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Book Review: Teachers taking action  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In Teachers Taking Action: A Comprehensive Guide to Teacher Research, editors Cynthia Lassonde and Susan Israel provide readers with a text that offers advice to teacher researchers on topics ranging from understanding what it means to conduct teacher research to developing a study and then getting that study published.

Bob Fecho

2009-01-01

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Experiencing discrimination increases risk taking.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Prior research has revealed racial disparities in health outcomes and health-compromising behaviors, such as smoking and drug abuse. It has been suggested that discrimination contributes to such disparities, but the mechanisms through which this might occur are not well understood. In the research reported here, we examined whether the experience of discrimination affects acute physiological stress responses and increases risk-taking behavior. Black and White participants each received rejecting feedback from partners who were either of their own race (in-group rejection) or of a different race (out-group rejection, which could be interpreted as discrimination). Physiological (cardiovascular and neuroendocrine) changes, cognition (memory and attentional bias), affect, and risk-taking behavior were assessed. Significant participant race × partner race interactions were observed. Cross-race rejection, compared with same-race rejection, was associated with lower levels of cortisol, increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, greater anger, increased attentional bias, and more risk-taking behavior. These data suggest that perceived discrimination is associated with distinct profiles of physiological reactivity, affect, cognitive processing, and risk taking, implicating direct and indirect pathways to health disparities.

Jamieson JP; Koslov K; Nock MK; Mendes WB

2013-02-01

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What It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Change  

Science.gov (United States)

A survey to principals of high schools without astronomy points to the conditions needed to increase the number of high school astronomy courses and acceptable justifications for adding in a course. The former includes the need for more and better trained teachers, changing the perceptions of higher officials from local administrations to…

Krumenaker, Larry

2010-01-01

4

Going Beyond Test-Taking Strategies: Building Self-Regulated Students and Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Since the inception of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standardized tests have been on the minds of students, parents, and educators, who are consistently concerned with how to increase test scores. In this article, the authors suggest that it is time to look beyond tests to enable willing, focused, and persistent - that is self-regulated - students and teachers. Self-regulated students and teachers take control of their learning, set goals, monitor progress, reflect on outcomes, are intrinsically motivated to learn, and demonstrate higher levels of achievement (Harter, 1996; Markman, 1979; Mason, Snyder, Sukhram, & Kedem, 2006; Perry, Nordby, & VandeKamp, 2003; Zimmerman, 2000, 2002). Supporting such self-regulation not only promotes more independent, competent, and motivated students and teachers, but is also likely to raise test scores (Paris & Paris, 2001). The authors suggest specific strategies for, and benefits of, the development of self-regulation in both students and teachers.

Stephanie G. Davis; Erika Swarts Gray

2007-01-01

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Taking One's Principles Seriously: A Teacher Confronts Controversy  

Science.gov (United States)

A teacher faces hostility from certain colleagues who view his decision to attend a controversial lecture as tantamount to the repudiation of the principle of inclusive education and the rights of students with disabilities. The teacher sees the proposed boycott of the lecture as a form of censorship threatening freedom of inquiry and critical…

Hare, William

2010-01-01

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Risk Taking Behaviour And Assertiveness Behaviour Of D.T.ED., Teacher Trainees – A Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of the study is to investigate the risk taking behaviour and assertiveness behaviour of D.T.Ed., Teacher Trainees. The sample of the study consisted of 400 D.T.Ed., Teacher Trainees (129 male and 271 female). The tools used in the study were the Risk Taking Behaviour Scale by Answer Yousuf and Assertiveness Inventory by Tasneem Naqvi (1988).After framing necessary objectives and hypotheses, appropriate analysis was carried out on the collected data .From this analysis it was found that the risk taking behaviour and assertiveness behaviour of D.T.Ed., Teacher Trainees are in an average level and they do not differ significantly in their risk taking behaviour and assertiveness behaviour based on their parental qualification

A.C. Lal Kumar; R.Muthumanickam

2012-01-01

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Embracing Advocacy: How Visible Minority and Dominant Group Beginning Teachers Take Up Issues of Equity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper is from a four-year research project that followed graduates of a teacher education program from teacher certification through their first three years of teaching. It focuses on participants' narratives about their advocacy efforts in both their pre-service practicum placements and their first year as probationary teachers. Our findings indicate that while dominant group white participants chose to advocate from a position of personal conviction (often based on new knowledge of equity issues), the visible minority participants were often summoned by others to advocate. The paper concludes with a discussion about how teacher education might better address advocacy issues, alongside the focus on equity issues.

Naomi Norquay; Marian Robertson-Baghel

2011-01-01

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Taking Part in the Dance: Technology Teachers Interacting with Communities of Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

|This research investigated how secondary school technology teachers planned and implemented units that enabled students to access authentic technological practice through their contact with a community of practice (CoP). It was found that when teachers plan to access a community of practice for their students a complex dance-style relationship…

Slatter, Wendy; France, Bev

2011-01-01

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Longitudinal Effects of Pay Increase on Teachers’ Job Satisfaction: A Motivational Perspective  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study investigates the longitudinal effects of a pay-increase schema, known as the teachers’ cadre, on teachers’ job satisfaction. A total of 155 primary school teachers responded to a questionnaire tapping their overall job satisfaction over four occasions. The results of the study showed that pay increase did not have a significant effect on teachers’ job satisfaction. After pay increase, teachers with high academic attainments were significantly less satisfied with their teaching profession than teachers with low academic attainments. After pay increase, male teachers were significantly more satisfied with their teaching profession than female teachers. Length of service did not have a significant effect on teachers’ job satisfaction.

Sabry M. ABD-EL-FATTAH

2010-01-01

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Strategies to Increase Behavior-Specific Teacher Praise in an Inclusive Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

Managing students' disruptive behavior in the classroom can be a time-consuming task and greatly reduces the amount of time teachers spend on instruction. Although there are several research-validated classroom management strategies, teachers are more likely to adopt strategies that are less time-consuming than strategies that take more time or…

Musti-Rao, Shobana; Haydon, Todd

2011-01-01

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Reason to take physical education teachers choose the content that in sport in secondary education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article forms part of a study in which treatment was sought in order to know the area of sport in physical education in compulsory secondary education in the province of Huelva. In this article we focus on aspects that teachers have in mind when choosing the sports content. We examine a total of 63 teachers who were given a questionnaire. The data were analyzed using SPSS (13.0). The main findings are that the sport is content that has greater presence in our classrooms, being team sports the most developed. As for the main reasons for choosing facilities and find that materials are crucial. Another aspect is also taken into account is that content is motivating and innovative, interest and student demand, and self-knowledge and command of the teacher about the different sports.

José Robles Rodríguez; Francisco Javier Giménez Fuentes-Guerra

2010-01-01

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Increasing the Number of Latino and Navajo Teachers in Hard-to-Staff Schools.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined the development of two teacher education programs designed to increase the number of quality minority teachers in Latino neighborhood schools and on the Navajo reservation. Review of teacher education literature and analysis of interviews with program staff, archival records, and program documentation indicated that these two…

Becket, Diane R.

1998-01-01

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Caffeine protects against increased risk-taking propensity during severe sleep deprivation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous research suggests that sleep deprivation is associated with declines in metabolic activity within brain regions important for judgement and impulse control, yet previous studies have reported inconsistent findings regarding the effects of sleep loss and caffeine on risk-taking. In this study, 25 healthy adults (21 men, four women) completed the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) and Evaluation of Risks (EVAR) scale at regular intervals to examine behavioral and self-reported risk-taking propensity during 75 h of continuous sleep deprivation. Participants received either four double-blind administrations of 200 mg caffeine (n=12) or indistinguishable placebo (n=13) gum bi-hourly during each of the 3 nights of sleep deprivation. No significant effects of drug group or sleep deprivation were evident on the BART or EVAR when measured at 51 h of wakefulness. However, by 75 h, the placebo group showed a significant increase in risk-taking behavior on the cost-benefit ratio and total number of exploded balloons on the BART, whereas the caffeine group remained at baseline levels. On the EVAR, several factors of self-reported risk-taking propensity, including total risk, impulsivity and risk/thrill seeking, were reduced among subjects receiving caffeine across the 3 days of sleep deprivation, but remained at baseline levels for the placebo group. These results suggest that 3 nights of total sleep deprivation led to a significant increase in behavioral risk-taking but not self-reported perception of risk-propensity. Overnight caffeine prevented this increase in risky behavior. PMID:20946437

Killgore, William D S; Kamimori, Gary H; Balkin, Thomas J

2010-10-14

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Pedagogical Strategies to Increase Pre-service Teachers? Confidence in Computer Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Pre-service teachers? attitudes towards computers significantly influence their future adoption of integrating computer technology into their teaching. What are the pedagogical strategies that a teacher education instructor or an instructional designer can incorporate to enhance a pre-service teacher?s comfort level in using computers? In this exploratory report, the researcher synthesizes related literature, provides a comprehensive list of theory-based instructional strategies, and describes a study of the perceptions of 189 pre-service teachers regarding strategies related to increasing their comfort in using computers.

Li-Ling Chen

2004-01-01

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Excessive alcohol consumption increases risk taking behaviour in travellers to Cusco, Peru.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The risks associated with alcohol intoxication are rarely discussed during pre-travel counselling. However, alcohol immoderation abroad may increase the exposure to health risks. Few studies have addressed alcohol consumption and risk taking behaviour in travellers to South America. From October to December of 2004, travellers leaving the city of Cusco in Peru were asked to fill out anonymous questionnaires regarding demographics, self-reported alcohol consumption, illness and risk behaviour for sexually-transmitted infection (STI) and travellers diarrhoea. Most travellers (87.2%) consumed alcohol and 20.4% reported inebriation in Cusco. Those admitting inebriation were more likely to be male, single, <26 years old, and travelling alone or with friends. Travellers who admitted inebriation and fell ill while in Cusco were more likely to seek medical attention, change itinerary, and report decreased satisfaction with the trip experience. In the multivariate analysis, inebriation was independently associated with reporting higher numbers of unsafe food choices, illicit drug use, and risky sexual activity. It is concluded that alcohol intoxication during travel was associated with increased risk taking behaviour for common travel related conditions. Although travel related illnesses were not associated with inebriation, some markers of illness severity were more often reported by those who admitted intoxication. Risk for heavy alcohol use abroad should be assessed during the pre-travel visit in certain groups and appropriate counselling should be provided.

Cabada MM; Mozo K; Pantenburg B; Gotuzzo E

2011-03-01

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Excessive alcohol consumption increases risk taking behaviour in travellers to Cusco, Peru.  

Science.gov (United States)

The risks associated with alcohol intoxication are rarely discussed during pre-travel counselling. However, alcohol immoderation abroad may increase the exposure to health risks. Few studies have addressed alcohol consumption and risk taking behaviour in travellers to South America. From October to December of 2004, travellers leaving the city of Cusco in Peru were asked to fill out anonymous questionnaires regarding demographics, self-reported alcohol consumption, illness and risk behaviour for sexually-transmitted infection (STI) and travellers diarrhoea. Most travellers (87.2%) consumed alcohol and 20.4% reported inebriation in Cusco. Those admitting inebriation were more likely to be male, single, Cusco were more likely to seek medical attention, change itinerary, and report decreased satisfaction with the trip experience. In the multivariate analysis, inebriation was independently associated with reporting higher numbers of unsafe food choices, illicit drug use, and risky sexual activity. It is concluded that alcohol intoxication during travel was associated with increased risk taking behaviour for common travel related conditions. Although travel related illnesses were not associated with inebriation, some markers of illness severity were more often reported by those who admitted intoxication. Risk for heavy alcohol use abroad should be assessed during the pre-travel visit in certain groups and appropriate counselling should be provided. PMID:21420363

Cabada, Miguel M; Mozo, Karen; Pantenburg, Birte; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

2011-03-21

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Through your eyes: incongruence of gaze and action increases spontaneous perspective taking.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

What makes people spontaneously adopt the perspective of others? Previous work suggested that perspective taking can serve understanding the actions of others. Two studies corroborate and extend that interpretation. The first study varied cues to intentionality of eye gaze and action, and found that the more the actor was perceived as potentially interacting with the objects, the stronger the tendency to take his perspective. The second study investigated how manipulations of gaze affect the tendency to adopt the perspective of another reaching for an object. Eliminating gaze cues by blurring the actor's face did not reduce perspective-taking, suggesting that in the absence of gaze information, observers rely entirely on the action. Intriguingly, perspective-taking was higher when gaze and action did not signal the same intention, suggesting that in presence of ambiguous behavioral intention, people are more likely take the other's perspective to try to understand the action.

Furlanetto T; Cavallo A; Manera V; Tversky B; Becchio C

2013-01-01

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Through your eyes: incongruence of gaze and action increases spontaneous perspective taking  

Science.gov (United States)

What makes people spontaneously adopt the perspective of others? Previous work suggested that perspective taking can serve understanding the actions of others. Two studies corroborate and extend that interpretation. The first study varied cues to intentionality of eye gaze and action, and found that the more the actor was perceived as potentially interacting with the objects, the stronger the tendency to take his perspective. The second study investigated how manipulations of gaze affect the tendency to adopt the perspective of another reaching for an object. Eliminating gaze cues by blurring the actor's face did not reduce perspective-taking, suggesting that in the absence of gaze information, observers rely entirely on the action. Intriguingly, perspective-taking was higher when gaze and action did not signal the same intention, suggesting that in presence of ambiguous behavioral intention, people are more likely take the other's perspective to try to understand the action.

Furlanetto, Tiziano; Cavallo, Andrea; Manera, Valeria; Tversky, Barbara; Becchio, Cristina

2013-01-01

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Opening Up and Closing Down: How Teachers and TAs Manage Turn-Taking, Topic and Repair in Mathematics Lessons  

Science.gov (United States)

|Support for children with special educational needs in inclusive classrooms is increasingly provided by teaching assistants (TAs). They often have a direct pedagogical role, taking responsibility for instruction in mathematics. The quality of TAs' oral skills is crucial for learning but has rarely been researched. Using conversation analysis,…

Radford, Julie; Blatchford, Peter; Webster, Rob

2011-01-01

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Low mate encounter rate increases male risk taking in a sexually cannibalistic praying mantis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Male praying mantises are forced into the ultimate trade-off of mating versus complete loss of future reproduction if they fall prey to a female. The balance of this trade-off will depend both on (1) the level of predatory risk imposed by females and (2) the frequency of mating opportunities for males. We report the results of a set of experiments that examine the effects of these two variables on male risk-taking behavior and the frequency of sexual cannibalism in the praying mantis Tenodera sinensis. We experimentally altered the rate at which males encountered females and measured male approach and courtship behavior under conditions of high and low risk of being attacked by females. We show that male risk taking depends on prior access to females. Males with restricted access to females showed greater risk-taking behavior. When males were given daily female encounters, they responded to greater female-imposed risk by slowing their rate of approach and remained a greater distance from a potential mate. In contrast, males without recent access to mates were greater risk-takers; they approached females more rapidly and to closer proximity, regardless of risk. In a second experiment, we altered male encounter rate with females and measured rates of sexual cannibalism when paired with hungry or well-fed females. Greater risk-taking behavior by males with low mate encounter rates resulted in high rates of sexual cannibalism when these males were paired with hungry females.

Brown WD; Muntz GA; Ladowski AJ

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
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It Takes Two to Tango: In Dynamic Inquiry, the Self-Directed Student Acts in Association with the Facilitating Teacher  

Science.gov (United States)

The current research presents a qualitative view of a teacher-student association within the context of dynamic inquiry, as encouraged by a new biology curriculum, ''Biomind''. This curriculum enables open inquiry learning through teacher guidance. We characterized the various aspects of the student's functioning as a self-directed student during…

Zion, M.; Slezak, M.

2005-01-01

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Potential negative effects of perspective-taking efforts in the context of close relationships: increased bias and reduced satisfaction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Three experiments demonstrated that trying to appreciate a close other's unique point of view (imagine-other perspective taking) increases the extent to which individuals overestimate their own transparency to the close other, that is, how many of their values, preferences, traits, and feelings are readily apparent to him or her. Trying to be objective and pay careful attention to cues from a close other, which inhibits perspective taking, instead had the opposite effect. Mediation analyses suggested that increased focus on the self as an object of evaluation contributed to the positive effect of imagine-other perspective taking on perceived transparency, and decreased focus on the self as an object of evaluation contributed to the negative effect of trying to be objective on these judgments. These effects on perceived transparency had important implications for relationship well-being: Enhanced perceived transparency of negative feelings prompted by imagine-other perspective taking during a back-and-forth exchange with a romantic partner led to systematic discrepancies between individuals' own and their partner's experience of the exchange and reduced relationship satisfaction; trying to be objective instead reduced perceived transparency and thereby increased satisfaction. Notably, initial closeness with another person enhanced rather than tempered the egocentric effects of perspective taking. Taken together, these results suggest that positive motivations to nurture a close relationship and be sensitive to a loved one might sometimes be better channeled toward paying closer attention to his or her behavior than toward perspective taking.

Vorauer JD; Sucharyna TA

2013-01-01

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News Conference: ASE '09 invigorates participants 34th Stirling Physics Meeting: IOP in Scotland meets to debate curriculum and celebrate success From the News to the Classroom: A positive outlook for science as Obama takes up US presidency Workshop: Nanoschool educates Finnish teachers CERN: Act fast: High School Teacher Programme calls for applicants London Physics Teachers' Network: Teachers' Network Day has an international flavour CERN: LHC timetabled to restart in the summer  

Science.gov (United States)

Conference: ASE '09 invigorates participants 34th Stirling Physics Meeting: IOP in Scotland meets to debate curriculum and celebrate success From the News to the Classroom: A positive outlook for science as Obama takes up US presidency Workshop: Nanoschool educates Finnish teachers CERN: Act fast: High School Teacher Programme calls for applicants London Physics Teachers' Network: Teachers' Network Day has an international flavour CERN: LHC timetabled to restart in the summer

2009-03-01

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Ordinance on the body responsible for taking measures in case of increased radioactivity (OROIR)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This Ordinance, based on atomic energy legislation, public safety, military organisation and the defense council, replaced a previous ordinance of 1966 on alert in case of increased radioactivity. It sets up the body responsible for this work and describes the tasks to be performed in case of an occurrence which could create hazards for the population due to increased radioactivity. If a Swiss nuclear installation creates such a hazard, the 1982 Ordinance on emergency measures in the neighbourhood of nuclear installations also applies. The Ordinance entered into force on 1 May 1987 (NEA)[fr] Cette Ordonnance, fondee a la fois sur les lois sur l'energie atomique, la protection civile, l'organisation militaire, les organes directeurs et le conseil de la defense, a remplace l'ancienne Ordonnance de 1966 concernant l'Organisation d'alarme en cas d'augmentation de la radioactivite. Elle etablit l'Organisation d'intervention et decrit ses taches lors d'un evenement pouvant provoquer pour la population un danger du a une augmentation de la radioactivite. En cas de danger cause par une installation nucleaire suisse, l'Ordonnance de 1983 sur la protection d'urgence au voisinage d'installations nucleaires. L'Ordonnance est entree en vigueur le 1er mai 1987

1987-05-01

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Evaluation of a teacher-led physical activity curriculum to increase preschooler physical activity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Preschool students are generally sedentary at school, and few interventions have addressed whether teacher-led activities can increase physical activity at preschools. The current study aimed to increase physical activity in preschool children enrolled in childcare centers by training childcare providers to deliver a physical activity curriculum. A within-group pre-test/post-test design was used including 32 children at 4 preschools. A teacher-led physical activity curriculum, the Coordinated Approach to Child Health Early Childhood Education Curriculum (CEC) was implemented in each childcare center for six weeks. Activity levels of participants were monitored through the use of accelerometers and direct observation for approximately five hours pre- and post-intervention. Time spent in moderate/vigorous physical activity in preschoolers in three of the four preschools suggested a positive trend increasing from 34.5% ± 13.2% baseline to 39.3% ± 15.4% at follow-up (p = 0.10). Teachers from all four centers reported spending 24.6 ± 13.0 minutes per activity session with up to two activity sessions completed per day. These results justify larger trials to determine the impact of a teacher-led physical activity curriculum on the intensity and duration of preschool students’ physical activity at school.

Margaret Dunn-Carver; Lizzy Pope; Gregory Dana; Anne Dorwaldt; Brian Flynn; Janice Bunn; Jean Harvey-Berino

2013-01-01

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Taking Teachers' Continuous Professional Development (CPD) beyond Reflection: Adding Shared Sense-Making and Collaborative Engagement for Professional Renewal  

Science.gov (United States)

|While reflection continues to be promoted as a central feature of teachers' continuous professional development (CPD) activities in Scotland and elsewhere, a wider debate across professions and national boundaries has opened as to how reflection might be re-conceptualised to restore its social and critical dimensions. This paper seeks to…

McArdle, Karen; Coutts, Norman

2010-01-01

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Research on the Stiff Function of Network Media Taking Network Media Reports on Male Teachers as Examples  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In order to research on the stiff function of network media, this paper selects a special group-male teachers as research objects, analyzes comprehensively from the perspective of communication science, summarizes how the image of this group is set up in network media and what kind of communication effect is generated, and makes suggestions, which are expected to be beneficial for network media to exert effective function in public opinion supervision.

Kunjin Luo

2009-01-01

28

Increasing the Teacher Rate of Behaviour Specific Praise and its Effect on a Child with Aggressive Behaviour Problems  

Science.gov (United States)

|A single subject design was used to investigate the effectiveness of an increase in teacher behaviour-specific praise statements to address anti-social behaviours demonstrated by a student who displays aggressive behaviours. Researchers agree that praise is effective in improving problem behaviours. They also agree that training teachers to use…

Moffat, Thecla Kudakwashe

2011-01-01

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Increasing Secondary Teachers' Behavior-Specific Praise Using a Video Self-Modeling and Visual Performance Feedback Intervention  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers working with students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) in elementary schools can be helped to increase use of an important behavioral strategy, behavior-specific praise statements (BSPS). Unfortunately, teachers' behaviors return to baseline levels when researchers leave, and little is known about the use of praise on high school…

Hawkins, Shannon M.; Heflin, L. Juane

2011-01-01

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Increasing the Teacher Rate of Behaviour Specific Praise and its Effect on a Child with Aggressive Behaviour Problems  

Science.gov (United States)

A single subject design was used to investigate the effectiveness of an increase in teacher behaviour-specific praise statements to address anti-social behaviours demonstrated by a student who displays aggressive behaviours. Researchers agree that praise is effective in improving problem behaviours. They also agree that training teachers to use…

Moffat, Thecla Kudakwashe

2011-01-01

31

Intragastric acidification increases the sensitivity of 14C-urea breath test in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Objective: To investigate if intragastric acidification at the ingestion of 14C-urea can decrease the likelihood of false-negative (FN) results of urea breath test (UBT) in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Methods: Twenty-three patients with positive 14C-UBT (UBT-1) results underwent an acid suppression treatment with omeprazole 40 mg/d for 14 d. On day 13, patients underwent second standard UBT (YBT-2). On day 14, patients underwent a modified UBT (UBT-3), which included consuming 200 mL of 0.1 mol/L citric acid solution 30 min before and at the administration of 14C-urea. Mean 14CO2 expiration and the number of FN results were compared for the three UBTs. Results: Omeprazole caused a significant decrease in mean 14CO2 excretion between UBT-1[(5.57 +- 3.90) Bq/mmol] and UBT-2[(1.98 +- 1.42) Bq/mmol, t=5.867, P=0.000]. Omeprazole caused 10(43.5%) FN UBT-2 results. Mean 14CO2 expiration in UBT-3 [(4.93 +- 3.77) Bq/mmol] was greater than that in UBT-2 (t=-4.538, P=0.000). UBT-3 caused only 2 FN results (8.7%, x2=6.66, P14C-urea increases 14Co2 expiration and decreases FN 14C-UBT results in patients taking PPI

2002-01-01

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Increases in wheat yield on limed soil after reduction of take-all by fungicide application and crop rotation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The severity of take-all, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, was measured with lime, rotation and flutriafol treatments in a long-term field experiment. The incidence of eyespot lesions caused by Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides was also measured. Flutriafol reduced the number of plants with deadheads or no heads and resulted in 12-60% more grain yield. However flutriafol had no effect on the number of plants with eyespot lesions. The number of plants with deadheads or no heads was highest (50-53%) on the wheat which was a third consecutive crop and on soil which had been amended with 2.5 and 5.0 t/ha lime. Sowing wheat after a subterranean clover based pasture considerably reduced the number of deadheads. Control of annual grasses in the pasture by spray-topping further reduced deadheads and with this treatment and at nil and low lime there were 2-7% deadheads. The percentage of plants with eyespot lesions was higher with the continuous cropped wheat. Lime increased grain yield only where the disease incidence was low but had no effect on the percentage of eyespot lesions. This work demonstrates the importance of crop rotation for disease control, particularly where soils are limed to amend severe soil acidity; the value of controlling annual grasses in pasture in the year preceding wheat cropping; and the potential of fungicide treatment as a practical means for controlling take-all in field grown wheat.

Conventry DR; Brooke HD; Killmorgen JF; Ballinger DJ

1989-01-01

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Increasing Teachers' Use of Praise with a Response-to-Intervention Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

A multiple baseline design across teachers was used to evaluate the effects of a systematic, response-to-intervention (RTI) approach on rates of desired teacher behavior. Specifically, teachers whose rates of specific, contingent praise were nonresponsive to typical schoolwide positive behavior support training (primary intervention tier) were…

Myers, Diane M.; Simonsen, Brandi; Sugai, George

2011-01-01

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Using ICT and distance education to increase access, equity and quality of rural teachers’ professional development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The goal of ‘teacher quality for all’ is proving difficult to achieve in many countries, especially in rural areas, yet teacher quality is a key determinant of students’ participation rates and achievement levels. It also affects the attainment of social justice in terms of equity in educational quality for students. One contributor to teacher quality is professional development though limits on its availability and quality create inequity for many teachers. This paper describes how distance education and ICT improved access, equity, and quality in professional development for rural teachers in one province in western China, viewed through the lens of a ‘rights-based’ framework.

Bernadette Robinson

2008-01-01

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More fatal all-terrain vehicle crashes occur on the roadway than off: increased risk-taking characterises roadway fatalities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) have steadily increased in popularity, size and speed, characteristics that likely contribute to the alarming rise in ATV-related fatalities. One potentially high-risk activity is riding on the road. OBJECTIVES: To compare fatal ATV crashes that occur on the roadway and off, to more fully understand factors that contribute to fatalities at each location. METHODS: Fatality data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) were used for descriptive and comparative analyses. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine relative risk. RESULTS: Over 60% of all fatalities (1985-2009) resulted from roadway crashes. After 1998, roadway fatalities increased at over twice the rate of off-road fatalities. Roadway crashes were more likely than off-road crashes to involve multiple fatalities, carrying passengers, alcohol use, collisions and head injuries. Roadway victims were less likely to be helmeted than off-road victims. Passengers and operators with passengers were also less likely to be helmeted than operators riding alone. Helmeted victims were half as likely to suffer a head injury. CONCLUSIONS: Fatal roadway crashes were more likely than off-road crashes to involve risk-taking behaviours (eg, carrying passengers) that could exacerbate the inherent difficulty of operating ATVs on roadway surfaces. Higher crash forces from greater speed, and lower use of protective equipment, may also have contributed to higher roadway mortality rates. Eliminating non-essential ATV road use may be an effective way to reduce ATV-related fatalities. This will likely require a substantial investment in rider education and better enforcement of ATV road use restriction laws.

Denning GM; Harland KK; Ellis DG; Jennissen CA

2013-08-01

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A Qualitative Investigation of Teachers' Information, Motivation, and Behavioral Skills for Increasing Fruits and Vegetables Consumption in Preschoolers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Using the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model as a framework, researchers qualitatively assessed preschool teachers' perceived motivation, facilitators, and barriers related to getting preschool children to eat fruits and vegetables (FV). METHODS: Individual, semi-structured interviews with 28 Head Start teachers in central North Carolina. RESULTS: Participants reported the need for FV-related information (Information) to improve FV consumption in children, perceived themselves to be parents at school (Motivation), and reported using conditional rewards and punishment statements to get preschoolers to eat FV (Behavioral Skills). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Nutrition educators may use the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model to develop education materials targeting increases in preschoolers' FV consumption. To motivate preschool teachers who see themselves as parents at school (Motivation), nutrition educators can provide teachers with FV-related information that was reported as their needs (Information), and supportive feeding practices (Behavioral Skills) to get preschoolers to consume FV.

Mita SC; Li E; Goodell LS

2013-06-01

37

Is Conformity a Mediating Variable on Increased Risk-Taking Behavior Across Years of Membership in the Greek System?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the college subculture of Greek Life, members adhere to specific rules and norms in order to remain accepted, which could beindicative of conformity. This notion raises the question: what is the role of conformity on the risk taking behaviors of alcoholusage and sexual promiscuity as well as on the academic performance across years of membership? The article examines conformityin 31 fraternity members, cross-sectionally, using a compressed longitudinal design and hypothesizes members develop lower levelsof conformity after initiation, making them less susceptible to risk taking behaviors such as binge drinking, sexual promiscuityand decreased academic performance. Surveys were administered in paper format, and results were evaluated using a series ofanalysis of variance equations. The results indicated an interaction effect between peer conformity (high, low) and alcoholicbeverages consumed as well as a main effects for between peer involvement (high, low) and time on college GPA.

CHLOË ELIZABETH LEE-ZORN; WILLIAM BUHROW JR.; BRETT VICARIO

2012-01-01

38

Increasing the satisfaction of general practitioners with continuing medical education programs: A method for quality improvement through increasing teacher-learner interaction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuing medical education (CME) for general practitioners relies on specialist-based teaching methods in many settings. Formal lectures by specialists may not meet the learning needs of practitioners and may cause dissatisfaction with traditional CME. Increasing learner involvement in teaching programs may improve learner satisfaction. Methods A quality improvement program for CME for 18 general practitioners in the Tel Aviv region was designed as a result of dissatisfaction with traditional CME activities. A two-step strategy for change was developed. The CME participants first selected the study topics relevant to them from a needs assessment and prepared background material on the topics. In the second step, specialist teachers were invited to answer questions arising from the preparation of selected topics. Satisfaction with the traditional lecture program and the new participatory program were assessed by a questionnaire. The quality criteria included the relevance, importance and applicability of the CME topic chosen to the participant's practice, the clarity of the presentation and the effective use of teaching aids by the lecturer and the potential of the lecturer to serve as a consultant to the participant. Results The participatory model of CME significantly increased satisfaction with relevance, applicability and interest in CME topics compared to the traditional lecture format. Conclusions Increased learner participation in the selection and preparation of CME topics, and increased interaction between CME teachers and learners results in increased satisfaction with teaching programs. Future study of the effect of this model on physician performance is required.

Gercenshtein Leonid; Fogelman Yacov; Yaphe John

2002-01-01

39

Research on the Influencing Factors of Job Stress of University Teachers ---- Take Changchun University of Science and Technology as an Example  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper selects 159 teachers of Changchun University of Science and Technology (CUST) by stratifi ed sampling method to perform questionnaire survey, determines five factors that influence the job stress of university teachers by principal component analysis. It also analyzes the influence of academic title, gender, age, education background, length of service and discipline difference on the job stress so as to guide universities to deal with teachers’ job stress.Key words: University teacher; Job stress; Job performanceRésumé Le présent texte sélectionne 159 professeurs de l’Universitéde de la science et de la technologie de Changchun (CUST) par la méthode d’échantillonnage stratifié pour effectuer enquête par questionnaire, détermine cinq facteurs qui infl uencent le stress au travail des professeurs d’université par l’analyse en composantes principales. Il analyse également l’influence du titre de formation, le sexe, l’âge, l’éducation de base, la durée de service et de la différence de discipline sur le stress au travail afi n de guider les universités à faire face au stress d’emploi des enseignants.Mots clés: Professeur d’université; Le stress au travail; Le rendement au travail

Bo MENG; Liying GUO

2012-01-01

40

Taking Medication  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Forgot your ID or password? Priority Code: Taking Medication Diabetes is a progressive condition. Depending on what ... healthcare team will be able to determine which medications they should be taking and help them understand ...

 
 
 
 
41

It takes a village: the effects of 10th grade college-going expectations of students, parents, and teachers four years later.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adolescents are surrounded by people who have expectations about their college-going potential. Yet, few studies have examined the link between these multiple sources of college-going expectations and the actual status of students in postsecondary education years later. The study draws on data collected in the 2002-2006 Educational Longitudinal Study and employs an underutilized statistical technique (cross-classified multilevel modeling) to account for teacher reports on overlapping groups of students (typical of high school research). Results showed that positive expectations of students, parents, English, and mathematics teachers in the 10th grade each uniquely predicted postsecondary status 4 years later. As a group, the four sources of expectations explained greater variance in postsecondary education than student characteristics such as socioeconomic status and academic performance. This suggests positive expectations are additive and promotive for students regardless of their risk status. Teacher expectations were also found to be protective for low income students. Implications for future expectancy research and equity-focused interventions are discussed. PMID:23564059

Gregory, Anne; Huang, Francis

2013-09-01

42

A Survey about Professional Abilities of Old teachers of 45 and over in Junior Middle Schools under the New Curriculum Reform in China: Take Suzhou Anhui Province as an Example  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Professional abilities of teachers have been challenged by the New Curriculum Reform from 2001. To find the present state of professional abilities of old teachers of 45 and over in junior middle schools, the investigation adopts questionnaire to inquire 127 junior middle school teachers in Suzhou Anhui province. The results show that the Chinese old teachers have basic skills for teaching with good basic abilities of education and can perform their “teaching” functions well by taking advantage of teaching abilities today. But there are some problems for them in abilities of teaching reflection, education cooperation, teaching innovation, education research and career planning, which are inconsistent with the ideas of the New Curriculum Reform in China. Facing the challenges from the Reform, the old teachers must seek for the improving of professional abilities. On one hand, the government and the schools should provide good outer support for them; on the other hand, the old teachers should set up their selfdevelopment consciousness.Key words: Old teachers in junior middle schools; Professional abilities; The New Curriculum Reform in ChinaRésumé Les Capacités professionnelles des enseignants ont été contestées par le nouveau curriculum Réformer à partir de 2001. Pour trouver l’état actuel des capacités professionnelles des enseignants de agés de 45 ans et plus dans les collèges junior, l’enquête adopte questionnaire pour en savoir davantage, 127 enseignants des écoles intermédiaires junior à Suzhou province d’Anhui. Les résultats montrent queles enseignants de chinois anciens ont des compétences de base pour l’enseignement avec de bonnes aptitudes de base des l’éducation et peuvent exercer leurs fonctions «apprenant» et en tirant parti dequalités pédagogiques d’aujourd’hui. Mais il ya quelques problèmes pour eux dans les capacités de l’enseignement la recherche de réfl exion, la coopération l’éducation, l’innovation pédagogique, l’éducation et de carrière planifi cation, qui sont incompatibles avec les idées de la réforme du nouveau curriculum en Chine. Relever les défi s de la réforme, les anciens professeurs doivent chercher l’amélioration des capacités professionnelles. D’une part, le gouvernement et les écolesdevraient fournir un bon support externe pour eux; d’autre part, les anciens professeurs devraientmettre en place leur auto-développement de la conscience.Mots clés: Anciens professeurs des collèges juniors; Capacités professionnelles; La réforme du nouveau curriculum en Chine

Fang YIN

2012-01-01

43

Teacher's Toolkit: Helping middle school students with learning disabilities pass the federally mandated science tests--Science instruction, study skills, and test-taking strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

Since the passage of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) in 2002, and the amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 2004, the majority of students with learning disabilities take science courses as part of the general-education middle school class. In addition, they will be required to take the high-stakes science tests in accordance with NCLB at least one time during the middle school years, mandated to start in 2007-2008. The purposes of this article are to review the typical characteristics of learning disabilities (LD) that make science instruction a challenge and then to describe instructional modifications, study skills, and test-taking strategies to help students with LD succeed in science class and pass the related tests.

