning, Back to Basics, Course Facilitators, and Improvements. Conclusions: Faculty appreciated that the course development team addressed their expressed desire to become better teachers and offered 'in-house' faculty development. Low participation in the online modules indicated that preceptors preferred the face-to-face workshop. It is our expectation that other family medicine departments, as well as faculties of medicine, can benefit from our experiences designing and teaching the Essential Teaching Skills course as well as from using or adapting the ready-made workshop participant guide.

Colla J. MacDonald

2013-07-01

193

Teaching interpersonal skills in an international design-build course  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) started the CDIO concept in the autumn of 2008. The aim with this was to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers. The working conditions of a typical engineer involve many other fields than just those requiring technical skills. Interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important, including communication, teamwork and leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the co-operation between DTU and Metropolia on the development of an International Communication Course for the engineering students and to emphasize the importance of including a course like this into the CDIO concept, to be worked on in the process of further development. The course described in this paper is a strictly non-engineering course in communication; it is special in that its chief purpose is to bring into focus the fact that students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process. This is in stark contrast to a teacher giving lectures about communication, leaving the students passive listeners. The personal involvement aroused a negative reaction from several students at the beginning of the course however, during the one- week course the students gained a better understanding of the importance of learning how to communicate appropriately. Altogether, the four key questions dealing with the quality of the course show a very high satisfaction with the instruction. The grades one and two (1 best/very much, 5 worst/very little) of the responses to these four questions are ranging on average from 69.5% to 88% (on a yearly basis). The positive responses indicate that the students are very satisfied with the course recognising the need for education on international communication.

Christensen, JØrgen Erik; Karhu, Markku

2011-01-01

194

Teacher-Made Tactile Science Materials with Critical and Creative Thinking Activities for Learners Including Those with Visual Impairments  

Science.gov (United States)

Gifted students with visual impairments are twice exceptional learners and may not evidence their advanced science aptitudes without appropriate accommodations for learning science. However, effective tactile science teaching materials may be easily made. Recent research has shown that when tactile materials are used with "all" students…

Teske, Jolene K.; Gray, Phyllis; Kuhn, Mason A.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Smith, Latisha L.; Alsubia, Sukainah A.; Ghayoorad, Maryam; Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean Suchsland

2014-01-01

195

Teaching Students to Learn and to Work Well with 21st Century Skills: Unpacking the Career and Life Skills Domain of the New Learning Paradigm  

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Full Text Available In Do You Want Your Students to Be Job-Ready With 21st Century Skills? Kivunja (2014a draws on the work by the Partnership For Teaching 21st Century Skills (P21 reported by Trilling and Fadel (2009, to articulate that the skills that young people need to succeed as individuals, citizens and workers in the 21st century fall into four domains. As reported by Trilling and Fadel (2009 those four domains are the Traditional Core subjects and Skills domain, the Learning and Innovations Skills domain, the Career and Life Skills domain, as well as the Digital Literacies Skills domain. The pedagogical move from teaching the traditional core skills of literacy and numeracy to include these additional themes and skills of the 21st century is characterized by Kivunja (2014a as the pedagogical shift that is needed to ensure that on graduation, students will be job-ready with the skills most in demand in the 21st century workplace. Arguing that the components of the Traditional Core Skills domain such as the orthodoxy 3Rs of reading, -riting and rithmentic are well known, Kivunja (2014b in Innovative Pedagogies in Higher Education to Become Effective Teachers of 21st Century Skills, draws on the excellent work of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21, 2008 and on the Framework for 21st Century Learning (P21, 2011 to unpack the skills of the Learning and Innovations Skills domain (LIS. In that discussion, Kivunja (2014b argues strongly that it is essential that students be explicitly taught the skills of critical thinking and problem solving, effective communication, collaboration, as well as creativity and innovation, so as to make sure that they are well equipped with the Learning and Innovation Skills (LIS. This article, builds on the work of Kivunja cited above, (Kivunja, 2014a and 2014b, to extend an understanding of the new learning paradigm by discussing its Career and Life Skills (CLS domain. The article explains what the skills in this domain involve and discusses how the relevant skills can be taught to help prepare students for success in whatever workplaces, trades, occupations or professions they will join on their graduation into the 21st century Digital Economy.

Charles Kivunja

2014-10-01

196

Learning Theories and Skills in online Second Language Teaching and Learning : Dilemmas and challenges.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

For decades foreign and second language teachers have taken advantage of the technology development and ensuing possibilities to use e-learning facilities for language training. Since the 1980s, the use of computer assisted language learning (CALL), Internet, web 2.0, and various kinds of e-learning technology has been developed and researched comprehensively to extend predominantly communicative language teaching approaches focusing on training language skills. While international, in the 2000s the use of web 2.0 technologies in particular has been introduced for developing reading and writing skills in Denmark with special attention towards the development of web-based materials for Danish pronunciation. This paper sets out to introduce differences between the international and Danish use of web-based language learning and teaching. Finally, dilemmas and challenges for the use of CALL, IT, and web 2.0 in

Petersen, Karen Bjerg

2014-01-01

197

Developing teaching skills for the internationalized university: A Danish project  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

As an increasing number of higher education institutions offer degree programs taught in English, university management as well as teachers on the ground realize that while the English proficiency of faculty and students is important, there is more to it than just that; students and faculty not only have different first languages, they also come from different cultures, with tacit knowledge and expectations about what is expected in the multilingual and multicultural classroom in which English is the one language shared by all, and in which linguistic, cultural and educational issues all play complex and interlocking roles. This has created a pressing need to explore, develop and share strategies for addressing the needs of English-medium lecturers faced with the challenges and opportunities presented by the multicultural classroom. This poster will present the outcomes of a major project that has attempted to address these needs by designing, piloting and revising a set of resources available online for lecturers teaching through the medium of English in multicultural university settings.

Lauridsen, Karen M.; Cozart, Stacey Marie

198

EFFECTS OF TEACHING METACOGNITION STRATEGIES TO LISTENING OMPREHENSION SKILLS AND ATTITUDE TOWARD LISTENING  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this research is determining the effect of teaching metacognition strategies to the fifth grade students according to their listening comprehension skills and students’ attitudes toward listening. The study group of the research consists of 65 fifth grade students at two elementary schools in the province of K?r?kkale. In the study, mixed method which both quantitative and qualitative research methods are used together for collecting, analysing and interpreting data. During...

Katranci, Mehmet; Yangin, Banu

2013-01-01

199

The Impact of Teaching Critical Thinking Skills on Reading Comprehension of Iranian EFL Learners  

OpenAIRE

In line with the studies confirming the positive relationship between critical thinking ability and language proficiency, this study intended to investigate the impact of teaching critical thinking skills on reading comprehension ability, as well as the effect of applying debate on critical thinking of EFL learners. For this purpose 60 intermediate students were assigned to two experimental and control groups after being homogenized through a Nelson test. Afterwards, a reading comprehension a...

Mansoor Fahim; Maryam Sa’eepour

2011-01-01

200

Self-administered written prompts to teach home accident prevention skills to adults with brain injuries.  

OpenAIRE

This study evaluated the use of written checklists and task analyses as self-administered prompts to teach home accident prevention skills to 4 adults with brain injuries. Subsequent to baseline, participants used written checklists that identified potential in-home hazards but did not prompt behaviors necessary for hazard remediation. Written individualized task analyses, incorporating specific behavioral steps for correcting hazards that participants had failed to remediate during the check...

O Reilly, M. F.; Green, G.; Braunling-mcmorrow, D.

1990-01-01

201

Communication skills for end-of-life nursing care. Teaching strategies from the ELNEC curriculum.  

Science.gov (United States)

The End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) is a train-the-trainer educational program that helps nursing faculty integrate care of the dying patient and the patient's family into the nursing curriculum. This article presents pedagogical techniques derived from the ELNEC teaching module on communication and key content areas for developing communication skills in end-of-life care. Competent end-of-life nursing care begins with an understanding of communication techniques and their potential impact on care. PMID:14528862

Matzo, Marianne LaPorte; Sherman, Deborah Witt; Sheehan, Denice C; Ferrell, Betty Rolling; Penn, Barbara

2003-01-01

202

Level of Teaching Skills and Interest in Teaching Improvement as Perceived by Faculty in a Land-Grant College of Agriculture.  

Science.gov (United States)

According to responses from 113 agriculture faculty, they had high levels of skill and interest in traditional teaching methods, but little interest or skill in such nontraditional methods as case studies, discovery learning, and peer observation. They had a high level of interest in learning about educational technologies. (SK)

Wardlow, George W.; Johnson, Donald M.

1999-01-01

203

The impact of a multiple intelligences teaching approach drug education programme on drug refusal skills of Nigerian pupils.  

Science.gov (United States)

The rising incidence of drug abuse among youths in Nigeria is a source of concern for health educators. This study was carried out on primary six pupils to determine the effect of a Multiple Intelligences Teaching Approach Drug Education Programme (MITA-DEP) on pupils' acquisition of drug refusal skills. A programme of drug education based on the Multiple Intelligences Teaching Approach (MITA) was developed. An experimental group was taught using this programme while a control group was taught using the same programme but developed based on the Traditional Teaching Approach. Pupils taught with the MITA acquired more drug refusal skills than those taught with the Traditional Teaching Approach. Urban pupils taught with the MITA acquired more skills than rural pupils. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean refusal skills of male and female pupils taught with the MITA. PMID:25288586

Nwagu, Evelyn N; Ezedum, Chuks E; Nwagu, Eric K N

2014-10-01

204

Effectiveness Of Value Analysis Model Of Teaching In Developing Value Processing Skills Among Secondary School Students  

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Full Text Available Abstract:Value education is of having great significance as it helps in the full development of child's personality in its physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects, and inculcate good manners and responsibility and cooperative citizenship and develop respect for the individual and society. Such value education should help to eliminate obscurantism, religious fanaticism, violence, superstitions and fatalism. In every individual, there is not one value but many and often in contradiction. When different values make claim on man at the same time and in the same situation, then he makes use of processing of values. The value processing skills in this study are; choosing freely, choosing from alternatives, choosing after consideration of consequences, prizing and cherishing, publicly affirming when appropriate, acting when situation demands, and acting with consistency and repetition. The experimental method was carried out for a sample of 248 secondary school students. The tools used in this study are the comprehensive instructional material based on value analysis model of teaching, worksheet for this model, and value processing skills scale. The major findings of the study revealed the comprehensive instructional material based on value analysis model of teaching is effective in developing value processing skills of secondary school students than activity oriented method of teaching.

G. Lokanadha Reddy

2013-09-01

205

A Novel Educational Game for teaching Emotion Identification Skills to Preschoolers with Autism Diagnosis  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Emotion recognition is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in understanding and expressing emotions. Those deficits seem to be rather permanent so intervention tools for improving those impairments are desirable. Educational interventions for teaching emotion recognition should occur as early as possible. It is argued that Serious Games can be very effective in the areas of therapy and education for children with autism. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Before the age of 6, most children with autism do not have such basic motor skills in order to manipulate a mouse or a keyboard. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game, which provides physical interaction with natural user interface (NUI), we aim to support early intervention and to enhance emotion recognition skills.

Christinaki, Eirini; Vidakis, Nikolaos

2014-01-01

206

Involving students in real-world research: a pilot study for teaching public health and research skills  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background There is some evidence that medical students consider population health issues less important than other domains in the health sciences and attitudes to this field may become more negative as training progresses. A need to improve research skills among medical students has also been suggested. Therefore we piloted an integrative teaching exercise that combined teaching of research skills and public health, with real-world research. Methods Th...

Wilson Nick; Howden-Chapman Philippa; Baker Michael G; Millar Elinor; Dickson Nigel

2009-01-01

207

A model for changing teachers' attitudes towards the value of teaching critical thinking skills : school management perspective / Jacobus A. Souls.  

OpenAIRE

The primary aim of the study was to design a model for changing teachers' attitudes towards the value of teaching critical thinking skills. Currently, information regarding the conceptualisation of this topic is inadequate and vague. In this study the nature of the complexities involved in the management and implementation of the teaching of critical thinking skills were researched through a literature study and an empirical investigation. A model was then designed for the effective managemen...

Souls, Jacobus Abram

2009-01-01

208

Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor' on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Methods Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC. Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Results Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part of their career. However, whilst a number of students reported that their views of teachers and teaching had changed as a result of participation, this did not translate into significant changes in responses to questions that explored their views of the roles and qualities required of a good clinical teacher. Conclusion Findings affirm the benefits to volunteer tutors of cross-year peer tutoring, particularly in terms of skills enhancement and reinforcement of positive attitudes towards future teaching responsibilities, and have implications for the design and organisation of such programmes.

Zamora Javier

2007-06-01

209

The Effect of Teaching Practice Conducted by Using Metacognition Strategies on Students’ Reading Comprehension Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of teaching practise conducted by using metacognitive strategies on students’ reading comprehension skills at Turkish language course. For this purpose, this study has been carried out with 65 students at 5th grade of secondary education in 2012–2013 academic year. In the research, pre-test post-test control group design of experiment method has been used. While the subjects have been taught to students in experimental group by using metacognitive strategies in addition to teacher’s book, the same subjects have been taught to students in control group as they are stated within the curriculum and teacher’s book. The study took a total of 6 weeks. As data collection tool, Achievement Test For Measuring Students’ Reading Comprehension Skills which was developed by the researcher to determine the effect of metacognitive strategies on students’ reading comprehension skills was used. As a result of the reliability and validity studies, the reliability coefficient of the test was found to be 0.91, the average difficulty was found to be 0.64. At the end of the research, at teaching practice in which metacognitive strategies(planning, monitoring and regulation were used, a significant increase on students’ reading comprehension skills was found in favor of the experimental group.

Cevat Eker

2014-08-01

210

Informing Pedagogy Through the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model  

OpenAIRE

Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, ed...

Mariale Hardiman

2012-01-01

211

Preparing Teachers and Librarians to Collaborate to Teach 21st Century Skills: Views of LIS and Education Faculty  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses the results of an exploratory research project in which library and information studies (LIS) faculty and education faculty were asked about their views on teaching pre-service school librarians and teachers 21st Century Skills (as defined by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills) and librarian-teacher collaboration.…

Latham, Don; Gross, Melissa; Witte, Shelbie

2013-01-01

212

Comparison of Peer and Self-Video Modeling in Teaching First Aid Skills to Children with Intellectual Disability  

Science.gov (United States)

The purposes of this study were to (1) compare peer and self-video modeling in terms of effectiveness and efficiency in teaching first aid skills to children with intellectual disability and (2) analyze the error patterns made in probe sessions to determine whether the children who took the role of sufferers during the first aid skill sessions…

Ozkan, Serife Yucesoy

2013-01-01

213

Use of Video Modeling to Teach Vocational Skills to Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

As part of a collaborative project between a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities and a local private business, we examined the effects of video modeling to teach vocational skills to four adolescents and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Video modeling was used to teach the participants to wear a WalkAround[R]…

Allen, Keith D.; Wallace, Dustin P.; Renes, Diana; Bowen, Scott L.; Burke, Ray V.

2010-01-01

214

From Initial Phonics to Functional Phonics: Teaching Word-Analysis Skills to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability  

Science.gov (United States)

Reading instruction for students with MoID is typically limited to sight-word instruction. We developed a 2-part, phonetic instructional sequence based upon Direct Instruction teaching methodology to teach students with MoID word-analysis skills that generalize to untaught words encountered in their environment. Elementary and middle-school…

Fredrick, Laura D.; Davis, Dawn H.; Alberto, Paul A.; Waugh, Rebecca E.

2013-01-01

215

Measurement Invariance of Torrance Test of Creative Thinking Figural Scores across Age: A study in Spanish-Speaking Children and Adolescents.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available On the basis of a previous study carried out with Spanish-speaking children which indicates that the Creativity construct, operationalized by means of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT-Figural, consists of two factors –Innovation and Adaptation– (Krumm, Lemos & Arán Filippetti, in press, the objective of the present work was to prove whether this structure is invariant across age. A sample of 652 Spanish-speaking children and adolescents aged 9-17 years of both sexes was tested. It was in turn divided into three age groups: (a 9-10, (b 11-13 and (c 16 -17 years. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA showed that in each group of the sample, the structure of the TTCT is composed of two correlated factors, namely Innovation and Adaptation. In addition, Multigroup CFA demonstrated that the two-factor solution was actually invariant (configural and metric across age, meaning that children and adolescents equally conceptualize the Creativity construct. Finally, MANOVA showed a significant age effect on every subscale. These data suggest the relevance of considering the age factor when assessing the creative potential through the TTCT-Figural.

Gabriela L. Krumm

2013-12-01

216

Teaching biotechnology through case studies - can we improve higher order thinking skills of nonscience majors?  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching nonscience majors topics in biotechnology through case studies is the focus of this research. Our Biotechnology, Environment, and Related Issues module, developed within the Science for All framework, is aimed at elevating the level of students' scientific and technological literacy and their higher order thinking skills. The research goal was to investigate nonscience major students' ability to use various thinking skills in analyzing environmental and moral conflicts presented through case studies in the Biotechnology Module. The research population consisted of about 200 nonscience majors in eight classes of grades 10-12 from heterogeneous communities. We found a significant improvement in students' knowledge and understanding and higher order thinking skills at all academic levels. The scores that low academic level students achieved in the knowledge and understanding category were higher than their high academic level peers' scores. In the higher order thinking skills - question posing, argumentation, and system thinking - a significant difference in favor of the high academic level students was found. The gap that had existed between low and high academic level students narrowed. Most students reported that the biotechnological topics that they had studied were interesting and relevant. Based on these results, we advocate a curriculum that exposes students to scientific controversies through case studies with environmental and moral implications. Our research has shown that this approach is likely to contribute to developing scientific and technological literacy along with higher order thinking skills of nonscience majors.

Dori, Yehudit J.; Tal, Revital T.; Tsaushu, Masha

2003-11-01

217

How we enhanced medical academics skills and reduced social inequities using an academic teaching program.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract The training of future physicians should be concurrent with the development of different skills and attitudes. This warrants the need to regularly provide students with opportunities for self-development throughout their academic career. This approach was exemplified in a medical school in the Brazilian Amazon, where students were allowed to play the role of high school teachers. As part of this exercise, they conducted reinforcement classes for high school students to increase the number of university admissions. The medical students were solely responsible for organizing and implementing this project, giving them the opportunity to develop teaching and leadership skills, enhance their understanding of communication and administration and contribute toward the society. PMID:25301145

Martins, Antonio Camargo; Oliveira, Felipe Renê Alves; Delfino, Breno Matos; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; de Moraes, Fabio Henrique Pinto; Barbosa, Guilherme Viana; de Macedo, Lucas Felipe; Domingos, Tayna Da Silva; Da Silva, Dyemisson Pinheiro; Menezes, Charlene Cristine Rodrigues; Oliveira Filho, Edmar Santana; Pereira, Thales Augusto Da Silva; Piccirilli, Elizabeth Souza; Pinto, Wagner De Jesus

2014-10-10

218

Self-administered written prompts to teach home accident prevention skills to adults with brain injuries.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study evaluated the use of written checklists and task analyses as self-administered prompts to teach home accident prevention skills to 4 adults with brain injuries. Subsequent to baseline, participants used written checklists that identified potential in-home hazards but did not prompt behaviors necessary for hazard remediation. Written individualized task analyses, incorporating specific behavioral steps for correcting hazards that participants had failed to remediate during the checklist phase, were used to prompt appropriate responding when necessary. These were subsequently faded to transfer stimulus control to the natural conditions. A multiple probe technique across participants and settings was used. Results indicated that the checklist alone was sufficient to increase appropriate responses to many of the potential hazards. Individualized task analyses, when needed, resulted in appropriate remediation of all potential hazards. Generalization to untrained potential hazards occurred to some degree for all participants. Follow-up results showed that most skills trained were maintained over a 1-month period. PMID:2074235

O'Reilly, M F; Green, G; Braunling-McMorrow, D

1990-01-01

219

Teaching citizen science skills online: Implications for invasive species training programs  

Science.gov (United States)

Citizen science programs are emerging as an efficient way to increase data collection and help monitor invasive species. Effective invasive species monitoring requires rigid data quality assurances if expensive control efforts are to be guided by volunteer data. To achieve data quality, effective online training is needed to improve field skills and reach large numbers of remote sentinel volunteers critical to early detection and rapid response. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of online static and multimedia tutorials to teach citizen science volunteers (n = 54) how to identify invasive plants; establish monitoring plots; measure percent cover; and use Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Participants trained using static and multimedia tutorials provided less (p <.001) correct species identifications (63% and 67%) than did professionals (83%) across all species, but they did not differ (p =.125) between each other. However, their ability to identify conspicuous species was comparable to that of professionals. The variability in percent plant cover estimates between static (??10%) and multimedia (??13%) participants did not differ (p =.86 and.08, respectively) from those of professionals (??9%). Trained volunteers struggled with plot setup and GPS skills. Overall, the online approach used did not influence conferred field skills and abilities. Traditional or multimedia online training augmented with more rigorous, repeated, and hands-on, in-person training in specialized skills required for more difficult tasks will likely improve volunteer abilities, data quality, and overall program effectiveness. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Newman, G.; Crall, A.; Laituri, M.; Graham, J.; Stohlgren, T.; Moore, J.C.; Kodrich, K.; Holfelder, K.A.

2010-01-01

220

The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Design in Training Writing Skills Physics Teaching Materials  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Result of field studies showed low writing skill of teachers in teaching material. The root of the problem lies in their inability on translating description of teaching material into writing. This research focused on the effectiveness of scaffolding design. The scaffolding design was tested in the selected topics of physics courses for pre-service teachers through learning to write activity approach. The treatment effectiveness was determined by considering the effect size and normalized gain percentage, while the hypothesis was tested using “the Kruskal-Wallis test”. The research results showed that scaffolding between the stages of planning and translating plans into text was effective in improving pre-service physics teachers’ ability of writing physics teaching materials and was similarly effective in improving their conceptual understanding of the topics of electromagnetism, waves, and optics. Learning to write activity implemented in the course of physics with selected topics was effective in improving the ability of pre-service teachers in translating among different modes of representation and making multiple concept representations. The hypothesis test demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the abilities of writing teaching materials and conceptual understanding between experimental and control classes.

Parlindungan Sinaga

2015-01-01

221

Desarrollo del pensamiento creativo en la formación laboral juvenil / Developement of creative thinking in youth work training  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Argentina | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Proyecto de investigación que analiza las representaciones educativo-laborales sobre las atribuciones de valor a la creatividad, motivación e innovación en jóvenes de la educación formal y no formal que se preparan para el mundo del trabajo. La desarticulación educativa entre oferta, demanda y neces [...] idad, exige búsquedas que complementen la didáctica homogénea de un pensamiento convergente con otras vertientes que favorecen el pensamiento divergente. Se asume la creatividad como un concepto teórico, no observable, que difícilmente se da en forma espontánea y se reconoce solo como atributo exclusivo de artistas, siendo necesario generarla en todos los sujetos y disciplinas para una construcción de valores y desarrollo a escala humana. Avanza sobre nuevas aristas didácticas integradoras que cubren un extenso espectro de pertenencias culturales, con disimilitudes de conocimientos, de abstracción, de lenguajes e ideologías. Se opta por una integración metodológica para ampliar las posibilidades de los contextos de descubrimiento y validación priorizando el primero. La metodología comprensivista apunta más directamente a las metas propuestas con los aportes de la etnografía, interaccionismo simbólico y la etnometodología. Los primeros resultados parciales evidencian que las actitudes y motivaciones de los jóvenes, dentro y fuera de las aulas e instituciones, cambian radicalmente, apareciendo estrategias creativas e innovadoras para actividades que responden a intereses diferentes a los contenidos curriculares. En jóvenes alumnos de posgrado en educación, se relevan dificultades para enseñar y desconocimiento de didácticas orientadas al pensamiento divergente, pero interés por interiorizarse en la teoría e instrumentación de las mismas. Abstract in english This research project analyzes the education-labour representations on value attributions to creativity, motivation and innovation in youth with formal and non-formal education that are training for the job world. The educational detachment between offer, demand and need, requests a search that can [...] complement the homogeneous didactics of a converging line of thought with other currents that favour divergent thinking. Creativity is considered a theoretical concept, non observable, that can hardly happen in a spontaneous way and is solely an attribute of artists, but also necessary to be generated in all individuals and disciplines for a construction of values and development at a human scale. It makes progress over new integrating didactic aspects that cover a wide spectrum of cultural belongings, with dissimilar knowledge, of abstraction, of languages and ideologies. A methodological integration is chosen to enlarge the possibilities of the discovery and validation contexts prioritizing the former. The comprehensive methodology aims more directly to intended goals with contributions from ethnography, symbolic interaction and ethnomethodology. The first partial results show that attitudes and motivation in youngsters, inside and outside classrooms and institutions, change radically, giving rise to creative and innovative strategies that respond to different interests to those in curricular contents. Among young postgraduate students in education, difficulties in teaching and both an ignorance but also an interest in didactics oriented to diverging thought are shown.

Rosa, Pérez del Viso de Palou.

2008-11-01

222

Evaluating the Use of Role Playing Simulations in Teaching Negotation Skills to University Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper critically evaluates the use of role-playing simulations in a negotiation course taught to graduate students. The course consisted primarily of a series of simulations involving the alternative dispute resolution (ADR processes of negotiation, facilitation and mediation. Data were obtained from two sets of questionnaires completed by 41 students before and after the course. A review of previous research reveals that despite the widespread use of role-playing simulations in education, there has been very little empirical evaluation of their effectiveness, especially in conflict resolution and planning. Comparison of the data acquired from the two surveys generated findings regarding student understanding of ADR processes and key issues in conflict resolution; the educational value of simulations; the amenability of types of planning and planning goals to ADR; appropriate learning objectives; the importance of negotiation skills in planning; challenges in conducting effective simulations; the value of simulations in resolving real conflicts; the utility of negotiation theory; and obstacles to applying ADR to planning disputes. More generally, the paper concludes that role-playing simulations are very effective for teaching negotiation skills to students, and preparing them to manage actual conflicts skillfully and to participate effectively in real ADR processes. However, this technique is somewhat less valuable for teaching aspects of planning other than conflict resolution. Surprisingly, prior experience with simulations had no significant influence on the responses to the pre-course survey. Also surprising was the lack of a significant correlation between final exam scores and responses to relevant questions on the post-course survey.

John Andrew

2012-10-01

223

The Skill-Focused Approach to Interpretation Teaching: An Empirical Exploration  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper conducts an empirical study to testify the necessity and feasibility of the skill-focused interpretation teaching for undergraduate English majors, aiming at probing into the issue of accurate positioning of interpretation course. The participants in the experiment are 72 fourth-year students with 36 in the experimental class and 36 in the control class. The pedagogical principles and procedures between the experimental class and control class are rather different. The former follows the language-focused approach while the latter implements the skill-focused one. Results indicate that the mean of experimental class (77.69 is higher than that of the control class (72.48 in the post-test, and there is significant difference between them (p = .000. On the whole, experimental class produces better overall interpreting performance than control class, especially in terms of completeness, accuracy, re-expression, and adaptability. There are significant differences between all of them (p < .05. Empirical evidence shows that the skill-focused approach has its advantages over the traditional language-focused approach.

Xu Han

2013-05-01

224

The teaching of basic clinical skills at School of Medicine, University of São Paulo.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes how is the teaching of basic clinical skills given to the 3rd in the undergraduate program, at the School of Medicine, University of São Paulo. This course has been implementing some techniques of teaching-learning for last years in order to become it more dynamic and interesting. Small group teaching is the main feature of the course "Basic Clinical Skills" given at the University of São Paulo, School of Medicine. This technique is improved by keeping each group with a teacher for a long time to allow better integration between them and to facilitate a better acquisition of attitudes towards the patient and all the team involved in the care of patient. All the classes are practical with early contact with real cases. Medical students learn how to take down the medical history, how to perform an adequate physical examination and make diagnoses under supervision of their teachers. Discussion cases, recognition of medical patterns and hypothetic-deductive strategy are used to develop an efficient medical reasoning. The authors show the results obtained through questionnaires filled in by the students at the end of the course and the analysis of which demonstrates that the students are highly satisfied with these kind of strategies and profit better from them. In 1996 and 1997, respectively, the course's satisfaction was 93.13% and 88.08% (excellent + good). The students' capacity to perform their objectives is situated in their majority between 6 and 8, these values represent a good and sufficient to very good performance. PMID:10413951

Kira, C M; Atta, J A

1998-01-01

225

Poetry: It's Not Just for English Class Anymore  

Science.gov (United States)

Higher level thought involves both critical and creative thinking skills. Although the psychological literature is rich with research on teaching critical thinking, relatively little published work addresses ways of promoting creative thinking. In this article we describe the use of poetry writing in an abnormal psychology class to encourage…

Connor-Greene, Patricia A.; Young, Art; Paul, Catherine; Murdoch, Janice W.

