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Sample records for teachers increasingly takes

  1. Taking the Reins: Preservice Teachers Practicing Leadership

    Dunlap, Karen; Hansen-Thomas, Holly

    2011-01-01

    What makes the difference between a good teacher and a great one? Knowing one's content is important, but having strong leadership skills can tip the scales from mediocrity to excellence. The best time to begin practicing being a teacher leader is during the preservice years. By practicing leadership skills, one can begin to view oneself not onlyÖ

  2. Teaching Efficacy, Innovation, School Culture and Teacher Risk Taking

    Taylor, Margaret Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is an exploratory study of teacher risk taking. The risk-taking literature in education and other types of organizations is lacking in studies exploring the concept of healthy risk taking and how that risk taking is related to other concepts such as organizational culture, innovation, and efficacy. The purpose of this study was…

  3. A Tax Break for Teachers. Take Advantage!

    Milam, Edward E.

    1974-01-01

    Teachers are permitted to deduct certain education expenses for income tax purposes--one way of letting Uncle Sam bear part of the financial burden. Keeping accurate records and properly claiming the deductions on the tax return are necessary. (Author/MW)

  4. Perspective-taking increases willingness to engage in intergroup contact.

    Wang, Cynthia S; Kenneth, Tai; Ku, Gillian; Galinsky, Adam D

    2014-01-01

    The current research explored whether perspective-taking increases willingness to engage in contact with stereotyped outgroup members. Across three studies, we find that perspective-taking increases willingness to engage in contact with negatively-stereotyped targets. In Study 1, perspective-takers sat closer to, whereas stereotype suppressors sat further from, a hooligan compared to control participants. In Study 2, individual differences in perspective-taking tendencies predicted individuals' willingness to engage in contact with a hooligan, having effects above and beyond those of empathic concern. Finally, Study 3 demonstrated that perspective-taking's effects on intergroup contact extend to the target's group (i.e., another homeless man), but not to other outgroups (i.e., a man of African descent). Consistent with other perspective-taking research, our findings show that perspective-taking facilitates the creation of social bonds by increasing contact with stereotyped outgroup members. PMID:24465648

  5. Taking on Turnover: An Action Guide for Child Care Center Teachers and Directors.

    Whitebook, Marcy; Bellm, Dan

    Based on the "Taking On Turnover" training series conducted by the Center for the Child Care Workforce, this action guide for center-based child care teachers and directors is designed to assist in managing and reducing the increasingly serious problem of job turnover in the child care profession. Following several introductory sections, the guide…

  6. Going Beyond Test-Taking Strategies: Building Self-Regulated Students and Teachers

    Erika Swarts Gray

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the inception of No Child Left Behind (NCLB, standardized tests have been on the minds of students, parents, and educators, who are consistently concerned with how to increase test scores. In this article, the authors suggest that it is time to look beyond tests to enable willing, focused, and persistent - that is self-regulated - students and teachers. Self-regulated students and teachers take control of their learning, set goals, monitor progress, reflect on outcomes, are intrinsically motivated to learn, and demonstrate higher levels of achievement (Harter, 1996; Markman, 1979; Mason, Snyder, Sukhram, & Kedem, 2006; Perry, Nordby, & VandeKamp, 2003; Zimmerman, 2000, 2002. Supporting such self-regulation not only promotes more independent, competent, and motivated students and teachers, but is also likely to raise test scores (Paris & Paris, 2001. The authors suggest specific strategies for, and benefits of, the development of self-regulation in both students and teachers.

  7. Whatever It Takes: How Beginning Teachers Learn to Survive

    Le Maistre, Cathrine; Pare, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Reports of high attrition rates among beginning teachers suggest that new practitioners need help to develop coping strategies, preferably while they are still teacher candidates under the supervision of experienced teachers. Defining teaching as an ill-defined problem, where beginners have a limited repertoire of problem-solving strategies, thisÖ

  8. Rare disaster information can increase risk-taking

    Newell, Ben R.; Rakow, Tim; Yechiam, Eldad; Sambur, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The recent increase in the frequency and impact of natural disasters highlights the need to provide the public with accurate information concerning disaster prevalence. Most approaches to this problem assume that providing summaries of the nature and scale of disasters will lead people to reduce their exposure to risk. Here we present experimental evidence that such ex post `news reports’ of disaster occurrences can increase the tolerance for risk-taking (which implies that rare events are underweighted). This result is robust across several hundred rounds of choices in a simulated microworld, persists even when the long-run expected value of risky choices is substantially lower than safe choices, and is contingent on providing risk information about disasters that have been (personally) experienced and those that have been avoided (`forgone’ outcomes). The results suggest that augmenting personal experience with information summaries of the number of adverse events (for example, storms, floods) in different regions may, paradoxically, increase the appeal of a disaster-prone region. This finding implies a need to communicate long-term trends in severe climatic events, thereby reinforcing the accumulation of events, and the increase in their associated risks, across time.

  9. ‚ÄúI'm Riskin' It‚ÄĚ: Teachers Take on Consumerism

    Harste, Jerome C.; Albers, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates how 90 teachers explored critical curriculum through their reading, analysis and creation of counter advertisements. Located in visual discourse analysis, we designed a study to investigate the question "To what extent can teachers engaged in a critical literacy curriculum talk back to messages of consumerism,…

  10. Increased Risk Taking in Relation to Chronic Stress in Adults

    Ceccato, Smarandita; Kudielka, Brigitte M.; Schwieren, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is a public health problem that affects a significant part of the population. While the physiological damage it causes is under ongoing scrutiny, its behavioral effects have been overlooked. This is one of the first studies to examine the relation between chronic stress and decision-making, using a standard lottery paradigm. We measured risk taking in the gain domain through binary choices between financially incentivized lotteries. We then measured self-reported chronic stress...

  11. 34 CFR 200.57 - Plans to increase teacher quality.

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans to increase teacher quality. 200.57 Section 200... Paraprofessionals ß 200.57 Plans to increase teacher quality. (a) State plan. (1) A State that receives funds under... annual increase in the percentage ofó (A) Highly qualified teachers at each LEA and school; and...

  12. Acute Exercise Increases Sex Differences in Amateur Athletes' Risk Taking.

    Pighin, S; Savadori, L; Bonini, N; Andreozzi, L; Savoldelli, A; Schena, F

    2015-09-01

    The research presented here investigates the interaction between acute exercise, biological sex and risk-taking behavior. The study involved 20 amateur athletes (19-33 years old), 10 males and 10 females, who were asked to undergo subsequent experimental sessions designed to compare their risky behaviors on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) 34 at rest and while exercising at moderate intensity (60% of their maximal aerobic power). Results showed that physical exercise affected male and female participants differently: Whereas males became more risk seeking, females became more risk averse during exercise. PMID:26090877

  13. Turkish Language Teachers' Stance Taking Movements in the Discourse on Globalization and Language

    Coskun, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how Turkish teachers take and give stances in the discourse on globalization and language by using linguistic resources. According to the findings obtained through the discourse analysis of the corpus that consisted of 36 h of recording of the discussion among 4 teachers with 5 to 10 years of teaching experience, the…

  14. Risk Taking Behaviour And Assertiveness Behaviour Of D.T.ED., Teacher Trainees ‚Äď A Study

    A.C. LAL KUMAR; R.MUTHUMANICKAM

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the risk taking behaviour and assertiveness behaviour of D.T.Ed., Teacher Trainees. The sample of the study consisted of 400 D.T.Ed., Teacher Trainees (129 male and 271 female). The tools used in the study were the Risk Taking Behaviour Scale by Answer Yousuf and Assertiveness Inventory by Tasneem Naqvi (1988).After framing necessary objectives and hypotheses, appropriate analysis was carried out on the collected data .From this analysis ...

  15. Teacher Research Programs = Increased Student Achievement

    Dubner, J.

    2011-12-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers (SRP), founded in 1990, is one of the largest, best known university professional development programs for science teachers in the U.S. For eight weeks in each of two consecutive summers, teachers participate as a member of a research team, led by a member of Columbia University's research faculty. In addition to the laboratory experience, all teachers meet weekly during the summer for a series of pedagogical activities to assist them in transferring the experience to their classrooms. The primary goal of the program is to provide K-12 science teachers with opportunities to work at the cutting edge of science and engineering, and thus to revitalize their teaching and help them to appreciate the use of inquiry-based methods in their classroom instruction. The secondary goals of the program are to give the pre-college teacher the ability to guide their students toward careers in science and engineering, to develop new teaching strategies, and to foster long-term scholarly collaborations. The last is especially important as it leads to a model of the teacher as active in science yet committed to the pre-college classroom. Since its inception, SRP has focused on an objective assessment of the program's impact on attitudes and instructional practices of participating teachers, on the performance of these teachers in their mentors' laboratories, and most importantly, on the impact of their participation in the program has on student interest and performance in science. Our research resulted in a paper published in the journal Science. SRP also facilitates a multi-site survey-based evaluation of other teacher research programs around the country. The author will present the findings of both studies.

  16. Students and Teachers Conduct an Assessment of Antarctic Peninsula Ecosystems and Take Their Research into Classrooms.

    Lougheed, V. L.; Tweedie, C. E.; Robertson, W. H.; Velasco, A. A.; Garcia, C. V.

    2008-12-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso received an IPY grant from the US National Science Foundation to take undergraduate and graduate students, as well as teachers, to Antarctica over winter break 2007. The program, called IPY-ROAM (International Polar Year - Research and Educational Experiences in Antarctica for Minorities) aimed to increase the number of underrepresented minorities in the sciences, and increase public awareness about the polar regions. Participants completed research projects in terrestrial ecology, marine sciences, geosciences and tourism policy, and helped design education products to take this science into classrooms. All data were collected during a 10-day expedition aboard a tourist vessel in December 2007, which included 8 landings in the Antarctic Peninsula region. Student projects found that, in nearshore areas adjacent to penguin colonies, water column nutrients were elevated and algal communities were relatively unique, whereas algal communities found at sites without penguins tended to be more similar to each other. Similarly, student working on land found that penguin rookery size has a distinct impact on plant community composition, biomass and CO2 efflux. Education and outreach activities directed at schools across the US will take data and techniques from this research to teach students about polar science.

  17. Implementation Intentions Increase Parent-Teacher Communication Among Latinos

    Arriaga, Ximena; Longoria, Zayra

    2011-01-01

    This research tested an implementation intentions intervention to increase parent-teacher communication among Latino parents of young children. Parents (n=57) were randomly assigned to form implementation intentions or simply goal intentions to communicate with their child’s teacher. They completed measures of communication and goal intentions immediately prior to the manipulation, and after the manipulation for 6 consecutive weeks. Implementation intentions increased parent-teacher communica...

  18. Opening up and closing down: How teachers and TAs manage turn-taking, topic and repair in mathematics lessons

    Radford, J.; Blatchford, P.; Webster, R.

    2011-01-01

    Support for children with special educational needs in inclusive classrooms is increasingly provided by teaching assistants (TAs). They often have a direct pedagogical role, taking responsibility for instruction in mathematics. The quality of TAs' oral skills is crucial for learning but has rarely been researched. Using conversation analysis, this study compares teacher and TA talk in terms of turn allocation, topic generation and repair. From 130 recordings, transcripts of mathematics teachi...

  19. Is It Possible for Teachers to Take Students beyond a Rudimentary Introduction to an Activity?

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brief article presents student and professor responses to the question: Is it possible for teachers to take students beyond a rudimentary introduction to an activity? [Responses to this question were provided by Kevin Reilly, Terra Marjonen, Scott A. G. M. Crawford, Jason S. Whitworth, Brianne Mahoney, Erin Sereduk, Sam Thielen, Matt Lassen,Ö

  20. Taking Broader Impacts to Another Level: Researcher Benefits from Teacher Researcher Experience Collaborations

    Warburton, J.; Timm, K. M.; Holmes, R. M.; Geiger, C.; Lefer, B.

    2008-12-01

    Preliminary evaluation results from PolarTREC--Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a Teacher Research Experience (TRE) program matching teachers with polar researchers, has shown that program activities have many positive impacts on educators and their ability to teach science concepts and improve their teaching methods. Additionally, K-12 students benefit from their teacher's participation, and when polled in interest surveys, showed significant changes regarding the importance of understanding the polar regions as a person in today's world. Researchers participating in PolarTREC have also been overwhelmingly satisfied with the experience and have cited several specific strengths, including the program's crucial link between the teachers' field research experiences and their classroom and the extensive training provided to teachers prior to their expedition. Participating researchers have also reported that working closely with an educator has given them valuable perspectives on K-12 education and teaching methods that they often take back to their institutions, local schools, and communities. For many researchers, the experience is just the beginning of a long-lasting collaboration and a change in their view of education and its role in scientific research. This presentation will address how TRE's conceived and organized according to current best practices, such as pre-research training, mentoring, support for classroom transfer, and long-term access to resources, are integral to a successful collaboration before, during, and after the field research experience. Additionally, we will discuss how TRE's can greatly impact and diversify the broader impacts of scientific projects, and how TRE's have also become professional development experiences for the researchers that have hosted teachers. Teacher Research Experiences, including programs like PolarTREC, provide a tested approach and a clear route for varying levels of researcher participation in the education community, facilitating collaboration and ensuring educator, student, and community understanding of science during times of interrelated global change.

  1. A Teacher Takes on the Challenges of Deaf Literacy: An Interview with Jennifer Herbold.

    Milone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Jennifer Herbold, a deaf teacher of deaf students at the New Mexico School for the Deaf. Discusses important factors in determining Deaf students' success at learning to read. Notes that technology has enormous potential with deaf students because it provides increased exposure to English, it is often fun to use for deaf students, and…

  2. Central exit examinations increase performance ...: But take the fun out of mathematics

    JuŐąrges, Hendrik; Schneider, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    In response to PISA, all German federal states but one have adopted central exit examinations (CEEs) at the end of all secondary school tracks. Theoretically, the advantages of CEEs are fairly undisputed. CEEs make teaching and learning output observable and comparable across schools, and provide incentives for teachers and students to increase their effort. In line with earlier research, we confirm that CEEs have a positive causal effect on student performance. We also investigate what actua...

  3. Factors Influencing the Take-Up of Physics within Second-Level Education in Ireland--The Teachers' Perspective

    Politis, Yurgos; Killeavy, Maureen; Mitchell, Peter I.

    2007-01-01

    There has been a disturbing decline in the take-up of physics within second-level education in Ireland since the early nineties. Here, an analysis is presented of the main factors influencing the take-up of physics from the perspective of secondary school teachers. The database underpinning the analysis is based on a comprehensive survey ofÖ

  4. Wearing a Bicycle Helmet Can Increase Risk Taking and Sensation Seeking in Adults.

    Gamble, Tim; Walker, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Humans adapt their risk-taking behavior on the basis of perceptions of safety; this risk-compensation phenomenon is typified by people taking increased risks when using protective equipment. Existing studies have looked at people who know they are using safety equipment and have specifically focused on changes in behaviors for which that equipment might reduce risk. Here, we demonstrated that risk taking increases in people who are not explicitly aware they are wearing protective equipment; furthermore, this happens for behaviors that could not be made safer by that equipment. In a controlled study in which a helmet, compared with a baseball cap, was used as the head mount for an eye tracker, participants scored significantly higher on laboratory measures of both risk taking and sensation seeking. This happened despite there being no risk for the helmet to ameliorate and despite it being introduced purely as an eye tracker. The results suggest that unconscious activation of safety-related concepts primes globally increased risk propensity. PMID:26740528

  5. Wearing a Bicycle Helmet Can Increase Risk Taking and Sensation Seeking in Adults

    Gamble, Tim; Walker, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Humans adapt their risk-taking behavior on the basis of perceptions of safety; this risk-compensation phenomenon is typified by people taking increased risks when using protective equipment. Existing studies have looked at people who know they are using safety equipment and have specifically focused on changes in behaviors for which that equipment might reduce risk. Here, we demonstrated that risk taking increases in people who are not explicitly aware they are wearing protective equipment; furthermore, this happens for behaviors that could not be made safer by that equipment. In a controlled study in which a helmet, compared with a baseball cap, was used as the head mount for an eye tracker, participants scored significantly higher on laboratory measures of both risk taking and sensation seeking. This happened despite there being no risk for the helmet to ameliorate and despite it being introduced purely as an eye tracker. The results suggest that unconscious activation of safety-related concepts primes globally increased risk propensity. PMID:26740528

  6. Economic Growth and Risk Taking: Is it Rational to Suffer from Increasing Disaster Losses?

    Stéphane Hallegatte

    2013-01-01

    This article draws from a study that investigates the link between development, economic growth and the economic losses from natural hazards. Increasing investments in disaster risk reduction have led to a significant reduction in human casualties, but economic losses from natural disasters have been growing as fast or even faster than economic growth in both rich and poor countries. The analysis suggests indeed that economic growth leads to better defenses but also more risk taking, making a...

  7. Stress during adolescence increases novelty seeking and risk taking behavior in male and female rats

    Maria Toledo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period of major physical, hormonal and psychological change. It is also characterized by a significant increase in the incidence of psychopathologies and this increase is gender-specific. Likewise, stress during adolescence is associated with the development of psychiatric disorders later in life. Previously, using a rat model of psychogenic stress (exposure to predator odor followed by placement on an elevated platform during the pre-pubertal period (postnatal days 28-30, we reported sex-specific effects on auditory and contextual fear conditioning. Here, we study the short-term impact of psychogenic stress before and during puberty (postnatal days 28-42 on behavior (novelty seeking, risk taking, anxiety and depression and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis activation during late adolescence (postnatal days 45-51. Peri-pubertal stress decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased risk taking and novelty seeking behaviors during late adolescence (measured with the elevated plus maze, open field and exposure to novel object tests and intake of chocopop pellets before or immediate after stress. Finally neither depressive-like behavior (measured at the forced swim test nor HPA response to stress (blood corticosterone and glucose were affected by peri-pubertal stress. Nevertheless, when controlling for the basal anxiety of the mothers, animals exposed to peri-pubertal stress showed a significant decrease in corticosterone levels immediate after an acute stressor. The results from this study suggest that exposure to mild stressors during the peri-pubertal period induces a broad spectrum of behavioral changes in late adolescence, which may exacerbate the independence-building behaviors naturally happening during this transitional period (increase in curiosity, sensation-seeking and risk taking behaviors.

  8. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets.

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders' financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways. PMID:26135946

  9. Excessive alcohol consumption increases risk taking behaviour in travellers to Cusco, Peru.

    Cabada, Miguel M; Mozo, Karen; Pantenburg, Birte; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2011-03-01

    The risks associated with alcohol intoxication are rarely discussed during pre-travel counselling. However, alcohol immoderation abroad may increase the exposure to health risks. Few studies have addressed alcohol consumption and risk taking behaviour in travellers to South America. From October to December of 2004, travellers leaving the city of Cusco in Peru were asked to fill out anonymous questionnaires regarding demographics, self-reported alcohol consumption, illness and risk behaviour for sexually-transmitted infection (STI) and travellers diarrhoea. Most travellers (87.2%) consumed alcohol and 20.4% reported inebriation in Cusco. Those admitting inebriation were more likely to be male, single, food choices, illicit drug use, and risky sexual activity. It is concluded that alcohol intoxication during travel was associated with increased risk taking behaviour for common travel related conditions. Although travel related illnesses were not associated with inebriation, some markers of illness severity were more often reported by those who admitted intoxication. Risk for heavy alcohol use abroad should be assessed during the pre-travel visit in certain groups and appropriate counselling should be provided. PMID:21420363

  10. Promoting Teachers' Moral Reasoning and Collaborative Inquiry Performance: A Developmental Role-Taking and Guided Inquiry Study.

    Reiman, Alan J.; Peace, Sandra DeAngelis

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a study involving experienced teachers that illustrates a developmental methodology for promoting technical performance dimensions and moral and conceptual reasoning. Argues this learning-teaching framework (LTF) uses role taking, guided inquiry, balance, support and challenge, continuity and instructional coaching in educational…

  11. Teacher Preparation for Inclusive Education: Increasing Knowledge but Raising Concerns

    Forlin, Chris; Chambers, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    The role of the generalist teacher is now affirmed as being an important component in the success or otherwise of inclusive education practice. Issues about the effectiveness of teacher preparation for working in inclusive classes have arisen. An evaluation of pre-service teachers' perceptions regarding their preparedness for inclusion had some…

  12. Teacher training for mathematical literacy: A case study taking the past into the future

    Sarah Bansilal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of the Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications policy (MRTEQ, higher education institutions (HEIs are rethinking curricula for teacher training in order to enable entree for in-service teachers to reskill, retrain and have access to higher qualifications. In the field of mathematical literacy (ML, most teacher training has been offered via government-funded Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE qualifications, which have now largely been phased out. In this article we examine two ACE ML programmes offered in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN in order to present some lessons that have been learnt. We put forward some elements that we consider to be essential for training ML teachers and also raise concerns about future training of ML teachers.

  13. Embracing Advocacy: How Visible Minority and Dominant Group Beginning Teachers Take Up Issues of Equity

    Naomi Norquay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is from a four-year research project that followed graduates of a teacher education program from teacher certification through their first three years of teaching. It focuses on participants' narratives about their advocacy efforts in both their pre-service practicum placements and their first year as probationary teachers. Our findings indicate that while dominant group white participants chose to advocate from a position of personal conviction (often based on new knowledge of equity issues, the visible minority participants were often summoned by others to advocate. The paper concludes with a discussion about how teacher education might better address advocacy issues, alongside the focus on equity issues.

  14. Teacher Research Experience Programs = Increase in Student Achievement

    Dubner, J.

    2010-12-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers (SRP), founded in 1990, is one of the largest, best known university-based professional development programs for science teachers in the U.S. The program’s basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have not experienced it firsthand. For eight weeks in each of two consecutive summers, teachers participate as a member of a research team, led by a member of Columbia University’s research faculty. In addition to the laboratory experience, all teachers meet as a group one day each week during the summer for a series of pedagogical activities. A unique quality of the Summer Research Program is its focus on objective assessment of its impact on attitudes and instructional practices of participating teachers, on the performance of these teachers in their mentors’ laboratories, and most importantly, on the impact of their participation in the program on student interest and performance in science. SRP uses pass rate on the New York State Regents standardized science examinations as an objective measure of student achievement. SRP's data is the first scientific evidence of a connection between a research experience for teachers program and gains in student achievement. As a result of the research, findings were published in Science Magazine. The author will present an overview of Columbia's teacher research program and the results of the published program evaluation.

  15. Moving Mainstream: Taking a Closer Look at Teacher Research (Focus on Research).

    Huberman, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Looks at some of the core perspectives in teacher research, situates the movement in a wider context, and examines some of its explicit or implicit premises along with typical methodologies. Discusses the opportunities of teacher research; the craft-artistry perspective; communities of exchange, support, and inquiry; and warrants for knowledge inÖ

  16. It Takes a Village: Investigating the Critical Role Clinical Faculty Play in Mathematics Teacher Education

    Bahr, Damon L.

    2013-01-01

    The dispositions of preservice elementary education teachers toward reform-oriented mathematics education were surveyed before and after an extended pre-student teaching practicum. During the practicum, university and school-based personnel served as 'clinical faculty' as they supported the preservice teachers' practicum…

  17. What Can We Take Home? Action Research for Malaysian Preservice TESOL Teachers in Australia

    Neilsen, Rod

    2014-01-01

    Action Research (AR) is recognised as an effective way for language teachers to extend teaching skills and gain more understanding of teaching, learning and the classroom environment (Burns, 2010). It can also be a useful but challenging experience for trainee language teachers. This paper reports on the experiences of Malaysian trainee primaryÖ

  18. Taking Part in the Dance: Technology Teachers Interacting with Communities of Practice

    Slatter, Wendy; France, Bev

    2011-01-01

    This research investigated how secondary school technology teachers planned and implemented units that enabled students to access authentic technological practice through their contact with a community of practice (CoP). It was found that when teachers plan to access a community of practice for their students a complex dance-style relationship…

  19. Strategies to Increase Behavior-Specific Teacher Praise in an Inclusive Environment

    Musti-Rao, Shobana; Haydon, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Managing students' disruptive behavior in the classroom can be a time-consuming task and greatly reduces the amount of time teachers spend on instruction. Although there are several research-validated classroom management strategies, teachers are more likely to adopt strategies that are less time-consuming than strategies that take more time or…

  20. Sleep deprivation during late pregnancy produces hyperactivity and increased risk-taking behavior in offspring.

    Radhakrishnan, Arathi; Aswathy, B S; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Gulia, Kamalesh K

    2015-01-30

    Sleep deprivation in women resulting from their modern lifestyle, especially during pregnancy, is a serious concern as it can affect the health of the newborn. Anxiety disorders and cognitive deficits in the offspring are also on the rise. However, experimental studies on the effects of sleep loss during pregnancy, on emotional development and cognitive function of the newborn, are scanty in literature. In the current study, female rats were sleep-deprived for 5h by gentle handling, during the 6 days of the third trimester (days 14-19 of pregnancy). The effects of this sleep deprivation on anxiety-related behaviors of pups during their peri-adolescence age were studied using elevated plus maze (EPM). In addition to body weights of dams and offspring, the maternal behavior was also monitored. The weanlings of sleep-deprived dams showed heightened risk-taking behavior as they made increased explorations into the open arms of EPM. They also showed higher mobility in comparison to the control group. Though the body weights of sleep-deprived dams were comparable to those of the control group, their newborns had lower birth weight. Nevertheless, these pups gained weight and reached the control group values during the initial post-natal week. But after weaning, their rate of growth was lower than that of the control group. This is the first report providing evidences for the role of sleep during late pregnancy in shaping the neuropsychological development in offspring. PMID:25446439

  1. Increasing the Number of Latino and Navajo Teachers in Hard-to-Staff Schools.

    Becket, Diane R.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the development of two teacher education programs designed to increase the number of quality minority teachers in Latino neighborhood schools and on the Navajo reservation. Review of teacher education literature and analysis of interviews with program staff, archival records, and program documentation indicated that these two…

  2. Should increased regulation of bank risk-taking come from regulators or from the market?

    Robert L. Hetzel

    2009-01-01

    The heavy losses in bank asset portfolios do not reflect an inherent failure of markets to monitor risk adequately but rather the perverse incentives of the financial safety net to excessive risk-taking. The unsustainable rise in house prices and their subsequent sharp decline derived from the combination of a public policy to expand home ownership to unrealistic levels and from a financial safety net that encouraged excessive risk-taking by banks.

  3. Take the "Ow!" Out of Taxes Now: How to Plan for and Increase Your Medical Deductions

    Medisky, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    Each year countless taxpayers overpay simply because they're not taking full advantage of medical deductions. Individuals with disabilities are especially at risk. Time and energy spent running around to doctor visits, therapy sessions, and the like can leave little left to spend on preparing taxes. Fortunately, with a little effort year round andÖ

  4. Take the "Ow!" Out of Taxes Now: How to Plan for and Increase Your Medical Deductions

    Medisky, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    Each year countless taxpayers overpay simply because they're not taking full advantage of medical deductions. Individuals with disabilities are especially at risk. Time and energy spent running around to doctor visits, therapy sessions, and the like can leave little left to spend on preparing taxes. Fortunately, with a little effort year round and…

  5. A Visibility Project: Learning to See How Preservice Teachers Take up Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    Gere, Anne Ruggles; Buehler, Jennifer; Dallavis, Christian; Haviland, Victoria Shaw

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes the ways in which raced consciousness inflects developing understandings of cultural responsiveness among preservice teachers whose preparation included responses to imaginative engagement with literary texts, interactions in an underresourced school, and exploration of key concepts of culturally responsive pedagogy. The…

  6. Taking a Stance through Visual Texts: Novice Teachers as Educational Agents

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Maskit, Ditza

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on qualitative methodologies that integrate verbal and non-verbal texts, this study investigated novice teachers' attributions of their experiences of internship, as conveyed through a visual text. Novices were invited to design a visual text that represented their experience during internship, as part of a national call entitledÖ

  7. Taking Seriously the Perspectives and Potential of Immigrant Parents, Children, and Teachers in Early Childhood Education

    Adair, Jennifer Keys

    2012-01-01

    Because early childhood education sets the stage for children's academic trajectory, it is important to think carefully about how schools treat, position, and instruct young children of immigrants as well as immigrant parents and teachers. The relational and pedagogical imperatives shared in this article are meant to extend an invitation toÖ

  8. On-line Professional Learning Communities: Increasing Teacher Learning and Productivity in Isolated Rural Communities

    Dora Salazar; Zenaida Aguirre-Mu√Īoz; Kelly Fox; Lisa Nuanez-Lucas

    2010-01-01

    On-line and distance professional learning communities provides teachers with increased access and flexibility as well as the combination of work and education. It also provides a more learner-centered approach, enrichment and new ways of interacting with teachers in isolated rural areas. For educational administrators, on-line learning offers high quality and usually cost-effective professional development for teachers. It allows upgrading of skills, increased productivity and development of...

  9. Low Mate Encounter Rate Increases Male Risk Taking in a Sexually Cannibalistic Praying Mantis

    Brown, William D; Muntz, Gregory A.; Ladowski, Alexander J.

    2012-01-01

    Male praying mantises are forced into the ultimate trade-off of mating versus complete loss of future reproduction if they fall prey to a female. The balance of this trade-off will depend both on (1) the level of predatory risk imposed by females and (2) the frequency of mating opportunities for males. We report the results of a set of experiments that examine the effects of these two variables on male risk-taking behavior and the frequency of sexual cannibalism in the praying mantis Tenodera...

  10. Teacher-Centered Projects: Confidence, Risk Taking and Flexible Thinking (Mathematics).

    Liedtke, Werner W.

    The framework of the new British Columbia mathematics curriculum for grades 1-7 includes willingness to take risks and expanded tolerance of ambiguity as goals of mathematics learning. Two projects in Victoria (British Columbia) elementary schools explored ways to promote positive student attitudes toward mathematical tasks and problem solving.Ö

  11. Stress during adolescence increases novelty seeking and risk-taking behavior in male and female rats

    Maria Toledo

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of major physical, hormonal, and psychological change. It is also characterized by a significant increase in the incidence of psychopathologies and this increase is gender-specific. Likewise, stress during adolescence is associated with the development of psychiatric disorders later in life. Previously, using a rat model of psychogenic stress (exposure to predator odor followed by placement on an elevated platform) during the pre-pubertal period (postnatal days 28‚Äď30),...

  12. Ordinance on the body responsible for taking measures in case of increased radioactivity (OROIR)

    This Ordinance, based on atomic energy legislation, public safety, military organisation and the defense council, replaced a previous ordinance of 1966 on alert in case of increased radioactivity. It sets up the body responsible for this work and describes the tasks to be performed in case of an occurrence which could create hazards for the population due to increased radioactivity. If a Swiss nuclear installation creates such a hazard, the 1982 Ordinance on emergency measures in the neighbourhood of nuclear installations also applies. The Ordinance entered into force on 1 May 1987 (NEA)

  13. Increasing Treatment Integrity through Negative Reinforcement: Effects on Teacher and Student Behavior

    DiGennaro, Florence D.; Martens, Brian K.; McIntyre, Laura Lee

    2005-01-01

    The current study examined the extent to which treatment integrity was increased and maintained for 4 teachers in their regular classroom settings as a result of performance feedback and negative reinforcement. Teachers received daily written feedback about their accuracy in implementing an intervention and were able to avoid meeting with a…

  14. Increasing Teachers' Use of Evidence-Based Classroom Management Strategies through Consultation: Overview and Case Studies

    MacSuga, Ashley S.; Simonsen, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    Many classroom teachers are faced with challenging student behaviors that impact their ability to facilitate learning in productive, safe environments. At the same time, high-stakes testing, increased emphasis on evidence-based instruction, data-based decision making, and response-to-intervention models have put heavy demands on teacher time and…

  15. Effects of Increased Self-Regulated Learning Opportunities on Student Teachers' Metacognitive and Motivational Development

    Vrieling, E. M.; Bastiaens, T. J.; Stijnen, S.

    2012-01-01

    This intervention study focused on the relationships between student teachers' self-regulated learning (SRL) opportunities, their use of metacognitive learning strategies and their motivation for learning. Results indicate that student teachers' use of metacognitive learning strategies increases significantly in learning environments withÖ

  16. Increasing Elementary School Teachers' Awareness of Gender Inequity in Student Computer Usage

    Luongo, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to increase gender equity awareness in elementary school teachers with respect to student computer and technology usage. Using professional development methods with a group of teachers, the writer attempted to help them become more aware of gender bias in technology instruction. An analysis of the data revealed thatÖ

  17. On-line Professional Learning Communities: Increasing Teacher Learning and Productivity in Isolated Rural Communities

    Dora Salazar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available On-line and distance professional learning communities provides teachers with increased access and flexibility as well as the combination of work and education. It also provides a more learner-centered approach, enrichment and new ways of interacting with teachers in isolated rural areas. For educational administrators, on-line learning offers high quality and usually cost-effective professional development for teachers. It allows upgrading of skills, increased productivity and development of a new learning culture. At the same time, it means sharing of costs, of training time, increased portability of training, and the exchange of creativity, information, and dialogue.

  18. Increased ultrasonic vocalizations and risk-taking in rat pups of sleep-deprived dams.

    Gulia, Kamalesh K; Patel, Niraj; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in rodent pups are analogous to cries in human babies. There is reduction in USVs in pups after experimental deprivation of rapid eye movement sleep of dams during pregnancy. However, the effects of total sleep deprivation on the USVs of newborns and their emotional development are not documented. Male pups born to the rats that underwent total sleep deprivation for 5h during the third trimester made higher vocalizations, when tested on early postnatal days (pnds) in an isolation-paradigm. Their anxiety-related behaviors during pnds 25-28, were tested using elevated plus maze (EPM). In comparison to the control pups, weanlings of sleep-deprived dams made increased entries into the open arms and higher mobility in the EPM. Enhanced distress calls during early pnds and reduction in risk assessment in weanlings indicate a link between the two behaviors. The USVs during ontogeny may provide early signals about altered emotional development. PMID:25446215

  19. It Takes a Village - Strategies to increase Minority Participation in the Earth and Life Sciences

    Mourad, T.

    2013-12-01

    The issues surrounding minority participation are multifaceted and complex. To be successful in increasing minority participation in the earth and life sciences requires multiple layers of support both in formal and nonformal settings. A comprehensive approach to broadening participation needs to build in: 1) Awareness and exposure to the wide range of career options 2) Nurture of multiple professional experiences from novice to leadership over multiple years 3) mentoring and advice at critical decision stages 4) opportunities for peer networking among other like-minded minority scientists and 5) institutional leadership and investment. The presentation will share the major accomplishments of the award-winning SEEDS program of the Ecological Society of America which recognizes and welcomes the diversity of cultures and perspectives. It seeks to create a professional home for its students, nearly 90% of whom are from minority backgrounds. No single organization can do it all. We will also share how we have partnered with other organizations including the Institute for Broadening Participation's MSPhD's program and discuss strategies that universities can develop to work with professional societies to accomplish your diversity goals.

  20. AMS Professional Development Courses: Arming K-12 Teachers with the Tools Needed to Increase Students' Scientific Literacy

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Moran, J. M.; Nugnes, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    To better prepare tomorrow's leaders, it is of utmost importance that today's teachers are science literate. To meet that need, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Program offers content-rich, professional development courses and training workshops for precollege teachers in the geosciences. During the fall and spring semesters, the AMS in partnership with NOAA, NASA, and SUNY Brockport, offers a suite of pre-college teacher development courses, DataStreme Atmosphere, DataStreme Ocean and DataStreme Earth's Climate System (ECS). These courses are delivered to small groups of K-12 teachers through Local Implementation Teams (LITs) positioned throughout the U.S. The courses use current, real-world environmental data to investigate the atmosphere, ocean, and climate system and consist of weekly online study materials, weekly mentoring, and several face-to-face meetings, all supplemented by a provided textbook and investigations manual. DataStreme ECS takes an innovative approach to studying climate science, by exploring the fundamental science of Earth's climate system and addressing the societal impacts relevant to today's students and teachers. The course investigates natural and human forcings and feedbacks to examine mitigation and adaptation strategies for the future. Information and data from respected organizations, such as the IPCC, the US Global Change Research Program, NASA, and NOAA are used throughout the course, including in the online and printed investigations. In addition, participants differentiate between climate, climate variability, and climate change through the AMS Conceptual Energy Model, a basic climate model that follows the flow of energy from space to Earth and back. Participants also have access to NASA's EdGCM, a research-grade Global Climate Model where they can explore various future climate scenarios in the same way that actual research scientists do. Throughout all of the courses, teachers have the opportunity to expand their knowledge in the geosciences and incorporate technology into their classrooms by utilizing state-of-the-art resources from NOAA, NASA, and other lead scientific organizations. Upon completion of each course, teachers receive three free graduate credits from SUNY Brockport. The DataStreme courses have directly trained almost 17,000 teachers, impacting over one million students. The DataStreme courses have increased teachers' geoscience knowledge, pointing them to the resources available online, and building their confidence in understanding dynamic Earth systems. Through courses modeled on scientific inquiry and fashioned to develop critical thinking skills, these teachers become a resource for their classrooms and colleagues.