Steele, Marcee M.

2006-11-01

44

Workplace Conditions That Matter to Teachers. Principal's Research Review: Supporting the Principal's Data-Informed Decisions. Vol. 6, No. 1  

Science.gov (United States)

Much of the conversation in recent years about how to attract and retain high-quality teachers has focused on salaries--how much teachers are paid, the possibilities of differentiated pay scales, and pay for performance. But it has become increasingly clear that teachers take much more than salary into account when tallying up working conditions.…

Protheroe, Nancy

2011-01-01

45

Expression of a potato antimicrobial peptide SN1 increases resistance to take-all pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici in transgenic wheat.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Take-all, caused by soil-borne fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt), is a devastating root disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Breeding resistant wheat cultivars is the most promising and reliable approach to protect wheat from take-all. Currently, no resistant wheat germplasm is available to breed cultivars using traditional methods. In this study, gene transformation was carried out using Snakin-1 (SN1) gene isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) because the peptide shows broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in vitro. Purified SN1 peptide also inhibits in vitro the growth of Ggt mycelia. By bombardment-mediated method, the gene SN1 was transformed into Chinese wheat cultivar Yangmai 18 to generate SN1 transgenic wheat lines, which were used to assess the effectiveness of the SN1 peptide in protecting wheat from Ggt. Genomic PCR and Southern blot analyses indicated that the alien gene SN1 was integrated into the genomes of five transgenic wheat lines and heritable from T? to T? progeny. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that the introduced SN1 gene was transcribed and highly expressed in the five transgenic wheat lines. Following challenging with Ggt, disease test results showed that compared to segregants lacking the transgene and untransformed wheat plants, these five transgenic wheat lines expressing SN1 displayed significantly enhanced resistance to take-all. These results suggest that SN1 may be a potentially transgenic tool for improving the take-all resistance of wheat.

Rong W; Qi L; Wang J; Du L; Xu H; Wang A; Zhang Z

2013-08-01

46

Expression of a potato antimicrobial peptide SN1 increases resistance to take-all pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici in transgenic wheat.  

Science.gov (United States)

Take-all, caused by soil-borne fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt), is a devastating root disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Breeding resistant wheat cultivars is the most promising and reliable approach to protect wheat from take-all. Currently, no resistant wheat germplasm is available to breed cultivars using traditional methods. In this study, gene transformation was carried out using Snakin-1 (SN1) gene isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) because the peptide shows broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in vitro. Purified SN1 peptide also inhibits in vitro the growth of Ggt mycelia. By bombardment-mediated method, the gene SN1 was transformed into Chinese wheat cultivar Yangmai 18 to generate SN1 transgenic wheat lines, which were used to assess the effectiveness of the SN1 peptide in protecting wheat from Ggt. Genomic PCR and Southern blot analyses indicated that the alien gene SN1 was integrated into the genomes of five transgenic wheat lines and heritable from T0 to T4 progeny. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that the introduced SN1 gene was transcribed and highly expressed in the five transgenic wheat lines. Following challenging with Ggt, disease test results showed that compared to segregants lacking the transgene and untransformed wheat plants, these five transgenic wheat lines expressing SN1 displayed significantly enhanced resistance to take-all. These results suggest that SN1 may be a potentially transgenic tool for improving the take-all resistance of wheat. PMID:23839728

Rong, Wei; Qi, Lin; Wang, Jingfen; Du, Lipu; Xu, Huijun; Wang, Aiyun; Zhang, Zengyan

2013-07-10

47

Incentives and Effort in the Public Sector : Have U.S. Education Reforms Increased Teachers? Work Hours?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Beyond some contracted minimum, salaried workers? hours are largely chosen at the worker?s discretion and should respond to the strength of contract incentives. Accordingly, we consider the response of teacher hours to accountability and school choice laws introduced in U.S. public schools over the ...

Stoddard, Christiana; Kuhn, Peter

48

The Role of Teachers in Reducing/Increasing Listening Comprehension Test Anxiety: A Case of Iranian EFL Learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Three components have been introduced for foreign language learning anxiety in the literature: Test anxiety, fear of negative evaluation and communication apprehension. This study teases out the first of the three components with special focus on listening comprehension test to investigate the correlation between listening test results and foreign language anxiety. More importantly, the study aims at questioning the role teachers can play in either alleviating or aggravating the anxiety which has been triggered in the listening test takers. For this purpose, a number of 60 intermediate-level EFL learners participated in the study. To measure the level of anxiety in the testees, a modified and translated version of foreign language class anxiety scale (FLCAS) (developed by Horwtiz, Horwitz, and Cope, p. 1986) was used to be correlated with the testees’ scores in listening comprehension test. The results showed a moderate but significant negative correlation between FLCAS and listening comprehension (r=-.469). To answer the second research question, the high anxious participants underwent a treatment, which was designed to alleviate their foreign language learning anxiety. Immediately after the treatment, another listening comprehension test was administered to them to find out whether the treatment session can influence the test results. Using the statistical technique of t-test, the results showed that the high anxious informants had a significant improvement in the second listening comprehension test results due to the reduction of their level of anxiety in the treatment session. Finally, some suggestions were made to the teachers who seek to alleviate the amount of anxiety in their students.

Naser Atasheneh; Ahmad Izadi

2012-01-01

49

Professional development for science teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Next Generation Science Standards will require large-scale professional development (PD) for all science teachers. Existing research on effective teacher PD suggests factors that are associated with substantial changes in teacher knowledge and practice, as well as students' science achievement. But the complexity of the U.S. educational system continues to thwart the search for a straightforward answer to the question of how to support teachers. Interventions that take a systemic approach to reform hold promise for improving PD effectiveness.

Wilson SM

2013-04-01

50

Growing a New Generation of Music Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

In many parts of the United States, there is a growing shortage of music teachers to take the place of the retiring teachers. This is most evident in rural areas. If music teachers are not available to fill openings, music positions are sometimes combined, spreading music teachers too thin and requiring them to possess multiple music…

Burrack, Frederick

2009-01-01

51

Healthy working school teachers with high effort-reward-imbalance and overcommitment show increased pro-inflammatory immune activity and a dampened innate immune defence.  

Science.gov (United States)

To test whether chronic work stress is accompanied by altered immune functioning, changes in lymphocyte subsets and in lymphocyte production of cytokines were examined in reaction to acute psychosocial stress. Work stress was measured according to Siegrist's effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) model. ERI reflects stress due to a lack of reciprocity between costs and gains at work. Overcommitment (OC) is conceptualized as a dysfunctional coping pattern mainly characterized by the inability to withdraw from work obligations. Fifty-five healthy teachers (34 women, 21 men, mean age 50.0 ± 8.47 years) were exposed to a standardized laboratory stressor (Trier Social Stress Test). Lymphocyte subset counts and lymphocyte production of tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-?, interferon (IFN)-?, interleukin (IL)-2, -4, -6 and -10 were measured before and after challenge. High levels of ERI and OC were associated with lower natural killer (NK) cell (CD16+/56+) numbers whereas high levels of OC were related to a lower increase in T-helper cells (CD4+) after stress. Furthermore, subjects with higher ERI showed an overall increased pro-inflammatory activity, with higher TNF-? production at both time points and elevated pre-stress IL-6 production. IL-10 production decreased with higher ERI after stress. The ratios of TNF-?/IL-10 and IL-6/IL-10 were significantly increased in subjects high on ERI. Finally, OC was associated with higher IL-2 production post-stress. The present findings suggest a dampened innate immune defence, reflected in lower NK cell numbers together with an increased pro-inflammatory activity in teachers high on ERI and OC. Such pathways could partly be responsible for the increased vulnerability for stress-related diseases in individuals suffering from chronic work stress. PMID:20599495

Bellingrath, Silja; Rohleder, Nicolas; Kudielka, Brigitte M

2010-07-03

52

Healthy working school teachers with high effort-reward-imbalance and overcommitment show increased pro-inflammatory immune activity and a dampened innate immune defence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To test whether chronic work stress is accompanied by altered immune functioning, changes in lymphocyte subsets and in lymphocyte production of cytokines were examined in reaction to acute psychosocial stress. Work stress was measured according to Siegrist's effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) model. ERI reflects stress due to a lack of reciprocity between costs and gains at work. Overcommitment (OC) is conceptualized as a dysfunctional coping pattern mainly characterized by the inability to withdraw from work obligations. Fifty-five healthy teachers (34 women, 21 men, mean age 50.0 ± 8.47 years) were exposed to a standardized laboratory stressor (Trier Social Stress Test). Lymphocyte subset counts and lymphocyte production of tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-?, interferon (IFN)-?, interleukin (IL)-2, -4, -6 and -10 were measured before and after challenge. High levels of ERI and OC were associated with lower natural killer (NK) cell (CD16+/56+) numbers whereas high levels of OC were related to a lower increase in T-helper cells (CD4+) after stress. Furthermore, subjects with higher ERI showed an overall increased pro-inflammatory activity, with higher TNF-? production at both time points and elevated pre-stress IL-6 production. IL-10 production decreased with higher ERI after stress. The ratios of TNF-?/IL-10 and IL-6/IL-10 were significantly increased in subjects high on ERI. Finally, OC was associated with higher IL-2 production post-stress. The present findings suggest a dampened innate immune defence, reflected in lower NK cell numbers together with an increased pro-inflammatory activity in teachers high on ERI and OC. Such pathways could partly be responsible for the increased vulnerability for stress-related diseases in individuals suffering from chronic work stress.

Bellingrath S; Rohleder N; Kudielka BM

2010-11-01

53

A GOOD TEACHER , HIS ROLE AND QUALITIES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Think back to when you were in school. Who was your favorite teacher? Who was the teacher you dreaded having? Almost everyone will instantly be able to answer these two questions. We've all had good teachers and unfortunately most of us have had teachers that were not effective. So what qualities does an effective teacher have that an ineffective teacher does not? The answer is that it takes a perfect blend of several qualities to create a truly effective teacher who can have a lasting impact on virtually every student. In this article focus has been given on role of a good teacher and. qualities

UDAYSINH R. MANEPATIL

2013-01-01

54

Reaching the teachers  

CERN Document Server

The fourth edition of CERN's High School Teachers programme welcomed 38 teachers to the Laboratory this July. For three weeks the teachers were immersed in the life of CERN, giving them a unique experience to take back to their classrooms.   Participants and organisers of the HST 2001 programme. The pupils of the teachers who attended the High School Teachers (HST) programme at CERN will notice a difference when they meet their teachers at the beginning of next term. They'll see a new-found enthusiasm in their eyes, and this will be thanks to the three weeks they spent at the Laboratory attending the summer students' lectures and working with other teachers from around the world. 'This experience fires you up again!,' explains Wim Peeters, a Belgian teacher at CERN for the second time. For many teachers of physics, university is a long time ago. Physics research has moved on, and there are many new things to learn. That's why CERN has the HST, so that teachers can mix with university students in ...

2001-01-01

55

Students' note-taking as a knowledge construction.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Note-taking is the hegemonic study activity at university and, in many cases, the main ground for educational interaction between teacher and students. This observation has given rise to an increasing interest in studying students’ notetaking and its impact on learning. In broad terms, three lines of research have been developed in the last 40 years: the effects of note-taking and note-rewriting on some cognitive variables (attention, memory, comprehension, and so on); the relationship between quality of notes and significance of learning; and the changes in the teaching methodology which may enhance note-taking. However, the consideration of notes as a symbolic mediator which in certain educational conditions may promote knowledge construction and transformation and, ultimately, cognitive change has received much less attention. In a preliminary study of descriptive nature we confirmed that in the context of our universities note-taking basically performed a register and external memory function with respect to the contents which were to be assessed by the teacher. Only a reduced part of the studied sample attached notes an eminently epistemic function, turning classroom sessions into truly learning situations involving a strategic use (that is, conscious and intentional) of the note-taking procedures using paraphrasing, inferences, analogies and other rhetorical resources. From the data collected in this study we initiated a research and educational innovation project in our respective universities which aimed at the modification of the instructional context so as to turn note-taking into a tool for conceptual change. These modifications had to do with basically three aspects: 1. Form students in the contextualised use of the different note-taking procedures so that they gradually acquired a ‘‘strategic knowledge’’ related to when and why a given type of note adjusted more suitably to the conditions of the note-taking context. 2. Turn students’ notes into a formative assessment tool through a process of external guidance and regulation carried out by the teacher with the objective of notes becoming a tool allowing for self-regulation of students’ own learning. 3. Establish note-taking teams in the classroom with the objective of promoting collaborative learning through the use of activities which emphasise interdependence and peer-assessment. This text presents this project in detail analysing the results obtained and discussing the different degrees of influence which an intervention/approach such as the one outlined here may have on university teaching.

Castello, M.; Monereo, C.

2005-01-01

56

Listening Ability of Physical Education Teacher Department and Classroom Teacher Department Students on Interpersonal Communication  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the educational process “listening” is taking an important role like interpersonal communication. So, it is possible to increase the activity of teacher in communication between teacher and student by gaining and strengthening the “listening ability”. In the point of this view, the purpose of this study was to find out interpersonalcommunication ability level of classroom and physical education teacher department students and make some suggestions.For this purpose, 150 classroom teacher and 150 physical education teacher department students voluntarily join the study. A questionnaire, validity and reliability tests were done, applied the samples. Researchers were applied percentage, frequency, mean and t-test for statistical analysis by using SPSS statistical program.In the result; listening ability of both classroom teacher department and physical education teacher department students was “medium level”. There was no significant difference between gender and different department students on “listening ability” and finally it was an important foundation to think about that students(except two of them) did not have “the best listening ability”.

O?uzhan YONCALIK; Zafer Ç?MEN

2006-01-01

57

Black Father Involvement in Gifted Education: Thoughts from Black Fathers on Increasing/Improving Black Father-Gifted Teacher Partnerships  

Science.gov (United States)

|Black fathers are important advocates in addressing the underrepresentation of Black students in gifted programs, as well as the achievement gaps between Black and White students. Black fathers increasingly understand the important role that Black mothers have traditionally played in supporting their gifted children's school experiences. As a…

Grantham, Tarek C.; Henfield, Malik S.

2011-01-01

58

Universal Design for Learning: Preparing Secondary Education Teachers in Training to Increase Academic Accessibility of High School English Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

Although the concept of universal design for learning (UDL) is well understood in the world of architecture and in the area of special education, its use to increase the academic performance of high school English learners (ELs) is not widely explored. To reduce this void, this article presents an overview of the UDL concept and its principles,…

Lopes-Murphy, Solange

2012-01-01

59

TEACHERS’ SMOKING AT SCHOOL INFLUENCES ADOLESCENTS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aim: To explore the knowledge and behaviour of adolescents from a low socio-economic region of Istanbul, regarding smoking and how these variables are affected by their teachers’ smoking status.Method: This is a descriptive study carried out between February-March 2007 among 6th-8th grade students of 3 primary schools in Tasdelen region. A questionnaire was filled out by adolescents under supervision about their smoking experience, related factors and whether the students were affected by their teachers’ smoking behaviour. After descriptive and comparative analysis of the data, a logistic regression analysis was performed.Results: Among the 560 participants, mean age was 13±1.08 (11-15). The incidence of a smoking experience at least once was 12%. At least one of the teachers was observed while smoking by 83.8% of the students, and 16% of them declared they were negatively affected by their teachers’ smoking behaviour. Among the factors related to smoking experience, the teachers’ smoking status (being a smoker) increased the risk of smoking significantly, according to the regression analysis (p=0,008;OR 7,476;95% CI 1,703-32,826).Conclusion: Adolescents are influenced by teachers’ smoking at school. We think that the extent of this influence will decrease after the legislation (section number 5727, to take effect on July 19th 2009) prohibiting smoking in doors is passed.

Çi?dem Apayd?n Kaya; Mehmet Akman; Kübra Saçar; Selçuk Kaya; Muhammed Sulukaya

2010-01-01

60

Training of adult education teachers : experiences from a teacher training programme in cooperative learning  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The background of the study was that a group of teachers should develop competences in order to apply a new pedagogical approach, cooperative learning (CL), in a skilled manner. The total competence development process included theoretical knowledge about the method, practical training in its use, and ongoing and extensive coaching related to the teachers' experiences of implementing CL. It was assumed that the competence development process would result in a higher usage of CL as well as an increasingly professional and more reflected application of the teaching method over the year. The results from the study, as indicated by the teachers’ completed logs, and supplemented by the data from the focus group interviews, show a different picture. Two months into the project, the teachers were using CL on a large scale. The average level of their use did not increase during the academic year. By two months into the course, teachers already perceived themselves as being able to apply the method. They also reported that their skills were developed further during the course. They found that they became better at solving educational challenges, that they became more satisfied with their own teaching, and that they were better able to solve the problems deriving from the heterogeneous composition of the student group. The data thus documents measurable but limited developments in the teachers competences after the first two month. Our analysis of the teachers’ reflection skills reveals that as early as two months into the project, a high level of reflection was taking place. Contrary to our initial assumptions, there is no gradual and continuous rise of the teachers’ competence. The increase in teaching competence is located relatively early in the academic year; after that there is only modest improvement.

Wahlgren, Bjarne

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying  

Science.gov (United States)

This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

2011-01-01

62

Plans, Takes, and Mis-takes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper analyzes what may have been a mistake bypianist Thelonious Monk playing a jazz solo in 1958.Even in a Monk composition designed for patternedmayhem, a note can sound out of pattern. We reframethe question of whether the note was a mistake and askinstead about how Monk handles the problem. Amazingly,he replays the note into a new pattern that resituatesits jarring effect in retrospect. The mistake, orbetter, the mis-take, was “saved” by subsequent notes.Our analysis, supported by reflections from jazz musiciansand the philosopher John Dewey, encourages areformulation of plans, takes, and mis-takes as categoriesfor the interpretation of contingency, surprise, andrepair in all human activities. A final section suggeststhat mistakes are essential to the practical plying andplaying of knowledge into performances, particularlythose that highlight learning.

Nathaniel Klemp; Ray McDermott; Jason Raley; Matthew Thibeault; Kimberly Powell; Daniel J. Levitin

2008-01-01

63

Teachers' views of using e-learning for non-traditional students in higher education across three disciplines [nursing, chemistry and management] at a time of massification and increased diversity in higher education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The expansion of the higher educational sector in the United Kingdom over the last two decades to meet political aspirations of the successive governments and popular demand for participation in the sector (the Widening Participation Agenda) has overlapped with the introduction of e-learning. OBJECTIVES: This paper describes teachers' views of using e-learning for non-traditional students in higher education across three disciplines [nursing, chemistry and management] at a time of massification and increased diversity in higher education. DESIGN: A three phase, mixed methods study; this paper reports findings from phase two of the study. SETTINGS: One university in England. PARTICIPANTS: Higher education teachers teaching on the nursing, chemistry and management programmes. METHODS: Focus groups with these teachers. FINDINGS: Findings from these data show that teachers across the programmes have limited knowledge of whether students are non-traditional or what category of non-traditional status they might be in. Such knowledge as they have does not seem to influence the tailoring of teaching and learning for non-traditional students. Teachers in chemistry and nursing want more support from the university to improve their use of e-learning, as did teachers in management but to a lesser extent. CONCLUSIONS: Our conclusions confirm other studies in the field outside nursing which suggest that non-traditional students' learning needs have not been considered meaningfully in the development of e-learning strategies in universities. We suggest that this may be because teachers have been required to develop e-learning at the same time as they cope with the massification of, and widening participation in, higher education. The findings are of particular importance to nurse educators given the high number of non-traditional students on nursing programmes.

Allan HT; O'Driscoll M; Simpson V; Shawe J

2013-09-01

64

Teachers and Human Rights Education  

Science.gov (United States)

|Why do teachers need to be familiar with human rights? In multicultural societies, whose values take precedence? How do schools resolve tensions between children's rights and teachers' rights? Campaigners, politicians and the media cite human rights to justify or challenge anything from peaceful protest to military action. The phrase "human…

Osler, Audrey; Starkey, Hugh

2010-01-01

65

Take Your Medicines Safely  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking the bacteria completely out of ... taking this medicine? What are the possible side effects and what do I do if they occur? ...

66

Taking to the airwaves  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Personal Communication Services (PCS) are a new generation of wireless technology usng the broad bands of the radio spectrum that were once the exclusive domains of public utilities and emergency services. The technology is about ready to take to the airwaves, but to make that leap it needs an increased number of transmitter base stations, a fiver optic systems, digital switching stations, and a supporting network. Those are wide-ranging requirements difficult for one company to provide by itself. Through DukeNet Communications, Charlotte-based Duke Power Company is marketing its expertise in fiber optic cable, selling capacity on its growing fiber optic network, and partnering with Carolina Power and Light`s CaroNet, telecommunication giant BellSouth Corporation, and regional independent phone companies to provide PCS to areas in North and South Carolina.

Smith, M.H.; Snoddy, J.

1995-11-01

67

Reflections of Preservice Information Technology Teachers Regarding Cyberbullying  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The current phenomenological study addressed the reflections of preservice information technology (IT) teachers regarding their cyberbullying or victimization experiences. Fifty five preservice IT teachers at a Turkish teacher training institution were offered a lecture with the purpose of awareness-raising on cyberbullying, which was followed by the assignment of take-home reflection papers. Document analysis on reflection papers led researchers to find out underlying themes regarding participants’ cyberbullying or victimization experiences. Findings revealed that females were more likely to be victims than males. Instant messaging programs, e-mail, cell phones and online social networks were used as means to cyberbully. Varying psychological consequences of victimization incidents were reported. Noted reactions to incidents were discontinuing interaction with bullies, and seeking family, peer and legal support. Findings further implied that awareness raising activities regarding cyberbullying were likely to reduce cyberbullying instances and increase preservice teachers’ action competence.

Yavuz Akbulut; Cem Çuhadar

2011-01-01

68

Domain Building or Risk Taking  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The Nordic Countries are usually seen as the worlds must successful nations when it comes to gender equality, and the Scandinavian population in general appreciates values traditionally labeled feminine as caretaking and the quality of everyday life. However, the inequalities become obvious in school management. Among headmasters in High school in Denmark only 18 % are women despite of the fact that 52 % of the teachers are female. How can we explain that? This article is based on a survey answered by top- and middle level management staff. It rejects all traditional explanations of the relations between gender, values and family obligation but reveals an interesting difference between two strategies for career development: Domain Building and Risk Taking. Both strategies are applied by both men and women. However, one of them seems to be the most effective with regard to achieve a position as a top manager – and one of them is more often preferred by men than by women.

Hjort, Katrin; Abrahamsen, Marianne

2012-01-01

69

Teacher Burnout and Job Satisfaction among Agricultural Education Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

|The demands on teachers both in and out of classrooms combined with increased budget cuts have led many to question the levels of job satisfaction and burnout among agricultural education teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence of burnout and the level at which burnout exists among agricultural education teachers in…

Chenevey, Jamie L.; Ewing, John C.; Whittington, M. Susie

2008-01-01

70

TeacherTECH  

Science.gov (United States)

TeacherTECH is the teacher-training component of GirlTECH, a program of Center for Excellence and Equity in Education (CEEE) at Rice University. The project focuses on providing technology training and exploring "innovative teaching strategies that impact equity in the classroom." TeacherTECH offers lesson plans designed by teachers in a way that is intended to "take full advantage of Internet resources and to teach mathematics and science concepts in new and exciting ways." From this website, visitors can select lessons by the year they were developed (going back to 1995) or search on a particular topic or string of words. The lesson ideas are described along with links to additional resources. The lesson descriptions include related graphs, data tables, as well as suggested ways to extend the activity or integrate technology.

71

Fernandez Takes Charge.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses the impact that Chancellor Joseph Fernandez has had on the New York City school system. Discusses his ideological beliefs, which include school-based management and accountability. Comments on Fernandez's personal style and how this has affected his relationships with teachers, parents, principals, and others involved in the educational…

Traub, James

1990-01-01

72

Take a Planet Walk  

Science.gov (United States)

Physical models in the classroom "cannot be expected to represent the full-scale phenomenon with complete accuracy, not even in the limited set of characteristics being studied" (AAAS 1990). Therefore, by modifying a popular classroom activity called a "planet walk," teachers can explore upper elementary students' current understandings; create an…

Schuster, Dwight

2008-01-01

73

Taking the Leap  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers strive to engage students in rich and varied experiences involving exploration. These experiences should be accessible to all types of learners (e.g., visual, kinesthetic, mathematically inclined), offering multiple pathways for engagement at different levels of sophistication and accommodating both conceptual and computational…

Tretter, Thomas

2012-01-01

74

Helping Teachers Communicate  

Science.gov (United States)

|Personality type theory describes normal differences in how people are energized, take in information, make decisions, and approach work and life--all key elements in how people teach and learn. Understanding one another's personality type preferences helps teachers share their instructional strategies and classroom information. Type theory…

Kise, Jane; Russell, Beth; Shumate, Carol

2008-01-01

75

Opaqueness and Bank Risk Taking  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between opaqueness and bank risk taking. Using a sample of 199 banks from 38 countries over the period January 1996 to December 2006, I analyze whether more opaque banks are riskier than less opaque banks. I find suggestive evidence that commonly used proxies for bank opaqueness are significantly related to bank risk taking as measured by the Merton PD and the bank-individual Z-score, even after accounting for potential simultaneity between risk taking and opaqueness. More opaque banks seem to engage more in risk taking than less opaque banks. This result provides support to the common view that bank opaqueness is problematic and that transparency among financial institutions should be increased.

Patrick Behr

2012-01-01

76

Collaboration Takes Center Stage: Interactive Teaching through a Schoolwide Focus on the Performing Arts Leads to Dramatic Improvements in Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

In the Old Adobe Union School District in Petaluma, California, the school staff's goal is to assure that all teachers make the fundamental shift from teacher-centric to learner-centric thinking. For them, this is what distinguishes great teachers from good teachers. They believe this level of expertise takes years to develop and that schools play…

Williamson, Jeff; Zimmerman, Diane

2009-01-01

77

Online Professional Experiences in Teacher Preparation Program: A Preservice Teacher Study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Teacher preparation is a process of instructional fulfillment in teacher education. This program is widely used in school that need professionalism in terms of networking. Supervisor take their role to support preservice teacher in many expected attributes which school workers should be kno...

Prasart Nuangchalerm; Veena Prachagool; Patcharee Sriputta

78

Teacher's Myers-Briggs Personality Profiles: Identifying Effective Teacher Personality Traits  

Science.gov (United States)

|The Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI) and Beiderman Risk Taking (BRT) scale were administered to 58 teachers living in the state of Florida, USA. These teachers are considered part of prestigious group of educators who were nominated into the Florida League of Teachers by their superintendents/directors. Descriptive data includes frequency and…

Rushton, Stephen; Morgan, Jackson; Richard, Michael

2007-01-01

79

Teacher Education Effectiveness: Quality and Equity of Future Primary Teachers' Mathematics and Mathematics Pedagogical Content Knowledge  

Science.gov (United States)

The effectiveness of teacher education was examined by taking two indicators into account: future teachers' mean achievement on a paper-and-pencil test as an indicator of quality, and the variability of teacher achievement due to background characteristics as an indicator of equity. In detail, the effects of gender and language on mathematics…

Blomeke, Sigrid; Suhl, Ute; Kaiser, Gabriele

2011-01-01

80

Taking Acetaminophen Safely  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... care professional, such as your pharmacist, doctor, and nurse Taking too much acetaminophen is harmful. Severe liver ... If you have questions talk to your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. You can visit the FDA at ...

 
 
 
 
81

Take Your Medicines Safely  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... better, the antibiotic is working in killing the bacteria, but it might not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking the bacteria completely out of the system. It might be ...

82

Taking Acetaminophen Safely  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... it can be harmful. Acetaminophen can cause serious liver injury. This reference summary discusses: • what acetaminophen is ... taking too much acetaminophen, which can cause serious liver injury, you must follow the information given by: • ...

83

Taking iron supplements  

Science.gov (United States)

... part of treating iron deficiency anemia. However, iron supplements are often needed to build up the iron ... WHO SHOULD TAKE EXTRA IRON Iron supplements may be taken as ... The most common tablet size is 325 mg. Make sure your health ...

84

Take Your Medicines Safely  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... our culture, is that we take antibiotics for seven to 10 days, or we are supposed to. ... you've got your pills for the whole seven days of the week. Announcer: Regardless of age ...

85

Taking Acetaminophen Safely  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... used only as directed • how to prevent medicine accidents • what to do if someone takes too much ... with the other caregivers. This will help avoid accidents, like mistakenly giving: • an extra dose • another medicine ...

86

Taking Acetaminophen Safely  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available Taking Acetaminophen Safely Introduction Acetaminophen is an active ingredient used to relieve pain and lower fever. It is available ... you can find more information about acetaminophen What Acetaminophen is Used For Acetaminophen temporarily: • lowers fever • relieves ...

87

Taking Acetaminophen Safely  

Science.gov (United States)

Taking Acetaminophen Safely Introduction Acetaminophen is an active ingredient used to relieve pain and lower fever. It is available ... you can find more information about acetaminophen What Acetaminophen is Used For Acetaminophen temporarily: • lowers fever • relieves ...

88

The Math teachers know  

CERN Multimedia

What sorts of mathematics competencies must teachers have in order to teach the discipline well? This book offers a novel take on the question. Most research is focused on explicit knowledge-that is, on the sorts of insights that might be specified, catalogued, taught, and tested. In contrast, this book focuses on the tacit dimensions of teachers' mathematics knowledge that precede and enable their competencies with formal mathematics. It highlights the complexity of this knowledge and offers strategies to uncover it, analyze it, and re-synthesize it in ways that will make it more available

Davis, Brent

2013-01-01

89

Teachers And The New Ict Challenges  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Information Communication Technology (ICT) breakthroughs have brought new opportunities to restructure the learning and knowledge transfer environment. ICT technology has opened new avenues and brought new challenges to learners and teachers. The responsibility of learning has shifted to the learners and this allows the roles of teachers to change in tandem. However, we should not lose sight of the fact that teachers determine the quality of the learning that takes place, and not technology. This article discusses the changes that teachers would experience in this new learning environment and the implications on their pedagogic practice. It also shares what teachers say about using ICT in teaching.

Pramela Krish; Noraza Ahmad Zabidi

2007-01-01

90

A carência de professores de ciências e matemática na Educação Básica e a ampliação das vagas no Ensino Superior/ The shortage of science and mathematics teachers in Primary and Secondary Schools and the increase of teachers' training courses  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Este estudo parte das estatísticas do Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisas Anísio Teixeira sobre o Ensino Superior, para responder questões de estudo que envolvem: a dimensão da carência de professores no país, o crescimento da oferta de vagas nas licenciaturas presenciais, e a distância e as estimativas sobre o volume total de vagas necessárias para que o país possa formar licenciados em número suficiente para atender a Educação Básica. Metodologicament (more) e, este trabalho se apresenta como um estudo documental alicerçado na análise sistematizada de documentos, estatísticas e artigos da literatura. Os dados estatísticos sobre vagas, candidatos, ingressos, matrículas e concluintes são então apresentados e discutidos quantitativamente, buscando-se elementos que fundamentem as considerações feitas para o fortalecimento das políticas públicas na área. As conclusões apontam que medidas complementares à ampliação de vagas nos cursos de licenciatura são necessárias para a solução da carência de professores no Brasil. Abstract in english This study starts with the statistics of Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisas Anísio Teixeira on higher education to answer some questions that involve the lack of teachers in the country, the growth of vacancies in the undergraduate on-site and distance courses and the estimates for the necessary vacancies so that the country can form licentiates in enough numbers to provide basic education. Methodologically this work is a document study and is based on a systemati (more) zed analysis of documents, statistics and articles in the literature. The statistical data on vacancies, candidates, entrance, registrations and graduation are then presented and discussed looking for elements to base the considerations about the public politics in the area. The conclusions point to complementary measures for the enlargement of vacancies in degree courses which are necessary for the solution of the lack of teachers in Brazil.

Araujo, Renato Santos; Vianna, Deise Miranda

2011-01-01

91

Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin  

Science.gov (United States)

... Devices for Taking Insulin Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin On this page: What alternative devices for taking ... the skin. [ Top ] What alternative devices for taking insulin are available? Insulin pens provide a convenient, easy- ...

92

Taking a deep breath  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available While 2012 is going away, IJHDR prepares the celebration of its 5th anniversary! This is thus a time for reflection, to ponder on the good and bad experiences, to (re)think the next steps to improve our service to readers, authors and the scientific community at large. Along these hard, but rewarding first five years, IJHDR reached many readers and was supported by many authors all over the world, it achieved recognition by important scientific databases and societies. This success is the result of the joint work of the Editorial Board members and with GIRI, our hosting scientific society. IJHDR provided the homeopathic community an open, free, multimedia and electronic venue to share high-quality information. Focused on research articles, and open to the entire field of High Dilution research, including homeopathy and hormesis, IJHDR came to occupy a special place within the scientific map. Nevertheless, the goals achieved are not enough, but further improvement is needed for IJHDR keep on growing. Our aim for the next years is to maintain the original editorial vision and mission, while increasing even more the quality of publication. IJHDR will start 2013 by revising its Board of Consultants. Five years ago, when IJHDR was an unknown journal that still had to prove its quality, friends, idealists, and invited experts kindly contributed with their expertise to make peer review a mandatory step in the evaluation of articles. However, not only IJHDR grew, but also the editorial work did! The time arrives to include new experts in our Board of Consultant,, not only to share in the work, but to have cover a broader scope of knowledge, as HD research is a cross-disciplinary and emergent field. Also the structure of the articles will be revised. Improvement in the layout will be discussed to stimulate the use of multimedia resources like video and audio files, simulations, supplementary materials, links, and color images. Special attention will be paid to language revision and reference citation. Together with its authors and readers, IJHDR contributes to the development of a kind of knowledge close to the borders of science. Therefore, to establish a valid scientific background, the articles must be clearly written, and based on sound assumptions. High-visibility for articles is a fundamental aspect desired by all authors. As an open and free access journal, IJHDR meets that condition, and we are planning to make our influence and visibility even wider. Inclusion in the major databases has paramount importance in the academic milieu, however, it should be considered as a consequence, rather than a goal. In 2013, IJHDR will chair a collaborative project with several research institutions aiming to deliver information everywhere, increasing the visibility of the published articles. Thus, now it is the time to take a deep breath, relax, and prepare you for the forthcoming work! See you in 2013!

Carlos Renato Zacharias

2012-01-01

93

Teacher clusters in South Africa : opportunities and constraints for teacher development and change  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Teacher clusters represent a recent experiment in the field of teacher professional development in South Africa. Increasingly, teacher clusters are being used as a substitute for the traditional approaches to professional development in helping teachers reshape their professional knowledge and chang...