2005-01-01

226

EFFECTS OF TEACHING METACOGNITION STRATEGIES TO LISTENING OMPREHENSION SKILLS AND ATTITUDE TOWARD LISTENING  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this research is determining the effect of teaching metacognition strategies to the fifth grade students according to their listening comprehension skills and students’ attitudes toward listening. The study group of the research consists of 65 fifth grade students at two elementary schools in the province of K?r?kkale. In the study, mixed method which both quantitative and qualitative research methods are used together for collecting, analysing and interpreting data. During the research process, in the experimental group, teaching metacognition strategies was carried out through the usage of listening texts activities. In the control group, listening activities were carried out according to Turkish Teaching Curriculum. Implementation process of the study was carried out for a total of 12 weeks, for two hours per week. Both control and experimental group students’ listening comprehension levels, their metacognitive awareness levels toward listening and attitudes toward listening were determined with the scale developed for the study both at the beginning and at the end of the implementation process. The data of the study were analysed with SPSS programme. According to the findings of the research, for control and experimental group students’ listening comprehension,their metacognitive awareness levels toward listening and their attitudes toward listening were found as significant difference in favor of experiment group.

Mehmet KATRANCI

2013-01-01

227

Effectiveness and Efficiency of Constant-Time Delay and Most-to-Least Prompt Procedures in Teaching Daily Living Skills to Children with Intellectual Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

This study is aimed at comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of constant-time delay and most-to-least prompt procedures in teaching daily living skills to children with mental retardation. Adapted alternating treatment design was used. The outcome shows that both procedures were equally effective in teaching the daily living skills. However,…

Aykut, Cigil

2012-01-01

228

Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' ...

Zamora Javier; Buckley Sharon

2007-01-01

229

A gesture-controlled Serious Game for teaching emotion recognition skills to preschoolers with autism  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The recognition of facial expressions is important for the perception of emotions. Understanding emotions is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in the recognition of affective expressions. With the appropriate intervention, elimination of those deficits can be achieved. Interventions are proposed to start as early as possible. Computer-based programs have been widely used with success to teach people with autism to recognize emotions. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Such abilities are beyond very young children with autism as they have major restriction in their ability to interact with computers. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game which provides physical interaction, we aim to support early intervention and to foster emotion learning.

Christinaki, Eirini; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

230

Trigger Points: Enhancing Generic Skills in Accounting Education Through Changes to Teaching Practices  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In 2001 a small Australian university implement particular intervention strategies designed to improvespecific educational outcomes in its accounting degree program. These outcomes mirrored the three coreareas of the Graduate Careers Council of Australia’s Course Experience Questionnaire: (1 good teaching,(2 overall satisfaction, and (3 generic skills. Five areas were identified for intervention: (1 the effectiveallocation of full-time staff, (2 the effective use of sessional staff, (3 greater commitment by sessional staff,(4 the introduction of common subject outlines, and (5 the proactive response to student evaluations. Theresults indicate a statistically significant improvement in 2003 in the three core areas, supporting theargument that improving student satisfaction with their educational experience will improve studentoutcomes. A similar, but less significant, improvement of grades in the three final year accounting subjectswas identified. Suggestions for the decline from 2004 are also explored.

Ted Watts

2008-06-01

231

Managing the teaching of critical thinking skills in English home language to second language speakers in the further education and training phase / P. Pillay  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyse the effectiveness and necessity of managing the teaching of critical thinking skills in English Home Language to second language speakers in the Further Education and Training phase, by focusing on critical thinking skills; classroom management; management skills of professional teachers; the relationship between teaching and management; guidelines for effective classroom management; the National Curriculum Statement Grades 10-12; the Na...

Pillay, Parvathy

2011-01-01

232

Development of an Instructional Information System Prototype for Use in the Teaching and Development of Nursing Diagnostic Skills  

OpenAIRE

An interdisciplinary project was instituted in 1986 for the development and testing of an instructional system to be used in a nursing curriculum for teaching and developing the diagnostic skills of undergraduate nursing students. The system serves two major functions: to assist students in learning and becoming proficient in the diagnostic process and to assist educators in evaluating the students' learning.

Bloom, K. C.; Leitner, J. E.; Solano, J. L.

1988-01-01

233

Effects of Antecedent Prompt and Test Procedure on Teaching Simulated Menstrual Care Skills to Females with Developmental Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

Although menstrual care is among the most important skill areas for females with mild to moderate developmental disabilities to facilitate their independence, there is limited research examining this issue. The present study was designed to analyze the acquisition and maintenance effects of antecedent prompt and test procedure on teaching changing…

Ersoy, Gulhan; Tekin-Iftar, Elif; Kircaali-Iftar, Gonul

2009-01-01

234

Should Adolescents Go "Back" to the Basics?: A Review of Teaching Word Reading Skills to Middle and High School Students  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this review was to explore the effectiveness of teaching basic reading skills to adolescents. Studies that were published in the past 20 years from 1986 to 2006 were selected and reviewed on the basis of specific criteria for inclusion. Results indicated that there were 23 studies that met the criteria. Findings revealed that…

Joseph, Laurice M.; Schisler, Rebecca

2009-01-01

235

Using Internet Primary Sources To Teach Critical Thinking Skills in History. Greenwood Professional Guides in School Librarianship.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this book is to discuss and demonstrate how primary sources found on the Internet can be used to teach critical thinking skills for U.S. history and world history students in grades 7-12. The volume also provides guidelines and sample suggestions and questions for using primary sources in a variety of formats to stimulate critical…

Craver, Kathleen W.

236

Comparison of Direct Instruction and Problem Solving Approach in Teaching Social Skills to Children with Mental Retardation  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was aimed at comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of direct instruction and problem solving approaches in teaching social skills to children with mental retardation. The design was adapted alternating treatment design. The subjects of the study consist of a girl and a boy between the ages of 11 and 13 who are mentally retarded. In…

Dagseven Emecen, Deniz

2011-01-01

237

Opportunities to Improve Skills and to Teach and Train Others: Employee Outcomes in the United States and Japan  

Science.gov (United States)

Opportunities to improve skills and opportunities to teach or train others may be associated with job satisfaction, work engagement and organizational commitment. The analysis reported in this paper used a subsample of 823 employees within two Japanese and three American worksites. We tested not only the direct relationships of each type of…

Lee, HaeNim; McNamara, Tay K.; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Lee, Jungui

2014-01-01

238

Putting It All Together: Incorporating "SoTL Practices" for Teaching Interpersonal and Critical Thinking Skills in an Online Course  

Science.gov (United States)

Views of critical thinking were culled from the literature and developed into a scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) model that was implemented into the Internet course, "The Politics and Psychology of Hatred." Assessment of student course postings demonstrated a strong relationship between interpersonal skills (referred to in the…

Osborne, Randall E.; Kriese, Paul; Tobey, Heather; Johnson, Emily

2009-01-01

239

Effectiveness of Structured Teaching Programme on the Level of Knowledge of Communication Skill among Nurses Working at NIMHANS, Bangalore  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders of different kinds leave the clients with communication problems that make the interaction difficult to understand. Almost all the mental disorders lead to a pathological communication pattern. Like other skills of professional nursing, communication requires intense education. Aims and Objectives: 1. To develop structured teaching programme on communication skill for nurses 2. To identify the socio demographic characteristics of the nurses in the study. 3. To assess the level of knowledge of communication skill before the structured teaching programme. 4. To evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching programme. Material and methods: A quasi experimental study design with two groups' pre test and post test was used. The study population comprised of 32 nurses, 17 in experimental group and 15 in control group, working at NIMHANS, Bangalore using convenient sampling technique. The data were collected by using socio demographic data sheet and knowledge assessment questionnaire. The tools were prepared with the experts' guidance. Pilot study conducted was found to be feasible and reliable. The collected data were statistically analyzed. Results: The subjects in control and experimental group matched with each other in six socio demographic characteristics. There was a significant improvement in the level of knowledge in experimental group subjects after the intervention. Conclusion: Structured teaching programme was effective in improving the knowledge of communication skill.

Banu M. R

2014-07-01

240

A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Teachers' and Reporting Officers' Self-Ratings on Teaching and Leadership Skills across Singapore and Bahrain  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-rating bias is particularly likely in organizational behavior research as individuals tend to inflate their expertise, skills and character. This study aims to examine how two culturally diverse groups of teachers and their reporting officers respond to self-ratings of their own teaching skills and leadership skills respectively. It is…

Jonathan, Wee Pin Goh; Kim, Lee Ong; Salleh, Hairon

2009-01-01

241

Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians and medical educators have repeatedly acknowledged the inadequacy of communication skills training in the medical school curriculum and opportunities to improve these skills in practice. This study of a controlled intervention evaluates the effect of teaching practicing physicians the skill of "agenda-setting" on patients' experiences with care. The agenda-setting intervention aimed to engage clinicians in the practice of initiating patient encounters by eliciting the full set of concerns from the patient's perspective and using that information to prioritize and negotiate which clinical issues should most appropriately be dealt with and which (if any should be deferred to a subsequent visit. Methods Ten physicians from a large physician organization in California with baseline patient survey scores below the statewide 25th percentile participated in the agenda-setting intervention. Eleven physicians matched on baseline scores, geography, specialty, and practice size were selected as controls. Changes in survey summary scores from pre- and post-intervention surveys were compared between the two groups. Multilevel regression models that accounted for the clustering of patients within physicians and controlled for respondent characteristics were used to examine the effect of the intervention on survey scale scores. Results There was statistically significant improvement in intervention physicians' ability to "explain things in a way that was easy to understand" (p = 0.02 and marginally significant improvement in the overall quality of physician-patient interactions (p = 0.08 compared to control group physicians. Changes in patients' experiences with organizational access, care coordination, and office staff interactions did not differ by experimental group. Conclusion A simple and modest behavioral training for practicing physicians has potential to positively affect physician-patient relationship interaction quality. It will be important to evaluate the effect of more extensive trainings, including those that work with physicians on a broader set of communication techniques.

Rogers William H

2008-01-01

242

Talking the Talk: Developing a Student Centered Approach for Teaching Communication Skills for Operational Policing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The increasingly complex police - citizen situations in which the novice police officer may be placed demand that police training environments continually assess their education programs to ensure that such programs are contemporary and meet the expectations of stakeholders. One challenge facing recruit raining is the need to prepare the novice police officer to communicate effectively in often stressful and complicated situations. Police educators must develop learning strategies which provide opportunity for students to build their capacity to be effective communicators through autonomous, student - centered learning experiences. The communications teaching and learning opportunities within the Associate Degree in Policing Practice for New South Wales Police Force (NSWPF recruits is no exception. This paper discusses the changes that have occurred to the delivery of communication training to NSWPF recruits over the past 15 years. It considers the merits of incorporating authentic teaching strategies and learner assessment processes into the delivery of communication education and of creating experiential learning experiences that support autonomous, self-regulated learners. In particular, it discusses the use of role plays (verbal communication trials to provide a unique and authentic learning experience for students and to assess their verbal and non-verbal communication skills in a simulated policing environment.

Amanda Davies

2014-11-01

243

A comparison of procedures in teaching self-help skills: increasing assistance, time delay, and observational learning.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effectiveness and efficiency of two prompt-fading procedures were compared during the instruction of two self-help skills to four pairs of developmentally delayed preschoolers. In addition, the effect of observational learning was examined. Within a combined multiple probe and parallel treatments design, one member of each pair received direct instruction on the two skills. One skill was taught using an increasing assistance prompting procedure and the other skill was taught using a constant time delay procedure. The other member of the pair was prompted to observe the instruction, but was not taught directly. Reliability of scoring and procedural integrity were estimated, and social validity of outcomes considered. Findings indicated a slight but discernible advantage of using the time delay procedure rather than the increasing assistance procedure to teach complex, chained-response tasks. Further, considerable learning resulted solely from the observation of instruction. PMID:2708304

Schoen, S F; Sivil, E O

1989-03-01

244

Using the Imaginary Contexts of Role Plays in Teaching English for Professional Communication  

OpenAIRE

In the tertiary education system there is rather limited place for the development of creative thinking as an essential component of the graduate’s complex profile, although it should be a must, given the fact that in the field of engineering education – the author’s educational context – the focus is quite frequently on the development of new designs, methods and technologies in order to be competitive internationally, which requires excellent resourcefulness and imagination skills. ...

Yolanda-Mirela Catelly

2012-01-01

245

The First Clinical Skills: Students Teach Students To Take Vital Signs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract: Transition from the role of passive student to medical practitioner begins with learning the first clinical skill. This transition can be stressful for those experiencing it and to some extent by those coordi-nating it. Logistically, it requires demonstration of the techniques to the entire class by a single practitio-ner or to smaller groups of students by multiple practitioners. The former reduces the opportunity for close observation of technique and is less conducive to questions, while the latter requires multiple practi-tioners, which can be prohibitive given their already dense schedules. To reduce the stress for all in-volved and to maximize learning opportunities, an innovative approach to teaching the first skill, vital signs measurement, was developed. Small group instruction and practice were facilitated by senior medi-cal student volunteers in a simulated outpatient clinic using actual equipment. Instruction was provided in a relaxed, but guided format. Students were provided with a lesson plan that detailed both, technique and brief physiology points, as well as check sheets to use during the lab and later as a refresher guide. The lesson plan, instructions for facilitators, and student check sheets were developed by a senior medical stu-dent and reviewed by the course faculty. Recruitment and briefing of student facilitators and conduct of the lab were also performed by the senior student. The purpose of this trend article is to describe the de-velopment of a new course format and to report our experience with implementation of the new format. It is intended to spark interest in applying similar approaches to other curricular issues

R. Gregg Dwyer, M.D., Ed.D.

2002-10-01

246

The Effect of Problem Solving Teaching with Texts of Turkish Lesson on Students’ Problem Solving Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this research, by carrying out activities based on texts, effect of providing problem solving skill on students’ levels of problem solving attainment was tried to be identified. Research was performed according to pretest-posttest Experimental Model with Control Group, in 2008-2009 educational year at second grade of an elementary school in Denizli province. For nine weeks, four hours in a week, while teacher guide book was being followed in control group in Turkish language lesson, texts were carried out with problem solving activities in experimental group. In the research, “Problem Solving Test” which were used as data collection tools, were developed by benefiting from matching of attainment-problem solving steps-cognitive domain steps. Problem Solving Test is made up of 16 multiple choice and 9 open ended questions. In the analysis of data, t test was used. It was found that problem solving teaching succeeded at “identifying different possible solutions in the light of collected data, applying the decided way of solution, evaluating types of solutions, evaluating used problem solving method” stages of problem solving.

Havva ILGIN

2012-08-01

247

Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology Rory McGREAL, PhD Athabasca University – Canada’s Open University Athabasca AB, CANADA Sue DAVIS, MSc. New Brunswick Community College–Saint John Saint John, CANADA Terry MURPHY, PhD Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA Chris SMITH, BA Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA ABSTRACT The evaluation of this pilot of an epidemiology course conducted online and delivered across Canada was based on four main criteria: design, content, process and outcomes. Data was collected through seven sources: participant online survey results, post-pilot workshop feedback, four focus groups, telephone interviews with participants, interviews with course developers, examination of online materials, and analysis of log files generated by the web server. The pilot course had the following outcomes: Findings on the delivery showed that the course took much more time than estimated; the online environment was challenging/frustrating for some; there were technical glitches; discussion boards were not regularly used; interaction with instructors was minimal; feedback from instructors was slow in coming; the short development time led to errors/mismatches between content and assessment; and the high student/teacher ratio of 1:48 made it difficult to provide timely feedback.

Terry MURPHY

2006-01-01

248

Teaching skills for accessing and interpreting information from systematic reviews/meta-analyses, practice guidelines, and the Internet.  

OpenAIRE

Skills and practice related to accessing and interpreting clinical information from systematic reviews/meta-analyses, practice guidelines, and the Internet have been integrated into a new senior year elective designed to teach medical students how to critically appraise information from a variety of sources and evaluate it's applicability to patient care. Small groups of senior medical students under the direction of a multidisciplinary team (behavioral scientist, information specialist, phys...

Wolf, F. M.; Miller, J. G.; Gruppen, L. D.; Ensminger, W. D.

1997-01-01

249

Teaching practices for the development of the problem solving skills of gr 9 natural sciences learners / Ann Elizabeth Vicente  

OpenAIRE

A goal of Natural Sciences education is to ensure that learners become scientifically literate. Scientific literacy refers to learners? ability to solve problems that relate to policies and practices that affect the natural world. To achieve this goal, teachers need to ensure that their learners become effective problem solvers. This study explored the nature of teaching and assessment practices for the development of the problem solving skills of Gr 9 Natural Sciences learners and makes re...

Vicente, Ann Elizabeth

2013-01-01

250

Perceptions of teachers of the application of science process skills in the teaching of geography in secondary schools in the Free State province  

OpenAIRE

This article reports on teachers’ perceptions of the application of science process skills in the teaching of geography in secondary schools in the Free State province. A teachers’ questionnaire on the application of the science process skills in the teaching of geography was constructed and the questionnaire was content validated against the theoretical assumptions supported by the literature and practical applications of the subject. The questionnaires were distributed to 150 respond...

Rambuda, A. M.; Fraser, William John

2004-01-01

251

The ABC's of teaching social skills to adolescents with autism spectrum disorder in the classroom: the UCLA PEERS (®) Program.  

Science.gov (United States)

Social skills training is a common treatment method for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet very few evidence-based interventions exist to improve social skills for high-functioning adolescents on the spectrum, and even fewer studies have examined the effectiveness of teaching social skills in the classroom. This study examines change in social functioning for adolescents with high-functioning ASD following the implementation of a school-based, teacher-facilitated social skills intervention known as Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills (PEERS (®) ). Seventy-three middle school students with ASD along with their parents and teachers participated in the study. Participants were assigned to the PEERS (®) treatment condition or an alternative social skills curriculum. Instruction was provided daily by classroom teachers and teacher aides for 14-weeks. Results reveal that in comparison to an active treatment control group, participants in the PEERS (®) treatment group significantly improved in social functioning in the areas of teacher-reported social responsiveness, social communication, social motivation, social awareness, and decreased autistic mannerisms, with a trend toward improved social cognition on the Social Responsiveness Scale. Adolescent self-reports indicate significant improvement in social skills knowledge and frequency of hosted and invited get-togethers with friends, and parent-reports suggest a decrease in teen social anxiety on the Social Anxiety Scale at a trend level. This research represents one of the few teacher-facilitated treatment intervention studies demonstrating effectiveness in improving the social skills of adolescents with ASD in the classroom: arguably the most natural social setting of all. PMID:24715256

Laugeson, Elizabeth A; Ellingsen, Ruth; Sanderson, Jennifer; Tucci, Lara; Bates, Shannon

2014-09-01

252

On Cultivation of Cross-cultural Awareness in College English Teaching:Take Integrated Skills of English as an Example  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract: Language is an indispensable part of culture. To understand language means knowing about culture first. Culture teaching plays an essential role in English language teaching. The cultural orientation in language communication should be highly valued and the relevant cultural background should be led in where necessary. This paper discusses the training of cross-cultural awareness in college English teaching by taking Integrated Skills of English as an example. Besides teaching language, English teaching is to cultivate the students’ cross-cultural awareness and transform their linguistic competence into communicative competence in an effective way.Key words: Culture teaching; Cross-cultural awareness; Communicative competence; Integrated Skills of EnglishRésumé: La langue est un élément indispensable de la culture. Afin de comprendre une langue, il faut connaître la culture d'abord. L’enseignement de la culture joue un rôle essentiel dans l'enseignement de la langue anglaise. L'orientation culturelle dans la communication linguistique devrait être mise en valeur et le fond culturel approprié doit être introduit dans le cas échéant. Cet article discute la formation de sensibilisation interculturelle dans l'enseignement de l’anglais au collège en prenant des compétences intégrées en anglais comme un exemple. Outre l'enseignement de la langue, l’enseignement de l'anglais est de former la sensibilisation interculturelle des él?ves et de transformer leurs compétences linguistiques en compétence communicative de manière efficace. Mots clés: Enseignement de la culture; Sensibilisation interculturelle; Compétence communicative; Compétences intégrées en anglais

Ying YANG

2011-04-01

253

Using Standardized Clients in the Classroom: An Evaluation of a Training Module to Teach Active Listening Skills to Social Work Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the implementation of a module that utilizes drama students to teach social work students how to use active listening skills in an interview environment. The module was implemented during a semester-long micro skills practice course taught to 13 undergraduate social work seniors in a western liberal arts university. Four…

Rogers, Anissa; Welch, Benjamin

2009-01-01

254

Rethinking Teacher Education: Synchronizing Eastern and Western Views of Teaching and Learning to Promote 21st Century Skills and Global Perspectives  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study was to share findings with educators across disciplines of how to incorporate an eastern and western blended philosophy of teaching and learning to promote 21st century skills and global perspectives. Drawing from a previous self-study of their views of teaching and learning between Chinese and American cultures, the two…

Smith, Judith; Hu, Ran

2013-01-01

255

All Hands on Deck: Involving the Entire Faculty in Teaching Basic Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The English department at Central College (Pella, Iowa) has implemented a program that involves the entire faculty in the development of students' basic skills. The program's support system for students and faculty includes the following components: a skills laboratory staffed by a full-time skills coordinator and by trained student tutors…

Fassler, Barbara

256

O ensino de habilidades de vida em escolas no Brasil / Teaching life skills in schools in Brazil  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Habilidades de Vida são capacidades para comportamento adaptativo positivo, que possibilitam-nos negociar eficazmente as demandas e desafios do cotidiano. Envolvem habilidades pessoais que potenciarão as relações interpessoais. A OMS sugere que programas sejam desenvolvidos para reduzir comportament [...] os de risco e aumentar cuidados com saúde física e mental. Adolescentes são uma população especial para estes programas, pela sua maior vulnerabilidade. Vimos desenvolvendo no Brasil programas para ensino de Habilidades de Vida com adolescentes, em escola pública de futuros professores, com conteúdo elaborado através de adaptação cultural de programas da OMS. O objetivo é capacitar adolescentes de hoje, e preparar multiplicadores para incorporar estas habilidades em suas práticas profissionais. Utiliza-se exposição oral, discussões, dramatizações e dinâmica de grupos, em sessões semanais. O programa foi adequadamente adaptado, e houve aumento do conhecimento sobre as habilidades. Os adolescentes incorporaram habilidades no seu cotidiano, melhorando a qualidade das relações interpessoais e aumentando sua competência social. Abstract in english Life Skills are skills for positive adaptive behavior that enable us to deal efficiently with daily demands and challenges. They include personal skills that enhance interpersonal relationships. The WHO has suggested the development of programs to reduce health risk behaviors and to improve physical [...] and mental health care. Teenagers are a special target population for these programs because of their increased vulnerability. We have been developing in Brazil programs to teach life skills to teenagers in a public school for future teachers, using culturally adapted material from WHO programs. The aim is to qualify today's teenagers and to train multipliers to incorporate these skills into their everyday professional practices. Oral expositions, group discussions, dramatization (role playing) and group dynamics techniques are utilized in weekly sessions. The program was adequately adapted and we observed an increase in knowledge concerning the skills. Teenagers incorporated skills into their everyday life, improving the quality of their personal interrelationships and increasing their social competence.

Ricardo, Gorayeb.

257

Tapping the Potential of Skill Integration as a Conduit for Communicative Language Teaching  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this classroom-based study was to discover the kinds of skill integration tasks that were employed by English teachers in Kuwait and to measure their attitudes toward implementing the skill integration technique in their classrooms. Data collection involved recording 25 hours of classroom-based observations, conducting interviews with the same group of teachers, and distributing a survey to further explore the teachers’ attitudes toward the skill integration technique. Dat...

Shu-hua Wu; Sulaiman Alrabah

2014-01-01

258

Employing Socratic Pedagogy to Improve Engineering Students Critical Reasoning Skills: Teaching by Asking Instead of by Tellling  

Science.gov (United States)

Engineering faculty agree almost universally that the development of students higher order intellectual or cognitive abilities is one of the most important educational tasks of engineering programs. These abilities underpin our students perceptions of the world and the consequent decisions they make. Specifically, critical thinking (critical intelligence) the capacity to probe and evaluate skillfully, analytically and fairly the quality of evidence, formulas, precepts and pieces of received wisdom that too often go unexamined and unchallenged and detect inaccuracies, error, hypocrisy, manipulation, dissembling, and bias is central to both personal success and national needs. This paper assumes that the capacity of undergraduate engineering students to learn to apply good reasoning to problem solutions can be nurtured and developed by an educational process aimed directly at developing students critical thinking skills. More specifically, the paper reports on the judicious and amiable use of the Socratic Method of teaching by systematic questioning instead of teaching by telling to emphasize and foster critical reasoning skills in electrical engineering, computer engineering and engineering physics undergraduate students at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, California). The selective, careful use of the Socratic Method (in combination with traditional lectures and active learning exercises) in electrical circuits, linear systems, signal processing, probability and statistics, electronic communications, and senior capstone design project courses, teaching laboratories and projects helped improve student participation, got the students actively involved and excited about the projects and the material being taught, motivated the students to better master course content and taught the students to learn to think and reason more clearly, accurately, relevantly, logically, rationally, ethically and responsibly.

Garlikov, Rick

259

Approaches to Curriculum and Teaching Materials to Bring Out Better Skilled Software Engineers-An Indian Perspective  

CERN Document Server

Development of Curriculum and delivery materials has undergone changes over a period of time, in undergraduate engineering degree system in Indian universities. However, there exists a gap between industry expectations in IT field and skills and knowledge that the graduating engineers possess and this continues to grow. A similar situation has been seen in the developed countries like USA, UK and Australia. Several researchers and practitioners have discussed and tried to come up with innovative approaches to teaching software engineering and IT as a whole. In India, it is of vital importance that steps be taken to address this issue seriously. This paper discusses some of the measures that have been implemented so that this gap is reduced and software engineers with better skills are produced. Changes to curriculum, industry-academia collaboration through conferences, sabbaticals etc., industry internships and live projects for final year students are some of the measures that have been discussed in this pap...

Padmini, H A; Nair, T R Gopalakrishnan

2010-01-01

260

Is the use of videotape recording superior to verbal feedback alone in the teaching of clinical skills?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent times, medical schools have committed to developing good communication and history taking skills in students. However, there remains an unresolved question as to which constitutes the best educational method. Our study aims to investigate whether the use of videotape recording is superior to verbal feedback alone in the teaching of clinical skills and the role of student self-assessment on history taking and communication skills. Methods A randomized controlled trial was designed. The study was conducted with 52 of the Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine second year students. All students' performances of communication and history taking skills were assessed twice. Between these assessments, the study group had received both verbal and visual feedback by watching their video recordings on patient interview; the control group received only verbal feedback from the teacher. Results Although the self-assessment of the students did not change significantly, assessors' ratings increased significantly for videotaped interviews at the second time. Conclusions Feedback based on videotaped interviews is superior to the feedback given solely based on the observation of assessors.