  1. From Good to Great: Exemplary Teachers Share Perspectives on Increasing Teacher Effectiveness across the Career Continuum

    Behrstock-Sherratt, Ellen; Bassett, Katherine; Olson, Derek; Jacques, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    For well over a decade, teachers have been recognized as the single most important school-level factor influencing student achievement (Darling-Hammond, 2000; McCaffrey, Lockwood, Koretz, & Hamilton, 2003; Rivkin, Hanushek, & Kain, 2000; Rowan, Correnti & Miller, 2002; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997). Tremendous public resourcesÖ

  2. Increasing the number of female primary school teachers in African countries: Effects, barriers and policies

    Haugen, Caitlin S.; Klees, Steven J.; Stromquist, Nelly P.; Lin, Jing; Choti, Truphena; Corneilse, Carol

    2014-12-01

    Girls' education has been a high development priority for decades. While some progress has been made, girls are often still at a great disadvantage, especially in developing countries, and most especially in African countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, less than half of primary school teachers and only a quarter of secondary school teachers are women, and enrolment figures for girls are low. One common policy prescription is to increase the number of women teachers, especially in the many countries where teaching remains a predominantly male profession. This policy prescription needs to be backed by more evidence in order to significantly increase and improve its effective implementation. The available research seems to suggest that girls are more likely to enrol in schools where there are female teachers. Moreover, increasing the number of trained teachers in sub-Saharan Africa depends on more girls completing their school education. To date, however, there has been no comprehensive literature review analysing the effects of being taught by women teachers on girls' educational experience. This paper aims to make a start on filling this gap by examining the evidence on the effects in primary schools, especially in African countries. It also identifies and examines the barriers women face in becoming and staying teachers, and considers policies to remedy their situation.

  3. Intragastric acidification increases the sensitivity of 14C-urea breath test in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor

    Objective: To investigate if intragastric acidification at the ingestion of 14C-urea can decrease the likelihood of false-negative (FN) results of urea breath test (UBT) in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Methods: Twenty-three patients with positive 14C-UBT (UBT-1) results underwent an acid suppression treatment with omeprazole 40 mg/d for 14 d. On day 13, patients underwent second standard UBT (YBT-2). On day 14, patients underwent a modified UBT (UBT-3), which included consuming 200 mL of 0.1 mol/L citric acid solution 30 min before and at the administration of 14C-urea. Mean 14CO2 expiration and the number of FN results were compared for the three UBTs. Results: Omeprazole caused a significant decrease in mean 14CO2 excretion between UBT-1[(5.57 +- 3.90) Bq/mmol] and UBT-2[(1.98 +- 1.42) Bq/mmol, t=5.867, P=0.000]. Omeprazole caused 10(43.5%) FN UBT-2 results. Mean 14CO2 expiration in UBT-3 [(4.93 +- 3.77) Bq/mmol] was greater than that in UBT-2 (t=-4.538, P=0.000). UBT-3 caused only 2 FN results (8.7%, x2=6.66, P14C-urea increases 14Co2 expiration and decreases FN 14C-UBT results in patients taking PPI

  4. Greater exposure to sexual content in popular movies predicts earlier sexual debut and increased sexual risk taking.

    O'Hara, Ross E; Gibbons, Frederick X; Gerrard, Meg; Li, Zhigang; Sargent, James D

    2012-09-01

    Early sexual debut is associated with risky sexual behavior and an increased risk of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections later in life. The relations among early movie sexual exposure (MSE), sexual debut, and risky sexual behavior in adulthood (i.e., multiple sexual partners and inconsistent condom use) were examined in a longitudinal study of U.S. adolescents. MSE was measured using the Beach method, a comprehensive procedure for media content coding. Controlling for characteristics of adolescents and their families, analyses showed that MSE predicted age of sexual debut, both directly and indirectly through changes in sensation seeking. MSE also predicted engagement in risky sexual behaviors both directly and indirectly via early sexual debut. These results suggest that MSE may promote sexual risk taking both by modifying sexual behavior and by accelerating the normal rise in sensation seeking during adolescence. PMID:22810165

  5. Holistic Goal Attainment To Increase Levels of Self-Help. Teacher's Guide and Learner's Manual.

    Bosler, Shirley

    This guide demonstrates a holistic approach to goal attainment in adult education, welfare, and work force program. Holistic goal attainment treats the roots of illiteracy, measuring impact on learning and job readiness that increases teachable/reachable moments for instructors and builds self-esteem within the learner. The teacher's guide…

  6. Preservice Elementary Teachers Increase Descriptive Science Vocabulary by Making Descriptive Adjective Object Boxes

    Rule, Audrey C.; Crisafulli, Sherry; DeCare, Heather; DeLeo, Tonya; Eastman, Keri; Farrell, Liz; Geblein, Jennifer; Gioia, Chelsea; Joyce, Ashley; Killian, Kali; Knoop, Kelly; LaRocca, Alison; Meyer, Katie; Miller, Julianne; Roth, Vicki; Throo, Julie; Van Arsdale, Jim; Walker, Malissa

    2007-01-01

    Descriptive vocabulary is needed for communication and mental processing of science observations. Elementary preservice teachers in a science methods class at a mid-sized public college in central New York State increased their descriptive vocabularies through a course assignment of making a descriptive adjective object box. This teaching material…

  7. The politics of learning to teach: The juxtaposition of reform, risk-taking, and survival for a prospective science teacher

    McLoughlin, Andrea Sabatini

    1998-12-01

    It has proven difficult for teachers to enact and sustain the changes to thinking and pedagogy called for in science education reforms. It may be especially difficult for prospective teachers to create coherent professional identities as they learn to teach in the borderland between educational change and the existing context of education. Field experiences remain a pivotal point in teacher education, as prospective teachers mature from the perspective they have lived as students to the vantage point they are constructing as developing teachers. This qualitative, naturalistic case study examined a reform-oriented preservice science teacher's beliefs and actions during a year of field practica, including student teaching. Interviews, observations, and written documents were collected to examine the extent to which the prospective teacher's thoughts and actions continued to reflect reform ideals across that time. Inductive data analysis indicated that tacit beliefs held by the participant interacted with significant events of the field experiences to direct her learning to teach process in non-educative ways. Implications include: (a) deeper examination of the beliefs and experiences of prospective teachers would allow teacher educators the ability to understand and guide professional development in deeper and more productive ways, (b) the establishment of an atmosphere of experimentation/inquiry and a more cohesive, collaborative approach to teacher education are needed, especially during field experiences, if teacher education programs are to foster the productive and educative experiences supportive of reform ideals, (c) the preparation of prospective teachers who intend to implement reform ideals should include developing understandings of the dynamics of the change process, and (d) the exploration/confrontation of the power structures inherent in the existing educational system is essential if they are to be prevented from undermining reform efforts. As science teacher educators more fully explore prospective teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning, challenge the thinking and events that tend to reproduce the status quo, and look for the common points of departure that will help prospective teachers to construct an empowered and implementable new vision of themselves and their classrooms, science education reform will surely move closer to sustainability.

  8. Taking It to the Bone: The Cohort as Context for Novice Teachers Validating Culturally Responsive Beliefs and Practices.

    Canniff, Julie G.

    This study examined the experiences of a cohort of seven beginning high school teachers, all of whom were in their first year of teaching in schools where low performing students were at the greatest risk and where a culture of professional learning communities was rare. Teachers were struggling with what it meant to be a culturally responsive…

  9. Exposure to Free-Play Modes in Simulated Online Gaming Increases Risk-Taking in Monetary Gambling.

    Frahn, Tahnee; Delfabbro, Paul; King, Daniel L

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the behavioral effects of practice modes in simulated slot machine gambling. A sample of 128 participants predominantly aged 18-24 years were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 pre-exposure conditions: control (no practice), standard 90% return to player, inflated return to player and inflated return with pop-up messages. Participants in all conditions engaged in monetary gambling using a realistic online simulation of a slot machine. As predicted, the results showed that those players exposed to inflated or 'profit' demonstration modes placed significantly higher bets in the real-play mode as compared to the other groups. However, the groups did not differ in relation to how long they persisted in the real-play mode. Pop-up messages had no significant effect on monetary gambling behavior. The results of this study confirm that exposure to inflated practice or "demo" modes lead to short-term increases in risk-taking. These findings highlight the need for careful regulation and monitoring of internet gambling sites, as well as further research on the potential risks of simulated gambling activities for vulnerable segments of the gambling population. PMID:25023183

  10. The Development of Reproductive Strategy in Females: Early Maternal Harshness [right arrow] Earlier Menarche [right arrow] Increased Sexual Risk Taking

    Belsky, Jay; Steinberg, Laurence; Houts, Renate M.; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    To test a proposition central to J. Belsky, L. Steinberg, and P. Draper's (1991) evolutionary theory of socialization--that pubertal maturation plays a role in linking early rearing experience with adolescent sexual risk taking (i.e., frequency of sexual behavior) and, perhaps, other risk taking (e.g., alcohol, drugs, delinquency)--the authorsÖ

  11. Impacts of teachersí competency on job performance in research universities with industry characteristics: Taking academic atmosphere as moderator

    Anguo Xu; Long Ye

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Research universities with industry characteristics play an irreplaceable role in national economic development and social development. With the rapid development of research universities with industry characteristics in China, these universities face new challenges in managing teachers and promoting their quality. This paper aims to examine the impact of teachersí competency on job performance in research university with industry characteristics Design/methodology/approach: Based on...

  12. It Takes Courage: Fostering the Development of Critical, Social Justice-Oriented Teachers Using Museum and Project-Based Instruction

    Coffey, Heather M.; Fitchett, Paul G.; Farinde, Abiola A.

    2015-01-01

    Through course readings, museum visits, focus group discussions, and reflections on clinical observation experiences, preservice teachers developed a fictitious educational setting (Courage High School) that incorporates critical, social justice practices and privileges the experiences and cultural backgrounds of all K-12 students. Participants…

  13. Taking Aim At Guns...Gun Control Lessons for Intermediate, Junior and Senior High Schools. A Teacher's Handbook.

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This guide is intended to assist classroom teachers in developing lessons revolving around New York's 1980 handgun control law. It contains model lesson plans and a section on resource materials designed to provide insight into the law and its ramifications. The guide is designed for use in intermediate, junior and senior high schools. (Author/APM)

  14. Increasing Awareness of Practice through Interaction across Communities: The Lived Experiences of a Mathematician and Mathematics Teacher Educator

    Bleiler, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Collaborations between mathematicians and mathematics teacher educators are increasingly being expected, and realized, within the context of mathematics teacher education. Most research related to collaborative efforts between members of the mathematics and mathematics education communities has focused on the products, rather than the process of…

  15. Increasing Secondary Teachers' Behavior-Specific Praise Using a Video Self-Modeling and Visual Performance Feedback Intervention

    Hawkins, Shannon M.; Heflin, L. Juane

    2011-01-01

    Teachers working with students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) in elementary schools can be helped to increase use of an important behavioral strategy, behavior-specific praise statements (BSPS). Unfortunately, teachers' behaviors return to baseline levels when researchers leave, and little is known about the use of praise on high school…

  16. Increasing the Teacher Rate of Behaviour Specific Praise and its Effect on a Child with Aggressive Behaviour Problems

    Moffat, Thecla Kudakwashe

    2011-01-01

    A single subject design was used to investigate the effectiveness of an increase in teacher behaviour-specific praise statements to address anti-social behaviours demonstrated by a student who displays aggressive behaviours. Researchers agree that praise is effective in improving problem behaviours. They also agree that training teachers to use…

  17. Is Conformity a Mediating Variable on Increased Risk-Taking Behavior Across Years of Membership in the Greek System?

    CHLO√č ELIZABETH LEE-ZORN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the college subculture of Greek Life, members adhere to specific rules and norms in order to remain accepted, which could beindicative of conformity. This notion raises the question: what is the role of conformity on the risk taking behaviors of alcoholusage and sexual promiscuity as well as on the academic performance across years of membership? The article examines conformityin 31 fraternity members, cross-sectionally, using a compressed longitudinal design and hypothesizes members develop lower levelsof conformity after initiation, making them less susceptible to risk taking behaviors such as binge drinking, sexual promiscuityand decreased academic performance. Surveys were administered in paper format, and results were evaluated using a series ofanalysis of variance equations. The results indicated an interaction effect between peer conformity (high, low and alcoholicbeverages consumed as well as a main effects for between peer involvement (high, low and time on college GPA.

  18. Increasing self-efficacy and quality lesson planning using Lesson-Study with elementary preservice teachers

    Mitchell, Elizabeth Ann

    This qualitative, quasi-experimental study examined if lesson-study could be a successful approach in improving lesson plan quality and increasing self-efficacy levels toward teaching science at the preservice elementary teacher level in North Mississippi. Lesson-Study can be defined as a cycle of instructional improvement in which small groups work together to design and teach a lesson, revising again as needed over the course of a semester. This study described the experiences of two sections of preservice teachers enrolled in a science methods course as they engaged in lesson-study at a comprehensive university in Northeast Mississippi. One section of the class served as the control group while the other section, as the treatment group, received lesson-study over the course of the semester. Data was gathered in the form of interviews, observations, and a self-efficacy survey (STEBI-B). Lesson plans were also graded using a rubric to determine quality level. Findings indicated that, while not statistically significant, the treatment groups scores on the self-efficacy instrument increased more on average than the control groups' scores. There were also positive comments about the lesson study process from the teacher candidates in the treatment group as well as positive behaviors recorded by the researcher. Additionally, according to the external evaluators who graded the final drafts of the lessons, the treatment group had greater gains than the control class on average. These conclusions suggested the lesson study process implemented during the preservice teaching level can be beneficial.

  19. Taking peer victimization research to the next level: complex interactions among genes, teacher attitudes/behaviors, peer ecologies, & classroom characteristics.

    Espelage, Dorothy L

    2015-01-01

    This commentary reviews research findings of the five papers in the special entitled "School-related Factors in the Development of Bullying Perpetration and Victimization", which represent critical areas that are often overlooked in the literature. First, one paper points to the complex interaction between a genetic disposition for aggression and classroom norms toward aggression. Second, an intervention paper unpacks the underlying mechanisms of an efficacious school-wide bully prevention program by opening the "black box" and testing for mediators. Third, the remaining studies employ a wide range of rigorous designs to identify how teachers' attitudes, behaviors, and classroom practices play a critical role in the prevalence of victimization and bullying in the classroom. Further, teachers' attitudes and behaviors are shown to be predictive of youth's willingness to intervene to assist a peer who is being victimized. Results are situated in what is known about bullying prevention, and how the findings from these studies could maximize the sensitivity of future prevention efforts. PMID:25345834

  20. Increasing Teachers' Use of Praise with a Response-to-Intervention Approach

    Myers, Diane M.; Simonsen, Brandi; Sugai, George

    2011-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across teachers was used to evaluate the effects of a systematic, response-to-intervention (RTI) approach on rates of desired teacher behavior. Specifically, teachers whose rates of specific, contingent praise were nonresponsive to typical schoolwide positive behavior support training (primary intervention tier) were…

  1. Increasing Student Motivation through Teacher Communication: Six Essential Skills Every Physical Educator Should Master

    Webster, Collin A.

    2010-01-01

    Communication skills are central to teacher effectiveness and instructional expertise. A teacher's communication behaviors can also serve motivational purposes that facilitate a number of important instructional outcomes. This article highlights six skills that every physical education teacher should master. Three of the skills are rhetorical in…

  2. Assessing Graduate Teacher Training Programs: Can a Teaching Seminar Reduce Anxiety and Increase Confidence?

    Pelton, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Some effort to test the effectiveness of teacher assistant training programs is common, but these evaluations are typically limited to measures of student satisfaction. Two forms of assessment commonly used in elementary and secondary teacher training programs, measuring levels of teaching anxiety and teacher efficacy, may be of use for sociology…

  3. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS increases risk taking behavior in the Balloon Analogue Risk Task

    MichalLavidor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The process of evaluating risks and benefits involves a complex neural network that includes the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. It has been proposed that in conflict and reward situations, theta-band (4‚Äď8 Hz oscillatory activity in the frontal cortex may reflect an electrophysiological mechanism for coordinating neural networks monitoring behavior, as well as facilitating task-specific adaptive changes. The goal of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that theta-band oscillatory balance between right and left frontal and prefrontal regions, with a predominance role to the right hemisphere, is crucial for regulatory control during decision-making under risk. In order to explore this hypothesis, we used transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS, a novel technique that provides the opportunity to explore the functional role of neuronal oscillatory activities and to establish a causal link between specific oscillations and functional lateralization in risky decision-making situations. For this aim, healthy participants were randomly allocated to one of three stimulation groups (LH stimulation / RH stimulation / Sham stimulation, with active AC stimulation delivered in a frequency-dependent manner (at 6.5 Hz; 1mA peak to-peak. During the AC stimulation, participants performed the Balloon Analog Risk Task. This experiment revealed that participants receiving LH stimulation displayed riskier decision-making style compared to sham and RH stimulation groups. However, there was no difference in decision-making behaviors between sham and RH stimulation groups. The current study extends the notion that DLPFC activity is critical for adaptive decision-making in the context of risk-taking and emphasis the role of theta-band oscillatory activity during risky decision-making situations.

  4. Increased Risk of Hospitalization Related to Motor Vehicle Accidents Among People Taking Zolpidem: A Case‚ÄďCrossover Study

    Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lai, Jung-Nien; Lee, Chang-Hsing; Wang, Jung-Der; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2011-01-01

    Background Several epidemiological and experimental studies have found a positive association between the risk of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) and use of zopiclone and benzodiazepines. There is, however, little evidence of any risk of MVA attributable to the use of zolpidem 1 day before such accidents. We attempted to determine whether the use of zolpidem 1 day before is associated with an increased risk of an MVA. Methods Using a 1-million-person randomly sampled cohort from the Taiwan Nat...

  5. Greater Exposure to Sexual Content in Popular Movies Predicts Earlier Sexual Debut and Increased Sexual Risk Taking

    O’Hara, Ross E.; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Gerrard, Meg; LI, ZHIGANG; Sargent, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Early sexual debut is associated with risky sexual behavior and an increased risk of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections later in life. The relations among early movie sexual exposure (MSE), sexual debut, and risky sexual behavior in adulthood (i.e., multiple sexual partners and inconsistent condom use) were examined in a longitudinal study of U.S. adolescents. MSE was measured using the Beach method, a comprehensive procedure for media content coding. Controlling for char...

  6. Stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional failures predict earlier relapse to smoking in young adults: A pilot investigation.

    Schepis, Ty S; Tapscott, Brian E; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2016-04-01

    Substantial evidence links greater impulsivity and stress exposure to poorer smoking cessation outcomes. Results from adolescents also indicate that stress-related change in risk taking can impede cessation attempts. We investigated the effects of stress-related change in impulsivity, risk taking, attention and nicotine withdrawal, and craving in young adult smokers on time to smoking relapse in a relapse analogue paradigm. Twenty-six young adult smokers (50% women; mean age: 20.9 ¬Ī 1.8) were exposed to a stress imagery session followed by a contingency management-based relapse analogue paradigm. Participants smoked at least 5 cigarettes daily, with a mean baseline carbon monoxide (CO) level of 13.7 (¬Ī5.1) ppm. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t tests examined stress induction validity and Cox regressions of proportional hazards examined the effects of stress-related changes in nicotine withdrawal, nicotine craving, attention, impulsivity, and risk taking on time to relapse. While stress-related change in impulsivity, nicotine craving and withdrawal did not predict time to relapse (all ps > .10), greater stress-related increases in reaction time (RT) variability (p = .02) were predictive of shorter time to relapse, with trend-level findings for inattention and risk taking. Furthermore, changes in stress-related risk taking affected outcome in women more than in men, with a significant relationship between stress-related change in risk taking only in women (p = .026). Smoking cessation attempts in young adults may be adversely impacted by stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional disruption. Clinicians working with young adults attempting cessation may need to target these stress-related impairments by fostering more adaptive coping and resilience. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26901590

  7. Taking Teacher Education to Task: Exploring the Role of Faculty Education in Promoting Values and Moral Education of Task-Based Language Teaching

    Dr. Gabriel C. Delariarte

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available - This study aimed to determine the taking teacher education to task: exploring the role of teacher education in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching in the college of education of West Visayas State University Calinog-Campus for the school year 2012-2013. Descriptive research method was utilized in the study. The findings revealed that the respondents perceived highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching; the entire group of respondents has perceived highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching; both male and female respondent have perceived a highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching; all age brackets have perceived a highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching except 19 to 20 brackets that perceived very highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of taskbased language teaching. Finally, there is no significant difference in the perceived teacher’s role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching when classified as to sex and age.

  8. Reducing Teacher Burnout by Increasing Student Engagement: A Children's Rights Approach

    Covell, Katherine; McNeil, Justin K.; Howe, R. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Teacher burnout has long been understood to have significant negative effects on teaching efficacy. Research has indicated that student misbehaviour, often a result of disengagement, is a major predictor of teacher burnout. In part to address student disengagement, Hampshire County in England has undertaken a whole-school rights-based reform…

  9. Teachers and Game-Based Learning: Improving Understanding of How to Increase Efficacy of Adoption

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Schifter, Catherine C.

    2011-01-01

    Interest in game-based learning for K-12 is growing. Thus, helping teachers understand how to use these new pedagogies is important. This paper presents a cross-case study of the development of teacher professional development for the River City project, a games-based multi-user virtual environment science curriculum project for middle school…

  10. Mars Rover Curriculum: Teacher Self Reporting of Increased Frequency and Confidence in their Science and Language Arts Instruction

    Bering, E. A.; Carlson, C.; Nieser, K.; Slagle, E.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Houston is in the process of developing a flexible program that offers children an in-depth educational experience culminating in the design and construction of their own model Mars rover. The program is called the Mars Rover Model Celebration (MRC). It focuses on students, teachers and parents in grades 3-8. Students design and build a model of a Mars rover to carry out a student selected science mission on the surface of Mars. A total of 65 Mars Rover teachers from the 2012-2013 cohort were invited to complete the Mars Rover Teacher Evaluation Survey. The survey was administered online and could be taken at the convenience of the participant. In total, 29 teachers participated in the survey. Teachers were asked to rate their current level of confidence in their ability to teach specific topics within the Earth and Life Science realms, as well as their confidence in their ability to implement teaching strategies with their students. In addition, they were asked to rate the degree to which they felt their confidence increased in the past year as a result of their participation in the MRC program. The majority of teachers (81-90%) felt somewhat to very confident in their ability to effectively teach concepts related to earth and life sciences to their students. In addition, many of the teachers felt that their confidence in teaching these concepts increased somewhat to quite a bit as a result of their participation in the MRC program (54-88%). The most striking increase in this area was the reported 48% of teachers who felt their confidence in teaching 'Earth and the solar system and universe' increased 'Quite a bit' as a result of their participation in the MRC program. The vast majority of teachers (86-100%) felt somewhat to very confident in their ability to effectively implement all of the listed teaching strategies. In addition, the vast majority reported believing that their confidence increased somewhat to quite a bit as a result of their participation in the MRC program (81-96%). The most striking increases were the percentage of teachers who felt their confidence increased 'Quite a bit' as a result of their participation in the MRC program in the following areas: 'Getting students interested in and curious about science' (63%); 'Teaching science as a co-inquirer with students' (56%); and 'Continually find better ways to teach science' (59%). The areas where teachers reported the least amount of increase were those related to: Fostering student reading comprehension skills during science instruction and learning and integrating reading language arts into my science teaching. This outcome, however, is not surprising as many teachers reported not implementing the language arts, comprehension and vocabulary aspects of the program. The program training for last year did not explicitly cover the language arts components in detail or with support.

  11. Teacher Leaders: Boosting Teacher Effectiveness and Student Achievement. The Progress of Education Reform. Volume 11, Number 6

    Education Commission of the States (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Teacher leaders are teachers who aspire to stretch beyond their classrooms to engage in leadership roles that take many shapes and forms, both "informal" and "formal." These teachers view the school as a whole, see the "big picture" and focus on how they can help improve aspects of the school to result in increases in student achievement. TeacherÖ

  12. Increasing the satisfaction of general practitioners with continuing medical education programs: A method for quality improvement through increasing teacher-learner interaction

    Fogelman Yacov

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuing medical education (CME for general practitioners relies on specialist-based teaching methods in many settings. Formal lectures by specialists may not meet the learning needs of practitioners and may cause dissatisfaction with traditional CME. Increasing learner involvement in teaching programs may improve learner satisfaction. Methods A quality improvement program for CME for 18 general practitioners in the Tel Aviv region was designed as a result of dissatisfaction with traditional CME activities. A two-step strategy for change was developed. The CME participants first selected the study topics relevant to them from a needs assessment and prepared background material on the topics. In the second step, specialist teachers were invited to answer questions arising from the preparation of selected topics. Satisfaction with the traditional lecture program and the new participatory program were assessed by a questionnaire. The quality criteria included the relevance, importance and applicability of the CME topic chosen to the participant's practice, the clarity of the presentation and the effective use of teaching aids by the lecturer and the potential of the lecturer to serve as a consultant to the participant. Results The participatory model of CME significantly increased satisfaction with relevance, applicability and interest in CME topics compared to the traditional lecture format. Conclusions Increased learner participation in the selection and preparation of CME topics, and increased interaction between CME teachers and learners results in increased satisfaction with teaching programs. Future study of the effect of this model on physician performance is required.

  13. Writing Groups in Teacher Education: A Method to Increase Scholarly Productivity

    Page, C. Steven; Edwards, Susan; Wilson, Judi H.

    2012-01-01

    Writing groups have been used in a variety of academic disciplines to support and encourage faculty in their scholarly endeavors. This article gives an overview of the impact a writing group within a Teacher Education department at a teaching institution had on scholarly output over a two year period. The structure of the writing group is shared…

  14. The Role of Technology in Increasing Preservice Teachers' Anticipation of Students' Thinking in Algebra

    Rhine, Steve; Harrington, Rachel; Olszewski, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    The collision between a growing, inexperienced teaching force and students' algebra struggles should be one of great concern. A collaboration of four public and private universities in Oregon restructured mathematics methods courses for preservice teacher candidates by using the affordances of technology to counteract this loss of experience. Over…

  15. Physical Education Teacher Education: Creating a Foundation to Increase the Status of Physical Education in Schools

    Richardson, Karen Pagnano

    2011-01-01

    Physical education teacher education (PETE) programs have contributed to the marginalization of physical education in three significant ways. First, the nature of content knowledge is contested. Is content knowledge disciplinary knowledge, or is movement the content knowledge of our field? Second, PETE has failed to produce a critical mass of K-12…

  16. Test-Taking Skills.

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Samples of classroom activities designed to provide practice in specific test-taking skills are provided for use by teachers in the New York City school system. This guide provides activities that aid children in following instructions, time management, use of separate answer sheets, answer choice, and scanning and skimming. Unacceptable teaching…

  17. Competition, Economic Rationalization, Increased Surveillance, and Attacks on Diversity: Neo-Liberalism and the Transformation of Teacher Education in the U.S.

    Zeichner, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses recent developments in U.S. teacher education that are tied to the global neo-liberal project. The focus is on how changes experienced throughout the world have played out in the U.S. Three areas are addressed in particular: the commodification of teacher education, hyperrationality and increased accountability, and attacks on…

  18. Physics Take-Outs

    Riendeau, Diane; Hawkins, Stephanie; Beutlich, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Most teachers want students to think about their course content not only during class but also throughout their day. So, how do you get your students to see how what they learn in class applies to their lives outside of class? As physics teachers, we are fortunate that our students are continually surrounded by our content. How can we get them to notice the physics around them? How can we get them to make connections between the classroom content and their everyday lives? We would like to offer a few suggestions, Physics Take-Outs, to solve this problem.

  19. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving Reducing ... Media Policy | Contact AADE | Sitemap Copyright 2016 AADE Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Pinterest Google Plus Instagram

  20. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication ... Legislative Action Center Federal Legislation State Legislation Affordable Care Act Information Advocacy Tools and Resources Cart Search ...

  1. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication ... Legislation State Legislation AADE Policy Positions & Statements Affordable Care Act Information Advocacy Tools and Resources Cart Search ...

  2. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving Reducing Risks Healthy Coping Education & Career Webinars Upcoming Webinars Recorded Webinars ...

  3. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Reviewed Diabetes Prevention Program About DPP DPP Newsletters Lifestyle Coach Training DPP at Annual Meeting National Diabetes ... Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving ...

  4. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving Reducing Risks Healthy Coping Education & Career Webinars ...

  5. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving Reducing Risks Healthy ... IL 60606 800.338.3633 Contact Us Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Social Media Policy | Contact AADE | ...

  6. Increasing Bellevue School District's elementary teachers' capacity for teaching inquiry-based science: Using ideas from contemporary learning theory to inform professional development

    Maury, Tracy Anne

    This Capstone project examined how leaders in the Bellevue School District can increase elementary teachers' capacity for teaching inquiry-based science through the use of professional learning activities that are grounded in ideas from human learning theory. A framework for professional development was constructed and from that framework, a set of professional learning activities were developed as a means to support teacher learning while project participants piloted new curriculum called the Isopod Habitat Challenge. Teachers in the project increased their understanding of the learning theory principles of preconceptions and metacognition. Teachers did not increase their understanding of the principle of learning with understanding, although they did articulate the significance of engaging children in student-led inquiry cycles. Data from the curriculum revision and professional development project coupled with ideas from learning theory, cognition and policy implementation, and learning community literatures suggest Bellevue's leaders can encourage peer-to-peer interaction, link professional development to teachers' daily practice, and capitalize on technology as ways to increase elementary teachers' capacity for teaching inquiry-based science. These lessons also have significance for supporting teacher learning and efficacy in other subject areas and at other levels in the system.

  7. Enhancing Playful Teachers' Perception of the Importance of ICT Use in the Classroom: The Role of Risk Taking as a Mediator

    Goodwin, A. Lin; Low, Ee Ling; Ng, Pak Tee; Yeung, Alexander S.; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    In today's world, teaching and learning processes inevitably involve the application of information and communication technology (ICT). It seems reasonable to expect personal attributes such as cognitive playfulness to be associated with consistent application of ICT. Using survey responses from Singapore students in a teacher education programme…

  8. Needs Assessment of the National Association of Industrial and Technical Teacher Educators. [and] Taking NAITTE's Pulse: No Easy Job. [and] The Miller Study Stops Short of Solutions.

    Miller, Patrick W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Miller's report of a survey of 149 members of the National Association of Industrial and Technical Teacher Educators (116 replies) indicates overall satisfaction with association mission, publications, dues, and services. Walker comments that conventional needs assessment may not be the best for organizational planning. Evans notes declining…

  9. Double Take

    Educational Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins by discussing the results of two studies recently conducted in Australia. According to the two studies, taking a gap year between high school and college may help students complete a degree once they return to school. The gap year can involve such activities as travel, service learning, or work. Then, the paper presents links toÖ

  10. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Referral Patient Resources How a Diabetes Educator Can Help You Maria Ibarra Tony Essex Pat Conroy Been Referred. What's Next? Find a Diabetes Educator Diabetes Goal Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking ...

  11. Taking Medication

    Full Text Available ... Patient Resources How a Diabetes Educator Can Help You Maria Ibarra Tony Essex Pat Conroy Been Referred. What's Next? Find a Diabetes Educator Diabetes Goal Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving ...

  12. Using Tele-Coaching to Increase Behavior-Specific Praise Delivered by Secondary Teachers in an Augmented Reality Learning Environment

    Elford, Martha Denton

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the effects of real-time feedback on teacher behavior in an augmented reality simulation environment. Real-time feedback prompts teachers to deliver behavior-specific praise to students in the TeachLivE KU Lab as an evidence-based practice known to decrease disruptive behavior in inclusive classrooms. All educators face theÖ

  13. Using Tele-Coaching to Increase Behavior-Specific Praise Delivered by Secondary Teachers in an Augmented Reality Learning Environment

    Elford, Martha Denton

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the effects of real-time feedback on teacher behavior in an augmented reality simulation environment. Real-time feedback prompts teachers to deliver behavior-specific praise to students in the TeachLivE KU Lab as an evidence-based practice known to decrease disruptive behavior in inclusive classrooms. All educators face the…

  14. Field Experience + Inclusive ECE Classrooms = Increased Preservice Teacher Efficacy in Working with Students with Developmental Delays or Disabilities

    Atiles, Julia T.; Jones, Jennifer L.; Kim, Hyunjin

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined whether field placements within an inclusive classroom are associated with improved preservice teacher's efficacy when working with children with developmental delays or disabilities. Study participants were 165 undergraduate students enrolled in primary teacher education classes at a Midwestern university. Participants…

  15. Electronic Portfolios in Teacher Education: A Case Study of Early Childhood Teacher Candidates

    Ntuli, Esther; Keengwe, Jared; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic portfolios is increasingly becoming popular in teacher education programs. The electronic portfolio allows learners to express their work and take ownership over their own ability to plan and assess and reflect upon their learning during a specific period of time. While many teacher education programs have adopted electronicÖ

  16. Electronic Portfolios in Teacher Education: A Case Study of Early Childhood Teacher Candidates

    Ntuli, Esther; Keengwe, Jared; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic portfolios is increasingly becoming popular in teacher education programs. The electronic portfolio allows learners to express their work and take ownership over their own ability to plan and assess and reflect upon their learning during a specific period of time. While many teacher education programs have adopted electronic…

  17. Increasing the Chances of Implementing NGSS by Bolstering High School Teacher Knowledge and Views about Climate Change, a NICE NASA Example

    Bleicher, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose of Presentation This paper will highlight how the results of this initial study foreshadow possibilities of NGSS (NGSS, 2013) playing out in high school classrooms in the near future. Research findings from a three-year NASA-funded project, Promoting Educational Leadership in Climate Science (PEL) will be presented. Objectives and Research Questions PEL aims to increase climate science literacy in high school teachers and students through scientific argumentation using authentic NASA data. This initial study focuses on the following questions: 1. Are teachers increasing their climate science knowledge? 2. Are there changes in teachers' views about climate change? 3. What resources and are provided to assist teachers to develop their students' scientific argumentation skills? Theoretical Framework Because of the changing nature of climate science knowledge and its relevance to societal issues, teachers must be able to understand the basic concepts and remain up-to-date on scientific issues. The need for a more thorough understanding of the concepts of climate change are highlighted by recent studies on the public perceptions and attitudes on the subject (Leiserowitz et al., 2013). Teachers need to understand the difference between skepticism as a characteristic of the nature of science and denial of climate change (Sommervillle & Hasol, 2011). Teachers need to understand the natural and human-induced factors affecting climate, and the potential consequences, and ways to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Generally, when teachers learn about a subject, they demonstrate more self-efficacy to teach about it (Bleicher & Lindgren, 2005). Analytic Strategy Data were analyzed using paired-samples t-tests, independent t -tests, and ANOVA. Latent class analysis was employed to analyze the Six America's Survey data. Correlational studies were conducted to examine possible relationships among variables. Findings in Brief Teachers' content knowledge increased significantly and teachers were more concerned about climate change after participation in PEL. Teachers with higher self-efficacy demonstrated higher climate change science knowledge. Teachers indicated that they felt more confident and were motivated to implement classroom lessons with their students that employed resources rich in NASA climate data and focused on scientific argumentation. References Bleicher, R.E., & Lindgren, J. (2005). Success in learning science and preservice science teaching self-efficacy. Journal of Science Teacher Education. 16, 205-225. Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., Feinberg, G., & Howe, P.(2013) Climate change in the American mind: Americans' global warming beliefs and attitudes in April, 2013 Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project on Climate Change Communication. Retrieved 7/26/13 from: http://climatechangecommunication.org/sites/default/files/reports/Climate-Beliefs-April-2013.pdf Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). (2013). Available at http://www.nextgenscience.org/print/121. Somerville, R. C. J. & Hassol, S. J. (2011). Communicating the science of climate change. Physics Today, 64(10), 48-53.

  18. Taking SESAME to the classroom

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 High School Teacher Programme (HST) is well under way, and this year it has a distinct Middle Eastern flavour, with eight teachers from the region among the 54 taking part.   Established in the late 1990s, HST is a three-week residential programme in English designed to give teachers a taste of frontier research and promote the teaching of modern physics in high schools. Along with the more than 30 other teacher schools given in the native language of the participants, HST aims to help teachers bring modern physics to the classroom and motivate their students to study science at upper secondary school and university. As part of the HST programme, teachers form working groups to develop lessons based on CERN science. This year, however, with eight teachers coming from Israel, Palestine, Iran and Jordan, all of which are members of SESAME, the international laboratory for Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science Applications in the Middle East, one group is working on a dif...

  19. Iranian EFL teachers' perceptions of teacher self-disclosure

    Ali Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Teacher self-disclosure (TSD as a communication behavior can influence students' learning by increasing their engagement and class participation as well as helping them establish effective interpersonal relationships. Owning to its context-sensitive and culture-dependent nature, however, TSD topics, purposes, and considerations may vary cross-culturally. This study was an attempt to explore Iranian EFL teachers' perceptions of appropriateness of TSD as well as to investigate whether there was a significant difference between male and female teachers' perceptions of appropriateness of TSD. To this end, the Appropriateness of Teacher Self-Disclosure Scale was distributed among 68 Iranian EFL teachers (34 females and 34 males from six language institutes. The results of the study indicated the extent to which the Iranian EFL teachers perceived TSD topics, purposes, and considerations to be appropriate or inappropriate. Furthermore, the study found convergence and divergence between male and female teachers' perceptions in terms of the topics used in TSD, the purposes TSD serves in classroom, and considerations the teachers take into account when practicing TSD. The results of the study suggest that Iranian EFL teachers can practice TSD as a pedagogical tool to enhance learning although they should be wary of its consequences in some aspects as TSD is contingent upon context and culture.