Jita, Loyiso C.; Ndlalane, Thembi Constance

94

Constructing Outcomes in Teacher Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available As we enter the twenty-first century, the outcomes, consequences, and results of teacher education have become critical topics in nearly all of the state and national policy debates about teacher preparation and licensure as well as in the development of many of the privately and publicly funded research agendas related to teacher and student learning. In this article, I argue that teacher education reform over the last fifty years has been driven by a series of questions about policy and practice. The question that is currently driving reform and policy in teacher education is what I refer to as "the outcomes question." This question asks how we should conceptualize and define the outcomes of teacher education for teacher learning, professional practice, and student learning, as well as how, by whom, and for what purposes these outcomes should be documented, demonstrated, and/or measured. In this article, I suggest that the outcomes question in teacher education is being conceptualized and constructed in quite different ways depending on the policy, research, and practice contexts in which the question is posed as well as on the political and professional motives of the posers. The article begins with an overview of the policy context, including those reforms and initiatives that have most influenced how outcomes are currently being constructed, debated, and enacted in teacher education. Then I identify and analyze three major "takes" on the outcomes question in teacher education?outcomes as the long-term or general impacts of teacher education, outcomes as teacher candidates' scores on high stakes teacher tests, and outcomes as the professional performances of teacher candidates, particularly their demonstrated ability to influence student learning. For each of these approaches to outcomes, I examine underlying assumptions about teaching and schooling, the evidence and criteria used for evaluation, units of analysis, and consequences for the profession. I point out that how we construct outcomes in teacher education (including how we make the case that some outcomes matter more than others) legitimizes but also undermines particular points of view about the purposes of schooling, the nature of teaching and learning, and the role of teacher education in educational reform. In the second half of the article, I offer critique across the three constructions of outcomes, exploring the possibilities as well as the pitfalls involved in the outcomes debate. In this section, I focus on the tensions between professional consensus and critique, problems with the inputs-outputs metaphor, the need to get social justice onto the outcomes agenda, problems with the characterization of teachers as either saviors or culprits, and the connection of outcomes to educational reform strategies that are either democratic or market-driven.

Marilyn Cochran-Smith

2001-01-01

95

Auditory perspective taking.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Effective communication with a mobile robot using speech is a difficult problem even when you can control the auditory scene. Robot self-noise or ego noise, echoes and reverberation, and human interference are all common sources of decreased intelligibility. Moreover, in real-world settings, these problems are routinely aggravated by a variety of sources of background noise. Military scenarios can be punctuated by high decibel noise from materiel and weaponry that would easily overwhelm a robot's normal speaking volume. Moreover, in nonmilitary settings, fans, computers, alarms, and transportation noise can cause enough interference to make a traditional speech interface unusable. This work presents and evaluates a prototype robotic interface that uses perspective taking to estimate the effectiveness of its own speech presentation and takes steps to improve intelligibility for human listeners.

Martinson E; Brock D

2013-06-01

96

Teacher's Domain  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers' Domain is an online educational service with two related components: collections and courses that help teachers enhance their students' learning experiences and advance their own teaching skills. The Teachers' Domain collections include classroom-ready multimedia resources for use in lessons or independent study, and the Teachers' Domain Professional Development courses utilize many of the same resources along with videos of exemplary classroom practice. The collections provide learning experiences that no textbook can. This ever-expanding library currently includes collections on life science, physical science, engineering, earth and space sciences.

2010-06-01

97

Taking drugs very seriously.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Neither anti-illegal drug proponents nor their detractors have wholly plausible arguments for their positions, because neither takes responsibility for drug use sufficiently seriously. Instead, only a policy that places users' responsibility at the forefront of the problem is acceptable, one that is sufficiently respectful of actual or potential nonusers' rights not to be wrongfully harmed, directly or indirectly, by drug use, or coerced to support it in any way.

Corlett JA

2013-04-01

98

Greens Take Root.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

. -, - (2006). ISSN 1214-1615Výzkumný zám?r: CEZ:AV0Z70280505Klí?ová slova: greensKód oboru RIV: AO - Sociologie, demografiehttp://www.tol.cz/look/TOL/article.tpl?IdLanguage=1&IdPublication=4&NrIssue=167&NrSection=3&NrArticle=17186&search=search&SearchKeywords=Greens+take+root&SearchMode=on&SearchLevel=0

Smith, MichaelG

99

Take the "C" Train  

Science.gov (United States)

In this essay, the author recalls several of her experiences in which she successfully pulled her boats out of river holes by throwing herself to the water as a sea-anchor. She learned this trick from her senior guides at a spring training. Her guides told her, "When you're stuck in a hole, take the "C" train."" "Meaning?" The author asked her…

Lawton, Rebecca

2008-01-01

100

Take back needs logistics  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In order to establish effective take back systems in industrialized countries an area-wide logistic network for the redistribution of used (electronic) products will be necessary. Today the logistic costs present up to 70% of the total recycling costs - and consequently logistics is important in the realization of sustainable policy and recycling. The development of logistic solutions for the redistribution of products using existing chains of distribution, channels to be newly established, or other ones already existing, taking into account all technical and organizational components, one has to consider that varying quantity flows, branchings and combinations of the material flow have to take place in the recycling process for the quantity flow of the production from raw material suppliers via supplier to the manufacturer. This also requires the development of networks for a systematic information flow from the recycling process back to the construction of recycling-based products as well as for the information from the construction to the product recycling - e.g. working plans for dismantling, lists of parts containing hazardous substances, certificates on the further use of components, etc. (orig.)

Hansen, U. [Univ. of Applied Sciences RheinAhrCampus, Remagen (Germany)

2004-07-01

 
 
 
 
101

Relations of Children's Effortful Control and Teacher-Child Relationship Quality to School Attitudes in a Low-Income Sample.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

RESEARCH FINDINGS: The purpose of this study was to examine the relations of children's effortful control and quality of relationships with teachers to school attitudes longitudinally in an ethnically diverse and economically disadvantaged sample. Data were collected as part of a larger intervention project during mid-fall, winter, and late spring (ns = 823, 722, and 758, respectively) for 2 cohorts of 3- to 5-year-olds (collected during 2 different school years). Children's effortful control was assessed in the fall with parents' and teachers' reports and 2 behavioral measures. Teacher-child relationship quality was assessed mid-year with teachers' reports of closeness and conflict. Attitudes toward school were assessed in late spring using teachers' and students' reports of school avoidance and liking. Effortful control, in general, was positively correlated with teacher-child closeness and school liking and negatively correlated with conflict and school avoidance. Using structural equation modeling and controlling for sex and ethnicity, we found that effortful control was positively related to teacher-child relationship quality, which in turn was positively related to school attitudes. Furthermore, the relation of effortful control to school attitudes was mediated by teacher-child relationship quality. PRACTICE OR POLICY: Results provide evidence for the importance of relational processes that take place within the classroom context and have implications for teachers and clinicians working to increase school success in ethnic minority and low-income children.

Silva KM; Spinrad TL; Eisenberg N; Sulik MJ; Valiente C; Huerta S; Edwards A; Eggum ND; Kupfer AS; Lonigan CJ; Phillips BM; Wilson SB; Clancy-Menchetti J; Landry SH; Swank PR; Assel MA; Taylor HB

2011-01-01

102

Adaptive learning and risk taking.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Humans and animals learn from experience by reducing the probability of sampling alternatives with poor past outcomes. Using simulations, J. G. March (1996) illustrated how such adaptive sampling could lead to risk-averse as well as risk-seeking behavior. In this article, the author develops a formal theory of how adaptive sampling influences risk taking. He shows that a risk-neutral decision maker may learn to prefer a sure thing to an uncertain alternative with identical expected value and a symmetric distribution, even if the decision maker follows an optimal policy of learning. If the distribution of the uncertain alternative is negatively skewed, risk-seeking behavior can emerge. Consistent with recent experiments, the model implies that information about foregone payoffs increases risk taking.

Denrell J

2007-01-01

103

Teacher's Niche  

Science.gov (United States)

This website has information and links to resources for ocean sciences teachers located in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. The resources include professional development opportunities, student opportunities, teaching resources and lessons, and organizations and agencies to connect teachers with ocean science materials.

104

Competent teacher  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article focuses on the concept of competences which are necessary for defining a teacher with certain abilities as a competent teacher. While analysing the concept of competence one should remember about the differences in interpreting the notions of competence and qualifications, as well as about recognizing both competences and qualifications as key factors.

Piatek Tadeusz

2010-01-01

105

Beyond Turn-taking  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article discusses several epistemological and methodological issues related to the analysis of discourse in general and of educational talk in particular. The theoretical framework provided by conversation analysis (CA) is applied and critically discussed in the analysis of an empirical example of educational talk. Several questions seem pertinent: Can we - as analysts - have direct access to talk "as it actually occurs", independent of any kind of theorizing and predefined categorization? What is the epistemological status of the conversation analytic categories? What are the limitations of applying turn-taking as an analytical category in the study of talk? To what extent can we presume the knowledgeability of the interlocutors as a premise in our analysis? On the background of my own attempts at applying CA in the analysis of educational discourse, I argue for a widening of the perspective from a narrow, empiricist focus on conversational turn-takings and sequential organization of talk, for example in the handling of issues like silences and absences in talk. On the other hand, I also warn against the pitfalls of historicist, abstract social theory; here exemplified with some texts from theorists applying abstract philosophical categories from dialectical and historical materialism like "the law of contradiction" as explanatory tools in the study of situated action. In the study of educational meaning making we should avoid empiricist as well as historicist approaches and explanations.

Ivar Solheim

2002-01-01

106

Preparing high-school physics teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This February 2009 Physics Today article argues that by taking on a significant part of the education of high-school physics teachers, physics departments in the US can inspire their students and help ensure a scientifically educated population.

Hodapp, Theodore; Hehn, Jack; Hein, Warren

2009-02-22

107

Are Boys Better Off with Male and Girls with Female Teachers? A Multilevel Investigation of Measurement Invariance and Gender Match in Teacher-Student Relationship Quality  

Science.gov (United States)

Although research consistently points to poorer teacher-student relationships for boys than girls, there are no studies that take into account the effects of teacher gender and control for possible measurement non-invariance across student and teacher gender. This study addressed both issues. The sample included 649 primary school teachers (182…

Spilt, Jantine L.; Koomen, Helma M. Y.; Jak, Suzanne

2012-01-01

108

Mentoring Beginning and Crossover Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This poster focuses on mentoring efforts with the Physics Teacher Education Coalition Project (PhysTEC) and comments from some mentees. This poster will focus on mentor-mentee interactions during the last three years. Types of interactions, time spent on those different interaction types, and summary comments from mentees will be available. (The PhysTEC project goals include increasing the number of physics teachers produced, improving undergraduate physics teacher education preparation, better equipping prospective teachers through their undergraduate education, and providing some mentoring support during their first years of teaching. The author served as a high school Teacher in Residence at Western Michigan University during 2002-2003 and has continued his involvement with the PhysTEC project through mentoring beginning and crossover teachers.)

Freeland, Dale

2006-12-01

109

Balancing Teacher Quality and Quantity  

Science.gov (United States)

The world is facing a shortage of trained teachers. According to the 2010 Global Monitoring Report approximately 10.3 million teachers will be needed globally to staff classrooms from Bangkok to Canada. The situation is worse in Sub-Saharan Africa. Estimates suggest that approximately 1.2 million new teachers will be needed in Sub-Saharan Africa alone to achieve universal primary education goals by 2015. Increases in primary school enrollments, drought, and HIV-AIDS have exacerbated the need for well trained teachers. Despite the need, the focus is on balancing quality with quantity. An effective teacher is deemed a critical element, although not the only one, in a student's success in the classroom. This paper focuses on the dilemma of meeting universal primary education goals in Sub-Saharan Africa, while maintaining teacher quality in fragile contexts.

Bond, Helen

110

Besieged Institutions and the Massachusetts Teacher Tests  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teacher testing was inaugurated in Massachusetts in 1998 and a 59% failure rate among test-takers led to public shaming of the teacher candidates and their colleges and universities in the media. Within a two-year time period, low-performing teacher education programs in Massachusetts initiated a wide range of test preparatory activities which led to a dramatic increase in their students' pass rates. The authors separate colleges and universities into three categories and examine their differentiated responses to teacher testing. Their finding that institutions of higher education have responded effectively to teacher testing does not preclude critique of teacher testing as currently practiced in Massachusetts.

Larry H. Ludlow; Dennis Shirley; Camelia Rosca

2002-01-01

111

Relationships between Teacher Characteristics, Interpersonal Teacher Behaviour and Teacher Wellbeing  

Science.gov (United States)

|The classroom as a microsystem is characterised by many interpersonal relationships. These relationships are perceived differently by the teacher than they are by the students. In our research we examine the relationship between formal teacher characteristics, interpersonal teacher behaviour as perceived by the teacher, and teacher wellbeing.…

Van Petegem, K.; Creemers, B. P. M.; Rossel, Y.; Aelterman, A.

2005-01-01

112

Relationships between Teacher Characteristics, Interpersonal Teacher Behaviour and Teacher Wellbeing  

Science.gov (United States)

The classroom as a microsystem is characterised by many interpersonal relationships. These relationships are perceived differently by the teacher than they are by the students. In our research we examine the relationship between formal teacher characteristics, interpersonal teacher behaviour as perceived by the teacher, and teacher wellbeing.…

Van Petegem, K.; Creemers, B. P. M.; Rossel, Y.; Aelterman, A.

2005-01-01

113

Multicultural Education and teacher’s social well-being  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The configuration of new intergroup and interpersonal relations that take place in the receiving social context as a result of migratory processes, owns direct influences over the school scene. Having in account there are different paradigms and models in multicultural education (Banks, 2009), the aim of the study is to analyse the impact that has on teacher’s social well-being, the main or minor percentage of immigrant students in the schools. The Social Well-Being Scale of Keyes (1998), adapted by Blanco & Diaz (2005) was applied on a sample of 281 primary education teachers from Guipúzcoa, (Spain). They were distributed in three groups for its comparison. The results indicate, that those teachers that carry out their work in schools with greater concentration of immigrant students, presented the greater level of social well-being with respect to their colleagues who belong to schools characterized by the sociocultural homogeneity of the pupils.

Alonso, María L; Martínez Taboada, Cristina

2011-01-01

114

Teachers' Knowledge of Education Law  

Science.gov (United States)

The knowledge base of education-related law is growing at a rapid pace. The increase in federal and state statutes is rising commensurate with litigation that directs teachers on curricular, professional, and social matters. At the same time, numerous studies provide significant evidence that teachers lack an adequate level of knowledge of…

Littleton, Mark

2008-01-01

115

Can Teacher Evaluation Improve Teaching?  

Science.gov (United States)

The modernization of teacher evaluation systems, an increasingly common component of school reform efforts, promises to reveal new, systematic information about the performance of individual classroom teachers. Yet while states and districts race to design new systems, most discussion of how the information might be used has focused on traditional…

Taylor, Eric S.; Tyler, John H.

2012-01-01

116

School development planning in Serbia: How teachers evaluate it  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available School development planning is an instrument of school internal development. It has been present in Serbian schools since 2002, but until today there have not been enough data regarding the way development planning takes place and what its effects are. The main question in this research is how the teachers directly involved in the process itself evaluate development planning in their schools. The sample consisted of 291 teachers from 51 primary schools in Serbia. They replied in written form to the open-ended questions regarding their opinion about the positive and the negative sides of school development planning. Data processing included creating categories of teacher answers and calculating the relative presence of answers by categories. Teachers estimated that the following were the positive sides of development planning: strengthening cooperation and team work, introducing planning practice, school development, increased participation, successful project realization and acquisition of new knowledge and advanced training. Teachers most often had no objections to development planning, and when they did, these referred to the following: insufficient support to the development team, resistance and lack of interest of their colleagues, demands of planning, problems with the functioning of the development team and poor plan realization. The results point out to the conclusion that school development planning is predominantly positively evaluated and at the same time provide the foundation for arriving at practical ideas regarding the future direction of the policies in the field of internal school development.

Stankovi? Dejan

2011-01-01

117

Plant nutrition from teachers thinking  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this work, it´s analyzed which contents related to plant nutrition are considered important by a group of secondary education teachers. Its objective is also to determine the existence of any correlations among teachers, depending on the selected and most valued contents in the evaluation activities and questions.The analysis of the obtained results has shown that the contents in which teachers are more focused are those describing the differences between autotrophic and heterotrophic nutrition, the photosynthesis process and the structures involved on it (plant and cellular organs). On the other hand, the less considered contents are related to the nutrition general concept, breathing concept and those associated to the ecological dimension of plant nutrition. The existence of certain trends among the teachers taking part in this study has been confirmed; a prevailing correlation has also been found. The majority trend is the physiogical.

González Rodríguez, Concepción;; García Barros, Susana;; Martínez Losada, Cristina

2012-01-01

118

Taking the plunge  

CERN Multimedia

On 8 and 15 October, 58 people took the plunge and headed to the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva for their first taste of scuba diving at one of the CERN scuba club’s free trial dives. Club president Alberto Pace, left, taking a new recruit on his first dive. The CERN scuba club was making waves down at the Varembe swimming pool on Wednesday 15 October. Thirty-six people turned up to the club’s second free trial dive. "It was fantastic," said Jörg, one of the new recruits, after his first ever dive. "I’ve always wanted to try diving and this was a free lesson, so I thought I would come and have a go." Fourteen of the club’s fully qualified instructors were there to give one-on-one tuition. After a first dive in the normal pool the new divers moved into the deep pool. Some took to the water like fish, and at one point an impromptu game of aqua-Frisbee broke out, five metres below the surface. Richard Catherall, who organi...

2008-01-01

119

Teacher's Guide  

Science.gov (United States)

Lesson plans and exercises for teachers to use this site and the CD-ROM ?Atomic Archive: Enhanced Edition? in their classrooms. The exercises cover the following subjects: Arms Control, Atomic Physics, Delivery Systems, Fission, Fusion, History and Weapon Effects.

Griffith, Christopher

120

Asthma knowledge and asthma management behavior in urban elementary school teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Although schools are an important setting for asthma care in youth, teachers' asthma knowledge and symptom management is poor. This study investigated the knowledge, prevention and management behaviors, and communication regarding asthma of teachers of low-income, ethnic minority students. It was hypothesized that relative to colleagues whose students did not have active asthma (i.e., did not have symptoms during the day), teachers of students with active asthma would have better asthma knowledge and that more would take asthma prevention steps and communicate with parents and school nurses. METHODS: Drawing from 25 elementary schools in New York City, 320 pre-Kindergarten through 5th grade classroom teachers with at least one student with asthma completed measures assessing their asthma knowledge, steps taken to manage asthma, communication with the school nurse or parents, information they received about asthma, and whether or not they had at least one student in their class experience asthma symptoms. t test and chi-square were used to test hypotheses. RESULTS: Asthma knowledge varied among teachers. Most could identify potential triggers, yet few knew that medication taken prior to exercise could prevent symptoms and that students with asthma need not avoid exercise. Communication between teachers and school nurses and between teachers and parents was lacking. Relative to colleagues whose students did not have active asthma, teachers whose students had active asthma had better asthma knowledge, more took steps to prevent students from having asthma symptoms, communicated with parents, and more initiated communication with the nurse. CONCLUSIONS: Teachers' knowledge about asthma and asthma management is limited, especially among those whose students did not have active asthma. Teachers respond reactively to students who have symptoms in class by increasing prevention steps and communications with parents and the school nurse. A more proactive approach to managing asthma in schools is warranted.

Bruzzese JM; Unikel LH; Evans D; Bornstein L; Surrence K; Mellins RB

2010-03-01

 
 
 
 
121

Teacher turnover: An issue of workgroup racial diversity.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available One neglected aspect of the teacher labor supply is a recent increase in the proportion of minority teachers. Using the Schools and Staffing Survey and the Teacher Follow-up Survey, one can estimate the relationship between workgroup racial diversity and the turnover of White teachers. This approach finds that young White teachers are more likely to stay in their original schools when the proportion of minority teachers is smaller. However, the opposite pattern emerges for older teachers. This poses a policy dilemma for recruiting and retaining teachers on the one hand and diversifying teaching staff on the other hand.

Kitae Sohn

2009-01-01

122

News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

2010-05-01

123

Computer Conferencing and the Development of Habits of Mind Associated with Effective Teacher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Today teacher educators emphasize the need for preservice teachers to develop certain habits of mind (like reflection) in order to be effective teachers. These educators are constantly searching for pedagogical strategies that can help teachers quickly learn, understand, and take to heart important dispositions. This article describes a three-year…

Lepage, Pamela; Robinson, Paulette

2005-01-01

124

Teacher Identity in an Era of Educational Reform: The Case of Trinidad and Tobago.  

Science.gov (United States)

Compares the beginning teacher identity of primary teacher trainees in Trinidad and Tobago, with the concept of the teacher image present in reform initiatives. Highlights the need for reform efforts to take into account the gaps between existing teacher identity images and those envisioned for the reformed system. (CAJ)

George, June; Mohammed, Jeniffer; Quamina-Aiyejina, Lynda

2003-01-01

125

The use of classroom videos as a context for research on teachers’ practice and teacher education  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present communication comes from a project where we are developing multimedia cases for teacher education that integrate video and other resources from classrooms where an inquiry-based approach to teaching is taking place, combing a perspective of research on classroom practice and teacher educ...

Oliveira, Hélia; Menezes, Luís; Canavarro, Ana Paula

126

Pre-Service Science Teachers` Views About Characteristics of Effective Science Teaching and Effective Science Teacher  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this study an attempt was made to understand the perceptions of pre-service science teachers regarding effective science teaching strategies and teachers who are successful at implementing these strategies in their educational practice culminating towards being considered an effective science teacher. Firstly, for the purposes of this research a consideration of the following questions was necessary: What are the characteristics of effective science teaching? What are the characteristics of an effective science teacher? In order to gain insight into the research in question, related literature was reviewed and questionnaire research, including open-ended questions had been administered to pre-service teachers. Some remarkable findings have been discovered which are briefly discussed. The main feature revealed through the study is that pre-service science teachers believe the pedagogical skills of professional teachers should take precedence at first over the improvement of their theoretical knowledge on their subject matter.

Kutret Gezer; Kadir Bilen

2007-01-01

127

Decision Taking as a Service  

CERN Multimedia

Decision taking can be performed as a service to other parties and it is amenable to outtasking rather than to outsourcing. Outtasking decision taking is compatible with selfsourcing of decision making activities carried out in preparation of decision taking. Decision taking as a service (DTaaS) is viewed as an instance of so-called decision casting. Preconditions for service casting are examined, and compliance of decision taking with these preconditions is confirmed. Potential advantages and disadvantages of using decision taking as a service are considered.

Bergstra, Jan A

2012-01-01

128

Teacher's creative competence  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article's aim is to study what 180 Polish teachers understand by creativity and how they put it into practice. The Creative competency of teachers was evaluated, using 6 variables: 1) understanding of teaching as a creative action; 2) knowledge of opportunities and secure limits in implementing creative changes; 3) ability to create and change elements of classroom work; 4) understanding of educational entities and having the ability to act in order to increase the autonomy of such entities; 5) critical thinking; 6) ability to research their own practice. To do so both a semi-structured interview and direct observation in their classroom were utilized. Results point out the need to foster teachers' innovative and creative capabilities.

Anna Babicka; Przemys?aw Dudek; Ma?gorzata Makiewicz; El?bieta Perzycka

2010-01-01

129

Journey of "Becoming": Secondary Teacher Candidates' Concerns and Struggles  

Science.gov (United States)

As is widely recognized in the teacher education field, it is a complex process for teacher candidates to become effective classroom teachers. With growing linguistic and cultural diversity in today's classrooms, as well as different social expectations for education, the teacher preparation process is becoming increasingly demanding and…

Cooper, Jewell E.; He, Ye

2012-01-01

130

Should You Take Dietary Supplements?  

Science.gov (United States)

... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Should You Take Dietary Supplements? A Look at Vitamins, Minerals, Botanicals and More ... of all Americans take one or more dietary supplements daily or on occasion. Supplements are available without ...

131

TEACHER NEEDED  

CERN Multimedia

Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

2002-01-01

132

Teacher-student interactions and attachment states of mind as predictors of early romantic involvement and risky sexual behaviors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adolescents' capacities to negotiate sexual behavior in romantic relationships have important implications for their reproductive and health outcomes. This study examined adolescents' interactions with teachers and attachment states of mind as predictors of their romantic involvement and risky sexual behavior in an economically disadvantaged sample. Negative interactions with teachers predicted increased sexual risk-taking behaviors and females' early romantic involvement. Preoccupied states of mind increased risk for early romantic involvement and the likelihood that females would engage in risky sexual behavior. The findings demonstrate how adolescents' school experiences contribute to adaptation in romantic relationships in mid to late adolescence above and beyond representations of parent-child attachment.

Kobak R; Herres J; Gaskins C; Laurenceau JP

2012-01-01

133

Teaching history-taking: where are we?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Knowledge in history-taking has increased rapidly over the last twenty years. Currently the principles to be taught include "conduct," "content," and "diagnostic reasoning." However, inattentiveness of medical schools, reluctance of busy faculty to be involved, and increasing enrollments have result...

Nardone, D. A.; Reuler, J. B.; Girard, D. E.

134

A comparison between the views of teachers in South Africa and six other countries on involvement in school change  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Worldwide, and especially in South Africa, change and decentralised decision-making have been topical issues in the provision of education for the past years. It appears that teachers - the key agents in implementing the policies concerned - are largely ignored in the pre-implementation phases, and treated merely as implementers of these policies. The results from an empirical investigation revealed that the teachers in the South African sample expressed an exceptional degree of eagerness to be involved in decision-making and responsibility-taking concerning school change, even in aspects of management that could be considered as the principal's 'turf'. Although the views of a group of teachers in six other countries showed very similar result patterns, the sample of South African teachers was considerably more eager to be involved in initiatives of school change and related responsibilities than the teachers in the samples of the other countries. The results are illuminating, taking into consideration the increased workload of teachers, as well as certain other factors. Possible explanations for these observations are discussed.

Cassie Swanepoel

2009-01-01

135

CHP - expanding plant options to increase its take-up  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The development of 'micro turbines' may be about to give a significant boost to what is already a highly successful technology which combines heat and power. The paper discusses the recent past of the CHPs and gives some pointers to the future. With respect to small-scale CHP, the trend now is towards bigger units; few less than 100 kw are available. The larger units (about 3.5 MW output) were popular in applications requiring steam. As with smaller units,many large-scale units have been installed through 'design build finance and operate' schemes. The gap between the smaller and larger units has mostly been filled with reciprocating spark ignition gas engines. At present, there is equipment available across almost the entire size range apart from sub-100 kW units and small-scale units that provide heat in the form of steam. However, there are now a number of micro turbine (also called micro-turbogenerators) developments close to commercial exploitation; outputs range from 30 to 500 kW. Projected capital and operating costs should provide cost-effective operation. CHP technology is said to have real potential in a strategy to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to atmosphere. (UK)

Peacock, Neil [Energy International (UK) Ltd. (United Kingdom)

1999-03-01

136

It Takes Two to Tango.  

Science.gov (United States)

Highlights the importance of student effort in the high school experience. Discusses current educational expectations from the perspectives of parents, students, teachers, and society as a whole. Points to a national tendency to emphasize innate ability over achievement and lax college entrance standards as contributing to current social patterns.…

Welsh, Patrick

1992-01-01

137

The analysis of principle’s, supervisor’s and teacher’s perception of the term “teacher  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teachers are among the fundamental elements of education. The teacher has significant roles both within the society and the school. The place and importance of the teacher, particularly in the success of the students, cannot be denied. In this context, teaching as a career is a distinctive profession that requires professionalism. The profession of teaching requires expertise, as well as the support of both principals and primary education supervisors from time to time. For this reason, collaboration and cooperation among the teacher, the principal and the supervisor is inevitable for the success of the teacher, and consequently, the success of education. In order to maintain this collaboration and cooperation, it is necessary that principals, teachers and primary education supervisors act being aware of the expectations and needs of the others. The success of teachers and consequently the accomplishment of students can be maintained through utilizing the perceptions of principals and supervisors towards teachers. The aim of the present study is to determine the perceptions of primary school supervisors, primary school principals and teachers towards the teacher through the use of metaphors and discover the roles expected of the teachers. The study is a descriptive research study intended to determine and analyze the present situation. In the study, a qualitative research method was used to collect, analyze and interpret the research data. The sample group of the study consisted of 51 educational supervisors on duty in the province of Konya, 73 primary school administrators (65 headmasters and 8 deputy headmasters) and 154 teachers employed in the three central districts located within the borders of the metropolitan municipality in the academic year of 2008-2009. The research data was collected by requesting the participants to complete the sentence “A teacher is like ......, because.......” in written form. The collected data was analyzed through content analysis. The metaphors produced by the participants were divided into 13 themes as; incompetent, devoted, hardworking, enlightening, shaper, leader, inefficient, cheap labor, monotonous, inconsistent, lazy, aggressive and crushed, by also taking the explanations into consideration. The results of the analyses showed that educational supervisors, principals and teachers perceived the teachers as individuals showing (1) positive (devoted, hardworking, enlightening, shaper and leader) and (2) negative (incompetent, inefficient, cheap labor, monotonous, inconsistent, lazy, aggressive and crushed) attitudes. When these two findings are interpreted together, it can be seen that supervisors, principals and teachers perceive teachers both as enlightening and shaping leaders who work devotedly without expecting any return in spite of all sorts of difficulties, and also as incompetent, inefficient and lazy individuals. The findings reveal the view that, besides the positive roles expected of the teachers, there are also teachers who cannot adequately meet these expectations. Furthermore, it can be stated that in order to perform the roles expected of them, teachers need to be authorized in accordance with their responsibilities, to have a better economic status and to be respected within the society. Suggestions: (1) School-based research studies should be conducted in order to determine the points that prevent the authorization of teachers in accordance with their responsibilities, (2) It should be maintained that primary education supervisors and school principals endeavour to understand the teachers and provide the required support in education and teaching activities (3) Senior managements, particularly principals, should create democratic environments in order to maintain the participation of teachers in the administration of schools and take the requests and suggestions of teachers into consideration.

Atila Y?ld?r?m; Ali Ünal; Methi Çelik

2011-01-01

138

Theoretical reflections on the construction of pedagogical content knowledge of prospective teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) is used by the teacher to transform his/her knowledge about the content in knowledge comprehensible and teachable forstudents. For the construction of PCK, literature indicates that prospective teachers should come across to issues inherent to carrying out teaching since their entrance in pre-service formation, and not only during the curricular training. In view of the above, this essay is aimed at reflecting on the relationship between the contexts of preservice formation and teacher practice in the Basic Education, as well as possible reflections of the experiences of pedagogical practices in the curricular training for prospective teachers and to build their PCK. Consulted literature suggests that: the context of formation needs to permeate and be permeated by social and educational contexts which surround the courses, with the relation between initial formation and Basic Education being ruled by harmony, complementarity, and reciprocity; the participation of pedagogical practices in the construction of PCK allows prospective teachers to get to the curricular training in better conditions to take responsibilities inherent to this stage of their teaching formation; and even though literature does not make strategies evident for the implementation of pedagogical practices, it has been increasing the consensus that they need to be distributed horizontally in courses of formation of prospective teachers.

Daniel Marcon; Amândio Braga dos Santos Graça; Juarez Vieira do Nascimento

2012-01-01

139

Reaching the Critical Mass: The Twenty Year Surge in High School Physics. Findings from the 2005 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. AIP Report. Number R-442  

Science.gov (United States)

This report traces the growth of high school physics in American school over the past twenty years. Highlights of the report include: (1) Enrollments in high school physics continue to grow; (2) Increase in number and proportion of physics teachers; (3) Number of students taking honors, advance placement or second-year physics course has nearly…

Neuschatz, Michael; McFarling, Mark; White, Susan

2008-01-01

140

Decision Taking versus Action Determination  

CERN Document Server

Decision taking is discussed in the context of the role it may play for various types of agents, and it is contrasted with action determination. Some remarks are made about the role of decision taking and action determination in the ongoing debate concerning the reverse polder development of the hertogin Hedwige polder.

Bergstra, Jan A

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

PARAMETERS CHECKING BEFORE TAKE OFF  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Now a day’s airplane is widely used vehicle. So it is very important to check the condition of the flight before it is take off. The main intension of this project is to check the fuel condition and temperature of the flight. According to this project whenever the temperature is high or fuel is low, the microcontroller display this information on LCD and intimate through buzzer.In this paper the microcontroller plays a major role in transmitting data to RF transmitter and here the data is transmitted using RF communication. In transmitter side microcontroller directs the data obtained from PC and at the receiver side microcontroller receives the data from the RF receiver and given to robot. Here we are using temperature sensor to read the temperature value. If the temperature value crosses the threshold value then the given data is send to the controller to display on the PC which is on the section II through ADC.Fuel indicator with two levels, low level and medium level. This we can achieve as used in cars, the gauge consists of two parts: The sensing unit and The indicator The sensing unit usually uses a float connected to a potentiometer. Typically printed ink design in a modern automobile. As the tank empties, the float drops and slides a moving contact along the resistor, increasing its resistance. In addition, when the resistance is at a certain point, it will also turn on a "low fuel" light on some vehicles

V. SRIDHAR, P. SHREELA, B. SRIKANTH, T.SHIVAKRISHNA REDDY

2012-01-01

142

Price increase  

CERN Multimedia

Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

2005-01-01

143

Price increase  

CERN Multimedia

Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced, as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

2006-01-01

144

When science takes centre stage  

CERN Multimedia

The teachers at 'Science on stage' are not emotionally attached to their chalk. Neither are they are weary old men who sport tweed jackets with elbow-patches and enter into conversation with their blackboards. Actually, 'Science on stage' teachers are far from the cliché of the boring physics teacher who can only inspire yawns from his pupils. Some present the basic principles of mechanics using a bicycle, others explain chemistry with examples from everyday life. The most audacious of them go so far as to explain the Doppler effect by means of a play in which Einstein dreams about jumping cows... These are but a few of the activities and plays that will be shown during the EIROforum1 Science on Stage Festival (organised by 7 European scientific organisations including CERN), to be held from 21 to 25 November at CERN, Geneva. This festival is dedicated to the teaching science in order to make it more attractive. After the first edition 'Physics on Stage' which was held in 2000 at CERN, the laboratory agai...

2005-01-01

145

Reflection on the Teaching-Learning Process in the Initial Training of Teachers. Characterization of the Issues on Which Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers Reflect  

Science.gov (United States)

Our aim was to highlight the issues of the reflections of pre-service mathematics teachers in their learning portfolio about the teaching-learning process taking place in a university teacher-training classroom. Category systems were designed which, together with the analysis system used, could provide a method helpful to teacher educators,…

Chamoso, J. M.; Caceres, M. J.; Azcarate, P.

2012-01-01

146

Increasing Preservice Teachers' Support of Multicultural Education  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to build candidate knowledge utilizing Katz and Chard's Project Approach (1989) promoting movement across Nieto's (2000) levels of support for multicultural education. Three major preliminary steps advancing multicultural sensitivity and teaching practice were identified as foundational for the future…

Owen, Pamela M.

2010-01-01

147

Assistive Technology Training for Teachers--Innovation and Accessibility Online  

Science.gov (United States)

|As teachers face increasing demands to meet the needs of students with special needs in inclusive classrooms, there is a corresponding increase in the need for professional development opportunities for practicing teachers in areas that will assist them to become more knowledgeable in meeting these needs. One area of concern for teachers is the…

Chmiliar, Linda; Cheung, Billy

2007-01-01

148

Taking Care of Your Hair  

Science.gov (United States)

... in how healthy it looks. Continue Caring for Hair How you take care of your hair depends ... and not breaking off. Back Continue Dealing With Hair Problems Here are some common hair problems — and ...

149

Preservice Teachers’ Metaphors about University Teacher and Metaphor as an Evaluation Tool  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study is to reveal preservice teachers’ metaphors about the lecturers at university. Study group of the research consists of 347 preservice teachers enrolled at three different education faculties in Turkey in 2011-2012 academic year. Data was obtained from the preservice teachers’ completion of the sentences such as “University teacher is like ..., because ...”. For analysing the data quantitative and qualitative research methods were used. As a result, 183 metaphors were determined about University teachers in 16 conceptual categories. The categories which produced metaphors most about the University teachers are as follows; university teachers as the source and passer one of the knowledge (42 metaphors), the university teacher as a guide one (38 metaphors), the university teacher as a changing one (24 metaphors), the university teacher as a scary-repelling one (21 metaphors), the university teacher as a versatile one (17 metaphors) respectively. Besides, the metaphors can be used as an evaluation tool for determining the performance of a university teacher at studies of increasing quality in higher education.