Yildirim Ediz

2009-12-01

261

Autismo e ensino de habilidades acadêmicas: adição e subtração Autism and teaching academic skills: addition and subtraction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available O ensino de habilidades acadêmicas para pessoas com autismo tem recebido pouca atenção de estudos, provavelmente porque os comprometimentos clássicos do transtorno relacionados à comunicação, interação social e comportamentos são vistos como prioritários no desenvolvimento de pesquisas. Porém, o desenvolvimento de tecnologias para o ensino de habilidades acadêmicas que atinjam esse público é fundamental, principalmente na realidade brasileira em que, com o advento da filosofia de inclusão escolar, a educação de pessoas com necessidades educacionais especiais, incluindo autistas, passou a ser direcionada para a escola regular. Assim, crianças com autismo estão cada vez mais expostas aos conteúdos acadêmicos nas salas de aula regulares e estratégias de ensino adequadas às suas necessidades são fundamentais para a entrada, permanência e progresso destas pessoas na escola. Assim, este trabalho descreve o ensino de habilidades de adição e subtração para uma adolescente com autismo e utilizou procedimentos adaptados com base em descrições sobre o quadro de autismo, princípios de aprendizagem da análise experimental do comportamento, técnicas de ensino e observação direta do repertório da participante. Para as tarefas acadêmicas foram utilizados estímulos visuais - gráficos e uso das mãos - que indicavam relações visualmente óbvias para explicar à participante como as operações aritméticas deveriam ser realizadas. Gradualmente, aumentou-se a complexidade das operações ensinadas, à medida que ia aumentando o número de acertos dela nas tarefas. Esses procedimentos foram realizados no decorrer de nove sessões. Os erros e acertos foram computados e serviram para representação gráfica. Os resultados demonstram a aprendizagem gradativa das habilidades ensinadas à medida que a intervenção ocorreu.The teaching of academic skills to individuals with autism has received little attention from research literature, probably because the classical deficits in communication, reciprocal social interaction and behaviors are seen as priorities in scientific investigations. Nevertheless, the development of technologies for teaching academic skills to this population is necessary, mainly in the context of Brazilian school inclusion. People with autism are being included with greater frequency in regular classes and, consequently, need adequate strategies to learn academic contents for their entrance, permanence and progress in the schools. Many studies describe characteristics and difficulties that people with autism have, which can influence the way they learn. These variables need to be considered when planning appropriate teaching strategies for this population. Among these variables are the ways in which these individuals respond to environmental stimuli, the way they think and their typical behaviors. This study describes strategies for teaching addition and subtraction to an adolescent with autism. These teaching procedures were elaborated based on the general characteristics of autism, principles derived from Applied Behavior Analysis, and the repertoire of the participant. The results show gradual learning of the taught skills.

Camila Graciella Santos Gomes

2007-12-01

262

Using an Interdisciplinary Approach to Teach Undergraduates Communication and Information Literacy Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

For successful and productive careers, undergraduate students need effective communication and critical thinking skills; information literacy is a substantial component in the development of these skills. Students often perceive communication courses as distinct and separate from their chosen discipline. Faculty from the Departments of English and…

Dinkelman, Andrea L.; Aune, Jeanine E.; Nonnecke, Gail R.

2010-01-01

263

Teaching Cafe' Waiter Skills to Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Real Setting Study  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study was to examine effectiveness of the Cafe' Waiter Education Program by providing the least prompting to three adult subjects with intellectual disability in a real-life setting. A multiple probe research design across subjects was used. Cafe' waiter skills included five main tasks incorporating 125 skill steps. Task…

Cavkaytar, Atilla

2012-01-01

264

Teaching Listening Skills to Young Learners through "Listen and Do" Songs  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the author examines the use of songs to improve the listening skills of young learners. He first provides a theoretical discussion about listening skills and YLs, and about songs and YLs in general; second, he provides a sample lesson for what can be called "Listen and Do" songs for YLs at the beginning level. These are the songs…

Sevik, Mustafa

2012-01-01

265

The Relationship between Campus Climate and the Teaching of Critical Thinking Skills in Community College Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Although critical thinking skills are important for all citizens participating in a democratic society, many community college students appear to lack these skills. This study addressed the apparent lack of research relating critical thinking instruction to campus climate. Critical thinking theory and Moos's organizational climate theory served as…

Simon, Thomas C.

2010-01-01

266

Teaching 21st Century Process Skills to Strengthen and Enhance Family and Consumer Sciences Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals need to be equipped with a set of strategies and tools to prepare their students for the challenges they will face in the 21st century. Nationwide, educators are integrating a set of skills deemed essential for student success in college and a career. Building upon these skills and the process areas…

Mosenson, Andrea B.; Fox, Wanda S.

2011-01-01

267

LIS Students' ICT Skills in Kuwait: Perspectives of Employers, Teaching Staff and Students  

Science.gov (United States)

In Kuwait and elsewhere, developments in electronic information resources have led to the demand for employees with ICT (information and communication technology) skills especially in information handling institutions. There is, therefore, a need to prepare the students for this workplace. As a result, the ICT skills of current LIS (library and…

Buarki, Hanadi; Hepworth, Mark; Murray, Ian

2011-01-01

268

An Activity-Based Study on Providing Basic Knowledge and Skills of Measurement in Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

Even though one of the prerequisites of inquiry-based science classes is acquiring measuring skills, there is not enough emphasis in the schools today on developing these skills. The current study, which has been designed with the thought that this situation may be caused by the fact that teachers do not have a sufficient level of measurement…

Maral, Sahide; Oguz-Unver, Ayse; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

2012-01-01

269

Using Content Reading Assignments in a Psychology Course to Teach Critical Reading Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Liberal arts students are expected to graduate college with fully developed critical reading and writing skills. However, for a variety of reasons these skills are not always as well developed as they might be--both during and upon completion of college. This paper describes a reading assignment that was designed to increase students'…

Van Camp, Debbie; Van Camp, Wesley

2013-01-01

270

Using Content Reading Assignments in a Psychology Course to Teach Critical Reading Skills  

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Full Text Available Liberal arts students are expected to graduate college with fully developed critical reading and writing skills. However, for a variety of reasons these skills are not always as well developed as they might be - both during and upon completion of college. This paper describes a reading assignment that was designed to increase students’ discipline-specific critical reading and writing skills. The assignment was piloted in a mid-level social psychology class. Pre-test/post-test comparisons indicate substantial improvement in students’ ability to identify thesis statements, recognize and interpret evidence, and other critical reading skills. Furthermore, students themselves rate the assignment as efficacious in helping them with both their reading and writing skills.

Debbie Van Camp

2013-02-01

271

Teaching paediatric resuscitation skills in a developing country: introduction of the Advanced Paediatric Life Support course into Vietnam.  

Science.gov (United States)

In 2001, a nationwide study revealed deficiencies in the emergency care of seriously ill and injured children in Vietnam. In response, a project was initiated to conduct the Advanced Paediatric Life Support course in Vietnam and ascertain whether this course would provide a practical and sustainable method of improving the knowledge and skills of medical and nursing staff in this area. After approval to use the course was secured and funding obtained, the project commenced in 2003. Key Vietnamese personnel travelled to Australia to complete the course, undertake instructor training and gain organizational experience. Teaching materials were translated, reviewed and modified to account for local diseases and clinical practices while maintaining the fundamental principles of the parent course. Commencing in March 2004, 10 courses were conducted by Australian and Vietnamese instructors, training 239 doctors and nurses from a wide variety of clinical backgrounds. Additionally, three instructor courses were conducted, training 52 new instructors. As the skill and confidence of the Vietnamese instructors grew, the number and responsibilities of the international faculty reduced. The infrastructure now exists for the course to operate in a sustainable fashion within Vietnam. We believe that this project demonstrates that the course can be successfully modified to provide teaching in paediatric emergency care in a developing country. PMID:18549385

Young, Simon; Hutchinson, Adrian; Nguyen, Van Tu; Le, Thanh Hai; Nguyen, Dich Van; Vo, Thi Kim Hue

2008-06-01

272

Student perspectives of an online module for teaching physical assessment skills for dentistry, dental hygiene, and pharmacy students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract The integration of web-based learning into the curriculum of healthcare education has significantly increased over the past decade. This article aims to describe the student perspectives of an online module to teach physical assessment skills for pharmacy, dentistry, and dental hygiene students. A total of 103 students completed the online module: 48 third-year pharmacy students, 29 first-year dentistry students, and 26 first-year dental hygiene students. Students were asked to rate a list of 10 statements on a 5-point Likert scale on the relevance, impact, and overall satisfaction of the online module. Eighty-four of the 103 students (81.6% response rate) completed the questionnaire. While most students responded positively to the online content, pharmacy students responded more favorably compared with students from Dentistry and Dental Hygiene. These findings provide useful information to identify areas in which the web-based module can be improved for teaching skills in physical assessment across multiple healthcare programs. PMID:25374378

Leong, Christine; Louizos, Christopher; Currie, Chelsea; Glassford, Lorraine; M Davies, Neal; Brothwell, Douglas; Renaud, Robert

2014-11-01

273

Developing clinical piano improvisation skills : a structured approach to teaching and using musical techniques and therapeutic methods  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teaching piano improvisation skills for use in clinical work relies on the development of a range of musical techniques and therapeutic methods that are combined and integrated. Simple musical styles of playing such as melody dialogues, two chord accompaniments, walking basses (tonal and atonal), 6ths with octave grounds, pentatonic and Spanish style frameworks are easily learnt and applied through in combination with therapeutic approaches such as matching, supporting, frame-working grounding ? and many others. The use of transitions in therapeutic improvisation are a primary and musically skilful way of helping a client or group of clients move, or develop their musical expression (Wigram & Bonde 2002 pp 278-279). Frame-working is a method that offers a musical structure to the music of a client. This structure could have the goal of enhancing the music aesthetically, or guiding the client in a new direction. Structure and lack of structure play a balanced role in the clinical process, and reflects the skills of the therapist to musically meet the needs of the client. This workshop will provide teaching and practice tools for the participants that are intended to sustain the creativity of improvisation while adding some clear structure and method to it?s clinical application

Wigram, Anthony Lewis

2003-01-01

274

Teaching Communication and Management Skills with Business Letter and Report Writing  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes a situational approach that equips students to be effective managers as well as communicators by developing skills in persuasive expression, human relations, and decision making; emphasis is on business letter and report writing. (Editor/TA)

Poe, Roy W.

1978-01-01

275

Description and evaluation of a bench porcine model for teaching surgical residents vascular anastomosis skills  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Numerous models, of variable quality, exist to impart the complex skills required to perform vascular anastomosis. These models differ with regard to the kinds of materials used, as well as their sizes, the time needed for their preparation, their availability, and the associated costs. The present study describes a bench model that uses formalin-fixed porcine aorta, and its evaluation by young surgical residents during a recent skills course. Findi...

Jauch Karl-Walter; Thasler Wolfgang E; Rentsch Markus; Kleespies Axel; Khalil Philipe N; Bruns Christiane J

2010-01-01

276

Are learner perceptions of digital literacy skills teaching affected by demographic factors?  

OpenAIRE

It is becoming increasingly important for learners to develop digital literacy skills (defined by the European Commission as the confident and critical use of ICT for work, leisure, learning and communication). The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education requires graduates to demonstrate digital literacy and employers demand these vital employability skills. And, with the rising cost of university education, learners themselves increasingly expect courses to demonstrate relevance to the...

Hall, Marion; Nix, Ingrid; Baker, Kirsty

2012-01-01

277

The Digital Microscope: A Tool for Teaching Laboratory Skills in Distance Learning Courses  

OpenAIRE

The majority of undergraduate students studying for a science degree will at some point carry out experiments in a laboratory setting, thus developing their practical skills and understanding of experimental principles. For distance learning students, there is no laboratory setting available for them to complete such work and as such there is a risk that they will lack these key skills. The Open University has developed a computerized tool, in the form of a Digital Microscope, to allow studen...

Dommett, Eleanor J.; Leys, Katherine S.

2008-01-01

278

PRIMER ICT : #a #new blended learning paradigm for teaching ICT skills to older people  

OpenAIRE

As the `third age' of human life becomes noticeably longer, the opportunity for elderly to obtain new skills reduces the tendency to consider this period of life as being disadvantaged. Hence, the fundamental aim of the project PRIMER-ICT was to educate older people in four participating countries (Slovenia, Ireland, UK and Austria) in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) skills/practice by using an inter-generational and multisectoral approach empowering elderly to use ICT on eve...

Kokol, Peter; S?tiglic, Gregor

2012-01-01

279

LA EVALUACIÓN DE COMPETENCIAS DOCENTES EN EL MODELO DECA: ANCLAJES TEÓRICOS / ASSESSMENT OF TEACHING SKILLS IN THE DECA MODEL: THEORETICAL ANCHORS  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish En este artículo se analizan algunos anclajes teóricos del Modelo para el Desarrollo y Evaluación de Competencias Académicas. Inicialmente se revisa el concepto de competencias y sus posibilidades de trasladarlo a momentos de práctica docente y de evaluación de competencias. Específicamente, se abor [...] dan conceptos relacionados con competencias y competencias docentes. De los dos dispositivos que el modelo integra, aquí se aborda el de evaluación de competencias docentes, concebido como un momento más de su desarrollo y se proponen estrategias e instrumentos centrados en la evaluación auténtica de competencias docentes que permitan evaluar profesores en procesos de formación centrados en sus producciones. Dentro del modelo, se destaca al portafolio docente como una estrategia para la formación y evaluación de profesores y como un dispositivo de práctica reflexiva que contribuye a los procesos de formación y evaluación de competencias docentes. Abstract in english This article discusses some theoretical anchors of the Model for Development and Assessment of Academic Skills. It initially reviews the concept of skills and the possibility of going to moments of teaching practice and skill assessment. It specifically addresses concepts related to skills and teach [...] ing skills. We herein address one of the two devices included in the model: the assessment of teaching skills, conceived as one more moments of their development; strategies and tools are proposed focused on an authentic assessment of teaching skills to evaluate teachers in their training processes, focusing on their productions. Within this model, the Teaching Portfolio is stressed as a strategy to train and evaluate teachers.

Rigoberto, Marín; Isabel, Guzmán; Amelia, Márquez; Manuel, Peña.

280

Developing Speaking and Writing Skills of L1 Arabic EFL Learners through Teaching of IPA Phonetic Codes  

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Full Text Available This exploratory study investigated the development of speaking and writing skills of L1 Arabic EFL learners based on their level of perception and understanding of phonetic transcriptions through visualisation of letter-to-symbol representations using the International Phonetic Alphabet (henceforth IPA. The participants were 169 University-level Preparatory Year Program (PYP male Saudi EFL students. The study was carried out as a pedagogical approach to improve university first year students’ pronunciation, correct speech and writing skills. The students selected attended 6, 50-minute Integrated Pronunciation Teaching (IPT lessons which included IPA transcription codes using both audio and visual teaching methods in addition to one ICT aided lesson.  Throughout those lessons, students were initially introduced to the IPA phonetic codes in gradual increase of difficulty and were encouraged to use the monolingual (English-English, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (LDCE. Two written tests and one oral test were conducted using a number of carefully selected IPA transcription codes related questions and results were analysed and interpreted. Results obtained showed slight variations between higher and lower ability students in understanding the IPA transcription codes. As a whole, however, the results indicated that students reached a high level of understanding of letter-to-symbol representations – the IPA system - and oral test results proved that phonological awareness can help Saudi students at tertiary level education improve their writing and speaking skills. Above all, learning the phonetic transcription codes helped them develop a sense of autonomy and competence when using monolingual dictionaries. The study concluded with a brief discussion of the ramifications of the study and the potential for further research.

Hussam Rajab

2013-04-01

281

ssessment of Learner Acceptance and Satisfaction with Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance  

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Full Text Available As video-based instructional materials become available to distance learners to learn practical skills at a distance, it is important to assess the instructional effectiveness of these materials and to understand how students respond to them. This paper is the second part of a larger exploratory study that assessed the instructional effectiveness of video-based instructional materials for teaching distance learners practical skills in block-laying and concreting and how learners respond to these instructional materials. Specifically, this paper aims to assess learners’ acceptance and satisfaction with the materials. It also aims to determine whether levels of learner satisfaction and acceptance differ according to study centres. Data were collected from 71 respondents at three study centres using a self-completion questionnaire comprising 17 Likert-type items. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Scheffe’s post hoc test at a 0.05 level of significance. Learners appeared positive about their learning experiences with the use of video-based instructional materials to learn practical skills at a distance as they rated highly all the items assessing their acceptance and satisfaction. Results of item-by-item ANOVA regarding learner acceptance indicated that the respondents, categorized according to study centres, exhibited similar levels of acceptance for nine of the ten items. For learner satisfaction, there were no statistically significant differences for six of the seven items. Thus, learners of different study centres exhibited about the same level of acceptance and satisfaction.

Francis Donkor

2011-06-01

282

Comparison the Effect of Teaching of SBAR Technique with Role Play and Lecturing on Communication Skill of Nurses  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Ineffective communication is a main factor in engender of unwanted hospital errors and impede suitable patient care. SBAR technique (Situation-Background- Assessment- Recommendation is a standard tool for building communication among healthcare professionals. While educating the SBAR technique requires appropriate educational methods, but this issue has been less investigated. So, the aim of present study was to compare the effect of educating the SBAR technique with role play and lecturing on communication skills of nurses in transferring patients to next shift. Methods: This quasi-experimental study conducted by participating 78 nurses who assigned to role play and lecturing groups randomly. SBAR technique was educated to each group separately. At the end of the learning session in each group, the skills of the participants in performing SBAR technique were investigated by the standard SBAR scale. Data analysis was performed by using SPSS statistical software version 11.5. Results: Comparison the total score of performing SBAR technique using independent samples t-test showed statistical differences between mean score of role play and lecturing groups. Similarly, comparison the scores of skill in performing each four parts of SBAR technique showed statistical differences between two groups.Conclusion: Role play is an effective educational method in teaching SBAR technique for nurses and it can be used as a tool for build effective communication between healthcare professionals.

Narges Toghian Chaharsoughi

2014-06-01

283

Curriculum Development In Aerospace Education Teaching for Behavior, Skills and Values  

Science.gov (United States)

Traces contribution to teaching effectiveness and curriculum design, occurring since 1950, and presents a format for modifying the developments made in other disciplines to aerospace education. Included is an example of an inquiry lesson dealing with parachutes. (SL)

Jones, Robert M.; Steinbrink, John E.

1977-01-01

284

Passing on the Legacy: Teaching Capillary Filtration and Developing Presentation Skills Using Classic Papers  

Science.gov (United States)

Description of using Classic Papers in a teaching symposium exploring the evidence supporting current concepts of capillary fluid exchange. Individual students are given papers to read, edit, and present to the class.

PhD J. Graham McGeown (Queen's University of Belfast, School of Medicine and Dentistry Cell and Metabolic Signaling Group)

2006-09-01

285

Organic bench model to complement the teaching and learning on basic surgical skills Modelo de bancada orgânico para complementar o ensino-aprendizagem de habilidades cirúrgicas básicas  

OpenAIRE

PURPOSE: To propose an organic bench model made with fruits/vegetables as an alternative to complement the arsenal of simulators used in the teaching and learning of basic surgical skills during medical graduation and education. METHODS: They were described the training strategies, through the use of fruits (or vegetables) to the learning of different techniques of incision, sutures, biopsies and basic principles of reconstruction. The preparation of bench model, the processes of skill acquis...

Rafael Denadai; Luís Ricardo Martinhão Souto

2012-01-01

286

PILOTing Undergraduate Students to Hands-On Teaching and Research Skills  

OpenAIRE

Undergraduate research can make a positive impact on science education. Unfortunately, the one student-one mentor paradigm of undergraduate research generates a wide range of variability in the student’s experience and further limits its availability to a select few students. In contrast, a single faculty member can offer multiple undergraduate teaching positions that provide a consistent experience for the student. We attempted to combine the undergraduate research and teaching experiences...

Borgon, Robert A.; Nicole Verity; Ken Teter

2013-01-01

287

Teachers' intentions with outdoor teaching in school forests : Skills and knowledge teachers want students to develop  

OpenAIRE

There is an interest among Swedish teachers to locate teaching outdoors. This study focuses on four teachers in grades 4-6, to explore their intentions and objectives with regular teaching outdoors. Data sources consist of semi-structured interviews, descriptions on successful activities, and reflections on metaphors.   The use of intentional analysis and Bloom’s revised taxonomy on teachers’ objectives show that the teachers stress the out-of-school learning that draws on the actual wo...

Wilhelmsson, Birgitta; Ottander, Christina; Lidestav, Gun

2012-01-01

288

Práctica docente en contextos multiculturales:: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales / Practice Teaching in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Costa Rica | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El presente artículo proviene de una investigación titulada Ejercicios docentes en contextos multiculturales: Lecciones para la formación en competencias docentes interculturales, realizada durante el 2011-2012, por el Departamento de Estudios e Investigación Educativa del Ministerio de Educación Pú [...] blica (Escalante, Fernández y Gaete, 2012), con la finalidad de explorar la diversidad cultural en las aulas e instituciones educativas en Costa Rica. Este fenómeno multicultural ha obligado a prestar especial atención a la oferta educativa que se brinda, principalmente, en primaria. Además, ha generado la discusión con respecto a los vacíos conceptuales y pedagógicos en el personal y en sus habilidades y destrezas en el proceso de enseñanza de estas poblaciones de origen distinto. De igual manera se impone una reflexión de los currículos educativos, los que resultan mayoritariamente nacionales y básicos. El estudio se realizó en 12 instituciones de primaria de diferente direcciones regionales, que tienen una alta diversidad cultural entre el alumnado. Por medio de técnicas cualitativas de investigación se explora las opiniones de directores, docentes y estudiantes al respecto. La conclusión más importante a la que se ha llegado es la ausencia de una pedagogía intercultural en las aulas nacionales y la necesidad de preparar al cuerpo docente en este sentido. Abstract in english This paper presents the results of a research project entitled Teaching Exercises in Multicultural Contexts: Lessons to Training in Intercultural Teaching Skills, which was conducted during 2011-2012 by the Department of Teaching Research and Studies from the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education [...] (Escalante, Fernández and Gaete, 2012), in order to explore cultural diversity in classrooms and educational institutions in Costa Rica. This multicultural phenomenon has forced authorities to pay special attention to the educational services provided, particularly in elementary. In addition, it has sparked a discussion regarding the teachers’ conceptual and pedagogical void and a gap in their teaching skills to deal with student populations of different origins. Similarly, it leads to a reflection about the basic national educational curriculum. The research was conducted in 12 elementary schools from different educational districts, which have a high cultural diversity among students. Using qualitative research techniques, the opinions of principals, teachers and students regarding this topic are explored. The most important conclusion reached in this study is the absence of an intercultural pedagogy in the country’s classrooms and the need to prepare teachers in this respect.

Cristina, Escalante Rivera; David, Fernández Obando; Marcelo, Gaete Astica.

2014-08-01

289

Tapping the Potential of Skill Integration as a Conduit for Communicative Language Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this classroom-based study was to discover the kinds of skill integration tasks that were employed by English teachers in Kuwait and to measure their attitudes toward implementing the skill integration technique in their classrooms. Data collection involved recording 25 hours of classroom-based observations, conducting interviews with the same group of teachers, and distributing a survey to further explore the teachers’ attitudes toward the skill integration technique. Data analysis involved categorizing skill integration tasks, analyzing the interview data, and counting the means and standard deviations of the survey data. Findings indicated that the participating teachers performed a wide range of transactional and interactional tasks that involved the simultaneous integration of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in their classrooms. The findings also revealed that even though the skill integration technique was adopted by most of the English teachers, they were ambivalent toward its implementation in their classrooms. This was partly due to the negative washback effect of traditional English tests that measure students’ accurate application of grammar rules but not their fluency and ability to use the L2 as a tool for communication. Implications for L2 pedagogy were drawn regarding the need for teachers to expose students of all proficiency levels to both transactional and interactional tasks in the classroom. To counter the negative washback effect of conventional discrete-point tests, English teachers were encouraged to develop communicative tests that involve skill integration and emphasize the development of the four language skills in their daily classroom activities.

Shu-hua Wu

2014-10-01

290

Benefits of Teaching Medical Students How to Communicate with Patients Having Serious Illness: Comparison of Two Approaches to Experiential, Skill-Based, and Self-Reflective Learning  

OpenAIRE

Innovative approaches are needed to teach medical students effective and compassionate communication with seriously ill patients. We describe two such educational experiences in the Yale Medical School curriculum for third-year medical students: 1) Communicating Difficult News Workshop and 2) Ward-Based End-of-Life Care Assignment. These two programs address educational needs to teach important clinical communication and assessment skills to medical students that previously were not consisten...

Ellman, Matthew S.; Fortin, Auguste H.

2012-01-01

291

Teaching patient-centered communication skills: a telephone follow-up curriculum for medical students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: To encourage medical students’ use of patient-centered skills in core clerkships, we implemented and evaluated a Telephone Follow-up Curriculum focusing on three communication behaviors: tailoring education to patients’ level of understanding, promoting adherence by anticipating obstacles, and ensuring comprehension by having patients repeat the plans. Methods: The intervention group consisted of two different cohorts of third-year medical students in longitudinal clerkships (n=41; traditional clerkship students comprised the comparison group (n =185. Intervention students telephoned one to four patients 1 week after seeing them in outpatient clinics or inpatient care to follow up on recommendations. We used surveys, focus groups, and clinical performance examinations to assess student perception, knowledge and skills, and behavior change. Results: Students found that the curriculum had a positive impact on patient care, although some found the number of calls excessive. Students and faculty reported improvement in students’ understanding of patients’ health behaviors, knowledge of patient education, and attitudes toward telephone follow-up. Few students changed patient education behaviors or called additional patients. Intervention students scored higher in some communication skills on objective assessments. Conclusion: A patient-centered communication curriculum can improve student knowledge and skills. While some intervention students perceived that they made too many calls, our data suggest that more calls, an increased sense of patient ownership, and role modeling by clerkship faculty may ensure incorporation and application of skills.

George W. Saba

2014-04-01

292

Teaching Listening  

OpenAIRE

Teaching English to speakers of other languages can be looked at from many different angles. One useful way is to look at the teaching process as the teaching of various language skills. There are, in general, four language skills, each based upon the modality of emphasis. These are the Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing skills. Generally speaking, it is emphasized that we first teach listening, then speaking, then reading and writing. However, in real life situations of language commu...

Anca Marina R?dulescu

2012-01-01

293

Teaching communication and therapeutic relationship skills to baccalaureate nursing students: a peer mentorship simulation approach.  

Science.gov (United States)

The literature on techniques for improving student competency in therapeutic communication and interpersonal skills is limited. A simulation approach to enhance the learning of communication skills was developed to address these issues. Second-semester and senior nursing students participated in videorecorded standardized patient simulations, with senior students portraying the patient. Following simulated interactions, senior students provided feedback to junior students on their use of communication skills and other therapeutic factors. To integrate the learning experience, junior students completed a written assignment, in which they identified effective and noneffective communication; personal strengths and weaknesses; and use of genuineness, empathy, and positive regard. A videorecording of each student interaction gave faculty the opportunity to provide formative feedback to students. Student evaluations have been positive. Themes identified in student evaluations include the impact of seeing oneself, significance of practicing, getting below the surface in communication, and moving from insight to goal setting. PMID:25207556

Miles, Leslie W; Mabey, Linda; Leggett, Sarah; Stansfield, Katie

2014-10-01

294

Nigerian Pre-service Science Teachers' Self-Perceptions of Acquired Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills after Teaching Practice Exposure  

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Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to investigate the teaching competencies acquired and those not acquired by science teachers-in-training after exposure to teaching practice. The investigator used a fifty-six item questionnaire, labeled as Perception of the Acquired Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills Scale (PAPS, to elicit information from two hundred and ten pre-service science teachers in south-west geopolitical zone of Nigeria. A panel of five science educators determined the content validity of the questionnaire. The sample of science education undergraduates were drawn from three randomly selected universities using stratified random sampling technique. The pre-service teachers were required to rate their performance level on each teaching competence on a five-point Likert scale ranging from - high performance level - to - no performance level - with - average performance level - as the pivotal point of the scale. Following that, the mean of each competence item were computed. Any competence statement that had a mean rating of less than 3.00 was considered to be of low performance cadre, since the mean value of the scale was 3.00. The findings of the study indicate that most of the teaching competencies that teachers-in-training have not acquired fall under theme 1 (planning instruction, theme 2(implementing instruction, theme 3 (evaluating instruction, and theme 7 (integrating technology and media in the classroom. The study also revealed that pre-service science teachers demonstrated proficiency in reinforcing learning, managing classroom, building professional links with colleagues and understanding learners' development. Based on the findings of this study, it was recommended that the principle of collaborative approaches for teacher learning should be incorporated into the teacher training program and that regular follow-up workshops aiming at developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK of pre-service science teachers should be scheduled as needs arise.

A.E. Okanlawon

2014-02-01

295

Teaching self-catheterization skills to children with neurogenic bladder complications.  

OpenAIRE

We examined the effects of simulation training on the acquisition of self-catheterization skills in 2 female children with spina bifida. Based on a task analysis, the children were taught to perform on a doll each of the components of preparation, and, using a mirror to locate the urinary meatus, to insert and remove the catheter and to clean-up. Before, during, and after training, the children's performance of the skills on the doll and on themselves was assessed. Results of a multiple basel...

Neef, N. A.; Parrish, J. M.; Hannigan, K. F.; Page, T. J.; Iwata, B. A.