  20. Do Perceptions of Being Treated Fairly Increase Students' Outcomes? Teacher-Student Interactions and Classroom Justice in Italian Adolescents

    Molinari, Luisa; Speltini, Giuseppina; Passini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the associations between the students' perceptions of teachers' interpersonal behaviour and some school outcomes--namely, academic achievement, learning motivation, and a sense of class belonging--considering the mediating role of classroom justice. Moreover, the impact of the school type was analysed. The…

  1. Expelling Stress for Primary School Teachers: Self-Affirmation Increases Positive Emotions in Teaching and Emotion Reappraisal

    James Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of a brief work-related self-affirming implementation intention (WS-AII on the well-being of primary school teachers. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: one in which they were asked to create a WS-AII or one in which they were asked to create a control implementation intention (C-II. State anxiety was measured pre- and post-manipulation, self-efficacy at post-manipulation only, and emotions in teaching and emotion regulation at baseline and at a two-week follow-up. There were statistically significant differences between the WS-AII condition and the control. Teachers who created work-related self-affirming implementation intentions reported an immediate reduction in state anxiety. Positive effects extended over the two-week period, with teachers in the WS-AII condition also reporting more positive emotions in teaching and the use of reappraisal emotion regulation strategies rather than emotion suppression. Results suggest that the integration of the WS-AII into existing organisational practice may be of benefit to the well-being of teachers and other highly stressed workers.

  2. Expelling Stress for Primary School Teachers: Self-Affirmation Increases Positive Emotions in Teaching and Emotion Reappraisal.

    Morgan, James; Atkin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of a brief work-related self-affirming implementation intention (WS-AII) on the well-being of primary school teachers. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: one in which they were asked to create a WS-AII or one in which they were asked to create a control implementation intention (C-II). State anxiety was measured pre- and post-manipulation, self-efficacy at post-manipulation only, and emotions in teaching and emotion regulation at baseline and at a two-week follow-up. There were statistically significant differences between the WS-AII condition and the control. Teachers who created work-related self-affirming implementation intentions reported an immediate reduction in state anxiety. Positive effects extended over the two-week period, with teachers in the WS-AII condition also reporting more positive emotions in teaching and the use of reappraisal emotion regulation strategies rather than emotion suppression. Results suggest that the integration of the WS-AII into existing organisational practice may be of benefit to the well-being of teachers and other highly stressed workers. PMID:27187437

  3. Expelling Stress for Primary School Teachers: Self-Affirmation Increases Positive Emotions in Teaching and Emotion Reappraisal

    Morgan, James; Atkin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of a brief work-related self-affirming implementation intention (WS-AII) on the well-being of primary school teachers. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: one in which they were asked to create a WS-AII or one in which they were asked to create a control implementation intention (C-II). State anxiety was measured pre- and post-manipulation, self-efficacy at post-manipulation only, and emotions in teaching and emotion regulation at baseline and at a two-week follow-up. There were statistically significant differences between the WS-AII condition and the control. Teachers who created work-related self-affirming implementation intentions reported an immediate reduction in state anxiety. Positive effects extended over the two-week period, with teachers in the WS-AII condition also reporting more positive emotions in teaching and the use of reappraisal emotion regulation strategies rather than emotion suppression. Results suggest that the integration of the WS-AII into existing organisational practice may be of benefit to the well-being of teachers and other highly stressed workers. PMID:27187437

  4. Short-term data collection projects: A means to increase teacher content knowledge and bring authentic research experiences into the classroom

    Gaboardi, M.; Parker, W.; Rodriguez, D.

    2010-12-01

    Short-term field research projects were embedded into a two-week, Mathematics and Science Partnership-funded, teacher institute devoted to increasing content knowledge about the physical basis of climate change. Teams of four teachers were encouraged to ask any research question related to weather or climate, and create a data collection method that they thought might help answer their question. They were provided with a range of measurement devices, from simple immersible thermometers to light sensors, probeware, and carbon dioxide concentration sensors. Teams were expected to design data collection sites in a middle-school setting, present site designs to their peers, collect data, present initial results, and participate in peer-review about site design and data collected. Teachers were encouraged to generate research questions that could be replicated with their students at their schools. Design complexity ranged widely with some teachers deliberately choosing to model sites their students might design and others making full use of more sophisticated technology. On the third day of the institute, each group presented their research question and setup for data collection in poster format. Large gaps in understanding about testable questions and effective data collection methods were apparent. Instead of addressing errors as groups presented, facilitators encouraged participants to explore each groups’ presentation and make comments using post-it notes. Participants were then encouraged to respond to the comments and consider modifying their questions, site designs, or data collection methods. Teams gathered data up to three times daily and were fully responsible for choosing means of data organization; by the second week most were using and becoming familiar with Microsoft Excel. Final presentations were in Microsoft PowerPoint. Teams were expected to graphically report data, present possible interpretations, and discuss any problems related to their initial questions or methods. All teams reported problems with their work and identified improvements for future research. Teachers reported that the field component was very helpful to their understanding of the process of science and to deepening their content knowledge about climate change research. Additionally they reported that they were much more likely to include short-term research projects in their own classrooms as a result of this experience. Short-term data collection experiences such as these can serve to: - Encourage teachers to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own questions, and design methods to answer those questions; - Expose teachers to common pitfalls in data collection methods so that teachers can later guide students as students encounter similar problems; - Familiarize teachers with widely available technology used to record and present data; - Refine teacher understanding of research and improve likelihood of success on longer research projects; - Enable teachers to look at data sets more critically and in more depth; - Better understand how to construct, read, and interpret data tables and graphs; and - Increase depth of understanding of science content.

  5. The Classroom Check-up: A Classwide Teacher Consultation Model for Increasing Praise and Decreasing Disruptive Behavior

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Lewis-Palmer, Teri; Merrell, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    School-based consultation typically focuses on individual student problems and on a small number of students rather than on changing the classroom system. The Classroom Check-up (CCU) was developed as a classwide consultation model to address the need for classroom level support while minimizing treatment integrity problems common to school-based consultation. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of the CCU and Visual Performance Feedback on teacher and student behavior. Resul...

  6. Take action: influence diversity.

    Gomez, Norma J

    2013-01-01

    Increased diversity brings strength to nursing and ANNA. Being a more diverse association will require all of us working together. There is an old proverb that says: "one hand cannot cover the sky; it takes many hands." ANNA needs every one of its members to be a part of the diversity initiative. PMID:24579394

  7. Language teachers and teaching

    Ben Said, Selim

    2013-01-01

    This volume gathers contributions from a range of global experts in teacher education to address the topic of language teacher education. It shows how teacher education involves the agency of teachers, which forms part of their identity, and which they take on when integrating into the teaching community of practice. In addition, the volume explores the teachers' situated practice dynamic negotiation of classroom situations, socialization into the professional teaching culture, and ""on the ground experimentation"" with pedagogical skills/techniques.

  8. Fostering Leadership Skills in Pre-Service Teachers

    Xu, Yuejin; Patmor, George

    2012-01-01

    Teacher leadership is about empowering teachers to take a more active role in school improvement. Current pathways to teacher leadership, namely the Teacher Leader Master (TLM) degree program and teacher-led professional development, mainly target in-service teachers. Less attention has been paid to teacher leadership training in current teacherÖ

  9. The impact of the transmission dynamics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on sexual behaviour: a new hypothesis to explain recent increases in risk taking-behaviour among men who have sex with men.

    Boily, Marie-Claude; Godin, G; Hogben, M; Sherr, L; Bastos, F I

    2005-01-01

    Increases in sexually transmitted infections and related high-risk behaviours have been reported among men who have sex with men (MSM) in industrialised countries when effective antiretroviral therapy against HIV infection has become widely available, in the mid-nineties. The reasons for these increases are not fully understood and often conflicting. Prevention fatigue, relapses to unsafe sex, as well as optimism toward the risk of developing AIDS among people living with HIV are not unique to the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This has led researchers to highlight the need to investigate other potential reasons that could explain the increase in high-risk taking following the ART introduction. We put forward the hypothesis that the change in the transmission dynamics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic before and after the introduction of ART has contributed to this change in high-risk behaviour. It is suggested that a decline in sexual risk activities has occurred at the population-level following the initial spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic because AIDS mortality and severe morbidity disproportionately depleted the pool of high-risk taking individuals. As a result, non-volitional changes may have occurred at the individual-level over time because the depletion of this pool of high-risk individuals made it more difficult for the remaining high-risk taking individuals to find partners to engage in risky sex with. Following its introduction, ART has facilitated the differential replenishment of the pool of individuals willing to engage in high-risk taking behaviours because ART reduces AIDS mortality, and morbidity. Consequently, high-risk taking individuals who had previously reduced their level of risky sex non-volitionally (i.e., as a result of the reduced availability of high-risk partners) were able to resume their initial high-risk practices as the pool of high-risk taking individuals replenished over time. Thus, a fraction of the recently reported increase in high-risk sexual activities may be secondary to the fact that those MSM who were unable to engage in their desired high-risky sexual activities (because of reduced availability) are now able to revert to them as the availability of men willing to engage in risky sexual behaviours increases partly due to ART. Therefore, we suggest that a fraction of the changes in individual behaviour are non-volitional and can be explained by a change in "sexual partner availability" due to the transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS before and after ART. The hypothesis is formulated and explained using simple social network diagrams and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. We also discuss the implication of this hypothesis for HIV prevention. PMID:15922091

  10. Teacher Involvement in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Mason, Kevin O.

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers in the field of teacher education have proposed the formation of partnerships between teachers and teacher educators, without explicitly stating what additional roles teachers might play in the teacher preparation process. This article describes how some pre-service teacher education programmes have increased the involvement of…

  11. The Views of Pre-Service Teachers Who Take Special Teaching Course within the Context of Pedagogical Formation Certificate Program about Micro-Teaching Method and a Physics Lesson Plan

    Gurbuz, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the views of the pre-service teachers who received training on pedagogical formation certificate program about micro-teaching method. The study was carried out with a case study method. Semi-structured interviews were used in the study as a data collection tool to gather pre-service teachers' views about…

  12. Black Father Involvement in Gifted Education: Thoughts from Black Fathers on Increasing/Improving Black Father-Gifted Teacher Partnerships

    Grantham, Tarek C.; Henfield, Malik S.

    2011-01-01

    Black fathers are important advocates in addressing the underrepresentation of Black students in gifted programs, as well as the achievement gaps between Black and White students. Black fathers increasingly understand the important role that Black mothers have traditionally played in supporting their gifted children's school experiences. As aÖ

  13. Teaching Style, ICT Experience and Teachers' Attitudes toward Teaching with Web 2.0

    Kale, Ugur; Goh, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis on 21st Century Skills development has increased expectations on teachers to take advantages of emerging technologies to support student learning. Yet it is not clear whether teachers are well equipped with the necessary skills, support, and positive attitudes toward integrating them in their practices. Even though student-centeredÖ

  14. Teaching Style, ICT Experience and Teachers' Attitudes toward Teaching with Web 2.0

    Kale, Ugur; Goh, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis on 21st Century Skills development has increased expectations on teachers to take advantages of emerging technologies to support student learning. Yet it is not clear whether teachers are well equipped with the necessary skills, support, and positive attitudes toward integrating them in their practices. Even though student-centered…

  15. Science takes time : families take time!

    2000-01-01

    Who has time to have a family ? Scientists are the ¬ęheroes¬Ľ of our time. Science takes time - Families take time. Who gives time ? My case -study consists of interviews with scientific workers of both sexes. They are asked how they juggle the time required in the production of scientific knowledge and family life. My findings indicate that it is women, who give of their time.

  16. Science takes time :families take time!

    Hultberg, Kirsti Baird

    2000-01-01

    Who has time to have a family ? Scientists are the ¬ęheroes¬Ľ of our time. Science takes time - Families take time. Who gives time ? My case -study consists of interviews with scientific workers of both sexes. They are asked how they juggle the time required in the production of scientific knowledge and family life. My findings indicate that it is women, who give of their time.

  17. Take Charge. Take the Test. PSA (:30)

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  18. Take nothing for granted

    An overview of Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) natural gas supply, past, present and future, was presented. Reserves are considered as being more than adequate to meet supply requirements. In the long term, it is expected that there will be sufficient gas to fill all existing and currently planned pipelines serving the WCSB. Nevertheless, it does not pay to take anything for granted. One of the challenges facing the natural gas industry in an integrated North American market is to maintain a balance between deliverability and take-away capacity. Competition between fuels is also a factor that complicates matters. Measures taken by TransCanada Pipelines to prepare for the expected heightened competition were reviewed. Chief among them is the recent TransCanada/Nova merger which is expected to increase efficiency, decrease costs, provide a solid platform for continued growth, create customer-driven energy solutions and enable the new entity to successfully compete in an integrated North American market. The accord reached between CAPP, NOVA, SEPAC and TransCanada Pipelines and the status of the new Alberta tolls are further examples of measures taken by TransCanada Pipelines to prepare for all contingencies by leaving nothing to chance

  19. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... frequently being misused. By not following instructions on how to take medicine safely, people can vastly lower the ... reminders we've learned over the years of how to take our medication. One of the simplest ones ...

  20. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... in the United States, most of us, our culture, is that we take antibiotics for seven to ... I take it and for how long? What foods, drinks, other medicines or activities should I avoid ...

  1. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking the bacteria completely out of ... taking this medicine? What are the possible side effects and what do I do if they occur? ...

  2. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... and I'm taking one of them four times a day and one of them three times a day and one of them twice a ... January." It's easy to remember-- write down the time you take your medicine and as you take ...

  3. State Teacher Evaluation and Teacher Education

    Marchant, Gregory J.; David, Kristine A.; Rodgers, Deborah; German, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Current accountability trends suggest an increasing role in state mandates regarding teacher evaluation. With various evaluation models and components serving as the basis for quality teaching, teacher education programs need to recognize the role teacher evaluation plays and incorporate aspects where appropriate. This article makes that case and…

  4. Teacher Collaboration: Implications for New Mathematics Teachers

    Gellert, Laura M.; Gonzalez, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    One increasingly popular way of supporting new teachers is through the use of mentoring. New teachers are often paired with mentors as one of a number of supports meant to aid new teachers as they begin their career. The various types of mentoring range from school based mentors assigned by the school to specialty mentors, such as math coaches.Ö

  5. Use of Elements of Theatre as Teaching Strategies to Increase Preservice Teacher Self-Efficacy and Proficiency in the Art, Science, and Business of Teaching

    Davidson, Maaike T.

    2013-01-01

    This sequential, mixed method, QUAN-QUAL study redefines the craft of teaching into the science ("what"), art ("how"), and the business of teaching to assess and prepare preservice teachers. It also measures the effectiveness of using theatrical elements as teaching strategies to effectively develop preservice teachers in the…

  6. Becoming a science teacher: The competing pedagogies of schools and teacher education

    Rozelle, Jeffrey J.

    A culminating student teaching or internship experience is a central component of nearly every teacher education program and has been for most of teacher education's history. New teachers cite field experience and student teaching as the most beneficial, authentic, or practical aspect of teacher education. Teacher educators, however, have cause to view student teaching skeptically; student teachers often move away from the reform-minded practices espoused in teacher education. This multi-site ethnographic study investigated a full-year internship experience for six science interns at three diverse high schools as part of a teacher preparation program at a large state university. In taking an ecological perspective, this study documented the dynamic and evolving relationships between interns, cooperating teachers, teacher educators, and the school and classroom contexts. The goals of the study were to describe the changes in interns throughout the course of a year-long internship as a science teacher and to determine the relative influences of the various aspects of the ecology on interns. Data include fieldnotes from 311 hours of participant observation, 38 interviews with interns, cooperating teachers, and teacher educators, and 190 documents including course assignments, evaluations, and reflective journals. Interns' teaching practices were strongly influenced by their cooperating teachers. During the first two months, all six interns "used their mentor's script." When teaching, they attempted to re-enact lessons they witnessed their cooperating teachers enact earlier in the day. This included following the lesson structure, but also borrowing physical mannerisms, representations, anecdotes, and jokes. When interns could no longer follow their cooperating teacher due to an increased teaching load, they "followed their mentors' patterns"---implementing instruction that emphasized similar strategies---regardless of whether they were experiencing success in the classroom or not. To explore this disproportionate influence, this study documented the differences between the school-based placements and teacher education. Three contrasts were described. First, in schools, interns received support and assistance in real-time from cooperating teachers as they taught, while in teacher education, interns received support in planning for and reflecting on instruction. Second, in schools, interns and cooperating teachers' work had a task-orientation in which they solved concrete and contextualized problems together, while teacher educators were oriented toward ideas about teaching that might be generalized beyond the immediate context of the intern. Finally, in schools, interns acted like teachers. This meant dressing like a teacher, learning to use their bodies and voice in authoritative ways, and managing the physical space of the classroom. In teacher education classrooms, interns returned to talk and learn about teaching but reacquired the persona of students in their dress, movements, and social interactions. This study confirms the literature's consistent finding about the importance of cooperating teacher in the development of a student teacher's practices. In describing the worlds of the school and teacher education, it suggests reasons why the field experience acts as an influential "pedagogy of enactment" (Grossman, Hammerness, & McDonald, 2009) and discusses the implications for teacher education pedagogy.

  7. "The Teacher Is an Octopus": Uncovering Preservice English Language Teachers' Prior Beliefs through Metaphor Analysis

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2006-01-01

    Preservice teachers come to any teacher education course with prior experiences, knowledge and beliefs about learning and teaching. Additionally, the belief systems of preservice teachers often serve as a lens through which they view the content of the teacher education program. Consequently, it is essential that teacher educators take these prior…

  8. Opaqueness and Bank Risk Taking

    Patrick Behr

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between opaqueness and bank risk taking. Using a sample of 199 banks from 38 countries over the period January 1996 to December 2006, I analyze whether more opaque banks are riskier than less opaque banks. I find suggestive evidence that commonly used proxies for bank opaqueness are significantly related to bank risk taking as measured by the Merton PD and the bank-individual Z-score, even after accounting for potential simultaneity between risk taking and opaqueness. More opaque banks seem to engage more in risk taking than less opaque banks. This result provides support to the common view that bank opaqueness is problematic and that transparency among financial institutions should be increased.

  9. Plans, Takes, and Mis-takes

    Nathaniel Klemp; Ray McDermott; Jason Raley; Matthew Thibeault; Kimberly Powell; Levitin, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes what may have been a mistake bypianist Thelonious Monk playing a jazz solo in 1958.Even in a Monk composition designed for patternedmayhem, a note can sound out of pattern. We reframethe question of whether the note was a mistake and askinstead about how Monk handles the problem. Amazingly,he replays the note into a new pattern that resituatesits jarring effect in retrospect. The mistake, orbetter, the¬†mis-take, was ‚Äúsaved‚ÄĚ by subsequent notes.Our analysis, supported by re...

  10. Implementing Measures of Teacher Effectiveness

    Stecher, Brian; Garet, Mike; Holtzman, Deborah; Hamilton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    An initial look at work being done in a reform project sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation finds that evaluations of teacher performance aren't as unpopular with teachers who have experienced the new system as some would have us believe. Leaders acknowledge that the new approach to teacher evaluation takes more time than traditional…

  11. Integrating Ict Into Teacher Education Programme

    Geeta Thakur

    2012-01-01

    Teacher educators are faced with the challenges of preparing a new generation of teachers to effectively use the new learning tool in their teaching practices. ICT is an ocean. This paper focuses the possible usage of ICT in teacher education. ICT teacher training can take many forms. We can organize various ICTuse as: Main content focus of teacher training, Part of teaching methods, Core technology for delivering teacher training, and Facilitate professional development & networking. ICT can...

  12. Take Meds Faithfully

    ... cent were still taking a drug called a beta-blocker one year after the attack. Beta-blockers substantially lower the risk of another heart attack ... was that only 70 percent were taking a beta-blocker 30 days after their attack ‚ÄĒ indicting that 30 ...

  13. Taking the Long View

    Bennett, Robert B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Legal studies faculty need to take the long view in their academic and professional lives. Taking the long view would seem to be a cliched piece of advice, but too frequently legal studies faculty, like their students, get focused on meeting the next short-term hurdle--getting through the next class, grading the next stack of papers, making itÖ

  14. Grading the teacher

    Swartz, Clifford E.

    2000-04-01

    Several fads ago there was a movement to grade teachers in terms of their competency ó competency-based testing. Everyone knows that there are good teachers and there are bad teachers. The trouble is, it's hard to define the categories. It's like the Supreme Court justice who couldn't define pornography, but knew it when he saw it. In New York State, prospective teachers must take tests in both pedagogy and subject material. That seems reasonable. There ought to be some minimum standards, so I thought that I would try my hand at setting up such requirements.

  15. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... teeth or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines safely.

  16. Taking Care of Yourself

    ... chapter Join our online community Taking Care of Yourself You will experience good days and bad days ... may help improve your daily life. By educating yourself about the disease, developing effective coping strategies and ...

  17. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines safely.

  18. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... better, the antibiotic is working in killing the bacteria, but it might not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking the bacteria completely out of the system. It might be ...

  19. Take the IBS Test

    ... Committed to Quality in Patient Care TAKE THE IBS TEST Do you have recurrent abdominal pain or ... have a real and treatable medical condition called irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Your doctor now has new information and ...

  20. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... means taking the bacteria completely out of the system. It might be just putting it to rest ... if they occur? And, is there any written information available about the medicine? There are many reasons ...

  1. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... teeth or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines ...

  2. Taking Current Antiretroviral Drugs

    ... Sheet Categories Internet Bookmarks on AIDS Have Questions? Printing & Downloading Fact Sheets Permission to Use Fact Sheets ... Take one hour apart from ddI or antacids. Skin rash, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, headache, fatigue. Efavirenz (Sustiva) ...

  3. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... twice as bad. Woman: Alright, that's for high blood pressure. Doctor: Okay. Woman: I take a half ... we can't feel, so people with high blood pressure--we really can't feel that, and ...

  4. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... I take it and for how long? What foods, drinks, other medicines or activities should I avoid ... twice a day and one of them with food and the other one standing on my head, ...

  5. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... the-counter remedies can be purchased by any person, without the authorization of a medical professional. Dr. ... following instructions on how to take medicine safely, people can vastly lower the quality of their lives ...

  6. Take the Floor

    Godts, Marc

    2014-01-01

    A Closed Circuit Projection, projecting the Floor on the Wall Proposition to exhibit the floor on which the conference takes place. Example of such an installation by means of a closed circuit projection that captures and streams the conference floor to project it on one of the walls of the conference. Like a mirror, installing a delay, and by means of that delay, a reflection, allowing us to see us, take, occupy and share the floor.

  7. How can I improve my practice as a teacher and facilitator while working together with instructors/teachers in order to discuss with them and facilitate them in increasing the learning outcome of their students?

    Hamuha, Paul Tartisio Kenyi

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a self-study research approach into my practice as a teacher and facilitator at Wau Vocational Training Center (WVTC). I examined my experiences as a teacher for 7 years, enquire the forms of my knowing and my claims that I know, through adapting a self-study research approach under the umbrella question: how can I improve my practice (Whitehead, 2009)? Throughout my first year as a master student at Akershus University College (HiAk), I have come to acquire new knowledge...

  8. Reaching the teachers

    2001-01-01

    The fourth edition of CERN's High School Teachers programme welcomed 38 teachers to the Laboratory this July. For three weeks the teachers were immersed in the life of CERN, giving them a unique experience to take back to their classrooms.   Participants and organisers of the HST 2001 programme. The pupils of the teachers who attended the High School Teachers (HST) programme at CERN will notice a difference when they meet their teachers at the beginning of next term. They'll see a new-found enthusiasm in their eyes, and this will be thanks to the three weeks they spent at the Laboratory attending the summer students' lectures and working with other teachers from around the world. 'This experience fires you up again!,' explains Wim Peeters, a Belgian teacher at CERN for the second time. For many teachers of physics, university is a long time ago. Physics research has moved on, and there are many new things to learn. That's why CERN has the HST, so that teachers can mix with university students in ...

  9. Simulating Price-Taking

    Engelhardt, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a price-takers' market simulation geared toward principles-level students. This simulation demonstrates that price-taking behavior is a natural result of the conditions that create perfect competition. In trials, there is a significant degree of price convergence in just three or four rounds. Students find this…

  10. Rapid inventory taking system

    A data processing system designed to facilitate inventory taking is described. The process depends upon the earliest possible application of computer techniques and the elimination of manual operations. Data is recorded in optical character recognition (OCR) 'A' form and read by a hand held wand reader. Limited validation checks are applied before recording on mini-tape cassettes. 5 refs

  11. Taking Library Leadership Personally

    Davis, Heather; Macauley, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the emerging trends for leadership in the knowledge era. It discusses these within the context of leading, creating and sustaining the performance development cultures that libraries require. The first step is to recognise that we all need to take leadership personally no matter whether we see ourselves as leaders or followers.…

  12. Take a Bow

    Spitzer, Greg; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Performing-arts centers can provide benefits at the high school and collegiate levels, and administrators can take steps now to get the show started. When a new performing-arts center comes to town, local businesses profit. Events and performances draw visitors to the community. Ideally, a performing-arts center will play many roles: entertainmentÖ

  13. Take Three: Seasonal Flu

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting seasonal flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  14. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Full Text Available ... back twice as bad. Woman: Alright, that's for high blood pressure. Doctor: Okay. Woman: I take a half a ... that we can't feel, so people with high blood pressure--we really can't feel that, and so ...

  15. Taking the thrombin "fork".

    Mann, Kenneth G

    2010-07-01

    The proverb that probably best exemplifies my career in research is attributable to Yogi Berra (http://www.yogiberra.com/), ie, "when you come to a fork in the road ... take it." My career is a consequence of chance interactions with great mentors and talented students and the opportunities provided by a succession of ground-breaking improvements in technology. PMID:20554951

  16. Taking a deep breath

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While 2012 is going away, IJHDR prepares the celebration of its 5th anniversary! This is thus a time for reflection, to ponder on the good and bad experiences, to (rethink the next steps to improve our service to readers, authors and the scientific community at large. Along these hard, but rewarding first five years, IJHDR reached many readers and was supported by many authors all over the world, it achieved recognition by important scientific databases and societies. This success is the result of the joint work of the Editorial Board members and with GIRI, our hosting scientific society. IJHDR provided the homeopathic community an open, free, multimedia and electronic venue to share high-quality information. Focused on research articles, and open to the entire field of High Dilution research, including homeopathy and hormesis, IJHDR came to occupy a special place within the scientific map. Nevertheless, the goals achieved are not enough, but further improvement is needed for IJHDR keep on growing. Our aim for the next years is to maintain the original editorial vision and mission, while increasing even more the quality of publication. IJHDR will start 2013 by revising its Board of Consultants. Five years ago, when IJHDR was an unknown journal that still had to prove its quality, friends, idealists, and invited experts kindly contributed with their expertise to make peer review a mandatory step in the evaluation of articles. However, not only IJHDR grew, but also the editorial work did! The time arrives to include new experts in our Board of Consultant,, not only to share in the work, but to have cover a broader scope of knowledge, as HD research is a cross-disciplinary and emergent field. Also the structure of the articles will be revised. Improvement in the layout will be discussed to stimulate the use of multimedia resources like video and audio files, simulations, supplementary materials, links, and color images. Special attention will be paid to language revision and reference citation. Together with its authors and readers, IJHDR contributes to the development of a kind of knowledge close to the borders of science. Therefore, to establish a valid scientific background, the articles must be clearly written, and based on sound assumptions. High-visibility for articles is a fundamental aspect desired by all authors. As an open and free access journal, IJHDR meets that condition, and we are planning to make our influence and visibility even wider. Inclusion in the major databases has paramount importance in the academic milieu, however, it should be considered as a consequence, rather than a goal. In 2013, IJHDR will chair a collaborative project with several research institutions aiming to deliver information everywhere, increasing the visibility of the published articles. Thus, now it is the time to take a deep breath, relax, and prepare you for the forthcoming work! See you in 2013!

  17. Taking charge: a personal responsibility.

    Newman, D M

    1987-01-01

    Women can adopt health practices that will help them to maintain good health throughout their various life stages. Women can take charge of their health by maintaining a nutritionally balanced diet, exercising, and using common sense. Women can also employ known preventive measures against osteoporosis, stroke, lung and breast cancer and accidents. Because women experience increased longevity and may require long-term care with age, the need for restructuring the nation's care system for the ...

  18. Community Participation in Teacher Education: Teacher Corps and the Model Programs. GEM Bulletin 70-4.

    Bauch, Jerold P.

    An expressed purpose of the Teacher Corps program is to encourage and assist changes in teacher education directed toward better ways to prepare teachers for work in areas of concentration of low-income families. Too often community involvement in such programs takes place after most decisions and plans have been made. As the 1970-72 Teacher CorpsÖ

  19. Pre-Service Teachers and Study Abroad: A Reflective, Experiential Sojourn to Increase Intercultural Competence and Translate the Experience into Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Roller, Kathleen Marie

    2012-01-01

    This study used a randomized experimental, mixed methods approach to examine whether a stand-apart course curriculum based on experiential learning theory, Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) theory (Bennett, 1993) and culturally relevant pedagogy influenced students' intercultural competence within the context of a study abroad semester. The methods employed allowed the researcher to measure the intercultural competence of pre-service teachers engaged in an experiential, ...

  20. TEACHERS NEEDED

    2001-01-01

    The English Language Programme of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire has two teaching posts available for la rentrée 2001. 1. Part-time teacher of Primary-level English Candidates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree and teaching qualification. The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system. Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée. Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team. Induction & training are offered. 2. Part-time teacher of Secondary-level history-geography Candididates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree in history or geography and also a strong interest in the other subject. They should have a relevant teaching qualification and be confident classroom practioners. For more information on either of these posts please contact the school office on 04.50.40.82...

  1. Crime as risk taking

    Dhami, Mandeep K.; Mandel, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Engagement in criminal activity may be viewed as risk-taking behaviour as it has both benefits and drawbacks that are probabilistic. In two studies, we examined how individuals' risk perceptions can inform our understanding of their intentions to engage in criminal activity. Study 1 measured youths' perceptions of the value and probability of the benefits and drawbacks of engaging in three common crimes (i.e. shoplifting, forgery, and buying illegal drugs), and examined how well these percept...

  2. Taking Back Globalization

    Marie Christine Duggan

    2013-01-01

    Many Americans believe free trade destroyed the U.S. industrial base, and blame foreign workers for taking their jobs. During World War II, Keynes had similar misgivings about the effect of postwar free trade on Britain√Ę‚ā¨‚ĄĘs economy. Yet for Keynes, economic forces are never inevitable, and capital rather than labor was the cause of trouble. His 1941 proposal for an International Clearing Union suggested capital controls, forced creditor adjustment, and an international fiat reserve as remedie...

  3. Taking, Punishment and Trust

    Simon Halliday

    2012-01-01

    Is a trusting person more or less likely to steal? Is a trusting person more or less likely to punish someone who steals? A great deal of research has examined how trust and social capital correlate with altruistic, reciprocal and punishing behaviours, but less research has been dedicated to understanding the roles of trust and social capital in peoples' choices between a strictly antisocial behaviour - like stealing - and generosity, or in a third party's choice to punish taking behaviour. U...

  4. Collaboration Takes Center Stage: Interactive Teaching through a Schoolwide Focus on the Performing Arts Leads to Dramatic Improvements in Learning

    Williamson, Jeff; Zimmerman, Diane

    2009-01-01

    In the Old Adobe Union School District in Petaluma, California, the school staff's goal is to assure that all teachers make the fundamental shift from teacher-centric to learner-centric thinking. For them, this is what distinguishes great teachers from good teachers. They believe this level of expertise takes years to develop and that schools playÖ

  5. Perspective Taking in Workplaces

    Zappalà Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Workplaces are often described as places in which individuals are motivated by their self-interests and in which negative events like time pressure, anxiety, conflict with co-workers, miscomprehensions, difficulties in solving problems, not-transmitted or not-exchanged information that lead to mistakes, and in some cases to injuries, stress or control, are part of everyday life (Dormann & Zapf, 2002; Schabracq, Winnubst and Cooper, 2003. Such situations are often the result of the limited comprehension of needs, skills, or information available to colleagues, supervisors, subordinates, clients or providers. However, workplaces are also places in which employees take care of clients, support colleagues and subordinates (Rhoades & Eisenberger, 2002, are enthusiastic about their job (Bakker et al., 2008, are motivated by leaders that encourage employees to transcend their own self-interests for the good of the group or the organization and provide them with the confidence to perform beyond expectations (Bass, 1997. Thus positive relationships at work are becoming a new interdisciplinary domain of inquiry (Dutton & Ragins, 2006. Within this positive relationships framework, in this paper we focus on a positive component of workplaces, and particularly on an individual cognitive and emotional process that has an important role in the workplace because it facilitates interpersonal relations and communications: it is the perspective taking process. In order to describe perspective taking, we will refer to some empirical studies and particularly to the review published by Parker, Atkins and Axtell in 2008 on the International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

  6. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  7. Teacher Identity Work in Mathematics Teacher Education

    Neumayer-Depiper, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Becoming a teacher is not developing an identity, but is developing identity as a continuous process of constructing and deconstructing understandings within the complexities of social practice, beliefs, experiences, and social norms. I take up this stance on identity as articulated in Judith Butler's (1999) work with gender identity andÖ

  8. Teacher Identity Work in Mathematics Teacher Education

    Neumayer-Depiper, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Becoming a teacher is not developing an identity, but is developing identity as a continuous process of constructing and deconstructing understandings within the complexities of social practice, beliefs, experiences, and social norms. I take up this stance on identity as articulated in Judith Butler's (1999) work with gender identity and…

  9. Taking a Long View

    Ougaard, Morten

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss capitalism’s long-term prospects. To some extent I draw on material and arguments I have presented elsewhere (Ougaard, 2014; Ougaard, 2015a; Ougaard, 2015b); the present intention is to bring these elements together and combine them with other material to...... elaborate an argument about capitalism’s long term devel-opmental potential. On some points the argument resembles recent gloomy diagnoses for-warded by Wolfgang Streeck (Streeck, 2014a; Streeck, 2014b) and Andrew Gamble (Gamble, 2014), but is also offers an alternative to their interpretations by taking a...

  10. Taking of history

    Langebæk, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    students prepare themselves for the course by going online at home the day before class. Here they find a narrated PowerPoint presentation containing : 1) The principles of history taking 2) Client diversities ‚Äď and the obstacles one might have to face with these different types of clients Video In class a...... series of videos are shown to the students. These videos shows different situations from the clinic and illustrate different types of clients. Some situations are taken from real life, others are made using actors. Each situation is discussed in class ‚Äď we look at the obvious hurdles that we meet with...

  11. 2007 : governments take aim

    In 2007, the Canadian oil industry's competitiveness was eroded by the strength of the Canadian dollar and low gas prices in a predominantly natural gas basin with the highest service costs in the world. The Alberta government had also announced that it intended to take a larger cut of oil and gas revenues beginning in 2009. In the previous year, the federal government announced that it would start taxing income trusts. This effort to address the issue of tax leakage erased $20 billion from the Canadian equities market. Although a coalition of 40 Calgary energy trusts presented a study that emphasized the key role trusts played in Canada's energy sector, the government remained firm and changes are expected to take effect in 2011. Other key events in 2007 were also listed in this article. British Columbia pulled in more revenue than Alberta from land sales and the industry spent $300 million for shale land prospects in the province. Kitimat, British Columbia was chosen as the site for a liquefied natural gas port. 1 tab., 1 fig

  12. Taking Design Games Seriously

    Eriksen, Mette Agger; Brandt, Eva; Mattelmäki, Tuuli; Vaajakallio, Kirsikka

    Bruno Latour’s work on Actor-Network-Theory are applied. The aim is to take design games seriously by e.g. exploring how assemblages of humans and non-humans are intertwined in tacitly-but-tactically staging participation, and opening up for or hindering negotiations and decision-making, thus starting......Using design games at Participatory Design (PD) events is well acknowledged as a fruitful way of staging participation. As PD researchers, we have many such experiences, and we have argued that design games connect participants and promote equalizing power relations. However, in this paper, we will...... (self) critically re-connect and reflect on how people (humans) and materials (non-humans) continually participate and intertwine in various power relations in design game situations. The analysis is of detailed situated actions with one of our recent games, UrbanTransition. Core concepts mainly from...

  13. Coping styles of music teachers

    Staniçi, Jelena; Stankovi, Ivana; Bogunovi, Blanka

    2009-01-01

         The previous findings have shown that musicians as well as music teachers differ in personality characteristics from the general population. There are strong indications that musicians are exposed to numerous stressful situations during their education and professional life. We aimed to: identify preferred coping styles of music teachers and their possible difference in comparison to non-music teachers* coping styles, as well as to depict their relationship taking into consideration c...