Hasan Said TORTOP

2013-01-01

150

Educational Design for Learning Games with a focus on the teacher’s roles  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper deals with the challenges related to the development of an educational design for learning games. The focus will be on how instructional and introductory texts that are integrated in specific game-based platforms address teachers, and how and why these texts can be developed as part of the educational design of game-based learning. In the paper we shall conceptualize these texts as paratexts, following Genette’s terminology. In the paper we shall present an on-going development of an educational design concept for learning games with a focus on how teachers are and can be included in the design of game-based learning platforms. The teacher’s role is important in a game based school practice, as the teacher develops new functions as a teacher and new positions in relation to the students. A number of studies show that teachers often fail to take an active role when games are used in the classroom, as they often rely on the pupils to know what to do or believe that the students are active and engagedand therefore engaged in learning, when they are playing. However, the studies also show that the teacher’s role is imperative to the students’ benefits from learning, and often the pupils criticize the teacher’s failure to participate. Based on empirical studies we shall analyse different ways of employing paratexts directed to the teachers and in the educational design of game-based learning environments, and discuss what design aspects should be considered when addressing the teachers.

SØrensen, Birgitte Holm; Meyer, Bente Tobiesen

151

Online resources in mathematics: teachers' genesis of use  

CERN Multimedia

The long-term objective of our research is to develop the instrumental approach for teachers. A first step, presented in this paper, is to observe stable behaviours of teachers using internet resources in mathematics. We retain the scenarios as indicators of the genesis processes. We propose a scenario taxonomy taken from categories elaborated by computer sciences specialists and complemented to take into account didactical aspects. The descriptions provided by teachers permitted to observe an evolution of their scenarios elaboration's practices.

Bueno-Ravel, Laetitia

2010-01-01

152

Teacher Agency in Bilingual Spaces: A Fresh Look at Preparing Teachers to Educate Latina/o Bilingual Children  

Science.gov (United States)

|This review poses an increasingly common--and increasingly urgent--question in the field of teacher education: How can teachers best be prepared to educate Latina/o bilingual learners? The answers that the authors offer here challenge some of the prevailing assumptions about language and bilingualism that inform current approaches to teacher

Palmer, Deborah; Martinez, Ramon Antonio

2013-01-01

153

Theoretical perspectives of science teacher education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Science teacher education is an essential component in the entire system of science education. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate theory to describe and explain the complex phenomena and problems involved in science teaching and teacher education, and to provide effective guidance for policy-makers and practitioners. However, a range of theoretical viewpoints concerning science education and teacher education in general have been articulated in recent years. The aim of this article is to summarize some of the main theoretical perspectives in this area, so that they can be referred to in practical works and future research studies on science teacher education.First, contemporary views on the goals of science education and the principles of science teaching, assessment and teacher education have been articulated by a number of science educators and professional organizations worldwide (NRC, 2000; 2007). These theoretical viewpoints are based on a wealth of findings from research studies on students’ learning of science carried out in the past few decades. It was noted that learning with understand is the focus of the latest scientific studies on students learning, that is, cognitive processes involved in learning are the main research interests. Our new understanding of students’ learning indicated that students are active learners, their attention, memory, sense-making, problem solving, understanding and acquisition new knowledge are strongly influenced by their prior knowledge, skills, and conceptions. In addition, it was found that students’ inquiry skills and their understanding of basic science principles are closely related, and that meta-cognition plays an important role in science teaching and learning. The implications for science teacher education is that teacher education institutions are expected to provide opportunities for teachers to develop the knowledge, skills, and teaching approaches which will enable them to create better learning environments for their students. The importance of science teachers’ development of pedagogical content knowledge in school contexts is emphasized.Secondly, turning to literature on teacher education in general, theoretical perspectives on the purposes of teacher education, teachers’ professional qualities and teachers’ learning to teach are respectively discussed. Summarizing the analysis of Zeichner and Joyce, Doyle (1990) outlined five paradigms in teacher education programs, including teachers as good employees, junior professors, fully functioning persons, innovators, and reflective practitioners. Five conceptual orientations of teacher education programs are described by Feiman-Nemser (1990), including academic, practical, technological, personal, and critical/social. Doyle (1990) discussed teacher professional qualities in great length, by pointing out a sharp distinction between the professional-technical knowledge base emphasized by traditional competence-based teacher education program (informed by process-product research studies) and the kind of personal practical knowledge that teachers actively constructed within the social environment in school contexts. The former emphasizes direct instruction of generalized knowledge and skills in teaching, while the later emphasizes teachers’ roles in making personal meaning, insight, and creativity within a specific context. Doyle (1990) strongly suggested that successful teacher education program and research studies can be designed if one combines fruitfully the strengths of both knowledge types mentioned above. Korthagon (2004) and coworkers have done comprehensive research studies along the same line. In addition to point out that teachers change take place successively through a layered structure from environment, behavior, competencies, beliefs, identity, to mission (the innermost layer), they proposed that in learning to teach, mathematics teachers and possibly teachers in other fields as well, develop through a sequence of three stages, namely, gestalt formation, schematizatio

Chorng-Jee GUO

2010-01-01

154

A Crisis in Teacher Preparation: National Problem, Local Solutions  

Science.gov (United States)

The primary goals of the PhysTEC program are to demonstrate and provide models for increasing the number of highly qualified high school physics teachers, to improve the quality of K-8 physical science teacher education, to spread best-practice ideas throughout the community, and to work toward transforming physics departments to re-engage in the preparation of physics teachers. On average, member sites have exhibited a two-fold increase in secondary physics teacher production since 2002.

Hodapp, Theodore

2008-05-19

155

Teachers' Domain: Dust Explosion  

Science.gov (United States)

This video package illustrates the hazard of dust explosionsâspecifically, how a material that is not generally flammable suddenly becomes combustible when its surface area is increased. The featured chemical is lycopodium powder, which is not especially flammable in normal circumstances. But disperse it into the air, bring a flame close by and.....KABOOM. (Video may be viewed in slow motion.) Editor's Note: When a substance rapidly reacts with oxygen, energy is released in the form of heat and/or light. This type of exothermic reaction is known as combustion. This resource will be especially useful in helping students see that many factors can affect combustion: temperature, the concentration of the reactants, and surface area of the fuel. Teachers' Domain is a growing collection of more than 1,000 free educational resources compiled by researchers and experienced teachers to promote the use of digital resources in the classroom.

2011-06-27

156

THE ATTITUDES AND VIEWS OF TEACHERS AND PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS RELATED TO THE GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN SCHOOL LEADERSHIP  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Women are underrepresented in leadership positions in Turkish work life as well as in other countries. There are some social and personal barriers preventing women from managerial positions. One of the area in which women are underrepresented is school leadership. The main purpose of this study is to describe the attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions in schools. In accordance with the main purpose of the study it was investigated whether there were any differences between the attitudes and the views of the primary teacher and the primary pre-service teachers. The attitudes and the views about the barriers facing female teachers in school leadership were also compared according to gender and the grades of the primary pre-service teachers. Data were collected from 114 primary teachers working in primary schools in Çayeli district and 192 primary pre-service teachers attending primary school teacher training program in the Faculty of Education in Rize University.The attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions were described in two dimensions, personal attitudes and views, and social attitudes and views. Study results revealed that the attitudes and views differentiated significantly due to gender and position (teacher or pre-service teacher) in both dimensions. Moreover, it was indicated that gender and the position of the primary teachers and the primary pre-service teachers have significant joint effects on the personal attitudes and views whereas joint effects of the gender and positions on the social attitudes and views were not observed at statistically significant level. As a conclusion, study results indicated that female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers have not negative attitudes and views for female promoting to school leadership as much as their male counterparts. However, female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers seemed to accept voluntarily the social female roles more than male primary teachers and male primary pre-service teachers.In accordance with the study results some suggestions were developed. First of all, it was proposed that traditional gender roles should be redefined in Turkish Educational System. Secondly, gender discrimination subject might take place in teacher training programs. Moreover, further gender studies were recommended in terms of motivation, stress, work satisfaction, work performance, work commitment and organizational culture.

Cemalettin ?PEK; Seher YARAR

2010-01-01

157

PRIMARY TEACHERS CANDIDATES’ VIEWS ON GOOD TEACHER  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine qualitatively 109 third year primary teacher candidates’ views on being a good teacher. One open-ended question was posed to teacher candidates to be answered in writing. Although opinions about being a good teacher were categorized into six subtitles: personal characteristics, knowledge of subject and its teaching;, skills, professional growth, appreciation, and commitment to the mission, most of the answers were about different dimensions of personal characteristics.

Behiye UBUZ; Sibel SARI

2009-01-01

158

Teacher motivation for participating in school innovations - supporting factors  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The successful implementation of school innovations is based on teachers' motivation taking part into this innovation. The authors examine teachers' motivation and its supporting conditions within the scope of two school innovation projects. Self-determination theory and person-object-theory of inte...

Schellenbach-Zell, Judith; Gräsel, Cornelia

159

We Brought Teachers Up to Snuff, And So Can You.  

Science.gov (United States)

|The Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Plan for Instructional Improvement requires principals to take part in several workshops and activities to learn how to analyze what goes on in the classroom. Principals then direct teacher inservice training by conducting staff meetings, small seminars, and classroom observation followed by teacher conferences. (MLF)|

Jacobson, William C.

1984-01-01

160

Digital Storytelling in Teacher Education: Creating Transformations through Narrative  

Science.gov (United States)

|Stories are important resources in the repertoire of the teacher. Storytelling is a powerful way in which to communicate experiences and to explore ideas. Using stories, the teacher takes her students on journeys of discovery that introduce them to new vistas of lived experience. In this article, the authors describe how they have used "digital…

Skouge, James R.; Rao, Kavita

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Tackling the take-or-pay problem  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Centrica, the gas sales, trading and services company previously part of British Gas plc, has renegotiated a number of its take-or-pay contracts with North Sea gas producers since the end of 1996. The contracts - a legacy of the British Gas monopoly era - had placed an increasing financial burden on the company as it was effectively forced to pay above-market prices for gas which it did not always want to take, while trying to remain competitive in a market where an ever growing number of independent gas suppliers were offering low-cost supplies. The author looks at how Centrica has tackled its take-or-pay problem. (author)

1997-01-01

162

Research on Strategic-oriented College Teacher Performance Management System  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study gives guiding principles for constructing strategic-oriented college teacher performance management system, including strategic orientation, systematicness, reliability, efficiency, operability and dynamism; it also designs a dynamic circulation process which takes achieving college strat...

Zhou Jingkun

163

Taking the heat out of global warming  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

According to UK Meteorological Scientists (a meeting in Bonn in November 1999), the increase in global temperatures as a result of the increasing greenhouse effect is likely to be considerably more than the 3''oC predicted earlier for the year 2100. However, the chairman of the International Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), urges researchers to keep cool and look for win-win situations where climate change may have environmental advantages. The achievements and views of Bob Watson (chairman of the IPCC) are discussed. Watson is in no doubt that global warming is increasing and his assessments of its impact are discussed. Even where there are doubts about the deleterious effects of global warming enhancement, we should still take mitigating actions where possible. The UK's actions to tackle climate change and the requirements of the Rio and Kyoto agreements are mentioned. Actions which individuals can take are also discussed. Stratospheric ozone depletion is mentioned briefly. (UK)

O' Driscoll, C.

2000-02-01

164

New Jersey Teacher Salaries Are Comparable to Professional Pay in Private Sector. Issue Brief No. 5  

Science.gov (United States)

It is often said that public school teachers are poorly paid. At an average salary of about $60,000 a year, public school teachers in New Jersey take home substantially less pay than do many other college educated professionals. Teachers tend to work fewer hours in a year than do other professionals. Does the widespread assertion that New Jersey's…

Winters, Marcus A.

2010-01-01

165

Who Will Teach Our Children? Rural National Board Certified Teachers' Experiences.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study examined the types of support given to teachers pursuing certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). NBPTS has developed advanced standards for teachers in 27 fields. Teachers seeking NBPTS certification must prepare a comprehensive portfolio and take part in a day-long evaluation process at an…

Pawlas, George E.

166

Primary and Secondary Teachers' Conceptions about Heritage and Heritage Education: A Comparative Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

This study describes and analyses the conceptions of primary teachers and secondary teachers of Physics-Chemistry, Biology-Geology and Geography-History with respect to the concept of heritage and its teaching and learning, taking the model of teacher-researcher as the theoretical referent. The data collection instrument used was a questionnaire,…

Gimenez, Jesus Estepa; Ruiz, Rosa Maria Avila; Listan, Mario Ferreras

2008-01-01

167

Co-constructing Efficacy: A "Communities of Practice" Perspective on Teachers' Efficacy Beliefs  

Science.gov (United States)

|Teachers' efficacy beliefs are critical to improving student learning, but we have yet to fully understand how these beliefs develop. The prevailing model of teachers' efficacy development emerges from cognitive theories, but sociocultural theories may add insights to modeling the impact of teachers' school contexts. This case study takes a…

Takahashi, Sola

2011-01-01

168

Teacher training, capacity building and professional capital  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Contemporary reforms of basic schooling stand or fall with highly educated professional teachers. Teacher education of course is a key factor in this respect, but evidence also points to the fact that the world’s most improved school systems are getting better by the development of teacher capacity as a source of innovation in the teaching context and in co-operation with peers (Mourshed, Chijoke, & Barber, 2010). A clear trend can be observed in direction of paying still more attention to the processes in school reforms, i.e. to the quality of what actually happens in schools and class rooms and how well it is performed. High performing countries do not only praise the quality of the individual teacher, which is important, they also focus on support on the job, the importance of strong professional learning communities, and teachers possibility of taking part in successful school development (Hargreaves & Fullan, 2012). Teaching in a school-system steered by competence goals requires teachers to be high-level knowledge workers who constantly advance their own professional knowledge as well as that of their profession. With today’s strong focus on student outcomes, teachers are expected to embrace diversity with different pedagogical practices, and being inventive about personalizing educational experiences to teach in a learner centered way. The transition from teacher education to the teaching profession is often by beginning teachers regarded as demanding and critical. How demanding this transition will be, however, depends on how well teacher education has prepared the student for the teaching profession and what experiences the beginning teacher has during his or her first year of practice at the school. The Scandinavian countries like other European countries (e.g. Germany) have over the latest years introduced competence goals in their teacher education programs. These goals pay – compared to the previous goals –more attention to the development of professional skills of the teacher. The presentation will explain how competence based goals in the subjects of teacher education are created. It will also elaborate on capacity building as a force to improve teacher competences for diagnosing students’ learning problems and the ability to draw from a wide repertoire of possible teaching methods appropriate for the diagnose.

Rasmussen, Jens

169

Informatics Perspectives on Decision Taking  

CERN Multimedia

A decision is an act or event of decision taking. Decision making always includes decision taking, the latter not involving significant exchanges with non-deciding agents. A decision outcome is a piece of storable information constituting the result of a decision. Decision outcomes are typed, for instance: plan, command, assertion, or boolean reply to a question. A decision effect is any consequence of putting a decision outcome into effect. Decision outcomes must be expected by the decider to lead to certain decision effects, by way of their being put into effect. The availability of a model or of a theory of the causal chain leading from a decision outcome to one or more decision effects is assumed for the decision taker, otherwise the decision outcome is merely an utterance. Decision effectiveness measures the decision effects against objectives meant to be served with the decision. Decision taking is positioned amidst many similar notions including: decision making, decision process, decision making proce...

Bergstra, J A

2011-01-01

170

[Evaluating individual occupational risk in teachers].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The authors analyzed work conditions of comprehensive school teachers according to workplace assessment. Additional studies covered opportunistic pathogens content of air in classrooms. Auxiliary medical examination evaluated health state of the teachers. Individual occupational risk was calculated with consideration of actual work conditions and health state. Comprehensive school teacher's work is characterized by constant or transitory influence by complex of occupational and work hazards that are mostly (according to to workplace assessment) increased work intensity, noise and inadequate illumination parameters. Ambient air of classrooms constantly contains high number of opportunistic pathogens, that could decrease immune system parameters and cause more droplet infections. Individual occupational risk of teachers, calculated with consideration of work conditions and health state parameters, appears to be high and proves high possibility of teachers' health damage at work. Recommendations cover evaluation of biologic factors within the workplace assessment, obligatory preliminary (before employment) and periodic medical examinations for comprehensive school teachers as for workers exposed to occupational hazards.

Stepanov EG; Ishmukhametov IB

2012-01-01

171

Influenza Round Table: Take Three  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting the flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 11/3/2009 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/3/2009.

2009-11-03

172

Four Takes on Tough Times  

Science.gov (United States)

Educational Leadership talks with four experts in the fields of education policy and finance about how schools can weather the current financial crisis. Michael A. Rebell focuses on the recession and students' rights; Allan Odden suggests five steps schools can take to improve in tough times; Anthony Rolle describes the tension between equity and…

Rebell, Michael A.; Odden, Allan; Rolle, Anthony; Guthrie, James W.

2012-01-01

173

The Galileo Teacher Training Programme  

Science.gov (United States)

The Galileo Teacher Training Program is a global effort to empower teachers all over the world to embark on a new trend in science teaching, using new technologies and real research meth-ods to teach curriculum content. The GTTP goal is to create a worldwide network of "Galileo Ambassadors", promoters of GTTP training session, and a legion of "Galileo Teachers", edu-cators engaged on the use of innovative resources and sharing experiences and supporting its pears worldwide. Through workshops, online training tools and resources, the products and techniques promoted by this program can be adapted to reach locations with few resources of their own, as well as network-connected areas that can take advantage of access to robotic, optical and radio telescopes, webcams, astronomy exercises, cross-disciplinary resources, image processing and digital universes (web and desktop planetariums). Promoters of GTTP are expert astronomy educators connected to Universities or EPO institutions that facilitate the consolidation of an active support to newcomers and act as a 24 hour helpdesk to teachers all over the world. GTTP will also engage in the creation of a repository of astronomy education resources and science research projects, ViRoS (Virtual Repository of resources and Science Projects), in order to simplify the task of educators willing to enrich classroom activities.

Doran, Rosa

174

Teacher Beliefs regarding Bilingualism in an English Medium Reading Program  

Science.gov (United States)

|Reading classes in schools where English is the medium of instruction are increasingly servicing a linguistically diverse population; however, teacher-training for English teachers lacks a focus on bilingualism. Using the context of Singapore, this paper analyses beliefs on bilingualism of English teachers in an early intervention reading…

Vaish, Viniti

2012-01-01

175

Inclusion in Mexico: Ensuring Supportive Attitudes by Newly Graduated Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

|The inclusion of students with special education needs in regular schools in Mexico is slowly gaining momentum. Likewise, teacher training for inclusion is increasingly becoming an important aspect of preservice training. This research investigates the perceptions of 286 preservice teachers who are about to complete their general teacher training…

Forlin, Chris; Cedillo, Ismael Garcia; Romero-Contreras, Silvia; Fletcher, Todd; Hernandez, Humberto Javier Rodriguez

2010-01-01

176

Teacher as Learning Facilitator in ELT  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The classroom is the magic active scenery where many educational things take place simultaneously.Intellectual, emotional, socio-cultural, motivational and curricular factors corroborate their influence onclassroom environments, whether we deal with traditional models of teaching or with the constructivistapproaches. The growing demand for language teachers, English in particular, has determined a new vision oflanguage teaching strategies. The cutting-edge technology has created a fertile ground which successfullyfosters the teacher –student communication, emphasizing the teacher’s role to guide students and to generate achange in their learning approach and in eliciting useable knowledge. This way, the teacher has a larger abilityto convert knowledge into practical information that is of real help and value to students. Students are involvedin a continuous educational scheme and are tested on what they have learned. This ensures they can alwaysenjoy the benefits of active learning from expert teachers. The present paper deals with a brief analysis of therole of teacher as learning facilitator and its importance for student acquisition process, eliciting some strategiesin support of collaborative and student-centered learning.

Badea Elena Codruta

2012-01-01

177

[Risk taking and the insular cortex].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Abstract Risk taking can lead to ruin, but sometimes, it can also provide great success. How does our brain make a decision on whether to take a risk or to play it safe? Recent studies have revealed the neural basis of risky decision making. In this review, we focus on the role of the anterior insular cortex (AIC) in risky decision making. Although human imaging studies have shown activations of the AIC in various gambling tasks, the causal involvement of the AIC in risky decision making was still unclear. Recently, we demonstrated a causality of the AIC in risky decision making by using a pharmacological approach in behaving rats-temporary inactivation of the AIC decreased the risk preference in gambling tasks, whereas temporary inactivation of the adjacent orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) increased the risk preference. The latter finding is consistent with a previous finding that patients with damage to the OFC take abnormally risky decisions in the Iowa gambling task. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intact AIC promotes risk-seeking behavior, and that the AIC and OFC are crucial for balancing the opposing motives of whether to take a risk or avoid it. However, the functional relationship between the AIC and OFC remains unclear. Future combinations of inactivation and electrophysiological studies may promote further understanding of risky decision making.

Ishii H; Tsutsui K; Iijima T

2013-08-01

178

[Risk taking and the insular cortex].  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract Risk taking can lead to ruin, but sometimes, it can also provide great success. How does our brain make a decision on whether to take a risk or to play it safe? Recent studies have revealed the neural basis of risky decision making. In this review, we focus on the role of the anterior insular cortex (AIC) in risky decision making. Although human imaging studies have shown activations of the AIC in various gambling tasks, the causal involvement of the AIC in risky decision making was still unclear. Recently, we demonstrated a causality of the AIC in risky decision making by using a pharmacological approach in behaving rats-temporary inactivation of the AIC decreased the risk preference in gambling tasks, whereas temporary inactivation of the adjacent orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) increased the risk preference. The latter finding is consistent with a previous finding that patients with damage to the OFC take abnormally risky decisions in the Iowa gambling task. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intact AIC promotes risk-seeking behavior, and that the AIC and OFC are crucial for balancing the opposing motives of whether to take a risk or avoid it. However, the functional relationship between the AIC and OFC remains unclear. Future combinations of inactivation and electrophysiological studies may promote further understanding of risky decision making. PMID:23917499

Ishii, Hironori; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

2013-08-01

179

Teachers' Place: Monterey Bay Aquarium  

Science.gov (United States)

The Monterey Bay Aquarium has long had an ambitious outreach mission. As a result, its Teachers' Place is a fine resource for educators around the world. On the homepage, visitors will find sections such as Teacher Programs, Field Trips, and Classroom Resources. In the Classroom Resources area, visitors can take advantage of lesson plans and interactive media features that include Rocky Shore, Kelp Forest, Sea Otters, and Mission to the Deep. The Games & Interactives area includes downloadable posters, fact cards, and a virtual dive into Monterey Canyon that provides visitors with a truly immersive experience, minus the actual water, of course. This same section also has some pretty great tunes, such as "Hold On or Go With the Flow," which is a paean to surviving the rough and tumble world of the rocky shore.

180

Optimum take-off angle in the standing long jump.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to identify and explain the optimum projection angle that maximises the distance achieved in a standing long jump. Five physically active males performed maximum-effort jumps over a wide range of take-off angles, and the jumps were recorded and analysed using a 2-D video analysis procedure. The total jump distance achieved was considered as the sum of three component distances (take-off, flight, and landing), and the dependence of each component distance on the take-off angle was systematically investigated. The flight distance was strongly affected by a decrease in the jumper's take-off speed with increasing take-off angle, and the take-off distance and landing distance steadily decreased with increasing take-off angle due to changes in the jumper's body configuration. The optimum take-off angle for the jumper was the angle at which the three component distances combined to produce the greatest jump distance. Although the calculated optimum take-off angles (19-27 degrees) were lower than the jumpers' preferred take-off angles (31-39 degrees), the loss in jump distance through using a sub-optimum take-off angle was relatively small.

Wakai M; Linthorne NP

2005-02-01

 
 
 
 
181

Acute medical take or subacute-on-chronic medical take?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Older people are a significant source of emergency admissions to general hospitals relative to their proportion of the population. Little is known of the acuity of these admissions, aspects of which this study aims to determine. METHODOLOGY: A prospective survey of 1 in 10 acute general takes in a university teaching hospital over 11 months. Age, sex, acuity of presentation, premorbid functional status and cognitive impairment were recorded. RESULTS: Of 332 admissions, 127 (38%) patients were aged 65 years or over and 205 under 65. Of > or =65's, 53 (42 ) presented <2 days of symptoms compared to 117 (57%) <65's. Mean delay between onset of primary symptom and presentation was 8.76 days (> or =65's) and 6.77 days (<65's). Previous functional loss was present in 42% of > or =65's. On admission, 36% of > or =65's were deemed cognitively impaired. CONCLUSION: Acute on chronic illness represents a significant proportion of 'acute general take'. Older patients admitted in this fashion also tend to present to hospital later after the onset of their symptoms and with more physical and cognitive impairment than younger counterparts. These findings are supportive of the development of better models for managing chronic disease, such as acute geriatric medicine, stroke units, admission avoidance strategies and focussed community supports.

Martin M; Hin PY; O'Neill D

2004-07-01

182

CAUSES OF PROPENSITY FOR ELITE ATHLETES IN UNIVERSITIES TO TAKE UP KARATE AND THEIR EXPECTATIONS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aims to find out the causes of propensity for elite athletes in universities in Turkey to take up karate branch, their expectations and reasons of involvement. A survey method was used in the study. The population for the study was made of elite students in universities engaged in karate. The measurement instrument was administered to 97 students. Data obtained from the survey was tested by Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskall-Wallis test. Elite athletes in karate branch in universities indicated that their families had more influence on their decision to take up this branch. Elite athletes in universities indicated that teachers of physical education and the press media have had almost no influence on their decision. Athletes considered the enjoyment of success as an important reason for engaging in karate, while joining a group of friends easily was considered unimportant. It was found that athletes in the national karate team had higher expectation than those not in the national team for enjoyment of success, obtaining material gains and being famed nationwide. It was further found out that as the length of time of involvement in karate increased, the desire increased for obtaining material gains, becoming famed, becoming a trainer, a referee, being famed nationwide, enjoying success and getting in the national team.

O?uz ÖZBEK; Esra ?ANLI

2011-01-01

183

Propositions of nuclear issue education for teachers and students  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Besides renewable energy forms, the nuclear energy seems to be of the greatest importance now. Recently the nuclear technology has developed almost in all domains of human activity. Unfortunately, common knowledge about physical processes involved in the nuclear energetics and furthermore, about the specific, nuclear radiation effects on the living tissues, is still very poor among the secondary and university students. We can find proofs for this statement in everyday situations and in literature. Thus, we should take every opportunity to speak about the complex nuclear problems, and that much more of the school time should be spend on teaching radioactivity phenomenon. We should acquaint students both with benefits and risks of the nuclear energy applications. Knowledge is certainly the cheapest way to prevent any nuclear danger. Taking this into account we designed the proposition of projects aimed at increase of nuclear issue knowledge and awareness among teachers and students: Project RADONET; Computer aided investigations of radioactivity with the use of GM detector; Competition 'Radioactive World'; Distance lecture on 'Radioactivity Around Us'. The main objective of project RADONET (RADON + NET) was concentrated on answering the question: Radon in our homes - is the risk acceptable? It was based on the concentration of radon investigations in indoor air, ground and drinking water and in the vicinity of TV and computer screens, made by the science teachers from Torun. In our opinion, the knowledge about radon and its health risk should be implemented to the interdisciplinary science education as early as possible. Thus, inspiring by English and Hungarian researchers we propose the method of environmental education related to the radon issue. In collaboration with 35 science teachers from different regions of Poland educational research project RADONET for students was performed. The concentration of radon was measured by the use of passive method (TASTRAK detectors). For communication of researchers, teachers and students as well for discussion of the obtained results e-mail, WWW pages, etc. were used. As the result we created the preliminary map of radon concentration in Poland made by students and we got the evidence that the increasing number of teacher and pupils wish to take a part in this kind of educational investigations. Since the phenomenon of radioactivity was discovered by Henry Becquerel, Marie Curie- Sklodowska and Pierre Curie we know, that the 'ionizing radiation' is around us. It can be the stream of particles of the distinct kind - alpha, beta, protons, ions, neutrons and stream of high energy - X or gamma rays. But, naturally some problems arise: where does this radiation come from, how long does it live, is it dangerous to the human body, can we measure its amount and behaviour? In this paper we report our attempt to answer mainly the last question. For this purpose we designed and constructed computer controlled Geiger-Mueller counter with the dedicated software to measure ionising radiation intensity. The menu of the software contains the following options: characteristic of detector, intensity of the ionising radiation and its dependence on distance and type of absorbing material as well as statistical distribution of ionising radiation [8]. Last year, tribute to the 100th anniversary of Maria Curie-Sklodowska Nobel Prize, we organised the competition for educational projects under the general title Radioactive World. The competition was addressed to Polish teachers and their pupils. The Award Committee received 44 projects from upper and lower secondary schools. Knowledge and methodical level of all projects was very high. Most of them engaged not only the science subjects teachers but also specialists of literature, history and art. The committee awarded 15 projects which were the most original and their results were presented to the wide local community by press, radio and TV. The results of the best projects: original lessons plans, posters, WWW pages, computer animations were

2004-01-01

184

Readmission reduction takes center stage.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As penalties for excess readmissions rise and more diagnoses are included in the program, case managers can play a major role in helping their hospitals avoid penalties. Take the time to complete a thorough assessment of patients and talk to their family members and caregivers to uncover psychosocial issues as well as medical issues and use the information to develop the discharge plan. Collaborate with post-acute providers to ensure that patients receive the services they need after discharge. When patients are readmitted, conduct a root-cause analysis to determine why they came back, track the data, and use it to develop process improvement projects.

2013-09-01

185

Professional development and formation of the future teacher of physical culture in the conditions of informatization and computerization  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is rotined that informatization of education is the key condition of preparation of specialists. The necessity of increase of level of informative culture of student is marked. Directions of professional growth are resulted taking into account the newest requirements to professional activity. Attention is accented on principles, maintenance, terms and organizational forms of professional preparation of student in an informative environment and society. Approaches are recommended on a change personality of professional position of future teacher. Terms are selected for an effective self-education and self-perfection of students taking into account the newest tendencies of informatization of society.

Dragnev Y. V.

2012-01-01

186

Rethinking Recruitment: The Comprehensive and Strategic Recruitment of Secondary Science Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

The shortage of science teachers has spurred a discussion about their retention and recruitment. While discussion about retaining science teachers has increased dramatically in just the last few years, science teacher educators have not attended to the recruitment of science teachers with the same tenacity. This paper is our effort to initiate…

Luft, Julie A.; Wong, Sissy S.; Semken, Steve

2011-01-01

187

Teacher Retirement Benefits  

Science.gov (United States)

|The ongoing global financial crisis is forcing many employers, from General Motors to local general stores, to take a hard look at the costs of the compensation packages they offer employees. For public school systems, this will entail a consideration of fringe benefit costs, which in recent years have become an increasingly important component…

Costrell, Robert; Podgursky, Michael

2009-01-01

188

Teacher Retirement Benefits  

Science.gov (United States)

The ongoing global financial crisis is forcing many employers, from General Motors to local general stores, to take a hard look at the costs of the compensation packages they offer employees. For public school systems, this will entail a consideration of fringe benefit costs, which in recent years have become an increasingly important component of…

Costrell, Robert; Podgursky, Michael

2009-01-01

189

Factors Influencing How Teachers Manage Their Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teaching and learning a foreign language is a social process which requires theinteraction of two important parts of the process, the teacher and the students, in a socialenvironment. As this process takes place in a social context, it is inevitable toexperience some problems while teaching the students having different needs, interestsand levels. These problems may be caused by the students, teachers as well as thephysical environment in which teaching and learning take place. It is clear that languageteaching skill is not enough to handle these problems; teachers also need classroommanagement skills so that they are able to manage their classrooms. It is believed thatsuccessful classroom management is highly related to effective instruction. Asclassroom management is a general term that is affected by many factors, theeffectiveness of classroom environment depends on how teachers cope with thesefactors and provide their students with a positive and friendly classroom atmosphere. Itis clear that a detailed analysis of the factors that affect successful classroommanagement and adequate teacher training on how to cope with them will makeunmanageable classrooms manageable which will immediately result in effectiveteaching and learning process. In this article, factors that influence successful classroommanagement will be analyzed and possible solutions to these problems will bepresented.

Arif SARIÇOBAN; Sevilay SAKIZLI

2006-01-01

190

ChemTeacher: Titration  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Titration page includes resources for teaching students about the theory and applications of titrations.

2011-01-01

191

ChemTeacher: Stoichiometry  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Stoichiometry page includes resources for teaching students about stoichiometry.

2011-01-01

192

ChemTeacher: Proton  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Proton page includes resources for teaching students about protons.

2011-01-01

193

ChemTeacher: Isotopes  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Isotopes page includes resources for teaching students about the structure and uses of isotopes.

2011-01-01

194

Effects of teacher training  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.

Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

2010-01-01

195

Cooperation Between Migrant Parents and Teachers in School: A Resource?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Even smaller Western countries receive immigrants from remote areas with poorer living conditions. As stated in the U.N. Child Convention, immigrant children should be given equal opportunities in education. Parents are always interested in their children’s future, and education may gain from stronger cooperation between school and parents. Some research shows that even illiterate parents may support their children’s training in a second language (Cummins, 1986/2001, p. 665). Dialogues between teachers and parents promote mutual understanding and increase parents’ knowledge of school and society. This might make the parents trust society more, enhance their acculturation and reduce future intergenerational conflicts (Portes & Rumbaut, 2001). A professional teacher needs cultural knowledge and understanding in order to give her/his students an education adapted to their needs. Migrant students especially should feel that there is coherence in their education, because cultural conflicts sap their energy and may also cause identity problems and lead to lack of motivation. For teachers it is important that education policy provides for equal opportunities. Norway has an inclusive policy concerning immigrant children. The students have language support to a certain degree both in their mother tongue and in Norwegian when needed. Parents and schools are obliged to cooperate in education, and some support is therefore given to translation. Cooperation is required by conferences and meetings. There are gains for all parties in cooperation between school and migrant parents, but it is difficult to develop mutual cultural understanding for all students and equal opportunities for migrant students. This requires a clear school policy, the means to implement it, and teacher competence. It takes a process to learn how to cooperate and give adequate support. The Norwegian policy shows a will to cooperation, but the implementation of the policy can still be improved.

Martha Lea

2012-01-01

196

SOME INITIATIVES ON ICT ENABLED TEACHER EDUCATION IN IRA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Like any other part of the world, the ICT revolution has influenced almost every aspect of public life in Iran including education. As a developing nation, the need to take appropriate measures to overcome the digital divide is being felt more urgently in Iran as compared to any other country. Iran is not a late starter by any means in this regard. The Government of Iran has initiated multiple actions to keep pace with the latest developments in information technology.The very fact that a large number of professionals engaged in knowledge industry the world over belong to Iran speaks highly of the Iran initiatives in IT education. However, this is only indicative of the qualitative aspect. In terms of quantity, a large number of people are yet to be covered to make a real breakthrough. It is being increasingly realized that a faster way of achieving competency in this field is to integrate it with general education at all levels. For this, the training of teachers in ICT skills is a must. The various schemes and programs have been launched both at government and non-governmental levels to develop ICT skills in teachers.Various universities in Iran have designed specific courses for this purpose. However, in a big country like Iran with millions of teachers at different levels, it is indeed difficult to produce ICTenabled teachers at a large scale within a short period. The problems are complex and issues are numerous. The paper presents an overview of some of the initiatives in this area and highlights the relevant issues, and at the same time indicates directions for future course of action.