1989-01-01

296

O ensino de habilidades e atitudes: um relato de experiências / Teaching of attitudes and skills: an experience report  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo relata a experiência do ensino de Habilidades e Atitudes, na graduação em Medicina da Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL) com a metodologia de ensino da Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas, ancorada no modelo biopsicossocial. O ensino de Habilidades e Atitudes implica a formulação diag [...] nóstica mutiaxial, descrição contextual e padronizada da condição clínica. Utiliza como instrumento a avaliação sistemática de eixos e domínios altamente informativos e relevantes para o tratamento. Eixo I: transtornos clínicos (mentais e condições médicas gerais); Eixo II: incapacidades nos cuidados pessoais, funcionamento ocupacional e com a família, e funcionamento social mais amplo; Eixo III: fatores contextuais (problemas interpessoais e outros psicossociais e ambientais); Eixo IV: qualidade de vida (refletindo primariamente as percepções do próprio paciente). A competência clínica foi avaliada por meio da discussão de casos clínicos, portfólios reflexivos e pelo Exame Clínico Estruturado por Objetivo (Osce), método que avalia as habilidades clínicas, as habilidades de atitudes e a comunicação dos estudantes de Medicina. Abstract in english This article describes an experience of teaching Attitudes and Skills in a medical course at the Londrina State University using the methodology of Problem-Based Learning grounded in a biopsychosocial model. The teaching of Attitudes and Skills requires from teachers a multi-axial diagnostic formula [...] tion in a contextual and standardized description of the clinical condition through a number of highly informative, therapeutically significant and systematically assessed axes or domains. The assessment of a patient should lead to multi-axial diagnostic formulation in a systematically assessed axes or domains. Axis I: clinical disorders (mental and general medical conditions); Axis II: disabilities (in personal care, occupational functioning, functioning with family, and broader social functioning); Axis III: contextual factors (interpersonal and other psychosocial and environmental problems); Axis IV: quality of life (primarily reflecting patient's self-perceptions).The assessment of clinical competence was performed through the discussion of clinical cases, the use of reflexive portfolios, and Objective Structured Clinical Exams (Osce), a method to evaluate the medical students' clinical skills, attitudes and communications skills.

Sandra Odebrecht Vargas, Nunes; Evelin Massae Ogatta, Muraguchi; Olavo Franco, Ferreira Filho; Rose Meire Albuquerque, Pontes; Lucienne Tibery Queiroz, Cardoso; Cíntia Magalhães Carvalho, Grion; Renata Maciulis, Dip; Luiz Carlos Lúcio, Carvalho.

2013-03-01

297

Effective Methods for Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Undergraduate Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective The objective of this systematic review was to assess which library instruction methods are most effective for improving the information skills of students at an introductory, undergraduate level, using cognitive outcomes (measuring changes in knowledge. The study sought to address the following questions: 1 What is the overall state of research on this topic? 2 Which teaching methods are more effective? Methods This project utilised systematic review methodology. Researchers searched fifteen databases and retrieved 4,356 potentially relevant citations. They reviewed the titles and abstracts for relevance, and of those, 257 complete articles were considered in-depth using a predetermined inclusion/exclusion form. There were 122 unique studies that met the inclusion criteria and were subjected to an extensive data extraction and critical appraisal process. Of these studies, 55 met author?defined quality criteria to provide information on the effectiveness of different teaching methods. From this review there was a final group of 16 studies with sufficient information to enable meta-analyses and calculations of standardized mean differences. Results The overwhelming majority of studies were conducted in the United States (88%. Experimental or quasi-experimental research methods were used in 79 studies (65%. Teaching methods used in the studies varied, with the majority focused on traditional methods of teaching, followed by computer assisted instruction (CAI, and self?directed independent learning (SDIL. Studies measured outcomes that correlated with Bloom’s lower levels of learning (‘Remember’, ‘Understand’, ‘Apply’. Sixteen studies compared traditional instruction (TI with no instruction, and twelve of those found a positive outcome. Meta-analysis of the data from 4 of these studies agreed with the positive conclusions favouring TI. Fourteen studies compared CAI with traditional instruction (TI, and 9 of these showed a neutral result. Meta-analysis of 8 of these studies agreed with this neutral result. Another group of 6 studies compared SDIL with no instruction, and meta-analysis of 5 of these agreed that the result was positive in favour of SDIL. Conclusion Based on the results of the meta-analysis, there is sufficient evidence to suggest that CAI is as effective as TI. Evidence also suggests that both TI and SDIL are more effective than no instruction. Additional comparative research needs to be done across different teaching methods. Studies comparing active learning (AL, CAI, and SDIL would greatly enrich the research literature. Further studies utilizing appropriate methodologies and validated research tools would enrich our evidence base, and contribute to the growth of knowledge about effectiveness of particular teaching methods.

Denise Koufogiannakis

2006-09-01

298

Applying Analogical Reasoning Techniques for Teaching XML Document Querying Skills in Database Classes  

Science.gov (United States)

XML has become the most ubiquitous format for exchange of data between applications running on the Internet. Most Web Services provide their information to clients in the form of XML. The ability to process complex XML documents in order to extract relevant information is becoming as important a skill for IS students to master as querying…

Mitri, Michel

2012-01-01

299

Innovative Teaching Games: Climbing the Hills of Math Skills. California Demonstration Mathematics Program.  

Science.gov (United States)

The card games in this publication are an alternative activity to help students master computational skills. Games for operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, integers, and square roots are included. They can be used to introduce math topics and for practice and review, with either the whole class or in small groups with 2 to…

Pittsburg Unified School District, CA.

300

Revisiting a Theory-Supported Approach to Teaching Cross-Cultural Management Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Cross-cultural skills are a major criterion for success in the global business environment. For American managers in multinational organizations, this means learning to manage cultural difference at three levels: self, interpersonal, and organizational. Since literature indicates that training programs based on cross-cultural and learning theories…

Sizoo, Steve; Serrie, Hendrick; Shapero, Morris

2007-01-01

301

Teaching Citizen Science Skills Online: Implications for Invasive Species Training Programs  

Science.gov (United States)

Citizen science programs are emerging as an efficient way to increase data collection and help monitor invasive species. Effective invasive species monitoring requires rigid data quality assurances if expensive control efforts are to be guided by volunteer data. To achieve data quality, effective online training is needed to improve field skills…

Newman, Greg; Crall, Alycia; Laituri, Melinda; Graham, Jim; Stohlgren, Tom; Moore, John C.; Kodrich, Kris; Holfelder, Kirstin A.

2010-01-01

302

Meursault on Trial: Multi-Skills Activities for Teaching "L'Etranger."  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents a unit of activities based on a reading of Albert Camus'""L'Etranger." The activities, which can be adapted to various levels and abilities in an intermediate French class, incorporate reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Sample materials and a bibliography are appended. (AM)

Polly, Lyle R.; Buscaglia, Michael J.

1978-01-01

303

Improving Higher Order Thinking Skills among Freshmen by Teaching Science through Inquiry  

Science.gov (United States)

Twenty-eight freshmen majoring in biology and/or chemistry in an Arab college in Israel, were given a pre-test and a post-test in which they had to identify the control group and design a controlled experiment. During the course an intervention was used. Science was taught by inquiry while using strategies that promote higher-order thinking skills…

Hugerat, Muhamad; Kortam, Naji

2014-01-01

304

Reality versus Authenticity: Mapping the Scaffolding Needs for Teaching Intellectual Skills for Working in Television  

Science.gov (United States)

A number of elements of scaffolding are identified that contribute to the operationalization of real world video production projects as authentic learning environments in which students can learn the intellectual television production skills necessary for working in the television industry. Three key elements are identified. Firstly projects must…

McKee, Alan

2007-01-01

305

Herramientas informáticas para la aplicación de técnicas de desarrollo de pensamiento creativo / Computing tools for the application of creative thinking development techniques  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Venezuela | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El sistema educativo no escapa a la renovación de las técnicas para incentivar el pensamiento innovador. El objetivo de esta reflexión monográfica es mostrar la relación entre el desarrollo de la creatividad y los usos de los softwares educativos. Las técnicas seleccionadas son, el mapa mental y el [...] de conceptos, el mandala y las supernotas. Y los softwares empleados, son el Mind Manager, el Inspiración y el CMap Tool. El procedimiento hace referencia a los fundamentos teóricos argumentados por los autores y, a una descripción de las bondades de los tres softwares seleccionados. Como reflexión final se puede decir que los softwares seleccionados cumplen la función de herramienta mental-tecnológica, al desarrollar habilidades para procesar información de forma creativa. Abstract in english The educational system does not escape to renewing the techniques to motivate innovative thinking. The goal of this monographic reflection is to show the relation between creativity development and education software uses. The chosen techniques are, mental and concept map, the mandala and super note [...] -taking. The software used is the Mind Manager, Inspiration, and the CMap Tool. The procedure refers to the theoretical fundaments argued by the authors and, to a description of the goodness of the software used. As a final reflection it can be said that the software work as a mental-technological tool, by developing skills to process information in a creative way.

Anny, Castillo Rojas.

2008-12-01

306

The Role of Reading in Improving Speaking Skill in the Context of Teaching English as a Foreign Language  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teaching foreign language is a challenging task; in language learning, speaking skill is considered a core productive part of learning. With this in mind, this article investigates how speaking can be made articulate and smooth. Furthermore, this article also determines the relationship between reading and speaking proficiency and extent to which teachers-led reading can affect students’ speaking performance. It is a known fact that lack of vocabulary makes learners stumbling and hesitant in speaking, because words precede communication ahead. In language learning hesitations/weakness in speaking can be overcome by encouraging learners to read a specific text. If teachers engage their students in worthwhile activities, such as providing appropriate and interesting reading texts in order to enable them to communicate what they have read. This article aims to reveal how reading gears speaking and reduces time in learning foreign language.

Faheem Akbar

2014-12-01

307

Do Student Evaluations Influence the Teaching Skills of Clerkship Clinical Faculty?  

Science.gov (United States)

Web-based student evaluations of clinical faculty were collected over an 8-year period. There were 19,881 medical student evaluations over the 8-year period for all clinical clerkships, representing a total of 952 faculty. Students used a 5-point Likert scale to rate the teaching effectiveness of faculty. Criterion-based methods and standard…

Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Hoyt, Amy; McNulty, John A.

2013-01-01

308

Communication Skills for End-of-Life Nursing Care: Teaching Strategies from the ELNEC Curriculum.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents a key module in a 3-day train-the-trainer course in end-of-life nursing--competence in communicating with patients and families. Factors affecting communication, coping strategies for families, strategies for classroom and clinical teaching, and resources are described. (SK)

Matzo, Marianne LaPorte; Sherman, Deborah Witt; Sheehan, Denice C.; Ferrell, Betty Rolling; Penn, Barbara

2003-01-01

309

Helping the Healers in Syracuse Study for Life: Teaching More than Study Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes how Dr. Deirdre Neilen has been a much-tapped natural resource for overwhelmed first-year medical students at Syracuse's Upstate Medical University for 20 years. Discusses how she teaches novices study techniques and how to believe in themselves. (EV)

Kriss, Erik

2001-01-01

310

Total Physical Response: A Technique for Teaching All Skills in Spanish.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents a strategy for using an expanded version of Total Physical Response (TPR) as one tool for teaching listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish. Variations of TPR are suggested for the purpose of implementing the technique within the foreign language curriculum. (Author/CB)

Glisan, Eileen W.

1986-01-01

311

Skill Acquisition and Reflection-Based Decision Making in a Teaching Laboratory: An Evaluative Study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Findings are presented from a study of the effectiveness of a training program designed to increase nonverbal expressiveness, during expository teaching/lecturing, in the nonverbal channels: voice delivery, eye expression, gaze, facial expression, gesturing, posture, and movement. The program includes laboratory practice sessions, characterized by…

Klinzing, Hans Gerhard

1988-01-01

312

An Evaluation of Grading and Instructional Feedback Skills of Graduate Teaching Assistants in Introductory Psychology  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored graduate teaching assistant (GTA) grading on 480 papers across two writing assignments as integrated into large Introductory Psychology courses. We measured GTA accuracy, consistency, and commenting (feedback) quality. Results indicate that GTA graders improved, although unevenly, in accuracy and consistency from Time 1 to 2…

Doe, Sue R.; Gingerich, Karla J.; Richards, Tracy L.

2013-01-01

313

Preparing for Online Teaching: Web-Based Assessment and Communication Skills in K12  

Science.gov (United States)

Students are doing less hand-raising and more clicking as online classes become increasingly popular in K12 instruction, both in combination with brick-and-mortar classrooms and in independent full-time virtual schools. With online instruction comes a change in the nature of teaching, communicating with, and assessing students. As schools move to…

DeNisco, Alison

2013-01-01

314

Using Virtual Interactions to Enhance the Teaching of Communication Skills to Information Technology Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper examines the use of virtual interactions in a Communication class at Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT)-South Africa. It demonstrates how synthesising virtual and other computer-assisted exercises as well as traditional classroom-based activities can enhance the teaching and learning of communication concepts. The paper is…

Pineteh, Ernest A.

2012-01-01

315

Teaching Approach for Developing Nonverbal Communication Skills in Students with Social Perception Deficits. Part I. The Basic Approach and Body Language Clues.  

Science.gov (United States)

An approach to ameliorate social perception deficits in learning disabled children is described. Based on task analysis and diagnosis and prescription, the approach is seen to cover four stages in teaching nonverbal communication skills: discrimination of specific social cues (body language), understanding of the social meanings of such cues,…

Minskoff, Esther H.

1980-01-01

316

A Comprehensive, Simulation-Based Approach to Teaching Clinical Skills: The Medical Students’ Perspective  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

Evans, Leigh V.; Crimmins, Ashley C.; Bonz, James W.; Gusberg, Richard J.; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D.; Dodge, Kelly L.

2014-01-01

317

The Effect of Problem Solving Teaching with Texts of Turkish Lesson on Students’ Problem Solving Skills  

OpenAIRE

In this research, by carrying out activities based on texts, effect of providing problem solving skill on students’ levels of problem solving attainment was tried to be identified. Research was performed according to pretest-posttest Experimental Model with Control Group, in 2008-2009 educational year at second grade of an elementary school in Denizli province. For nine weeks, four hours in a week, while teacher guide book was being followed in control group in Turkish language lesson, text...

Ilgin, Havva; Arslan, Derya

2012-01-01

318

Teaching information literacy skills: a case study of the QU-core program in Qatar University  

OpenAIRE

Purpose: The study examines students’ assessment of a general requirement course entitled “Basics of Information Technology”.Methodology: A written survey was distributed to 80 students in 3 different classes. 61 surveys (76% of the total) were returned within the study period.Results: Respondents stated that knowledge and skills acquired are essential to pursue their studies in the university and beyond. Using search engines and searching databases were identified as the most important...

Hesham Azmi

2006-01-01

319

Procedural Skills Training During Emergency Medicine Residency: Are We Teaching the Right Things?  

OpenAIRE

Objectives: The Residency Review Committee training requirements for emergency medicine residents (EM) are defined by consensus panels, with specific topics abstracted from lists of patient complaints and diagnostic codes. The relevance of specific curricular topics to actual practice has not been studied. We compared residency graduates’ self-assessed preparation during training to importance in practice for a variety of EM procedural skills.Methods: We distributed a web-based survey to al...

Druck, Jeffrey; Valley, Morgan A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.

2009-01-01

320

Teaching reading comprehension : the effects of direct instruction and cognitive apprenticeship on comprehension skills and metacognition  

OpenAIRE

Governments, organisations and educators agree that education should not just focus on basic skills, but also on more complex outcomes such as metacognition. Youngsters must be prepared to deal with the rapidly changing society; they need to become life-long learners. Schools must provide opportunities for active, self-directed and independent learning to prepare students for this life-long learning. Metacognition plays an important role in this lifelong learning. This study ad...

Jager, Bernadet

2002-01-01

321

Enacting teaching and learning in the interaction process: “Keys” for developing skills in piano lessons through four-hand improvisations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Embodied mind theories underline the role of the body in the act of knowing. According to the enactive approach, we learn to perceive and to know through our bodily interactions with the world (Varela, Thompson & Rosch, 1991. However, such an approach remains incomplete as long as sociality is not taken into account (Froese & Di Paolo, 2009. Recently, an inter-enactive approach has accordingly been proposed. Social interactions are seen as processes of coordinated sense-making that emerge from the dynamics of the inter-action process itself (De Jaegher & Di Paolo, 2007. As learning mainly takes place in intersubjective contexts (e.g. as an effect of teaching, this approach is relevant to the issue of pedagogy. Teaching settings are a special case though: cognitive interactions are reciprocal but asymmetrically guided by the teacher. In this paper, the question of the relations between body and education is thus addressed from the point of view of the inter-enactive approach. To this end, we first sketch out the phenomenological and theoretical contours of embodied intersubjectivity and intersubjective embodiment. Then, we present an interactive pedagogical method for musical learning (free spontaneous four-hand improvisations in the context of the Kaddouch pedagogy and discuss it using illustrative case studies. The teacher’s role appears to operate directly within the dynamics of the interaction process, a source of knowing and skill enaction for the learner

Laroche Julien

2014-06-01

322

A comprehensive, simulation-based approach to teaching clinical skills: the medical students' perspective.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p communication (p = 0.02), teamwork (p = 0.01), confidence in management (p < 0.001), and translation to clinical experience (p < 0.001). Regarding the team leader role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p < 0.001) and awareness of team building (p = <0.001). Ratings demonstrate a positive impact of simulation on both clinical management skills and team leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

Evans, Leigh V; Crimmins, Ashley C; Bonz, James W; Gusberg, Richard J; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D; Dodge, Kelly L

2014-12-01

323

Developments in undergraduate teaching of small-animal soft-tissue surgical skills at the University of Sydney.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses recent developments in soft-tissue surgery teaching at the University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science. An integrated teaching program was developed for Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) students with the aim of providing them with optimal learning opportunities to meet "Day One" small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies. Didactic lectures and tutorials were introduced earlier into the curriculum to prepare students for live-animal surgery practical. In addition to existing clinics, additional spay/neuter clinics were established in collaboration with animal welfare organizations to increase student exposure to live-animal surgery. A silicon-based, life-like canine ovariohysterectomy model was developed with the assistance of a model-making and special effects company. The model features elastic ovarian pedicles and suspensory ligaments, which can be stretched and broken like those of an actual dog. To monitor the volume and type of student surgical experience, an E-portfolio resource was established. This resource allows for the tracking of numbers of live, student-performed desexing surgeries and incorporates competency-based assessments and reflective tasks to be completed by students. Student feedback on the integrated surgical soft-tissue teaching program was assessed. Respondents were assessed in the fourth year of the degree and will have further opportunities to develop Day One small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies in the fifth year. Ninety-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they were motivated to participate in all aspects of the program, while 78% agreed or strongly agreed that they received an adequate opportunity to develop their skills and confidence in ovariohysterectomy or castration procedures through the fourth-year curriculum. PMID:22430078

Gopinath, Deepa; McGreevy, Paul D; Zuber, Richard M; Klupiec, Corinna; Baguley, John; Barrs, Vanessa R

2012-01-01

324

Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

Gupta Garima

2012-01-01

325

Procedural Skills Training During Emergency Medicine Residency: Are We Teaching the Right Things?  

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Full Text Available Objectives: The Residency Review Committee training requirements for emergency medicine residents (EM are defined by consensus panels, with specific topics abstracted from lists of patient complaints and diagnostic codes. The relevance of specific curricular topics to actual practice has not been studied. We compared residency graduates’ self-assessed preparation during training to importance in practice for a variety of EM procedural skills.Methods: We distributed a web-based survey to all graduates of the Denver Health Residency Program in EM over the past 10 years. The survey addressed: practice type and patient census; years of experience; additional procedural training beyond residency; and confidence, preparation, and importance in practice for 12 procedures (extensor tendon repair, transvenous pacing, lumbar puncture, applanation tonometry, arterial line placement, anoscopy, CT scan interpretation, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, slit lamp usage, ultrasonography, compartment pressure measurement and procedural sedation. For each skill, preparation and importance were measured on four-point Likert scales. We compared mean preparation and importance scores using paired sample t-tests, to identify areas of under- or over-preparation.Results: Seventy-four residency graduates (59% of those eligible completed the survey. There were significant discrepancies between importance in practice and preparation during residency for eight of the 12 skills. Under-preparation was significant for transvenous pacing, CT scan interpretation, slit lamp examinations and procedural sedation. Over-preparation was significant for extensor tendon repair, arterial line placement, peritoneal lavage and ultrasonography. There were strong correlations (r>0.3 between preparation during residency and confidence for 10 of the 12 procedural skills, suggesting a high degree of internal consistency for the survey.Conclusions: Practicing emergency physicians may be uniquely qualified to identify areas of under- and over-preparation during residency training. There were significant discrepancies between importance in practice and preparation during residency for eight of 12 procedures. There was a strong correlation between confidence and preparation during residency for almost all procedural skills, re-enforcing the tenet that residency training is the primary locus of instruction for clinical procedures.[WestJEM. 2009;10:152-156.

Druck, Jeffrey

2009-08-01

326

Teaching Basic Skills in Life Skills Contexts: An Inservice Training Module for LVA-CT English as a Second Language Tutors.  

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The set of instructional materials is designed as a training module for volunteer tutors in English as a Second Language (ESL) for adults. It presents the content of a workshop, about 2.5 hours long, with three main objectives: to (1) help tutors understand the distinction between basic skills and life skills in ESL; (2) develop skills in two…

Literacy Volunteers of America--Connecticut, Hartford.

327

O pensamento criativo de Paul Klee: arte e música na constituição da Teoria da Forma The creative thinking of Paul Klee: art and music in the formation of the Theory of Form  

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Full Text Available Estudo sobre a Teoria da Forma concebida no início do século XX pelo artista plástico Paul Klee e publicado no livro O Pensamento Criativo (KLEE, 1920. A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é uma demonstração do pensamento artístico que adota pressupostos formais, previamente estabelecidos para resultar na prática da representação artística. Klee identificou as relações formais entre a música e as artes visuais, apresentando conexões entre a linha melódica e a linha no desenho; o ritmo e as seqüências de módulos e sub-módulos; os tempos dos compassos e as divisões da pintura; a métrica da música e a modulação da forma e da cor nas artes visuais. Klee também apresentou suas experiências com superposição de cores e texturas para representar visualmente a polifonia. A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é um exemplo de estudo que pressupõe modelos formais para a elaboração artística e projetual.Study on the Theory of Form conceived in the early twentieth century by artist Paul Klee and published in the book The Creative Thinking (KLEE, 1920. The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is a demonstration of an artistic thought that adopts the previously established formal prerequisites that result in the practice of artistic representation. Klee identified the formal relationship between music and the visual arts, providing connections between the melodic line and the line in the drawing, rhythm and sequence of modules and sub-modules, the pulses of the measures and the divisions of the painting, metrics in music and the modulation of shape and color in the visual arts. Klee also presented his experiences with overlapping colors and textures to visually represent polyphony. The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is an example of a study that requires formal models for the artistic and design elaboration.

Rosana Costa Ramalho de Castro

2010-01-01

328

Statistical study on bodily communication skills in volleyball to improve teaching methods  

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Full Text Available Focus of the study is to verify the incidence of performance analysis data of bodily communication in volleyball. The sample was chosen to represent the scores obtained in three technical skills strongly influenced by bodily communication: the second ball goes to the opposite court instead of setting for attacking; the attack as fast as possible in the middle of the net and the off speed hit instead of power spike over the block. The purpose of this study is to measure the amount of the three technical skills points for each set, the total of them, the points awarded to the attack and the total points of each set, and so to read the relations between the different categories of scoring. The method used is the recruitment of the data with the use of video software Data Project by a team of operators made by the team’s official analyst, by the coach and by the single athlete, only for measurements concerning him. The assignment of the data is attributed by the team's official analyst after sharing with the coach and the athlete. The datum recruited must necessarily accepted by the coach, otherwise is not considered. The data recruited were compared with data on total points in the set and with the overall results of the attack, first individually and then together, in order to determine the relationship among points attributable to bodily communication and the final score. The dependency relationship, analyzed through a simple regression model, was statistically significant. The results show as this study can help the coach to train the team for improving the analyzed technical skills in different mode, creating a methodological system training to enhance the performance.

GAETANO RAIOLA

2012-06-01

329

Statistical study on bodily communication skills in volleyball to improve teaching methods  

OpenAIRE

Focus of the study is to verify the incidence of performance analysis data of bodily communication in volleyball. The sample was chosen to represent the scores obtained in three technical skills strongly influenced by bodily communication: the second ball goes to the opposite court instead of setting for attacking; the attack as fast as possible in the middle of the net and the off speed hit instead of power spike over the block. The purpose of this study is to measure the amount of the three...

GAETANO RAIOLA; PIO ALFREDO DI TORE

2012-01-01

330

Developing Thinking Skills with Computers.  

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A study in which Logo programming was used to teach problem-solving skills to fourth to eighth grade students is described. The results, and their implications for further use of the computer to teach higher order thinking skills, are discussed. The possible use of Prolog programming to teach reasoning skills is described. (JL)

Black, John B.; And Others

1988-01-01

331

Technology-based vs. traditional instruction. A comparison of two methods for teaching the skill of performing a 12-lead ECG.  

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The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM with traditional methods of teaching the skill of performing a 12-lead ECG. A randomized pre/posttest experimental design was used. Seventy-seven baccalaureate nursing students in a required, senior-level critical-care course at a large midwestern university were recruited for the study. Two teaching methods were compared. The traditional method included a self-study module, a brief lecture and demonstration by an instructor, and hands-on experience using a plastic manikin and a real 12-lead ECG machine in the learning laboratory. The second method covered the same content using an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM embedded with virtual reality and supplemented with a self-study module. There were no significant (p student satisfaction with their learning method, or perception of self-efficacy in performing the skill. Overall results indicated that both groups were satisfied with their instructional method and were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly on a live, simulated patient. This evaluation study is a beginning step to assess new and potentially more cost-effective teaching methods and their effects on student learning outcomes and behaviors, including the transfer of skill acquisition via a computer simulation to a real patient. PMID:12743975

Jeffries, Pamela R; Woolf, Shirley; Linde, Beverly

2003-01-01

332

Needs assessment and evaluation of a short course to improve faculties teaching skills at a former World Health Organization regional teacher training center  

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Introduction: In the design of educational programs, much attention has been paid to teaching methods, needs assessment, an important part of the development of educational programs, generally is neglected. Another important aspect in educational program design is assessing effectiveness. The aims of this study were to design a formal needs assessment program to define the core contents of a faculty development program, and to determine whether participation in the faculty development program reinforced new teaching skills. Methods: A teacher-training program was designed at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences to help medical instructors boost their teaching skills. Needs assessment was done with nominal group technique followed by a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. The program, imparted in workshop format, covered effective teaching methods, feedback, assessing knowledge and time management. Instruction was in the form of lectures, group discussions, case simulations, video presentations and role-plays. The program was evaluated in several phases using data triangulation and multi-item assessments of overall program quality in three major dimensions: Kirkpatrick program evaluation model, evaluation of the educational environment and qualitative analysis with open-ended questions. All participants in the study belonged to the academic staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (n=396). Results: Seven main categories were derived from nominal group techniques and questionnaires. After the program, participants rated the quality of the program highly. They felt that the educational intervention was appropriate and had a positive impact on their knowledge of effective teaching methods, feedback, knowledge assessment and time management. Assessment of the effectiveness of the program showed that participants reported significant improvements in their teaching abilities. Conclusions: Our faculty development program  have a significant positive effect on medical university teaching staff members’ competencies. Further research is needed to investigate whether the faculty development program actually results in improved teaching performance. PMID:25587548

KOJURI, JAVAD; AMINI, MITRA; KARIMIAN, ZAHRA; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA; SABER, MAHBOOBEH; BAZRAFCAN, LEILA; EBRAHIMI, SEDIGHEH; REZAEE, RITA

2015-01-01

333

Research and Teaching: Promoting the Use of Higher-Order Cognitive Skills in Qualitative Problem Solving  

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A study was conducted to promote higher order cognitive skills (HOCS) in a chemistry class using the GOAL (Gather, Organize, Analyze, and Learn) method. Students were assigned four qualitative problems specifically designed to be solved with the method over the course of the semester outside of normal homework and testing. The problems served as a platform to encourage students to use HOCS in their Learn responses. The study focused on students' use of HOCS in these Learn responses regardless of whether HOCS were used in the actual solving of the problems or not. The results of this study suggest that consistent use of the Learn response in problem solving promotes reflection with an accompanied increase in use of HOCS by students during a semester.