  14. Teaching Writing Teachers about Assessment

    Weigle, Sara Cushing

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of student writing is an essential task for writing teachers, and yet many graduate programs do not require students to take a course in assessment or evaluation, and courses on teaching writing often devote only a limited amount of time to the discussion of assessment. Furthermore, teachers frequently need to prepare their studentsÖ

  15. Teachers and Human Rights Education

    Osler, Audrey; Starkey, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Why do teachers need to be familiar with human rights? In multicultural societies, whose values take precedence? How do schools resolve tensions between children's rights and teachers' rights? Campaigners, politicians and the media cite human rights to justify or challenge anything from peaceful protest to military action. The phrase "humanÖ

  16. Appleseeds: For Beginning Art Teachers.

    Brouch, Virginia M., Ed.; Funk, Fanchon F., Ed.

    This booklet contains contributions from experienced art teachers to introduce beginning art teachers to the field. Sections are titled (1) "Plan Plot Scheme," stressing the importance of a flexible lesson plan; (2) "Discipline," providing insights into how and when to take disciplinary actions; (3) "Exhibit," stressing the potential value ofÖ

  17. Teachers and Human Rights Education

    Osler, Audrey; Starkey, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Why do teachers need to be familiar with human rights? In multicultural societies, whose values take precedence? How do schools resolve tensions between children's rights and teachers' rights? Campaigners, politicians and the media cite human rights to justify or challenge anything from peaceful protest to military action. The phrase "human…

  18. Comparing Views of Primary School Mathematics Teachers and Prospective Mathematics Teachers about Instructional Technologies

    Adnan Baki

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology is rapidly improving in both hardware and software side. As one of the contemporary needs people should acquire certain knowledge, skills, attitudes and habits to understand this technology, to adapt to it and to make use of its benefits. In addition, as in all domains of life, change and improvement is also unavoidable for educational field. As known, change and improvement in education depends on lots of factors. One of the most important factors is teacher. In order to disseminate educational reforms, teachers themselves should accept the innovation first (Hardy, 1998, Baki, 2002; Oral, 2004. There has been variety of studies investigating teacher and prospective teachers‚Äü competences, attitudes and opinions (Paprzychi, Vikovic & Pierson, 1994; Hardy, 1998; Kocasara√ß, 2003; Lin, Hsiech and Pierson, 2004; Elik√ľ√ß√ľk, 2006; YeńĘilyurt, 2006; Fendi, 2007; Teo, 2008; Arslan, Kutluca & √ĖzpńĪnar, 2009. As the common result of these studies indicate that teachers‚Äü interest towards using instructional technology have increased. Accordingly, most of the teachers began to think that using instructional technologies becomes inevitable for teachers. By reviewing the related literature, no studies have been come across comparing the opinions of teachers and teacher candidates about instructional technologies. In this study, it was aimed to investigate and compare the views of mathematics teachers with prospective mathematics teachers about ICT. It was considered that collecting opinions of teachers and teachers candidates about the instructional technologies, comparing and contrasting them will contribute to the field. To follow this research inquiry, a descriptive approach type; case study research design was applied. The reason for choosing such design is that the case study method permits studying one aspect of the problem in detail and in a short time (Yin, 2003; √áepni, 2007. The study was conducted with the total sample of 12. 3 of them were mathematics teachers chosen from 3 different schools of different social stratification among primary schools in Artvin city center in the spring term of 2008-2009 educational year, another 3 of them were mathematics teachers from 3 different schools of different social stratification among primary schools in Trabzon city. Prospective mathematics teachers at their last year were randomly chosen from the elementary mathematics teacher training program of Fatih Faculty of Education in Karadeniz Technical University.The chosen 6 teachers and 6 candidate teachers were interviewed with 9-item semi-structured interviews in duration of 25 to 40 minutes. The opinions of the teachers and candidate teachers were compared and interpreted in a multidimensional point of view by¬†the researchers. Concerning the research inquiries, the obtained data were classified under the titles as; definition of the instructional technology concept, instructional technologies used by the participants, benefits of this usage, competences related to usage of these technologies, suggestions for using these technologies. Based on the data these results were drawn; while the teachers take the instructional technologies concept as technological tool specifically, the candidate teachers, on the other hand, perceive the concept from a broader point of view. The teachers are more acquainted with mainstream technological products like computer and internet however the candidate teachers are also aware of books, magazines and concrete materials. Complying with some previous studies (Baki, 2000; YeńĘilyurt, 2006; Lin, Hsiech and Pierson, 2004; AyvacńĪ et al., 2007, both teachers and candidate teachers agree on that using instructional technologies matters in a positive way. However, since the teachers are actively in-service, they mentioned on application problems, on the contrary the candidate teachers are unaware of the prospective problems. The reason of this situation may be the problems faced during the application but could not be envisaged in the theoretical pre-service education. That the candidate teachers have not encountered these problems may have caused their overlooking of these problems. As another result, it can be concluded that both the teachers and the candidate teachers feel themselves partially competent in terms of using instructional technologies. It was determined that the teachers suggest that there should be an elaborate planning period for using instructional technologies, while the candidate teachers suggested that in-service training should be prioritized for the sake of effective usage of instructional technologies. Backed with the results, it was recommended that candidate teachers should be informed about the benefits of instructional technologies and probable problems they will face and sharing instructional technologies should be supported among teachers.

  19. Qualifying online teachers

    Levinsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide there is an increasing demand for educational institutions to offer part of their educations online and mixed mode. For institutions to comply with these demands, it is necessary to prepare teachers (and other members of the staff), to fulfil their responsibilities within the virtual environment. Teachers must be able to organize their courses pedagogically according to different conditions, i.e., subject domains, group sizes, variations within communication and interaction. Teacher...

  20. Work to School: Teachers from Industry

    Green, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Vocational Education and Training (VET) in Schools teachers are required to deliver current and relevant industry and workplace knowledge to senior students in secondary schools. One of the ways in which VET in Schools teachers can be well prepared to teach VET Industry Curriculum Framework courses is to take teachers from an industry background…

  1. Culturally Responsive Training of Teacher Educators

    Prater, Mary Anne; Devereaux, Temma Harris

    2009-01-01

    Given that the numbers of culturally and/or linguistically diverse students being educated in U.S. public schools are growing immensely, teacher educators must take responsibility for preparing teacher candidates to work in today's diverse classrooms. This can be difficult, however, if teacher educators are not culturally responsive in their…

  2. Do Principals Fire the Worst Teachers?

    Jacob, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    This article takes advantage of a unique policy change to examine how principals make decisions regarding teacher dismissal. In 2004, the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and Chicago Teachers Union signed a new collective bargaining agreement that gave principals the flexibility to dismiss probationary teachers for any reason and without the…

  3. THE PERCEPTIONS OF TEACHERS’ TOWARDS PROFESSIONAL ATTITUDE CONTEMPORARY TEACHERS QUALIFICATIONS

    Abdurrahman ńįLńěAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research in general aims to determine the relationship between teacher candidates‚Äô attitudes towards teaching who are trained in Science and Art Faculties taking pedagogical formation and the level of importance that a contemporary teacher place on the necessary qualifications required for a teacher. In order to achieve this aim, whether overall teacher candidates‚Äô attitudes towards teaching and the level of importance that a contemporary teacher place on the necessary qualifications required for a teacher change according to teacher candidates‚Äô gender, age, graduation, marital status, working for a wage, graduation grade point averages, working sector, the predominant reason their taking pedagogical formation and the educational level of their parents have been investigated. This study adopted correlational research design which is survey and relational example of descriptive research. Data were collected from 269 prospective teachers by scales called ‚ÄúAttitudes towards Teaching (ATT‚ÄĚ and ‚ÄúContemporary Teacher Qualifications‚ÄĚ (CTQ. The ATT included 17 items with 5-point Likert-scale responses such as: (1 Strongly disagree, (2 disagree, (3 neutral, (4 agree, (5 strongly agree. Exploratory factor analysis managed for he ATT scale revealed that KMO was .945 and Bartlett test (,000 was significant. According to this result, it can be said that the data of ATT was factorable. Factor loadings of the ATT‚Äôs items ranged from ,568 to ,87; and item-total correlation values ranged from ,514 to ,834. Due to the ATT explained 53.9% of total variance it is suitable to use ATT as a unidimensional. The ATT has an internal consistency coefficient alpha of ,86. Accordingly, it is possible to say that the ATT is valid and reliable. The CTQ included 18 items with 5-point Likert-scale responses such as: (1 Never, (2 rarely, (3 average, (4 much, (5 very much. Exploratory factor analysis managed for he CTQ scale revealed that KMO was .930 and Bartlett test (,000 was significant. According to this result, it can be said that the data of CTQ was factorable. Factor loadings of the CTQ‚Äôs items ranged from ,457 to ,739; and item-total correlation values ranged from ,402 to ,693. Due to the CTQ explained 42.1% of total variance it is suitable to use CTQ as a unidimensional. The CTQ has an internal consistency coefficient alpha of ,92. Accordingly, it is possible to say that the CTQ is valid and reliable. For demographic variables frequency and percentages and t-test was used in order to evaluate attitudes towards teaching profession according to gender, age, type of education, graduation, marital status, working for a wage. Finally, the relationship between attitudes towards teaching profession and contemporary teacher qualifications was tested by using Pearson correlation technique. The research found out that attitudes towards teaching profession did not change significantly according to teacher candidates‚Äô gender, age, type of education, marital status, working for a regular wage but it changed according to the area of training. Accordingly, prospective teachers who have bachelor's degree in social sciences have more positive attitudes towards teaching than science and mathematics. While, teacher candidates' attitudes towards teaching did not change significantly according to undergraduate grade point average and working area, the dominant point of rationale in choosing pedagogical formation certificate program is different attitudes. Accordingly, prospective teachers who choose pedagogical formation certificate program because of having positive attitudes towards teaching profession take higher scores than those who believe this certificate provides ease of finding a job and those who prefer taking pedagogical certificate because of the pressure of family or surroundings. Prospective teachers‚Äô emphasis on the qualifications of contemporary teachers are expected to correspond to the full level. With reference to this, prospective teachers attributing importance to the qualifications of contemporary teacher at full level. While teacher candidates attach the highest importance to the sentence of ‚Äúteachers should have adequate sense of responsibility to train students‚ÄĚ, attach least importance to the expression ‚Äúteachers should be adequate in using computer technology. In order to determine the relationship between scores of teacher attitudes towards teaching and qualifications of the contemporary a positive and statistically significant relationship between these two variables was found by using Pearson correlation technique. By taking into consideration the demographic variables attitudes of teacher candidates differed in terms of field which is graduated. Prospective teachers who have graduated from departments of social sciences have higher scores. The findings contrary to this research or supporting the results of this research can be explained by the help of studies searching the attitudes of teacher candidates towards teaching profession in different years and different areas. There are differences about dominant reason to continue the pedagogical formation program. Teacher candidates who have positive attitudes towards teaching profession have higher attitude scores. This result is consistent with several studies in the literature. Majority of candidate teachers attributed high level of importance to the qualifications of contemporary teachers. There is a positive and low-level significant relationship between the scores of candidate teachers‚Äô attitudes towards teaching and the qualifications of contemporary teachers. Hence, if the scores of attitudes towards teaching profession increase, the importance given to the qualifications of contemporary teachers increase a small amount.

  4. Superlattices start taking shape

    The current furore surrounding nanotechnology makes it difficult to assess progress in this field. A clear breakthrough, however, is the recent creation of 3D binary superlattices of magnetic nanocrystals and semiconductor quantum dots by Chris Murray of IBM Research and co-workers in the US. The properties of these new materials can be tuned by controlling the size, shape and chemical identity of particles on the nanoscale (F Redl et al. 2003 Nature 423 968). The physical properties of a material depend largely on its structure. Take the differences between graphite and diamond. Both materials are made of pure carbon, but the different arrangements of their atoms in space are responsible for the difference between pencils and precious jewellery. The structure of a material is not only of importance at the atomic scale. Opals, for example, are colloidal crystals of silica microspheres, and their beautiful colouration is due to optical diffraction by their micro-scale structure. Structure on different length scales determines many other physical properties: graphite, for example, has a layered structure, which means that its electronic conductivity is anisotropic. The work of Murray and co-workers at Columbia University and the University of New Orleans now suggests that the structure of materials can also be controlled on the nanometre scale. In the September issue of Physics World Matthias Brust describes how this new material could have applications in the IT industry. (U.K.)

  5. Superlattices start taking shape

    Brust, Matthias

    2003-09-01

    The current furore surrounding nanotechnology makes it difficult to assess progress in this field. A clear breakthrough, however, is the recent creation of 3D binary superlattices of magnetic nanocrystals and semiconductor quantum dots by Chris Murray of IBM Research and co-workers in the US. The properties of these new materials can be tuned by controlling the size, shape and chemical identity of particles on the nanoscale (F Redl et al. 2003 Nature 423 968). The physical properties of a material depend largely on its structure. Take the differences between graphite and diamond. Both materials are made of pure carbon, but the different arrangements of their atoms in space are responsible for the difference between pencils and precious jewellery. The structure of a material is not only of importance at the atomic scale. Opals, for example, are colloidal crystals of silica microspheres, and their beautiful colouration is due to optical diffraction by their micro-scale structure. Structure on different length scales determines many other physical properties: graphite, for example, has a layered structure, which means that its electronic conductivity is anisotropic. The work of Murray and co-workers at Columbia University and the University of New Orleans now suggests that the structure of materials can also be controlled on the nanometre scale. In the September issue of Physics World Matthias Brust describes how this new material could have applications in the IT industry. (U.K.)

  6. PCB's take a stroll

    M. Castillo RodrŪguez

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to bioaccumulable organochlorine compounds is a reality, not only because of the known presence in tissues of the residue of historic contaminants such as DDT and other pesticides, but also because of the risk of current exposure to compounds still in use, such as lindane, endosulphan and polychlorinated biphenyls or PCBs, among others. The case of the PCBs is of particular importance. Although their production was prohibited due to their hazardous nature, persistence and environmental toxicity, a large number of equipments that contain considerable volumes of PCBs continue functioning. These equipments will reach the residual stage in the next few years, if not already, so that their correct disposal is necessary to avoid their release into the environment. A National Plan for the decontamination and elimination of polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs, polychloroterphenyls (PCTs and the equipments that contain them was launched in Spain in 2001. This plan must be implemented taking full account of the possible effects of PBCs on the environment and human health and with the knowledge of those responsible for public health.

  7. Taking the plunge

    2008-01-01

    On 8 and 15 October, 58 people took the plunge and headed to the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva for their first taste of scuba diving at one of the CERN scuba club’s free trial dives. Club president Alberto Pace, left, taking a new recruit on his first dive. The CERN scuba club was making waves down at the Varembe swimming pool on Wednesday 15 October. Thirty-six people turned up to the club’s second free trial dive. "It was fantastic," said Jörg, one of the new recruits, after his first ever dive. "I’ve always wanted to try diving and this was a free lesson, so I thought I would come and have a go." Fourteen of the club’s fully qualified instructors were there to give one-on-one tuition. After a first dive in the normal pool the new divers moved into the deep pool. Some took to the water like fish, and at one point an impromptu game of aqua-Frisbee broke out, five metres below the surface. Richard Catherall, who organi...

  8. Taking Care of Time

    Cortney Davis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available So take good care of time, therefore and how you spend it. -from " The Cloud of Unknowing"Yesterday it was a thousand small coinsringing in your pocket, your hand dipping in, scooping threeat a time, giving them away. Often you'd drop onein the lush grass, unaware it was lost.Spent, tarnished, it is irretrievable.Today time comes to you in a different disguise:a bold of fine silk, vermillion or blue, you measure itlike a woman preparing to sew.Tomorrow, watch out, it comes as something else-thunderstorm, slant rain, February blizzard that drives you inside.Insomniac, you pace and cursethe blue glow of television, computer screen, radio.Soon enough, time will come to you as you were once,newly born and difficult to recognize. You could mistake itfor an elderly coughing man or a woman overrun with disease.Do not stop your ears against its cry.It will ask you to return any small change.It will say, cherish every moment under the leaden sky.

  9. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more seriousÖ

  10. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

  11. Improvement teacher Professional Qualifications in Lithuania and Entrepreneurship

    ISORAITE, Margarita; ńĆERNIAUSKIENE, Nendrńó

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes the professional development of teachers Lithuania, proposed new form of teacher internships, teacher development concept, entrepreneurship. Professional training for teachers is required in order to update the teachers of local and national priorities and initiatives being; update their knowledge, understanding and skills in pedagogy, curriculum, use of new technologies in teaching areas. In addition, effective professional learning takes place when teachers work with ea...

  12. Taking It All into Account

    Driver, Melissa K.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating special education teachers is an especially salient topic for secondary principals because special educators in middle and high schools often collaborate with numerous content-area teachers and have varying degrees of direct instructional impact. The author's experiences as a secondary special educator and as a supervisorÖ

  13. Taking It All into Account

    Driver, Melissa K.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating special education teachers is an especially salient topic for secondary principals because special educators in middle and high schools often collaborate with numerous content-area teachers and have varying degrees of direct instructional impact. The author's experiences as a secondary special educator and as a supervisor…

  14. Getting Teachers Learner-Ready: Reforming Teacher Preparation. re:VISION No. 04, Part 4

    Jackson, Stephen; Remer, Casey

    2014-01-01

    Improving teacher preparation is critical to long-term improvement in teacher quality. More than 200,000 new teachers enter classrooms each year. Increasing student enrollment, the retirement of baby boom generation teachers, and high attrition in their first five years (between 40 and 50 percent of new teachers leave the profession) have…

  15. A Case Study of Teacher Appraisal in Shanghai, China: In Relation to Teacher Professional Development

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Ng, Ho Ming

    2011-01-01

    Literature has confirmed that teacher appraisal can and should facilitate the professional development of teachers. In the past, teacher appraisal in China has been conducted mainly for administrative purposes; nowadays, it is increasingly being viewed as a means of teacher professional development. However, the way in which teacher appraisal…

  16. Student Teachers' Collaborative Research: Small-Scale Research Projects during Teacher Education

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    Teacher research is increasingly described as an important aspect of professional development. In response, teacher education programs incorporate teacher research in their curricula. We report on the collaborative research processes of two groups of student teachers in a university teacher education program, focussing on elaboration and decision…

  17. Deriving Instructional Objectives for Teacher Corps Training Programs.

    Higgins, Norman; Rabe, Bonnie

    The collaborative procedures used to derive the instructional objectives for Arizona State University's Teacher Corps training programs for inservice teachers, preservice teachers, and teacher aides were time consuming and costly, but have resulted in increased respect and better working relationships between teachers, parents, and teacherÖ

  18. Research trends in mathematics teacher education

    Lo, Jane-Jane; Van Zoest, Laura R

    2014-01-01

    Research on the preparation and continued development of mathematics teachers is becoming an increasingly important subset of mathematics education research. Such research explores the attributes, knowledge, skills and beliefs of mathematics teachers as well as methods for assessing and developing these critical aspects of teachers and influences on teaching.Research Trends in Mathematics Teacher Education focuses on three major themes in current mathematics teacher education research: mathematical knowledge for teaching, teacher beliefs and identities, and tools and techniques to support teac

  19. Study on the Distribution of Compulsory School Teacherís Resources in Guizhou

    Yali ZHANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The student-teacher ratio of compulsory schools in Guizhou has declined. The student-teacher ratio of junior middle schools is higher than that of primary schools. The student-teacher ratio of urban schools is the highest of all. The teachersí educational level of compulsory schools in Guizhou is higher than before. The structure of teachersí professional titles is unreasonable in that the proportion of teachers with high professional titles is too low. The workload of teachers is too heavy to meet the demand of diversified running of schools in Guizhou. To improve the quantity and quality of teachers in rural compulsory education schools, as well as the the compulsory education quality in Guizhou, it is necessary to take the following measures: optimizing the authorized size of compulsory school teachers, approving the student-teacher ratio, continuing to implement the Special Contracted Teachersí Policy, reforming the evaluating policy of the professional titles and recruiting caretakers and so on.

  20. Taking radionuclides to heart

    Ischaemic heart disease is a main cause of death in South Africa. Non-invasive ECG gated radionuclide bloodpool imaging plays an increasingly useful role in the evalution of the function of the heart as a pump, and the extent of heart muscle perfusion defects is further pinpointed by invasive krypton-81m studies to improve patient management

  1. Greek Teachers Programme 2015

    Hoch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The 3rd edition of this year's Greek Teachers Programme was co-organized by CERN Education Group and the Hellenic Physical Society and took place from 8 to 12 November 2015. The programme targets physics high-school teachers from all over Greece. It aims to help teachers inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers by motivating their students to understand and appreciate how science works at the world's largest physics laboratory, whereby increasing their interest in pursuing studies in STEM fields in secondary and post-secondary education. 33 teachers took part in this programme which comprised lectures by Greek members of the CERN scientific community, with visits to experimental facilities, hands-on activities and dedicated sessions on effective and creative ways through which participants may bring physics, particle physics and CERN closer to their school classroom. In 2015, more than 100 teachers took part in the three editions of the Greek Teachers Programme.

  2. Secondary Special Education Teachers as Teacher Leaders: Redefining Their Role

    Mulrine, Christopher F.; Huckvale, Manina Urgolo

    2014-01-01

    As the responsibilities and challenges of special education teachers at the secondary level increase, their roles are expanding to include mentor, coach, and facilitator for other teachers. In these roles, they lend their expertise and skills to become the new teacher leaders for today's inclusive secondary classroom settings.

  3. Teacher Burnout and Job Satisfaction among Agricultural Education Teachers

    Chenevey, Jamie L.; Ewing, John C.; Whittington, M. Susie

    2008-01-01

    The demands on teachers both in and out of classrooms combined with increased budget cuts have led many to question the levels of job satisfaction and burnout among agricultural education teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence of burnout and the level at which burnout exists among agricultural education teachers in…

  4. Teacher Efficacy of Alternative and Traditionally Certified Special Education Teachers

    Green, Sean Michael

    2012-01-01

    A teacher shortage in the area of special education has led to an increase in the number of alternatively certified special education teachers. Many alternative certification programs focus on content knowledge rather than pedagogical training, allowing many alternatively certified teachers into the classroom with little pedagogical training.…

  5. Trading Places: From Physical Education Teachers to Teacher Educators

    Casey, Ashley; Fletcher, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in research on becoming teacher educators, yet little is known about becoming physical education teacher educators (PETE). Responding to concerns about the current state of doctoral PETE programs and inadequate preparation of novice teacher educators, this paper explores our transition from high school teaching…

  6. Price increase

    2006-01-01

    Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced, as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

  7. Price increase

    2005-01-01

    Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

  8. Sexual risk taking behaviour

    Buttmann, Nina; Nielsen, Ann; Munk, Christian; Liaw, Kai L; Kjśr, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Sexual habits and risky sexual behaviour strongly affect public health. Available data indicate that sexually transmitted infections are increasing in many EU countries. Changes in the epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases across Europe are among other factors suggested to be driven by ch...... changes in sexual behaviour patterns. The purpose of our study is to assess the occurrence of risky behaviour in men aged 18-45 years from the general population. Furthermore, we aim to examine factors associated with risky sexual behaviour.......Sexual habits and risky sexual behaviour strongly affect public health. Available data indicate that sexually transmitted infections are increasing in many EU countries. Changes in the epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases across Europe are among other factors suggested to be driven by...

  9. Sexual risk taking behaviour

    Buttmann, Nina; Nielsen, Ann; Munk, Christian; Liaw, Kai L; Kjær, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Sexual habits and risky sexual behaviour strongly affect public health. Available data indicate that sexually transmitted infections are increasing in many EU countries. Changes in the epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases across Europe are among other factors suggested to be driven by...... changes in sexual behaviour patterns. The purpose of our study is to assess the occurrence of risky behaviour in men aged 18-45 years from the general population. Furthermore, we aim to examine factors associated with risky sexual behaviour....

  10. The APSU 0.5m Telescope - A Hands-On Learning Environment for Secondary Teachers

    Allyn Smith, J.; Buckner, S. L.; Pirkle, S. F.

    2012-05-01

    Physical science teachers with hands-on experience are critical to secondary education learning. In "Before It’s Too Late," the U.S. Department of Education (2000) estimated "about 56% of high school students taking physical science are taught by out-of-field teachers." In Tennessee, the problem is even greater, while the demand is increasing. This project aims to address the shortage of well-prepared physics and astronomy teachers. Austin Peay State University has recently installed a 0.5m telescope with imaging and rudimentary spectroscopic capability. We are committed to working with the College of Education to bring secondary teachers in training and practicing secondary teachers to the telescope to experience basic operations and conduct small research projects. This is done via classes and summer workshops. We describe the program setup, expectations for the participants, learning outcomes, and the evaluation process.

  11. Can We Really Teach Test-taking Skills?

    Foster, Sharon K.; Paulk, Allene; Dastoor Barbara Riederer

    1999-01-01

    Teacher education candidates who had failed admission tests were coached in test taking and taught relaxation techniques. Three passed a retake immediately and three others within 3 months. Strategies such as affirmations, appeals to different learning modalities, positive anchors, and mental dress rehearsals can help students deal with test…

  12. Taking Shakespeare from the Page to the Stage.

    Breen, Kathleen T.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching William Shakespeare by which one teacher had students take the plays from the page to the stage by becoming actors and directors as well as scholars. Shows ways of relating various plays to more contemporary works. (HB)

  13. The Relative Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Adolescents' Interactions with Their Teachers: High School Teachers' Opinions.

    Reed, Vicki A.; Spicer, Lynette

    2003-01-01

    High school teachers (n=143) ranked 14 communication skills according to the perceived order of importance for Grade 10 adolescents' communication with them as teachers. Teachers tended to perceive skills associated with discourse management strategies as relatively more important than other skills. Science teachers ranked turn taking higher than…

  14. Preparing Teachers for Professional Learning: Is There a Future for Teacher Education in New Teacher Induction?

    Kane, Ruth G.; Francis, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Today the quality of teachers is held to be increasingly important yet there continue to be doubts about whether teacher education programs graduate teachers ready to meet the challenges of their initial years of teaching. In some jurisdictions, other agencies (Ministries of Education, school districts, and private providers) are supplementing the…

  15. Forest Field Trips among High School Science Teachers in the Southern Piedmont

    McCabe, Shannon M.; Munsell, John F.; Seiler, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Students benefit in many ways by taking field trips to forests. Improved academic performance, increased participation in outdoor recreation, and a better grasp of natural resources management are some of the advantages. However, trips are not easy for teachers to organize and lead. Declining budgets, on-campus schedules, and standards of learning…

  16. Forest Field Trips among High School Science Teachers in the Southern Piedmont

    McCabe, Shannon M.; Munsell, John F.; Seiler, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Students benefit in many ways by taking field trips to forests. Improved academic performance, increased participation in outdoor recreation, and a better grasp of natural resources management are some of the advantages. However, trips are not easy for teachers to organize and lead. Declining budgets, on-campus schedules, and standards of learningÖ

  17. LHC Report: Take Five

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is continuing to perform well and an integrated luminosity of over 5fb-1 has now been delivered to ATLAS and CMS. While keeping a close eye on beam induced heating and vacuum quality, the bunch current has been gently raised to over 1.4x1011 protons per bunch. This has given a peak luminosity of 3.6x1033 cm-2s-1. Some long fills have helped production and recent high points include 120pb-1 delivered in one fill and 580pb-1 delivered in one week.   Time has also been devoted to some special physics runs for TOTEM and ALFA. In these runs, the beam is de-squeezed to a ß* of 90 m in ATLAS and CMS. This is instead of the usual 1m ß*, and gives a larger beam size at interaction points. The increased beam size results in a reduced beam divergence at the interaction points. This permits TOTEM and ALFA to probe low-angle scattering and allows them to measure the total cross section of proton-proton interactions and the absolute luminosity cal...

  18. Monetary policy effects on bank risk taking

    ABBATE, Angela; THALER, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, we provide empirical evidence on the existence of a risk- taking channel in the US economy. By identifying a Bayesian VAR through sign restrictions, we find that an expansionary monetary policy shock causes a persistent increase in proxies for bank risk-taking behaviour. We then develop a New Keynesian model with a risk-taking channel, where low levels of the risk free rates induce banks to extend credit to riskier borrowers. Conditional on ca...

  19. Being a Teacher of TCFL vs. Becoming a Teacher of TCFL

    Zhang, Chun

    Language). This paper explores how the identity formation of five native-speaking teachers of Chinese (NTCs) takes place with regard to how their roles as 'being a Chinese teacher' and ‚Äėbecoming a teacher of TCFL' are negotiated and constructed while teaching Chinese to degree students in Denmark. Key...

  20. New Teacher Induction Programs in Georgia: Common Components and Perceptions

    McDaniel, Andrea Marshall

    2012-01-01

    With increasing demands on teachers, retaining new teachers has become more difficult in recent decades. New teacher induction programs appear to increase retention rates significantly among new teachers. Many states, including Georgia, have implemented induction programs to support and retain beginning teachers. In response to the Race to the Top…

  1. Teacher Burnout: Stylish Fad or Profound Problem.

    Cunningham, William G.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence suggests that teacher burnout has significant impact on the quality of education and on teacher job satisfaction. Its causes include job stress and organizational structures or professional relationships. Reduction of burnout may come from such strategies as increased teacher role differentiation, greater teacher support, and improved…

  2. Using our Heads and HARTSS*: Developing Perspective-Taking Skills for Socioscientific Reasoning (*Humanities, ARTs, and Social Sciences)

    Kahn, Sami; Zeidler, Dana L.

    2016-03-01

    Functional scientific literacy demands an informed citizenry capable of negotiating controversial socioscientific issues (SSI). Perspective taking is critical to SSI implementation as it enables understanding of the diverse cognitive and emotional perspectives of others. Science teacher educators must therefore facilitate teachers' promotion of classroom environments that value diverse perspectives. The purpose of this theoretical paper is to propose the HARTSS model through which successful practices that promote perspective taking in the humanities, arts, and social sciences are identified and translated into socioscientific contexts, thereby developing an array of promising interventions designed for science teacher educators to foster perspective taking in current and future science teachers and their students.

  3. Using our Heads and HARTSS*: Developing Perspective-Taking Skills for Socioscientific Reasoning (*Humanities, ARTs, and Social Sciences)

    Kahn, Sami; Zeidler, Dana L.

    2016-04-01

    Functional scientific literacy demands an informed citizenry capable of negotiating controversial socioscientific issues (SSI). Perspective taking is critical to SSI implementation as it enables understanding of the diverse cognitive and emotional perspectives of others. Science teacher educators must therefore facilitate teachers' promotion of classroom environments that value diverse perspectives. The purpose of this theoretical paper is to propose the HARTSS model through which successful practices that promote perspective taking in the humanities, arts, and social sciences are identified and translated into socioscientific contexts, thereby developing an array of promising interventions designed for science teacher educators to foster perspective taking in current and future science teachers and their students.

  4. The Math teachers know

    Davis, Brent

    2013-01-01

    What sorts of mathematics competencies must teachers have in order to teach the discipline well? This book offers a novel take on the question. Most research is focused on explicit knowledge-that is, on the sorts of insights that might be specified, catalogued, taught, and tested. In contrast, this book focuses on the tacit dimensions of teachers' mathematics knowledge that precede and enable their competencies with formal mathematics. It highlights the complexity of this knowledge and offers strategies to uncover it, analyze it, and re-synthesize it in ways that will make it more available

  5. Education Partnerships in Teacher Training: McDonald Observatory and the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization.

    Finkelstein, Keely; Preston, Sandra Lee; Hemenway, Mary; Malasarn, Davin; Wetzel, Marc

    2015-08-01

    McDonald Observatory in remote, west Texas has a long history of providing K-12 teacher professional development (PD) through workshops at the observatory. Recently, we have started a new teacher PD program in partnership with the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) to provide teacher training and establish a network of teachers and students engaged in the Giant Magellan Telescope. The GMT Teacher workshop has been offered to 30 teachers during the summers of 2014 and 2015; continued engagement has been offered to the teachers through online resources, networking, participation in other teacher PD opportunities and conferences. Evaluation has been conducted using several metrics immediately post workshops, and long term followup evaluation methods. At the close of the 2014 workshop teachers reported learning about the telescopes and nighttime observing, and the promise of the GMT. Consensus statements at the close of the workshop also spoke about passion for and appreciation of astronomy. The major source of recommendation during the year one workshop was to provide more detailed information or activities on the GMT during the workshops. While this does prove challenging to incorporate a full slate of activities on the GMT before the telescope is even built, we are currently working to produce more take-home materials which are GMT specific, continue to make general connections to telescope technology and science that are applicable to the GMT with the teachers. McDonald Observatory and GMTO will continue to partner to offer teacher PD related to the GMT, and increase the network of teachers and students engaged in the GMT, up and through the beginning of its operations in 2020. We will present the current highlights, evaulation outcome results, and future outlook for this program and collaboration.

  6. Online Professional Experiences in Teacher Preparation Program: A Preservice Teacher Study

    Prasart Nuangchalerm; Veena Prachagool; Patcharee Sriputta

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation is a process of instructional fulfillment in teacher education. This program is widely used in school that need professionalism in terms of networking. Supervisor take their role to support preservice teacher in many expected attributes which school workers should be known and learned in various kind of school contexts. This study aims to investigate the implementation of professional experiences through online reflection in teacher preparation program. The study ...

  7. Using Mobile Devices to Connect Teachers and Museum Educators

    Delen, Ibrahim; Krajcik, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    The use of mobile devices is increasing rapidly as a potential tool for science teaching. In this study, five educators (three middle school teachers and two museum educators) used a mobile application that supported the development of a driving question. Previous studies have noted that teachers make little effort to connect learning experiences between classrooms and museums, and few studies have focused on creating connections between teachers and museum educators. In this study, teachers and museum educators created an investigation together by designing a driving question in conjunction with the research group before field trips. During field trips, students collected their own data using iPods or iPads to take pictures or record videos of the exhibits. When students returned to the school, they used the museum data with their peers as they tried to answer the driving question. After completing the field trips, five educators were interviewed to investigate their experiences with designing driving questions and using mobile devices. Besides supporting students in data collection during the field trip, using mobile devices helped teachers to get the museum back to the classroom. Designing the driving question supported museum educators and teachers to plan the field trip collaboratively.

  8. NEW DISCOURSES OF TEACHER PROFESSIONALISM: A NORWEGIAN CASE

    Eyvind Elstad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Teacher-training programmes at the universities should be at the level of and ideally ahead of developments in the schools. When both teaching organisations and the authorities place an emphasis on efforts towards increased professionalism in the work of the teacher, it is reasonable to ask how the teacher-training programmes at the universities can and should respond.  This is taking place at a time when new management systems are being put in place within the education sector.  The purposes of this article are to place the questions relating to efforts towards increased professionalism within a theoretical framework and to use this framework to discuss challenges faced by the teacher-training programmes at the universities in particular. The theoretical framework consists of four competing visions for influence in terms of the school’s activities: professionalism, administrative management of the school sector, school democracy and marketisation. I will use this theoretical framework to discuss the possibilities and limitations for efforts towards increased professionalism and their consequences for teacher-training institutions. The solutions to the conflicts between these visions suggest that it is rational to look for a balance between several positive but partially contradictory intentions.  The efforts towards increased professionalism have consequences both for student teachers and for established teachers, whilst tools for assessing teachers and making them accountable also have deep implications for teacher training.  The manner in which these tools will be used will have consequences for the competitive situation between schools.  Product development will be important in this perspective, which means a need to develop innovation skills within the teacher’s field of work. The conclusion must be that efforts towards increased professionalism based on tools for increasing responsibility and work assessment provides the teacher-training programmes at the universities with both significant challenges and with new opportunities.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-4-18

  9. PolarTREC‚ÄĒA Model Program for Taking Polar Literacy into the Future

    Warburton, J.; Timm, K.; Larson, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Polar TREC‚ÄĒTeachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, is a three-year (2007-2009) NSF-funded International Polar Year (IPY) teacher professional development program that advances Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education by improving teacher content knowledge and instructional practices through Teacher Research Experiences (TRE) in the Arctic and Antarctic. Leveraging profound changes and fascinating science taking place in the polar regions, PolarTREC broadly disseminates activities and products to students, educators, researchers, and the public, connecting them with the Arctic and Antarctica and sustaining the widespread interest in the polar regions and building on the enthusiasm that was generated through IPY. Central to the PolarTREC Teacher Research Experience Model, over 40 teachers have spent two to eight weeks participating in hands-on research in the polar regions and sharing their experiences with diverse audiences via live events, online multimedia journals, and interactive bulletin boards. The Connecting Arctic/Antarctic Researchers and Educators (CARE) Network unifies learning community members participants, alumni, and others, developing a sustainable association of education professionals networking to share and apply polar STEM content and pedagogical skills. Educator and student feedback from preliminary results of the program evaluation has shown that PolarTREC‚Äôs comprehensive program activities have many positive impacts on educators and their ability to teach science concepts and improve their teaching methods. Additionally, K-12 students polled in interest surveys showed significant changes in key areas including amount of time spent in school exploring research activities, importance of understanding science for future work, importance of understanding the polar regions as a person in today‚Äôs world, as well as increased self-reported knowledge and interest in numerous science content areas. Building on previous programs and successes, PolarTREC has developed a successful internet based program for teachers and researchers to interact, leveraging their diverse experiences and expertise for the creation of interdisciplinary educational tools including online journals and forums, real-time Internet seminars, lesson plans, classroom activities, audio, video, and other highly relevant and adaptable educational resources that address a broad range of scientific topics. These highly accessible methods and resources are available to educators and students of varying ages and abilities across the globe, and have connected thousands of students and citizens to the excitement of polar science. PolarTREC provides a tested approach and a clear route for varying levels of researcher participation in the education community, therefore facilitating the types of positive benefits and understanding that ensure increased educator, student, and community understanding of science and the polar regions during times of interrelated global change. For more information, email info@polartrec.com or call 907-474-1600.