Nayereh Shahmohammadi

2011-01-01

197

Teacher Page - Deutsch Klasse  

Science.gov (United States)

On this site you will find the resource needed to teach a German Level I Course. There are links below for lesson plans and a link to the student page. This page is an introductory page for the teacher. Below are four links that will provide teachers with additional resources to use in their classrooms. Teacher Page - Lesson Plans Teacher Page - Resources Student Page - Deutsch Klasse Student WebQuests ...

Barlow, Frau

2009-11-02

198

Performance Pay for Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

During the past few years, interest in shifting at least a portion of what teachers are paid away from a reliance on a traditional salary schedule to one that incorporates a pay for performance component has reached a new high. Proponents of the approach view it as a way to improve teacher quality by both motivating teachers and--through higher…

Protheroe, Nancy

2011-01-01

199

The teacher under stress  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Empirical records consistently point to the fact that the phenomenon of stress is characteristic of service professions, especially of teacher’s. Although stress in teachers is a problem of public interest, it is still a relatively new field of empirical investigations. Data available show that stre...

Krnjaji? Stevan B.

200

Preparing Rural Elementary Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes Brigham Young University's elementary rural teacher training program which has successfully provided rural student teaching experiences for over 250 prospective teachers since 1973. Details live-in experience, financial structure, reciprocal benefits, and school district-university cooperation in teacher preparation. (NEC)

Campbell, Milo K.

1986-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Teacher Education in Scandinavia.  

Science.gov (United States)

The trend in Scandinavia is to broaden teacher education and training for academic secondary school teachers in order to overcome excessive specialization. The context of apprenticeship of pre-school, primary teachers is changing toward a more academically oriented program. However, the affective part of the learning/teaching process is becoming…

Wasser, Henry

202

Teachers staying ahead of the game  

CERN Multimedia

Even though the school holidays are in full swing, some 40 high-school teachers have come to CERN to take part in the High School Teachers (HST) programme organised by the CERN Education Group (see box). Far from considering this as a piece of holiday fun, the teachers are getting their hands dirty and putting in some serious hours’ learning. The High School Teachers 2009 at CERN.The 3-week HST programme hosts dozens of teachers from around the world, offering a deeper insight into particle physics through a variety of lectures, visits and workshops. The programme’s ambitious overall aim is to help these teachers to inspire their students to follow careers in science. In the second week, they split up into working groups to evaluate CERN’s existing educational tools or create new ones. "This year, one of the groups is reviewing some of the CERN visits service itineraries," says HST programme manager Mick Storr. "From their pers...

2009-01-01

203

Take Control of PDFpen 5  

CERN Multimedia

After a whirlwind history and overview of PDF, you'll take a tour through PDFpen's tools and navigation. With those basics taken care of, you'll learn how to: Scan a document to PDF and make the text editable with OCRCombine pages from multiple files into a single PDFTurn a Web site into a multi-page PDFAdd or remove pages from a PDFAdd a hand-written signature to a PDFAdd page and URL links to a PDFMake a clickable table of contents for a PDFUse professional editing marks on a PDFEdit text within a PDF that was received in emailLeave comments on a PDF documentRemove sensitive or confidential

Cohen, Michael

2010-01-01

204

Data Glove For Note Taking  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We aim at creating a note-taking device typically to be used in a classroom environment. Traditional methods of writing have limited speed and cannot keep up with speech. Writing with pen on paper requires us to look at the paper, which can reduce concentration on the ongoing discussion. Laptops are costly, power consuming and heavy for such a trivial task. Voice to text programs dont have the freedom of choosing the text to be included, and noise in the room can affect performance of such a program. Smart phones have a small keypad, which demands more user concentration. We have created a glove that one can wear and touch-type on any flat surface with minimal costs and power consumption. With ergonomics in mind, the glove has been designed to yield ten self fabricated switch button sensors to finally create a complete utility for simple and an inexpensive typing tool.

Akshay Mahajan; Aniruddha Bajaj; Ganesh Gore; Jayati Ambekar

2012-01-01

205

Meaningful contexts or dead mock reality: Which form will the everyday take?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper describes the experiences of two teachers, Bulelwa and Kevin, who attempt to take on board the notion of incorporating the everyday into the mathematics, as the new South African Curriculum requires.  Both of them, though in different ways,  attempt to accommodate the two discourses, name...

Godfrey Sethole

206

Are the Competent the Morally Good? Perspective Taking and Moral Motivation of Children Involved in Bullying  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study tested the hypothesis of the cognitively competent but morally insensitive bully. On the basis of teacher and peer ratings, 212 young elementary school children were selected and categorized as bullies, bully-victims, victims, and prosocial children. Children's perspective-taking skills were assessed using theory-of-mind tasks,…

Gasser, Luciano; Keller, Monika

2009-01-01

207

Take-off of small Leidenfrost droplets  

CERN Multimedia

We put in evidence the unexpected behaviour of Leidenfrost droplets at the later stage of their evaporation. We predict and observe that, below a critical size $R_l$, the droplets spontaneously take-off due to the breakdown of the lubrication regime. We establish the theoretical relation between the droplet radius and its elevation. We predict that the vapour layer thickness increases when the droplets become smaller. A satisfactory agreement is found between the model and the experimental results performed on droplets of water and of ethanol.

Celestini, Franck; Pomeau, Yves

2012-01-01

208

2+2 Program for Teachers’ Performance Appraisal in China  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examined the impact of the 2+2 Alternative Teacher Performance Appraisal System that has been implemented in Shanxi province in China. A mixed research design was used to evaluate the program. Six high schools and a total of 78 teachers (13 teachers in each school) in Shanxi province were selected. Three of the schools participated in the 2+2 program while another three served as the comparison. The results showed that 2+2 program significantly improved teachers’ professional performance, enhanced teachers’ collaboration, and increased the feedback between the peers.

Shuli Zhao

2009-01-01

209

The Relation between School Leadership from a Distributed Perspective and Teachers' Organizational Commitment: Examining the Source of the Leadership Function  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: In this study the relationship between school leadership and teachers' organizational commitment is examined by taking into account a distributed leadership perspective. The relation between teachers' organizational commitment and contextual variables of teachers' perceptions of the quality and the source of the supportive and supervisory…

Hulpia, Hester; Devos, Geert; Van Keer, Hilde

2011-01-01

210

IN MY OPINION: Taking part matters  

Science.gov (United States)

For a week last July, the University of Leicester played host to the 31st International Physics Olympiad. Sixty-three countries sent teams of five students, accompanied by two Leaders who were professors or teachers. The students faced two five-hour exams, one theory and one practical, woven into a week of visits and fun. The International Physics Olympiad has been held since 1967. The idea originated at a conference of the Czechoslovak Physical Society in Prague and the first competition was in Warsaw with teams from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and Romania participating. The competition has grown in size and scope over the decades, and in 1991 it was awarded the medal of the International Commission on Physics Education. The citation reads `the International Physics Olympiad has become an achievement of world wide impact, and physics educators from various countries around the world have attested to the strong influence it has had in stimulating interests in physics among both students and teachers in their countries'. The British Physics Olympiad team was chosen from Year 13 students who had come through the selection procedure. Schools are invited to challenge their best pupils with a preliminary paper, sat and marked at school. Students gaining above a given threshold are encouraged to sit a second, three-hour paper, which is centrally marked and graded. From among the Gold-medal winners in this exam, the team of five is selected. Amid the pressures of A-levels, some practical and theory tuition is fitted in before the competition. The different countries use a variety of selection methods and coaching. The Australians managed a week of scientific and cultural education in Vienna prior to arriving at Leicester, and several teams talked of pre-competition work-camps. How much Physics can be crammed into a week? Countries that have institutions selecting pupils highly gifted in Maths and Science have a great start, as do those with the most demanding syllabuses for pre-university exams. In years gone by, some of our most gifted students happened to be taught by some of our most able teachers, and together they tackled the old Scholarship-level papers. The old O-level work gave students a solid grounding in classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, with lots of sums on which to anchor the concepts. Those who enjoyed this aspect of the science could launch into A-level studies of Maths, Physics, Chemistry and/or Further Maths, and relish the challenges hidden in the syllabuses. Advanced level aims have changed. Mathematical elements have been played down; traditional proofs and applications may be referred to but are no longer required learning for the candidates. The modular system allows less repetitive revision and consolidation of ideas so that students are not required to immerse themselves in the subject in the same way as a generation ago. Does this matter? The `new way' hopes to attract some students into Physics and Engineering who would have been intimidated by the rigour and commitment required to do well in the old system. The single-minded student has a wealth of information available to further his or her studies and will not be limited by the dictates of any syllabus. However, without the need to meet exam requirements, many of our most able students have been deprived of the pleasure of advancing their knowledge so far at school, and must wait for a degree course to take up the story. (We should worry if many of these potential scientists get deflected from Physics.) The change in A-level targets inevitably means that the UK is slipping down the IPhO medal table, but in the Olympic tradition it is the taking part that matters. The 31st Olympiad was won by the People's Republic of China, with five gold medals out of five. Heartiest congratulations to them and to Russia, who came second with two gold, two silver and a bronze. The other gold medals went to Hungary (2), India (2), Taiwan (2), Bulgaria (1) and Switzerland (1). The UK team won two bronze medals. Who will be lucky enough to g

Stone, Christine

2000-09-01

211

Three ways of understanding development as a teacher.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The demands on faculty in terms of teaching are increasing, but until recently there has been little discussion of how faculty perceive that development as a teacher can be achieved or what approaches they use or suggest themselves. The aim of this study is to explore how teachers in dentistry and medicine understand development as teachers. For this study, 20 teachers were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Three different ways of understanding development were identified: 1) Development as a dental or medical clinician/expert as the teacher role is seen as a tacit part of the role of the clinician. 2) Experience and professional and personal maturation, related to personal and professional development and confidence in ones clinical role. 3) Knowledge in education and systematic teacher training as in this category, being a teacher is seen as a separate role from that of being a clinician. The differences in these three ways of understanding development as a teacher are shown in their different aims of development, what kind of knowledge that may be used and what methods they suggested. The way teachers understand what it means to develop as a teacher will affect their motivation for engaging in development activities, which activities they choose and their own aims of development. This means that awareness of teachers' understanding of development is central when developing support or faculty development activities for teachers.

Stenfors-Hayes T; Hult H; Dahlgren LO

2012-02-01

212

Three ways of understanding development as a teacher.  

Science.gov (United States)

The demands on faculty in terms of teaching are increasing, but until recently there has been little discussion of how faculty perceive that development as a teacher can be achieved or what approaches they use or suggest themselves. The aim of this study is to explore how teachers in dentistry and medicine understand development as teachers. For this study, 20 teachers were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Three different ways of understanding development were identified: 1) Development as a dental or medical clinician/expert as the teacher role is seen as a tacit part of the role of the clinician. 2) Experience and professional and personal maturation, related to personal and professional development and confidence in ones clinical role. 3) Knowledge in education and systematic teacher training as in this category, being a teacher is seen as a separate role from that of being a clinician. The differences in these three ways of understanding development as a teacher are shown in their different aims of development, what kind of knowledge that may be used and what methods they suggested. The way teachers understand what it means to develop as a teacher will affect their motivation for engaging in development activities, which activities they choose and their own aims of development. This means that awareness of teachers' understanding of development is central when developing support or faculty development activities for teachers. PMID:22251339

Stenfors-Hayes, T; Hult, H; Dahlgren, L O

2011-05-10

213

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusing on effective classroom management will enhance a teacher's skills and performance in the classroom.

DR.S.KAYARKANNI

2012-01-01

214

The Entrepreneurial Orientation Can Enhance the Teacher Performance in Higher Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The high employers demand for seeking the best candidate to perform the job with perfect professional skills make the job market competitive for the job seeking candidates specially the new graduates. The ease of rapid technology transfer and the continuous weak boundaries of the international borders compel the job seekers to continuously upgrade his or her professional skill set. This also affects the traditional role of the teacher in the class in which teacher had to meet the demands of the educational institution and the demands of his class simultaneously. The added dimension would be that the teacher must have to be fully aware with the changing demands of the job market, where students have to be employed. This complex situation requires from the teacher to create a balance between job market, educational institute and students. The classic framework of the classroom skills was not enough for the job market for which students were prepared and where public/private organizational demands frequently increased and changed. To meet these divergent demands teacher have to adopt the leadership style and use more entrepreneurial orientation skills like innovation, pro activeness and risk taking to play his role successfully. This paper tries to investigate that how entrepreneurial orientation skills helps the teacher in higher education to better satisfy their students as well as make them capable to be employed in the job market. Data has been collected within the strength of 200 students. The students are perusing the higher education from business education department of two different universities. The collected data has been analyzed through SPSS. The findings will definitely contribute new knowledge in the fields of leadership and entrepreneurship for teaching at higher education level, especially educational leadership.

Naeem HAYAT; Muhammad Tayyeb RIAZ

2011-01-01

215

Mentoring New Science Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Most experienced high school science teachers are asked at some point to serve as a mentor to a novice teacher. While mentor-training programs have been established in many states, they often only focus on how the mentor can help new science teachers understand and negotiate the school culture, such as how the school runs and where supplies are kept. Less attention is given to teaching mentors how to assist new science teachers to develop their content knowledge, general pedagogical knowledge, and science-specific pedagogical content knowledge. This article provides a checklist for mentor teachers to use when assessing the teaching skills and knowledge of new science teachers. This checklist helps prioritize what and how much assistance the new teacher needs.

Shea, Kathleen; Greenwood, Anita

2009-01-05

216

Conceptualizing Multicultural Perspective Taking Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

U. S. Army leaders are increasingly required to engage in full- spectrum operations that include a multinational or multicultural component. Army leaders must develop cultural understanding and skills in order to work effectively in multinational alliance...

A. Abbe A. Gunderson G. F. Goodwin J. R. Rentsch

2007-01-01

217

Better Video - Streaming Lessons among Palestinian Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of redundant information in video streaming of ICDL course for Palestinian trainee-teachers. Two modes of video streaming were used, namely video and narration (VN) mode, and video and narration cum text (VTN) mode of ICDL course. The sample consisted of 203 trainee-teachers in the National Institute for Training (NIT) in Gaza. The results showed that redundancy in the VTN mode increases cognitive overload and split attentions; hence inhibiting the learning process. The Findings showed that trainee-teachers using the VN mode performed significantly better in post-test scores than counterparts in the VTN modes.

Ali H. AbuSaada; Soon Fook Fong

2013-01-01

218

The acute medical take: an outpatient specialty.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The traditional model of acute medical care involves the admission of patients to hospital to be assessed by a consultant and facilitate access to investigation and treatment. This model has, however, led to a number of problems. Firstly, there is high bed occupancy which restricts access and increases the risk of healthcare-acquired infection. Secondly, only limited training opportunities are offered for junior medical staff in this setting. Thirdly, patients often receive care from a 'generalist' rather than a 'specialist' although there is increasing evidence that the most appropriate specialist provides the best patient care. Many medical emergencies could be managed in the outpatient (ambulatory) setting if the appropriate facilities were available including staff, environment and access to investigations. Emergency outpatient clinics can provide gold standard emergency care by providing structure to the acute take, ensuring access to the most appropriate specialist and training opportunities for junior medical staff.

Connolly V; Hamad M

2008-02-01

219

Developing Communication Skills of EFL Teacher Trainees  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Higher Education Council of Turkey has added a one term course named as “Effective Communication Skills” to the curriculum since 2006 in Foreign Language Education Departments because of the crucial importance of communication in the information society. In order to test the effectiveness of this course, a research project was developed by looking at the pre-and post course interviews conducted with first year teacher trainees about communication skills compared with the fourth year students’ ideas who did not take the course. This paper describes both the significance of effective communication skills and the benefits of the course for developing teacher trainees’ effective communication skills. The implementations and suggestions for teacher education has also been discussed.

Kadriye Dilek Akp?nar

2009-01-01

220

MOTIVATION IS AN IMPORTANT ROLE FOR TEACHERS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Indian higher educational focuses and emphasizes only to the students educational levels that is the methods and techniques that can be used to motivate students. But another important role that is “Teacher Motivation”. Teacher motivation is a vital role to improve the quality of education. The main determinants of the teachers of higher education institutions are occupational of teachers, job satisfaction and security, salary and social status. It focuses on the importance of the factors that affect the motivation of teachers. It defines the concept of motivation. It also takes into account the sources of motivation which are necessary in teaching process.

J. IMMANUVEL JOHNSON; K. JAYARAMAN

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Perspectives on Policy/Practice (Dis)Connection—Special Educators Turned Teacher Educators’ Points of View  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Educational policy and practice have long been disconnected. This paper explores the experiences of two former teachers turned teacher educators as they examine unintended consequences of policy reform. This paper positions No Child Left Behind’s and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act’s “Highly Qualified Teachers,” “Annual Yearly Progress,” and the issues of “evidence-based practices” alongside the authors’ personal school-based examples to demonstrate (dis)connections between policy, schools, and classrooms. The analysis provides a critique of these policies to demonstrate where teacher educators can take an active role in helping future teachers understand implications of these policies.

Kathryn S. Young; Svjetlana Curcic

2013-01-01

222

DEPRESSION AMONG THE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the most severe disabling disorders in the world in view of teachers occupational stress, this study was desinged to measure the magnitude of depression among them. Methods: 291 Teachers from 21 primary schools in esfahan city were enamined by means of beck"s test. Results: This study revealed that 89% of the teachers suffered from afferent degrees of depression i.e ,33% mild , 28.3% moderate and 27.2% sever the degree of depression decreased as the level of education increased and with age the degree of depression increased. Conclusion: In view of their occupational roles, teachers are rulencable and more attention must be paid to their needs.

G AHMADZADEH; GH GHASEMI; M.M KARAMI

2003-01-01

223

How to Motivate Science Teachers to Use Science Experiments  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A science experiment is the core tool in science education. This study describes the science teachers' professional competence to implement science experiments in teaching/learning science. The main objective is the motivation of science teachers to use science experiments. The presented research tries to answer questions aimed at the science teachers' skills to use science experiments in teaching/learning science. The research discovered the following facts: science teachers do not include science experiments in teaching/learning in a suitable way; are not able to choose science experiments corresponding to the teaching phase; prefer teachers' demonstration of science experiments; are not able to improvise with the aids; use only a few experiments. The important research result is that an important motivational tool for science teachers is the creation of simple experiments. Examples of motivational simple experiments used into teachers' training for increasing their own creativity and motivation are presented.

Josef Trna

2012-01-01

224

Take Aim At Climate Change  

Science.gov (United States)

This music video features a rap song about some of the causes and effects of climate change with the goal of increasing awareness of climate change and how it will impact nature and humans. The website also includes links to short fact sheets with lyrics to the song that are annotated with the sources of the information in the lyrics.

Palooza.com, Polar

225

Science teacher enhancement project (STEP)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

STEP, a National Science Foundation-funded initiative, forms an alliance between the three private Virginia Historically Black Colleges (Hampton University, Virginia Union University, and Saint Paul`s College) and nine school divisions, to increase the capabilities of middle school science teachers. Clearly articulated roles of each partner, and the inclusion of all partners in program planning has been invaluable. A unique feature of this project is the careful tailoring of the program to meet the needs of each school division, effected by ongoing communication between all of the partners. The program effected by ongoing communication between all of the partners. The program includes a Lead Teacher and Teacher Trainee component, and emphasizes science content, using a hands-on approach. In addition to science content, the Lead Teachers receive training in leadership, proposal writing, and pedagogical enrichment responsive to the curriculum change directions in science education, especially as it relates to minority and at-risk students. The enrichment is provided by university scientists and educators, through summer institutes and academic year workshops. Results include: use of new technologies in the classroom, cross-grade communication, use of university scientists as presenters for family science programs, and improved knowledge.

Ramsey, P.P.; Bowman, A.W. [Hampton Univ., VA (United States)

1994-12-31

226

Classroom Management Training: Keeping New Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Many new teachers begin their first day of school with a sense of idealism. They expect to make a difference in the lives of young students. However, many soon learn the challenges of classroom, behavior management and feel great stress. Can more classroom management training in college and pre-service, student-teaching strategies help these novice educators? This article asks education professionals and researchers to evaluate their teacher training programs and increase classroom management training.

Michael R. Coggins

2009-01-01

227

The Problems Teachers Encountered During the Candidacy Process  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This research, which was in a qualitative research design, was performed for the purpose of determining the problems that teachers encounter during the candidacy process. The target population of this research consists of the primary school teachers who are working as teacher candidates at 2008-2009 academic year in Elaz?? city. As the sample group, forty nine teachers were selected with convenience sampling method. Data were obtained through a ten-itemed structured interview form which was prepared by the researchers and analyzed by NVivo 7 program. The results of the research showed that candidate teachers mostly; experience orientation problems to the profession and to their schools, did not take enough guidance and support, viewed the in-service training as insufficient, indicated that there are differences between graduate education and practice and they experience problems about these matters.

Etem YE??LYURT; Mehmet KARAKU?

2011-01-01

228

A Dip into the World of Particles for Swedish Teachers  

CERN Document Server

For three full days, forty-one Swedish secondary school physics teachers were introduced to the rudiments of the particle physics. This series of courses is celebrating its tenth anniversary. The Swedish teachers followed lectures, visited CERN experiments... ... and analysed the latest DELPHI data. 'I am sure that, as in previous years, many of these teachers will return to CERN with their students. It is an excellent way of encouraging young people to orient themselves towards physics.' Staffan Hörnberg, Vice President of the International Centre for Education and Development, is enthusiastic about the repercussions of the teaching programme for Swedish teachers that he organises with CERN physicist, Richard Jacobsson. For the tenth consecutive year, this series of introductory courses to particle physics was a success. Forty-one teachers came from schools all over Sweden to take part in lectures and visits on the theme of particle physics, its methods of investigation, and its applications. San...

2001-01-01

229

Elementary School Teachers' Manipulative Use  

Science.gov (United States)

Using data from 503 inservice elementary teachers, this study investigated the relationship between teachers' background characteristics, teachers' beliefs about manipulatives, and the frequency with which teachers use manipulatives as part of their mathematics instruction. Findings from the study show that teachers' grade level and beliefs about…

Uribe-Florez, Lida J.; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

2010-01-01

230

Conceptualising GP teachers' knowledge: a pedagogical content knowledge perspective.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Most teacher development initiatives focus on enhancing knowledge of teaching (pedagogy), whilst largely ignoring other important features of teacher knowledge such as subject matter knowledge and awareness of the learning context. Furthermore, teachers' ability to learn from faculty development interventions is limited by their existing (often implicit) pedagogical knowledge and beliefs. Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) represents a model of teacher knowledge incorporating what they know about subject matter, pedagogy and context. PCK can be used to explore teachers' prior knowledge and to structure faculty development programmes so that they take account of a broader range of teachers' knowledge. We set out to examine the application of a PCK model in a general practice education setting. METHODS: This study is part of a larger study that employed a mixed method approach (concept mapping, phenomenological interviews and video-stimulated recall) to explore features of GP teachers' subject matter knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and knowledge of the learning environment in the context of a general practice tutorial. RESULTS: This paper presents data on GP teachers' pedagogical and context knowledge. There was considerable overlap between different GP teachers' knowledge and beliefs about learners and the clinical learning environment (i.e. knowledge of context). The teachers' beliefs about learners were largely based on assumptions derived from their own student experiences. There were stark differences, however, between teachers in terms of pedagogical knowledge, particularly in terms of their teaching orientations (i.e. transmission or facilitation orientation) and this was manifest in their teaching behaviours. CONCLUSIONS: PCK represents a useful model for conceptualising clinical teacher prior knowledge in three domains, namely subject matter, learning context and pedagogy. It can and should be used as a simple guiding framework by faculty developers to inform the design and delivery of their faculty development programmes.

Cantillon P; de Grave W

2012-05-01

231

[Teachers attitudes towards smoke-free regulations].  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the study was to analyze the teachers attitudes towards smoke-free regulations in public places. The study population consisted of 348 teachers. Among the study participants the questionnaire was conducted including socio-demographic characteristic and smoking profile. Detailed information was collected about teachers' opinion on smoke-free public places. About 13% of study participants declared current daily tobacco smoking and 5% smoked occasionally. Almost all study participants (90%-93%) are in favor of smoking ban in offices, health and educational buildings and sport facilities. 83% supported smoking ban in workplaces. Most of the teachers were in favor of smoke-free restaurants (71%) but they were less likely to support smoke-free bars, pubs and clubs (55%). The percentage of teachers who supported total ban on smoking in the presence of pregnant women was 94% and in the presence of children 93%. About 27%of the study subjects did not accept the concept of raising taxes on tobacco. Total ban on tobacco advertising was accepted by 70% of teachers and support for pictorial warning on tobacco packages declared 75% of participants. About 45% of study population indicated that they noted other teachers smoked at school (where smoking is banned). For students such percentages were even higher (76%). It is important to strengthen educational and informational activities to increase public awareness on health consequences of active and passive smoking and the ways of elimination of such exposures. PMID:23421075

Kaleta, Dorota; Pola?ska, Kinga; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elzbieta; Kowalska, Alina; Drygas, Wojciech; Fronczak, Adam

2012-01-01

232

Human Rights Education Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

|This article proposes a set of human rights education standards for classroom teachers and, by implication, outcomes for teacher preparation programs. The discussion includes a brief description of human rights education and concludes with recommendations for teacher preparation programs.|

Jennings, Todd

2006-01-01

233

Brazilian science teachers conceptions about the world situation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Recognizing the urgent need of a scientific education thet would provide for citizen participation in decision making regarding problems that affect our survival, this paper reports teachers perceptions about problems that affect the future of human kind and life in our planet. Taking as reference recent studies which approach this issue globally, we analyse science teachers conceptions concerning the present world situation. Results show a fragmentary character and an insufficient conscientization of the extent and serioussness of the problems. This finding points at the need of formative actions that would provide teachers with a more adequate perspection of those problems and of possible solutions.

Daniel Gil-Pérez; Amparo Vilches; Mónica Edwards; Maria Lúcia Vital dos Santos Abib

2000-01-01

234

Research on Strategic-oriented College Teacher Performance Management System  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study gives guiding principles for constructing strategic-oriented college teacher performance management system, including strategic orientation, systematicness, reliability, efficiency, operability and dynamism; it also designs a dynamic circulation process which takes achieving college strategic management objective system as the center and contains four key links: Making plans for college teacher performance evaluation, performance tutorship and implementation, performance evaluation and feedback and utilization of results of performance evaluation; besides, this study provides a model of strategic-oriented college teacher performance management system based on six key decisions: Evaluation subject, methods, indicators, standards, period and feedback and utilization of results.

Zhou Jingkun

2012-01-01

235

The wind energy takes off  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

After having evoked the objectives defined for wind energy production by 2050, the important growth of wind energy in Europe and in other parts of the world, and its importance in terms of business and jobs, this article presents the Denmark model where the wind energy industry is a world leader but now faces the need of a new development model. It comments the investments and incentives implemented in Western countries after the first oil crisis. It outlines the increasing power of wind generators and their technological evolution, the development of offshore wind farms and their cost, and finally the intermittency problem and the case of small wind turbines

2010-01-01

236

Methanization takes countryside by storm  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A new plant is operating in Brittany: it transforms cattle effluents and slaughterhouse wastes into electric power through natural fermentation. Thus, every year, 75.000 tons of organic wastes will produce methane and 1.5 MW. Other projects exist in the same region. One faced the opposition of the population. Therefore, the idea is now to develop smaller projects. France is very late compared to Germany and the Netherlands. The Grenelle de l'Environnement seems to have boosted these projects, notably due to the increase of the electricity purchase price proposed by EDF. Another issue is discussed: the development of this industrial sector in France

2011-01-01

237

Teachers and Bullying Developing a Deeper Understanding of Teachers' Perceptions of Teacher-to-Student Bullying  

Science.gov (United States)

Students report that teachers bully them, but a review of the literature indicates that little attention has been given to teacher-to-student bullying. This study used a mixed-methods approach to investigate elementary teachers' perceptions of seriousness and their intent to intervene in teacher bullying incidents. Results indicated that teachers

Zerillo, Christine

2010-01-01

238

Meaningful family relationships: neurocognitive buffers of adolescent risk taking.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Discordant development of brain regions responsible for cognitive control and reward processing may render adolescents susceptible to risk taking. Identifying ways to reduce this neural imbalance during adolescence can have important implications for risk taking and associated health outcomes. Accordingly, we sought to examine how a key family relationship-family obligation-can reduce this vulnerability. Forty-eight adolescents underwent an fMRI scan during which they completed a risk-taking and cognitive control task. Results suggest that adolescents with greater family obligation values show decreased activation in the ventral striatum when receiving monetary rewards and increased dorsolateral PFC activation during behavioral inhibition. Reduced ventral striatum activation correlated with less real-life risk-taking behavior and enhanced dorsolateral PFC activation correlated with better decision-making skills. Thus, family obligation may decrease reward sensitivity and enhance cognitive control, thereby reducing risk-taking behaviors.

Telzer EH; Fuligni AJ; Lieberman MD; Galván A

2013-03-01

239

What Affects Teacher Ratings of Student Behaviors? The Potential Influence of Teachers' Perceptions of the School Environment and Experiences.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Teachers serve as the natural raters of students within the school and classroom contexts. Yet teachers' ratings of their students may vary based on these contextual factors. The current study explored the extent to which teacher perceptions of the school environment predict their longitudinal ratings of student behaviors. Data for this study come from 702 teachers in 42 elementary schools. Teachers self-reported their perceptions of the school context at a single time point, and provided ratings of their students' behavior via the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaption-Checklist (TOCA-C) across three school years. Latent profile analysis identified three latent classes of teachers based on their ratings of school organizational health, burnout, and efficacy. A regression framework demonstrated an association between the baseline profiles in relation to TOCA-C ratings of student behavior across 3 years. Teachers with more favorable perceptions of the environment had lower initial ratings of concentration problems, disruptive behavior, and internalizing symptoms, and higher ratings of prosocial behaviors and family involvement. They also showed slower growth in their ratings of emotion dysregulation and greater increases of their ratings of family involvement over time. This work is particularly important for determining the extent to which teacher ratings may be biased by teacher and contextual factors, and may have implications for the identification of teachers who may rate students poorly over time.

Pas ET; Bradshaw CP

2013-08-01

240

Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes  

Science.gov (United States)

... Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes The Basics Take Action! Ver en español Content ... do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes (“dy-ah-BEE-teez”), including: Watching your weight ...

 
 
 
 
241

Taking power from the Nile  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The progress of hydro-electric power development on the upper Nile in Uganda, Ethiopia and Sudan is reviewed. Uganda was the first to benefit from the development of large-scale hydro-electric power. In 1954, the first of ten 15MW units at the Owen Falls dam was commissioned and since then exports of power have been made more or less continuously to Kenya. The Ugandan national grid has developed as a purely hydropower system and over the past ten years the installed capacity has been increased to 180MW. However, rapidly increasing demand can be met in the short term only by the construction of thermal plant and further realisation of the still considerable hydro potential is essential in the early years of the next century. Ethiopia`s topography combines a high plateau suitable for low-cost storage reservoirs with escarpments and gorges where heads greater than 1000m are possible. The hydropower potential in the Blue Nile basin is estimated as about 20GW. A number of hydro schemes have been carried out both on the Blue Nile and other rivers and there is considerable scope for export. Sudan has far less hydro power potential than Uganda or Ethiopia. Nevertheless, the extensive grid system built up over the past 35 years is largely based on hydro power from the Blue and Main Nile supplemented by thermal generation. Forecasts of demand into the middle of the next century point to the need for further expansion of hydro capacity in all three countries accompanied by the establishment of interconnections for exports. (UK)

Widgery, N.J.

1997-01-01

242

[Fetal taking in some particular circumstances].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Fetal takings still concern about 6 to 7% of the pregnancies. If, in the majority of the cases, the taking does not present difficulty for a trained operator, particular circumstances related to maternal context (anticoagulating treatment, vaginal bleeding, fever…) may make the taking become more difficult. From a questionnaire sent to the French multidisciplinary centers for prenatal diagnosis and a review of the literature, we establish guidelines for fetal taking in these circumstances.

Roth P; Bernard JP; Salomon LJ; Dumez Y; Ville Y

2013-07-01

243

Hadron therapy takes off in Europe  

CERN Document Server

A joint meeting of ULICE, ENLIGHT and PARTNER recently took place in Marburg (Germany). The three initiatives are shaping both the present and the future of hadron therapy in Europe, where new cutting-edge facilities have started to fight cancer with beams of protons and carbon ions.   A pictorial representation of a raster scan on a tumour. (Photo courtesy of HIT/GSI/Siemens.) Thanks to a very active multidisciplinary community consisting of physicists, biologists, radiobiologists, engineers, IT specialists and medical doctors, hadron therapy is taking off in Europe. Indeed, after a few decades during which the innovative technique was mainly used experimentally in Japan, the US and a couple of pioneering laboratory-based facilities in Europe, today an increasing number of hospitals are being equipped with synchrotrons and dedicated treatment rooms. “Asia and Europe are at the forefront of research and use of carbon ions in the treatment of some rare and radio-resistant t...

CERN Bulletin

2011-01-01

244

Slavia takes the Czech path  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Biodiesel was the main reason Slavia Capital bought the oil processing company, Palma Tumys, Bratislava last year. The biofuels added to fuel produced from oil are one of the core products of this investment group. But today Slavia is profiting more from the production of edible oils and margarine produced by the Palma Group. It has benefited from the global increase in food prices. But Palma is also profiting from the experience and contacts of its new Czech managers appointed by the new owner. They have found a place in Czech stores for Slovak oils and margarines. In the past the company only used to supply its products to Czech bakers. And they even found a place for biodiesel. Petr Zejdlik is Czech and is the chairman of the board of Palma Group. Matej Valtr, is also Czech and is responsible for managing company strategies. They replaced the former owners, original Slovak privatizers who used to manage the company and did not do badly. They managed to keep one of the biggest Slovak food processing companies in good shape and in profit and j with stable revenues of around 90 mil. EUR. But finally they gave in to international competition from Bunge, Cargill and Archer Daniels Midland and sold the company to a financially strong investor. (author)

2007-11-20

245

A Study of EFL Teachers' Locus of Control and Self-regulation and the Moderating Role of Self-efficacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study investigated the relationship between EFL teachers' locus of control and self-regulation and the moderating role of self-efficacy. To empirically investigate the theorized relationship between self-regulation and locus of control, 63 English teachers were selected according to a convenience sampling from different language institutes in Mashhad. The participants were asked to complete the' Teacher Self-Regulation Scale' as well as the 'Teacher Locus of Control Scale'. The data supported the theoretical expectation of a linkage between self-regulation and locus of control. The results indicated a significant relationship between teachers' self-regulation and internal locus of control. It was found that about 48% of the variation in teacher self-regulation can be explained by taking their internal LOC into account. Subsequent data analyses indicated that among the components of self-regulation, 'mastery goal orientation', and 'intrinsic interest' have the highest correlations with teacher locus of control. The findings also illustrated that teacher self-efficacy had no significant impact on the relationship between self-regulation and locus of control. This suggests that regardless of the teacher self-efficacy level, a teacher self-regulation is related to his/her internal locus of control. The results derived from the present study should encourage teacher educators to take advantage of this relationship by providing EFL teachers with programs and experiences for developing effective paths for enhancing teacher self-regulatory skills as well as their internal tendencies and perceptions.

Mohammad Taghi Monshi Toussi; Afsaneh Ghanizadeh

2012-01-01

246

Implementing Interventions to Increase Motivation in the English Language Classroom: from Theory to Practice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A growing body of empirical research shows a relationship between student motivation and learning outcomes in the teaching of English in ESL and EFL contexts. Despite a sound theoretical framework, however, there are few studies which implement strategies intended to increase motivation and report findings. Using qualitative research, this article attempts to link theory with practice and shed light into the factors which demotivate students and act as barriers to effective foreign language learning. Theoretical principles are applied in the classroom and the effectiveness of interventions to increase motivation is assessed. Thus, the article is pragmatic in focus and provides teachers with a tool for analyzing students’ motivation so that they implement effective motivation strategies in the English classroom. The strategies and interventions suggested can be adapted and used by teachers in various teaching situations after taking into consideration their own teaching context.