Jason Justice

2008-05-01

334

Teaching surgical skills in obstetrics using a cesarean section simulator – bringing simulation to life  

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Full Text Available Venkata Sujatha Vellanki1, Sarath Babu Gillellamudi21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2Department of General Surgery Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Sreepuram, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, IndiaPurpose: Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in obstetrics. Incorporating a simulation model into training provides a safe, low-stress environment in which students can gain skills and receive feedback. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of obstetrics simulator training for medical students doing their internship.Methods: Twenty-five students posted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology received a formal lecture on cesarean section and demonstration of the procedure on a mannequin in the first week of their internship, The study group (n = 12 practiced their skills on an obstetrics simulator under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The control group received no simulator-based training (n = 13 or further instruction. All students were asked to complete a prevalidated questionnaire to assess their level of confidence in performing the procedure after the educational session.Results: Compared with their peers in the study, students in the simulator group were significantly more likely to define the steps of cesarean section (91% vs 61.5%, and were comfortable in assisting cesarean section (100% vs 46.15% as they were able to identify the layers of abdomen opened during cesarean section. All 12 students reported this as an excellent experience.Conclusion: We were able to construct an inexpensive cesarean section trainer that facilitates instruction in cesarean section technique in a low-stress environment.Keywords: simulation, obstetrics, medical students

Venkata Sujatha Vellanki

2010-12-01

335

Establishing A Minimum Generic Skill Set For Risk Management Teaching In A Spreadsheet Training Course  

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Past research shows that spreadsheet models are prone to such a high frequency of errors and data security implications that the risk management of spreadsheet development and spreadsheet use is of great importance to both industry and academia. The underlying rationale for this paper is that spreadsheet training courses should specifically address risk management in the development process both from a generic and a domain-specific viewpoint. This research specifically focuses on one of these namely those generic issues of risk management that should be present in a training course that attempts to meet good-practice within industry. A pilot questionnaire was constructed showing a possible minimum set of risk management issues and sent to academics and industry practitioners for feedback. The findings from this pilot survey will be used to refine the questionnaire for sending to a larger body of possible respondents. It is expected these findings will form the basis of a risk management teaching approach to b...

Chadwick, David

2008-01-01

336

Long-term prospective teaching effectivity of practical skills training and a first OSCE in cranio maxillofacial surgery for dental students.  

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Basic skills in oral/CMF surgery should be taught effectively to dental students as surgical skills training is traditionally under-represented in the dental curriculum compared to its later need in daily clinical practice. Rigid curricular time frames and prospectively condensed professional education foster new effective teaching and examination formats. Transmitting and assessing clinical competence objectively (independent of subjective bias), reliably (repeatable, inter-rater consistency) and valid (representative, structured task selection) was intended and evaluated in oral/CMF surgery skills acquisition starting in summer 2009. A small-group practical skills training (PST) day initiated a one-week practical training course, covering previously formulated learning objectives. An objective structured clinical evaluation (OSCE) was held at the end of each semester. Theoretical background knowledge and clinical skills should have to be memorized within a representative number of practical tasks (test stations). A first semester (26 students) used classical practical training alone as controls, the following semesters (171 students) had PST, considered as a study group. All 197 students were assessed with OSCE's over a 3-year period. An instructor held PST based on presentations, videos and practical training, including mannequins, with pairs of students. This included history taking, communication and interpretation of laboratory/image diagnostics, structured clinical facial examination, fracture diagnosis, venipuncture, suturing, biopsy and wire loops on pig jaws for manual and clinical skills, which were later incorporated in OSCE stations. OSCE average results increased from 63.3 ± 9.7% before and to 75.5 ± 10% after the inclusion of PST (p < 0.05). Knowledge diffusion between sittings on the same test date and between consecutive semesters was insignificant. Students and faculty rated their learning/teaching experience "very good" to "good". PST was effective in optimizing clinical skills as evaluated by OSCE. PMID:24012014

Landes, Constantin A; Hoefer, Sebastian; Schuebel, Florian; Ballon, Alexander; Teiler, Anna; Tran, Andreas; Weber, Roxane; Walcher, Felix; Sader, Robert

2014-07-01

337

Benefits of teaching medical students how to communicate with patients having serious illness: comparison of two approaches to experiential, skill-based, and self-reflective learning.  

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Innovative approaches are needed to teach medical students effective and compassionate communication with seriously ill patients. We describe two such educational experiences in the Yale Medical School curriculum for third-year medical students: 1) Communicating Difficult News Workshop and 2) Ward-Based End-of-Life Care Assignment. These two programs address educational needs to teach important clinical communication and assessment skills to medical students that previously were not consistently or explicitly addressed in the curriculum. The two learning programs share a number of educational approaches driven by the learning objectives, the students' development, and clinical realities. Common educational features include: experiential learning, the Biopsychosocial Model, patient-centered communication, integration into clinical clerkships, structured skill-based learning, self-reflection, and self-care. These shared features - as well as some differences - are explored in this paper in order to illustrate key issues in designing and implementing medical student education in these areas. PMID:22737055

Ellman, Matthew S; Fortin, Auguste H

2012-06-01

338

Fostering Creative Thinking in Student Engineers.  

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Focuses on ways to foster and access creativity in engineering students. Presents three case studies that demonstrate the importance of establishing freedom in the learning process as well as providing motivation be it extrinsic or intrinsic. Describes how to monitor the level of success in fostering creativity in students. (Author/PVD)

Baillie, Caroline; Walker, Paul

1998-01-01

339

Creative Thinking: Processes, Strategies, and Knowledge  

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Creative achievements are the basis for progress in our world. Although creative achievement is influenced by many variables, the basis for creativity is held to lie in the generation of high-quality, original, and elegant solutions to complex, novel, ill-defined problems. In the present effort, we examine the cognitive capacities that make…

Mumford, Michael D.; Medeiros, Kelsey E.; Partlow, Paul J.

2012-01-01

340

Educating Teachers for Higher Order Thinking: The Three-Story Intellect.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the process by which teachers learn to teach thinking in the classroom. The paper describes the evolution of thinking skills in three phases: thinking skills acquisition, critical and creative thinking processes, and thoughtful application. Teachers pass through the three-stage process as they learn how to teach thinking. (SM)

Fogarty, Robin; McTighe, Jay

1993-01-01

341

The effects of teacher anxiety and modeling on the acquisition of a science teaching skill and concomitant student performance  

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In a study designed to explore the effects of teacher anxiety and modeling on acquisition of a science teaching skill and concomitant student performance, 69 preservice secondary teachers and 295 eighth grade students were randomly assigned to microteaching sessions. Prior to microteaching, teachers were given an anxiety test, then randomly assigned to one of three treatments; a transcript model, a protocol model, or a control condition. Subsequently both teacher and student performance was assessed using written and behavioral measures. Analysis of variance indicated that subjects in the two modeling treatments significantly exceeded performance of control group subjects on all measures of the dependent variable, with the protocol model being generally superior to the transcript model. The differential effects of the modeling treatments were further reflected in student performance. Regression analysis of aptitude-treatment interactions indicated that teacher anxiety scores interacted significantly with instructional treatments, with high anxiety teachers performing best in the protocol modeling treatment. Again, this interaction was reflected in student performance, where students taught by highly anxious teachers performed significantly better when their teachers had received the protocol model. These results were discussed in terms of teacher concerns and a memory model of the effects of anxiety on performance.

Koran, John J., Jr.; Koran, Mary Lou

342

Postdoctoral Clinical-Research Training in Psychiatry: A Model for Teaching Grant Writing and Other Research Survival Skills and for Increasing Clarity of Mentoring Expectations  

OpenAIRE

The authors describe a model for teaching grant writing and other research survival skills to postdoctoral clinical-research fellows in psychiatry and for improving research mentoring. Over the past 4 years, the authors have developed a course on writing grant applications for postdoctoral clinical-research fellows, using peer-review processes modeled after a National Institutes of Health study section. At the same time, the authors have clarified expectations of mentors in ways designed to h...

Reynolds, Charles F.; Martin, Christopher; Brent, David; Ryan, Neal; Dahl, Ronald E.; Pilkonis, Paul; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kupfer, David J.

1998-01-01

343

Undergraduate technical skills training guided by student tutors – Analysis of tutors' attitudes, tutees' acceptance and learning progress in an innovative teaching model  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Skills labs provide a sheltered learning environment. As close supervision and individual feedback were proven to be important in ensuring effective skills training, we implemented a cross-year peer tutor system in our skills lab of internal medicine that allowed intense training sessions with small learning groups (3–4 students taught by one student tutor. Methods The expectations, experiences and criticisms of peer tutors regarding the tutor system for undergraduate skills lab training were investigated in the context of a focus group. In addition, tutees' acceptance of this learning model and of their student tutors was evaluated by means of a pre/post web-based survey. Results 14 voluntary senior students were intensely prepared by consultants for their peer tutor activity. 127 students participated in the project, 66.9% of which responded to the web-based survey (23 topics with help of 6-point Likert scale + free comments. Acceptance was very high (5.69 ± 0.07, mean ± SEM, and self-confidence ratings increased significantly after the intervention for each of the trained skills (average 1.96 ± 0.08, all p Conclusion This study demonstrates that peer teaching in undergraduate technical clinical skills training is feasible and widely accepted among tutees, provided that the tutors receive sufficient training and supervision.

Jünger Jana

2008-04-01

344

The Effectiveness of Computer-Assissted Learning in the Teaching of Quantitative Volumetric Analysis Skills in a First-Year University Course  

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This paper presents findings from a project that commenced at The University of Melbourne in 1992 on the teaching of quantitative volumetric analysis skills to the first-year students. We discuss the extent to which the level of laboratory skills of a group of students, in this case with a weak chemistry background and poor experimental ability, can be changed by the introduction of the combination of a computer-assisted learning (CAL) tutorial and video before the first practical exercise. Analysis of feedback data from the tutorial and from video observation during the first laboratory session has shown that understanding and application of skills are improved to a level at least comparable to that of students who have a much better background and experimental ability.

McNaught, Carmel; Grant, Heather; Fritze, Paul; Barton, Janet; McTigue, Peter; Prosser, Robert

1995-11-01

345

ENHANCEMENT OF LEARNING AND TEACHING IN COMPUTER GRAPHICS THROUGH MARKER AUGMENTED REALITY TECHNOLOGY  

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Full Text Available In this paper the experience gained at using low-cost interactive marker augmented reality (AR technology during course Computer graphics is presented. The preliminary exploration of AR technology adoption for teaching support and learning enhancement is done and several benefits are identified, summarized and analyzed via a model. Two learning scenarios are designed based on human-computer interaction principles to present important concepts virtually in interactive and engaging way. The students’ opinion is gathered and the results describe AR as promising and effective technology that allows better understanding of theory and facts and that supports creative thinking and development of more realistic 3D models and scenes.

Malinka Ivanova

2011-01-01

346

The Relationship Between the Managerial Skills and Results of "Performance Evaluation "Tool Among Nursing Managers in Teaching Hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science  

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Full Text Available Performance of different organizations, such as hospitals is mainly influenced by their managers’ performance. Nursing managers have an important role in hospital performance and their managerial skills can improve the quality of the services. Hence, the present study was conducted in order to assess the relationship between the managerial skills and the results of their performance evaluation in Teaching Hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science in 2013. The research used the cross sectional method in 2013. It was done by distributing a managerial skills assessment questionnaire, with close-ended questions in 5 choice Likert scale, among 181 managers and head nurses of hospitals of Iran university of Medical Sciences; among which 131 answered the questions. Another data collection tools was a forms to record evaluation marks from the personnel records. We used Pearson and Spearman correlation tests and SPSS for analysis and description (frequency, mean and standard deviation. Results showed that the managerial skills of the nursing mangers were fair (2.57 out of 5 and the results of the performance evaluation were in a good condition (98.44. The mangers’ evaluation results and the managerial skills scores were not in a meaningful correlation (r=0.047 np=0.856. The research showed no correlation between different domains of managerial skills and the performance evaluation marks: decision making skills (r=0.074 and p=0.399, leadership (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.654, motivation (correlation coefficient 0.118 and p=0.163, communication  (correlation coefficient 0.116 and p=0.122, systematic thinking  (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.828, time management (correlation coefficient 0.077 and p=0.401 and strategic thinking  (correlation coefficient 0.041 and p=0.756. Lack of any correlation and relation between managers’ managerial skills and their performance evaluation results shows need to a fundamental revision at managers’ performance evaluation form.

Haleh Mousavi Isfahani

2014-09-01

347

Informing Pedagogy Through the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model  

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Full Text Available Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, educators need a pedagogical framework that helps them interpret and apply research findings. This article describes the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, a scheme that relates six distinct aspects of instruction to research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences.

Mariale Hardiman

2012-02-01

348

Competencias en los procesos de ense?anza-aprendizaje virtual y semipresencial Teaching Skills in Virtual and Blended Learning Environments  

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Full Text Available Actualmente las universidades están inmersas en lo que se conoce como el proceso de «convergencia europea» y que llevará al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior (EEES. El objetivo es dotar a Europa de un sistema universitario homogéneo, compatible y flexible que permita a los estudiantes y titulados universitarios europeos una mayor movilidad, así como ofrecer al sistema universitario europeo unos niveles de transparencia y calidad, mediante sistemas de evaluaci?n, que le hagan atractivo y competitivo en el ámbito internacional dentro del actual proceso de globalizaci?n. En este art?culo, interesa centrar la reflexión en dos de las modalidades de la educación a distancia que asumirán importancia en ese cambio universitario: el e-learning y el b-learning, que consisten básicamente en la virtualización de los procesos de aprendizaje a través del uso de equipos informáticos. Para ello se ha realizado una investigación cualitativa con metodología de estudio de casos. De entre los resultados se destaca el uso de las TIC por parte del profesorado para conseguir un mejor aprendizaje en los estudiantes, de igual forma un porcentaje importante de los profesores 78% utiliza alguna plataforma virtual como apoyo a la docencia. Como conclusión se resalta que las políticas de formación deberían fortalecer las competencias del profesorado universitario en el uso de dispositivos telemáticos, recursos e instrumentos relacionados con el aprendizaje semipresencial y virtual.Universities are currently immersed in what is known as the process of European convergence to create the European Higher Education Area (EHEA. The aim is to establish a standardized, compatible and flexible European university system that enables graduates and undergraduates to move easily from one institution to another within Europe. As a result of evaluation mechanisms, the system will be transparent and of high quality, which will make it attractive and competitive internationally in a globalized world. In this paper, we focus on two distance learning modes that will become more important as a result of this change in universities: e-learning and b-learning. These basically involve the virtualization of learning processes through the use of computer equipment. We carried out a qualitative study using the case study method. The results indicate that teaching staff use information and communication technology (ICT to improve student learning. Similarly, a high percentage (78% of lecturers use some form of digital platform as a support for teaching. In conclusion, training policies should strengthen university teachers’ skills in the use of ICT equipment, tools and resources related to blended and virtual learning.

Francisco Imbernón Muñoz

2011-03-01

349

Competencias docentes de profesores de pregrado: diseño y validación de un instrumento de evaluación / Teaching Skills in Undergraduate Level Teachers: Design and Validation of an Evaluation Instrument  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Se describe el diseño, construcción y validación de un instrumento para evaluar las competencias docentes de los profesores de pregrado de la Universidad Católica de Colombia. El instrumento evalúa siete competencias básicas para el ejercicio de la función docente: planificación curricular, utilizac [...] ión adecuada de diseño metodológico y organización de actividades de enseñanza, competencia científica tecnológica, interacción adecuada con estudiantes, competencia para evaluar, competencia para realizar tutorías, autorreflexión sobre la práctica docente. Se construyeron así los indicadores de competencias del docente de la Universidad Católica de Colombia, prueba que fue validada por medio del juicio de 60 expertos. Con los resultados se diseñó el instrumento de evaluación de las competencias, que una vez ajustado fue aplicado a 20 docentes de la Facultad de Psicología de la Universidad Católica de Colombia. Abstract in english We describe the design, construction and validation processes of a instrument aimed to the evaluation of teaching skills of the Catholic University of Colombia's undergraduate level teachers. The instrument evaluates seven skills that are basic to the exercise of teaching: curriculum planning, appro [...] priate usage of methodological designs and organization of teaching activities, scientific technological competence, appropriate interaction with students, evaluative competence, tutorial skills, and self-reflection on teaching practices. The indicators of teacher's competence were thus constructed, and the test was validated by the opinion of 60 expert judges. The results of this process were used to design the final instrument, which once adjusted, was applied to 20 teachers of the Catholic University of Colombia.

ITALA MARINA, CAMARGO-ESCOBAR; CARLOS, PARDO-ADAMES.

2008-08-01

350

Organic bench model to complement the teaching and learning on basic surgical skills / Modelo de bancada orgânico para complementar o ensino-aprendizagem de habilidades cirúrgicas básicas  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Propor um modelo de bancada orgânico, confeccionado com legumes/frutas, como alternativa para complementar o arsenal de simuladores aplicados no ensino-aprendizagem das competências cirúrgicas básicas durante a graduação e o ensino médico. MÉTODOS: Foram descritas as estratégias de treinam [...] ento, através da utilização de frutas (ou legumes), para a aprendizagem de diferentes técnicas de incisão, suturas, biópsias e princípios básicos de reconstrução. A preparação do modelo de bancada, os processos de aquisição de habilidades e feedback e os métodos deavaliação também foram delineados. RESULTADOS: Estruturou-se uma proposta de ensino baseada em um modelo orgânico com o treinamento distribuído em várias sessões, com níveis crescentes de dificuldade e com feedback e avaliação de todo o processo. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo orgânico, por ser simples, versátil, portátil, reprodutível, disponível, de fácil aquisição e baixo custo é mais uma opção para complementar o arsenal de simuladores de ensino e aprendizagem existentes. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To propose an organic bench model made with fruits/vegetables as an alternative to complement the arsenal of simulators used in the teaching and learning of basic surgical skills during medical graduation and education. METHODS: They were described the training strategies, through the use o [...] f fruits (or vegetables) to the learning of different techniques of incision, sutures, biopsies and basic principles of reconstruction. The preparation of bench model, the processes of skill acquisition, feedback and evaluation were also delineated. RESULTS: A proposal for teaching based on an organic model with training delivered in multiple sessions, with increasing levels of difficulty, and with feedback and evaluation during all the process was structured. CONCLUSION: The organic model, being simple, versatile, portable, reproducible, readily available, and having low cost, is another option to complement the existing simulators for teaching and learning of basic surgical skills.

Rafael, Denadai; Luís Ricardo Martinhão, Souto.

2012-01-01

351

Organic bench model to complement the teaching and learning on basic surgical skills Modelo de bancada orgânico para complementar o ensino-aprendizagem de habilidades cirúrgicas básicas  

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Full Text Available PURPOSE: To propose an organic bench model made with fruits/vegetables as an alternative to complement the arsenal of simulators used in the teaching and learning of basic surgical skills during medical graduation and education. METHODS: They were described the training strategies, through the use of fruits (or vegetables to the learning of different techniques of incision, sutures, biopsies and basic principles of reconstruction. The preparation of bench model, the processes of skill acquisition, feedback and evaluation were also delineated. RESULTS: A proposal for teaching based on an organic model with training delivered in multiple sessions, with increasing levels of difficulty, and with feedback and evaluation during all the process was structured. CONCLUSION: The organic model, being simple, versatile, portable, reproducible, readily available, and having low cost, is another option to complement the existing simulators for teaching and learning of basic surgical skills.OBJETIVO: Propor um modelo de bancada orgânico, confeccionado com legumes/frutas, como alternativa para complementar o arsenal de simuladores aplicados no ensino-aprendizagem das competências cirúrgicas básicas durante a graduação e o ensino médico. MÉTODOS: Foram descritas as estratégias de treinamento, através da utilização de frutas (ou legumes, para a aprendizagem de diferentes técnicas de incisão, suturas, biópsias e princípios básicos de reconstrução. A preparação do modelo de bancada, os processos de aquisição de habilidades e feedback e os métodos deavaliação também foram delineados. RESULTADOS: Estruturou-se uma proposta de ensino baseada em um modelo orgânico com o treinamento distribuído em várias sessões, com níveis crescentes de dificuldade e com feedback e avaliação de todo o processo. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo orgânico, por ser simples, versátil, portátil, reprodutível, disponível, de fácil aquisição e baixo custo é mais uma opção para complementar o arsenal de simuladores de ensino e aprendizagem existentes.

Rafael Denadai

2012-01-01

352

READING BASED-CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES: AN EFFORT TOWARD THE INTEGRATION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN INDONESIA  

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Full Text Available Abstract: This paper proposes the implementation of reading-based classroom activities for teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia. Compared to other language skills, reading is viewed to provide a relatively stable foundation for Indonesian students to develop their communicative competence in English. It is argued that reading-focused activities stimulate confidence for Indonesian learners to get involved in listening, speaking, and writing related-activities in ways that are similar to normal daily life communication. The reasons for the proposed implementation of reading-based classroom activities in TEFLIN and the role of reading and its relation with other language skills are presented.

Hadi Hadi

2006-01-01

353

The Comparative Instructional Effectiveness of Print-Based and Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance  

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Full Text Available Print-based instructional materials have been more popular than any other medium for teaching practical skills during the delivery of technical and vocational education and training via distance learning. However, the approach has its shortcomings and in recent times alternatives have been sought. The comparative instructional effectiveness of one such alternative is the focus of this paper. The study sought to examine the instructional effectiveness of video-based instructional materials vis-à-vis traditional print-based instructional materials for teaching distance learners of a Block-Laying and Concreting practical skills programme. An experimental design was used and participants were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: Users of video-based instructional materials or users of print-based instructional materials. A researcher-designed performance test and an achievement test of 20 multiple-choice items were used to collect data from 34 participants who used print-based instructional materials and 35 participants who used video-based instructional materials to learn practical skills. The instruments were based on the instructional objectives of lessons on mortar and wall finish. Pilot test data for the achievement test yielded Cronbach’s alpha of 0.84. Descriptive statistics and t-test at a 0.05 level of significance were used to analyse the data. The results indicated that the two instructional materials were pedagogically equivalent in terms of theoretical knowledge acquired. Practical skills acquired, however, were significantly higher among users of video-based instructional materials. Finally, users of video-based instructional materials displayed significantly superior craftsmanship.

Francis Donkor

2010-03-01

354

Teaching Competitive Intelligence Skills to North American and Overseas Audiences: A World of Difference in Pedagogical Effectiveness  

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This article contrasts teaching methodologies and pedagogical effectiveness in executive development programs delivered in North America and three diverse regions of the world. Based on the authors' collective teaching experience exceeding 40 years encompassing over 24 countries, and augmented by a review of the literature, a theoretical model is…

Blenkhorn, David L.; Fleisher, Craig S.

2010-01-01

355

A Bird in the Hand and a Bird in the Bush: Using Proverbs to Teach Skills and Comprehension.  

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Discusses objectives that can be accomplished through the study of proverbs. Suggests a number of exercises involving proverbs that can be used to improve reading comprehension and hone writing skills and to develop a vocabulary. (RBW)

Holden, Marjorie H.; Warshaw, Mimi

1985-01-01

356

Die ontwikkeling van 'n DBS-reeks ter ondersteuning van leesvaardighede / Development and integration of multimedia teaching and learning support material (LTSM) to support reading skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: Afrikaner Abstract in english The Department of Education, educators, parents and various stakeholders are concerned about the literacy levels of learners in South-African schools. Various national and international studies revealed shockingly low levels and underachievement. In 2006 the Department of Education revealed the dist [...] urbing fact that 61% of South African learners still cannot read by the end of grade 3. Results of a systemic evaluation that was undertaken in 2007 revealed an alarmingly low average of 36% for literacy. The Department of Education launched various investigations to establish why the levels of reading proficiency for South African learners are so poor. The Foundations for Learning Campaign was one of the responses to address these concerns and an effort to assist teachers in facilitating literacy skills effectively. South African educators are experiencing increased pressure to teach literacy skills (including reading) effectively. It is imperative that effective reading instruction should commence in the foundation phase, where the basis for more advanced skills is established. In order to help learners to become better readers, teachers need support to deal with problems typically experienced in South African classrooms. These problems include large classes, a lack of teaching expertise/ training as well as a lack of resources in many classrooms. The purpose of this study was to describe how recently developed multimedia learning and teaching support material (MLTSM) by means of a digital book disc (DBD) can enhance the reading skills of foundation phase learners. It also describes the benefits of the DBD for the South African school context and the potential it has to enrich and support reading instruction in the foundation phase. The DBD is a form of electronic mobile learning facilitated by a DVD player that can be used as MLTSM. The DBD uses multimedia (written and spoken words, visual illustrations or animation) presented in a mobile format (portable DVD players). According to Mayer's cognitive theory of multimedia learning, the working memory includes both visual and auditory channels and learning is enhanced when both these channels are used during multimedia supported learning activities. The proposed model provides guidelines for the development and integration of MTLSM on a DBD to enable learners to become skilled in reading and writing, while enjoying the process of becoming literate. The DBD focuses on phonemic awareness, word recognition, reading comprehension and fluency as important components of reading instruction. Shared reading instruction activities where learners follow the text and join in when they are able to do so, improves motivation. Stories, poems and songs that relate to the themes (context) in the classroom, are examples of the different kinds of text used on the DBD. Relevant teaching and learning principles that support reading proficiency while using the DBD, are discussed. These include active learner participation, motivation, reinforcement of positive attitudes, self assessment and immediate feedback. The study also demonstrates how relevant learning material that relate to the learner's experience, edutainment and scaffolding can contribute to effective reading instruction. Different multimedia principles that support and enhance reading profi ciency are also explained. The DBD enables the teacher to facilitate enrichment (additional stories) as well as remedial activities, where learners experiencing difficulties/problems, can repeat learning activities according to their individual needs. The differentiated stories allow learners with varying abilities to choose activities that relate to their developmental level providing the appropriate level of challenge. Thematic stories and other reading material can also be produced by individual teachers to enhance the relevancy of the content for the learner's world, experience and interest. The DBD addresses some of the problems typical of South African sc

Audrey, Klopper; Carisma, Nel.

2010-12-01

357

Teaching memory-impaired people to touch type: the acquisition of a useful complex perceptual-motor skill.  

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This study provides ecological validity for laboratory findings that people with memory difficulties following brain injury can learn new skills. This was done by testing the acquisition of a useful real-world perceptual-motor skill. Using a conventional computer software training package supplemented by one-to-one coaching, a woman with severely impaired memory and a man with poor memory learned to touch type. They achieved the initial criterion of 20 wpm with over 90% accuracy; reached a top speed of 30 wpm and retained their skill a year later. The memory-impaired participants received short sessions of distributed practice and as far as possible were taught under error-free learning conditions. Their performance was broadly comparable with that of two non-memory-impaired comparison participants in terms of acquisition, consolidation and transfer, speed and accuracy, and retention. PMID:18576273

Todd, Mary; Barrow, Corinne

2008-08-01

358

Segments of marketers based on a perceived importance of marketing knowledge and skills  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to define and empirically verify a range of knowledge and skills which are necessary in order to segment marketers, based on their perceptions of the importance of such marketing knowledge and skills. To empirically verify the importance of marketing knowledge and skills, a 28-item measurement instrument was developed. Responses from 235 marketing vice-presidents, marketing directors, sales directors or company presidents/owners in Slovenia were obtained (an 11.8% total response rate. The results reveal four clusters of marketers: marketing specialists, marketing generalists, non-marketers and marketing generals. General and leadership skills are highly evaluated, together with the knowledge and skills related to competition and the company’s market position. Consistent with the general prejudice about marketing people, creative thinking skills and imagination are very important, especially to marketing generalists in our survey. Yet, the knowledge and skills related to consumer behaviour and marketing communication are less important, especially to marketing generals and non-marketers. Certain implications for marketing education and practice arise from the survey.

Vesna Žabkar

2009-07-01

359

Teaching Science through Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses the objectives of the science curriculum and the teacher's responsibility of passing through not only the required material, but also skills. Suggests that in order to improve teaching and learning skills, new strategies, such as teaching and learning through research must be utilized. Presents four examples of teaching and learning…

Hugerat, Muhamad; Zidani, Saleem; Kurtam, Naji

2003-01-01

360

Integrating Math & Computer Skills in the Biology Classroom: An Example Using Spreadsheet Simulations to Teach Fundamental Sampling Concepts  

Science.gov (United States)

Students often enter biology programs deficient in the math and computational skills that would enhance their attainment of a deeper understanding of the discipline. To address some of these concerns, I developed a series of spreadsheet simulation exercises that focus on some of the mathematical foundations of scientific inquiry and the benefits…

Ray, Darrell L.