  10. Reflections of Preservice Information Technology Teachers Regarding Cyberbullying

    Yavuz Akbulut

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The current phenomenological study addressed the reflections of preservice information technology (IT teachers regarding their cyberbullying or victimization experiences. Fifty five preservice IT teachers at a Turkish teacher training institution were offered a lecture with the purpose of awareness-raising on cyberbullying, which was followed by the assignment of take-home reflection papers. Document analysis on reflection papers led researchers to find out underlying themes regarding participants’ cyberbullying or victimization experiences. Findings revealed that females were more likely to be victims than males. Instant messaging programs, e-mail, cell phones and online social networks were used as means to cyberbully. Varying psychological consequences of victimization incidents were reported. Noted reactions to incidents were discontinuing interaction with bullies, and seeking family, peer and legal support. Findings further implied that awareness raising activities regarding cyberbullying were likely to reduce cyberbullying instances and increase preservice teachers’ action competence.

  11. PARAMETERS CHECKING BEFORE TAKE OFF

    V. SRIDHAR, P. SHREELA, B. SRIKANTH, T.SHIVAKRISHNA REDDY

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Now a day’s airplane is widely used vehicle. So it is very important to check the condition of the flight before it is take off. The main intension of this project is to check the fuel condition and temperature of the flight. According to this project whenever the temperature is high or fuel is low, the microcontroller display this information on LCD and intimate through buzzer.In this paper the microcontroller plays a major role in transmitting data to RF transmitter and here the data is transmitted using RF communication. In transmitter side microcontroller directs the data obtained from PC and at the receiver side microcontroller receives the data from the RF receiver and given to robot. Here we are using temperature sensor to read the temperature value. If the temperature value crosses the threshold value then the given data is send to the controller to display on the PC which is on the section II through ADC.Fuel indicator with two levels, low level and medium level. This we can achieve as used in cars, the gauge consists of two parts: The sensing unit and The indicator The sensing unit usually uses a float connected to a potentiometer. Typically printed ink design in a modern automobile. As the tank empties, the float drops and slides a moving contact along the resistor, increasing its resistance. In addition, when the resistance is at a certain point, it will also turn on a "low fuel" light on some vehicles

  12. Taking Care of Your Teeth

    ... of them, they'll help take care of you. Strong, healthy teeth help you chew the right foods to ... be sure to spit after brushing. Continue How You Can Keep Your Teeth Healthy Kids can take charge of their teeth by ...

  13. Changing Teachers.

    Berlin, Barney M.; Jensen, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Discussions of ways that teachers should change emphasize the need for a better curriculum, instructional method, or organization for learning that will improve student outcomes. However, models of teacher change recognize that teachers must "buy into" the change or school improvement process. (MW)

  14. Teacher Evaluation

    Tolefat, Saleh

    1987-01-01

    Teacher evaluation is considered to be a significant issue in education. However, the quality of educational output depends heavily on the quality of the teacher. Therefore, this paper focuses on several factors such as Evaluation Techniques, Evaluative Team, Teacher Competence and so forth.

  15. Mentor Teacher Internship Program, 1986-87. OEA Evaluation Report.

    Guerrero, Frank; Goldberg, Phyllis

    The Mentor Teacher Internship Program (MTIP) provided first-year provisional teachers with an experienced mentor teacher in the context of a supportive, non-evaluative peer relationship. The pilot program, implemented by the New York City Board of Education and the United Federation of Teachers, focused on increasing teacher effectiveness and…

  16. Take Charge. Take the Test. "You Know" PSA (:60)

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 60 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  17. Teacher Research Experiences, Partnerships with Scientists, and Teacher Networks Sustaining Factors from Professional Development

    Dresner, Marion; Worley, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This study examined some long-term impacts of a professional development program, Teachers in the Woods. Several outcomes of the program were acknowledged by participants as having been valuable: a network of like-minded teachers, a network of scientists and teachers, and an increase in teachers' ecological knowledge and field skills. The authors…

  18. Preparing Teachers to Support the Development of Climate Literate Students

    Haddad, N.; Ledley, T. S.; Ellins, K. K.; Bardar, E. W.; Youngman, E.; Dunlap, C.; Lockwood, J.; Mote, A. S.; McNeal, K.; Libarkin, J. C.; Lynds, S. E.; Gold, A. U.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthLabs climate project includes curriculum development, teacher professional development, teacher leadership development, and research on student learning, all directed at increasing high school teachers' and students' understanding of the factors that shape our planet's climate. The project has developed four new modules which focus on climate literacy and which are part of the larger Web based EarthLabs collection of Earth science modules. Climate related themes highlighted in the new modules include the Earth system with its positive and negative feedback loops; the range of temporal and spatial scales at which climate, weather, and other Earth system processes occur; and the recurring question, "How do we know what we know about Earth's past and present climate?" which addresses proxy data and scientific instrumentation. EarthLabs climate modules use two central strategies to help students navigate the multiple challenges inherent in understanding climate science. The first is to actively engage students with the content by using a variety of learning modes, and by allowing students to pace themselves through interactive visualizations that address particularly challenging content. The second strategy, which is the focus of this presentation, is to support teachers in a subject area where few have substantive content knowledge or technical skills. Teachers who grasp the processes and interactions that give Earth its climate and the technical skills to engage with relevant data and visualizations are more likely to be successful in supporting students' understanding of climate's complexities. This presentation will briefly introduce the EarthLabs project and will describe the steps the project takes to prepare climate literate teachers, including Web based resources, teacher workshops, and the development of a cadre of teacher leaders who are prepared to continue leading the workshops after project funding ends.

  19. New Teacher Functions in Cyberspace

    Buhl, Mie

    2008-01-01

    Information technology allows the education system to do its job in new ways.  Conceptions of what it means to be educated are changing both for teachers and for students.  A teacher's professional duties are not limited to acting as a disseminator of knowledge and facilitating learning processes...... for the student.  Teachers must also relate their position to new constructions of time and space.  However, these new constructions of what it is to be an actor in time and space mean that some of the functions that have as a matter of course been assembled in the person of the teacher have been...... displaced into other positions.  Information technology exposes the teacher's performative choice in how teachers act in certain situations, which intensifies reflexivity.  This article is about how teachers must meet increasing expectations to perform on the premises of mass media and how this displaces...

  20. 'ICTs' IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    Girdhar lal Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Education in the Indian region faces a number of problems. These problems include the shortage of qualified teachers, very large student populations, high drop-out rates of students and teachers, and weak curriculum. All of these negative aspects result in poor delivery of education. The education crisis is worsened by the devastating effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, increasing poverty, a brain drain in the teaching community, budgetary constraints, poor communication, and inadequa...

  1. Should You Take Dietary Supplements?

    ... Viewed August 2013 Print RSS Find us on Facebook External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Should You Take Dietary Supplements? A Look at Vitamins, Minerals, Botanicals and More When you ...

  2. Informatics perspectives on decision taking

    Bergstra, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    A decision is an act or event of decision taking. Decision making always includes decision taking, the latter not involving significant exchanges with non-deciding agents. A decision outcome is a piece of storable information constituting the result of a decision. Decision outcomes are typed, for instance: plan, command, assertion, or boolean reply to a question. A decision effect is any consequence of putting a decision outcome into effect. Decision outcomes must be expected by the decider t...

  3. Income inequality and risk taking

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Neyse, Levent; Aleknonyte, Milda

    2015-01-01

    Standard economic theory assumes that individual risk taking decisions are independent from the social context. Recent experimental evidence however shows that the income of peers has a systematic impact on observed degrees of risk aversion. In particular, subjects strive for balance in the sense that they take higher risks if this gives them the chance to break even with their peers. The present paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first systematic analysis of income inequality and ri...

  4. When science takes centre stage

    2005-01-01

    The teachers at 'Science on stage' are not emotionally attached to their chalk. Neither are they are weary old men who sport tweed jackets with elbow-patches and enter into conversation with their blackboards. Actually, 'Science on stage' teachers are far from the cliché of the boring physics teacher who can only inspire yawns from his pupils. Some present the basic principles of mechanics using a bicycle, others explain chemistry with examples from everyday life. The most audacious of them go so far as to explain the Doppler effect by means of a play in which Einstein dreams about jumping cows... These are but a few of the activities and plays that will be shown during the EIROforum1 Science on Stage Festival (organised by 7 European scientific organisations including CERN), to be held from 21 to 25 November at CERN, Geneva. This festival is dedicated to the teaching science in order to make it more attractive. After the first edition 'Physics on Stage' which was held in 2000 at CERN, the laboratory agai...

  5. The Future of Instructional Teacher Leader Roles

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Stoelinga, Sara Ray

    2010-01-01

    In response to increased performance expectations, schools and districts are turning to nonsupervisory, school-based, instructional teacher leader roles to help improve teachers' instruction and enhance student learning. Increased opportunities to learn about teacher leadership may facilitate the implementation and institutionalization of…

  6. The Future of Instructional Teacher Leader Roles

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Stoelinga, Sara Ray

    2010-01-01

    In response to increased performance expectations, schools and districts are turning to nonsupervisory, school-based, instructional teacher leader roles to help improve teachers' instruction and enhance student learning. Increased opportunities to learn about teacher leadership may facilitate the implementation and institutionalization ofÖ

  7. The Importance of Taking Risks: A Report on the Conference

    Kotliar I.A.,; Sokolova M.V.; Sheina E.G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the 14th interdisciplinary conference The Importance of Taking Risks held by the Welsh branch of the International Play Association. The meeting focused on various aspects of supporting children’s play and on the role of risk in child development. The conference had a clear multidis- ciplinary character and brought together specialists from a variety of fields: psychologists, teachers, social workers, experts in risk assessment, and health care professionals. Th...

  8. Entrepreneurship Education for Science Teachers as a Means of Achieving National Transformation.

    Habila Nuhu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to answer questions such as: How do science teachers perceive entrepreneurship education? Why is entrepreneurship education becoming more important? How can this theme be implemented and enhanced in the school context towards achieving National transformation in Nigeria? It is obvious that the question of how science teachers perceive the theme will definitely affect how they value it. A total of 40 science teachers (male and female teaching in Junior and Senior secondary Schools in Jos, Bukuru and environs were interviewed. One-third of the teachers studied re-evaluated their views or modified the manner in which they had earlier defined entrepreneurship education. One can therefore infer that the ability to re-evaluate and change one's attitude is influenced by an increased knowledge. An inner ability to manage the changes taking place in our post modern society and the labor market is stressed in this paper.

  9. Otters Increasing - Threats Increasing

    Andreas Kranz

    1994-01-01

    In some parts of Central Europe populations of otters are apparently increasing. Until recently, no research was being conducted on the ecology of otters in mainly artificial habitats like fish farms. Otters are not only a new source of conflict requiring species management, but appear once again threatened by illegal hunting. Austria is dealing with this problem using compensation for otter damage, electric fencing and translocation of problem otters. Despite a rise in illegal killing, Austr...

  10. Teachers' Beliefs about Inappropriate Behaviour: Challenging Attitudes?

    Grieve, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on taking a first step in the process of influencing teachers' attitudes by building a description of beliefs about inappropriate behaviour that can be used in staff development work to provoke dissonance-led change. It describes a study, undertaken in two parts, exploring teachers' attitudes to inclusion, and ascertaining their…

  11. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  12. The Whole Story: Teachers Talk about Portfolios.

    Smith, Mary Ann, Ed.; Juska, Jane, Ed.

    In this book, 11 teachers, from first through twelfth grades, take readers into their classrooms where students are assembling collections of their work. In honest, down-to-earth accounts in the book, these teachers describe the advantages and complexities of using portfolios as a way to evaluate and promote student achievement. In the portfolio…

  13. Evaluation System Weighing down Tennessee Teachers

    Heitin, Liana

    2011-01-01

    A state law, which helped Tennessee win Race to the Top money, pushed schools to implement a system that had limited pilot-testing. Education officials in Tennessee are taking flak from teachers and unions for rushing the implementation of the new teacher-evaluation system that will eventually undergird tenure decisions--a move, some worry, thatÖ

  14. Otters Increasing - Threats Increasing

    Andreas Kranz

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available In some parts of Central Europe populations of otters are apparently increasing. Until recently, no research was being conducted on the ecology of otters in mainly artificial habitats like fish farms. Otters are not only a new source of conflict requiring species management, but appear once again threatened by illegal hunting. Austria is dealing with this problem using compensation for otter damage, electric fencing and translocation of problem otters. Despite a rise in illegal killing, Austria does not formally recognise this as a threat.

  15. Factors Influencing How Teachers Manage Their Classrooms

    Sar?Áoban, Arif; Sak?zl?, Sevilay

    2006-01-01

    Teaching and learning a foreign language is a social process which requires the interaction of two important parts of the process, the teacher and the students, in a social environment.† As this process takes place in a social context, it is inevitable to experience some problems while teaching the students having different needs, interests and levels. These problems may be caused by the students, teachers as well as the physical environment in which teaching and learning take place. It is cl...

  16. Factors Influencing How Teachers Manage Their Classrooms

    SARI«OBAN, Arif; Sevilay SAKIZLI

    2006-01-01

    Teaching and learning a foreign language is a social process which requires theinteraction of two important parts of the process, the teacher and the students, in a socialenvironment. As this process takes place in a social context, it is inevitable toexperience some problems while teaching the students having different needs, interestsand levels. These problems may be caused by the students, teachers as well as thephysical environment in which teaching and learning take place. It is clear th...

  17. Educating for Teacher Growth: A Cognitive-Developmental Perspective.

    Sprinthall, Norman; Thies-Sprinthall, Lois

    It is time for the teacher education profession to take more systematic steps for the advancement of theory, research, and practice in the teacher education field. A cognitive-developmental perspective on teacher education curriculum avoids the choice between cognitive and affective goals by providing a dual focus on highly specific behavioral…

  18. The Impact of Facebook in Teaching Practicum: Teacher Trainees' Perspectives

    Goktalay, Sehnaz Baltaci

    2015-01-01

    Prompt feedback is one of the critical components of teacher education programs. To reap the greatest benefit from the teaching practicum process, the quality of feedback as well as its implementation by stakeholders, supervisors, cooperating teachers, and teacher trainees, takes on great importance. The purpose of this study is to examine how Web…

  19. Completion Time as a Nonverbal Component of Teacher Attitude.

    Brooks, D. M.; Wagenhauser, Betsy

    1980-01-01

    Examines the dynamics of the formation of impressions that teachers and pupils have of one another and suggests that the time pupils take to complete a teacher-directed task may be a nonverbal component in the formation of teachers' impressions. (Author/MP)

  20. Learning to Teach Inclusively: Student Teachers' Classroom Inquiries

    Oyler, Celia

    2006-01-01

    This book--co-authored by a teacher educator, a diverse group of five pre-service student teachers, and their student teaching supervisor--takes a unique, illuminating look at the experience of student teaching from the perspective of student teachers. It is premised on learning to teach as an inquiry process enriched by collaborative…

  1. Didactic Dissonance: Teacher Roles in Computer Gaming Situations in Kindergartens

    Vangsnes, Vigdis; √ėkland, Nils Tore Gram

    2015-01-01

    In computer gaming situations in kindergartens, the pre-school teacher's function can be viewed in a continuum. At one extreme is the teacher who takes an intervening role and at the other extreme is the teacher who chooses to restrict herself/himself to an organising or distal role. This study shows that both the intervening position and the…

  2. Integrating Ict Into Teacher Education Programme

    Geeta Thakur

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Teacher educators are faced with the challenges of preparing a new generation of teachers to effectively use the new learning tool in their teaching practices. ICT is an ocean. This paper focuses the possible usage of ICT in teacher education. ICT teacher training can take many forms. We can organize various ICTuse as: Main content focus of teacher training, Part of teaching methods, Core technology for delivering teacher training, and Facilitate professional development & networking. ICT can be used to enhance richness and quality of teacher education in the classroom through web-based instruction, which can be implemented by Web-assisted classroom instruction and Individual learning.For effective learning, close and conducive learning environment in the college can be created through strategies like Development of instructional material, Use of web conferencing and blogs, Formation of discussion forum and newsgroup.

  3. Collaboration Between Astronomers at UT Austin and K-12 Teachers: Connecting the Experience of Observing and Research with the Classroom

    Finkelstein, Keely D.; Sneden, Christopher; Hemenway, Mary Kay; Preston, Sandra; EXES Teachers Associate Program

    2015-01-01

    McDonald Observatory has a long history of providing teacher professional development (PD), and recently we have developed a new workshop model for more advanced participants. By choosing a select group of middle and high school teachers from those previously involved in our past PD programs, we have created a joint workshop / observing run program for them. After traveling to the observatory, the teachers participate in an actual observing run with a research astronomer. The teachers are trained first-hand how to take observations, operate the telescope, set up the instrument, and monitor observing conditions. The teachers are fully put in the role of observer. They are also given background information before and during the workshop related to the science and data they are helping to collect. The teachers work in teams to both perform the nightly observations with an astronomer, but to also perform new interactive classroom activities with education staff, and use other telescopes on the mountain. This is a unique experience for teachers since it allows them to take the resources and experiences directly back to their classrooms and students. They can directly relate to their students what skills for specific careers in STEM fields are needed. Evaluation from these workshops shows that there is: increased content knowledge among participants, greater impact that will be passed on to their students, and an authentic research experience that can't be replicated in other PD settings. In addition, not only is this program beneficial to the teachers, but this group is benefit to the education program of McDonald Observatory. Building on an existing PD program (with a 16 year history) we have the opportunity to test out new products and new education endeavors with this devoted group of well-trained teachers before bringing them to wider teacher and student audiences. This program is currently supported by the NSF grant AST-1211585 (PI Sneden).

  4. Take Charge of Your Career

    Brown, Marshall A.

    2013-01-01

    Today's work world is full of uncertainty. Every day, people hear about another organization going out of business, downsizing, or rightsizing. To prepare for these uncertain times, one must take charge of their own career. This article presents some tips for surviving in today's world of work: (1) Be self-managing; (2) Know what you…

  5. Taking Care After A Concussion

    2010-03-17

    This podcast describes how to take care of yourself after a concussion, including proper recognition and response recommendations.  Created: 3/17/2010 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/17/2010.

  6. Perspective-Taking and Altruism.

    Underwood, Bill; Moore, Bert

    1982-01-01

    Concludes that there are reliable relationships between altruism and perceptual, social, and moral perspective taking. Results concerning the relationship between empathy and altruism are nonsignificant overall, but it is suggested that a reliable association between empathy and altruism develops over time and is found in adults. (Author/RH)

  7. Influenza Round Table: Take Three

    2009-11-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting the flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 11/3/2009 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/3/2009.

  8. Risk-taking and the media.

    Fischer, Peter; Vingilis, Evelyn; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Vogrincic, Claudia

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, media formats with risk-glorifying content, such as video games that simulate illegal street racing ("bang and crash" games), films about extreme sports, and risky stunts have emerged as top sellers of the media industry. A variety of recent studies conducted by several researchers revealed that exposure to risk-glorifying media content (e.g., video games that simulate reckless driving, smoking and drinking in movies, or depictions that glorify extreme sports) increases the likelihood that recipients will show increased levels of risk-taking inclinations and behaviors. The present article (1) reviews the latest research on the detrimental impact of risk-glorifying media on risk-taking inclinations (cognitions, emotions, behaviors), (2) puts these findings in the theoretical context of recent sociocognitive models on media effects, and (3) makes suggestions to science and policymakers on how to deal with these effects in the future. PMID:21155859

  9. Teacher labor markets in developed countries.

    Ladd, Helen F

    2007-01-01

    Helen Ladd takes a comparative look at policies that the world's industrialized countries are using to assure a supply of high-quality teachers. Her survey puts U.S. educational policies and practices into international perspective. Ladd begins by examining teacher salaries-an obvious, but costly, policy tool. She finds, perhaps surprisingly, that students in countries with high teacher salaries do not in general perform better on international tests than those in countries with lower salaries. Ladd does find, however, that the share of underqualified teachers in a country is closely related to salary. In high-salary countries like Germany, Japan, and Korea, for example, only 4 percent of teachers are underqualified, as against more than 10 percent in the United States, where teacher salaries, Ladd notes, are low relative to those in other industrialized countries. Teacher shortages also appear to stem from policies that make salaries uniform across academic subject areas and across geographic regions. Shortages are especially common in math and science, in large cities, and in rural areas. Among the policy strategies proposed to deal with such shortages is to pay teachers different salaries according to their subject area. Many countries are also experimenting with financial incentive packages, including bonuses and loans, for teachers in specific subjects or geographic areas. Ladd notes that many developed countries are trying to attract teachers by providing alternative routes into teaching, often through special programs in traditional teacher training institutions and through adult education or distance learning programs. To reduce attrition among new teachers, many developed countries have also been using formal induction or mentoring programs as a way to improve new teachers' chances of success. Ladd highlights the need to look beyond a single policy, such as higher salaries, in favor of broad packages that address teacher preparation and certification, working conditions, the challenges facing new teachers, and the distribution of teachers across geographic areas. PMID:17407929

  10. Model Teachers

    Reeves, Douglas B.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of teachers' influence is confirmed by a recent survey the author and his colleagues conducted of more than 300 teachers and administrators representing a mix of urban, rural, and suburban schools. In analyzing responses to an open-ended question about the greatest influences on respondents' professional practice, they found that…

  11. Educators Take Another Look at Substitutes

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2012-01-01

    The mythology surrounding the substitute teacher is not a pretty one: Paper airplanes, lost learning, bullying. But as schools collect more information about teacher absenteeism and its consequences, districts and schools are exploring ways to professionalize substitute teaching--or experiment with alternative ways of coping with teacher absences.…

  12. Astronomy Education and Teacher Training in Turkey

    Kirbiyik, Halil

    In this talk, education in astronomy and space sciences in schools in Turkey as well as activities to create awareness in these subjects will be discussed. A search done among youngsters(ages from 15 to 24) for measuring the scientific literacy showed that most attractive subjects to the Turkish younsters are ‚Äúinternet‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúastronomy‚ÄĚ. This result led authorities to take necessary measures to fill the gap especially in teaching material such as books. Another attempt along this is to increase astronomy subjects in the school curricula. Besides TUBITAK National Observatory, universities and Turkish Astronomical Society are giving every efort to create public awareness of space activities and space sciences. As for the teacher training in astronomy and space sciences, much has been done but no success has come yet. Astronomy subjects, in schools, are generally taught not by astronomers but some other substitutes from other branches, such as physics and mathematics. Thus the Ministry of Education prefers training teachers in service. Nevertheless it must be stated that astronomers are pushing forward to formally have the right to train astronomers to become teachers to be hired by the Ministry of Education in schools.

  13. Cross Cultural Marketing Teachers' Profile

    Vila, Natalia; Boluda, Ines Kuster

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Marketing has attracted increased interested over the past 15 years in both academic and commercial circles and there has been a market rise in the number of students. At the university level, the characteristics of the teacher play an essential role in student/teacher interaction and influence academic results and future professional…

  14. Deliberate Practice in Teacher Education

    Bronkhorst, Larike H.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Koster, Bob; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Deliberate practice is increasingly recognised as necessary for professional development. This paper sets out to explore in what ways student teachers' learning activities in a teacher education programme can be characterised as deliberate practice. Based on an in-depth exploration of 574 learning activities, our results highlight the…

  15. Cross Cultural Marketing Teachers' Profile

    Vila, Natalia; Boluda, Ines Kuster

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Marketing has attracted increased interested over the past 15 years in both academic and commercial circles and there has been a market rise in the number of students. At the university level, the characteristics of the teacher play an essential role in student/teacher interaction and influence academic results and future professionalÖ

  16. Teachers as Actors: The Implications of Acting on Physics Teaching

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2007-10-01

    In the spring of 2006, a rather unusual advertisement by the Centre of Teaching and Academic Growth at UBC (http://www.tag.ubc.ca) came to my attention. Faculty members were invited to take part in a workshop entitled "All the World's a Stage: Teachers as Actors," offered by a zoology instructor and an amateur actor, Greg Bole: Teaching can be seen as creating an interpersonal relationship and hence uses many of the same skills as acting. The investigation and use of acting skills in teacher preparation can allow a greater facility with diverse methods, increase skill at adapting to change in the classroom or lecture hall, and an increased ability to quickly form positive relationships with students. (Greg Bole: http://www.tag.ubc.ca/programs/series-detail.php?series_id=249 )

  17. Taking CERN physics to South Asia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2015-01-01

    CERN physicists travelled to South Asia last month to bring a plethora of particle physics events to schools, universities and public venues. The initiative was the first of its kind in the region, and brought CERN particle physics to a new audience in Nepal and India.   Kathmandu University students take part in an ATLAS virtual visit. On 19 December 2014, students from Kathmandu University and Tribhuvan University, Nepal and 16 schools in Punjab, India took part in a joint virtual visit to ATLAS. The visit, which was the first of its kind in South Asia, followed a two-day Masterclass in particle physics that took place simultaneously in the two countries. The Masterclass was organised as a part of Physics Without Frontiers, an International Centre for Theoretical Physics project in partnership with CERN. Besides the Masterclass, physics workshops led by ATLAS physicists Kate Shaw, Joerg Stelzer and Suyog Shrestha were held for high school students and science teachers in three different d...

  18. Teacher Identity in an Era of Educational Reform: The Case of Trinidad and Tobago.

    George, June; Mohammed, Jeniffer; Quamina-Aiyejina, Lynda

    2003-01-01

    Compares the beginning teacher identity of primary teacher trainees in Trinidad and Tobago, with the concept of the teacher image present in reform initiatives. Highlights the need for reform efforts to take into account the gaps between existing teacher identity images and those envisioned for the reformed system. (CAJ)

  19. "Like a Ball and Glove": Teachers' Conceptions of the Promise and Challenges of Conducting Classroom Inquiry

    Bennett, Lisa H.; Athanases, Steven Z.; Wahleithner, Juliet Michelsen

    2016-01-01

    Teacher inquiry holds promise in teacher education, but only if student teachers take up inquiry practices as they leave preservice and transition to teaching. As they learn to conduct inquiry during preservice, student teachers may begin to internalize dispositions that promote ongoing inquiry experiences. Through analysis of questionnaires…

  20. Worldmindedness: Taking Off the Blinders

    Sum Cho Po

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic web of global interconnectedness has expanded the engagement and political efficacy of citizens in the 21st century. The acceleration of knowledge creation, the dynamics of electronic communication and the resulting availability of global perspectives are changing the nature of public discourse and action. As more and more people gain access to information and interact with individuals and communities across the planet, they acquire new worldminded ways of learning, debating, and creating which in turn expand the scope of civic consciousness and responsibilities beyond national borders. In this article we look at ways in which teachers in Hong Kong, Japan and the United States are preparing young people to become worldminded citizens.

  1. Plant nutrition from teachers thinking

    GonzŠlez RodrŪguez, Concepciůn;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, itīs analyzed which contents related to plant nutrition are considered important by a group of secondary education teachers. Its objective is also to determine the existence of any correlations among teachers, depending on the selected and most valued contents in the evaluation activities and questions.The analysis of the obtained results has shown that the contents in which teachers are more focused are those describing the differences between autotrophic and heterotrophic nutrition, the photosynthesis process and the structures involved on it (plant and cellular organs. On the other hand, the less considered contents are related to the nutrition general concept, breathing concept and those associated to the ecological dimension of plant nutrition. The existence of certain trends among the teachers taking part in this study has been confirmed; a prevailing correlation has also been found. The majority trend is the physiogical.

  2. Computer assisted medical history taking

    Quaak, M.J.; Hasman, Arie

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis a study is described which was performed to explore the possibilities of computer-assisted history taking to support patient care. A system was developed by which the patient himself enters his medical data into a computer. The system enables an unexperienced user, i.e. a patient, to answer questions asked to him by an "intelligent" computerized questionnaire. In developing this system, use has been made of a fourthgeneration programming package. The system appeared...

  3. Professionally Developing as a Teacher Educator

    Loughran, John

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in the professional development of teacher educators as the demands, expectations, and requirements of teacher education increasingly come under scrutiny. The manner in which teacher educators learn to traverse their world of work in the development of their knowledge, skills, and ability is important. This articleÖ

  4. Teacher community in elementary charter schools.

    Marisa Cannata

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The organizational context of charter schools may facilitate the formation of a strong teacher community. In particular, a focused school mission and increased control over teacher hiring may lead to stronger teacher professional communities. This paper uses the 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey to compare the level of teacher community in charter public and traditional public schools. It also estimates the effect of various charter policy variables and domains of school autonomy on teacher community. Charter school teachers report higher levels of teacher community than traditional public school teachers do, although this effect is less than one-tenth of a standard deviation and is dwarfed by the effect of a supportive principal, teacher decision-making influence, and school size. Charter public schools authorized by universities showed lower levels of teacher community than those authorized by local school districts. Teachers in charter schools that have flexibility over tenure requirements and the school budget report higher levels of teacher community. This study reveals that charter schools do facilitate the formation of strong teacher communities, although the effect is small. The analysis also suggests that the institutional origin of the charter school and specific areas of policy flexibility may influence teacher community.

  5. Involving teachers in school development

    Stankovińá Dejan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key messages of the contemporary approach to school development is that teacher participation is a necessary precondition for the successfulness of this process. Experience from the world, however, shows that broad and active participation of teachers in school development is neither easy to achieve nor to sustain in the long run. Similarly, the first experiences with school developmental planning in Serbia from the first half of this decade also pointed out to the differences with respect to readiness of teachers to take over this new role. The research that will be presented in this paper was conducted with the aim of discovering and determining the levels and ways in which different factors influence teacher involvement in developmental activities in school, whereby those activities are of cooperative and leadership character. The research was conducted on the sample of 385 teachers from 51 primary schools in Serbia. The findings indicate that teacher involvement in school development is a product of a complex combination and interaction of numerous personal and contextual factors, bearing in mind that harmony of personal and professional identity and meanings ascribed to changes in school is of primary importance. The final part of the paper provides recommendations for system and organizational level in order for teacher involvement in school development to become a widespread and sustainable practice.

  6. Preparing Teachers to Work with "Everybody": A Curricular Approach to the Reform of Teacher Education

    Florian, Lani

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a curricular approach to teacher education using the ideas in "Learning without Limits" to prepare teachers to enter a profession in which they take responsibility for the learning and achievement of all learners. Key aspects of Scotland's Inclusive Practice Project (IPP) are described and the role ofÖ

  7. University Teacher Competencies in a Virtual Teaching/Learning Environment: Analysis of a Teacher Training Experience

    Guasch, Teresa; Alvarez, Ibis; Espasa, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to shed light on the competencies a university teacher must have in order to teach in virtual learning environments. A teacher training experience was designed by taking into account the methodological criteria established in line with previous theoretical principles. The main objective of our analysis was to identify the…

  8. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for World History Teachers: What Is It? How Might Prospective Teachers Develop It?

    Harris, Lauren McArthur; Bain, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    This article takes up the question of world history teachers' pedagogical content knowledge by reporting on two separate but related projects. In the first, we briefly discuss an empirical investigation one of the authors conducted into the ways that pre- and in-service world history teachers think about, organize, and make meaning of separate andÖ

  9. Science and Social Studies Teachersí Beliefs and Practices about Teaching Controversial Issues: Certain Comparisons

    Zafer Ku?

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study aims to investigate social studies and science teachersí attitudes and classroom practices associated with controversial issues. The study is a qualitative research based on data collected through interviews and observation. Social studies and Science teachers participated in the current study which was conducted in Kirsehir, a city in the center of Turkey, during the 2012-2013 academic years. Data were collected through classroom observation and interviews with teachers. In this study, teachers' positioning during controversial issues are determined by Kelly's (1986 positioning classification: Exclusive Neutrality, Exclusive Partiality, Neutral Impartiality, and Committed Impartiality. According to results of the research, violence against women, education system, terrorism and nationalism are the leading issues among the controversial issues that both social studies and science teachers listed in Turkey. In relation to their area, social studies teachers stated that the issues such as Kemalism, democracy, military coups, and deep state, which are associated with recent history of Turkey, were among the important controversial issues. Science teachers on the other hand stated issues such as cancer and anti-toxic foods and global warming among the controversial issues in Turkey. Both social studies and science teachers stated that the most frequently encountered problem in discussions was lack of knowledge by students. Whereas social studies teachers stated that their priority goals were particularly to raise active citizens and to set up a democratic classroom environment, science teachers pointed to raising scientifically thinking students and increasing studentsí knowledge as their priority goals. During in-class discussions teachers take some positions. The positions stated by the teachers and in-class observations of them conflict. Whereas the teachers stated that they prefer the 4th and 3rd positions, the in-class observations showed that they mainly adopted the 2nd position. Results of observations in social studies classes show that teachers definitely stated their positions about the discussed issue as a priority; they tried to teach the students their positions about the issue; and occasionally about some issues, they told just their positions.

  10. Reaching the Critical Mass: The Twenty Year Surge in High School Physics. Findings from the 2005 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. AIP Report. Number R-442

    Neuschatz, Michael; McFarling, Mark; White, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This report traces the growth of high school physics in American school over the past twenty years. Highlights of the report include: (1) Enrollments in high school physics continue to grow; (2) Increase in number and proportion of physics teachers; (3) Number of students taking honors, advance placement or second-year physics course has nearly…

  11. Domain Building or Risk Taking

    Hjort, Katrin; Abrahamsen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic Countries are usually seen as the worlds must successful nations when it comes to gender equality, and the Scandinavian population in general appreciates values traditionally labeled feminine as caretaking and the quality of everyday life. However, the inequalities become obvious in...... relations between gender, values and family obligation but reveals an interesting difference between two strategies for career development: Domain Building and Risk Taking. Both strategies are applied by both men and women. However, one of them seems to be the most effective with regard to achieve a...

  12. PARAMETERS CHECKING BEFORE TAKE OFF

    V. SRIDHAR, P. SHREELA, B. SRIKANTH, T.SHIVAKRISHNA REDDY

    2012-01-01

    Now a day’s airplane is widely used vehicle. So it is very important to check the condition of the flight before it is take off. The main intension of this project is to check the fuel condition and temperature of the flight. According to this project whenever the temperature is high or fuel is low, the microcontroller display this information on LCD and intimate through buzzer.In this paper the microcontroller plays a major role in transmitting data to RF transmitter and here the data is tra...

  13. Perceived perspective taking: When others walk in our shoes

    Goldstein, NJ; Vezich, IS; Shapiro, JR

    2014-01-01

    A great deal of psychological research has investigated the influence of perspective taking on individuals, indicating that perspective taking increases the extent to which people like, feel a sense of self-other overlap with, and help those whose perspective they take. However, previous investigations of the topic have been limited to the study of the perspective taker, rather than the individual whose perspective has been taken. The purpose of the current work is to begin to fill this large...

  14. Teachers' beliefs about science teaching and context factors: Implications for teaching and learning science at the middle school level

    Pea, Celeste H.

    Current research shows that teachers' beliefs have been virtually ignored in science education reform efforts spearheaded by the development of national, state, and local standards. Since the aim of science education reform is to improve scientific literacy for all students, increasingly, researchers are questioning the lack of attention to teachers' beliefs and are calling for more research to examine teachers' beliefs and the influence of school environmental factors on their classroom practices. The purpose of this study was to explore, investigate, and analyze data that might reveal middle school science teachers' beliefs about science teaching and how school environmental factors influence their classroom behavior. The mixed methods study was conducted in a large urban/suburban county in an eastern state in the United States. Data were collected through a Likert-style survey and interview and observation sessions. Ninety-one middle school science teachers completed the survey. Three teachers from the survey sample also participated in the interview and observation sessions. The findings from the quantitative and qualitative data indicated that most of the middle school science teachers in this study believed that science teaching should be student-centered, and science instruction should be based on an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning. They also believed that the state and county standards were the most important factors in helping teachers to use inquiry-based instructional strategies to teach science. In addition to the science standards, the middle school science teachers believed that peer and principal support were critical to their success as teachers, and that instructional materials and supplies were readily available to help them teach science. The findings from the study indicated that few school environmental factors affected the middle school teachers' classroom practices. However, time (to participate in more professional activities and to complete class work), student level of maturity to do inquiry, and students taking responsibility for their own learning were identified as school environmental factors teachers believed hindered their effectiveness as teachers. The research findings confirmed findings from earlier studies that some teachers' beliefs are inconsistent with their practices. Although most of the teachers responded or were observed using nontraditional practices, the inconsistency that was observed between some teachers' stated beliefs and their practices supports the idea that it may be difficult to achieve scientific literacy for all students. Since current science reform marks a sharp departure from the way science was taught in the past, more research is needed to help determine why this inconsistency continues to exist.