Iakovos Tsiplakides; Areti Keramida

2010-01-01

247

Teacher Autonomy Perceptions of Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study aimed at examining Iranian (N= 218) and Turkish (N=142) high school EFL teachers’ opinions about teacher autonomy over (a) the choice of appropriate teaching methods, strategies and techniques and implementation of the established curriculum (b) teacher involvement in decision making processes and (c) teachers’ use of personal initiative in solving their work problems. An 11-item questionnaire (?= .758) was used to measure autonomy perceptions of the participants. The results revealed that Turkish teachers’ autonomy perceptions were greater than that of Iranian teachers in the three teacher autonomy dimensions. Moreover, it was observed that male and master- holder teachers perceive less autonomy than female and bachelor-holder ones; whereas, no significant relationship were observed for the age and marital status variables with any teacher autonomy dimensions. Lastly, decision making dimension was the strongest predictor of teacher autonomy among both Iranian and Turkish teachers.

Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

2013-01-01

248

The challenges of leader's role of the teacher  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper deals with the leader's role of the teacher in school, as one of central persons in educational process, and the creation of a climate stimulative for learning. Besides defining the leader's role of the teacher, which is here treated as an aspect of participation in decision-making and responsibility, different manifestations of that role in school are discussed, as well as its importance for contemporary education and possibilities and challenges of encouraging the development of teachers-leaders. The results of several studies that present the leader's role of the teacher from the point of view of different participants in school life are displayed. It is concluded that leadership of teachers in school is desirable and that it should be encouraged, since it contributes to democratisation of school climate, stimulates pupils' achievements, motivates other teachers, as well as that it is necessary to analyze numerous obstacles to leadership of teachers. Among the most important obstacles are those stemming from institutional inertia, the fear of taking risks and resistance of school principals to developing the leadership of teachers.

Pavlovi? Branka

2008-01-01

249

Innovations in Science and Technology Education through Science Teacher Associations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available One emerging issue highlighted in a UNESCO booklet (Fensham, 2008, p6)is to draw attention to the need for students to receive science education from able science teachers. The booklet emphasizes that quality science learning time, albeit less, is preferable to the damage done by underequipped science teachers. It also draws attention to the important role of science teacher associations, where its members not only have the insights and experience, but also the interest in helping science teacher colleagues. This paper highlights the various contributions possible from Science Teacher Associations (STAs) to the development and delivery of innovative science and technology education in a world that is increasinglydriven by the outputs of science and technology. It stresses the key role of such professional bodies in developing teacher ownership, the sharing of experience at a collaborative level and to be guided to take active responsibility for the interpretations of the intended Government curriculum so as to provide innovative science education best suited to students within their school. Any shift away from ‘teaching the textbook information’,‘teaching to the examination’ and towards ‘assessment for learning’(formative assessment) will be heavily enhanced by the setting up ofmultiple professional fora for enhancing the development of teacher’s PCK(pedagogical content knowledge).

Ben B. Akpan

2010-01-01

250

77 FR 45268 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Plan AGENCY: National...this final rule amending the Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Plan (BDTRP) and its...through April 30. Members of the Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Team (Team)...

2012-07-31

251

77 FR 21946 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Commercial Fishing Operations; Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Plan AGENCY: National...NMFS) proposes to amend the Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Plan (BDTRP) and implementing...through April 30. Members of the Bottlenose Dolphin Take Reduction Team (BDTRT)...

2012-04-12

252

Alchemy and the Teacher  

Science.gov (United States)

In order for teachers to reflect deeply upon themselves, they need powerful models and images to guide their introspection. In teacher reflectivity, as in the therapeutic processes, psychic energy must ultimately be "contained" by models and modalities that enable one to make sense out of one's inner and outer experiences. This enables those…

Mayes, Clifford

2003-01-01

253

Conceptualizing Teacher Professional Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

|This article adopts a complexity theory framework to review the literature on teachers' professional development practices, the generative systems of these practices, and the impact that learning experiences have on their knowledge and changes in classroom practices. The review brings together multiple strands of literature on teacher

Opfer, V. Darleen; Pedder, David

2011-01-01

254

Preparing Rural Elementary Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

|During the past 14 years, the elementary rural teacher training program at Brigham Young University (BYU), Utah, has successfully provided an 8-week student teaching experience which has assisted more than 250 prospective teachers in comparing their lifestyle and interests with those of rural America. Student participants are required to live…

Campbell, Milo K.

255

The Liberal Teacher  

Science.gov (United States)

Identifies qualities of an ideal liberal teacher, including capability of giving a liberal education, living well, exhibiting orderly habits, possessing humane values, and believing in the power of the mind. Difficulties in becoming a good teacher are discussed. Available from: College of Education, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011.…

Highet, Gilbert

1976-01-01

256

Why Teachers Burn Out.  

Science.gov (United States)

This survey involving 1,211 teachers from 2 independent school districts in western Canada addressed teacher burnout issues. Findings of this qualitative/quantitative study indicate that experiences other than prolonged work stress may lead to burnout. These other factors include depersonalization and status dissatisfaction. (TJH)

Friesen, David; And Others

1988-01-01

257

The teacher under stress  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Empirical records consistently point to the fact that the phenomenon of stress is characteristic of service professions, especially of teacher’s. Although stress in teachers is a problem of public interest, it is still a relatively new field of empirical investigations. Data available show that stress in teachers can have negative effects on school as an organization teacher professional achievement, his/her and his/her family psychosocial status. The most frequent symptoms of a prolonged professional stress are anxiety, depression, frustration, unfriendly behavior towards students and colleagues, emotional weariness, and extreme tension. Health and psychological problems cause, most frequently, the reduction of self-esteem job dissatisfaction, job resignation, absenteeism, and wrong decision-making. In an attempt to call professional public attention to negative effects of stress on the outcomes of teacher work, we have analyzed four important aspects of stress teachers experience in their everyday work (a) definition and measurement of stress, (b) distribution and sources of stress (problem behaviors in students, poor working conditions, lack of time, poor school ethos), (c) teacher personality traits (sex, age, work experience, locus of control, job satisfaction, intention to resign absenteeism), (d) strategies for overcoming and reducing negative effects of stress (direct action techniques, palliative techniques).

Krnjaji? Stevan B.

2003-01-01

258

Physics Teacher Resource Agents  

Science.gov (United States)

Many physics departments do some sort of professional development for area teachers, often summer workshops or summer courses. A program that is of high quality, already developed and perfect for teachers is already available, AAPT's PTRA. State MSP funding requires careful evaluation, and the PTRA program is already set up to do this sort of evaluation, both of teacher and student learning gains, as well as teacher confidence and use of technology. The professional growth of teachers involved in the program is amazing, and it is much easier to host PTRA workshops than try to develop something at your own institution from scratch. Assistance was even made available from AAPT/PTRA in preparing a proposal for the state. Some of our experiences in hosting PTRA workshops and pursuing state funding will be shared.

Stewart, Gay

2009-03-20

259

Effective Teacher’s Attitudes According to Teacher’s Perceptions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aim of this research is to determine the qualifications which an effective teacher should have and to designate these qualifications according to their importance in the light of teachers? perception.Teachers working in K?r?ehir city center have been the environment for this research.A specific sample hasn?t been choosen because all the environment has been reached.The questionnaire which has been made by the researcher has been used in order to collect data and these data have been analysed by using techniques of frequency and percentage and then interpreted in schedules.At the end of the research,effective teacher attitudes in the light of their perceptions have been classified as „?personality??, „?professional sufficiency??, „?behaviour to students??, „?branch knowledge?? and determined order of their importance.According to the teachers in this working group, preference orders of effective theacher qualifications have not changed in terms of their branches.

Ayfer ?AH?N

2011-01-01

260

Teachers’ Perceptions of the Present and Optimum Status of the In-Service EFL Teacher Preparation Programs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study sought the different perceptions of Iranian EFL instructors and teachers on the present and optimum status of in-service programs. A 26-item questionnaire completed by 90 participants, thirty of whom were instructors and the rest were teachers, revealed that instructors and teachers had different conceptions about these in-service programs. In the light of the results gained from questionnaire and interview, it is suggested that although most teachers were satisfied with these programs, they lacked adequate motivation to participate in these programs. Moreover, most instructors were not also satisfied with the present in-service programs, and they were looking for reforms in the educational plans and programs. The findings also suggest that, on the one hand, instructors should provide teachers with appropriate motives to enthusiastically take part in these classes, and they should feel responsible to address teachers’ weaknesses and strengths both theoretically and practically. On the other hand, teachers should seize theses opportunities with both hands to ameliorate and refresh their English knowledge. Therefore, it is suggested instructors and teachers should reconcile as far as methodological and pedagogical implications are concerned.

Parviz Birjandi; Ali Derakhshan Hesari

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy in Patients Taking Antiplatelet Agents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Continuation  of antiplatelet agents during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy may lead to increased risk of procedure-related bleeding. However, temporary interruption of these agents increases the risk of thrombotic event. The aim of this article was to review the management of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients taking antiplatelet agents.

Cevahir Özer

2013-01-01

262

The Rural Practicum: Preparing a Quality Teacher Workforce for Rural and Regional Australia  

Science.gov (United States)

|Communities play a critical role in supporting pre-service teachers during rural and regional professional experience. This support, coupled with access to teacher educators and university resources, appears to positively influence graduate attitudes toward taking up a rural appointment. These are among the key findings to emerge from open-ended…

Kline, Jodie; White, Simone; Lock, Graeme

2013-01-01

263

Teachers' Use of Data: Loose Coupling, Agenda Setting, and Team Norms  

Science.gov (United States)

This article explores the influence of grade-level team norms and district and school leadership on teachers' data use. Using an embedded-systems perspective to consider teachers' data use in four schools located in two different districts, the research takes the practitioners' perspective on what constitutes data. Findings indicate that…

Young, Viki M.

2006-01-01

264

Motivation and Quality of Work Life among Secondary School EFL Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This study set out to investigate the relationship between quality of work life and teacher motivation among 160 secondary school English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in Tehran, Iran. In addition, 30 of the participants were randomly selected to take part in follow-up interviews which asked why they felt the way they reported. The results…

Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Gordani, Yahya

2012-01-01

265

Motivation and Quality of Work Life among Secondary School EFL Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study set out to investigate the relationship between quality of work life and teacher motivation among 160 secondary school English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in Tehran, Iran. In addition, 30 of the participants were randomly selected to take part in follow-up interviews which asked why they felt the way they reported. The results…

Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Gordani, Yahya

2012-01-01

266

Teachers' Perspectives on Literacy Instruction for Students with Severe Disabilities Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' perspectives on the appropriate skills and settings for literacy instruction, the factors influencing their decisions about literacy instruction, and the barriers to literacy instruction in general education classrooms. A sample of special education teachers (n = 69) of students taking the…

Ruppar, Andrea L.; Dymond, Stacy K.; Gaffney, Janet S.

2011-01-01

267

Teachers’ Views about Effective Use of Technology in Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Effective use of technology in educational environments and its successful integration increases the productivity of instructional processes. Constant and good-quality support supposed to be provided for teachers is quite important for technology use in educational environments. Thus, it is necessary to find answers to the question of what kinds of activities could be used to provide teachers with constant support for technology integration in educational environments. In this respect, the present study aimed at determining teachers’ views and their suggestions about the process of technology integration into educational environments and about the problems experienced in the process. In the study, the research sample included a total of 21 teachers teaching at Tepebasi Resat Benli Elementary School in the city of Eskisehir. Of all the participating teachers, 11 of them were elementary school teachers, and 10 of them were field teachers. In order to find answers to the research questions directed in line with the overall purpose of the study, the qualitative research method was applied. The research data were analyzed with the help of thematic analysis. The research data were collected via the focus-group interviews held with the teachers, observations and researcher journals. The data collected in the study were gathered under two main themes depending on the open-ended questions directed to the teachers regarding technology use and on the related literature. These themes were ‘Problems experienced by teachers regarding technology use in class’ and ‘Suggestions for effective use of technology’.

Suzan Duygu Eri?ti; Adile a?k?m Kurt; Muhterem Dindar

2012-01-01

268

CNS Institute for Physics Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This professional development program from Cornell University's Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS), designed specifically for high-school physics teachers, updates educators on recent advances in physics and related applications. It provides take-home laboratory exercises designed to meet the time and budgetary constraints of a typical high school. Site materials include an overview of the program and information on workshops and summer courses, a collection of downloadable, inquiry-based laboratory exercises, and information about an equipment lending library that supports the lab activities and is available to program participants. The Institute offers two-week and one-week programs, both for graduate credit. Participants are selected and awarded grants covering the full cost of attending the program.

2003-12-11

269

Teacher Perceptions and Teacher-Student Interaction in Integrated Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher ratings of students' potential achievement, classroom behavior, personal characteristics, and teacher-student dyadic interaction measures were obtained to examine the nature of teacher perceptions and interaction with Black and White, male and female students in integrated classrooms. Results show teachers perceived Black and White…

Cornbleth, Catherine; Korth, Willard

1980-01-01

270

Teachers in Teacher Education: Clinical Faculty Roles and Relationships.  

Science.gov (United States)

The roles and relationships of clinical faculty (experienced teachers who work with students in teacher education) in university teacher-education programs are examined to see how they might contribute to improvement of teacher education and what obstacles may exist. Implications for education reform are discussed. (SLD)

Cornbleth, Catherine; Ellsworth, Jeanne

1994-01-01

271

One Class Takes on the Standards  

Science.gov (United States)

Using an article about labor leader Cesar Chavez's grape boycott and hunger strike, students at Stuart-Hobson Middle School in Washington, D.C., are doing a "close read," a skill prized by the new Common Core State Standards being put into practice in the District of Columbia. As an English/language arts teacher in the common-core era, Ms. Dowan…

Gewertz, Catherine

2013-01-01

272

Taking a chance: Sex, alcohol & acquaintance rape  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This article analysis meanings of alcohol in relation to young people’s sexuality, with the specific focus on when this go wrong and end in acquaintance rape. Drinking is a way to stage oneself as mature and is intentionally used by both male and female youth to make sexual pleasure possible. It is argued that in the context of sexuality among young people there is a fine line between freedom and gender specific restrictions. The concept of risk has traditionally dominated research on acquaintance rape and alcohol drinking among youth. This article introduces chance along the concept of risk in order to grasp the complexities of the grey zone situations of acquaintance rape among youth. The risks of social stigmas within the gendergame increase with drinking alcohol in the same time as the chances of expanding the limitations of genderroles also increase with drinking. These social stigmas embedded in the genderroles are central for understanding when a pleasurable situation turns into acquaintance rape. The article is based on 95 police reports of rape and 37 focus groups on alcohol and sexuality with Danish youth. The analysis takes it onset in a single case.

Demant, Jakob; Heinskou, Marie Bruvik

2011-01-01

273

Teachers' Organisations and Their Role in Teachers Welfare  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper is aimed at to acquaint regarding teachers organizations and their role inteacher welfare. Teachers' organization has to play decisive role in back drop of therecent educational reforms. The role of teachers' organizations in fosteringprofessionalism and initiating teachers into social action can hardly is overemphasizedgiven the key position that the teacher holds in a society. The obligations whichconstitute the academic ethics are not the same as a comprehensive code of conduct foruniversity teachers in all spheres of life. A working of the teachers' organizations in Indiareveals that they have addressed themselves to fulfilling union-type functions.

Bijendr Pradhan

2012-01-01

274

Primary and secondary school mental health teachers in professional identity of intervention programs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available To explore the impact of teacher training on the professional identity of primary and secondary school mental health teachers, this study conducted a half-month professional development training program to 54 primary and secondary school mental health teachers, and performed measurement on the professional identity of the teachers in the experimental group and the control group with “Teachers’ Professional Identity Questionnaire”. The result shows that after the training there is a significant improvement in the professional identity of the teachers in the experimental group, and the teachers’ scores on the four dimensions of profession identity: the sense of role, the professional behavioral tendency, the occupational values, and the sense of belonging, all increased significantly. This indicates that the curriculum intervention for the primary and secondary school mental health teachers could effectively improve the teachers’ professional identity.

Hao Lei; Cheng Guo; Yanling Liu

2012-01-01

275

Exploring the relationship between task, teacher actions, and student learning Exploración de las relaciones entre tarea, acciones del profesor y aprendizaje del estudiante  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

We are examining actions that teachers take to convert tasks into learning opportunities. In this paper, we contrast ways that three teachers convert the same task into lessons, and the way that their lessons reflect their intent. We found that the teachers did what they intended to do, that this wa...

Sullivan, Peter; Clarke, Doug; Clarke, Barbara; O'Shea, Helen

276

Improving Teacher Education through Inquiry-Based Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Preservice educators face daunting challenges throughout their professional development, but no challenge is greater than that of contextualizing their instruction within multicultural environments. Addressing the increasing diversity and ever-changing cultures within student populations is often skimmed over within teacher education curriculums; yet, its importance to the success of preservice teachers cannot be understated. Investigators developed two specific projects which led teacher candidates to innovate and promote inquiry-based learning within their elementary learners. These practical, real-world applications took teacher candidates through the process of effective instruction: assessment, modeling, scaffolding, and evaluation.

Evan Ortlieb

2011-01-01

277

Research on teacher education programs: logic model approach.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Teacher education programs in the United States face increasing pressure to demonstrate their effectiveness through pupils' learning gains in classrooms where program graduates teach. The link between teacher candidates' learning in teacher education programs and pupils' learning in K-12 classrooms implicit in the policy discourse suggests a one-to-one correspondence. However, the logical steps leading from what teacher candidates have learned in their programs to what they are doing in classrooms that may contribute to their pupils' learning are anything but straightforward. In this paper, we argue that the logic model approach from scholarship on evaluation can enhance research on teacher education by making explicit the logical links between program processes and intended outcomes. We demonstrate the usefulness of the logic model approach through our own work on designing a longitudinal study that focuses on examining the process and impact of an undergraduate mathematics and science teacher education program.

Newton XA; Poon RC; Nunes NL; Stone EM

2013-02-01

278

Revised data taking schedule with ion beams  

CERN Document Server

This document presents the revised data taking schedule of NA61 with ion beams. The revision takes into account limitations due to the new LHC schedule as well as final results concerning the physics performance with secondary ion beams. It is proposed to take data with primary Ar and Xe beams in 2012 and 2014, respectively, and to test and use for physics a secondary B beam from primary Pb beam fragmentation in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

Gazdzicki, Marek; Aduszkiewicz, A; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Choi, K U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Cleymans, J; Derkach, D A; Diakonos, F; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hasegawa, T; Haungs, A; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Katrynska, N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kolevatov, R S; Kondratiev, V P; Kowalski, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Majka, Z; I Malakhov, A; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mijakowski, P; Mitrovski, M; Montaruli, T; Mrówczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nikolic, V; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Röhrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovskii, A; Sakashita, K; Schuster, T; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Zipper, W; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

2009-01-01

279

In the Company of Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Being in the company of teachers is at the heart of the Coalition. The center of Ted Sizer's work, of his life, of CES, is the life of the teacher. "Horace's Compromise," the first of Sizer's well known series about teachers and school change, imparted a sympathetic portrait of Horace Smith, a teacher trying to make a difference in a system…

Wood, George

2009-01-01

280

Teacher as Decision-Maker.  

Science.gov (United States)

The teacher as decisionmaker is a fairly new concept, and yet the choices teachers make--among alternative approaches--afffect the attitudes, knowledge, and skills students carry into adult life. This booklet's chapter titles are as follows: (1) New Image for Teachers--Decision-Maker; (2) Decisions Teachers Make; (3) A Rational Model; (4) Planning…

Smith, Carl B.

 
 
 
 
281

More than "Just" a Teacher  

Science.gov (United States)

|Most teachers often pass themselves off as "just" teachers, when in truth they are so much more. Teacher, adviser, consultant, confidante, manager, leader, partner, collaborator, role model, councillor, researcher, learner, friend. Of course, in the 21st-century education system teachers are expected to carry out roles well beyond "just"…

Bianchi, Lynne

2011-01-01

282

Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia  

Science.gov (United States)

In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

2012-01-01

283

How South Korean Teachers Handle an Incident of School Bullying  

Science.gov (United States)

With school-level variables receiving increasing attention for their role in the maintenance of bullying behaviors, this study examined teacher responses to a hypothetical bullying situation among a sample of South Korean teachers. Using an online survey method, school-level variables (anti-bullying policy and anti-bullying program) and individual…

Yoon, Jina; Bauman, Sheri; Choi, Taesan; Hutchinson, Alisa S.

2011-01-01

284

An Examination of Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Cyberbullying  

Science.gov (United States)

Today, in parallel with the increase of technology use, cyberbullying becomes one of the major issues in schools affecting students' lives negatively similar to bullying. To minimize the negative effects of cyberbullying and to get preservice teachers ready for managing cyberbullying, it is necessary to examine preservice teachers' perception…

Yilmaz, Harun

2010-01-01

285

"Contact Us Next Year": Tracing Teachers' Use of Gifted Practices.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study followed up teachers two years after they had attended a summer institute on gifted education to identify changes teachers made in their classrooms. It identified factors that either supported (student success, personal challenge, and increasing self confidence) or impeded (feelings of isolation, school bureaucracy, large class size,…

Cashion, Marie; Sullenger, Karen

2000-01-01

286

Teachers' Perceptions of and Interaction with Students in Multicultural Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examination of the relationships between achievement ratings and interaction variables suggest that teachers interpret the same student behavior in different ways depending upon the student's race. With increased understanding of the student characteristics and behaviors influencing the formation of differential teacher perceptions, it would be…

Cornbleth, Catherine; Korth, Willard

287

Hello Children! A Teacher's Guide. Excerpts (Part 1).  

Science.gov (United States)

Provides excerpts from Shalva Amonashvili's 1983 teacher's guide, "Hello Children." Explains that "Hello Children" is based on Amonashvili's successful experience teaching six-year olds and increasing the elementary grades to four (now implemented throughout the USSR). Amonashvili stresses teachers' love for children and methods promoting…

Amonashvili, Shalva Aleksandrovich

1988-01-01

288

How Biology Teachers Can Respond to Intelligent Design  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers of biology and related subjects are increasingly meeting objections from students and their parents to the teaching of evolution and the exclusion of what is called the theory of Intelligent Design. This paper attempts to draw together arguments and evidence which may be used by such teachers. Four lessons are drawn from the 1982…

Mackenzie, Jim

2010-01-01

289

AAPT - Committe on Teacher Preparation Minutes - Edmonton 2008  

Science.gov (United States)

The Committee on Teacher Preparation met on July 20th at the AAPT meeting in Edmonton, Alberta. Topics discussed included increasing the number of sites with Math Science Partnership grants, the Task Force on Physics Teacher Preparation, the new RTOP listserv, PhysTEC and PTEC, and sessions and workshops for the summer 2009 AAPT meeting.

Plisch, Monica

2008-07-28

290

Enhancing Prospecitve Teachers' Coordination of Center and Spread: A Window Into Teacher Education Material Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper describes a development and evaluation process used to create teacher education materials that help prepare middle and secondary mathematics teachers to teach data analysis and probability concepts with technology tools. One aspect of statistical reasoning needed for teaching is the ability to coordinate understandings of center and spread. The materials attempt to foster such coordination by emphasizing reasoning about intervals of data rather than a single focus on a point estimate (e.g., measure of center). We take a close look at several different data sources across multiple implementation semesters to examine prospective mathematics teachers’ ability to reason with center and spread in a coordinated way. We also look at the prospective teachers’ ability to apply their understandings in pedagogical tasks. Our analysis illustrates the difficulty in both achieving this understanding and transferring it to teaching practices. We provide examples of how results were used to revise the materials and address issues of implementation by mathematics teacher educators.

Hollylynne S. Lee; J. Todd Lee

2011-01-01

291

Teacher in the Transformative Learning Space  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Abstract to the conference “Teachers and Trainers in Lifelong Learning” Workshop A: Future Competences of Persons working in Lifelong Learning Title of proposal: Teacher in the Transformative Learning Spaces Author: Elina Maslo, dr. paed., National Library of Education, The Danish School of Education, Aarhus University, elma@dpu.dk Key words: learning, lifelong learning, adult learning, workplace learning, transformative learning spaces, teachers competencies During many years of research on lifelong foreign language learning with very different groups of learners, we found some criteria, which makes learning process successful. Since then we tried to find some other examples on “successful learning” from the formal, informal and non-formal learning environments, trying to prove those criteria. This conference paper will present the newest example: the research library, which is a very interesting example on the mixture of those very different environments. Taking the library example, we will show the new role of the teacher in the transformative learning spaces, namely, a person helping to learn. Using the systemic-constructivist approach to life and learning (Reich) and taking into consideration that the learning process is multidimensional (Pestalozzi, Illeris), we believe, that learning is only possible if learners themselves are able to realize their own learning process, which must be personally significant for them. With this understanding the most important task for the teachers or supervisors is to help their learners to create a transformative learning space for their own learning. The goal of this paper is to research the teachers (supervisors, counsellors) role in the possibilities to learn at the library, analyzing the learning process from many different perspectives (the users of the library – students of different grades, non studying people, researchers; the people working at the library – office workers, librarians, research staff; teachers and supervisors) and answering the key question: what makes the learning process successful? Methods/methodology: The complicated process of learning and the role of a teacher at the research library will be analyzed from different perspectives by different learning participators using qualitative research methodology (interviews, observations, smaller action research projects, group discussions). A special attention will be paid to the systematic review of literature, the analysis of previous studies, with the aim of ensuring the valuable evidence of the research analysis. Expected Outcomes/results: There will be given a qualitative analysis of the library as a transformative learning space, which can be used as inspiration in all formal, non-formal and informal educational environments. The criteria, which makes the learning process successful in many contexts, will be presented. The competencies needed by teacher in the transformative learning spaces will be described. Intent of publication: The intent of the publication is to show the mechanism of learning in non traditional environment and the teachers role in those transformative learning spaces. The study aims to show, that there are some universal criteria, which makes learning process successful. Those criteria can be used in many different learning environments. The criteria have a connection to the competencies needed by teachers in transformative learning spaces. References: Illeris, Knud (2001): Læring – aktuel læringsteori i spændingsfeltet mellem Piaget, Freud og Marx. Roskilde Universitetsforlag. Illeris, Knud (2008): Læring i et positivt psykologisk perspektiv. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag. Lave, Jean and Etienne Wenger (1991): Situated Learning. Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press. Mezirow, Jack and Associates (2000): Learning as Transformation. Critical Perspectives on Theory in Progress. Jossey-Bass Publishers: San Francisco.Reich, Kersten (2005): Systemisch-kinstruktivistische Pädagogik – Einf?hrung in Grundlagen einer interaktionistisch-konst

Maslo, Elina

292

Teachers’ Narratives indicate Professional Stamina  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The neoliberal restructuring of the welfare state has changed the conditions for teacher practice. Teachers’ narratives have been collected in the western part of Denmark. They give insight in teacher practice and how teachers’ conditions for working have changed. 3 themes are discussed to illustrate this development: 1) individualisation, 2) operating economy and 3) loss of authority. The teachers’ main focus is the benefit of the children even though this means they have to manipulate the demands issued on them.

Daugbjerg, Peer SchrØder

293

Monterey Bay Aquarium Teachers & Kids  

Science.gov (United States)

Education page with resources for teachers and students. Teacher's Place has teacher professional development opportunities such as Wetlands Teacher Institute and Teacher Open House, a quarterly electronic educator newsletter, and hands-on elementary level classroom activities. Subjects include: kelp forests, sea otters, sharks, tide pools, and penguins. Kid's Corner has games and activities, aquarium career information, summer programs, web cams, and animal field guides.

294

Student Teacher Input and Teacher Work Sample as Part of a Teacher Education Unit Accountability System.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents findings of surveys completed by student teachers on their ability to prepare a teacher work sample, discussing potential program improvements arising from survey responses related to planning, assessment, and student learning, which are components of a teacher work sample, also sharing student teachers' perceptions of their…

Keese, Nancy; Brown, Tammie

295

Take Action: Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle  

Science.gov (United States)

The Take Action column in the free, online magazine Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle suggests actions young people (K-grade 5) can take to reduce the impacts of climate change. The magazine examines the recognized essential principles of climate literacy and the climate sciences as well as the guiding principle for informed climate decisions.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

2011-09-01

296

Taking the Pressure Off Sports Competition  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available Taking the Pressure Off Sports Competition KidsHealth > Kids > Staying Healthy > Keeping Fit and Having Fun > Taking the Pressure Off Sports Competition ... or team does. Continue Why Do I Feel Pressure? Do you ever have "butterflies" in your stomach? ...

297

PREREQUISITES FOR SUCCESSFUL CAREER AS A TEACHER IN TECHNICAL INSTITUTES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teaching is a noble profession and a teacher plays an important role in society. In this modern world, we have well deviated from the “Gurukul” system of Indian teaching-learning process in educating our young mass. In order to cope with the rapid developments in the technological world and the education system, a technical teacher has to understand the system as a whole to play a pivotal role. In this paper, we present the attributes, characteristics and duties of a teacher for successful career in technical education, who takes up the profession by virtue of his/her interest not by compulsion. In addition, some suggestions have been highlighted to improvethe working condition for a teacher in technical institutes.

Dr. Akshaya Kumar Sabat,; Dr. Arun Kumar Ray

2011-01-01

298

Take-off and landing of aicraft  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this paper, the take-off and landing segments of an airplane trajectory are studied. The equations of motion for the ground run are derived and solved for distance. Then, specific formulas are obtained for the take-off ground distance and time and the landing ground distance and time. Transitions from take-off to climb and descent to landing are investigated so that take-off distance and landing distance and time can be estimated. The run distances and the run times for take-of and landing dependent of altitude, speed wing, temperature, the coefficient of rolling friction. In conformity with mathematical model, programs of calculation were elaborated. Also interfaces of calculations were elaborated for programs of calculation.

Vasile ISTRATIE; Nicolae APOSTOLESCU

2012-01-01

299

[Stress and burnout among Tunisian teachers].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Burnout, or professional exhaustion syndrome, is defined as a state of emotional, mental and physical exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress at work. Despite the fact that it is not a recognized disorder in the DSM-IV, burnout has been widely described among medical and paramedical staff. In Tunisia, all the studies about this syndrome have only considered populations of doctors. However, professional exhaustion syndrome is not only limited to the medical sector, but can also be seen in any profession involving a relation of help. Thus, the teaching profession seems to be concerned with this syndrome. In fact, in our clinical practice, we are increasingly confronted with teachers' suffering. The latter face increasing difficulties in their work and moreover some of them can no longer resist and thus become vulnerable to the professional exhaustion syndrome. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate burnout among a population of Tunisian teachers and to examine the professional stressors associated with teachers' burnout. METHODS: Our study was a transversal study conducted over five months (from October 2009 to February 2010) and it concerned teachers working in the public high schools of Manouba (Tunisia). The participants completed a self-questionnaire dealing with professional stressors. Five types of professional stressors were identified in the literature: bad working conditions, work overload, administrative difficulties, organizational factors and difficulties with pupils and their relatives. They were also explored by the scale of the burnout: the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which is the best-studied measurement of burnout in the literature. We used the French version of the MBI adapted to educational settings. It is a scale composed of 22 items and three dimensions: emotional exhaustion (nine items), dehumanization (five items) and reduced personal accomplishment (eight items). In our study, we considered a teacher was suffering from burnout when at least two among the three dimensions of this scale were pathological. RESULTS: From the total number of teachers working in public high schools of Manouba (n=876), only 398 teachers filled in our questionnaires. Hence the rate of participation was 45.4%. The mean age of those participants was 40.04 years. 52.3% of them were women (sex ratio=0.91) and the great majority was married (81.8%). The burnout syndrome was found in 21% of those teachers: Moderate professional exhaustion was found in 16.4% of cases and severe professional exhaustion was found in 4.6%. A high emotional exhaustion was found in 27.4% of cases. A percentage of 16.1 of participants had a high dehumanization and 45.5% of them were susceptible to reduced personal accomplishment. The majority of teachers (66.4%) declared being stressed at work. The professional stressors reported by the teachers were in decreasing order of rate: bad working conditions (80.3%), overload work (75.2%), administrative difficulties (70.4%), difficulties with pupils and their relatives (64.4%) and finally organizational factors (57.1%). In our study, we found a strong association between burnout syndrome among teachers and three types of professional stressors which were: bad working conditions (p=0.0017), administrative difficulties (p=0.005) and difficulties with pupils and their relatives (p=0.005). The organizational factors and the work overload were not associated with the burnout syndrome. CONCLUSION: The job of teaching accumulates many difficulties. Some Tunisian teachers cannot tolerate this professional stress and develop a burnout. This syndrome leads to a teachers' psychological distress with the risk of an increase in absenteeism at work. So, we hope that this study will give rise to future research on stress, coping and burnout among Tunisian teachers, with theoretical aims as well as practical applications to prevent and reduce the risk of this problem.

Chennoufi L; Ellouze F; Cherif W; Mersni M; M'rad MF

2012-12-01

300

Supporting Teachers in Identifying Students' Learning Styles in Learning Management Systems: An Automatic Student Modelling Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

In learning management systems (LMSs), teachers have more difficulties to notice and know how individual students behave and learn in a course, compared to face-to-face education. Enabling teachers to know their students' learning styles and making students aware of their own learning styles increases teachers' and students' understanding about…

Graf, Sabine; Kinshuk; Liu, Tzu-Chien

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

How to Be a Wise Consumer of Coaching: Strategies Teachers Can Use to Maximize Coaching's Benefits  

Science.gov (United States)

|Instructional coaching is gaining popularity as a school-based effort to increase teacher effectiveness and student achievement. A coach can be broadly defined as a person who works collaboratively with a teacher to improve that teacher's practice and content knowledge, with the ultimate goal of affecting student achievement. By its very nature,…

Yopp, David; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Heidema, Clare; Mitchell, Arlene; Sutton, John

2011-01-01

302

The Effect of Visual Performance Feedback on Teacher Use of Behavior-Specific Praise  

Science.gov (United States)

This study evaluated the effects of visual performance feedback (VPF) on teacher use of behavior-specific praise. In addition to receiving individual VPF, teachers participated in group consultation focused on increasing competence in the use of behavior-specific praise. Three general education elementary teachers and six students participated in…

Reinke, Wendy; Lewis-Palmer, Teri; Martin, Emma

2007-01-01

303

Beyond Induction: The Continuing Professional Development Needs of Early-Career Teachers in Scotland  

Science.gov (United States)

Continuing professional development (CPD) for teachers in Scotland, as in many other countries worldwide, is receiving increased attention. Within the Scottish context, a gap in the CPD framework had been identified for early-career teachers who have completed the induction year but are not yet eligible to embark on the Chartered Teacher

Kennedy, Aileen; McKay, Jane

2011-01-01

304

Reducing Teacher Isolation  

Science.gov (United States)

This workshop presentation from the 2006 PTEC Conference covers issues of mentoring new physics teachers. Mentee needs, strategies for successful mentoring programs, and examples are included in the discussion.

Freeland, Dale; Olsen, Julia

2006-10-02

305

TSC Information for Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

... the development of the child’s Individual Education Plan (IEP), parents, teachers, and other professionals will determine the ... with Disabilities Education Act 2004 What is an IEP (Individualized Education Program)? Transitioning from School to Community ...