2013-01-01

361

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities of International Business Majors: What We Teach Them "versus" What Companies Need Them to Know  

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To compete in a global environment, firms need people with the appropriate international knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA). Undergraduate international business (IB) majors may not be taught the specific KSA that match those business needs. This study surveyed the most active international companies in Minnesota (USA) that had recently hired…

Prestwich, Roger; Ho-Kim, Thu-Mai

2007-01-01

362

Learning Style Differences in Adult Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Classroom Techniques for Teaching Quantitative Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

More than half of adults in the USA have quantitative literacy ratings at or below a basic level. This lack of literacy often becomes a barrier to employability. To overcome this barrier, adults are returning to college to improve their quantitative skills and complete an undergraduate education, often through an accelerated degree program. A…

Deever, Walter Thomas

2012-01-01

363

Animal Diversity Web as a Teaching & Learning Tool to Improve Research & Writing Skills in College Biology Courses  

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Most teachers agree that writing is an important skill for students to master, yet not all teachers incorporate writing assignments in their courses. Employers agree that written communication is important for college graduates, yet in a survey, less than 10% of employers thought that colleges did a good job preparing students for work. Writing an…

Yahnke, Christopher J.; Dewey, Tanya; Myers, Phil

2013-01-01

364

Problem Solving Skills and Learning Achievements through Problem-Based Module in teaching and learning Biology in High School  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of using problem-based module (PBM in the subject of Biology on high school students’ problem-solving skill and achievement. This research used the quasi-experiment method with Non-Equivalent Pretest and Posttest Control Group Design, which involved two science classes, in which one group was assigned as control group and another one as experiment group, in a high school in Pekan Baru, Indonesia. The problem-solving ability and the product of learning were descriptively analyzed before being inferentially analyzed. To find out whether or not there is any difference in their problem-solving skill, t-Test and N-gain test was conducted on the experimental group’s and control group’s concept mastery level and product of learning. The result shows that the problem-solving skill percentage of the experimental group was 95.47% (very good, whereas that of the control group was 25.12% (low. The average of student’s achievement in the experimental group was 84.26% (good, while that of the control group equaled 79.08% (moderate. The average of the product of learning was 89.89% (good for the experimental group, whereas that of the control group was 52.10% (low. The findings showed that PBM can actually increase problem-solving skill, students’ achievement, and students’ learning product, with the experimental group getting higher percentage in all three aspects compared to the control group by using PBM in their Biology class. The implication of this study is the increase in the quality of learning through learning innovation using learning module. The panned and organized implementation of this module by teachers will not only improve students’ thinking skills, but also increase the quality of science and technology, consistent with the aim of Indonesia education.

Wan Syafii

2013-08-01

365

Teaching Assistants and Class Teachers: Differing Perceptions, Role Confusion and the Benefits of Skills-Based Training  

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Research has shown that teaching assistants (TAs) working in mainstream classrooms with special needs students in Australia are being required to perform quite complex tasks such as curriculum modification and differentiation yet they are not required to have any formal qualifications nor training in these tasks. In the United Kingdom, TAs are not…

Butt, Rosemary; Lowe, Kaye

2012-01-01

366

Evaluation of a Video Prompting and Fading Procedure for Teaching Dish Washing Skills to Adults with Developmental Disabilities  

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We evaluated a video prompting and fading procedure for teaching three adults with developmental disabilities to wash dishes. Video prompting involved showing video clips depicting each step of the task. All three adults reached 90-100% correct when video prompting was implemented. Following acquisition, video prompting was withdrawn, but…

Sigafoos, Jeff; O'Reilly, Mark; Cannella, Helen; Edrisinha, Chaturi; de la Cruz, Berenice; Upadhyaya, Megha; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Hundley, Anna; Andrews, Alonzo; Garver, Carolyn; Young, David

2007-01-01

367

Comparing Simultaneous Prompting and Constant Time Delay to Teach Leisure Skills to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability  

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We compared the effects of simultaneous prompting and constant time delay in teaching two solitaire card games to five high school students with moderate intellectual disability. An adapted alternating treatments within a multiple probe design was used to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. Both procedures were effective…

Seward, Jannike; Schuster, John W.; Ault, Melinda Jones; Collins, Belva C.; Hall, Meada

2014-01-01

368

Peer-teaching in the food chemistry laboratory: student-produced experiments, peer and audio feedback, and integration of employability skills  

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Full Text Available This paper describes the author’s experience over the last several years of implementing an alternative Food Chemistry laboratory practical model for a group of third-year BSc Nutraceuticals students. The initial main objectives were to prepare students for the more independent final-year research project; to incorporate innovative approaches to feedback; and to integrate key employability skills into the curriculum. These were achieved through building the skills required to ultimately allow students working in groups to research, design and run a laboratory for their class. The first year of the project involved innovative approaches to feedback, including weekly feedback sessions, report checklists and audio feedback podcasts. Student evaluation after one year suggested the case group felt more prepared for final-year research projects and work placement owing to the redesign of the laboratory assessment. This, together with general positive feedback across several indicators, was proof of concept, and was a foundation for an improved model. The improvements related to the organisation and management of the project, but the same pedagogical approach has been retained. The second year saw the introduction of a more rigorous and easier to manage peer evaluation though use of the online Comprehensive Assessment for Team-Member Effectiveness (CATME tool. The most recent revision has included a Project Wiki hosted on Blackboard to facilitate the organisation, communication, assessment and feedback of student-generated resources.More recently, the final-year students who had participated in the peer-teaching Food Chemistry labs when in third year have been evaluated. This evaluation took place following their research projects, and suggests that the peer-teaching model better prepared them for these activities, compared to traditional laboratories.

Julie Lisa Dunne

2014-10-01

369

The Impact of Teaching Two Courses ( Electronic Curriculum Design and Multimedia on The Acquistion of Electronic Content Design Skills  

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Full Text Available The use of Multimedia applications in Learning provides useful concepts for Instructional Content Design.This study aimed to investigate the effect of design electronic curriculum and multimedia applications onacquiring e-content design skills, and improving their attitudes towards e-learning. To achieve theobjective of the study, the researchers developed a test to measure the efficiencies of designing electroniccontent and the measure of attitudes towards e-learning, The results showed that study of both coursescontributed positively to the acquisition of design skills of e-content , The results revealed that there arestatistical significant differences between the scores of the students in the two applications (pre and poston the total score of the attitude measure and three areas of it.

Natheer K Gharaibeh

2013-01-01

370

Differentiating Information Skills and Computer Skills: A Factor Analytic Approach  

OpenAIRE

A basic tenet of information literacy programs is that the skills needed to use computers and the skills needed to find and evaluate information are two separate sets of skills. Outside the library this is not always the view. The claim is sometimes made that information skills are acquired by learning computer skills. All that is needed is a computer lab and someone to teach computer skills. This study uses data from a survey of computer and information skills to determine whether or not...

Pask, Judith M.; Saunders, E. Stewart

2004-01-01

371

Estetoscópio digital como ferramenta inovadora no ensino da ausculta cardíaca / Digital stethoscope as an innovative tool on the teaching of auscultatory skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese O exame físico cardiovascular, em particular a ausculta cardíaca, é uma das habilidades clínicas mais difíceis para os alunos durante seu treinamento médico. Estudos sugerem que o uso de tecnologias, como o estetoscópio digital, aumente a acurácia do exame clínico, entretanto, seu impacto no ensino [...] da propedêutica da ausculta cardíaca em alunos de graduação de Medicina não é conhecido. O objetivo é demonstrar a utilidade do estetoscópio digital, em comparação com métodos tradicionais, como instrumento de ensino da ausculta cardíaca. Estudo de intervenção, longitudinal, controlado, unicêntrico e randomizado. Foram inscritos 38 alunos de medicina para um curso de semiologia cardiovascular com duração de oito semanas. Definiu-se um programa com aulas expositivas e à beira do leito nas enfermarias de Cardiologia. Nas aulas práticas, os alunos foram randomizados em dois grupos: 1) (n = 21) estetoscópio digital (Littmann® modelo 3200, 3M); e 2) (n = 17) estetoscópios convencionais. Foi realizada uma avaliação pré-treinamento, através de um teste utilizando o software Heart Sounds®, que foi repetida ao final do curso. As médias das avaliações foram comparadas pelo teste T pareado e não pareado. Observa-se que, ao final do curso, houve uma melhora significativamente maior no grupo que utilizou o estetoscópio digital (51,9%) quando comparado ao grupo que utilizou o estetoscópio convencional (29,5%). Intervenções de curta duração para o ensino de semiologia cardíaca são capazes de contribuir de modo significativo para melhora da proficiência da identificação dos sons cardíacos. O uso do estetoscópio digital demonstrou ser um fator positivo no ensino dessas habilidades. Abstract in english Physical cardiovascular examination, particularly cardiac auscultation, is one of the most difficult clinical skills for students during their medical training. Studies suggest that the use of technologies such as digital stethoscope increase the accuracy of clinical examination, however, its impact [...] on the teaching of cardiac auscultation for undergraduate students of medicine is not known. The objective is to demonstrate the usefulness of the digital stethoscope compared to traditional methods as a tool in the teaching of auscultatory skills. nterventional, longitudinal, controlled, unicenter and randomized study. Thirty-eight medicine students were enrolled for a cardiovascular semiology course lasting eight weeks. The course program included lectures and bedside practice in Cardiology wards. In the practical lessons, the students were randomized into two groups: 1) (n = 21) digital stethoscope (Littmann® Model 3200, 3M); and 2) (n = 17) conventional stethoscopes. A pre-training evaluation was conducted through a test using the software Heart Sounds®, which was repeated after the course. The average scores were compared by paired T test and unpaired T test. It is observed that, at the end of the course, there was a significantly greater improvement in the group that used the digital stethoscope (51.9%) compared to the group using the conventional stethoscope (29.5%). Short-term interventions for cardiac semiology teaching are able to contribute significantly to improving proficiency in the identification of heart sounds. The use of digital stethoscope proved to be a positive factor in teaching these skills.

Claudio Tinoco, Mesquita; Jader Costa dos, Reis; Luciana Silveira, Simões; Eduardo Cardoso de, Moura; Gustavo Amarante, Rodrigues; Carolina Cunto de, Athayde; Hugo Lima, Machado; Pedro Gemal, Lanzieri.

2013-02-01

372

FORMACIÓN DEL PROFESORADO UNIVERSITARIO EN LAS COMPETENCIAS DOCENTES / UNIVERSITY TEACHER TRAINING IN TEACHING SKILLS / FORMAÇÃO DO PROFESSORADO UNIVERSITÁRIO NAS COMPETÊNCIAS DOCENTES  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in portuguese A pesquisa realizada sintetiza as contribuições de vários projetos, orientados à formação, o desenvolvimento profissional e ao conhecimento das competências mais valiosas para o professorado universitário. Construiuse um mapa das competências docentes mais estimadas por expertos, uma ampla mostra de [...] docentes e tutores, a partir do qual se desenha um modelo para impulsionar a formação do professorado universitário e a consolidação da identidade profissional, mediante a integração de métodos quantitativos e qualitativos. Destacam-se duas grandes modalidades de competências: as ligadas ao domínio das chaves do EEES, a sociedade do conhecimento, a comunicação, pesquisa e inovação da docência, e as ligadas à melhora do processo formativo: identidade profissional, planificação, tutoria, sistema metodológico, desenho de meios, avaliação; que iriam de integrar a teoria e prática docente nas instituições formativas. Abstract in spanish La investigación realizada sintetiza las aportaciones de varios proyectos orientados a la formación, el desarrollo profesional y al conocimiento de las competencias más valiosas a dominar por el profesorado universitario. Se construye un mapa de las competencias docentes más estimadas por expertos, [...] una amplia muestra de docentes y tutores, a partir del cual se diseña un modelo para impulsar la formación del profesorado universitario y la consolidación de la identidad profesional, mediante la integración de métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos. Se destacan dos grandes modalidades de competencias: Las ligadas al dominio de las claves del EEES, la sociedad del conocimiento, la comunicación, investigación e innovación de la docencia, y las ligadas a la mejora del proceso formativo: identidad profesional, planificación, tutoría, sistema metodológico, diseño de medios, evaluación; que han de integrar la teoría y práctica docente en las instituciones formativas. Abstract in english The research summarizes the contributions of research projects aimed at training, professional development and knowledge of the most valuable skills mastered by the faculty. We build a map of the teaching competencies most valued by experts, a large sample of teachers and tutors, at the end of the c [...] ycle, from which a model is designed to promote teacher training college and the consolidation of professional identity, or through the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods. It highlights two major forms of competence: domain linked to the keys of the EHEA, the society of knowledge, communication, research and innovation in teaching and those linked to improving the teaching process: professional identity, mentoring, planning, methodological system, media design, evaluation, they have to integrate teaching theory and practice in educational institutions.

Antonio, Medina Rivilla; Mª Concepción, Domínguez Garrido; Fernando, Ribeiro Gonçalves.

2011-12-01

373

Simulated electronic health record (Sim-EHR) curriculum: teaching EHR skills and use of the EHR for disease management and prevention.  

Science.gov (United States)

Electronic health records (EHRs) can improve many aspects of patient care, yet few formal EHR curricula exist to teach optimal use to students and other trainees. The Simulated EHR (Sim-EHR) curriculum was introduced in January 2011 at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) to provide learners with a safe hands-on environment in which to apply evidence-based guidelines while learning EHR skills. Using an EHR training platform identical to the OHSU EHR system, learners review and correct a simulated medical chart for a complex virtual patient with chronic diseases and years of fragmented care. They write orders and prescriptions, create an evidence-based plan of care for indicated disease prevention and management, and review their work in a small-group setting. Third-year students complete the Sim-EHR curriculum as part of the required family medicine clerkship; their chart work is assessed using a rubric tied to the curriculum's general and specific objectives. As of January 2014, 406 third-year OHSU medical students, on campus or at remote clerkship sites, and 21 OHSU internal medicine interns had completed simulated charts.In this article, the authors describe the development and implementation of the Sim-EHR curriculum, with a focus on use of the curriculum in the family medicine clerkship. They also share preliminary findings and lessons learned. They suggest that the Sim-EHR curriculum is an effective, interactive method for providing learners with EHR skills education while demonstrating how a well-organized chart helps ensure safe, efficient, and quality patient care. PMID:24448035

Milano, Christina E; Hardman, Joseph A; Plesiu, Adeline; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Biagioli, Frances E

2014-03-01

374

7 CFR 3406.11 - Scope of a teaching proposal.  

Science.gov (United States)

...the areas of teaching competency...and advising skills. Teachers...effective teaching materials...colleges or universities to learn new...colleges and universities undertake...satellite communications. (iv...Instrumentation for teaching. ...communication skills as well...

2010-01-01

375

Nurturing 21st century physician knowledge, skills and attitudes with medical home innovations: the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education teaching health center curriculum experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose. The effect of patient centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum interventions on residents’ self-reported and demonstrated knowledge, skills and attitudes in PCMH competency arenas (KSA) is lacking in the literature. This study aimed to assess the impact of PCMH curricular innovations on the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. Methods. Twenty four (24) Internal Medicine residents—12 Traditional (TR) track residents and 12 Teaching Health Center (THC) track residents—began training in Academic Year (AY) 2011 at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education (WCGME). They were followed through AY2013, covering three years of training. PCMH curricular innovations were focally applied July 2011 until May 2012 to THC residents. These curricular innovations were spread program-wide in May 2012. Semi-annual, validated PCMH Clinician Assessments assessing KSA were started in AY2011 and were completed by all residents. Results. Mean KSA scores of TR residents were similar to those of THC residents at baseline for all PCMH competencies. In May 2012, mean scores of THC residents were significantly higher than TR residents for most KSA. After program-wide implementation of PCMH innovations, mean scores of TR residents for all KSA improved and most became equalized to those of THC residents. Globally improved KSA scores of THC and TR residents were maintained through May 2014, with the majority of improvements above baseline and reaching statistical significance. Conclusions. PCMH curricular innovations inspired by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA’s) Teaching Health Center funded residency program expansion quickly and consistently improved the KSA of Internal Medicine residents.

Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Gollamudi, Lakshmi Rani; Sheth, Jignesh; Ebersole, Brian; Gardner, Katlyn J.; Nardella, Julie; Ruddy, Meaghan P.; Meade, Lauren

2015-01-01

376

Shop Skills Can Be Life Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Suggesting the use of the vocational shop program for personal development in addition to learning mechanical skills, the authors propose that instructors plan specific values and values clarification activities as a regular part of the shop program, including the teaching of positive attitudes and moral development. (BM)

Scarborough, Cayce; Ezell, Lewie

1978-01-01

377

Comunicação no ensino médico: estruturação, experiência e desafios em novos currículos médicos / Communication skills in medical teaching: structure, experience and challenges in new medical curricula  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo relata a experiência de um grupo de docentes do curso de Medicina da Universidade Estadual de Londrina no ensino de comunicação no módulo de Habilidades do currículo integrado. A constatação da importância da comunicação no relacionamento médico-paciente e na evolução de doenças levou à [...] elaboração de uma estrutura com dificuldades progressivas ao longo dos quatro primeiros anos do curso. Os conteúdos abordados variam desde a observação de pacientes em sala de espera até a discussão técnica sobre a abordagem da transmissão de informações, adesão ao tratamento e manejo de grupos especiais de pacientes em diferentes fases da vida. As estratégias utilizadas incluem observação de pacientes, entrevistas, discussões em grupo, dramatizações, filmes, mesas-redondas, conferências e depoimentos de pacientes. A avaliação é feita em duas partes, formativa e cognitiva. O treinamento da comunicação visa desenvolver a competência do aluno em aprimorar seu vínculo com o paciente, potencializar os processos de obtenção e transmissão de informações, o manejo do paciente e a promoção da adesão ao tratamento. Abstract in english This article relates an experience of a group of teachers of the Integrated Medical Course of the State University of Londrina in teaching communication in the Skills Module. The awareness of the importance of communication skills not only in the doctor-patient relationship but also in the evolution [...] of diseases led to the design of a module with progressive difficulties throughout the first years of the course. The content of the module ranges from observation of patients in the waiting room to discussions on how to transmit information, treatment adherence and management of special groups of patients in different stages of life. The methods used include observation of patients, interviews, group discussions, role-playing, films, round tables, conferences and statements of patients. The evaluation occurs in two parts: formative and cognitive. The training of communication skills is aimed at developing the ability of the student to establish a good doctor-patient relationship, history taking and transmission of information and at promoting treatment adherence.

Barbara, Turini; Daniel, Martins Neto; Marcelo de Sousa, Tavares; Sandra Odebrecht Vargas, Nunes; Vera Lucia Menezes da, Silva; Zuleika, Thomson.

2008-06-01

378

Microteaching Handbook; Skills, Planning, and Critiquing.  

Science.gov (United States)

This handbook, developed for use in a microteaching laboratory, presents information on: (l) the history of microteaching; (2) research supporting microteaching; (3) advantages of microteaching; (4) teaching skill clusters (response repertoire, questioning skills, creating student involvement, increasing student participation, presentation…

Kasambira, K. Paul

379

Higher Order Thinking Skills for Students with Special Needs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Methods for teaching higher order thinking skills to students with special needs are considered. These include microthinking skills (e.g., classification); critical thinking skills; and major thinking operations (e.g., problem solving, decision making, and conceptualizing). Strategies for teaching individual skills and for incorporating thinking…

Lombardi, Thomas P.; Savage, Louise

1994-01-01

380

21st Century Skills: Prepare Students for the Future  

Science.gov (United States)

Skills students will need for the society in which they will work and live shouldn't be thought of as "one more thing to teach," but rather training integrated across all curricula. This article takes a look at 21st century skills and how these skills directly impact teaching and learning. Classroom teachers need to be familiar with these skills…

Larson, Lotta C.; Miller, Teresa Northern

2011-01-01

381

Ver, oír y aprender: una filmación educativa para la enseñanza de habilidades en exploración física / Watch, listen and learn: an educational film for teaching physical examination skills  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción. Hemos desarrollado un cortometraje educativo para la formación en exploración física de estudiantes de medicina de tercer año, sin experiencia previa en habilidades clínicas. Materiales y métodos. El estudio se ha realizado en el Servicio de Medicina Interna del Hospital Universitari S [...] agrat Cor de Barcelona durante dos años consecutivos. Se efectuaron evaluaciones sobre exploración física de los estudiantes antes y después de ver la película. La primera evaluación se llevó a cabo el primer día de estancia de los estudiantes en el hospital. A continuación, visualizaron la filmación y se les informó de que al cabo de 48 horas se efectuaría una segunda evaluación en la que deberían realizar una exploración física de acuerdo con lo que habían visto y oído en el cortometraje. Al final del período de seis semanas de estancia en el hospital se realizó una tercera evaluación. Todas las evaluaciones se llevaron a cabo por el mismo profesor, a partir de un listado de contenidos evaluativos elaborado previamente. Resultados. Después de ver la película, 48 horas después de su llegada al hospital, los estudiantes habían mejorado en las diferentes pruebas de exploración física, en una tasa media del 43,4%. Al cabo de seis semanas, se apreció un 14,3% de mejora en relación con la segunda evaluación del tercer día del curso. Conclusión. Un cortometraje es un buen medio para la formación en la exploración física normal, más rápido que otros sistemas de enseñanza y favorece la adopción de competencias estables. Abstract in english Introduction. We created a short educational film to teach third-year medical students on physical examination, without previous experience in clinical skills. Designed to be understood without other explanations than those which appear in the film, the students are shown the film on their first day [...] in the hospital. Materials and methods.The study has been made in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University Hospital Sagrat Cor of Barcelona during two consecutives course years. We assess the educational possibilities of this resource testing student skills before and after watching the film. The first evaluation was held on the students' first day in the hospital and they were informed that 48 hours later they would be given a second evaluation where they had to do a physical exploration according to the film. At the end of the 6-week period in the internal medicine department the third evaluation was given. All of these explorations were performed by the same professor with a same check list. Results. After watching the film, 48 hours after their arrival, the students had improved in the different tests on physical exploration, at an average rate of 43.4%. At the end of the stage their progression was of 14.3% improvement in relation to the third day of the course. Conclusion. A short film is a good element for training in normal physical exploration, faster than other teaching systems, and also gives permanent skills.

Jordi, Delás; Wilma, Penzo; Antoni, Delás; Raquel, González-Cardona; César, Morcillo; Gemma, Martín.

2014-06-01

382

Teaching the Lecturers: Academic Staff Learning about Online Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

Developing online teaching skills can occur through involvement in learn-by-doing strategies, which incorporates informal, organic or need-driven strategies. Such processes are sometimes labeled as "bottom-up" staff development processes. In other contexts, teaching staff are formally directed to develop online teaching skills through a series of…

Northcote, Maria; Reynaud, Daniel; Beamish, Peter

2012-01-01

383

Education Innovation: Case Studies in e-Learning and Face-to-Face Teaching in Higher Education: What is the Best?  

Science.gov (United States)

Education innovation is here to stay. This chapter gives the results of a study of the application of information and communication technology to advanced teaching and learning activities. It is strategically important that the technology opens up new ways of teaching and learning. The purpose of this chapter is firstly to identify the typical advanced teaching and learning activities/functions that can be applied in e-Learning and face-to-face teaching and learning. Case studies were selected from a group of teachers who have already been involved in both teaching modes for some years and thus have experience in blended teaching and learning. A number of teaching activities/functions were seen as positive in their application in the e-Learning situation. Those that stand out are peer review and collaboration, promotion of reflection and stimulation of critical and creative thinking, team teaching, promotion of discovery/extension of knowledge, and problematization of the curriculum. In face-to-face teaching and learning, inviting engagement, how to come to know, involving metaphors and analogies, teaching that connects to learning, inspire change, promote understanding, and others stand out. As seen by the teachers in the case studies, both e-Learning and face-to-face teaching and learning are seen as complementary to each other. We define this view as blended teaching and learning.

Boon, J. A.

384

Kritiese denke as opvoedkundige imperatief  

OpenAIRE

The purpose o f this paper is to stimulate debate on the teaching o f thinking skills in and across the university curriculum. Because RAU includes instruction in critical and creative thinking skills as an educational requirement in its mission statement, I take issue with this university's mission statement and argue that the leaching o f thinking skills is a useless endeavour unless it is done within the framework of a critical thinking approach: such an approach focuses on the affective d...

Pieter van Veuren

1993-01-01

385

Development and Application of a Scoring Rubric for Evaluating Students' Experimental Skills in Organic Chemistry: An Instructional Guide for Teaching Assistants  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to develop a scoring rubric to assess students' manipulation skills and identify students' learning difficulties in conducting organic chemistry experiments. In constructing the scoring rubric, we first analyzed the skills needed in the experiment, then divided the skills into subskills, and finally…

Chen, Hui-Jung; She, Jui-Lin; Chou, Chin-Cheng; Tsai, Yeun-Min; Chiu, Mei-Hung

2013-01-01

386

A Statics Skills Inventory  

Science.gov (United States)

Engineering faculty recognize the value of assessment instruments to measure student learningand to evaluate changes in teaching. As a result, a number of engineering subject assessmentinstruments formulated as âÂÂconceptâ inventories have been developed. Taking a different tack,the authors of this paper decided to focus on assessment of student skills in statics and this paperprovides details of the development of a statics skills assessment tool. The use of only conceptinventories to provide proof of student learning is an incomplete assessment as effectiveapplication of engineering knowledge consists of both a sound understanding of conceptualknowledge and skill intertwined. For instance, while demonstrating understanding of theconcept of equilibrium is valuable, it is also important students are able to generate correctequations of equilibrium. A multi-step Delphi process involving statics educators was used toreach consensus on the important skills of statics. The Delphi rankings, including the importanceof the skill as judged by the Delphi participants as well as an estimate of the proportion ofstudents whom can perform the skill, were used to develop the final list of top ranked skills.Initial skill-based questions were developed to probe these areas and tested with students. Thecurrent status of the skill assessment instrument is discussed.

Danielson, Scott

2011-05-19

387

Teaching Metacognition  

Science.gov (United States)

This webpage features resources associated with the 2008 Educause Learning Initiative annual meeting session on Teaching Metacognition. It includes links to Marsha Lovett's powerpoint slides and a video of her presentation. The presentation describes effective methods of teaching students: (1) that their ability to learn is mutable, (2) how to plan and set goals for their learning, and (3) how to self-monitor their learning and make adjustments when necessary. The presentation also describes gains in student learning resulting from teaching these metacognitive skills in first-year science courses.

Lovett, Marsha; 2008 Educause Learning Initiative annual meeting presentation

388

Assessing Listening Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers confronted with the task of teaching or assessing listening skills should realize that competence in listening is acquired by knowing and doing and is evidenced by appropriate feedback or response. Various state curriculum and assessment projects have identified and grouped competencies in listening according to function, such as sensing,…

Ridge, Alice

389

ENSEÑANZA DE LAS HABILIDADES NO INTERPRETATIVAS EN RADIOLOGÍA: REVISIÓN DE LA LITERATURA, EXPERIENCIA LOCAL Y PROYECCIONES FUTURAS TEACHING NON-INTERPRETIVE SKILLS IN RADIOLOGY TRAINING: LITERATURE SEARCH, LOCAL EXPERIENCE AND FUTURE TRENDS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Se aborda el tema de la enseñanza de los aspectos humanísticos de la atención médica en radiología (Habilidades No Interpretativas: HNI a través de una revisión de la literatura disponible y de la experiencia local en el Departamento de Radiología de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Chile, entre los años 2000 y 2004. Tanto de lo publicado en la literatura como de la experiencia local, se deduce que la enseñanza de las HNI debería ser incluida en el programa de formación de especialistas en radiología. Sugerimos un modelo para su enseñanza en radiología, que haga más práctico su aprendizaje, e incluirlo formalmente en el "Programa de Formación de Especialistas en Radiología".We discuss the relevance of including the teaching of humanistic aspects of medical care in Radiology Residency Training Programs (i.e. "Non-interpretive skills", HNI, as per its Spanish acronym, through a review of available literature on this topic and our experience at the Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, from 2000 to 2004. Based on the published literature and our own local experience, we conclude that including Non-interpretive skills such as communication abilities and interpersonal competences, in Radiology Residency Training Programs, is relevant. We propose a teaching model designed to enhance practica! learning of those skills.