  15. Teacher agency

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Robinson, Sarah

    The concept of teacher agency has emerged in recent literature as an alternative means of understanding how teachers might enact practice and engage with policy (e.g. Lasky, 2005; Leander & Osbourne, 2008; Ketelaar et al., 2012; Priestley, Biesta & Robinson, 2013). But what is agency? Agency...... remains an inexact and poorly conceptualised construct in much of the literature, where it is often not clear whether the term refers to an individual capacity of teachers to act agentically or to an emergent ‚Äėecological‚Äô phenomenon dependent upon the quality of individuals‚Äô engagement with their...... environments (Biesta & Tedder, 2007). In this chapter, we outline the latter conception of agency, developing a conceptual model for teacher agency that emphasizes the temporal and relational dimension of the achievement of agency. Why does this matter? Recent curriculum policy in many countries heralds a [re...

  16. Considering the Impact of Preservice Teacher Beliefs on Future Practice

    Thomas, Cathy Newman

    2014-01-01

    Preservice teacher beliefs merit additional attention from special education teacher-educators. Given current policy and reforms aimed at improving outcomes for students with disabilities and increasing the adoption of evidence-based practices, teacher-educators should recognize the barrier that preservice teacher beliefs can pose and consider…

  17. Teacher Leader Model Standards: Implications for Preparation, Policy, and Practice

    Berg, Jill Harrison; Carver, Cynthia L.; Mangin, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher leadership is increasingly recognized as a resource for instructional improvement. Consequently, teacher leader initiatives have expanded rapidly despite limited knowledge about how to prepare and support teacher leaders. In this context, the "Teacher Leader Model Standards" represent an important development in the field. In…

  18. Teacher Leader Model Standards: Implications for Preparation, Policy, and Practice

    Berg, Jill Harrison; Carver, Cynthia L.; Mangin, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher leadership is increasingly recognized as a resource for instructional improvement. Consequently, teacher leader initiatives have expanded rapidly despite limited knowledge about how to prepare and support teacher leaders. In this context, the "Teacher Leader Model Standards" represent an important development in the field. InÖ

  19. DIGITAL TRAINING TEACHER COMPETENCIES

    Jes√ļs Arturo Regalado Sandoval

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently we could say that in education internationally, nationally and locally, is the ‚Äúfashion‚ÄĚ and also a need to talk about teaching skills, digital skills, project work, learning to learn in schools of all levels, as it is in this case the high school, as our young students belong to a new era of XXI century, which takes place in the so-called knowledge society and information and teachers must in this case present such innovations and power and be a true facilitator of learning in this world that evolves with lightning speed.

  20. Improving Test-Taking Skills of Secondary Students.

    Bernstein, Laura

    1991-01-01

    Describes a University of Texas project for increasing the pool of future minority teachers. Academically knowledgeable secondary students who lacked skills for coping with minimum competency testing were given "The Effective Test Performance Study Guide" to help prepare for standardized testing. Results indicate the guide contributed to testÖ

  1. Increasing Induction-Level Teachers' Positive-to-Negative Communication Ratio and Use of Behavior-Specific Praise through E-Mailed Performance Feedback and Its Effect on Students' Task Engagement

    Rathel, Jeanna M.; Drasgow, Erik; Brown, William H.; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of e-mailed specific performance feedback that included progress monitoring graphs on induction-level teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative communication behaviors and their use of behavior-specific praise in classrooms for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, mild…

  2. Increasing Induction-Level Teachers' Positive-to-Negative Communication Ratio and Use of Behavior-Specific Praise through E-Mailed Performance Feedback and Its Effect on Students' Task Engagement

    Rathel, Jeanna M.; Drasgow, Erik; Brown, William H.; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of e-mailed specific performance feedback that included progress monitoring graphs on induction-level teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative communication behaviors and their use of behavior-specific praise in classrooms for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, mildÖ

  3. Perspective-taking among offender and nonoffender youth.

    Mullis, R L; Hanson, R A

    1983-01-01

    Research has shown that adolescents show varying abilities in the area of social perspective-taking. The relative importance of offender and nonoffender status or sex on perspective-taking abilities is still unclear. The purpose of this paper was to investigate differences between male and female offender and nonoffender youth in this area. Subjects of the study were 117, 14- and 15-year-old adolescents, 64 boys and 53 girls from three juvenile facilities and one public high school in the midwest. Perspective-taking was assessed by having subjects take the Rest's Defining Issue Test (DIT) three consecutive times, as himself/herself, as a teacher, and as a police officer. Findings of the study indicated that 14- and 15-year-old offenders and non-offenders did not differ in their perspective-taking ability across three social roles. One explanation for this finding may be that younger adolescents are in developmental transition in this domain of cognitive functioning. Suggestions for future research in this area were made. PMID:6666708

  4. The Elusiveness of Teacher Quality: A Comparative Analysis of Teacher Certification and Student Achievement in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Countries

    Wiseman, Alexander W.; Al-bakr, Fawziah

    2013-01-01

    In national education systems worldwide, teacher quality has become synonymous with education reform efforts, but a more elusive goal is empirically measuring teacher quality. One proposed measure of teacher quality, teacher licensing, also known as certification, is an increasingly ubiquitous component of national education systems andÖ

  5. Take Control of PDFpen 5

    Cohen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    After a whirlwind history and overview of PDF, you'll take a tour through PDFpen's tools and navigation. With those basics taken care of, you'll learn how to: Scan a document to PDF and make the text editable with OCRCombine pages from multiple files into a single PDFTurn a Web site into a multi-page PDFAdd or remove pages from a PDFAdd a hand-written signature to a PDFAdd page and URL links to a PDFMake a clickable table of contents for a PDFUse professional editing marks on a PDFEdit text within a PDF that was received in emailLeave comments on a PDF documentRemove sensitive or confidential

  6. Taking it all back home

    Reprocessing contracts stipulate that Cogema's and BNFL's foreign customers will take back their vitrified residues to ensure subsequent storage themselves. National policies have been defined by those customers for the interim storage on return. Belgium and Japan have chosen to store them in glass canisters in air-cooled pits - at Mol and at Rokkasho-mura, respectively (similar to their current stores at the reprocessing plants) -while Germany and Switzerland have opted to use storage flasks. Aware of the need for vitrified residue return, almost 10 years ago Transnucleaire began developing a new model of flask to suit the various needs of the utilities concerned. Named TN 28 V in view of its basic payload of 28 vitrified waste canisters, this flask is currently being manufactured in two versions: one for the routine transport of glass-containing canisters and another for their transport followed by a long period of interim storage. (author)

  7. Taking the Copenhagen Process apart

    Cort, Pia

    The aim of this thesis is to analyse the EU vocational education and training policy process (The Copenhagen Process) from a critical perspective based on the policy analysis methodology, ‚ÄúWhat‚Äôs the Problem Represented to Be?‚ÄĚ (WPR) developed by Professor Carol Bacchi. The main research question...... ‚ÄúHow can the European vocational education and training policy process - the Copenhagen Process - be understood from a WPR perspective? ‚Äú is addressed in six articles which take apart the Copenhagen Process and deal with specific WPR questions and specific aspects of the Copenhagen Process: the...... construction of vocational education and training; changes in governmentality; the genealogy of EC vocational education and training policy; the technologies of Europeanization; and finally the discursive and institutional effects of the policy process in the Danish context. The thesis argues that the...

  8. Data Glove For Note Taking

    Akshay Mahajan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We aim at creating a note-taking device typically to be used in a classroom environment. Traditional methods of writing have limited speed and cannot keep up with speech. Writing with pen on paper requires us to look at the paper, which can reduce concentration on the ongoing discussion. Laptops are costly, power consuming and heavy for such a trivial task. Voice to text programs dont have the freedom of choosing the text to be included, and noise in the room can affect performance of such a program. Smart phones have a small keypad, which demands more user concentration. We have created a glove that one can wear and touch-type on any flat surface with minimal costs and power consumption. With ergonomics in mind, the glove has been designed to yield ten self fabricated switch button sensors to finally create a complete utility for simple and an inexpensive typing tool.

  9. Qualifying online teachers

    Levinsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

    everybody involved in e-learning, and the challenge is not met by offering introductory courses for university teachers. Based on basis of a recent examination of concrete actions and strategies for the future within 11 Danish universities, the auther argues that there exists a severe mismatch between the...... organisational expectations and strategies and the competence-evolving activities that the same organisations offer to their staff. A recent case study of a university pedagogy course on e-learning for university teachers demonstrates and identifies some of the consequences of the mismatch. Finally the author......Worldwide there is an increasing demand for educational institutions to offer part of their educations online and mixed mode. For institutions to comply with these demands, it is necessary to prepare teachers (and other members of the staff), to fulfil their responsibilities within the virtual...

  10. Teacher's creative competence

    Anna Babicka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article's aim is to study what 180 Polish teachers understand by creativity and how they put it into practice. The Creative competency of teachers was evaluated, using 6 variables: 1 understanding of teaching as a creative action; 2 knowledge of opportunities and secure limits in implementing creative changes; 3 ability to create and change elements of classroom work; 4 understanding of educational entities and having the ability to act in order to increase the autonomy of such entities; 5 critical thinking; 6 ability to research their own practice. To do so both a semi-structured interview and direct observation in their classroom were utilized. Results point out the need to foster teachers' innovative and creative capabilities.

  11. Sampling vs. taking some - 59349

    Collecting a sample is a delicate task that is Not naively equivalent to simply 'taking some of the material'. The question examined is: 'What is it exactly?' The problem of sampling in general, and for nuclear decontamination in particular, is properly defined. A theory is presented (Gy's Theory of Sampling, a.k.a. TOS) that brings all the answers and allows us to put them to work. The author draws form his lifelong experience in research, teaching and practical applications in this domain to emphasize the critical odds (i.e. risks) of not taking sampling explicitly into account when assessing grades and concentrations. The evolution of the acceptance of this theory in the nuclear industry is finally illustrated, and a hopeful glimpse into the future concludes the presentation. Equally interesting, however, besides what has already been achieved at the CEA along these years, is the realization of what could not be done with TOS, and therefore had to be treated in some other ways - e.g. using mapping tools (geostatistical). It is one the great side-advantages of using a consistent theory that it warns you, before it is too late, that what you are trying to do will not work: TOS, indeed, much like its Geo-statistics sister, besides preventing many a disaster, can provide pragmatic lessons in scientific humility that are best not being left ignored. In conclusion, there are great tools out there, such as TOS, that are well worth investing into, and that our community should be much more attuned to. (author)

  12. Take-off of small Leidenfrost droplets

    Celestini, Franck; Pomeau, Yves

    2012-01-01

    We put in evidence the unexpected behaviour of Leidenfrost droplets at the later stage of their evaporation. We predict and observe that, below a critical size $R_l$, the droplets spontaneously take-off due to the breakdown of the lubrication regime. We establish the theoretical relation between the droplet radius and its elevation. We predict that the vapour layer thickness increases when the droplets become smaller. A satisfactory agreement is found between the model and the experimental results performed on droplets of water and of ethanol.

  13. CAUSES OF PROPENSITY FOR ELITE ATHLETES IN UNIVERSITIES TO TAKE UP KARATE AND THEIR EXPECTATIONS

    Ońüuz √ĖZBEK

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find out the causes of propensity for elite athletes in universities in Turkey to take up karate branch, their expectations and reasons of involvement. A survey method was used in the study. The population for the study was made of elite students in universities engaged in karate. The measurement instrument was administered to 97 students. Data obtained from the survey was tested by Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskall-Wallis test. Elite athletes in karate branch in universities indicated that their families had more influence on their decision to take up this branch. Elite athletes in universities indicated that teachers of physical education and the press media have had almost no influence on their decision. Athletes considered the enjoyment of success as an important reason for engaging in karate, while joining a group of friends easily was considered unimportant. It was found that athletes in the national karate team had higher expectation than those not in the national team for enjoyment of success, obtaining material gains and being famed nationwide. It was further found out that as the length of time of involvement in karate increased, the desire increased for obtaining material gains, becoming famed, becoming a trainer, a referee, being famed nationwide, enjoying success and getting in the national team.

  14. A COMPARISON OF ORAL EVALUATION RATINGS BY NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS AND NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS

    Brittany Baitman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to explore the differences and similarities between native English speaker (NES teachers and non-native English speaker (NNES teachers in their oral evaluation ratings of the same university level English language learners. To this effect, the iBT/Next Generation TOEFL Test Independent Speaking Rubric and a questionnaire were employed. The results reveal that NES teachers are more lenient in their oral evaluation ratings than NNES teachers. In regards to the questionnaire employed, it was found that NES teachers take into consideration the aspects of fluency and pronunciation more so than NNES teachers when orally assessing students, while NNES teachers take more into consideration the aspects of grammatical accuracy and vocabulary. Further research is required in the area of oral assessment specifically pertaining to nationality, age, work experience, and knowledge of a second language.

  15. A study of teacher cognition in planning elementary science lessons

    Wing-Mui So, Winnie

    1997-03-01

    Advances in cognitive psychology and in research techniques have led to an increase in the acceptance of the conception of teaching as a ‚Äúthoughtful‚ÄĚ profession. The interest and enthusiasm of researches in aspects of teacher cognition demonstrate a shift from an emphasis on observable teacher behaviours to a focus on a teacher's unobservable thinking process. In this study, a qualitative approach was used to uncover a teacher's thinking process during lesson planning, to depict a more holistic view of the structural complexity of teacher cognition during lesson planning. Specialised science teachers and general teachers who had different levels of subject expertise were studied. The teachers were interviewed on how they planned an elementary science lesson. Interview protocols were analysed using a taxonomy which assessed the cognitive complexity of teacher thinking. Differences were found between specialised science teachers and general teachers in the levels of structural complexity in their thinking process.

  16. Teachers' Understanding of Learning Goals

    Krog Skott, Charlotte; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard; Carlsen, Dorthe; Misfeldt, Morten

    The national curriculum for Danish primary and lower secondary schools has recently changed in a goal-oriented direction. The intention is to increase the teachers¬ī and students¬īattention to learning outcome, by making learning goals visible. Danish surveys show that teachers did not use the...... previous curriculum in the intended way in relation to goals (Danmarks Evaluerings Institut, 2012). The surveys also indicate that teachers in general do not articulate learning goals (Skovgaard et al, 2014). Our research investigates how the requirements for goal-orientation influence teachers' practice...... will be presented. We expect to deepen our understanding of the relations between the various parameters in the teachers' practice in relation to learning goals and goal-oriented teaching. There is conducted research on the effects of goal-oriented teaching on students' learning both internationally...

  17. Team communication amongst clinical teachers in a formal meeting of post graduate medical training.

    Slootweg, Irene A; Scherpbier, Albert; van der Leeuw, Renťe; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2016-03-01

    The importance of team communication, or more specifically speaking up, for safeguarding quality of patient care is increasingly being endorsed in research findings. However, little is known about speaking up of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training. In order to determine how clinical teachers demonstrate speaking up in formal teaching team meetings and what factors influence this, the authors carried out an exploratory study based on ethnographic principles. The authors selected 12 teaching teams and observed, audio recorded and analysed the data. Subsequently, during an interview, the program directors reflected on speaking up of those clinical teachers present during the meeting. Finally, the authors analysed iteratively all data, using a template analysis, based on Edmondson's behaviours of speaking up. The study was conducted from October 2013 to July 2014 and ten teams participated. During the teaching team meetings, the clinical teachers exhibited most of the behaviours of speaking up. "Sharing information" strongly resembles providing information and "talking about mistakes" occurs in a general sense and without commitment of improvement activities. "Asking questions" was often displayed by closed questions and at times several questions simultaneously. The authors identified factors that influence speaking up by clinical teachers: relational, cultural, and professional. The clinical teachers exhibit speaking up, but there is only limited awareness to discuss problems or mistakes and the discussion centred mainly on the question of blame. It is important to take into account the factors that influence speaking up, in order to stimulate open communication during the teaching team meetings. PMID:26228705

  18. Reviewing the Intersection between Foreign Language Teacher Education and Technology

    John Jairo ViŠfara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The advent of new technologies in education has inspired a vast array of expectations in relation to the improvement of teaching processes. Surprisingly, the impact of these tools has not influenced the pedagogy of foreign languages as substantially and promptly as was predicted. Nonetheless, this article reveals that efforts are being made by scholars to increase the impact of new technologies in the preparation of educators. This review article takes a retrospective look at the last ten years in the field, focusing on the salient trends. Collaboration in computer mediated communication (CMS, teachersí attitudes and performance towards education programs, autonomous learning and project work emerge as tendencies.

  19. The teacher and the curriculum;

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Philippou, Stavroula; Robinson, Sarah

    A key debate in the curriculum field has centred on the extent to which teachers should or could achieve agency over the curriculum they enact. Risks to teacher agency have come from top-down control of curricula, either through input regulation (prescription of content, methods and/or teaching m...... with a discussion of why it is important to understand and take into account teacher agency, when formulating and developing curriculum policy.......A key debate in the curriculum field has centred on the extent to which teachers should or could achieve agency over the curriculum they enact. Risks to teacher agency have come from top-down control of curricula, either through input regulation (prescription of content, methods and/or teaching...... materials) or output regulation (steering through outcomes). Drawing upon an ‚Äėecological model‚Äô to explore the concept of teacher agency, this chapter will illustrate through empirical research conducted in Scotland and Cyprus, how it manifests in various ways through teachers‚Äô work. The chapter concludes...

  20. Science initial teacher education and superdiversity: educating science teachers for a multi-religious and globalised science classroom

    De Carvalho, Roussel

    2016-01-01

    Steven Vertovec (2006, 2007) has recently offered a re-interpretation of population diversity in large urban centres due to a considerable increase in immigration patterns in the UK. This complex scenario called superdiversity has been conceptualised to help illuminate significant interactions of variables such as religion, language, gender, age, nationality, labour market and population distribution on a larger scale. The interrelationships of these themes have fundamental implications in a variety of community environments, but especially within our schools. Today, London schools have over 300 languages being spoken by students, all of whom have diverse backgrounds, bringing with them a wealth of experience and, most critically, their own set of religious beliefs. At the same time, Science is a compulsory subject in England's national curriculum, where it requires teachers to deal with important scientific frameworks about the world; teaching about the origins of the universe, life on Earth, human evolution and other topics, which are often in conflict with students' religious views. In order to cope with this dynamic and thought-provoking environment, science initial teacher education (SITE)‚ÄĒespecially those catering large urban centres‚ÄĒmust evolve to equip science teachers with a meaningful understanding of how to handle a superdiverse science classroom, taking the discourse of inclusion beyond its formal boundaries. Thus, this original position paper addresses how the role of SITE may be re-conceptualised and re-framed in light of the immense challenges of superdiversity as well as how science teachers, as enactors of the science curriculum, must adapt to cater to these changes. This is also the first in a series of papers emerging from an empirical research project trying to capture science teacher educators' own views on religio-scientific issues and their positions on the place of these issues within science teacher education and the science classroom.

  1. The Resourceful Facilitator: Teacher Leaders Constructing Identities as Facilitators of Teacher Peer Groups

    Allen, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of teacher peer groups is a prevalent strategy for school-based professional development and instructional improvement. Facilitation of such groups is an increasingly vital dimension of teacher leadership as a component of school improvement efforts. Drawing on a qualitative study of facilitation of teacher peer groups, the article…

  2. The Malaysian Teacher Standards: A Look at the Challenges and Implications for Teacher Educators

    Goh, Pauline Swee Choo

    2012-01-01

    Talks of education transformation to improve the quality and outcomes of education in Malaysia culminated in the articulation of standards for teachers. The all new Malaysian Teacher Standards (MTS) launched in 2009 is to establish "high competency" standards for the teaching profession and to increase the status of teachers in Malaysia. This…

  3. In the eyes of Turkish EFL learners: what makes an effective foreign language teacher?

    ??elik, Servet; Ar??kan, Arda; Caner, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Research on the qualities of successful teachers in Turkey indicates that students consider teacher effectiveness as the ability to ensure an environment in which positive student-teacher interaction can take place. However, further studies are needed to clarify students??? perceptions of the qualities of effective foreign language teachers, in particular, thus providing educators with necessary information concerning the implementation of language teacher development programs. Therefore, 998...

  4. Take care of your mouse!

    IT Department

    2011-01-01

    “Stop --- Think --- Click" is the basic recommendation for securely browsing the Internet and for securely reading e-mails. Users who have followed this recommendation in the past were less likely to have their computer infected or their computing account compromised. We would like to thank all those who donated their mouse to the CERN Animal Shelter for Computer Mice (http://cern.ch/c-a-s). For those who still use a mouse, please stay vigilant and  alert: do not click on links whose origin you do not trust or which look like gibberish. Do not install untrusted software or plug-ins, since software from untrusted sources may infect or compromise your computer, or violate copyrights. Finally, take particular care with e-mails: Do not open unexpected or suspicious e-mails or attachments. Delete them if they do not concern you or if they appear strange. If in doubt, or if you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Computer.Security@cern.ch

  5. Microgravity Smoldering Combustion Takes Flight

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment lifted off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in September 1995 on the STS-69 mission. This experiment is part of series of studies focused on the smolder characteristics of porous, combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a nonflaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of combustible materials. Common examples of smoldering are nonflaming embers, charcoal briquettes, and cigarettes. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smoldering, both in microgravity and Earth gravity. As with other forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of air and the transport of heat, and therefore, the rate of combustion. Results of the microgravity experiments will be compared with identical experiments carried out in Earth's gravity. They also will be used to verify present theories of smoldering combustion and will provide new insights into the process of smoldering combustion, enhancing our fundamental understanding of this frequently encountered combustion process and guiding improvement in fire safety practices.

  6. Teacher as Researcher: Teacher Action Research in Teacher Education

    Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Historically, "teacher action research" and "teacher research" have been terms mostly used at the PK-12 level. Yet, embracing it fully and visibly in the teacher education realm is important because it raises awareness of the critical and transformative aspects of teaching and learning. It allows teacher research to be made visible and validated…

  7. Taking Full Advantage of Children's Literature

    Serafini, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Teachers need a deeper understanding of the texts being discussed, in particular the various textual and visual aspects of picturebooks themselves, including the images, written text and design elements, to support how readers made sense of these texts. As teachers become familiar with aspects of literary criticism, art history, visual grammar,…

  8. Developing teachers as agents of inclusion and social justice

    Pantińá, NataŇ°a; Florian, Lani

    2015-01-01

    Policies around the world increasingly call for teachers to become ‚Äėagents of change‚Äô, often linked to social justice agendas. However, there is little clarity about the kind of competencies such agency involves or how it can be developed in teacher education. This paper draws on theories of teacher agency and inclusive pedagogy to clarify the meaning of teachers as agents of change in the context of inclusion and social justice. Inclusive practice requires the collaboration of teachers and o...

  9. Teacher in the Transformative Learning Space

    Maslo, Elina

    2009-01-01

    Abstract to the conference ‚ÄúTeachers and Trainers in Lifelong Learning‚ÄĚ Workshop A: Future Competences of Persons working in Lifelong Learning Title of proposal: Teacher in the Transformative Learning Spaces Author: Elina Maslo, dr. paed., National Library of Education, The Danish School of...... Education, Aarhus University, elma@dpu.dk Key words: learning, lifelong learning, adult learning, workplace learning, transformative learning spaces, teachers competencies During many years of research on lifelong foreign language learning with very different groups of learners, we found some criteria...... interesting example on the mixture of those very different environments. Taking the library example, we will show the new role of the teacher in the transformative learning spaces, namely, a person helping to learn. Using the systemic-constructivist approach to life and learning (Reich) and taking into...

  10. Adult teachers

    Larsen, Lea Lund

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I examine the research into the process of adult teachers‚Äô practice-based learning as a part of an on-going project titled ‚ÄúCompetence development through practice-based learning ‚Äď a study of adult teacher‚Äôs learning processes‚ÄĚ. The project relies on the notion of the adult teacher as...... a 'reflective practitioner‚Äô, who develops 'the language of practice‚Äô, through experience and learns when she is exposed to 'disjuncture‚Äô. Research done on continuing professional development and the inquiries done in the field of teacher thinking and within this the research on novices becoming...

  11. TEACHER NEEDED

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

  12. IN MY OPINION: Taking part matters

    Stone, Christine

    2000-09-01

    For a week last July, the University of Leicester played host to the 31st International Physics Olympiad. Sixty-three countries sent teams of five students, accompanied by two Leaders who were professors or teachers. The students faced two five-hour exams, one theory and one practical, woven into a week of visits and fun. The International Physics Olympiad has been held since 1967. The idea originated at a conference of the Czechoslovak Physical Society in Prague and the first competition was in Warsaw with teams from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and Romania participating. The competition has grown in size and scope over the decades, and in 1991 it was awarded the medal of the International Commission on Physics Education. The citation reads `the International Physics Olympiad has become an achievement of world wide impact, and physics educators from various countries around the world have attested to the strong influence it has had in stimulating interests in physics among both students and teachers in their countries'. The British Physics Olympiad team was chosen from Year 13 students who had come through the selection procedure. Schools are invited to challenge their best pupils with a preliminary paper, sat and marked at school. Students gaining above a given threshold are encouraged to sit a second, three-hour paper, which is centrally marked and graded. From among the Gold-medal winners in this exam, the team of five is selected. Amid the pressures of A-levels, some practical and theory tuition is fitted in before the competition. The different countries use a variety of selection methods and coaching. The Australians managed a week of scientific and cultural education in Vienna prior to arriving at Leicester, and several teams talked of pre-competition work-camps. How much Physics can be crammed into a week? Countries that have institutions selecting pupils highly gifted in Maths and Science have a great start, as do those with the most demanding syllabuses for pre-university exams. In years gone by, some of our most gifted students happened to be taught by some of our most able teachers, and together they tackled the old Scholarship-level papers. The old O-level work gave students a solid grounding in classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, with lots of sums on which to anchor the concepts. Those who enjoyed this aspect of the science could launch into A-level studies of Maths, Physics, Chemistry and/or Further Maths, and relish the challenges hidden in the syllabuses. Advanced level aims have changed. Mathematical elements have been played down; traditional proofs and applications may be referred to but are no longer required learning for the candidates. The modular system allows less repetitive revision and consolidation of ideas so that students are not required to immerse themselves in the subject in the same way as a generation ago. Does this matter? The `new way' hopes to attract some students into Physics and Engineering who would have been intimidated by the rigour and commitment required to do well in the old system. The single-minded student has a wealth of information available to further his or her studies and will not be limited by the dictates of any syllabus. However, without the need to meet exam requirements, many of our most able students have been deprived of the pleasure of advancing their knowledge so far at school, and must wait for a degree course to take up the story. (We should worry if many of these potential scientists get deflected from Physics.) The change in A-level targets inevitably means that the UK is slipping down the IPhO medal table, but in the Olympic tradition it is the taking part that matters. The 31st Olympiad was won by the People's Republic of China, with five gold medals out of five. Heartiest congratulations to them and to Russia, who came second with two gold, two silver and a bronze. The other gold medals went to Hungary (2), India (2), Taiwan (2), Bulgaria (1) and Switzerland (1). The UK team won two bronze medals. Who will be lucky enough to go to IPhO 2001, to be held in Turkey next summer, and will the teams include more than 13 girls? All the very able young people gathered in Leicester had a wealth of experiences beyond Physics. Friendships made may last a lifetime and, funding permitting, the UK may be lucky enough to welcome some of them back as students or graduate students. For further information on IPhO see: www.star.le.ac.uk/IPhO-2000 or contact Dr C Isenberg at Physics Laboratory, University of Kent at Canterbury, Canterbury CT2 7NR (e-mail C.Isenberg@ukc.ac.uk).

  13. Perceived perspective taking: when others walk in our shoes.

    Goldstein, Noah J; Vezich, I Stephanie; Shapiro, Jenessa R

    2014-06-01

    A great deal of psychological research has investigated the influence of perspective taking on individuals, indicating that perspective taking increases the extent to which people like, feel a sense of self-other overlap with, and help those whose perspective they take. However, previous investigations of the topic have been limited to the study of the perspective taker, rather than the individual whose perspective has been taken. The purpose of the current work is to begin to fill this large gap in the literature by examining the consequences of believing that another individual is taking one's perspective, a phenomenon we refer to as perceived perspective taking. Over a series of 6 experiments, we demonstrate that perceiving that one's perspective has been taken confers many of the same interpersonal benefits as taking another's perspective. Specifically, our data suggest that believing that another person has successfully taken one's perspective results in an increased liking for, a greater sense of self-other overlap with, and more help provided to that person. Consistent with predictions, we find that one's self-other overlap with the perspective taker and the amount of empathy one perceives the perspective taker to feel operate in tandem to mediate the link between perceived perspective taking and liking for the perspective taker. Further, a mediational path from perceived perspective taking to helping behavior through liking is supported. Future directions are discussed, along with implications for theory and application in domains such as intergroup relations, conflict resolution, and political campaigning. PMID:24841098

  14. Reading Test-taking Strategies in General Training IELTS

    Vahede Nosrati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The significance of gaining a better understanding of how test-taking strategies are used has been recognized by researchers. Considering this fact, this study aimed at investigating the test-taking strategies which were employed by IELTS candidates in reading comprehension test. Besides, it tried to take into account the differences among strategies used for different tasks. In order to gather data, two instruments were employed: the think-aloud protocol, and an IELTS reading test. The obtained data were analyzed and interpreted qualitatively by the researcher. The findings indicated that candidates employed 15 different strategies which were categorized in 3 stages, pre-reading, reading, and post-reading stages. Furthermore, it was revealed that test-takers used certain strategies differently, depending on the type of the task. The findings provide a better understanding of strategy use among IELTS candidates and help teachers to improve their approaches toward teaching and learning goals.Keywords: Test-taking Strategy, Test-taker, Reading Comprehension, Language Learning Strategy, IELTS

  15. Becoming a teacher in Portugal : initial teacher training: a review

    Jo√£o RUIVO; Helena MESQUITA

    2010-01-01

    The article contextualizes the training of teachers in Portugal, taking as references, first to change social policy in Portugal before the fall of the dictatorship and, at this juncture, the trend between the Reform Veiga Sim√£o (1973) and Law on the Education System (1986). Attempts to show that the creation of Higher Education and the Polytechnic School of Education (ESEs), on the eve of the 80, in conjunction with the movement of some innovative universities, broke with the traditional mod...

  16. Teacher expertise

    Rasmussen, Jens

    reform of 2007. The study included four teacher training colleges at two university colleges and about 100 students. In the reform and in the study focus was on professional development. Each of the colleges implemented a number of actions in order to see whether they had potential for bridging the gap...

  17. language teachers

    2007-01-01

    The Le Rosey Institute at Rolle (autumn and spring) and Gstaad (winter) is looking for part-time language teachers of 
Bulgarian, Farsi, Hindi, Korean and Romanian for the start of the autumn term in September 2007. For further details, please contact : www.rosey.ch Please send applications with CVs to job@rosey.ch

  18. Mongolian Teachers

    Madsen, Ulla Ambrosius

    2002-01-01

    The article comprises the result of a research project conducted among Mongolian teachers in a period of transition. The study is based on quantitative as well as on qualitative data. The study is carried out as part of research activities in an educational development programme....

  19. TEACHER PERCEPTIONS OF SUPERVISOR-TEACHER INTERACTION.

    AMIDON, EDMUND; BLUMBERG, ARTHUR

    TEACHER PERCEPTIONS OF SUPERVISOR-TEACHER INTERACTION WERE ANALYZED TO SUPPORT THE HYPOTHESIS THAT FOUR GROUPS, REPRESENTING DIFFERENT PERCEPTIONS OF SUPERVISORY BEHAVIOR, WOULD DIFFER WITH RESPECT TO TEACHER EVALUATIONS OF CONFERENCE PRODUCTIVITY, CONFERENCE LEARNING, AND THE COMMUNICATIVE ATMOSPHERE. THE 166 GRADUATE INSERVICE TEACHERS AT TEMPLE…

  20. Attitudes of Teacher Education Students toward Teachers.

    Miller, A. H.; And Others

    Cognitive dissonance theory implies that teacher education students will optimally internalize and most fully use pedagogical learnings compatible with their attitude systems. In order to determine the self-reported attitudes of teacher education students toward teachers, a pilot-study sample of graduate students reacted to four teacher-types…

  1. Factors That Impact Administrator-Teacher Relationships

    Gray, Patrick Sean

    2013-01-01

    Retaining teachers continues to be problematic for educational leaders across the country. With these numbers steadily increasing, one must examine the reasons as to why teachers are leaving the profession and how school administrators can address these problems if schools are going to maintain and increase their levels of success. ReasonsÖ

  2. Helping New Teachers Liven up Physical Education

    Stewart, Amanda; Elliott, Steve

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer strategies to help beginner physical education teachers increase the tempo of their classes. Most of these ideas are applicable to any physical education setting and grade level. After incorporating some of these strategies into daily lesson plans beginner teachers should see an increase in student energy levels…

  3. Complete guide to becoming an English teacher

    Clarke, Stephen R; Westbrook, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Praise for the previous edition: 'This is a text that should accompany every student teacher of English and find its way on to the shelf of all practising teachers. This book excited me. It is written in a style that makes you want to try out activities and take up challenges. This book will encourage the student teacher to embrace the subject of English along with its associated values and debates' - ESCalate `If I was training to teach English today, this is the book I would want - an extraordinarily professional handbook of good practice ' - Geoff Barton, Times Educational Supplement,

  4. Methanization takes countryside by storm

    A new plant is operating in Brittany: it transforms cattle effluents and slaughterhouse wastes into electric power through natural fermentation. Thus, every year, 75.000 tons of organic wastes will produce methane and 1.5 MW. Other projects exist in the same region. One faced the opposition of the population. Therefore, the idea is now to develop smaller projects. France is very late compared to Germany and the Netherlands. The Grenelle de l'Environnement seems to have boosted these projects, notably due to the increase of the electricity purchase price proposed by EDF. Another issue is discussed: the development of this industrial sector in France

  5. How do beliefs and other factors such as prior experience influence the decision-making of new teachers during their first year teaching experience?

    Short, Barbara J.

    2003-06-01

    The qualitative research project explored the perceptions of three new secondary education physics teachers. The content question stated: How do beliefs and other factors such as prior experience influence the decision-making of new teachers during their first year teaching experience? Specific questions includes: (1) What do first year teachers identify as their beliefs about teaching and learning? (2) How do first year teachers arrive at decisions about their instruction, materials, lessons, assessment, and student achievement? (3) How does decision-making occur in the learning environment from their perspective? (4) How do first year teachers solve problems? (5) To what extent do first year teachers actively think about what they do? The participants and their university professor were interviewed. Data was collected, transcribed, and coded using grounded theory techniques to conclude: (1) Belief systems take time to develop using filters. (2) Beliefs and perceptions help to fill gaps between knowledge. Gestalts change beliefs. (3) Modeling is a powerful technique influencing decision-making and beliefs over time. (4) Nurturing and preparation build confidence fostered at the university and public school. (5) New teachers' personalities, dispositions, and self-understandings effect filtering of perceptions, influencing behaviors in the learning environment. (6) Knowledge gained through experience, instruction, and reflection by the teacher enhances student learning. (7) Problem solving is learned and personality-based, helping to determine success. (8) Too many constraints to a novice cause limitations in his/her ability to be an effective teacher. (9) Early acceptance into a new environment helps to increase a sense of belonging leading to performance. (10) Positive attitudes towards students affect relationships with students in the classroom. (11) Backgrounds, personalities, and environments affect beliefs and decision-making. (12) New teachers focus more on their actions than on their students' learning. Implications are made for university pre-service instruction and public schools new teacher support systems.

  6. Rebels in the Classroom: Creativity and Risk-Taking in Honors Pedagogy

    Wintrol, Kate; Jerinic, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this article write that, as college teachers, they continue to confront their own timidity, and fear of risk. They have had to ask themselves when, in lip service to academic rigor, they are just taking the safe way out. They say that they worry at times while admonishing students to think for themselves, come up with new ideas, andÖ

  7. Students Taking Charge: Inside the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom

    Sulla, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Teachers and administrators who recognize the needs of today's society and students, and their impact on teaching and learning, can use this book to create student-centered classrooms that make technology a vital part of their lessons. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step guidelines, "Students Taking Charge" will help educators design…

  8. Constructing a Self-Funded Program Takes More than Just Dollars and Cents

    Burke, Scott

    2012-01-01

    With a little ingenuity and a lot of dedication, the author created a self-funded construction program that is weathering the ups and downs of school funding; it enjoys great support from the community, is accomplishing more with less, and collaborative efforts between teachers are paying off. Creating such a program takes time, vision,…

  9. Note-Taking Interventions to Assist Students with Disabilities in Content Area Classes

    Boyle, Joseph R.; Forchelli, Gina A.; Cariss, Kaitlyn

    2015-01-01

    As high-stakes testing, Common Core, and state standards become the new norms in schools, teachers are tasked with helping all students meet specific benchmarks. In conjunction with the influx of more students with disabilities being included in inclusive and general education classrooms where lectures with note-taking comprise a majority of…

  10. Research Plan: Teacher Learning For CLIL Teachers

    Bovenlander, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed research questions of the participating schools in the embedded research of the U-Teach programme demonstrate a notion of a lack of teacher learning in bilingual education and a lack of collaboration between teachers of English and other subject teachers. (How) can bilingual education in the Netherlands -TTO- be improved by (more) collaboration between the teacher of English and the other subject teachers? Two of the schools (Herman Wesselink College & Regionale Scholengemeenscha...