306

India. Rajasthan adopts new strategy in teacher training.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the State of Rajasthan, there are about 100,000 teachers working in remote places. Training this large number of teachers in population education is always tedious, time consuming and expensive. To be able to reach and train these teachers working in primary schools without extra effort, time and money, the State Institute of Educational Research and Training (SIERT) adopted a new approach for this purpose. The approach makes use of the block level administrative approach in Rajasthan, where the monthly pay is distributed at various pay centers in the block. Every month, about 50-60 teachers gather at each pay center to collect their salaries. These teachers also take this opportunity to spend some time to learn new academic information and solve their problems. The SIERT took this opportunity of group meetings by presenting lectures or talks on population education to these teachers. Experts were invited from the District Institute of Education and Training to give lectures on various topics such as concepts and needs for population education; teaching, strategies and organization of co-curricular activities and discussion on the textual material in the Hindi language and environmental education for primary school students. So far, these talks had been arranged at 150 pay centers covering around 7500 teachers in the year 1993. PMID:12345765

1994-01-01

307

India. Rajasthan adopts new strategy in teacher training.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In the State of Rajasthan, there are about 100,000 teachers working in remote places. Training this large number of teachers in population education is always tedious, time consuming and expensive. To be able to reach and train these teachers working in primary schools without extra effort, time and money, the State Institute of Educational Research and Training (SIERT) adopted a new approach for this purpose. The approach makes use of the block level administrative approach in Rajasthan, where the monthly pay is distributed at various pay centers in the block. Every month, about 50-60 teachers gather at each pay center to collect their salaries. These teachers also take this opportunity to spend some time to learn new academic information and solve their problems. The SIERT took this opportunity of group meetings by presenting lectures or talks on population education to these teachers. Experts were invited from the District Institute of Education and Training to give lectures on various topics such as concepts and needs for population education; teaching, strategies and organization of co-curricular activities and discussion on the textual material in the Hindi language and environmental education for primary school students. So far, these talks had been arranged at 150 pay centers covering around 7500 teachers in the year 1993.

1994-01-01

308

Novas tecnologias na educação: transformações da prática pedagógica no discurso do professor = New technologies in education: changes in the pedagogical practice according to teacher’s speech  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta os resultados de uma pesquisa que investigou as percepções de um grupo de professores sobre possíveis transformações ocorridas em suas práticas pedagógicas após terem participado do Curso de Formação Continuada ‘Introdução à Educação Digital’, evento promovido pelo Programa Nacional de Formação Continuada em Tecnologia Educacional - Proinfo Integrado e desenvolvido pelo Núcleo de Tecnologia Educacional - NTE de Itajaí, Estado de Santa Catarina. Os dados foram coletados mediante a aplicação de dois questionários denominados de pré-curso e pós-curso. Os resultados apontaram que, após a participação no referido curso, ocorreram mudanças na prática pedagógica, com incremento no uso técnico-pedagógico do computador e introdução dos recursos mais avançados. A pesquisa, contudo, também revelou que o número de professores que usam o computador nas atividades com os alunos é ainda pequeno e este uso restringe-se aos laboratórios de Informática das escolas.This paper presents the results of a research which examined the perceptions of a group of teachers about the changes occurred in their pedagogical practices after taking part in the course called ‘Introduction to the Digital Education’ promoted by the Continued Formation National Program in Educational Technology – Integrated Proinfo and developed by the Educational Technology Center – NTE in Itajaí, Santa Catarina State, from 2008 to 2009. The data were collected through the application of two surveys calted pre-course and post-course. The results pointed out that after participating in the course some changes happened in the teacher´s pedagogical practice with an increase in the technical and pedagogical use of the computer and the inclusion of more advanced sources. Nevertheless the research also showed that the number of teachers who use the computer in student´s tasks is still small and this use is restricted to the school computer labs.

Suênia Lino Molin; André Raabe

2012-01-01

309

The Training of Teachers in a Society of Information and Communication  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article is focused on the impact of the information and communication society on the teacher and teaching. The contemporary society requires a new type of culture and civilization. The teacher training must redefine itself according to the new standards of society and students’ needs. The teacher should be able to create a learning context in which students can develop active and constructive processes of acquiring knowledge and skills that stimulate students to set their goals and take responsibility for their own learning activities and processes. The constructivist paradigm can help the teacher to assume the new role.

Mihaela Voinea

2009-01-01

310

Parents’ and Teachers’ Opinions about the School Food Policy in Belgian Flemish Nursery Schools  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The partnership of parents, teachers, and schools is necessary to develop effective school food interventions. To gather parents’ and teachers’ opinions and perceptions about the school food policy, 884 parents and 70 teachers of preschoolers completed a questionnaire. School food policy is an issue of importance for parents and teachers: the majority agrees that schools should restrict the availability of snacks and soft drinks; however, to replace fruit juice and sugared milk drinks with sugarless alternatives will take special effort. Fruit is not always available at school, although parents would appreciate it. Parents of lower educational level are in general more permissive.

Carine Vereecken; Hilde van Houte; Veerle Martens; Isabelle Wittebroodt; Lea Maes

2009-01-01

311

Study Guide for Teacher Certification Test for Media Specialists.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study guide is designed for individuals preparing to take the Georgia Teacher Certification Test (TCT) for media specialists. It provides two kinds of information--narratives and bibliographic references. Content objectives are covered for the areas of: (1) management and organization; (2) personnel administration; (3) instruction and…

Smith, Jane Bandy

312

How Do Teachers Use Textbooks: A Review of the Literature.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a striking contrast between the kinds of questions asked in developing countries about how teachers use textbooks and those asked in the United States. Research in developing countries stems largely from interest among World Bank staff-taking the...

J. Moulton

1997-01-01

313

Article Reprints from "The Computing Teacher" on Software Evaluations.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reprinted from the "The Computing Teacher," this collection of nine articles presents information on computer software selection and evaluation. The articles include: (1) "The DISC Model for Software Evaluation and Support Material Design" (Shelley Yorke Rose and Carol Klenow); (2) "Selecting Computer Software--We Take It Seriously" (Jean Donham);…

International Council for Computers in Education, Eugene, OR.

314

Students' Cognitive Style and Their Ratings of Their Teacher's Effectiveness.  

Science.gov (United States)

The cognitive style of 107 college juniors taking an education class at the University of Nebraska was measured using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the Inquiry Mode Questionnaire, and the Conflict Mode Questionnaire. The subjects' evaluation of teacher's competency was measured by the Teaching Analysis of Students questionnaire. Generally,…

Kagan, Dona M.; Tixier y Vigil, Yvonne

1987-01-01

315

Motivation innovation future teacher  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article is devoted to the study of motivation innovation of future teachers. The study was conducted at the Faculty of Philology and the Faculty of Physical Education and Safety CSPU. We used data from a survey 247 students of 4–5 courses, the aim of which was to study the motives that impel prospective teachers to engage in innovative activities.

Vera Elagina; Elena Nemydraya

2013-01-01

316

Lava Layering: Teacher Page  

Science.gov (United States)

This is the Teacher Page of an activity that teaches students about the stratigraphy of lava flows produced by multiple eruptions. This page has background information on lava flows (with an emphasis on the Moon), recipes for the play dough required for the activity, and questions for the teacher to ask. The procedures for this activity can be found on the Student Page. This activity is part of Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Volcanology section.

317

Wind Energy Teachers Guide  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This guide, created by the American Wind Association, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is a learning tool about wind energy targeted toward grades K-12. The guide provides teacher information, ideas for sparking children's and students' interest, suggestions for activities to undertake in and outside the classroom, and research tools for both teachers and students. Also included is an additional resources section.

anon.

2003-01-01

318

Methods for Marine Ecosystems Research through the Use of PDAs with Preservice Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Science teachers are charged with the task of providing students in grades K-12 with opportunities that will enable them to make sense of science and develop habits of mind. One goal of science education is to prepare well-rounded citizens who are scientifically literate. Through inquiry-based learning, students formulate questions, perform investigations, and construct new understandings. It is important for preservice science teachers to be introduced to current techniques, discoveries, and debates in the field of science. The use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) can provide K-12 students with increased opportunities for exploring and learning through scientific investigations. In order for these devices to be successfully integrated into classroom instruction, changes in teaching methodologies must be adopted. This paper presents a model lesson that can be used to guide preservice teachers in the use of PDAs for studying a marine ecosystem. The field experience takes place on the shoreline of Long Island Sound at Stratford Point, in Stratford Connecticut.

Antoinette Bruciati; Maria Lizano-DiMare

2005-01-01

319

Training of Adult Education Teachers : Experiences from a teacher training programme in cooperative learning  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The background of the study was that a group of teachers should develop competences in order to apply a new pedagogical approach, cooperative learning (CL), in a skilled manner. The total competence development process included theoretical knowledge about the method, practical training in its use, and ongoing and extensive coaching related to the teachers' experiences of implementing CL. It was assumed that the competence development process would result in a higher usage of CL as well as an increasingly professional and more reflected application of the teaching method over the year. The results from the study, as indicated by the teachers’ completed logs, and supplemented by the data from the focus group interviews, show a different picture. Two months into the project, the teachers were using CL on a large scale. The average level of their use did not increase during the academic year. By two months into the course, teachers already perceived themselves as being able to apply the method. They also reported that their skills were developed further during the course. They found that they became better at solving educational challenges, that they became more satisfied with their own teaching, and that they were better able to solve the problems deriving from the heterogeneous composition of the student group. The data thus documents measurable but limited developments in the teachers competences after the first two month.

Wahlgren, Bjarne

320

Learning to Foster Autonomy: The Role of Teacher Education Materials  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increased appreciation of the interrelationship between learner autonomy and teacher autonomy, both in the classroom and in the self-access centre. One obvious impact on learners’ autonomy is their teachers’ understanding of what autonomy means, and their ability to implement it in the classroom. Especially for beginning teachers, knowledge of learner autonomy is likely to be shaped in large part by the professional training they receive and the amount of attention given to the topic during their teacher education. It is therefore important to ask to what extent teacher training courses prepare teachers for fostering autonomy, including those teachers working in self-access centres. This study attempts to answer that question by critically investigating a range of popular teacher training course materials widely used in professional programmes worldwide. We apply an evaluative framework to identify 1) what information teachers are given about learner autonomy, and 2) the extent to which the materials cover the teaching of different skills for independent learning. Perhaps surprisingly, despite the growing interest in autonomy, it was found that the selected books included almost no information about learner autonomy at all and did not, with one or two minor exceptions, focus on the development of skills for supporting autonomous learning.

Hayo Reinders; Cem Balcikanli

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

The perceptions of teachers and school principals of each other's disposition towards teacher involvement in school reform  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english Worldwide teachers are faced with the task of continuously facilitating and implementing educational reform that has been designed without their participation. This exclusion of the key agents, who must mediate between the change agenda and actual change in the classroom, from the planning and decision-making processes, is detrimental to educational reform. Although school-based management has recently emerged as the instrument to accomplish the decentralisation of decisi (more) on-making powers to school level, the success thereof depends largely on school principals' disposition regarding teacher involvement. It is argued that the expectation of principals regarding their own leadership role, as well as the professional role teachers should fulfil, is a primary determinant of principals' willingness to involve teachers in responsibility-taking processes outside the classroom. The results from an empirical investigation revealed that principals' perception, of the wishes of teachers regarding involvement, significantly underestimated teachers' actual involvement wishes. Likewise, the expectation of teachers regarding the willingness of principals to involve them was a significant underestimation of the involvement level principals are actually in favour of. These misperceptions probably discourage actual school-based management and could jeopardize the implementation of educational reform in general.

Swanepoel, Cassie

2008-02-01

322

The perceptions of teachers and school principals of each other's disposition towards teacher involvement in school reform  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Worldwide teachers are faced with the task of continuously facilitating and implementing educational reform that has been designed without their participation. This exclusion of the key agents, who must mediate between the change agenda and actual change in the classroom, from the planning and decision-making processes, is detrimental to educational reform. Although school-based management has recently emerged as the instrument to accomplish the decentralisation of decision-making powers to school level, the success thereof depends largely on school principals' disposition regarding teacher involvement. It is argued that the expectation of principals regarding their own leadership role, as well as the professional role teachers should fulfil, is a primary determinant of principals' willingness to involve teachers in responsibility-taking processes outside the classroom. The results from an empirical investigation revealed that principals' perception, of the wishes of teachers regarding involvement, significantly underestimated teachers' actual involvement wishes. Likewise, the expectation of teachers regarding the willingness of principals to involve them was a significant underestimation of the involvement level principals are actually in favour of. These misperceptions probably discourage actual school-based management and could jeopardize the implementation of educational reform in general.

Cassie Swanepoel

2008-01-01

323

Reading Rockets: Literary Resources for Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

The Reading Rockets site (est. 2001) has worked with hundreds of partners to create content for teachers who seek to fine-tune their approach to teaching reading and literacy. The For Teachers section includes links to blogs written by literacy experts such as Dr. Joanne Meier, and a most effective How To area with sections such as "Find the right book level," "Set up a classroom library," and "Find free or low-cost books." An important section of this site is dedicated to Struggling Readers, and features helpful topical essays like âÂÂTutoring,â "Target the Problem!", and "Put Downs & Comebacks.â Be sure to take a look at the site's collection of widgets for news headlines, teaching resources, books, and quality blogs about reading and related matters.

2012-01-01

324

Assessing Teachers' Needs for Environmental Education Services  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes a case in which a needs assessment was conducted by graduate students in the Environmental Education Program Development course at the University of Florida. This assessment served to provide guidance for program improvement to the Crown Region Environmental Education Service Project (RSP), and to provide students with experience in developing tools and designing strategies to conduct program evaluations. The assessment consisted of focus groups and a mass mailing of surveys. It indicated that teachers hold positive attitudes toward environmental education (EE), include elements of citizenship and action-taking in their definition of EE, but have relatively little contact with the RSP. Teachers' perspectives on EE also differed widely as a function of the school administration and educational philosophy.

Monroe, Martha

325

Age, CEO Succession, and Risk Taking  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available CEO successions are major corporate events with the potential to change corporate direction.  We investigate risk-taking following CEO succession and whether age affects CEO succession.  In 679 CEO successions occurring between 1992 and 2005 in 650 small, medium and large-cap North American firms, we find that, except when the predecessor CEO was forced to leave, successor CEOs tend to entrench the status quo in terms of age. Board age has implications for corporate risk taking, with older boards being associated with less firm risk taking.

Eahab Elsaid; Nancy D Ursel

2012-01-01

326

The Perceptions In Respect To The Education Projects In Province Of The Teachers’ In Charge Of The Elementary Schools  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nowadays, there are important events such as the black board replaced by the smart board, the textbooks replaced by tablet computers and a dazling speed of change occured in education process. But, it has been seen that all of these changes could be succeded by the all stakeholders’ heart and brain power and theirs the strong believes in change. Change is taking place so quickly, the teachers named the actors of the education scene, how they share their point of change and, most importantly believe in the necessity of change? In this study, we have tried to find out the answers to questions mentioned above. As a result, we tried to ascertain the perceptions about education change efforts of teachers served in primary schools. In the study, the general survey model named descriptive research method was conducted. The frequency and percentage values were used in the resolution of data. The differences of teachers’ gender, seniority, academic background, branch were compared by T-test; seniority, branch, academic background were compared by one factor variance analysis form (ANOVA) and multi dimensional comparing was used by Scheffe method. According the result of research, the teachers have seen themselves open to the change efforts. They have thougt that Increasing The Success In Education Project In Sakarya (ISEPS) and other projects were usable, resultable and had the tendecy to increase the success in education. However they have pointed out that, the change efforts were not planned, their opinions were not taken and there were difficulty to study on more than one project at the same time. They explained that these attitudes mentioned above prevented the change efforts in education. There have been meaningful diffirence among the teachers’ seniority, the realization level of project and ISEPS, the motivation and communication levels.

Özlem Hilal ÖRGEV

2012-01-01

327

Daughters Taking Over the Family Business : A Gender Analysis  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper investigates the succession process as perceived and lived by daughters taking over the family business, with a gender perspective. Despite the rich literature on the succession process in family firms, few studies use a gender approach, though an increasing number of ventures are launche...

Constantinidis, Christina; Cornet, Annie

328

Alzheimer's Research Takes a New Turn  

Science.gov (United States)

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alzheimer's Research Takes a New Turn Study suggests that ... 2013) Tuesday, August 13, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Page Alzheimer's Disease TUESDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A protein ...

329

Taking Exams (Black Box Software Testing classes)  

Science.gov (United States)

This subset of the Black Box Software Testing collection includes lecture videos, slides, suggested readings, and study questions focusing on skills needed for Taking Exams - especially answering essay questions.

Kaner, Cem; Fiedler, Rebecca L.

2011-06-01

330

Get Moving! Take Charge of Your Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... PDF files require the free Adobe Acrobat Reader Get Moving! Take Charge of Your Health Be active ... your friends for other fun, lively challenges. Top Get the facts! Weight-control Information Network Check out ...

331

Don't Take This with That!  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Contents Menu Resources for You Special Features - Don't take this with that! Grapefruit causes problems when ... bushel of problems. How it does or doesn’t work Depending on the active ingredient, grapefruit can ...

332

Don't Take This with That!  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Special Features - Don't take this with that! Grapefruit causes problems when taken with certain medications Sometimes ... ain’t worth the squeeze…especially when combining grapefruit with medicines. While it can be part of ...

333

Bacteria Take the Path of Least Resistance  

Science.gov (United States)

... 05-109Bacteria Take the Path of Least Resistance Findings may lead to new nano-devices and ... closer to the porous surface experience less resistance and thus move faster. "Because of E. coli's ...

334

Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks  

Science.gov (United States)

... Subscribe Love Your Heart Take Steps To Reduce Heart Risks February is American Heart Month—a time to ... and addressing your personal risk.” To tackle your heart risk factors, it helps to know your numbers. Ask ...

335

Taking the Pressure Off Sports Competition  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... usually takes a team effort to win the game. What all sports competitions have in common is ... high school teams get nervous before a big game. Even professional players feel nervous sometimes! Feeling a ...

336

Erectile Dysfunction and Diabetes: Take Control Today  

Science.gov (United States)

Erectile dysfunction Basics In-Depth Multimedia Expert Answers Resources What's New Reprints A single copy of this article may be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Erectile dysfunction and diabetes: Take control today By Mayo Clinic ...

337

Take Caution When Bats Are Near  

Science.gov (United States)

... Favorites Delicious Digg Google Bookmarks Take Caution When Bats Are Near Bats play an important role in ... safe when bats are near. Diseases Spread by Bats Several highly fatal diseases have been linked to ...

338

Steps You Can Take to Prevent Cancer  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

This podcast discusses the main steps people can take to reduce their risk of getting cancer.  Created: 2/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/2/2012.

2012-02-02

339

77 FR 25829 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska...Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska...noise generated from the proposed marine seismic survey, these are low...

2012-05-01

340

78 FR 37209 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...  

Science.gov (United States)

...RIN 0648-XC564 Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska Correction In notice document 2013-14188 appearing on pages 35851-35874...

2013-06-20

 
 
 
 
341

78 FR 22095 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Replacement of the...  

Science.gov (United States)

...fisheries; incidental take and intentional kills during commercial fish harvests; subsistence take; entanglement in marine debris; disease; pollution; and harassment. Steller sea lions are also sensitive to disturbance at rookeries...

2013-04-12

342

Stroke thrombolysis in patients taking dabigatran.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Stroke thrombolysis is becoming a common practice in Australian and New Zealand hospitals. There are no established guidelines for thrombolysis of patients who are taking dabigatran, and accurate medication reconciliation may not be possible. Patients with normal activated partial thromboplastin time are unlikely to have clinically significant dabigatran concentration in the blood. For safest outcomes, we suggest incorporating thrombin time assay for acute stroke patients suspected to be taking dabigatran.

Jayathissa S; Gommans J; Harper P

2013-07-01

343

Take home maintenance medication in opiate dependence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Opiate-dependent patients can be given several days' worth of maintenance medication to take home. We studied whether the patients chosen to receive take home maintenance medication met the criteria that were published in the guidelines of the German Medical Association. These include, among other things: abstinence from additional consumption of heath-endangering substances, psychosocial reintegration, completion of the switch from illegal narcotics to the substitute maintenance medication, and clinical stabilization. METHODS: In this study, data were obtained by questionnaire over the period from May to October 2011 from patients of all 20 psychiatric hospitals and all 110 physicians' practices with licenses to provide opiate maintenance medication in Berlin, Germany. RESULTS: 986 (19.9%) of the 5032 patients taking opiate medication answered the study questionnaire; 956 gave information about the frequency with which they received medication. 365 of these 956 patients (38.2%) reported having received take home medication. Among them, 197 (56.0%) said that they additionally consumed health-endangering substances, compared to 388 (69.9%) of those who received maintenance medication every day (p<0.0001). Lower rates of additional consumption among recipients of take home maintenance medication were also found for each of the substances heroin, cocaine, and benzodiazepines (p<0.0001 for each). Patients receiving take home medication more commonly indicated that they were employed and tended to have been in the maintenance program longer than patients receiving maintenance medication every day (p<0.0001 for each question). Clinical stabilization, i.e., improvement of mental and physical health, was reported in equal measure by patients who were and were not receiving take home medication. CONCLUSION: The patient questionnaire reveals that most patients receiving take home maintenance medication meet the criteria specified in the guidelines of the German Medical Association.

Gutwinski S; Bald LK; Heinz A; Müller CA; Schmidt AK; Wiers C; Bermpohl F; Gallinat J

2013-06-01

344

Motivating English Language Teachers through Job Enrichment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Hackman's (1987) job characteristics model of work motivation is described and applied to English language teaching, with concrete recommendations made on the basis of Hackman's action principles for job design. The approach results in teacher opportunities for long-term growth, career advancement, increased self-actualization, and empowerment.…

Pennington, Martha C.

1992-01-01

345

Psychopathy and Risk Taking among Jailed Inmates.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Several clinical descriptions of psychopathy suggest a link to risk taking; however the empirical basis for this association is not well established. Moreover, it is not clear whether any association between psychopathy and risk taking is specific to psychopathy or reflects shared variance with other externalizing disorders, such as antisocial personality disorder, alcohol use disorders, and drug use disorders. In the present study we aimed to clarify relationships between psychopathy and risky behavior among male county jail inmates using both self-reports of real-world risky behaviors and performance on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), a behavioral measure of risk taking. Findings suggest that associations between externalizing disorders and self-reported risk taking largely reflect shared mechanisms. However, psychopathy appears to account for unique variance in self-reported irresponsible and criminal risk taking beyond that associated with other externalizing disorders. By contrast, none of the disorders were associated with risk taking behavior on the BART, potentially indicating limited clinical utility for the BART in differentiating members of adult offender populations.

Swogger MT; Walsh Z; Lejuez CW; Kosson DS

2010-04-01

346

An Evaluation of the Questions Chemistry Teachers Asked in Exams in Terms of the Target Behaviors  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The measurement and evaluation constitute an important part of science education. Therefore, it is particularly important that teachers have sufficient knowledge about the measurement and evaluation in terms of quality of education. In this study, to what extent the questions chemistry teachers used in the examinations reflected the target behaviors in the chemistry learning program in high schools and which criteria the teachers used in determining the examination questions were investigated. For this purpose, the questionnaire and document analysis were conducted. 389 examination questions were gathered from 14 chemistry teachers. In addition, a questionnaire consisting of 15 open-ended items related to measurement tools they used and quality of the questions in these tools was administered to the teachers. Results showed that the teachers in the sample group did not have sufficient knowledge on the measurement and evaluation and did not take into consideration the target behaviors.

Gökhan Demircio?lu; Hülya Demircio?lu

2009-01-01

347

Portuguese-language high school teacher programme extends its reach to South America and Africa  

CERN Multimedia

From 5 to 10 September, a record 75 teachers from Portugal, Brazil, Mozambique, Angola, São Tomé and Cape Verde will take part in the Portuguese-language high school teacher programme at CERN.   The group of Portuguese-sepaking teachers who visited CERN in 2009. CERN usually focuses on the Member States when organizing its national teacher programmes, providing them with additional return on their investment in the Laboratory by helping to train and inspire the next generation of scientists. However, Portugal’s Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), through the Agency Ciência Viva, has taken the initiative to go beyond the borders of Portugal and include other countries that speak Portuguese. Last year there were 60 participants in the programme, including 11 teachers from Brazil and 5 from Mozambique. This year brings even more teachers from more African co...

Carolyn Lee

2010-01-01

348

The language teacher as go-between  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In a world of increased multilingualism and multiculturalism, foreign languageteachers seem to be challenged to be less authoritative transmitters of linguisticor pragmatic knowledge, than mediators between various identities, discoursesand worldviews. This article attempts to define the challenges and the paradoxesin language teacher education, suggests a way of conceptualizing such an educa-tion in the multilingual/multicultural environments we live in today, and exam-ines on a concrete example how a view of the language teacher as a go-betweencan lead to a more democratically oriented foreign language education.

Claire Kramsch

2004-01-01

349

Globalization and paradigm changes in Teacher Education: Revolutionizing Teaching Learning Process at School Level in Pakistan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The world has become a global village. No county can live in isolation without seeking impact of global trends and a change in all field of life education is the most important tool in national development. So this age of knowledge has great impact on education. Teacher education is the brain of all educational disciplines as it delivers education to train the prospective teachers. It is also the mother of all professions. Like all other professions, globalization is also affecting teacher education. Therefore there is a global paradigm shift in teacher education. The main purpose of this study was to explore the paradigm shift in teacher education which has revolutionized teaching learning process at school level. The teacher education programs of five public universities of Pakistan where focused to fulfill the objectives of the study. The study was quantitative as well as qualitative in nature. Information regarding shift paradigm in teacher education were gathered by conducting self administered surveys, document analysis and interviews. Sample of the study comprised of prospective teachers, working teachers and executives (directors and heads).total 100 prospective teahers, 50 working teachers and 20 executives were selected by using random sampling techniques, collected data was analyzed by implementing simple descriptive statistical techniques such as percentages. The main paradigm changes in teacher education in perception of the selected respondents were: increase in duration of teacher education programmes, standard based curriculum, balance in theory and practice, shift from teacher to student centered delivery system, quality assurance and shift in assessment procedures.

Muhammad Iqbal; Muhammad Irfan Arif

2011-01-01

350

Reading strategy instruction and teacher change: implications for teacher training  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available I report on teacher change in the context of a reading strategy instruction intervention. Reading Strategy Instruction (RSI) was implemented by three teachers, new to the concept, over a period of 15 weeks. Observations of these teachers showed that a multitude of factors affect the uptake of RSI as part of everyday teaching practice, and that teachers seem to move through distinct phases in their uptake of RSI. The article focuses on teachers' reaction to RSI and highlights a number of issues that are important to the implementation of RSI, not the least of which is that a clear need exists for changes to in-service teacher training and support and pre-service teacher training. In an effort to address these training issues the article contains specific recommendations for pre-service teacher training in particular.

Nanda M Klapwijk

2012-01-01

351

Reading strategy instruction and teacher change: implications for teacher training  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english I report on teacher change in the context of a reading strategy instruction intervention. Reading Strategy Instruction (RSI) was implemented by three teachers, new to the concept, over a period of 15 weeks. Observations of these teachers showed that a multitude of factors affect the uptake of RSI as part of everyday teaching practice, and that teachers seem to move through distinct phases in their uptake of RSI. The article focuses on teachers' reaction to RSI and highlig (more) hts a number of issues that are important to the implementation of RSI, not the least of which is that a clear need exists for changes to in-service teacher training and support and pre-service teacher training. In an effort to address these training issues the article contains specific recommendations for pre-service teacher training in particular.

Klapwijk, Nanda M

2012-01-01

352

How Professional Development, Teacher Satisfaction and Plans to Remain in Teaching are Related: Some Policy Implications  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Each year, thousands of teachers become dissatisfied with teaching and leave theprofession. In a climate of increasing demands for qualified teachers, stemming this flow wouldbe immensely helpful. This report discusses the findings of a survey of teachers in a large city inthe Southwestern United States that suggest that the usefulness of professional developmentactivities can influence teacher satisfaction and plans to remain in teaching. Based on theseresults, policy makers should look to enhancing professional development as a key strategy ininfluencing teacher satisfaction and commitment.4How Professional Development, Teacher Satisfaction andPlans to Remain in Teaching are Related: Some Policy ImplicationsMore than one quarter of the teachers who left the profession, according to a recent study,did so because they were dissatisfied, and approximately 7% of teachers do leave the professioneach year (Henke, Choy, Chen, Geis, Alt, & Broughman, 1997). That kind of loss po...

Jay Parkes; Joseph J. Stevens

353

Approaches to Building Teacher-Parent Cooperation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the areas of cooperation inwhich parent and teacher expectations were the same and where they differed. Data were obtained from a sample of 55 randomly selected primary schools. We analyzed school-to home communications, parentalinfluence on school decisions, and parent involvement in different school activities. At the same time, we also explored building cooperation among the teachers, students, and their parents, within the framework of the program ‘Reading and Conversation’. The findings indicated that the third- and ninth- grade lead teachers were mostly in agreement about the importance of parent involvement and as such represented a fairly homogenous group. The third-grade lead teachers were more open about actual involvement of parents in instruction than their ninth-grade colleagues, who were more cautious and restrained. In contrast to the lead teachers who represented a relatively narrow professional group, parents’ views were much more diverse. Parental education was the best predictor of their readiness to become involved in the life and work of their children’s school. Whether the area in which the families lived was urban or suburban did not make any difference. The evaluation of the one-year ‘Reading and Conversation’ programme revealed increases in parents’motivation to collaborate with the school as a consequence of the program’s approach to work, as well as improvement in mutual relationships and dialogue.

Franc Cankar; Tomi Deutsch; Sonja Sento?nik

2012-01-01

354

Restructuring Teachers' Work  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Despite repeated attempts to reform schools, teachers' work has remained surprisingly stable. The purpose of this study was to investigate implementation of a state-funded restructuring initiative that intended broad changes in teachers' professional roles. Sponsors of the founding legislation reasoned that changes in teachers' roles would contribute to higher student achievement. This study examined the question of whether and how this program of comprehensive whole-school change promoted changes in teachers' roles in school governance, collegial relations, and the classroom. Further, the study traced the relationship of these changes to one another, and weighed the likelihood that they had the capacity to affect core educational practices. Theoretically, this study is situated in the available literature on teachers' collegial relations; participation in shared decision making; and classroom roles, relationships and practice. Three elementary schools served as the sites for intensive qualitative data collection completed over a two-year period. The schools differed in geographic location (two urban, one rural), but all enrolled a racially, ethnically and linguistically diverse population of students, and more than half of the students in each school qualified for free or reduced price lunch. The study resulted in multiple types and sources of data on teachers' professional roles, including: observations in classrooms, collegial interactions, and governance situations; interviews with teachers (including teacher leaders), parents, administrators, and students; and documents pertaining to the restructuring plans and process. Findings show that changes in the three areas were achieved unevenly in the three schools. All three schools introduced changes in classroom practice and roles, ranging from the adoption of multi-age classrooms to more modest innovations in curriculum or instruction. In only one case were changes in professional roles outside the classroom organized to support and sustain classroom changes. Two of the three schools introduced changes in staff organization (teacher teams) and leadership (governance committees), but under-estimated the professional development and other supports that would in turn support changes in classroom practice. Altogether, it appears unlikely that the observed changes in professional roles were sufficiently well established and connected to affect core educational practice in the long run.

Lisa Kirtman

2002-01-01

355

Healthy lifestyle in teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: The role of individual healthy behaviors like physical activity, nutrition and stress management on reduction of rate of disease mortality and morbidity is well known. The aim of this study is to determine healthy life style in teachers employed in district No.4 in Isfahan, Iran, in 2010. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants of this cross-sectional study were 96 teachers in district No. 4, selected via random sampling method. The data collection was performed using a questionnaire including demographic healthy lifestyle questions. Analysis of the data was performed through Software SPSS version 18. RESULTS: The mean age of the subjects was 40.26 ± 6.05 years and, BMI mean was 25.08 ± 3.20. 96.8% of them were married and 3.1% also were single. 1% of the teachers had a weak lifestyle, 13.5%had moderate, 85.4% had a good lifestyle. In terms of nutrition, 2% of the teachers had a weak lifestyle, 23% moderate, 74% good. 76% in terms of physical activity, 29.2% smoking and 21.9% stress had a weak lifestyle. CONCLUSION: According to the results, planning for teachers in school for receiving information about healthy lifestyle is important.

Pirzadeh A; Sharifirad G; Kamran A

2012-01-01

356

Fuel Cells in Transportation: Teacher's Guide  

Science.gov (United States)

This teacher's guide will provide useful for classes learning about the future of renewable energy for transportation. Specifically, this classroom unit looks at fuel cells. This unit should take anywhere from 1-4 class periods to complete. Students will learn the components of a fuel cell, understand how the technology works, learn how thermodynamics apply to fuel cells, and learn the larger implications of how transportation affects air quality. A student worksheet section is included in the materials. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

2012-07-30

357

Recognising and Developing Urban Teachers: Chartered London Teacher Status  

Science.gov (United States)

Chartered London Teacher (CLT) status is a unique scheme designed by London Challenge to recognise and reward teachers' achievements and provide a framework for professional development. As well as having the prestige of being a Chartered London Teacher for life, educators receive a one-time payment of 1,000 British pounds from the school budget…

Bubb, Sara; Porritt, Vivienne

2008-01-01

358

Narrative Construction of Professional Teacher Identity of Teachers with Dyslexia  

Science.gov (United States)

|This paper considers the development of teachers' professional identity in the context of educators that have diverse backgrounds. We elucidate how teachers with dyslexia working in tertiary education use narrative resources to construct and negotiate their professional teacher identities. The analysis of narrative interviews, interpreted within…

Burns, Eila; Bell, Sheena

2011-01-01

359

Teacher Beliefs and Teacher Behaviour in Portfolio Assessment  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study concerns the relation between teachers' beliefs towards teaching behaviour and their actual teaching behaviour in teacher portfolio assessment. We analysed the beliefs and behaviour of 18 teachers as described in their portfolios. In addition, each portfolio was independently assessed by two trained raters on eight content standards…

van der Schaaf, Marieke F.; Stokking, Karel M.; Verloop, Nico

2008-01-01

360

Teacher Induction: Implications for Physical Education Teacher Development and Retention  

Science.gov (United States)

Data show that 46% of all teachers in public schools will leave the profession within their first 5 years of teaching (Ingersoll, 2003). These data refer to teachers from all disciplines including physical education. To address these problems school districts have developed teacher induction programs that show promising results. Our literature…

Banville, Dominique; Rikard, G. Linda

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
361

Preservice Teachers: Teacher Preparation, Multicultural Curriculum and Culturally Relevant Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

This study is part of a larger study that uses mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative methods) to investigate preservice teachers' knowledge and understanding of multiculturalism and to prepare preservice teachers to work in diverse classrooms. The results indicate two findings: 1) that preservice teachers come from homogeneous backgrounds;…

Hopkins-Gillispie, Delphina

2009-01-01

362

Standard operating procedures for taking a sexual history.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: While there is evidence of increased professional and public awareness of sexual problems, both male and female sexual dysfunctions remain underdiagnosed and undertreated by health care professionals around the world. Health care professionals (HCPs) are typically reluctant, disinterested, or unskilled in sexual problem management and regrettably are often disinclined to inquire about sexual issues. HCPs in all countries receive variable, nonstandardized, or inadequate training in sexual history taking and its treatment. AIM: This article presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) for taking a sexual history from men or women with sexual problems or performance concerns. METHODS: Review of relevant evidence-based literature identified through a PubMed search, integrated with expert opinion. RESULTS: Guidelines for taking a sexual history are presented along with the relevant domains, opening and follow-up questions. CONCLUSIONS: The SOP presented in this article offers HCPs a brief, structured, and uniform method for obtaining a sexual history from men or women seeking health care services. Sexual history taking should be based on three basic principles, which serve as the foundation for managing sexual problems in men and women. These include the following: (i) a patient-centered approach; (ii) evidenced-based diagnostic and treatment recommendations; and (iii) use of a unified management approach for men and women. Sexual history taking should always be conducted in a culturally sensitive manner, taking account of the individual's background and lifestyle, status of the partner relationship, and the clinician's comfort and experience with the topic. Sexual inquiry should be incorporated into all new patient encounters, when possible, if only to ask one or two broad questions such as the following: "Are you sexually active? Do you have any sexual concerns or problems you would like to discuss?" Sexual history taking is a cornerstone of sexual medicine clinical practice. All patients should be provided an opportunity for frank and open discussion of sexual issues or concerns, conducted in an atmosphere of sensitivity and respect.