Dulia Ortega T

2009-01-01

390

ENSEÑANZA DE LAS HABILIDADES NO INTERPRETATIVAS EN RADIOLOGÍA: REVISIÓN DE LA LITERATURA, EXPERIENCIA LOCAL Y PROYECCIONES FUTURAS / TEACHING NON-INTERPRETIVE SKILLS IN RADIOLOGY TRAINING: LITERATURE SEARCH, LOCAL EXPERIENCE AND FUTURE TRENDS  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Se aborda el tema de la enseñanza de los aspectos humanísticos de la atención médica en radiología (Habilidades No Interpretativas: HNI) a través de una revisión de la literatura disponible y de la experiencia local en el Departamento de Radiología de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Chi [...] le, entre los años 2000 y 2004. Tanto de lo publicado en la literatura como de la experiencia local, se deduce que la enseñanza de las HNI debería ser incluida en el programa de formación de especialistas en radiología. Sugerimos un modelo para su enseñanza en radiología, que haga más práctico su aprendizaje, e incluirlo formalmente en el "Programa de Formación de Especialistas en Radiología". Abstract in english We discuss the relevance of including the teaching of humanistic aspects of medical care in Radiology Residency Training Programs (i.e. "Non-interpretive skills", HNI, as per its Spanish acronym), through a review of available literature on this topic and our experience at the Department of Radiolog [...] y, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, from 2000 to 2004. Based on the published literature and our own local experience, we conclude that including Non-interpretive skills such as communication abilities and interpersonal competences, in Radiology Residency Training Programs, is relevant. We propose a teaching model designed to enhance practica! learning of those skills.

Dulia, Ortega T; César, García M.

391

Teaching Roberto  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper is a case study in the form of a teacher's personal diary of experiences during a semester teaching a class of academically at-risk high school students. It focuses on the interactions among the teacher, the class, and Roberto, a student with negligible English skills. Because of his lack of proficiency in English, discovered later,…

Courtney, Michael

2005-01-01

392

Hard Facts and Soft Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

The argument now raging in academic circles pits those who espouse teaching 21st century skills against those who believe that schools should be teaching explicit and well-sequenced content. This debate has largely been framed as an either-or proposition. In this author's view, portraying this debate as one between two mutually exclusive sides…

Terego, Alex

2009-01-01

393

Projektbericht zum Simulatorennetzwerk: Ein Tool zur Verbesserung der Unterrichtsmaterialien und zum gezielten Einsatz von Ressourcen in Skills Labs [Simulator Network Project Report: A tool for improvement of teaching materials and targeted resource usage in Skills Labs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available [english] During the last decade, medical education in the German-speaking world has been striving to become more practice-oriented. This is currently being achieved in many schools through the implementation of simulation-based instruction in Skills Labs. Simulators are thus an essential part of this type of medical training, and their acquisition and operation by a Skills Lab require a large outlay of resources. Therefore, the Practical Skills Committee of the Medical Education Society (GMA introduced a new project, which aims to improve the flow of information between the Skills Labs and enable a transparent assessment of the simulators via an online database (the Simulator Network.[german] Die medizinische Ausbildung im deutschsprachigen Raum bemüht sich vermehrt in der letzten Dekade um mehr Praxisbezug. Dieser wird mittlerweile an vielen Fakultäten durch simulations-basierten Unterricht in Skills Labs implementiert. Simulatoren sind damit essentieller Bestandteil für diese Art der medizinischen Ausbildung. Ihre Beschaffung und der Betrieb im Rahmen eines Skills Lab verlangen einen großen Einsatz von Ressourcen. Hier soll daher ein Projekt des Ausschusses für praktische Fertigkeiten der Gesellschaft für medizinische Ausbildung vorgestellt werden, welches eine Online-Datenbank (das Simulatorennetzwerk für einen bessern Informationsfluss zwischen den Skills Labs und für eine transparente Bewertung der Simulatoren ermöglicht.

Schnabel, Kai P.

2013-02-01

394

On teaching styles of water educators and the impact of didactic training  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Solving today's complex hydrological problems requires originality, creative thinking and trans-disciplinary approaches. Hydrological education that was traditionally teacher centred, where the students look up to the teacher for expertise and information, should change to better prepare hydrologists to develop new knowledge and apply it in new contexts. An important first step towards this goal is to change the concept of education in the educators' minds. The results of an investigation to find out whether didactic training influences the beliefs of hydrology educators about their teaching styles is presented. Faculty of UNESCO-IHE has been offered a didactic certification program named university teaching qualification (UTQ. The hypothesis that UTQ training will significantly alter the teaching style of faculty at UNESCO-IHE from expert/formal authority traits towards facilitator/delegator traits was tested. A first survey was conducted among the entire teaching staff (total 101, response rate 58%. The results indicated that there are significantly higher traits of facilitator and delegator teaching styles among UTQ graduates compared to faculty who were not significantly trained in didactics. The second survey which was conducted among UTQ graduates (total 20, response rate 70%, enquiring after their teaching styles before and after UTQ, corroborated these findings.

A. Pathirana

2012-10-01

395

On teaching styles of water educators and the impact of didactic training  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Solving today's complex hydrological problems requires originality, creative thinking and trans-disciplinary approaches. Hydrological education that was traditionally teacher centred, where the students look up to the teacher for expertise and information, should change to better prepare hydrologists to develop new knowledge and apply it in new contexts. An important first step towards this goal is to change the concept of education in the educators' minds. The results of an investigation to find out whether didactic training influences the beliefs of hydrology educators about their teaching styles is presented. Faculty of UNESCO-IHE has been offered a didactic certification program named University Teaching Qualification (UTQ. The hypothesis that UTQ training will significantly alter the teaching style of faculty at UNESCO-IHE from expert/formal authority traits towards facilitator/delegator traits was tested. A first survey was conducted among the entire teaching staff (total 101, response rate 58%. The results indicated that there are significantly higher traits of facilitator and delegator teaching styles among UTQ graduates compared to faculty who were not significantly trained in didactics. The second survey which was conducted among UTQ graduates (total 20, response rate 70%, enquiring after their teaching styles before and after UTQ, corroborated these findings.

A. Pathirana

2012-03-01

396

Exploring Knowledge through Peer Tutoring in a Transitional Learning Community:An Alternative Way of Teaching Counseling Skills to Students in Social Work Education  

OpenAIRE

Learning to be a professional child welfare worker involves learning counseling skills. In Norway, these skills have long been taught by teachers, but recent reforms in higher education initiated by the Bologna Process encourage giving more responsibility to students for their own learning. This paper describes one of these new initiatives—a peer tutoring program of counseling skills for students training to be child protection workers. Using the results of a series of questionnaires admini...

Fougner, Amelie

2011-01-01

397

QUEST FOR TEACHING EXPERIMENTAL SKILLS  

OpenAIRE

In Andhra Pradesh, India, chemical experimenting in under graduate college labs by students is neglected because most of the intermediate (10+1 and 10+2) students concentrate on writing competitive exams like EAMCET (Engineering and Medical Common Entrance Test), IIT JEE (Indian Institute of Technology Joint Entrance Test), AIEEE (All India Engineering Entrance Examination), AFMS (Armed Forces Medical Services), AIMS (All India Institute of Medical Science). The students spend most of their t...

Samrajya Lakshmi, B.; Venkateswara Rao, B.

2013-01-01

398

Quest for Teaching Experimental Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

In Andhra Pradesh, India, chemical experimenting in under graduate college labs by students is neglected because most of the intermediate (10+1 and 10+2) students concentrate on writing competitive exams like EAMCET (Engineering and Medical Common Entrance Test), IIT JEE (Indian Institute of Technology Joint Entrance Test), AIEEE (All India…

Lakshmi, B. Samrajya; Rao, B. Venkateswara

2013-01-01

399

Conversions Rock! Lessons & Worksheets to Build Skills in Equivalent Conversions. Poster/Teaching Guide. Expect the Unexpected with Math[R  

Science.gov (United States)

"Welcome to Conversions Rock" is a new math program designed to build and reinforce the important skills of converting fractions, decimals, and percents for students in grades 6-8. Developed by The Actuarial Foundation, this program seeks to provide skill-building, real-world math to help students become successful in the classroom and beyond. [A…

Actuarial Foundation, 2013

2013-01-01

400

The Effect of the Genre-Based Approach to Teaching Writing on the EFL Al-Azhr Secondary Students' Writing Skills and Their Attitudes towards Writing  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aimed at developing some writing skills for second year secondary stage students and their attitudes towards writing through using the genre based approach. Hence, the problem of the study was stated in the following statement: "The students at Al Azhar secondary schools are not good at writing. As a result their writing skills are…

Elshirbini Abd-ElFatah Elashri, Ismail Ibrahim

2013-01-01

401

Teaching Teaching Artists: Interview with Richard Hahlo  

Science.gov (United States)

This article presents an interview with Richard Hahlo, a Teaching Artist, trainer of Teaching Artists, actor, director and author who has worked around the globe in a variety of settings. In Germany, England, Japan, Poland, South Africa and the United States, he has brought his unique vision and skill to a wide range of students, teachers,…

Moore, Christopher; Hahlo, Richard

2004-01-01

402

Analysis of deposit of physiological and psychological theories of forming motive skills on development of theory of teaching to the physical drills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Influence of different theories is certain on the construction of process of teaching motive actions of young gymnasts. The results of complete factor experiment are presented. They allowed to formulate principle settings to the construction of process of teaching the physical drills of young gymnasts at the age 7-13 years old. On the construction of teaching process influences more in all: theory of functional systems (43%, ?<0,001, theory of construction of motions (41%,?<0,001, theory of management mastering of knowledge, forming actions and concepts (2,6%, ?<0,05. The positive effect of teaching depends on the successive decision of tasks of teaching and rational application of methods.

Khudolii O.N.

2010-06-01

403

Familiar-Strange: Teaching the Scripture as John Would Teach  

Science.gov (United States)

The Gospel of John teaches through telling the story of Jesus in light of the familiar Hebrew faith stories. It is an interpretive task that presents Jesus to his audience and teaches them adequate faith. John the Teacher skillfully uses narrative skills to create the familiar-strange effect in his storytelling. Each story is followed by a…

Ha, Tung-Chiew

2014-01-01

404

Microteaching, an efficient technique for learning effective teaching  

OpenAIRE

Microteaching, a teacher training technique currently practiced worldwide, provides teachers an opportunity to perk up their teaching skills by improving the various simple tasks called teaching skills. With the proven success among the novice and seniors, microteaching helps to promote real-time teaching experiences. The core skills of microteaching such as presentation and reinforcement skills help the novice teachers to learn the art of teaching at ease and to the maximum extent. The impac...

Remesh, Ambili

2013-01-01

405

Peer-teaching in the food chemistry laboratory: student-produced experiments, peer and audio feedback, and integration of employability skills  

OpenAIRE

This paper describes the author’s experience over the last several years of implementing an alternative Food Chemistry laboratory practical model for a group of third-year BSc Nutraceuticals students. The initial main objectives were to prepare students for the more independent final-year research project; to incorporate innovative approaches to feedback; and to integrate key employability skills into the curriculum. These were achieved through building the skills required to ultimately ...

Julie Lisa Dunne

2014-01-01

406

Recursos multimídia no ensino de habilidades sociais a crianças de baixo rendimento acadêmico / Multimedia resources to teach social skills to children with low academic achievement  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Programas de intervenção em habilidades sociais associados a recursos audiovisuais e multimídia podem ser utilizados para superar déficits e contribuir no desempenho acadêmico. Este estudo avaliou os efeitos de um programa, baseado nas vinhetas de vídeo do RMHSC-Del-Prette, sobre o repertório de hab [...] ilidades sociais e o desempenho acadêmico de crianças com baixo rendimento escolar. Sob delineamento experimental, 14 crianças foram avaliadas com o Sistema de Avaliação de Habilidades Sociais antes e depois de um programa de 22 sessões grupais. O Grupo Experimental apresentou ganhos significativamente maiores que o Grupo Controle em habilidades sociais e no desempenho acadêmico. Discute-se a utilidade e viabilidade do uso do RMHSC-Del-Prette em programas de intervenção e questões ligadas à sua disseminação no contexto escolar. Abstract in english Social skills programs using audiovisual or multimedia resources may help to overcome social skills deficits and low academic performance. This study evaluated the effects of a program based on video vignettes of RMHSC-Del-Prette on social skills repertoire and academic performance of children with [...] low academic achievement. Under an experimental design, 14 children were assessed with the Social Skills Rating System before and after interventions composed by 22 sessions. Experimental Group showed significantly higher gains than the Control Group in social skills and academic performance. The usefulness of RMHSC-Del-Prette in social skills programs and issues related to its dissemination in the school context are discussed.

Daniele Carolina, Lopes; Zilda Aparecida Pereira Del, Prette; Almir Del, Prette.

407

How to Leverage Virtual Learning Communities for Teaching Agile Communication Skills? The eGroups Case at the University of Münster in Germany and Massey University in New Zealand  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Global business life nowadays is marked by quickly evolving forms of cooperation. These are often set in virtual space where various members from different countries are brought together in order to collaborate. This trend calls for specific abilities in communication that respond to the challenges evoked by the ever evolving and newly forming nature of international virtual project teams. In this paper, these abilities are called “agile communication skills”. The paper reports on the conceptualisation and implementation of a Virtual Learning Community (VLC in a longitude study designed to foster so-called “agile communication skills”. Our research presents an approach where VLCs are used in order to create authentic evolving cooperations between students. For this matter internet technology seemed to prove as a key enabler. However, the mere use of technology does not suffice on its own. We, thus, identified design principles of VLCs that appear to be critical factors for successfully implementing such communities. We applied design-oriented research by grounding our model in prior work and formatively evaluating it in multiple case studies over a period of two years. In this paper we present the matured model and show what features characterise an eLearning environment to teach agile communication skills in a university setting. In addition we report on evaluating this model in a real-life application scenarios by giving illustrating examples from the final case study between the players involved: the Massey University in New Zealand and the University of Münster in Germany.

Christina vom Brocke

2011-12-01

408

Medical students’ perceptions of their development of ‘soft skills’ Part II : The development of ‘soft skills’ through ‘guiding and growing’  

OpenAIRE

BACKGROUND: This paper reports on medical students’ views on the ways in which their ‘soft skills’ were developed. It is the result of a study on soft skills among two groups of students before and after curriculum reform at the School of Medicine of the University of Pretoria. One of the aims of the reform was to provide more teaching and learning opportunities for the development of soft skills. Soft skills include professional interpersonal and social skills, communication skills,...

Bergh, Anne-marie; Staden, C. W.; Joubert, Pierre M.; Kruger, Christa; Pickworth, G. E.; Roos, J. L.; Schurink, W. J.; Du Preez, R. R.; Grey, Somarie V.; Lindeque, B. G.

2006-01-01

409

Undergraduate Management Skills Courses and Students' Emotional Intelligence  

OpenAIRE

In this paper, we draw parallels between teaching undergraduate management skills and the emotional intelligence movement: both address the need for personal and interpersonal skills to help one succeed in work and in life, both identify a comprehensive set of skills which can be learned by adults, and both identify various reflective and self-monitoring techniques to learn and teach these skills. Using a pre-test/post-test experimental design, we provide evidence that current methods of teac...

Clark, Sue Campbell; Callister, Ronda Roberts; Wallace, Ray

2003-01-01

410

Ensino superior e desenvolvimento de habilidades para a empregabilidade: explorando a visão dos estudantes / Higher teaching and skill development for employability: exploring the students' view  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo examina a postura dos estudantes em relação ao desenvolvimento das habilidades de empregabilidade no ensino superior. A análise se baseia em um questionário de pesquisa apresentado a 60 alunos de graduação, os quais cursaram bacharelado em políticas sociais e bacharelado combinado em pol [...] íticas sociais e sociologia em uma universidade londrina, criada depois de 1992. A pesquisa examina a opinião que os estudantes têm sobre as habilidades desenvolvidas e sobre suas preferências no que diz respeito ao desenvolvimento das habilidades para a empregabilidade. Os resultados mostram que a maioria dos estudantes considera de igual importância o conhecimento sobre matérias variadas e o desenvolvimento de habilidades relacionadas à empregabilidade. Há total apoio para uma estratégia institucional e um modelo integrado que reforcem as habilidades para a empregabilidade. Os resultados finais endossam a necessidade do desenvolvimento de habilidades para a empregabilidade, no contexto da aprendizagem. Abstract in english This article explores student attitudes towards employability skills development in higher education. The analysis draws on a questionnaire survey undertaken with 60 undergraduates studying for a single honours social policy degree and a combined honours social policy/sociology degree in one post-19 [...] 92 University in London. The survey investigates students' perceptions of skills provision, and their preferences for the development and the assessment of employability skills. The findings show that the majority of students consider the development of subject knowledge and employability skills of equal importance. There is clear support for an institutional strategy and an integrated model for the enhancement of employability skills. The overall results support the development of employability skills within the situated learning approach.

Monika, Zulauf.

2006-12-01

411

Teaching Java Backwards  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching programming concepts in a more object-oriented way is a growing trend in Computer Science education. This paper takes the idea of abstraction-first teaching a step further, by using Bloom's Taxonomy to design a course to present factual content early, followed by higher-level cognitive skills. In the course described here, factual content…

Machanick, Philip

2007-01-01

412

Inculcation of Science Process Skills in a Science Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teachers play an important role for teaching science process skills in class through planning and arranging learning activities and teaching how to reach scientific information. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the teaching aproaches used in the teaching and learning process of a science class are able to provide the opportunity to inculcate science process skills and to identify which science process skills were inculcated (if any during the lesson without actually planning to teach science process skills. This is a qualitative case study in two Smart Schools in Malaysia. 24 students aged 14 years old and two science teachers were the sample of this study This study revealed that the process of teaching and learning science that uses various teaching approaches in one science lessons has additional advantages in terms of providing opportunities for the inculcation of science process skills. It also managed to provide the students with the opportunity to learn independently in acquiring some of the skills. The use of various teaching approaches is in juxtaposition to each other. Science teaching and learning process is a dynamic process, where the movement from one teaching approach to another occur and not necessarily always occur in an orderly sequence. Hence, the use of various teaching approaches in a single lesson can create more opportunities for inculcation and acquisition of science process skills in the classroom.

Rose Amnah Abd Rauf

2013-05-01

413

7 CFR 3406.15 - Evaluation criteria for teaching proposals.  

Science.gov (United States)

...Evaluation criteria for teaching proposals. The maximum score a teaching proposal can...national electronic communication systems, publications...or research/teaching skills workshops? ...disciplines at a university, between...

2010-01-01

414

Using Internet Primary Sources To Teach Critical Thinking Skills in Government, Economics, and Contemporary World Issues. Greenwood Professional Guides in School Librarianship.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers of political science, social studies, and economics, as well as school library media specialists, will find this resource guide invaluable for incorporating the Internet into their classroom lessons. The guide references over 150 primary Web sites and pairs them with questions and activities designed to encourage critical thinking skills

Shiveley, James M.; VanFossen, Phillip J.

415

COMPARING THE TEACHING INTERACTION PROCEDURE TO SOCIAL STORIES FOR PEOPLE WITH AUTISM  

OpenAIRE

This study compared social stories and the teaching interaction procedure to teach social skills to 6 children and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder. Researchers taught 18 social skills with social stories and 18 social skills with the teaching interaction procedure within a parallel treatment design. The teaching interaction procedure resulted in mastery of all 18 skills across the 6 participants. Social stories, in the same amount of teaching sessions, resulted in mastery of 4 of...

Leaf, Justin B.; Oppenheim-leaf, Misty L.; Call, Nikki A.; Sheldon, Jan B.; Sherman, James A.; Taubman, Mitchell; Mceachin, John; Dayharsh, Jamison; Leaf, Ronald

2012-01-01

416

The Medical Educator Teaching Portfolio: Its Compilation and Potential Utility  

OpenAIRE

A revolution in thinking and redefinition of traditional scholarship by prioritising teaching skills and achievements has led to the birth of the Teaching Portfolio, designed to carry a comprehensive and dynamic record of the teaching activities of the faculty. A teaching portfolio documents the faculty’s teaching scholarship and effectiveness. It is a record of selected information on one’s teaching achievements, skills and strategies and dynamically represents the faculty’s growth, pr...

Lamki, Neela; Marchand, Mark

2006-01-01

417

Psychiatric Residents' Self-Assessment of Teaching Knowledge and Skills following a Brief "Psychiatric Residents-as-Teachers" Course: A Pilot Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Resident physicians have an important role in medical student teaching. There has been limited curriculum development in this area for general psychiatric residents. A 4-hour workshop for PGY-2 psychiatric residents was designed and implemented to improve residents' self-assessment of their knowledge of the medical student curriculum…

Grady-Weliky, Tana A.; Chaudron, Linda H.; DiGiovanni, Sue K.

2010-01-01

418

Psychomotor skills in medical ultrasound imaging: an analysis of the core skill set.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sonographers use psychomotor skills to perform medical ultrasound examinations. Psychomotor skills describe voluntary movements of the limb, joints, and muscles in response to sensory stimuli and are regulated by the motor neural cortex in the brain. We define a psychomotor skill in relation to medical ultrasound imaging as "the unique mental and motor activities required to execute a manual task safely and efficiently for each clinical situation." Skills in clinical ultrasound practice may be open or closed; most skills used in medical ultrasound imaging are open. Open skills are both complex and multidimensional. Visuomotor and visuospatial psychomotor skills are central components of medical ultrasound imaging. Both types of skills rely on learners having a visual exemplar or standard of performance with which to reference their skill performance and evaluate anatomic structures. These are imperative instructional design principles when teaching psychomotor skills. PMID:25063399

Nicholls, Delwyn; Sweet, Linda; Hyett, Jon

2014-08-01

419

THINKING SKILL - THE MAIN LEARNING TOOL  

OpenAIRE

The method of teaching with help of four elementary skills - reading, speaking, writing and listening is definitely inconceivable to teaching any foreign language. But automatic answers following the exercise and students passive memorising does not make speaking language and its learning very natural. This has forced me to find and create the way how to make learners think and realise the point and meaning of learning itself. My paper is about special skill I have tried to apply –thinking ...

Daniela Koteková

2010-01-01

420

Using teaching resources to help students develop team and project skills pays off, both in terms of employability and shorter study time.  

OpenAIRE

Since Aalborg University in Denmark was started in 1974 it has been using a special educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students on the Engineering Educations form groups of approximately 6 persons, which uses half of the study time within the semester to solve and document a real-world engineering problem. Working with problems gives the students a very deep learning of the subjects they study, but also very good problem solving skills and ...

Jensen, Lars Peter

2006-01-01

421

Using teaching resources to help students develop team and project skills pays off, both in terms of employability and shorter study time.  

OpenAIRE

Since Aalborg University in Denmark was started in 1974 it has been using a special educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students on the Engineering Educations form groups of approximately 6 persons, which uses half of the study time within the semester to solve and document a real-world engineering problem. Working with problems gives the students a very deep learning of the subjects they study, but also very good problem solving skills and ...

Jensen, Lars Peter

2005-01-01

422

Shop Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Shop Skills is a lesson plan which provides instruction in the safety procedures and work processes for hand and machine tools used in a metal machine shop. Specific skills include sawing, drilling, boring, grinding, lathing, and milling. After completing this module, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in these skills through a variety of shop projects and in a final exercise that uses a combination of these skills. Note: This module is part of a modularized manufacturing technology curriculum created by the PSCME, found at www.pscme.org/educators.html.

423

An Application of Collaborative Learning in a CALL Website Construction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Rationale and features of collaborative learning and a CALL website construction is discussed to verify the validity of the application of collaborative learning in foreign language teaching. It shows that collaborative learning can effectively promote learners to communicate with others and enhance their abilities to solve problems with the support to group members. Thus it can improve the development of creative thinking and train lifelong learning skills.

Ji Song

2011-01-01

424

Information Literacy Skills: Comparing and Evaluating Databases  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this database comparison is to express the importance of teaching information literacy skills and to apply those skills to commonly used Internet-based research tools. This paper includes a comparison and evaluation of three databases (ProQuest, ERIC, and Google Scholar). It includes strengths and weaknesses of each database based…

Grismore, Brian A.

2012-01-01

425

Listening Skills in the Workplace.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines the listening process and factors affecting listening. It also suggests general guidelines for teaching and assessing listening and gives examples of activities for practicing and developing listening skills for the workplace. Listening is a demanding process that involves the listener, speaker, message content, and…

Grognet, Allene; Van Duzer, Carol

426

Effective Technique for Consistent Evaluation of Negotiation Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Negotiation is an important managerial skill. Teaching negotiations is challenging in the class room environment because of the need to create learning experiences that enable students to practice this critical skill. However, experience of teaching this course over four years, suggests that the more difficult task is to measure student…

Page, Diana; Mukherjee, Arup

2009-01-01

427

A curriculum model for transferable skills development  

OpenAIRE

This paper presents a model of curriculum development which can be adapted to fit a teaching framework for developing skills at undergraduate level. The model presented is based upon research conducted in the field of engineering and is promoted here as a theoretical model of best practice for developing skills by providing a holistic view of skills development throughout the curricula. It shows how a progression of implemented strategies is required to complement undergraduate progression fr...

Deesha Chadra

2006-01-01

428

How learning a musical instrument affects the development of skills  

OpenAIRE

Previous research does not teach us much about the role of music for skill development. Learning a musical instrument during childhood may affect educational opportunities by improving cognitive skills, teaching non-cognitive skills or sending positive signals to school teachers. Our study is the first to examine these channels with data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). In addition to assessing the duration and intensity of music practice during childhood, the SOEP contains detail...

Hille, Adrian; Schupp, Ju?rgen

2013-01-01

429

Geritalk: Communication Skills Training for Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Fellows  

OpenAIRE

Expert communication is essential to high quality care for older patients with serious illness. While the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. We drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method, to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the c...

Kelley, Amy S.; Back, Anthony L.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goldberg, Gabrielle R.; Lim, Betty B.; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B.; O’neill, Lynn B.

2011-01-01

430

Teaching ICT  

CERN Document Server

&p. Reflective practice is at the heart of effective teaching, and this book helps you develop into a reflective teacher of ICT. Everything you need is here: guidance on developing your analysis and self-evaluation skills, the knowledge of what you are trying to achieve and why, and examples of how experienced teachers deliver successful lessons. The book shows you how to plan lessons, how to make good use of resources and how to assess pupils' progress effectively. Each chapter contains points for reflection, which encourage you to break off from your reading and think about the challenging q

Simmons, Carl

2009-01-01

431

Backers of "21st-Century Skills" Take Flak  

Science.gov (United States)

The phrase "21st-century skills" is everywhere in education policy discussions these days, from faculty lounges to the highest echelons of the U.S. education system. Broadly speaking, it refers to a push for schools to teach critical-thinking, analytical, and technology skills, in addition to the "soft skills" of creativity, collaboration, and…

Sawchuk, Stephen

2009-01-01

432

Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.  

Science.gov (United States)

An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

1987-01-01

433

Dil Ö?reniminde ve Ö?retiminde Tiyatronun Kullan?m? ve Tiyatronun Temel Dil Becerilerine Katk?s? The Use Of Theatre In Teaching Of Language And The Contributions Of Theatre To Basic Language Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Education and self-development is a duration which continues through life and has wide boundaries. In addition, learning which forms according to individual’s needs like education and includes mental processes is a multi-faced activity. From past to present, there have been lots of improvements in the thought of people about education. With changing values and needs, different learning fields have appeared in education and training. Language learning and teaching which is one of those, has been one of most important subject recently and isperceived as a most important way of communicating with othersocieties. A variety of method is avaliable in language learning andteaching.. What is important in language learning is to identifyappropriate learning model and method. The essence success inlearning can be achieved by conscious efforts and by finding the correctmethod. For that reason a variety of methods and techniques have beendeveloped in language learning and teaching which is one of the mostimportant issues of today. With current methods and techniques, newapproaches are appearing and used gradually. One of those is learningwith theatre. The use of theatre has been ignored in learning withtheatre and teaching of Turkish as a language. However that theatreaffects and develops basic language skills is known. In this study, theuse of theater in teaching of Turkish as a language and theater’scontribution to the basic language skills are considered. E?itim ve ki?isel geli?im ya?am boyu devam, s?n?rlar? çok geni? olan bir süreçtir. Ö?renme ise t?pk? e?itim gibi bireyin ihtiyaçlar? do?rultusunda ?ekillenen ve zihinsel süreçleri de kapsayan karma??k ve çok yönlü bir etkinliktir. Geçmi?ten günümüze dek e?itim ve ö?retim anlay???nda oldukça ilerleme kaydedilmi?tir. Günümüzde de?i?en de?erler ve ihtiyaçlar ile birlikte bunlara ba?l? olarak e?itim ve ö?retimde farkl? ö?renme alanlar? ortaya ç?km??t?r. Bunlardan bir tanesi olan dil ö?renimi ve ö?retimi, son y?llarda üzerinde en çok durulan ve en çok çal???lan konular?ndan bir tanesi olup dünyayla ve di?er toplumlarla anla?man?n en önemli yolu olarak alg?lanmaktad?r. Dil ö?reniminde ve ö?retiminde çok de?i?ik yöntem ve tekniklerin varl??? mevcuttur. Dil ö?reniminde ve ö?retiminde önemli olan uygun ö?renme modelinin ve yönteminin tespit edilebilmesidir. Ö?renmede as?l ba?ar? bilinçli çabalarla ve do?ru yöntemin tespitiyle sa?lanabilir. Bu nedenle ça??m?z?n en önemli konular?ndan bir tanesi olan dil ö?retiminde ve ö?reniminde çe?itli yöntem ve teknikler geli?tirilmi?tir. Mevcut yöntem ve tekniklerle beraber her geçe gün yeni yakla??mlar da ortaya ç?kmakta ve kullan?lmaktad?r. Bunlardan bir tanesi de tiyatro ile ö?renimdir. Tiyatro arac?l??? ile dil ö?renimde ve ö?retiminde tiyatronun kullan?m? üzerinde çok durulmamakta, ancak tiyatronun temel dil becerilerini etkiledi?i ve geli?tirdi?i bilinmektedir. Bu çal??mada dil ö?reniminde ve ö?retiminde tiyatronun kullan?m? ile tiyatronun temel dil becerilerine katk?s? ele al?nm??t?r.