  11. Multitasking and Synchronous Work: Complexities in Teacher Work

    Brante, Goran

    2009-01-01

    Teacher work is described as increasing in complexity and intensity. Reasons for this include societal changes, reformed and increased work tasks, and the changed moral and normative character of teacher work, but also teachers' experiences of doing more than one thing at the same time, and of thinking about one's work at all times. The concept of…

  12. Understanding Preschool Teachers' Perspectives on Empathy: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Peck, Nancy Farstad; Maude, Susan P.; Brotherson, Mary Jane

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is a trait and skill necessary for teachers working with children and for partnering with families. This qualitative study focused on how teachers expressed empathy in the context of early childhood education. Diversity has increased in the United States and as diversity increases, the need for teachers to be able to empathize with…

  13. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    ... Contact Us General Background: When & How to take Antibiotics When should you take antibiotics? What is the proper dosage? How safe are antibiotics? How does a physician decide which antibiotic to ...

  14. On maps taking lines to plane curves

    Petrushchenko, Vsevolod; Timorin, Vladlen

    2014-01-01

    We study cubic rational maps that take lines to plane curves. A complete description of such cubic rational maps concludes the classification of all planarizations, i.e., maps taking lines to plane curves.

  15. Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks

    ... weight, including physical activity tips and a menu planner. To learn more, visit http://healthyweight.nhlbi.nih. ... you enjoy. Take a brisk walk, play ball, lift light weights, dance or garden. Even taking the ...

  16. Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide

    ... PDF for professional printing [PDF-983KB] Cancer Home Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide Infographic Language: English Espa√Īol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide Most prostate cancers grow ...

  17. Taking power from the Nile

    Widgery, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    The progress of hydro-electric power development on the upper Nile in Uganda, Ethiopia and Sudan is reviewed. Uganda was the first to benefit from the development of large-scale hydro-electric power. In 1954, the first of ten 15MW units at the Owen Falls dam was commissioned and since then exports of power have been made more or less continuously to Kenya. The Ugandan national grid has developed as a purely hydropower system and over the past ten years the installed capacity has been increased to 180MW. However, rapidly increasing demand can be met in the short term only by the construction of thermal plant and further realisation of the still considerable hydro potential is essential in the early years of the next century. Ethiopia`s topography combines a high plateau suitable for low-cost storage reservoirs with escarpments and gorges where heads greater than 1000m are possible. The hydropower potential in the Blue Nile basin is estimated as about 20GW. A number of hydro schemes have been carried out both on the Blue Nile and other rivers and there is considerable scope for export. Sudan has far less hydro power potential than Uganda or Ethiopia. Nevertheless, the extensive grid system built up over the past 35 years is largely based on hydro power from the Blue and Main Nile supplemented by thermal generation. Forecasts of demand into the middle of the next century point to the need for further expansion of hydro capacity in all three countries accompanied by the establishment of interconnections for exports. (UK)

  18. Teacher learning in Vietnam

    Huong T. M. Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    In order for Vietnam to seek better international integration into an increasingly globalised world, the Vietnamese government has launched educational reforms, requiring teachers to adopt ‚Äėwestern‚Äô constructivist pedagogies. This study focuses on pre-service teachers‚Äô learning in Vietnam, where traditional attitudes towards teachers‚Äô and learners‚Äô roles promote passivity amongst students and unquestioning respect for the authority of teachers‚Äô knowledge. The thesis describes a cycle of acti...

  19. TEACHERS' OPINIONS RELATED WITH ETHIC BEHAVIOURS OF EDUCATION INSPECTORS

    U?URLU, Yrd.DoÁ.Dr.Celal Teyyar

    2010-01-01

    Problem: Relation styles of education inspectors that take into consideration ethic values can provide teachers to have more morale and loyalty while working for their schools and students. Secondary school teachers' opinions related with ethic behaviors of education inspectors and sample situations the teachers have experienced are brought out by this search. Population of this study concerns 42 primary schools from Ad?yaman and its central counties. As applying to this poll at schools will ...

  20. TEACHERSí OPINIONS RELATED WITH ETHIC BEHAVIOURS OF EDUCATION INSPECTORS

    U?URLU, Yrd.DoÁ.Dr.Celal Teyyar

    2010-01-01

    Problem: Relation styles of education inspectors that take into consideration ethic values can provide teachers to have more morale and loyalty while working for their schools and students. Secondary school teachersí opinions related with ethic behaviors of education inspectors and sample situations the teachers have experienced are brought out by this search. Population of this study concerns 42 primary schools from Ad?yaman and its central counties. As applying to this poll at schools will ...

  1. Reflections of Preservice Information Technology Teachers Regarding Cyberbullying

    Yavuz Akbulut; Cem Çuhadar

    2011-01-01

    The current phenomenological study addressed the reflections of preservice information technology (IT) teachers regarding their cyberbullying or victimization experiences. Fifty five preservice IT teachers at a Turkish teacher training institution were offered a lecture with the purpose of awareness-raising on cyberbullying, which was followed by the assignment of take-home reflection papers. Document analysis on reflection papers led researchers to find out underlying themes regarding partic...

  2. Teacher Agency in Bilingual Spaces: A Fresh Look at Preparing Teachers to Educate Latina/o Bilingual Children

    Palmer, Deborah; Martinez, Ramon Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This review poses an increasingly common--and increasingly urgent--question in the field of teacher education: How can teachers best be prepared to educate Latina/o bilingual learners? The answers that the authors offer here challenge some of the prevailing assumptions about language and bilingualism that inform current approaches to teacherÖ

  3. Natural gas industry takes stock

    This paper is a summary of the main topics discussed at the 1996 International Gas Research Conference (IGRC) which has taken place in Cannes (France) with more than 650 participants. From the examination of the technical program of the IGRC meeting, the main following points and developing technologies were presented: the new techniques of gas extraction from coal in exploration and production, the underground storage of natural gas, the lifetime of distribution networks, the fuel cells, the natural gas vehicles and the combustion quality, the cogeneration and the reduction of pollutants. The paper focusses on the new projects presented by Gaz de France for the reduction of storage and supplying costs, for the improvement of safety and reliability of distribution systems, for the promotion of gas appliances by the development of new technologies and equipments etc. The economic and environmental impacts of the increasing use of natural gas was discussed too. Finally, the research and development programs carried out by Gaz de France in collaboration with other gas companies in the framework of international collaborations are described. (J.S.). 1 fig., 4 photos

  4. Abortion: taking the debate seriously.

    Kottow Lang, Miguel Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Voluntarily induced abortion has been under permanent dispute and legal regulations, because societies invariably condemn extramarital pregnancies. In recent decades, a measure of societal tolerance has led to decriminalize and legalize abortion in accordance with one of two models: a more restricted and conservative model known as therapeutic abortion, and the model that accepts voluntary abortion within the first trimester of pregnancy. Liberalization of abortion aims at ending clandestine abortions and decriminalizes the practice in order to increase reproductive education and accessibility of contraceptive methods, dissuade women from interrupting their pregnancy and, ultimately, make abortion a medically safe procedure within the boundaries of the law, inspired by efforts to reduce the incidence of this practice. The current legal initiative to decriminalize abortion in Chile proposes a notably rigid set of indications which would not resolve the three main objectives that need to be considered: 1) Establish the legal framework of abortion; 2) Contribute to reduce social unrest; 3) Solve the public health issue of clandestine, illegal abortions. Debate must urgently be opened to include alternatives in line with the general tendency to respect women's decision within the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:26057783

  5. Slavia takes the Czech path

    Biodiesel was the main reason Slavia Capital bought the oil processing company, Palma Tumys, Bratislava last year. The biofuels added to fuel produced from oil are one of the core products of this investment group. But today Slavia is profiting more from the production of edible oils and margarine produced by the Palma Group. It has benefited from the global increase in food prices. But Palma is also profiting from the experience and contacts of its new Czech managers appointed by the new owner. They have found a place in Czech stores for Slovak oils and margarines. In the past the company only used to supply its products to Czech bakers. And they even found a place for biodiesel. Petr Zejdlik is Czech and is the chairman of the board of Palma Group. Matej Valtr, is also Czech and is responsible for managing company strategies. They replaced the former owners, original Slovak privatizers who used to manage the company and did not do badly. They managed to keep one of the biggest Slovak food processing companies in good shape and in profit and j with stable revenues of around 90 mil. EUR. But finally they gave in to international competition from Bunge, Cargill and Archer Daniels Midland and sold the company to a financially strong investor. (author)

  6. Teachers as Learners

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    In "Teachers as Learners", a collection of landmark essays, noted teacher educator and scholar Sharon Feiman-Nemser shines a light on teacher learning. Arguing that serious and sustained teacher learning is a necessary condition for ambitious student learning, she examines closely how teachers acquire, generate, and use knowledge about teachingÖ

  7. Helping Teachers Discover Empathy

    Aspy, David N.

    1975-01-01

    This article suggests four steps for interpersonal training for teachers. The four steps are: 1) establishing a common definition for the term "empathy"; 2) helping each teacher appreciate past empathic understanding; 3) helping teachers assess other teachers' levels of empathic understanding; and 4) helping teachers become fairly precise judges…

  8. Science Teachers' Views and Practices in Planning for Teaching.

    Sanchez, Gaspar; Valcarcel, M. Victoria

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the views and attitudes of secondary science teachers (n=27) toward lesson planning. Describes teacher decisions, the things they take into account, what they ascribe the most importance to, time spent, the source of their knowledge, and how they evaluate the results. Contains 46 references. (Author/WRM)

  9. A Five-Year Journey: Integrating Teacher Education Methods Courses.

    Wright, Eileen; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes one college's program requiring preservice elementary educators to take their methods courses in an integrated block during one semester before student teaching, noting pitfalls of and advantages to this network of classes and reporting data collected from cooperating classroom teachers who subsequently had these student teachers in…

  10. Entering the Arena: The Figured Worlds Transition of Preservice Teachers

    Saunders, Jane M.; Ash, Gwynne Ellen

    2013-01-01

    The article describes a semester-long project that draws on Suzanne Collins' "The Hunger Games" as a resource and over-arching theme for preservice teachers taking a content area literacy course. We examine how preservice teachers learn to connect written texts to content area (disciplinary) literacy and consider ways to prepareÖ

  11. Action Research: An Approach for the Teachers in Higher Education

    Yasmeen, Ghazala

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Action Research is a formative study of progress commonly practiced by teachers in schools. Basically an action research is a spiral process that includes problem investigation, taking action & fact-finding about the result of action. It enables a teacher to adopt/craft most appropriate strategy within its own teaching environment.…

  12. What and How Teacher Educators Prefer to Learn

    Dengerink, Jurri√ęn; Lunenberg, Mieke; Kools, Quinta

    2015-01-01

    In which areas and domains do individual teacher educators prefer to work on their professional development? What kind of learning activities do they want to take on and with whom? Are there significant differences in these preferences between teacher educators? This article reports on a recent survey (N = 268) about the professional development…

  13. Vocational Education and Training Teacher Professional Development: Tensions and Context

    Bound, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Planning and implementing teacher professional development is a process of engaging in organisational learning and change. Yet our planning and implementation of professional development is at times a series of one-off sessions and can be quite ad hoc. This paper argues that teacher learning takes place not only through formal sessions but also…

  14. Strengthening Teacher Evaluation: What District Leaders Can Do

    Donaldson, Morgaen L.; Donaldson, Gordon A., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    School districts have typically not done a good job of managing the human side of teacher evaluation. In general, neither supervisors nor teachers find performance assessment a constructive, interpersonally respectful experience. District leaders can cultivate high-quality teaching--and attend to the human side of assessment--by taking five…

  15. Just Cause and Due Process in Teacher Dismissals

    Lawrence, C. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating an unsatisfactory teacher is mentally and physically exhausting and might take months or even years to resolve. Commonly, the principal handling the unsatisfactory teacher evaluation will have his or her professional and personal conduct scrutinized. For that reason, principals must maintain professional boundaries by avoiding social…

  16. Research on Strategic-oriented College Teacher Performance Management System

    Zhou Jingkun

    2012-01-01

    This study gives guiding principles for constructing strategic-oriented college teacher performance management system, including strategic orientation, systematicness, reliability, efficiency, operability and dynamism; it also designs a dynamic circulation process which takes achieving college strategic management objective system as the center and contains four key links: Making plans for college teacher performance evaluation, performance tutorship and implementation, performance evaluation...

  17. Navigating Discourses of Cultural Literacy in Teacher Education

    Halbert, Kelsey; Chigeza, Philemon

    2015-01-01

    Pre-service teachers' understandings, skills and dispositions as global, culturally literate citizens and agents of change have arguably never been more important. Professional standards, systemic policies and frameworks and a broad range of scholarly perspectives on culture position pre-service teachers to take up cultural education in sometimes…

  18. A Study Of The Problems Which Faced By The Colleges Of Teacher Education In The Practice Teaching Programme

    Lata Shivaji Patil; Vinaya Keshav Kamble

    2013-01-01

    The student who take admission in college of education to become teachers have to study basic subjects and principles of education, as well as do some practical work. The practical work and its practice is equally important. Teacher training colleges give more importance to difference skills, methods, principles, definitions ideas, techniques and helps student-teachers to acquire these skills for effective teaching, based on which the student-teachers prepare lessons plans, take guidance for ...

  19. Capital income taxation and risk taking under prospect theory

    Hlouskova, Jaroslava; Tsigaris, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    This research examines capital income taxation for a loss averse investor under some acceptable in the literature reference levels relative to which are the changes in the level of wealth valued. Depending on the reference level, some results indicate that it could be possible for a capital income tax increase not to stimulate risk taking even if the tax code provides the attractive full loss offset provisions. However, risk taking can be stimulated if the investor interprets part of the tax ...

  20. Theatre and Critical Consciousness in Teacher Education

    David Dillon

    2008-01-01

    Education for social justice, or critical pedagogy, is designed to empower learners and often uses the arts as primary pedagogical means. It has gained increasing attention in teacher education in recent years. However, the author’s use of critical approaches to theatre with teacher education students raised serious questions about their limited level of consciousness, or empowerment, but also alternate possibilities, including theatre, for empowering students during their teacher educati...

  1. Student Teachers' Team Teaching: How Do Learners in the Classroom Experience Team-Taught Lessons by Student Teachers?

    Baeten, Marlies; Simons, Mathea

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on student teachers' team teaching. Two team teaching models (sequential and parallel teaching) were applied by 14 student teachers in a quasi-experimental design. When implementing new teaching models, it is important to take into account the perspectives of all actors involved. Although learners are key actors in the teaching…

  2. What Type of Teachers Do We Intend to Train? An Analysis of Teacher Profiles in MERCOSUR Curricula

    Alliaud, Andrea; Feeney, Silvina María

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, teachers have often been identified as 'key' players for the improvement of education systems. The successive waves of reform taking place in Latin America since the 1990s have aimed at initial and continuous teacher training. The main changes intended to improve the quality and lengthen the duration of initial teacher…

  3. Studying Mathematics Problem-Solving Classrooms. A Comparison between the Discourse of In-Service Teachers and Student Teachers

    Rosales, Javier; Orrantia, Josetxu; Vicente, Santiago; Chamoso, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    In the article we compare the approaches of 3 in-service teachers and 3 student teachers when they tried to solve a verbal arithmetic problem in the classroom. Each interaction was studied using a System of Analysis that takes into account the cognitive processes involved in the solution of a mathematic problem and describes the interaction at…

  4. Studying Mathematics Problem-Solving Classrooms. A Comparison between the Discourse of In-Service Teachers and Student Teachers

    Rosales, Javier; Orrantia, Josetxu; Vicente, Santiago; Chamoso, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    In the article we compare the approaches of 3 in-service teachers and 3 student teachers when they tried to solve a verbal arithmetic problem in the classroom. Each interaction was studied using a System of Analysis that takes into account the cognitive processes involved in the solution of a mathematic problem and describes the interaction atÖ

  5. Second Language Teachers' Identity Development through Online Collaboration with L2 Learners

    Kitade, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    The sociocultural perspective of second language teacher education (L2TE) (e.g., Johnson, 2009), unlike the traditional one, values the importance of teacher development through actual teaching practice. Student teachers' (STs) initial beliefs should be challenged and reconstructed by taking into account particular teaching contexts. This…

  6. Accounting for Movement between Childcare Classrooms: Does It Change Teacher Effects Interpretations?

    Setodji, Claude Messan; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Schaack, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Child care studies that have examined links between teachers' qualifications and children's outcomes often ignore teachers' and children's transitions between classrooms at a center throughout the day and only take into account head teacher qualifications. The objective of this investigation was to examine these traditional assumptions and to…

  7. When Complexity Theory Meets Critical Realism: A Platform for Research on Initial Teacher Education

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Ell, Fiona; Grudnoff, Lexie; Ludlow, Larry; Haigh, Mavis; Hill, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Many scholars have concluded that teacher education research needs to take a complex view, resist simplification, and account more fully for teacher education's contexts and processes as well as its impact on teacher candidates' and school students' learning (Cochran-Smith & Zeichner, 2005; Grossman & McDonald, 2008; Opfer & Pedder,Ö

  8. Do Principals Fire the Worst Teachers? NBER Working Paper No. 15715

    Jacob, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of a unique policy change to examine how principals make decisions regarding teacher dismissal. In 2004, the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) signed a new collective bargaining agreement that gave principals the flexibility to dismiss probationary teachers for any reason and without the…

  9. Co-constructing Efficacy: A "Communities of Practice" Perspective on Teachers' Efficacy Beliefs

    Takahashi, Sola

    2011-01-01

    Teachers' efficacy beliefs are critical to improving student learning, but we have yet to fully understand how these beliefs develop. The prevailing model of teachers' efficacy development emerges from cognitive theories, but sociocultural theories may add insights to modeling the impact of teachers' school contexts. This case study takes a…

  10. Professional Learning of Observers, Collaborators, and Contributors in a Teacher-Created Online Community in Korea

    Seo, Kyounghye

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated professional learning taking place in a teacher-created online community. In particular, this aimed to explore how teachers at different levels of participation learn in an online community. The results showed that teachers usually began as observers, reading others' postings and using contributors' teachingÖ

  11. Conflicts in Teachers' Professional Practices and Perspectives about Inclusion in Icelandic Compulsory Schools

    GunnĢůrsdůttir, HermŪna; Bjarnason, Důra S.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive education policy, now the norm in many parts of the world including Iceland, is highly dependent on teachers for its successful implementation. Research on inclusion often attempts to identify teachers' attitudes of inclusion (against/for). This article takes a different approach. It focuses on teachers' perspectives of theirÖ

  12. New Jersey Teacher Salaries Are Comparable to Professional Pay in Private Sector. Issue Brief No. 5

    Winters, Marcus A.

    2010-01-01

    It is often said that public school teachers are poorly paid. At an average salary of about $60,000 a year, public school teachers in New Jersey take home substantially less pay than do many other college educated professionals. Teachers tend to work fewer hours in a year than do other professionals. Does the widespread assertion that New Jersey's…

  13. The Relationship between Preservice Science Teachers' Attitude toward Astronomy and Their Understanding of Basic Astronomy Concepts

    Bektasli, Behzat

    2016-01-01

    Turkish preservice science teachers have been taking a two-credit astronomy class during the last semester of their undergraduate program since 2010. The current study aims to investigate the relationship between preservice science teachers' astronomy misconceptions and their attitudes toward astronomy. Preservice science teachers were given an…

  14. A Personal Journey: TGfU Teacher Development in Australia and the USA

    Light, Richard; Butler, Joy

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines teacher development of TGfU in teacher education programmes in Australia and the USA by taking a cross-sectional snapshot across a sequence covering the final two years of a teacher education programme in which TGfU is emphasised, and the first two years of teaching after graduating from the same programmes. It explores theÖ

  15. Case Study: How Perceived Behaviors of Administrative Support Influence Teacher Retention Decisions

    Daugherty, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Educational reform is taking the nation, teachers are nearing retirement age, some teachers are choosing early retirement, and teachers are exiting the profession at a significant rate. Collectively, these trends in education present staffing and training concerns for today's schools. The purpose of this case study was to examine howÖ

  16. Recruiting Expert Teachers into High-Needs Schools: Leadership, Money, and Colleagues

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Teacher quality experts are urging policymakers to identify and target expert teachers and entice them to teach in high-needs schools. To understand what this might take, expert teachers in Arizona were surveyed to understand their job-related preferences to inform future recruitment policies. Findings should inform others about the importantÖ

  17. Development of Teachers as Scientists in Research Experiences for Teachers Programs

    Faber, Courtney; Hardin, Emily; Klein-Gardner, Stacy; Benson, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the teachers' development as scientists for participants in three National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Teachers. Participants included secondary science and math teachers with varying levels of education and experience who were immersed in research environments related to engineering and science topics. Teachers' functionality as scientists was assessed in terms of independence, focus, relationships with mentors, structure, and ability to create new concepts. Hierarchies developed within these constructs allowed tracking of changes in functionality throughout the 6-week programs. Themes were further identified in teachers' weekly journal entries and exit interviews through inductive coding. Increases in functionality as scientists were observed for all teachers who completed both the program and exit interview ( n = 27). Seven of the 27 teachers reached high science functionality; however, three of the teachers did not reach high functionality in any of the constructs during the program. No differences were observed in demographics or teaching experience between those who did and did not reach high functionality levels. Inductive coding revealed themes such as teachers' interactions with mentors and connections made between research and teaching, which allowed for descriptions of experiences for teachers at high and low levels of functionality. Teachers at high functionality levels adjusted to open-ended environments, transitioned from a guided experience to freedom, felt useful in the laboratory, and were self-motivated. In contrast, teachers at low functionality levels did not have a true research project, primarily focused on teaching aspects of the program, and did not display a transition of responsibilities.

  18. Innovation through College Classroom Teacher: an Analysis of Experience

    Gonzalez-Tirados, Rosa Maria; Medina-Rojas, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    If we make a balance on the training received by the university professors to exercise its teaching skills we can find in Spain institutions, like Institute of Education Sciences (ICE), that have more than 40 years of existence, have been developing this role with great success and have data from this experience. It is true that only a few universities have created and promoted these institutions mostly from 70 Law and even today continue to develop training, modernized and adapted to the current needs of each university. Even some of them have created new ones, changed the name to Centers of Excellence or Innovation although not their functions, others such as the Universidad Polit√©cnica de Madrid (UPM), have incorporated these features of quality, innovation to their current actions. Despite this training in some universities, it is a voluntary and individual fact that every teacher, either by joining teaching for the first time or when want to upgrade, renovate or simply as a form of share experiences with other fellow teachers of other grades and may have the same problems. Looking at the same university context, in other countries, we see something similar in regards to common joint rules for access to the teaching profession as in other types of training, and also differences occurs in the recognition that training is done, unlike that resolves research and innovation taking place in the university. From a teacher training institution as the ICE at UPM, with a long experience in this training, we have managed to consolidate the organization and actions. In addition, we have learned to capture teachers attention, trying to find an appreciation for " the value of training " by the need to upgrade and the fact of knowing innovative methods and techniques to help them improve their teaching by, first, that students learn more and better themselves and, second, that teachers, mastering techniques, feel increasingly confident in the classroom and to the satisfaction of what they do is well done. Although this statement can be seen truncated as in the current moment research has higher priority versus teaching and scientific publications address the training and even mobility management or come to have more value than the training itself and learning along the life, although this phrase is used a lot from Bologna called Treaty. In these circumstances it is very difficult to practicing teachers, their training and educational needs updating, because what they are going to value professional development is, first, their research experience, giving the highest score at CV than to your educational background, teaching experience, also valued more educational management and administration. In this work we will provide objective data on the results regarding the university teachers training and different learning models that we have developed, as well as the achievements on the level of participation in the last ten years, the level of satisfaction and the innovation performance in the classroom, after receiving training. In addition, we would like to raise a discussion forum on the future of university faculty training for the profession of teaching and provoke interest here some questions for discussion and possible solutions: ‚ÄĘ Where should we focus on the university teachers training? ‚ÄĘ What is the status of university teacher Centers training in other EU countries? ‚ÄĘ What are the training models in other countries of the European Union? ‚ÄĘ What is the value and who appreciates the teacher training? ‚ÄĘ Should be mandatory or would be detrimental and would not be interested? A teacher should be an expert, brushing or reaching the excellence of their own knowledge, not to mention minimum-pedagogical training bases. Otherwise he will be an excellent researcher, something that is always needed, but mediocre or bad teacher that can cause irreparable damage to some students that fall in his class.

  19. Making the transition to middle schooling: A case study of experienced science teachers coping with change

    Strong, Donna Dorough

    The increasing popularity of the middle school movement necessitates a need for more interpretive research in middle level education. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore science teachers' perceptions of the transition to a new middle school and the meanings they attached to this new experience. The participants were three eighth grade science teachers, each with 20 plus years of teaching experience. The primary data for analysis was a series of five interviews with each participant. Data collection also included weekly participant observation of team meetings. Findings revealed that the science teachers all had positive feelings attached to the ability to keep track of students' academic progress and behavior problems as a result of teaming. The changes associated with the first year were very stressful for all three, primarily the loss of the traditional junior high departmentalized structure. The two participants who transferred directly from the junior high school were very skeptical of any benefits from an interdisciplinary curriculum, the appropriateness of the middle school philosophy for eighth grade students, and the move to heterogeneously grouped science classes. In contrast, the former junior high teacher who had spent the past ten years teaching sixth grade at the elementary school had positive beliefs about the potential benefits of an interdisciplinary curriculum and heterogeneous grouping. Teacher stress associated with a change in the school setting and the science teachers' constraints to actualizing a meaningful middle schooling experience are illuminated. Teachers' lack of ownership in the reform decision making process, loss of time with their science teacher peers, diminished compliments from high school counterparts, and need for more empirical evidence supporting proposed changes all served as barriers to embracing the reform initiatives. The participants found taking a very slow approach to be their most useful means of coping with the stress of these changes. The discussion includes meta-assertions and recommendations concerning the leadership and planning process for movement to a middle school philosophy, the most appropriate building structure for meeting needs of science teachers, teachers as curriculum makers, and the nature of middle level professional development for experienced science teachers.

  20. THE ATTITUDES AND VIEWS OF TEACHERS AND PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS RELATED TO THE GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    Cemalettin ńįPEK

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Women are underrepresented in leadership positions in Turkish work life as well as in other countries. There are some social and personal barriers preventing women from managerial positions. One of the area in which women are underrepresented is school leadership. The main purpose of this study is to describe the attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions in schools. In accordance with the main purpose of the study it was investigated whether there were any differences between the attitudes and the views of the primary teacher and the primary pre-service teachers. The attitudes and the views about the barriers facing female teachers in school leadership were also compared according to gender and the grades of the primary pre-service teachers. Data were collected from 114 primary teachers working in primary schools in Çayeli district and 192 primary pre-service teachers attending primary school teacher training program in the Faculty of Education in Rize University.The attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions were described in two dimensions, personal attitudes and views, and social attitudes and views. Study results revealed that the attitudes and views differentiated significantly due to gender and position (teacher or pre-service teacher in both dimensions. Moreover, it was indicated that gender and the position of the primary teachers and the primary pre-service teachers have significant joint effects on the personal attitudes and views whereas joint effects of the gender and positions on the social attitudes and views were not observed at statistically significant level. As a conclusion, study results indicated that female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers have not negative attitudes and views for female promoting to school leadership as much as their male counterparts. However, female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers seemed to accept voluntarily the social female roles more than male primary teachers and male primary pre-service teachers.In accordance with the study results some suggestions were developed. First of all, it was proposed that traditional gender roles should be redefined in Turkish Educational System. Secondly, gender discrimination subject might take place in teacher training programs. Moreover, further gender studies were recommended in terms of motivation, stress, work satisfaction, work performance, work commitment and organizational culture.

  1. Learning to Lead: A New Teacherís Perspectives on Teacher Leadership

    Kristie Bridges

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The question of teacher leadership is inextricably tied to teacher effectiveness. Leadership forms the foundation of classroom management and permeates all aspects of the curriculum. While many new teachers have visions of the kinds of leaders they wish to become, this vision is often complicated by the everyday realities of classroom life. Faced with increasingly difficult circumstances, it becomes infinitely more important for teachers to foster the trust and confidence required to make meaningful connections with their students. This article discusses the qualities of effective leaders and the impact of effective leadership on students. It also considers some of the challenges that arise when pursuing oneís vision of leadership.

  2. Theoretical perspectives of science teacher education

    Chorng-Jee GUO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Science teacher education is an essential component in the entire system of science education. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate theory to describe and explain the complex phenomena and problems involved in science teaching and teacher education, and to provide effective guidance for policy-makers and practitioners. However, a range of theoretical viewpoints concerning science education and teacher education in general have been articulated in recent years. The aim of this article is to summarize some of the main theoretical perspectives in this area, so that they can be referred to in practical works and future research studies on science teacher education.First, contemporary views on the goals of science education and the principles of science teaching, assessment and teacher education have been articulated by a number of science educators and professional organizations worldwide (NRC, 2000; 2007. These theoretical viewpoints are based on a wealth of findings from research studies on studentsí learning of science carried out in the past few decades. It was noted that learning with understand is the focus of the latest scientific studies on students learning, that is, cognitive processes involved in learning are the main research interests. Our new understanding of studentsí learning indicated that students are active learners, their attention, memory, sense-making, problem solving, understanding and acquisition new knowledge are strongly influenced by their prior knowledge, skills, and conceptions. In addition, it was found that studentsí inquiry skills and their understanding of basic science principles are closely related, and that meta-cognition plays an important role in science teaching and learning. The implications for science teacher education is that teacher education institutions are expected to provide opportunities for teachers to develop the knowledge, skills, and teaching approaches which will enable them to create better learning environments for their students. The importance of science teachersí development of pedagogical content knowledge in school contexts is emphasized.Secondly, turning to literature on teacher education in general, theoretical perspectives on the purposes of teacher education, teachersí professional qualities and teachersí learning to teach are respectively discussed. Summarizing the analysis of Zeichner and Joyce, Doyle (1990 outlined five paradigms in teacher education programs, including teachers as good employees, junior professors, fully functioning persons, innovators, and reflective practitioners. Five conceptual orientations of teacher education programs are described by Feiman-Nemser (1990, including academic, practical, technological, personal, and critical/social. Doyle (1990 discussed teacher professional qualities in great length, by pointing out a sharp distinction between the professional-technical knowledge base emphasized by traditional competence-based teacher education program (informed by process-product research studies and the kind of personal practical knowledge that teachers actively constructed within the social environment in school contexts. The former emphasizes direct instruction of generalized knowledge and skills in teaching, while the later emphasizes teachersí roles in making personal meaning, insight, and creativity within a specific context. Doyle (1990 strongly suggested that successful teacher education program and research studies can be designed if one combines fruitfully the strengths of both knowledge types mentioned above. Korthagon (2004 and coworkers have done comprehensive research studies along the same line. In addition to point out that teachers change take place successively through a layered structure from environment, behavior, competencies, beliefs, identity, to mission (the innermost layer, they proposed that in learning to teach, mathematics teachers and possibly teachers in other fields as well, develop through a sequence of three stages, namely, gestalt formation, schematization, and theory building. In general, at the gestalt stage, teachers operate or react to classroom events unconsciously and unintentionally, using their prior knowledge, experiences under similar situations as reference frames. Schemas are relatively more systematic thoughts formed by teachers when they are asked or required to reflect on their decisions and teaching behaviors explicitly, or to discuss and compare them with other teachers. The stage of theory building takes place only when teachers are conscious that their schemas are getting more complicated and that they want to make the logic and reasons involved clear.Finally, the limitations of traditional technical-oriented teacher education programs are pointed out. For science teacher education practice and research, it is recommended that various theoretical perspectives are considered, taking into account different goals, contexts, participants and other resources. As for future research directions, it is suggested that the links between theory and practice be strengthened. For example, how to inform teachers so that they can make better use of research findings and theoretical knowledge in their classroom teaching, and how to formulate more practical research questions based on teachersí practice in classroom contexts. Hopefully, this will eventually lead to the building of more useful teachersí practical theories.

  3. Using Diagnostic Assessment to Help Teachers Understand the Chemistry of the Lead-Acid Battery

    Cheung, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Nineteen pre-service and in-service teachers taking a chemistry teaching methods course at a university in Hong Kong were asked to take a diagnostic assessment. It consisted of seven multiple-choice questions about the chemistry of the lead-acid battery. Analysis of the teachers' responses to the questions indicated that they had difficulty inÖ

  4. Joint contributions of mathematics teacher educators and indigenous Terena teachers to revitalization of the native language

    Domite, M. do Carmo Santos; Dobereiner Pohl, Robert; Carvalho, Valéria de

    2014-01-01

    This study may be understood as a set of ideas, experiences, and proposals about possible directions for indigenous teacher education when the purpose is revitalization of indigenous language in general and the use and valuation of indigenous language in mathematics education in particular. Taking as a point of departure the visions and needs of indigenous Terena teachers relative to native language fluency, we worked with them in one Terena village and produced effective materials for learni...

  5. One University's Experience with Foreign-trained Teachers

    Belinda Bustos Flores

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Texas like many states is facing a teacher shortage. The author suggests that the teacher shortage should be considered in light of the diverse school population. Across states there is a need for well-prepared teachers to work with linguistically and culturally diverse school populations. Thus, areas such as bilingual education continue to be critical shortage areas. While different attempts are currently underway to increase the number of preservice bilingual educators, another way districts have addressed this issue is to employ foreign-trained teachers as paraprofessionals or as teachers. Recently, Texas passed a regulation that would allow legally residing foreign-trained teachers to become certified Texas teachers upon passing the appropriate teacher competency exams and demonstrating English proficiency. The passing of this "fast-track" regulation appears to demonstrate that the state board is thinking out of the box by tapping into a community's resources and acknowledging that immigrants can offer the community services beyond menial tasks. However, the researcher cautions that such actions may not increase the number of teachers and may not assure teacher quality. To support this notion, the researcher offers an analysis of a university's experience with the integration of legally residing foreign-trained Mexican teachers in their bilingual education teacher preparation program. The researcher posits that increasing the number of qualified teachers does require for entities to think out of the box, such as tapping into a community's natural resources; nevertheless, any plan of action should be critically examined and deliberated.

  6. Revised data taking schedule with ion beams

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Aduszkiewicz, A; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Choi, K U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Cleymans, J; Derkach, D A; Diakonos, F; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hasegawa, T; Haungs, A; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Katrynska, N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kolevatov, R S; Kondratiev, V P; Kowalski, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Majka, Z; I Malakhov, A; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mijakowski, P; Mitrovski, M; Montaruli, T; Mrówczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nikolic, V; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Röhrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovskii, A; Sakashita, K; Schuster, T; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Zipper, W; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the revised data taking schedule of NA61 with ion beams. The revision takes into account limitations due to the new LHC schedule as well as final results concerning the physics performance with secondary ion beams. It is proposed to take data with primary Ar and Xe beams in 2012 and 2014, respectively, and to test and use for physics a secondary B beam from primary Pb beam fragmentation in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

  7. Risk taking under heterogenous risk sharing

    Belhaj, Mohamed; Dero√Įan, Fr√©d√©ric

    2009-01-01

    We revisit the common view that risk sharing enhances risk taking in the context of heterogenous risk sharing in a small economy. Under low volumes of transfers, we express individual risk level in terms of Bonacich measure. We find that heterogeneity combined to strategic interaction imply that risk sharing enhances risk taking only in average. However, under high transfer volumes, risk sharing may reduce risk taking. We also provide conditions under which agents under or over invest with re...

  8. From Victim to Taking Control: Support Group for Bullied Schoolchildren.

    Kvarme, Lisbeth Gravdal; Aab√ł, Liv Sandnes; S√¶teren, Berit

    2016-04-01

    School bullying is a serious problem affecting the victims in their daily lives at school. The aim of this study was to investigate whether support groups were able to help the victims of bullying to overcome their victim status and to explore what it means to be a member of a support group. An exploratory qualitative design, with individual and focus group interviews, was used. The sample consisted of 19 schoolchildren, aged 12-13 years, 3 of whom were victimized. Six individual interviews and three focus group interviews were conducted. Findings show that support groups contribute to the cessation of bullying and improvements remain 3 months later. The support groups experience feeling important and helping others. It is important for the school nurse and teachers to follow up with victimized children, in collaboration with their parents, to help the victim to no longer be a victim and to take control. PMID:26072469

  9. Taking breaks from work: an exploratory inquiry.

    Strongman, K T; Burt, C D

    2000-05-01

    Two studies concerned with taking breaks from either mental or physical work are presented. In the first study, a questionnaire was given to 101 students in which they answered questions about their own break taking and that of others. They also completed a time management questionnaire and scales about procrastination, self-esteem, and work overload. In the second study, 17 students kept detailed diaries of their daily break-taking behavior over a 6-week period. Results are discussed in terms of the types of reasons given for taking breaks and the possible discrepancies between such reasons and the actual activities engaged in during breaks. PMID:10907702

  10. Native English-speaking teachers versus non-native English-speaking teachers

    García Merino, Iván

    1997-01-01

    There is a stereotype that takes for granted that a native speaker is by nature the best person to teach his/her foreign language. This assumption leaves little room for non-native teachers. A comparison of these two kinds of teachers is made following Medgyes' 3 dimensional framework: native/non-native, non-native/ non-native and native/native. The aim of this article is to analyze their differences in order to prove that non-native teachers have some advantages which shoul...