Müzeyyen ALTUNBAY

2012-12-01

434

Communication Skills  

OpenAIRE

Effective communication helps us better understand a person or situation and enables us to resolve differences, build trust and respect, and create environments where creative ideas, problem solving, affection, and caring can flourish. By learning these effective communication skills, you can better connect with your children, friends, and coworkers. Effective communication skills are fundamental to success in many aspects of life. Many jobs require strong communication ski...

Madhuri Ludbe

2010-01-01

435

Using Interactive Whiteboards in Teaching Retail Mathematics  

Science.gov (United States)

Undergraduate marketing students have sometimes been found to lack mathematical skills. It can therefore be challenging for instructors to effectively teach courses that depend on mathematical problem-solving skills. This paper discusses the use of interactive whiteboards as an innovative way to teach retail mathematics effectively. The authors…

Greene, Marla; Kirpalani, Nicole

2013-01-01

436

The Handy 5: Planning and Assessing Integrated Information Skills Instruction. Second Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

Information skills instruction is a fundamental and vital part of K-12 education in the 21st century. "The Handy 5", a proven effective model for planning, teaching, and assessing information skills instruction, was written to help library media specialists and teachers to collaborate more effectively in the teaching of information skills. This…

Blume, Shelia; Fox, Carol; Lakin, Jacqueline McMahon; Losey, Betsy; Stover, Jan

2007-01-01

437

O ensino de habilidades motoras esportivas na escola e o esporte de alto rendimento: discurso, realidade e possibilidades / The teaching of sport motor skills in the school and the high performance sport: discourse, reality and possibilities  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese A massificação da prática esportiva começando pela escola tem sido sugerida como uma forma eficaz para transformar o Brasil numa potência no esporte de alto rendimento. O objetivo deste ensaio é analisar e refletir sobre o discurso, a realidade e as possiblidades de ensino do esporte na escola, tend [...] o como pano de fundo a relação entre a Educação Física Escolar e o esporte de alto rendimento. Em outras palavras, fazer uma análise crítica para qualificar a vinculação escola-esporte de alto rendimento com o intuito de deixar claro o papel social da escola e a sua eventual contribuição para a formação de atletas, e para discutir as possibilidades reais de se ensinar o esporte na escola, particularmente as habilidades motoras, consideradas as condições em que ela se encontra. Abstract in english The amplification of mass sport practice starting from school physical education has been suggested as an effective way to transform Brazil in a powerful high performance sport country. The objective of this essay is to analyze and reflect on discourse, reality and possibilities of teaching sport in [...] the schools having as a background the relationship between school physical education and high performance sport. In other words, to carry out a critical analysis to qualify the link school-high performance sport in order to make clear the social role of the school and its eventual contribution to the formation of athletes, and to discuss the real possibilities to teach sport in the schools, particularly motor skills, considering the conditions in which they now are.

Go, Tani; Luciano, Basso; Sérgio Roberto, Silveira; Walter Roberto, Correia; Umberto Cesar, Corrêa.

2013-09-01

438

Formative Dialogues in Teaching Nonthreatening Peer Coaching  

OpenAIRE

Teaching universities, while claiming to value good teaching, do little to help individual faculty members improve learning in their classrooms. One effective way to help teachers reflect on their teaching and improve their teaching skills is to have a colleague observe and discuss the teaching episode, yet these dialogues seem to be rare. Visits to the classroom, if they occur at all, are usually summative, with little or no discussion, and typically used for the purposes of evaluation. The ...

Rice, Gail

2012-01-01

439

The IUGS Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism - promoting professional skills professionalism in the teaching, research and application of geoscience for the protection and education of the public  

Science.gov (United States)

A new IUGS Task Group entitled the Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism was formed in 2012 and launched at a symposium at the 341GC in Brisbane on strengthening communication between fundamental and applied geosciences and between geoscientists and public. The Task Group aims to ensure that the international geoscience community is engaged in a transformation of its profession so as to embed the need for a professional skills base alongside technical and scientific skills and expertise, within a sound ethical framework in all arenas of geoscience practice. This needs to be established during training and education and reinforced as CPD throughout a career in geoscience as part of ensuring public safety and effective communication of geoscience concepts to the public. The specific objective of the Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism that is relevant to this poster session is: • To facilitate a more 'joined up' geoscience community fostering better appreciation by academics and teachers of the professional skills that geoscientists need in the workplace, and facilitate better communication between academic and applied communities leading to more effective application of research findings and technology to applied practitioners and development of research programmes that truly address urgent issues. Other Task Group objectives are: • To provide a specific international forum for discussion of matters of common concern and interest among geoscientists and geoscientific organizations involved in professional affairs, at the local, national and international level; • To act as a resource to IUGS on professional affairs in the geosciences as they may influence and impact "Earth Science for the Global Community" in general - both now and in the future; • To offer and provide leadership and knowledge transfer services to countries and geoscientist communities around the world seeking to introduce systems of professional governance and self-regulation in the Earth sciences; • To provide geoscientists in all areas of professional practice and at all stages of their careers with practical guidance and support on professional matters; • To continue and increase over time the provision of symposia and technical sessions to allow for exchange and knowledge transfer at IGCs and other events for those involved in, and impacted by, the evolution of professionalism in the geosciences. • To act as a resource to members of IUGS, and others, of material and speakers to present to geoscience groups - in particular young Earth scientists - around the world on professional practice and registration matters (including geoscience practice standards and guidelines, and reporting standards, codes of ethics and conduct, and professional registration.) The sponsors of the new TG are: • European Federation of Geologists (EFG) • Geoscientists Canada • American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG) • Australian Institute of Geoscientists (AIG) • South African Council for Natural Scientific Professions (SACNSP) • El Colegio de Geólogos de Bolivia (College of Geologists of Bolivia)

Allington, Ruth; Fernandez-Fuentes, Isabel

2013-04-01

440

Using teaching resources to help students develop team and project skills pays off, both in terms of employability and shorter study time.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Since Aalborg University in Denmark was started in 1974 it has been using a special educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students on the Engineering Educations form groups of approximately 6 persons, which uses half of the study time within the semester to solve and document a real-world engineering problem. Working with problems gives the students a very deep learning of the subjects they study, but also very good problem solving skills and team work competencies that are highly recommended by the Danish companies. In the first years of the university many students had difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. An important aspect of the basic part of the education (first year), has therefore been the development of a course where the students gets tools and tricks for good communication, collaboration, learning and project management (CLP). Although the course was a good help to a lot of students it was not everyone that was using the tools in their project work, and since it is only possible to learn about these issues by actually doing them the students had to deliver not only a written report documenting the results of their project, but also an analysis of the working process getting there. Since year 1998 the teachers giving the CLP course have focused very much on these process analyses and as they are a part of the examination the students also have focused more on how they work together and plan and do the project. This has clearly improved the students team and project work skills, which the CLP-teachers can see and document because they have read all of the process analyses every year since year 1998. This paper will explain the content and the form of the CLP-course and give some examples of the student’s exercises and outcome of the course in terms of the process analyses. Results from a new Danish survey will document that not only are the engineering students from Aalborg University highly requested by companies, but there is also a much lower drop out rate among the students and a dramatically higher rate of students finishes their study within the prescribed time, compared to other Danish universities and engineering schools.

Jensen, Lars Peter

2005-01-01

441

Blended Learning zur integrierten und standardisierten Vermittlung klinischer Untersuchungstechniken: Das KliFO-Projekt [A blended learning approach for the integrated and standardized teaching of clinical skills: The CliSO project  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available [english] Objective: The medical faculties of LMU Munich and CAU Kiel have developed a joint blended learning concept for computer-based learning and practical training of clinical skills: "CliSO – Clinical Skills Online" (. CliSO is implemented in their core curricula with the intention to foster students’ medical examination skills at the preclinical and clinical level. Methods: Both partners contributed their special competencies in the fields of case-based learning (Munich: CASUS e-learning platform and systematic learning (Kiel: Nickels e-learning platform. The didactic concept comprises the integration of theory and practice. It combines the standardized teaching of the following three components: Clinical skills are trained and reviewed in face-to-face courses. In the e-learning environment, the well-directed combination of case-based and systematic learning together with the chosen diversity of media (video, audio, animation facilitates situated learning as well as the intelligible presentation of clinical skills and their biomedical background. Both faculties agreed on joint learning objectives and standards. Results and prospects: It was possible to apply the concept to the different target groups at both faculties (first and second study phases and the differently designed face-to-face courses (Kiel: students examine each other; Munich: patients are examined in addition. Evaluations and studies confirmed the success of this approach, so that a transfer of the concept to other faculties is intended. [german] Zielsetzung: Mit „KliFO – Klinische Fertigkeiten Online“ ( haben die Medizinischen Fakultäten der LMU München und der CAU Kiel ein gemeinsames Blended Learning-Konzept zum computergestützten Lernen und praktischen Trainieren von klinischen Untersuchungstechniken entwickelt und in Pflichtveranstaltungen der Curricula integriert. Ziele sind die Verbesserung der Vor- und Nachbereitung von Untersuchungskursen im vorklinischen und klinischen Studienabschnitt und damit einhergehend verbesserte Untersuchungsfertigkeiten der Studierenden bei den ersten Patientenkontakten. Methodik: Beide Partner brachten ihre speziellen Kompetenzen in den Bereichen fallbasiertes Lernen (München, Lernplattform CASUS und systematisches Lernen (Kiel, Lernplattform Nickels ein. Das didaktische Konzept beinhaltet die Integration von Theorie und Praxis. Es kombiniert die standardisierte Vermittlung der folgenden drei Komponenten: Im Präsenzunterricht werden die Untersuchungstechniken geübt und reflektiert. Computerbasiert werden durch gezielte Kombination von fallbasiertem und systematischem Lernen zusammen mit einem vielfältigen Medieneinsatz (Video, Audio, Animation situiertes Lernen gefördert, Untersuchungstechniken anschaulich dargestellt sowie Hintergrundwissen in inhaltlichem und zeitlichem Zusammenhang mit dessen Anwendung vermittelt. Beide Fakultäten haben sich auf gemeinsame Lernziele und Standards geeinigt. Ergebnisse und Ausblick: Das Konzept lässt sich auf die unterschiedlichen Zielgruppen an beiden Fakultäten (1. bzw. 2. Studienabschnitt und die unterschiedlich gestalteten Präsenzphasen (Kiel: gegenseitige Untersuchung der Studierenden, München: zusätzlich Untersuchungen an realen Patienten anwenden. Evaluationsergebnisse und Begleitstudien bestätigen den Erfolg dieses Konzepts, sodass nun ein Transfer von KliFO auf andere Fakultäten angestrebt wird.

Brüchner, Kirsten

2009-02-01

442

Fact versus fiction. The socio-economic benefits to be found in teaching critical thinking skills on nuclear waste issues in public schools  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The safe storage of radioactive wastes has been the topic of much heated debate. Many of the concerns raised demonstrate that the public is poorly informed about nuclear matters, bewildered by conflicting testimony and lacking the intellectual skills required to discriminate between statements of fact versus opinion or motive. Recently, the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) adopted a set of guidelines intended to encourage a stronger emphasis on urgent science-related social issues in the classroom and to provide for social studies teachers, rational and structure for the presentation of these issues. In this way, the NCSS is moving to meet the needs of the community for greater technological awareness. NCSS believes students need instruction and strategies for evaluating science-related material intelligently. As a case study in point, the topic ''Nuclear Waste: A Science Related Social Issue of Urgent Concern'' was brought before a recent NCSS national meeting. This paper discusses strategies for dealing with nuclear waste issues in the classroom and the potential socio-economic benefits to be found in dispelling myths surrounding nuclear issues

443

TEACHING BUSINESS VOCABULARY  

OpenAIRE

A competent group communicator is one who is able to interact appropriately and effectively with others in small groups. The teacher becomes the group communicator when interacting with student groups. That is why clear communication is essential in teaching business English. The teacher has to consider students’ pre-experience and to display a wide range of personal skills, knowledge, experience and attitude when teaching English. At the same time, the need to emphasize performance is esse...

Dabu, Bianca

2010-01-01

444

Teaching Students to Listen Empathically.  

Science.gov (United States)

Asserts the importance of empathy as a necessary condition for health service professionals. Describes classroom techniques and assignments that teach and assess empathic-listening skills. Includes students' ratings of 14 learning activities designed to enhance listening skills and empathy. (CFR)

Fernald, Peter S.

1995-01-01

445

Habilidades docentes en alumnos tutores en lectura crítica de investigación médica durante el internado de pregrado / Teaching skills of medical student tutors in research critical appraisal during internship  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Mexico | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción: Los alumnos pueden ser tutores en medicina en clínica u otras áreas. Objetivo: Evaluar las habilidades docentes de alumnos tutores en un curso de investigación por lectura crítica durante el internado de pregrado. Material y métodos: Se estudiaron dos grupos, G1 (n=5) con un profesor y [...] discusión grupal y G2 con cuatro alumnos tutores y discusión subgrupal (n=10). El curso duró 40 horas, se desarrolló con resolución de guías de lectura en casa y la discusión referida. Se aplicaron cinco instrumentos: 1) lectura crítica con 108 reactivos, 2) actividades subgrupales del profesor con 17 reactivos, 3) actividades de los estudiantes en la discusión subgrupal con 18 reactivos, 4) evaluación de aspectos cualitativos por los estudiantes al tutor con 8 reactivos y 5) una autoevaluación del alumno tutor con 10 reactivos. Los instrumentos 1, 2 y 4 se evaluaron antes y después del curso. El instrumento 1 se calificó sumando las respuestas correctas y restando las incorrectas utilizando las medianas. Se compararon ambos grupos (U de Mann Whitney y Wilcoxon) el avance ponderal y el azar. Se utilizó una escala de Likert con valor de 1 (mínimo) al 4 (máximo) en los instrumentos 2 al 5; los valores se sumaron y se utilizaron medianas. Se determinó la consistencia en los instrumentos 1 al 4. Resultados: En la lectura crítica no se observaron cambios significativos entre ambos grupos antes y después de las intervenciones, pero se observó avance ponderal y disminución del azar en G2. Los instrumentos 2, 3, 4 (Alfa de Cronbach > 0.75) reportaron medianas adecuadas en casi todos los aspectos. En instrumento 2, resultados cercanos al máximo al final en G2. Los tutores incrementan el afecto por sus alumnos. Discusión: Alumnos tutores pueden desarrollar habilidades docentes complejas apoyando el aprendizaje en estudiantes. Estas estrategias están subutilizadas en nuestro medio. Abstract in english Introduction: Students may be tutors in clinical medicine and other areas. Objective: To evaluate the teaching abilities of students as tutors in a critical appraisal research course, during their internship. Material and Methods: Two groups were studied: G1 (n=5) was taught by a Professor and inclu [...] ded group discussions, and G2 had four student tutors and engaged in sub-group discussions (n=10). The course lasted 40 hours and was conducted on the basis of resolving reading guide's in-house and referred discussion. Five instruments were applied: 1) critical reading including 108 items, 2) sub-group activities led by the professor, included 17 items, 3) student activities in sub-group discussions, with 18 items, 4) evaluation of the professor's qualitative characteristics by the students that included 8 items and 5) a self-evaluation of the student tutor consisting of 10 items. Instruments 1, 2 and 4 were evaluated before and after the course. Instrument 1 was graded by adding the correct answers and subtracting those that were incorrect; medians were recorded. Both groups were compared with Mann Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests, statistical weight and randomness. A Likert scale was also used with values ranging from 1 (minimum) to 4 (maximum), in instruments 2 to 5; the values were added and medians were used. Consistency was determined in instruments 1 to 4. Results: No significant differences were detected between both groups in critical reading before and after the interventions, although statistical weight did increase and randomness decreased in G2. Instruments 2, 3 and 4 (Cronbach's alpha > 0.75), reported adequate medians in almost all aspects; instrument 2 revealed almost maximum final results in G2. The tutors' affection for students increased. Discussion: Student tutors can develop complex teaching abilities and foster student learning. These strategies are underutilized in our milieu.

Héctor, Cobos-Aguilar; Patricia, Pérez-Cortés; Leonardo Alejandro, Bracho-Vela; Mario Alberto, Garza-Garza; Gabriel, Dávila-Rodríguez; Daniel Omar, López-Juárez; Evelyn, Maldonado-González; Liliana, Zapata-Aguirre.

2014-06-01

446

Principles for Teaching Problem Solving  

Science.gov (United States)

This 14-page monograph addresses the need to teach problem solving and other higher order thinking skills. After summarizing research and positions of various organizations, it defines several models and describes cognitive and attitudinal components of problem solving and the types of knowledge that are required. The authors provide a list of principles for teaching problem solving and include a list of references.

Rob Foshay and Jamie Kirkley

2003-01-01

447

Literature Review in Thinking Skills, Technology and Learning  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this report is: - to clarify what is meant by thinking skills and their relationship to technology - to identify the role of ICT in promoting thinking skills - to produce guidelines for the development of digital learning resources to support the teaching and learning of thinking skills - to evaluate the general direction of research in this area and how this should inform educational practice. The use of new technologies is often linked to the development of thinking skills or...

Wegerif, Rupert

2002-01-01

448

Reciprocal Teaching: Critical Reflection on Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper highlights reciprocal teaching as an inclusive instructional strategy that has been shown to improve reading comprehension and metacognitive skills. It provides a conceptual background to reciprocal teaching and examines its purpose, strengths and weaknesses. The notion of reciprocal teaching as an evidence-based practice is also…

McAllum, Ruth

2014-01-01

449

Teaching strategies for critical thinking.  

Science.gov (United States)

Critical thinking is a phase that is being heard frequently in nursing education. Nurse educators are encouraged to teach students to think critically because of the higher-order thinking skills that are required in our complex health care delivery system. The challenge to educators is the selection, development, and implementation of appropriate teaching strategies. This article describes a variety of strategies for teaching critical thinking within the context of nursing. PMID:1754128

Pond, E F; Bradshaw, M J; Turner, S L

1991-01-01

450

Leadership Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

While this may not be a "complete list" of what leadership skills one needs to effectively lead in any/every situation, it should provide a great overview of many of the things s/he needs to do, at least initially.

Parish, Thomas S.

2006-01-01

451

Study Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

Study strategies used to assist mildly handicapped students become more actively engaged and successful in gaining and responding to information in content area classes are described. They include using advance organizers, summarizing/paraphrasing what is read, enhancing listening skills, and improving the organization, appearance, and accuracy of…

Gleason, Mary M.; And Others

1988-01-01

452

PROPUESTA PARA ABORDAR EL QUÉ Y CÓMO ENSEÑAR LAS HABILIDADES MOTRICES EN SECUNDARIA: UN EJEMPLO A TRAVÉS DEL PATINAJE | PROPOSAL TO DEAL WITH THE 'WHAT' AND 'HOW' TEACH MOTOR SKILLS IN SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCACION: AN EXAMPLE OF INLINE SKATING  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available RESUMEN.- Uno de los contenidos que han acabado conformando las señas de identidad de la Educación Física Escolar es el de las Habilidades Motrices. En el presente artículo pretendemos mostrar nuestra forma particular de entenderlas y abordar su desarrollo en la etapa de secundaria. Para ello, tras exponer nuestras ideas respecto a este contenido y las características del contexto en el que hemos venido desarrollando nuestro trabajo, mostramos, a modo de ejemplo, el diseño y posterior desarrollo de una Unidad Didáctica concreta, sobre el patinaje en línea.En todo momento relacionamos y justificamos nuestro trabajo desde la legislación vigente, pero también desde el aval que, para nosotros, constituyen los numerosos documentos que nuestro alumnado ha generado a lo largo del proceso. Creemos que estos documentos reflejan fragmentos de nuestra particular contribución al desarrollo de sus capacidades (competencias, desde la concepción integral del alumno que preside nuestra idea de educación.Como exponemos en las conclusiones, consideramos que las claves metodológicas expuestas en el artículo podrían configurarse, como sucede en nuestro caso, en puntos de una guía válida no sólo para abordar el desarrollo de las habilidades motrices, sino también del resto de contenidos de la actual Educación Física Escolar.ABSTRACT.- Motor skills is one of the most influential contents in the shaping of the identity of PE. In this paper, we'll show our understanding of this PE content and the way we approach its development in the Secondary Education.To do so, we expose first our conception of this content and the features of the context in which we have developed our work. Then, we show, as an example, the design and subsequent development of a specific Teaching Unit about inline skating.Our work is always framed and justified by the existing curricular legislation and by the numerous documents that our students produce throughout the process. These last are for us very important because, although fragmentarily, they reflect our contribution to the development of the students' capacities and competencies (all considered within a holistic conception of education.Finally, in the conclusions we suggest that the methodological principles presented in this article might be considered, as in our case, as key points for the design and development not only of the motor skills content, but also of the other contents of PE.

Juan Mañeru-Cámara

2011-08-01

453

Teaching With Writing  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching writing can be a challenge, even for those who have been in front of a class full of students for years. The website of the Writing Center at Colorado State University is a great source of information for people who teach writing. A good place to start is the Teaching Guides area, which includes strategies on Planning & Conducting Classes, Teaching Specific Writing Skills, and Writing Across the Curriculum. Furthermore, the Teaching Activities section includes a range of compelling aides including Argument Quiz Discussion Starter, Evaluating Writing, and A Storyteller's Misguided Guide to Focus. Visitors also should also read the Across the Disciplines journal, which is "devoted to language, learning, and academic writing.� Other highlights include The Composition Archives and a crucial guide to dealing with plagiarism.

2012-01-01

454

Teaching and Training Aids for Orthopedic School Programs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Directions are give n for making teaching aids for physically handicapped children. Self help materials aid dressing and communication; modified instructional materials teach visual, speech, and reading skills. Both types of materials are suggested for other uses as well. (JD)

Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Bureau for Handicapped Children.

455

Learning leadership skills in practice through quality improvement.  

Science.gov (United States)

The development of leadership skills in doctors in training is essential to support both their professional development and the future supply of clinical leaders the NHS so desperately needs. There is, however, limited opportunity in current training programmes for trainees to learn and develop these skills, and what opportunity there is has often focused on management rather than leadership skills. Involvement in trainee-led supported quality improvement projects can teach these skills. We summarise the current limitations in leadership training and discuss how the College's 'Learning To Make a Difference' programme, and others like it, are helping to teach leadership. PMID:24532736

Gamble, James; Vaux, Emma

2014-02-01

456

Exploring Parents’ and Teachers’ Views of Primary Pupils’ Thinking Skills and Problem Solving Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article is based on a descriptive study using survey method and focus group interviews. Thinking skills and problem solving skills are vital for pupils in their daily lives and facing their future challenges. Therefore, parents and teachers play an important role in nurturing these skills among pupils. The objective of the study is to explore parents’ and teachers’ views of pupils’ thinking skills and problem solving skills according to locations of the school (urban and rural. This study also explores parents’ and teachers’ suggestions to enhance pupils’ thinking skills and problem solving skills. The sample consists of 302 parents of the pupils and 104 teachers who are teaching Year 4, Year 5 and Year 6. The quantitative data for the research was collected using questionnaires which were developed by the researchers. Each set of questionnaire consists of 23 items. While the qualitative data was collected through the focus group interview method among parents and teachers to get their suggestions on how to enhance pupils’ thinking skills and problem solving skills. The findings show that the urban parents’ views of children’s thinking skills and problem solving skills is significantly higher than those from the rural. The results also indicate that there is no significant difference between the urban school teachers’ and the rural school teachers’ views of pupils’ thinking skills and problem solving skills. Findings from the focus group interviews show that most parents engage their children in hands on activities at home to enhance their thinking skills and problem solving skills. On the other hand, teachers encourage active participation of pupils in co-curricular activities to enhance pupils’ thinking skills and problem solving skills.

Tang Keow Ngang

2012-02-01

457

THINKING SKILL - THE MAIN LEARNING TOOL  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The method of teaching with help of four elementary skills - reading, speaking, writing and listening is definitely inconceivable to teaching any foreign language. But automatic answers following the exercise and students passive memorising does not make speaking language and its learning very natural. This has forced me to find and create the way how to make learners think and realise the point and meaning of learning itself. My paper is about special skill I have tried to apply –thinking skill. I have chosen it to complement other four which teacher normally uses when teaching foreign language (reading, speaking, listening skills. At the same time I put thinking skill into a role to support and enhance learning process. To find and use some methods how to make students think, make their own opinion and also teach them to apply their own experience to learning process was the main goal of this survey. The methods I have applied were provoking students to think before they learn.

Daniela Koteková

2010-06-01

458

Capacidades motoras envolvidas na habilidade psicomotora da técnica de ressuscitação cardiopulmonar: subsídios para o processo ensino-aprendizagem Capacidades motoras involucradas en la habilidad psicomotora de la técnica de resucitación cardiopulmonar: subsídios para el proceso ensenanza-aprendizaje Motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation: subsidies of the teaching-learning process  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Trata-se de uma estudo bibliográfico sobre a identificação das capacidades motoras envolvidas na habilidade psicomotora da técnica de ressuscitação cardiopulmonar (RCP cuja finalidade é obter subsídios para o planejamento do processo ensino-aprendizagem desta habilidade. Verificou-se que as capacidades motoras envolvidas na habilidade psicomotora da técnica de RCP são predominantemente cognitivas e motoras, envolvendo 9 capacidades perceptivo-motoras e 8 capacidades de proficiência física. A técnica de RCP é uma habilidade psicomotora classificada como aberta, seriada e categorizada como uma habilidade fina e global e o processo de ensino-aprendizagem da técnica de RCP tem alto grau de complexidade.Se trata de un estudio bibliográfico sobre la identificación de las capacidades motoras involucradas en la habilidad psicomotora de la técnica de resucitación cardiopulmonar (RCP cuya finalidad fue obtener subsidios para la planificación del proceso ensenanza-aprendizaje de esta habilidad. Se verifico que las capacidades motoras involucradas en la habilidad psicomotora de la técnica de RCP son predominantemente cognitivas y motoras, involucrando 9 capacidades perceptivo-motoras y 8 capacidades de proficiencia física. La técnica de RCP es una habilidad psicomotora clasificada como abierta, seriada y categorizada como una habilidad fina y global y el proceso de ensenanza-aprendizaje de la técnica de RCP tiene alto grado de complejidad.It is a bibliographic study about the identification of the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR which aims to obtain subsidies to the planning of the teaching-learning process of this skill. It was found that: the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skill of the CPR technique are predominantly cognitive and motor, involving 9 perceptive-motor capacities and 8 physical proficiency capacities. The CPR technique is a psychomotor skill classified as open, done in series and categorizedas a thin and global skill and the teaching-learning process of the CPR technique has an elevated degree of complexity.

Ana Maria Kazue Miyadahira

2001-12-01

459

A curriculum model for transferable skills development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents a model of curriculum development which can be adapted to fit a teaching framework for developing skills at undergraduate level. The model presented is based upon research conducted in the field of engineering and is promoted here as a theoretical model of best practice for developing skills by providing a holistic view of skills development throughout the curricula. It shows how a progression of implemented strategies is required to complement undergraduate progression from dependent to autonomous learning. The model is jargon-free, which sh