  11. Language Teacher Action Research: Achieving Sustainability

    Edwards, Emily; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Action research (AR) is becoming increasingly popular in ELT contexts as a means of continuous professional development. The positive impacts of AR on language teacher development are well documented, but the important question of how those impacts can be sustained over time is virtually unexplored. Drawing on findings from a study of teachers in…

  12. Teacher Self-Actualization and Student Progress

    Coble, Charles R.; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1972-01-01

    There were no differences in biology achievement or critical thinking scores of students of teachers with different degrees of self actualization. However, when grouped according to their success in increasing students' critical thinking ability, effective teachers could be distinguished from ineffective by their scores on the existentiality''…

  13. Differentiating Teacher Professional Development with Design

    MacFarlane, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    Much research supports the benefits that quality professional development plays in impacting teacher quality. Experiences in professional development can affect a teacher's growth, the application of varied instructional techniques, and increase student learning. When professional development is well-planned, it can provide purpose, collaboration,…

  14. Ensuring Teacher Retention in a PDS

    Buchanan, Merilyn; Bleicher, Robert E.; Behshid, Sima; Evans, Charmon; Ngarupe, Linda

    2007-01-01

    This study takes place at a Professional Development School (PDS). This PDS opened as a pre-K-5 public charter school, and as a PDS in collaboration with a local public university in Southern California. This qualitative study examined the challenges of teaching in a new PDS as expressed by the teachers' voices. Interview and survey data wereÖ

  15. Preparing Experienced Elementary Teachers as Mathematics Specialists

    Nickerson, Susan D.

    2010-01-01

    High quality teaching is critical to student learning, yet takes considerable time to develop in particular content areas. Students in high-poverty, urban settings are less likely to encounter experienced and trained teachers. Administrators from a large school district and university mathematics education faculty partnered and attempted toÖ

  16. Second Language Teacher Education. International Perspectives

    Tedick, Diane J., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The education of second language teachers takes place across diverse contexts, levels, settings, and geographic regions. By bringing together research, theory, and best practices from a variety of contexts (ESL/EFL, foreign language, bilingual and immersion education), this book contributes to building meaningful professional dialogue among…

  17. Preservice Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge of Mathematics

    Menon, Ramakrishnan

    2009-01-01

    Sixty four preservice teachers taking a mathematics methods class for middle schools were given 3 math problems: multiply a three digit number by a two digit number; divide a whole number by a fraction; and compare the volume of two cylinders made in different ways from the same rectangular sheet. They were to a) solve them, explaining their…

  18. The Responsibility Education of Teacher Candidates

    Toremen, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to take the views and suggestions of academicians working at the faculty of education on what can be done about teacher candidates' responsibility education. This study was designed on the basis of qualitative research approach and purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected by unstructured interview method…

  19. Reconsidering an Economy of Teacher Education

    Takayanagi, Mitsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    This article has an overall aim as follows: to develop an alternative understanding to a narrow view of education, and in particular teacher training--preparatory and continuing--in terms of economy, as well as the competencies needed for the teaching profession. It takes the view that such an alternative is or could be found in the ideas put…

  20. Introducing Educational Technologies to Teachers: Experience Report

    Thota, Neena; Negreiros, Joao G. M.

    2015-01-01

    The dramatic rise in use of digital media has changed the way learning is taking place and has led to new ways to teach with digital technologies. In this article, we describe the experiences of teaching a course that introduces educational technologies to teachers in Macau. The course design is based on connectivism, a learning theory for theÖ

  1. Democracy and Teacher Education: Setting Priorities

    Goodman, Jesse H.

    2009-01-01

    As John Dewey noted in his last book, each generation, in its turn, must assume responsibility as caretaker of democracy. He noted that one should never take democracy for granted. Everyone lives in an imperfect democracy, and teacher educators should play their part in protecting, nurturing, and advancing democratic ideals, rituals, values, and…

  2. Sustained programs in physics teacher education

    Scherr, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    For over a decade, physics teacher education programs have been transformed at a number of institutions around the country through support from the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society in partnership with the American Association of Physics Teachers. In 2012-2013, PhysTEC supported an independent study on the sustainability of its sites after project funding ends. The study sought to measure the extent to which programs have been sustained and to identify what features should be prioritized for building sustainable physics teacher education programs. Most PhysTEC legacy sites studied have sustained their production of physics teachers. A few sites studied have thriving physics teacher education programs, that is, programs that have continued to substantially increase their production of teachers since the PhysTEC award. All of the studied sites that sustained their production of physics teachers have a champion of physics teacher education and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment. The necessity of the champion was known from the Report of the Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics (T-TEP report) and borne out by this study. The necessity of institutional motivation and commitment is a finding of this study. At some sites, PhysTEC support has precipitated an institutional focus on physics teacher education, leveraging other resources (including both awards and personnel) benefiting physics teacher education. The study also documented the sustainability of components of physics teacher education programs, such as recruitment, early teaching experiences, and a teacher in residence. Sustained components tend to be those that have direct benefit to undergraduates in the physics department, whereas less-sustained components seem to be those that primarily benefit secondary teachers. The number of sustained components does not appear to correspond to teacher production; that is, sites that have sustained more (or fewer) components do not produce larger (or smaller) numbers of teachers. This result further supports the finding that the presence of the champion and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment are the key features of successful physics teacher education programs.

  3. Stress Causing Factors Among Teachers in Elementary Schools and Their Relationship with Demographic and Job Characteristics

    Teuta AgaiĖDemjaha

    2015-07-01

    CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm that within the control category, the highest levels of perceived teacherís work-related stress were caused by changes in terms and conditions without consultation and given responsibility without the authority to take decisions, while in the category support, the same was true for stress factors lack of funds/resources to do the job and limited or no access to training. We have also concluded that the lower-grade school teachers, female teachers, teachers for whom this is the first job and teachers with university education perceive more often the lack of authority to take decisions as a very stressful factor than the upper-grade school teachers, male teachers, teachers previously employed in another workplace, and those with high education. The lower-grade school teachers, older teachers and teachers with university education perceive more often changes in education as a very stressful factor than the upper grade school teachers, younger teachers and those with high education.

  4. Teacher design of technology for emergent literacy: An explorative feasibility study

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    The active participation of teachers in designing classroom learning experiences contributes to teacher abilities to facilitate learning. This paper reports on a case study of one Dutch teacher designing a technology-rich learning environment for emergent literacy. Data were collected to explore the design and implementation of the learning environment, respectively. The main findings from the design study are that scaffolding teacher design: takes mammoth effort; appears to contribute to tea...

  5. Accounting for Movement between Childcare Classrooms: Does it Change Teacher Effects Interpretations?

    Messan Setodji, Claude; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Schaack, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Child care studies that have examined links between teachers' qualifications and children's outcomes often ignore teachersí and childrenís transitions between classrooms at a center throughout the day and only take into account head teacher qualifications. The objective of this investigation was to examine these traditional assumptions and to compare inferences made from these traditional models to methods accounting for transitions between classrooms and multiple teachers in a classroom. The...

  6. What characterises a good practicum in teacher education?

    Ulvik, Marit; Smith, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Practice teaching is regarded as a key component of teacher education and often highly valued by student teachers, even if the aims of field experiences vary from context to context. This article takes a closer look at the practicum in a one-year postgraduate teacher education programme (PGCE) in Norway by listening to the voices of student teachers, school-based mentors and university-based supervisors. The study aims to obtain a deeper understanding of how the practicum is understood and wh...

  7. English-for-Teaching: Rethinking Teacher Proficiency in the Classroom

    Freeman, Donald; Katz, Anne; Garcia Gomez, Pablo; Burns, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of English teaching in state education systems places increasing demands on English language teachers and how they are trained. A major thrust of these efforts has focused on improving teachers' English language proficiency. This expectation is manifested in policy and pedagogical directives that teachers "teach English in…

  8. Teacher Educators and Indigenous Language Rights Reform in Southern Mexico

    Tanner, Paul Edward

    2012-01-01

    Nations throughout the world have increasingly looked at teacher education policy as a vehicle for reform of both the educational system and the society at large, and teacher quality is often positively associated with the quality of the overall educational system. Although such reforms often target pre-service teacher education, little is knownÖ

  9. Teacher Induction in Australia: A Sample of What's Really Happening

    Hudson, Sue; Beutel, Denise; Hudson, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retention rates and stress levels of beginning teachers are of concern. Well-planned induction programs can assist beginning teachers to make the transition successfully into the profession, which may increase retention rates. This qualitative, year-long study aims to explore and describe the induction experiences of eight beginning teachers as…

  10. English-for-Teaching: Rethinking Teacher Proficiency in the Classroom

    Freeman, Donald; Katz, Anne; Garcia Gomez, Pablo; Burns, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of English teaching in state education systems places increasing demands on English language teachers and how they are trained. A major thrust of these efforts has focused on improving teachers' English language proficiency. This expectation is manifested in policy and pedagogical directives that teachers "teach English inÖ

  11. Cohort Placement of Teacher Interns in Public Schools.

    Roebuck, Johnnie J.; And Others

    Henderson State University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, launched a collaborative partnership effort with four public school districts in an effort to refine existing teacher education methods and explore alternative methods. Student teachers were called "teacher interns," which generated an increased professional attitude from both the "interns"…

  12. Legal Literacy: A Necessity for Florida Preservice/Inservice Teachers.

    Ringenberger, Barbara K.; Funk, Fanchon F.

    The increasing impact of judicial and legislative intervention at all levels of school operations make it necessary for educators to be more aware of their legal rights and liabilities. Few inservice and preservice teacher education programs in Florida provide legal education for teachers, and a study showed that teachers are largely uninformed ofÖ

  13. Teacher Educators and Indigenous Language Rights Reform in Southern Mexico

    Tanner, Paul Edward

    2012-01-01

    Nations throughout the world have increasingly looked at teacher education policy as a vehicle for reform of both the educational system and the society at large, and teacher quality is often positively associated with the quality of the overall educational system. Although such reforms often target pre-service teacher education, little is known…

  14. Forty Years of Teacher Education in Australia: 1974-2014

    Mayer, Diane

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I analyse the history of teacher education in Australia from 1974 to the current policy moment in which questions are increasingly being asked about the quality of teaching and teacher education. Teacher education is, and has been, a highly scrutinised domain in Australia. Since the 1970s, we have seen more than 100 reviews of…

  15. Cases for Teacher Development: Preparing for the Classroom

    Goldblatt, Patricia F., Ed.; Smith, Deirdre, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    With the recent and increasing attention to accountability and standards, teacher preparation programs are more than ever in need of tools that vicariously acquaint future teachers with the difficult situations they will face. This book is the perfect catalyst for this sort of teacher development. The cases encourage students to immerse themselves…

  16. Teacher Beliefs regarding Bilingualism in an English Medium Reading Program

    Vaish, Viniti

    2012-01-01

    Reading classes in schools where English is the medium of instruction are increasingly servicing a linguistically diverse population; however, teacher-training for English teachers lacks a focus on bilingualism. Using the context of Singapore, this paper analyses beliefs on bilingualism of English teachers in an early intervention reading program.…

  17. Teachers and the Policy Reform Agenda. What is Policy?

    Naidu, Sham

    2011-01-01

    This article is related to the impacts on teachers of the increasing marginalization of their voices in educational policy making and policy debates. Policy influences the nature of teaching and learning and if teachers are to re-centre teachers' voices and combat the neo-liberal agenda underpinning public education, they must construct their ownÖ

  18. A Review of Literature on Teacher Efficacy and Classroom Management

    Dibapile, Waitshega Tefo Smitta

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the literature on teacher efficacy and classroom management. The conceptual framework of this paper was based on the theories of Rotter (1966) and Bandura (1977). The review of literature indicated that teacher efficacy helps teachers plan effective instructional strategies, increases performance, and…

  19. Studying Science Teacher Identity: Current Insights and Future Research Directions

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10?years an increasing number of articles have been published in leading science education journals that report on research about teacher identity and describe interventions that support teacher identity development. My purpose in this review paper is to examine how the construct of science teacher identity has been conceptualised…

  20. The Galileo Teacher Training Programme

    Doran, Rosa

    The Galileo Teacher Training Program is a global effort to empower teachers all over the world to embark on a new trend in science teaching, using new technologies and real research meth-ods to teach curriculum content. The GTTP goal is to create a worldwide network of "Galileo Ambassadors", promoters of GTTP training session, and a legion of "Galileo Teachers", edu-cators engaged on the use of innovative resources and sharing experiences and supporting its pears worldwide. Through workshops, online training tools and resources, the products and techniques promoted by this program can be adapted to reach locations with few resources of their own, as well as network-connected areas that can take advantage of access to robotic, optical and radio telescopes, webcams, astronomy exercises, cross-disciplinary resources, image processing and digital universes (web and desktop planetariums). Promoters of GTTP are expert astronomy educators connected to Universities or EPO institutions that facilitate the consolidation of an active support to newcomers and act as a 24 hour helpdesk to teachers all over the world. GTTP will also engage in the creation of a repository of astronomy education resources and science research projects, ViRoS (Virtual Repository of resources and Science Projects), in order to simplify the task of educators willing to enrich classroom activities.

  1. Taking over someone else's e-learning design: challenges trigger change in e-learning beliefs and practices

    Karen M. Scott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As universities invest in the development of e-learning resources, e-learning sustainability has come under consideration. This has largely focused on the challenges and facilitators of organisational and technological sustainability and scalability, and professional development. Little research has examined the experience of a teacher dealing with e-learning sustainability when taking over a course with an e-learning resource and associated assessment. This research focuses on a teacher who was inexperienced with e-learning technology, yet took over a blended unit of study with an e-learning resource that accounted for one-fifth of the subject assessment and was directed towards academic skills development relevant to the degree program. Taking a longitudinal approach, this research examines the challenges faced by the new teacher and the way she changed the e-learning resource and its implementation over two years. A focus of the research is the way the teacher's reflections on the challenges and changes provided an opportunity and stimulus for change in her e-learning beliefs and practices. This research has implications for the way universities support teachers taking over another teacher's e-learning resource, the need for explicit documentation of underpinning beliefs and structured handover, the benefit of teamwork in developing e-learning resources, and provision of on-going support.

  2. Take part in a Django Girls training!

    2016-01-01

    Women are often under-represented in IT. And yet, at any age and whatever their level and background, it is a field that can arouse much interest.    To overcome this under-representation, the R0SEH1PSters community organises Django workshops targeted at women to introduce them to the world of coding and technology by teaching them how to successfully create a blog application and deploy it to the internet. And who knows, a spark of interest in the newly-discovered IT world may develop into a shine! The aim of Django Girls is also to increase the diversity within the industry. The mentors are mainly female volunteers who bring their passion to the workshop and are part of the awesome atmosphere attendees can feel during each event. Workshops have been organised worldwide regularly since 2014. Hosted by IdeaSquare and supported by the CERN IT department and the Diversity team, the Geneva workshop will take place in the evening on Friday evening, 26 February, and al...

  3. Hadron therapy takes off in Europe

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    A joint meeting of ULICE, ENLIGHT and PARTNER recently took place in Marburg (Germany). The three initiatives are shaping both the present and the future of hadron therapy in Europe, where new cutting-edge facilities have started to fight cancer with beams of protons and carbon ions.   A pictorial representation of a raster scan on a tumour. (Photo courtesy of HIT/GSI/Siemens.) Thanks to a very active multidisciplinary community consisting of physicists, biologists, radiobiologists, engineers, IT specialists and medical doctors, hadron therapy is taking off in Europe. Indeed, after a few decades during which the innovative technique was mainly used experimentally in Japan, the US and a couple of pioneering laboratory-based facilities in Europe, today an increasing number of hospitals are being equipped with synchrotrons and dedicated treatment rooms. “Asia and Europe are at the forefront of research and use of carbon ions in the treatment of some rare and radio-resistant t...

  4. Take AIM and Keep Your Students Engaged

    Nash, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the benefits to distance education teachers of formatting a weekly online newsletter in accordance with motivational learning theory. It reflects on the delivery of weekly AIM newsletters to undergraduate economics students at the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand via Moodle. The acronym, AIM, stands for Academic content,…

  5. A New Take on the Field Trip

    Lukes, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Because Laura Lukes used to be a geologist, when she started teaching science, she wanted to incorporate field experiences in her classroom. But, like many teachers, she faced obstacles: insufficient budgets, testing requirements, a lack of chaperones and transportation, and the safety concerns that come with fieldwork. As a result, a real field…

  6. Taking Care of Literacy: One Feminist's Critique.

    Luttrell, Wendy

    1996-01-01

    Shows how gender assumptions and inequalities influence how we define the literacy problem, value literacy skills, and perceive relations between adult literacy learners and teachers. Draws on various sources to describe and critique the gendered cornerstones of literacy education, focusing on how women's literacy activities become devalued andÖ

  7. Caregivers and Exercise -- Take Time for Yourself

    ... gov/Go4Life Caregivers and Exercise‚ÄĒTake Time for Yourself Taking care of yourself is one of the most important things you ... all at once. l Make an appointment with yourself to exercise. Set aside specific times and days ...

  8. Giving Ourselves Permission to Take Risks

    Jones, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    What's a risk? It's when one doesn't know what will happen when she/he takes action. Risks can be little or big, calculated or stupid. Every new idea carries risks--and the challenge to face them and see what will happen. Nobody becomes smart, creative, self-confident, and respectful of others without taking risks--remaining open to possibilities…

  9. Take-off and landing of aicraft

    Nicolae APOSTOLESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the take-off and landing segments of an airplane trajectory are studied. The equations of motion for the ground run are derived and solved for distance. Then, specific formulas are obtained for the take-off ground distance and time and the landing ground distance and time. Transitions from take-off to climb and descent to landing are investigated so that take-off distance and landing distance and time can be estimated. The run distances and the run times for take-of and landing dependent of altitude, speed wing, temperature, the coefficient of rolling friction. In conformity with mathematical model, programs of calculation were elaborated. Also interfaces of calculations were elaborated for programs of calculation.

  10. Training of adult education teachers

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    The background of the study was that a group of teachers should develop competences in order to apply a new pedagogical approach, cooperative learning (CL), in a skilled manner. The total competence development process included theoretical knowledge about the method, practical training in its use......, and ongoing and extensive coaching related to the teachers' experiences of implementing CL. It was assumed that the competence development process would result in a higher usage of CL as well as an increasingly professional and more reflected application of the teaching method over the year. The...... results from the study, as indicated by the teachers’ completed logs, and supplemented by the data from the focus group interviews, show a different picture. Two months into the project, the teachers were using CL on a large scale. The average level of their use did not increase during the academic year...

  11. Training of Adult Education Teachers

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    The background of the study was that a group of teachers should develop competences in order to apply a new pedagogical approach, cooperative learning (CL), in a skilled manner. The total competence development process included theoretical knowledge about the method, practical training in its use......, and ongoing and extensive coaching related to the teachers' experiences of implementing CL. It was assumed that the competence development process would result in a higher usage of CL as well as an increasingly professional and more reflected application of the teaching method over the year. The...... results from the study, as indicated by the teachers’ completed logs, and supplemented by the data from the focus group interviews, show a different picture. Two months into the project, the teachers were using CL on a large scale. The average level of their use did not increase during the academic year...

  12. An Exploration of Teachers' Perception of the Influence of Professional Learning Communities on Their Professional Practices and on Teacher Retention

    Mitchell, Tekeisha Ford

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' perceptions of the influence of professional learning communities on teachers' professional practices. Research shows that the adjustment from college student to the teaching environment for new teachers has increased through involvement on committees, collaboration with peers, and hands-onÖ

  13. Teacher Retirement Benefits

    Costrell, Robert; Podgursky, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The ongoing global financial crisis is forcing many employers, from General Motors to local general stores, to take a hard look at the costs of the compensation packages they offer employees. For public school systems, this will entail a consideration of fringe benefit costs, which in recent years have become an increasingly important component of…

  14. Teacher Learning by Script

    Reeves, Jenelle

    2010-01-01

    Scripted instruction (SI) programs, which direct teachers to teach, even to talk, from a standardized written script, are roundly criticized for inhibiting teacher creativity and teacher learning. In fact, such programs utilize scripting for exactly that reason: to reduce teacher interference with (and presumed weakening of) the prescribed…

  15. Should Teachers Be Authentic?

    Bialystok, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Authenticity is often touted as an important virtue for teachers. But what do we mean when we say that a teacher ought to be "authentic"? Research shows that discussions of teacher authenticity frequently refer to other character traits or simply to teacher effectiveness, but authenticity is a unique concept with a long philosophical…

  16. Effective Teachers of Literacy.

    Medwell, Jane; Wray, David; Poulson, Louise; Fox, Richard

    A study was commissioned to help the Teacher Training Agency and teachers in England to understand more clearly how effective teachers help children to become literate. Research aims were to: identify the key factors of what effective teachers know, understand, and do that enables them to put effective literacy teaching into practice; identify the…

  17. Inservicing the Teachers.

    Sharma, Toni

    1982-01-01

    Compares many teacher inservice programs to the artificial insemination of cows--decisions are made without teacher participation, teachers do not get to join in the act, and no one has much fun. Suggests that teachers be allowed to set their own goals and control their own learning. (Author/WD)

  18. Teacher Education in Canada

    Van Nuland, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Teacher education programmes within Canada are markedly different in structure and duration across the provinces, which affects programme delivery for teacher candidates and their opportunities for clinical practice. This paper provides a brief overview of Canadian pre-service teacher education, a summary of new teacher induction and mentoring…

  19. The Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors for Teacher Motivation

    Harun GULTEKIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Education researchers and school administrators have faced the challenge of motivating teachers to higher levels of performance. In this regard, teacher motivation increases classroom performance and, accordingly, improves schooling and the overall quality of the school system. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the different types of motivational factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic, that influence teacher performance and contribute to teacher motivation.

  20. Teacher Supply and Demand: Surprises from Primary Research

    Wayne, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of primary research studies on public school teacher supply and demand revealed four surprises. Projections show that enrollments are leveling off. Relatedly, annual hiring increases should be only about two or three percent over the next few years. Results from studies of teacher attrition also yield unexpected results. Excluding retirements, only about one in 20 teachers leaves each year, and the novice teachers who quit mainly cite personal and family reasons, not job diss...

  1. Teacher Education and Professional Development Programs in Pakistan

    Gopang, Illahi Bux

    2016-01-01

    Teacher education focuses on the professional and personal development of teachers’ abilities and communication skills. These abilities and skills make teachers capable enough to perform their duties effectively. Recent insights into teacher education in Pakistan has contributed a lot and increased awareness among teachers as researchers and practitioners. For this study, Data were collected using questionnaire with close and open ended items. A questionnaire was developed keeping in view of ...

  2. Risk taking in adolescence: what changes, and why?

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2004-06-01

    Extant studies of age differences in cognitive processes relevant to risk taking and decision making, such as risk perception and risk appraisal, indicate few significant age differences in factors that might explain why adolescents engage in more risk taking than adults. The present analysis suggests that the greater propensity of adolescents to take risks is not due to age differences in risk perception or appraisal, but to age differences in psychosocial factors that influence self-regulation. It is argued that adolescence is a period of heightened vulnerability to risk taking because of a disjunction between novelty and sensation seeking (both of which increase dramatically at puberty) and the development of self-regulatory competence (which does not fully mature until early adulthood). This disjunction is biologically driven, normative, and unlikely to be remedied through educational interventions designed to change adolescents' perception, appraisal, or understanding of risk. Interventions should begin from the premise that adolescents are inherently more likely than adults to take risks, and should focus on reducing the harm associated with risk-taking behavior. PMID:15251873

  3. The Teacher-Student Communication Pattern: A Need to Follow?

    Mohammad Hashamdar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is intended to investigate the teacher-student communication patterns in an†upper-intermediate English class. There are major questions in this study; (a what the nature ofinteraction is in a foreign language classroom, (b what the characteristics of teacher-student turn†taking are, (c what type of feedback is taken by the teacher, (d how the teacher's competence and†performance are. The participants of the study are female adult students and a female teacher†majoring English literature at MA level that has had five years of teaching experience. Five partial†sessions of the class are recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. According to the findings, the type of†discourse is teacher-initiated one and the question type is both WH-questions and questions with†auxiliaries. The way of student's reply is brief and limited to one teacher-student turn-taking. The†type of interaction is based on the questions posed by the teacher and long interaction such as†discussing, debating, and challenging could rarely be seen in the classroom in question. The type of†feedback depending on the skill and tasks dealt with, ranging from recast to direct correction. The†teacher's competence and performance are satisfactory with correct pronunciation and near native†accent.

  4. The Influence of the Professional Stress on the Communicative Qualities of Teacherís Personality

    Rezeda M. Khusainova

    2015-01-01

    Thematic justification of the teachersí professional stress research is due to the fact that its prevention is a significant problem of psychological services in education. The purpose of the article is to study the interplay between professional stress and communication characteristics of teacherís personality in the process of increasing the teaching experience. The main method of studying this issue is the ascertaining experiment. The professional stress is correlated both with communicati...

  5. Research interests of secondary science teachers

    Gabel, Dorothy L.; Samuel, K. V.; Helgeson, Stanley; Novak, Joseph; Butzow, John

    In the past few years, science educators and the nation at large have become increasingly concerned about the Crisis in Science Education. An underlying cause of this crisis is the nonuniform quality of instruction delivered by secondary science teachers. One way to improve the quality of teaching in the schools is the application of science education research findings to teaching. Most teachers are unaware of the research findings and/or do not apply them in their classrooms. This study helps determine the areas of research which are of greatest interest to secondary science teachers. Results will be used by NSTA to determine the contents of future volumes of the monograph What Research Says to the Science Teacher. A random sample of 600 secondary science teachers was obtained from the National Registry of NSTA. Teachers were sent a 23 item questionnaire that asked them to rate their interest in each research topic on a five point scale. The questionnaire contained the 12 items prepared by a NARST-NSTA committee in 1979 and an additional 11 items using the same format. Demographic data collected from the survey included sex, teaching assignment, role in school, type of school, type of community, years of teaching experience, and familiarity with What Research Says. Data were analyzed using this demographic data as well as according to whether teachers returned the original or a follow-up questionnaire. Teachers who returned the first questionnaire had basically the same preferences as those who returned the follow-up questionnaire. Sixty percent of the teachers completed the questionnaire in usable form. Overall results of the study based on both frequency of response and on mean rating indicate that the following five topics are of greatest interest to secondary science teachers: laboratory experiences, motivational techniques, effect on college courses, problem solving, and meaningful learning. Analysis of data according to the subject taught indicated that chemistry and physics teachers are more interested in problem solving than biology teachers, and that chemistry, physics, and earth science teachers are also interested in the sequence of the content. Males and females had the same top five interests but in a different order. The same is true for teachers of grades 7-9 versus grades 10-12. Rural teachers preferences varied substantially from those in other settings and differences were also found for teachers familiar with What Research Says compared to the rest of the sample. For every classification of teacher, the area of least interest was sex difference research.

  6. Changing beliefs and behavior through experience-taking.

    Kaufman, Geoff F; Libby, Lisa K

    2012-07-01

    The present research introduces the concept of experience-taking-the imaginative process of spontaneously assuming the identity of a character in a narrative and simulating that character's thoughts, emotions, behaviors, goals, and traits as if they were one's own. Six studies investigated the degree to which particular psychological states and features of narratives cause individuals, without instruction, to engage in experience-taking and investigated how the merger between self and other that occurs during experience-taking produces changes in self-judgments, attitudes, and behavior that align with the character's. Results from Studies 1-3 showed that being in a reduced state of self-concept accessibility while reading a brief fictional work increased-and being in a heightened state of self-concept accessibility decreased-participants' levels of experience-taking and subsequent incorporation of a character's personality trait into their self-concepts. Study 4 revealed that a first-person narrative depicting an ingroup character elicited the highest levels of experience-taking and produced the greatest change in participants' behavior, compared with versions of the narrative written in 3rd-person voice and/or depicting an outgroup protagonist. The final 2 studies demonstrated that whereas revealing a character's outgroup membership as a homosexual or African American early in a narrative inhibited experience-taking, delaying the revelation of the character's outgroup identity until later in the story produced higher levels of experience-taking, lower levels of stereotype application in participants' evaluation of the character, and more favorable attitudes toward the character's group. The implications of these findings in relation to perspective-taking, self-other overlap, and prime-to-behavior effects are discussed. PMID:22448888

  7. Teacher librarians, technology, and collaborative connections: A case study of teacher librarians from a communities of practice perspective

    Clark, Hazel Grace

    2006-01-01

    The role of teacher librarians is changing in an era increasingly influenced by information and communication technology ( 1 0 . The goal of this study was to document and analyze the work of teacher librarians and how it contributes to the delivery of educational programs. The work of a group of six teacher librarians was examined as an example of a community of practice. Email messages, field notes, and artifacts representing the work of these teacher librarians were collected over five mon...

  8. A Developmental Perspective on Adolescent Risk Taking in Contemporary America.

    Baumrind, Diana

    1987-01-01

    Adolescent risk-taking behavior needs to be understood in the context of contemporary youth culture and normal development. To facilitate passage through adolescence, parents should sustain a climate of control and commitment balanced by respect for the adolescent's increased capacity for self-regulation. (Author)

  9. Advanced Mathematics Course-Taking: A Focus on Gender Equifinality

    You, Sukkyung; Sharkey, Jill D.

    2012-01-01

    High school mathematics achievement predicts future success. Potentially different factors that lead to success for boys versus girls, termed equifinality, are not well understood. Such factors are needed to inform interventions to increase numbers of students taking advanced mathematics courses and going on into science and mathematics careers.Ö

  10. School Sexuality Education and Adolescent Risk-Taking Behavior.

    Jacobs, Cecilia Dine; Wolf, Eve M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines and critiques research that measures the effects of school sexuality education programs on adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior. Discusses common methodological problems and examines studies measuring program effectiveness. Research suggests participation in school sexuality education does not promote increased or earlier sexualÖ

  11. Tick off to Take off: The Pre-Departure Guide

    Arthur, Erica

    2009-01-01

    "Tick Off to Take Off (TOTTO)" is an online pre-departure guide for UK undergraduates intending to study abroad. It aims to simplify the application process, centralise information, increase efficiency and improve retention rates. TOTTO responds to the changing climate surrounding study abroad in UK universities and offers one way to address callsÖ

  12. Oxytocin and vasopressin modulate risk-taking.

    Patel, Nilam; Grillon, Christian; Pavletic, Nevia; Rosen, Dana; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2015-02-01

    The modulation of risk-taking is critical for adaptive and optimal behavior. This study examined how oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) influence risk-taking in function of three parameters: sex, risk-valence, and social context. Twenty-nine healthy adults (14 males) completed a risk-taking task, the Stunt task, both in a social-stress (evaluation by unfamiliar peers) and non-social context, in three separate drug treatment sessions. During each session, one of three drugs, OT, AVP, or placebo (PLC), was administered intra-nasally. OT and AVP relative to PLC reduced betting-rate (risk-averse effect). This risk-averse effect was further qualified: AVP reduced risk-taking in the positive risk-valence (high win-probability), and regardless of social context or sex. In contrast, OT reduced risk-taking in the negative risk-valence (low win-probability), and only in the social-stress context and men. The reduction in risk-taking might serve a role in defensive behavior. These findings extend the role of these neuromodulators to behaviors beyond the social realm. How the behavioral modulation of risk-taking maps onto the function of the neural targets of OT and AVP may be the next step in this line of research. PMID:25446228

  13. Perspective taking combats automatic expressions of racial bias.

    Todd, Andrew R; Bodenhausen, Galen V; Richeson, Jennifer A; Galinsky, Adam D

    2011-06-01

    Five experiments investigated the hypothesis that perspective taking--actively contemplating others' psychological experiences--attenuates automatic expressions of racial bias. Across the first 3 experiments, participants who adopted the perspective of a Black target in an initial context subsequently exhibited more positive automatic interracial evaluations, with changes in automatic evaluations mediating the effect of perspective taking on more deliberate interracial evaluations. Furthermore, unlike other bias-reduction strategies, the interracial positivity resulting from perspective taking was accompanied by increased salience of racial inequalities (Experiment 3). Perspective taking also produced stronger approach-oriented action tendencies toward Blacks (but not Whites; Experiment 4). A final experiment revealed that face-to-face interactions with perspective takers were rated more positively by Black interaction partners than were interactions with nonperspective takers--a relationship that was mediated by perspective takers' increased approach-oriented nonverbal behaviors (as rated by objective, third-party observers). These findings indicate that perspective taking can combat automatic expressions of racial biases without simultaneously decreasing sensitivity to ongoing racial disparities. PMID:21381852

  14. LITERACY COMPETENCES IN CULTURAL DIVERSE CLASSROOMS:EXPERIENCES OF TEACHERS

    PETER BROEDER

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution takes a closer look at literacy competence-related problems in socially andculturally diverse classrooms. Diversity in language and reading socialization both contribute significantlyto differences in literacy competences, which is something that surfaces in daily teaching practice. Asurvey among 169 primary and secondary school teachers in the Netherlands focused on the perspectiveof the teachers, since they are the ones who have to deal with the diversity in literacy. The extent ofthe problems the teachers indicated as being caused by their students’ lack of literacy competences isconsiderable in all classes. During their day-to-day teaching, teachers of multicultural classes experiencemore problems related to literacy competences than do teachers of monocultural classes. The resultsindicate that it is desirable if not vital to pay attention to the acquisition of literacy competences indiverse, multicultural classrooms in teacher training and refresher courses

  15. Cooperation Between Migrant Parents and Teachers in School: A Resource?

    Martha Lea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Even smaller Western countries receive immigrants from remote areas with poorer living conditions. As stated in the U.N. Child Convention, immigrant children should be given equal opportunities in education. Parents are always interested in their children’s future, and education may gain from stronger cooperation between school and parents. Some research shows that even illiterate parents may support their children’s training in a second language (Cummins, 1986/2001, p. 665. Dialogues between teachers and parents promote mutual understanding and increase parents’ knowledge of school and society. This might make the parents trust society more, enhance their acculturation and reduce future intergenerational conflicts (Portes & Rumbaut, 2001. A professional teacher needs cultural knowledge and understanding in order to give her/his students an education adapted to their needs. Migrant students especially should feel that there is coherence in their education, because cultural conflicts sap their energy and may also cause identity problems and lead to lack of motivation. For teachers it is important that education policy provides for equal opportunities. Norway has an inclusive policy concerning immigrant children. The students have language support to a certain degree both in their mother tongue and in Norwegian when needed. Parents and schools are obliged to cooperate in education, and some support is therefore given to translation. Cooperation is required by conferences and meetings. There are gains for all parties in cooperation between school and migrant parents, but it is difficult to develop mutual cultural understanding for all students and equal opportunities for migrant students. This requires a clear school policy, the means to implement it, and teacher competence. It takes a process to learn how to cooperate and give adequate support. The Norwegian policy shows a will to cooperation, but the implementation of the policy can still be improved.

  16. Sexuality educators: Taking a stand by participating in research

    Christa Beyers

    2013-01-01

    Life Orientation teachers play a critical role in the teaching and learning of sexuality education in South African schools. Using an experiential participatory approach with 125 teachers in the Motheo district, Free State, I explored three questions: What messages did the teachers learn about sex and sexuality? How do these messages inform the teachers' values? How do the teachers teach sexuality education? Despite its own problems and limitations, the participatory approach exploits and rei...

  17. Graft Take-Rates After Tympanoplasty

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Aabenhus, Kristine; Glad, Henrik; S√łrensen, Mads S√łlvsten

    2014-01-01

    , technique, graft material, and revision surgery) for tympanoplasty type I were studied. A comparison with the graft take-rates for tympanoplasty types II to IV and/or cholesteatoma was made. RESULTS: A user-friendly ear surgery database with fast data entry and direct import of audiometric data was......OBJECTIVE: To present a prospective ear surgery database and investigate the graft take-rate and prognostic factors for graft take-rate in tympanoplasty using the database. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective database study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: A total of 1606 cases undergoing...... tympanoplasty types I to IV were registered in the database in the period from February 2004 to November 2013. INTERVENTION: A total of 837 cases underwent myringoplasty/tympanoplasty type I. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Graft take-rate and prognostic factors (age, discharge at time of surgery, tuba function...

  18. Fear, excitement, and financial risk-taking.

    Lee, Chan Jean; Andrade, Eduardo B

    2015-01-01

    Can fear trigger risk-taking? In this paper, we assess whether fear can be reinterpreted as a state of excitement as a result of contextual cues and promote, rather than discourage, risk-taking. In a laboratory experiment, the participants' emotional states were induced (fear vs. control), followed by a purportedly unrelated financial task. The task was framed as either a stock market investment or an exciting casino game. Our results showed that incidental fear (vs. control) induced risk-averse behaviour when the task was framed as a stock investment decision. However, fear encouraged risk-taking when the very same task was framed as an exciting casino game. The impact of fear on risk-taking was partially mediated by the excitement felt during the financial task. PMID:24661027

  19. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    ... En espa√Īol Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  20. How to Take Your Heart Rate

    ... beats per minute. - If you have difficulty with math, try doubling the number twice. 25 doubled is ... from going too high. If you are taking medicine for your heart or blood pressure, check with ...