Althof SE; Rosen RC; Perelman MA; Rubio-Aurioles E

2013-01-01

363

ChemTeacher: Composition Stoichiometry  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Composition Stoichiometry page includes resources for teaching students about composition stoichiometry.

2011-01-01

364

ChemTeacher: Atomic Radius  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Atomic Radius page includes resources for teaching students about trends in atomic radius.

2011-01-01

365

ChemTeacher: Charles' Law  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Charles' Law page includes resources for teaching students about the history and applications of Charles' Law.

2011-01-01

366

ChemTeacher: Dalton's Law  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Dalton's Law page includes resources for teaching students about the history and applications of Dalton's Law.

2011-01-01

367

ChemTeacher: Avogadro's Law  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Avogadro's Law page includes resources for teaching students about the history and applications of Avogadro's Law.

2011-01-01

368

ChemTeacher: Boyle's Law  

Science.gov (United States)

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Boyle's Law page includes resources for teaching students about the history and applications of Boyle's Law.

2011-01-01

369

A Dynamic Demand-Supply Model for Elementary School Teachers in Taiwan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Ministry of Education needs to exercise long-term planning and control over teacher human resources. Teacher education policies determine teacher quality and affect the quality of education, which in turn weakens the national competitive edge. If teacher education policies change, a series of dynamic effects takes place. The supply and demand for Taiwan elementary school teachers in particular, while being governed by other factors such as teacher education policies, government budgets, education reform, and birthrates, iscontingent on the long-term planning and stability of teacher labor force, and is therefore a problem worthy of investigation. This study analyzes the history of teacher education,birthrates, and the excess supply of elementary school teachers. System dynamics is used as a methodology, proceeding from the perspective of system thinking to investigating the structure of the Taiwan elementary school teacher demand-supply system. A dynamic model is presented to explicate how the system operates. The System Dynamics model isalso used to implement trend simulation for government policy making. The implications of this model are also discussed.

Chih-Tung Hsiao; Hui-Ling Peng; Bruce Chien-Yuh Lee

2009-01-01

370

Teachers' Domain: Breathing Blue  

Science.gov (United States)

This 3-minute video demonstrates chemical reaction as a presenter exhales into "bromothymol blue", a chemical indicator for acids and bases. His breath releases carbon dioxide, which acidifies the solution and changes it from a bright blue color to yellow-green. Resource also includes teacher's guide and assessment. Editor's Note: In a chemical reaction, properties of the original substances change as new substances with different properties are formed. The molecular structure of the substances is altered irreversibly. This video is part of "Lessons in Matter and Energy" by WOSU Public Media. See related materials for a link to the full collection, also available for iTunes viewing. Teachers' Domain is a growing collection of more than 1,000 free educational resources compiled by researchers and experienced teachers to promote the use of digital resources in the classroom.

2011-06-23

371

Teachers: The vision supported  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A support system is necessary to implement the vision of standards-based science education. The National Science Resources Center has studied isolated areas where innovations have succeeded and finds that the successful enterprises have these elements in common: 1. The availability of high-quality, inquiry-centered science curriculum units that are appropriate for children; 2. Teacher education programs to prepare and support elementary teachers to teach hands-on, inquiry-centered science; 3. Support systems for supplying science materials and equipment to teachers; 4. Assessment methods for evaluating student performance that are consistent with the goals of an effective science program; and, 5. Administrative and community support for an effective science program.

Tuomi, J.

1994-12-31

372

Patrimony and the evolution of risk-taking.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The propensity to make risky choices has a genetic component, and recent studies have identified several specific genes that contribute to this trait. Since risk-taking often appears irrational or maladaptive, the question arises how (or if) natural selection favors risk-taking. Here we show, using a stochastic simulation of selection between two hypothetical species, "R" (risk-seeking) and "A" (risk-averse) that, when expected reproductive fitness of the individual is unaffected by the making of the risky choice (winnings balanced by losses) natural selection (taken to the point of extinction) favors the risk-averse species. However, the situation is entirely reversed if offspring are permitted to inherit a small fraction of the parent's increased or decreased fitness acquired through risk-taking. This seemingly Lamarckian form of inheritance actually corresponds to the human situation when property or culture are transmitted in families. In the presence of this "cultural inheritance", the long-shot risk-taking species was overwhelmingly favored, even when 90% of individuals were rendered sterile by a losing choice. Given this strong effect in a minimal model, it is important to consider the co-evolution of genes and culture when interpreting the genetics of risk-taking. This conclusion applies, in principle, to any species where parental resources can directly affect the fecundity of offspring. It might also be relevant to the effects of epigenetic inheritance, if the epigenetic state of zygotes can be affected by parental experiences.

Stern MD

2010-01-01

373

Perspective taking in children's narratives about jealousy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study explored relationships between perspective-taking, emotion understanding, and children's narrative abilities. Younger (23 5-/6-year-olds) and older (24 7-/8-year-olds) children generated fictional narratives, using a wordless picture book, about a frog experiencing jealousy. Children's emotion understanding was assessed through a standardized test of emotion comprehension and their ability to convey the jealousy theme of the story. Perspective-taking ability was assessed with respect to children's use of narrative evaluation (i.e., narrative coherence, mental state language, supplementary evaluative speech, use of subjective language, and placement of emotion expression). Older children scored higher than younger children on emotion comprehension and on understanding the story's complex emotional theme, including the ability to identify a rival. They were more advanced in perspective-taking abilities, and selectively used emotion expressions to highlight story episodes. Subjective perspective taking and narrative coherence were predictive of children's elaboration of the jealousy theme. Use of supplementary evaluative speech, in turn, was predictive of both subjective perspective taking and narrative coherence.

Aldrich NJ; Tenenbaum HR; Brooks PJ; Harrison K; Sines J

2011-03-01

374

The academic writing of teacher candidates: Connecting speaking and writing.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents a small-scale study that examines the relationship between spoken and written discourse among master’s level teacher candidates at an urban American university. It analyzes the writing of teacher candidates before and after the introduction of a student-centered, group interaction methodology, the Nominal Group Technique. Some of the specific areas assessed are the relationship between what students said in their groups and what they wrote in essays, interaction dynamics among teacher candidates in groups, observer perceptions of group behaviors, and teacher candidates’ perceptions of writing performance before and after the intervention. The study also assesses teacher candidates’ essays (N=9) and compares them to the essays of a control group (N=8). A significant increase in scores is noted from pretest to posttest after the treatment. Reaction to the class experience was largely positive. Pedagogic implications arising from findings are considered together with some tentative pointers toward future research.

Kennedy, E.

2007-01-01

375

Distance Learning and Teacher Education in Botswana: Opportunities and Challenges  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper reports on a study at Molepolole College of Education (MCE) involving teachers and tutors in the Diploma in Primary Education (DPE) program by distance mode, an in-service program aimed at upgrading academic and professional qualifications of primary school teachers in Botswana. The study sought to understand the level of access and the challenges faced by teachers and tutors. Data was collected through in-depth interviews, survey, and document analysis. Findings showed that teachers should be enrolled in the program at a younger age, and issues that lead to delays in completion must be addressed. The paper recommends that the Ministry of Education (MOE) hire full-time tutors to support teachers at their bases, provide resources for practical subjects, organize workshops to familiarize tutors with appropriate strategies for adult learners, increase the duration of residential sessions, explore the use of alternative instructional technologies, and institute regular customer evaluations.

Anne L Sikwibele; Judith K. Mungoo

2009-01-01

376

TEACHER OF ENGLISH NEEDED  

CERN Multimedia

Part-time teacher of primary English needed for September 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before 8 July. English National Programme, Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire.

2002-01-01

377

Teacher of primary English  

CERN Document Server

Part-time teacher of primary English needed for September 2003 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply see http://enpferney.org/staff_vacancies.htm English National Programme, Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire (http://enpferney.org/)

2003-01-01

378

Teachers' Domain: The Atom  

Science.gov (United States)

This Flash interactive activity explores atomic structure at a pace that middle school students can easily understand. It contains 26 animated pages that depict the atomic nucleus and the three primary subatomic particles: electrons, protons, and neutrons. It was designed to give learners a taste of the particles' properties, such as charge and mass, without introducing advanced terminology. Teachers' Domain is a growing collection of more than 1,000 free educational resources compiled by researchers and experienced teachers to promote the use of digital resources in the classroom.

2011-07-24

379

Teachers' Domain: Heat Transfer  

Science.gov (United States)

This item is an interactive Flash animation for Grades 5-8 on the topic of heat. Users explore methods of heat transfer and classify examples from everyday life. Three methods of heat transfer are depicted: conduction, convection, and radiation. Teachers' Domain is an NSF-funded pathway of the National Science Digital Library (NSDL). It is a growing collection of more than 1,000 free educational resources compiled by researchers and experienced teachers to promote the use of digital resources in the classroom.

2008-10-21

380

Bank Capital and Risk-Taking  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

51Introduction 72 Existing models of bank risk-taking 93 Endogenous capital: one bank 114 Endogenous capital: steady-state industry equilibrium 195 Implications for regulatory policy 236 Robustness and further work 247 Conclusion: capital reserves as self-insurance 27Appendix A Diagrammatic exposition of existing literature 29Appendix B Mathematical derivations 33Appendix C Variation of parameter values 38References 45AbstractWe study bank risk-taking and capitalisation in a continuous timemodel with closed-form solution, assuming uncertain cash #ow, randomregulatory audit and a constraint on equity issue. Capital reserves arebuilt up towards a desired level as an insurance against the threat ofliquidation. Risk-taking is a discontinuous function of the level ofcapital. We solve in steady-state for the liquidation rate andinvestigate the determinants of charter value. Minimum capitalstandards have little long-term impact on behaviour. Audit frequencyis the princ...

Alistair Milne; A Elizabeth Whalley

 
 
 
 
381

Information Literacy for Future Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to evaluate primary teacher education programs in Croatia. Prior to evaluation of the primary teacher education programs, expected primary teacher education competencies were defined. The expected teacher competencies were determined according to the goals stated in the Croatian national curriculum. In addition, international guidelines for information literacy development among primary education teachers were used. An extensive literature review on information literacy curriculum in teacher education higher education was conducted as a part of this study. The evaluation of primary teacher education programs is conducted according to the content analysis methodology. Since current primary teacher education programs do not state learning outcomes, future teacher competences are evaluated according to the state course goals. The content analysis indicates that the majority of the current primary teacher education programs include goals that could be linked to information literacy standards. Future teachers are most frequently taught how to evaluate information, but lack instruction on fair use of information. The discussion includes recommendations to raise information literacy among teacher educators and to align course syllabi with the common theoretical frameworks.

Ivana Batarelo Koki?

2012-01-01

382

Difficulties of Alternatively Certified Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This daily diary study followed, over a 2-week period, 252 beginning New York City public school teachers. Seventy percent were alternatively certified (New York City Teaching Fellows) and the rest, traditionally certified teachers. Alternatively certified teachers were more likely to experience stressors such as violent incidents and classroom…

Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Feinman, Samantha J.

2012-01-01

383

Becoming a Teacher of Mathematics  

Science.gov (United States)

For many years I have engaged future mathematics teachers in activities that focus on emotional dimensions of their learning. Even those teachers who were able to reconstruct themselves as learners of mathematics had difficulties with changing their practice. Through a series of autobiographical stories, I examine my own experiences as a teacher

Pereira, Peter

2005-01-01

384

Becoming-Teachers: Desiring Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This article proposes a reading of the lives of teachers through a Deleuzian-Guattarian materialistic approach. By asking the question "what kind of life do teachers live?" this article reminds us that teachers sometimes welcome the imposed policies, procedures and programmes, the consequences of which remove them from students. This desire is…

Mercieca, Duncan

2012-01-01

385

Teacher Retention: An Appreciative Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

Nationally, the problem of teacher retention compounds the unstable nature of the educational situation, especially in urban, high-needs schools. Much of the instability of urban schools is due to teacher movement, the migration of teachers from school to another school within or between school districts, particularly from high-needs schools.…

Pesavento-Conway, Jennifer Jean

2010-01-01

386

Teachers-Problems-Teachers' Problems: What is Considered as a Problem, among the Main Teacher Activities, by Hungarian Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper is about a research focusing on recent problems of Hungarian teachers. The aim of the study is to reveal the real troubles of Hungarian pedagogues, on the basis of their answers to a questionnaire, the nature of these problems and how they affect the role of the teacher. Supposedly, the nucleus of the problems of the teachers is…

Mrazik, Julianna

2009-01-01

387

Teacher Flexibility in Mathematical Discussion  

Science.gov (United States)

The significance of discussion in mathematics classes has been prominently debated in the research literature. Different studies have stressed the importance of teacher flexibility in orchestrating the discussion. We introduce an operational definition of teacher flexibility. In a case study with one secondary-school mathematics teacher, we…

Leikin, Roza; Dinur, Sariga

2007-01-01

388

Military Deployments: Evaluating Teacher Knowledge  

Science.gov (United States)

This mixed method study examined the possible influence of a military deployment online tutorial on teacher knowledge. DoDEA and public school teachers were the two groups used for the study. From this exploratory study, the researcher also wanted to explore if teachers would find professional development provided in an online tutorial relevant…

Thomas, Richard M.

2011-01-01

389

"I've Really Learned a Lot, But...": Cross-cultural Understanding and Teacher Education in a Racist Society.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes a cross-cultural course offered by the Faculty of Education at the University of Regina (Saskatchewan, Canada) to develop preservice teachers' understanding of aboriginal cultures, taking data from instructors' experiences and student narratives. The paper discusses the lack of understanding in white preservice teachers' views of self…

Finney, Sandra; Orr, Jeff

1995-01-01

390

Experienced Middle School Science Teachers' Assessment Literacy: Investigating Knowledge of Students' Conceptions in Genetics and Ways to Shape Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Using a framework of assessment literacy that included teachers' view of learning, knowledge of assessment tools, and knowledge of assessment interpretation and action taking, this study explored the assessment literacy of five experienced middle school teachers. Multiple sources of data were: teachers' predictions about students' ideas, students' written and verbal responses to assessment tasks, teacher background questionnaire, and a videotaped teacher focus group. We investigated middle school teachers' predictions, interpretations, and recommended actions for formative assessment in genetics. Results documented a variety of ways that teachers would elicit students' ideas in genetics, focusing on discussion strategies. Findings showed how well teachers predicted student conceptions compared to actual student conceptions. We also found that teachers mostly described general topics they would use to address students' alternative conceptions. Less often, they explained specific content they would use to challenge ideas or pedagogical strategies for conceptual change. Teachers also discussed barriers to addressing ideas. Teacher professional development should provide more support in helping teachers close the formative assessment cycle by addressing conceptions that are elicited with assessments.

Gottheiner, Daniel M.; Siegel, Marcelle A.

2012-08-01

391

Teachers’ Creativity in Posing Statistical Problems from Discrete Data  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Choosing a quality problem in mathematics is a challenge for many teachers. Teachers cannot rely on textbooks for good problems. They have to be able to pose their own problems in order to promote mathematical thinking among students. This study was conducted to explore the creativity of 175 teachers in terms of fluency, flexibility, and originality in posing statistical problems. Participants consisted of secondary school teachers from twenty schools in Peninsular Malaysia. Teaching experience was ranged from 1 to 33 years. The features of the problems posed by these teachers were also studied. The participants were provided a stimulus, which was a set of ungrouped discrete data, and they were asked to pose as many problems as they could. The posed statistical problems were supposed to promote mathematical thinking and to increase students’ understanding. Findings showed that participants were able to pose a total of 270 (74%) statistical problems within the time given. The mean of the creativity score was 11.08 (s.d. = 6.76). Analysis showed no significant difference in creativity between gender and the value of t = –.346, p = .73, where p > .05. Analysis showed significant differences in the teachers’ creativity scores for three groups of teachers: F (2172) = 6.83, p = .001, p < .05.The results also showed that 115 (31.5%) posed problems focuses on the statistical content measure of central tendency. The study provided expo- sure to the teachers to pose problems that can trigger students’ thinking in solving statistical problems.

Effandi Zakaria; Faridah Salleh

2012-01-01

392

Teacher competences required for developing reflection skills of nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: This paper is a report of a study in senior secondary vocational education designed to develop a framework for teacher competences to support nursing students in developing their reflection skills. BACKGROUND: For healthcare-related professions such as nursing, there is a growing attention for developing reflection skills. Little is known about teacher competences required to support the development of reflection skills in nursing students. Developing a framework of teacher competences can contribute to filling up this gap. These competences are described in 91 indicators distributed over six task domains. METHODS: A Delphi study was conducted in the first half year of 2008 to get consensus on a framework of teacher competences required for creating the learning environment needed for developing reflection skills in nursing students. Experts judged teacher competences on a seven-point Likert-type scale. FINDINGS: In the first round, mean scores on the teacher competences were already high. Minor revisions were needed. In the second round, mean scores increased, whereas standard deviations decreased in round 2 compared with round 1. These changes were statistically significant. Coaching was seen as most important task domain. CONCLUSION: Consensus has been reached on teacher competences to be used in nursing education to develop students' reflection skills. The framework of competences may be a source for curriculum development concerning reflection skills and for teacher training programmes to coach nursing students' reflections.

Dekker-Groen AM; van der Schaaf MF; Stokking KM

2011-07-01

393

Tracking the Career Paths of Physics Teachers in Texas  

Science.gov (United States)

In Texas, and some other states, there is a documented shortage of physics teachers, in terms of both number and qualifications.1 The shortage in Texas is due as much to teachers leaving the field (attrition) as to a lack of teachers entering. There are efforts under way to prepare more and better-qualified physics teachers who will stay in the field longer,2 but increasing the overall supply and retention will not necessarily address localized teacher shortages. To investigate this issue, we obtained a database cataloging every teacher who taught science in Texas public schools from 2003 to 2008, indicating the school where they taught during each of those years, the subjects they taught, and their route to certification. This allowed us to track not only teachers entering and leaving the public school system, but also migration between schools within the system. We found that migration poses a much bigger problem than attrition for some schools. We also found patterns in the movement of physics teachers in Texas that we would not necessarily have predicted and that varied substantially depending on certification.

Mount, Jennifer; Marshall, Jill; Fuller, Edward

2013-10-01

394

Taking St John's wort during pregnancy.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available QUESTION: A 23-year-old patient of mine has been taking St John's wort for postpartum depression for about 2 years. She is now planning her second pregnancy. Is she or her fetus at risk if she continues to take the herbal therapy? ANSWER: Despite the widespread availability and use of St John's wort and extensive research on the herb, there are almost no data on reproductive safety. At this stage, therefore, St John's wort cannot be recommended as safe therapy during pregnancy.

Goldman RD; Koren G

2003-01-01

395

Professional Partnerships: Supporting the Preparation of Pre-Service Teachers Through a Tiered Online Mentoring System  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The University of Maryland University College’s (UMUC) Department of Education developed a program to increase achievement of secondary school students and increase retention of Master of Arts in Teaching Program (MAT) pre-service teacher candidates entitled, “Professional Partnerships”. “Professional Partnerships” is a tiered system of support that promotes stakeholder success by providing online mentoring to pre-service teacher candidates from master mentor teachers. The master mentor teachers were provided with web conferencing workshops and online mentoring in the use of technology tools, The goals of the program are based upon the Redesign of Teacher Education and a research based framework that strengthens partnerships with local school districts to include: improvement of secondary student achievement, enhancement of instruction provided by teacher candidates and in-class teachers through the use of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) content as a tool for instruction, improvement, assessment, and communication within the global educational community.

Barbara Schwartz-Bechet; Arhonda Gogos

2011-01-01

396

Influences of Teacher Preparation Program on Preservice Science Teachers’ Beliefs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teacher preparation program is routinely make decisions regarding the best pedagogical methods from field experience studies, it can alter students’ understandings about academic content and some characteristics through professional practices. This study tries to investigate the extent to which individuals learning to be teachers feel what preservice teachers are capable of performing the pedagogical practices. Sixty seven preservice science teachers were described the influences of teacher preparation. Results indicated that preservice teachers enrolled in professional experiences courses perceived themselves as less capable of performing persuasive pedagogical practices than more generally accepted practices. In addition, preservice teachers perceived they were more capable of altering students’ knowledge about content than at modifying their beliefs about content. Implications for research and practice are forwarded.

Prasart Nuangchalerm; Veena Prachagool

2010-01-01

397

On College English Teacher’s Training and Creativity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the interpretations of the term “teacher”, as well as the implications for course content and design, and for the formal qualifications that might be thought appropriate for a “teacher”. It also discusses some problems existing in college English teachers themselves in China, and then calls for the urgent need for teacher training. The teacher plays a very important role in ELT (English Language Teaching) and ELL (English Language Learning). Therefore, if we want to apply creativity teaching in ELT, the first and most important thing to do is arouse the teachers’ creativity. The teachers themselves should try to improve their quality and use some teaching strategies to better their teaching effect and should also have creative mind to arrange active tasks and activities to arouse students’ interests and to cultivate their creativity.

Shuying An

2011-01-01

398

Itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing: practices and preparation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Increasing numbers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing are receiving their education in general education settings with special education support from an itinerant teacher. However, previous research indicates that the majority of teacher preparation programs do not provide training on the itinerant teaching model or set up field experiences for preservice teachers as an itinerant teacher. The purpose of this study was to survey a national sample of itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing to learn about their practices, preparation, perceptions, and the students they serve. Results, recommendations, and suggestions for future research are provided.

Luckner JL; Ayantoye C

2013-01-01

399

Itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing: practices and preparation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Increasing numbers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing are receiving their education in general education settings with special education support from an itinerant teacher. However, previous research indicates that the majority of teacher preparation programs do not provide training on the itinerant teaching model or set up field experiences for preservice teachers as an itinerant teacher. The purpose of this study was to survey a national sample of itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing to learn about their practices, preparation, perceptions, and the students they serve. Results, recommendations, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:23515459

Luckner, John L; Ayantoye, Catherine

2013-03-20

400

La formación docente: entre la indiferencia y la seducción/ Teacher?s edification: between indifference and seduction  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Este escrito constituye una reflexión teórica sobre la formación docente que ofrecen nuestros centros universitarios. Para abordar el análisis de los planes de formación docente es necesario partir del concepto de formación que subyace en ellos. Una vía de análisis, la constituyen la revisión de los fundamentos epistemológicos que sustentan la organización curricular de esos planes, y el examen, por esa ruta, de las consecuencias de las lógicas que dominan la (more) organización del conocimiento y los saberes mediante las disciplinas académicas (asignaturas). Además, este ejercicio puede servir para reflexionar acerca de la formación docente frente a los retos y desafíos que plantea una concepción curricular basada en la inter y transdiciplinariedad de los saberes como formas de interpretar la realidad desde la totalidad. Abstract in english This paper builds a theoretical reflection on the teacher?s edification offered by our universities. In order to target teacher?s edification plans, it is important start from the concept of edification underneath them. An analysis to take into account is the revision of the epistemological basis supporting the curricular organization of such plans, and on the same line, an examination of the logical consequences dominating knowledge and knowing organization through the (more) academic disciplines (subjects). Plus, this exercise can be helpful when reflecting on teacher?s education when facing the challenges presenting a curricular conception based on the inter and trans-disciplinarity of knowledge as ways of interpreting reality from entirety.

Ruiz Morón, Deyse; Peña, Pablo

2006-03-01

 
 
 
 
401

Burnout and effort-reward imbalance improvement for teachers by a manual-based group program.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: We developed a manual-based psychological group program aimed at teachers and focussing on their professional relationships. The intervention comprised ten sessions over a 10-month period. The aim of the program was to strengthen teachers' health. We investigated whether the effects of our intervention, during which the MBI and ERI were applied, result in general alleviation of occupational stress experienced by teachers. METHODS: This is a randomized controlled trial. All teachers (N = 2,484) of two school types (grammar schools and secondary modern schools) in 3 districts of southwestern Germany were invited to take part in our program. All teachers declaring their interest (N = 337) in the intervention were included in the project. They were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (N = 171) or to the control group (N = 166). RESULTS: We found that teachers who participated in at least 50% of the program benefited from this short intervention. Significant improvement was achieved on the two MBI scales, Emotional Exhaustion and Personal Accomplishment, as well as on the ERI subscale Appreciation. CONCLUSION: Teachers' occupational stress level may be decreased by taking part in a short manual-based psychological group intervention that focuses on more effective handling of interpersonal problems in school. Therefore, teachers should receive support and guidance in developing the appropriate skills necessary to cope with stress appropriately.

Unterbrink T; Pfeifer R; Krippeit L; Zimmermann L; Rose U; Joos A; Hartmann A; Wirsching M; Bauer J

2012-08-01

402

Autobiography: Inspiring new visions of teacher learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this article is to broaden the tradition of autobiography by using it as a way in which teachers can identify sources of inspiration in their educational experience. In the process, my aim is to make explicit the links between autobiography, learning and meta learning. Extending autobiographical inquiry to include different levels at which learning takes place serves to highlight the importance not only of the individual context of learning (the private self), but also the possibility of learning and constructing meaning from autobiography in dialogue with others. This article identifies four levels of learning-how-to-learn from autobiography. These levels are: 1. learning from autobiographical writing; 2. learning through intergenerational dialogues; 3. developmental learning through the career stages; and 4. whole group co-constructive learning. My ultimate goal is two fold. Firstly, to use these levels of learning to identify operational definitions of inspiration based on significant events and experiences in teacher’s personal stories. Secondly to identify a meta research orientation for linking autobiography with learning and meta-learning.

Irene Simon

2006-01-01

403

Teachers’ Use of Technology and Constructivism  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Technology has changed the way we teach and the way we learn. Many learning theories can be used to apply and integrate this technology more effectively. There is a close relationship between technology and constructivism, the implementation of each one benefiting the other. Constructivism states that learning takes place in contexts, while technology refers to the designs and environments that engage learners. Recent efforts to integrate technology in the classroom have been within the context of a constructivist framework. The purpose of this paper is to examine the definition of constructivism, incorporating technology into the classroom, successful technology integration into the classroom, factors contributing to teachers’ use of technology, role of technology in a constructivist classroom, teacher’s use of learning theories to enable more effective use of technology, learning with technology: constructivist perspective, and constructivism as a framework for educational technology. This paper explains whether technology by itself can make the education process more effective or if technology needs an appropriate instructional theory to indicate its positive effect on the learner.

Abbas Pourhosein Gilakjani; Lai-Mei Leong; Hairul Nizam Ismail

2013-01-01

404

Math Teacher's Survival Guide Practical Strategies, Management Techniques, and Reproducibles for New and Experienced Teachers, Grades 5-12  

CERN Multimedia

Classroom-tested strategies to help new and experienced math teachers thrive: Math teachers must not only instruct their students in basic mathematical skills and concepts, they must also prepare them for standardized tests, provide instruction in the use of technology, and teach problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. At the same time, they must also manage their other responsibilities â€" taking attendance, planning, grading, record-keeping, disciplining, and communicating with parents and administrators. This book provides efficient and practical information on the management skills n

Muschla, Judith A; Muschla, Erin

2010-01-01

405

Teachers Supporting Future Teachers: A Critical Part of Early Childhood Teacher Preparation  

Science.gov (United States)

A high-quality field experience is a fundamental part of early childhood teacher preparation where teachers-in-training observe, develop, and practice critical teaching skills and dispositions in early childhood classrooms. Many teachers welcome extra assistance in the classroom but do not know how to provide hands-on training to aspiring early…

Korth, Byran B.; Baum, Angela C.

2011-01-01

406

Taking a good look at the competition.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Among the steps to take in conducting a focused analysis of your competitors: Assess your market clout and understand who your competition is. Determine how important your core service area is to your competitors. Tap intelligence networks within your own organization.

Krentz SE; Camp T

2008-11-01

407

Disentangling Adolescent Pathways of Sexual Risk Taking  

Science.gov (United States)

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors aimed to describe the pathways of risk within sexual risk taking, alcohol use, and delinquency, and then identify how the trajectory of sexual risk is linked to alcohol use and delinquency. Risk trajectories were measured with adolescents aged 15-24 years (N = 1,778). Using…

Brookmeyer, Kathryn A.; Henrich, Christopher C.

2009-01-01

408

Taking a good look at the competition.  

Science.gov (United States)

Among the steps to take in conducting a focused analysis of your competitors: Assess your market clout and understand who your competition is. Determine how important your core service area is to your competitors. Tap intelligence networks within your own organization. PMID:18990838

Krentz, Susanna E; Camp, Tracey

2008-11-01

409

Haematological emergencies on the acute medical take.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As haematological emergencies are uncommon in daily clinical practice, enhanced awareness and high index of suspicion is required to ensure that the potentially lifesaving measures are offered. This article discusses some of the haematological conditions which may present on the acute medical take.

Myers Senior K; Mahmood MM; Alfitori G

2007-01-01

410

What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

2007-01-01

411

Executive board composition and bank risk taking  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Little is known about how socioeconomic characteristics of executive teams affect corporate governance in banking. Exploiting a unique dataset, we show how age, gender, and education composition of executive teams affect risk taking of financial institutions. First, we establish that age, gender, an...

Berger, Allen N.; Kick, Thomas; Schaeck, Klaus

412

A Study on Pre-service English Teachers’ Self - efficacy Beliefs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The construct of teacher efficacy has been explored by a number of researchers in recent years. Teachers’ efficacy beliefs are regarded as an important criterion in increasing the productivity and motivation during the teaching and the learning process and in defining the general framework of the requirements of the teaching profession. Consequently, teacher education programs have great responsibility for shaping the self-efficacy beliefs of pre-service teachers. The purpose of this study was to explore pre-service English teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs. Another purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of some variables (gender, perceived academic achievement, grade level, department preference and the attitude of the faculty as perceived by the pre-service teachers) upon self-efficacy of pre-service English teachers. Data in this study were collected from a total number of 353 pre-service English teachers (263 girls, 90 boys) enrolled in teacher education programs of the two selected universities in Turkey. Teacher self-efficacy scale (Kan, 2007) and information sheet which was developed by the researcher were utilized in the study. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis H tests were used to data regarding the sample. Data analysis indicated that pre-service English teachers generally expressed positive efficacy beliefs regarding English language teaching profession. At the same time, results showed that pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy differentiated according to perceived academic achievement and grade level.

Gül?ah KÜLEKÇ?

2011-01-01

413

Studying Teacher Moves  

Science.gov (United States)

In July 2011, Bill Gates told the "Wall Street Journal," "I'm enough of a scientist to want to say, "What is it about a great teacher?"" As a "practitioner" of sorts, the author has wondered the same thing for 15 years. The K-12 school sector generates little empirical research of any sort. And of this small amount, most is targeted to…

Goldstein, Michael

2012-01-01

414

Teachers and Operant Conditioning.  

Science.gov (United States)

|A survey was conducted of 406 elementary, middle, and secondary school teachers to determine their understanding, acceptance, and use of the principle of operant conditioning. The treatment of data was by percent and chi square analysis primarily according to sex, experience, degree, and position. Subjects reported that a) they believed that the…

Frey, Sherman

415

Air Pollution, Teachers' Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on air pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of air pollution and involves students in processes of…

Lavaroni, Charles W.; O'Donnell, Patrick A.

416

Recruiting Teachers in Colombia  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the author talks about a system of special schools in Colombia which introduces students to teaching careers as early as the 8th grade. The Colombian system is based on a simple idea: Every student is a potential teacher. Principals talk about molding "ciudadano-pedagogos"--citizen-educators who view teaching as a way of…

Blair, Robert

2009-01-01

417

Water Pollution, Teachers' Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

|One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on water pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of water pollution and involves students in processes of…

Lavaroni, Charles W.; And Others

418

Teacher's Guide for Earthworms.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This teacher's guide on earthworms includes four major sections: (1) introduction, (2) caring for earthworms in the classroom, (3) classroom activities, and (4) the appendix. The introduction includes information concerning grade level, scheduling, materials, obtaining earthworms, field study, classroom clean-up, and records. Caring for…

Bruno, Merle S.; And Others

419

Aviation. Teacher Resources.  

Science.gov (United States)

This teacher's guide contains information, lesson plans, and diverse student learning activities focusing on aviation. The guide is divided into seven sections: (1) "Drawing Activities" (Airmail Art; Eyewitness; Kite Power); (2) "Geography" (U.S. Airports); (3) "Information" (Aviation Alphabet; Glossary; Four Forces of Flight; What about Wind?;…

2001

420

Teacher as Prophetic Trickster  

Science.gov (United States)

There are a multitude of powerful cultural archetypes and images of the school teacher. These include nurturing caregiver, guardian of morality, champion of the global economy, self-sacrificing do-gooder, cultural worker, intellectual, tyrant, and many more metaphors. Jim Garrison's essay introduces another figure, a mythological persona, to the…

Garrison, Jim

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
421

Folklore for Foxfire Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses using folklore as a means of connecting classroom work to surrounding communities and the real world (a Foxfire "core practice"). Includes an overview of Foxfire history, folklore concepts, and activities for learning about folklore. Stresses the value of folklore for both teachers and students. Lists information resources and books…

Duncan, Barbara Reimensnyder

1993-01-01

422

PERSONALITY TRAITS OF ENGLISH TEACHERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The influence of a teacher cannot be replaced by textbooks, through moralizing or by a set of punishments and encouragements. The example set by a teacher and the influence of their personality are irreplaceable. A teacher’s work often has a far reaching, long term and suggestive impact on the development of a pupil’s personality, their behaviour and feelings. In our paper we try to describe some of the personality traits of English teachers in primary education in selected schools in the Czech Republic with the use of standardized psychological tests (quantitative method) and personal interview (qualitative method).

LENKA HRUŠKOVÁ

2013-01-01

423

First Year K-12 Teachers as High Leverage Point to Implement GEMS Space Science Curriculum Sequence  

Science.gov (United States)

The recurring challenge for curriculum developers is how to efficiently prepare K-12 classroom teachers to use new curricula. First-year teachers, numbering nearly 250,000 in the US each year, have the greatest potential to impact the largest number of students because they have potential to be in the classroom for thirty years. At the same time, these novice teachers are often the most open minded about adopting curricular innovation because they are not yet deeply entrenched in existing practices. To take advantage of this high leverage point, a collaborative of space scientists and science educators at the University of California, Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science and Center for Science Education at the Space Sciences Laboratory with experts from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the University of Wyoming, and the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education experimented with a unique professional development model focused on helping master teachers work closely with pre-service teachers during their student teaching internship field experience. The Advancing Mentor and Novice Teachers in Space Science (AMANTISS) team first identified master teachers who supervise novice, student teachers and trained these master teachers to use the GEMS Space Science Curriculum Sequence. Then, these master teachers were mentored in coaching interning student teachers assigned to them in using GEMS materials. Evaluation showed that novice teachers mentored by the master teachers felt knowledgeable after teaching the GEMS units. However, they seemed relatively less confident about the solar system and objects beyond the solar system. Overall, mentees felt strongly at the end of the year that they have acquired good strategies for teaching the various topics, suggesting that the support they received while teaching and working with a mentor was of real benefit to them. Funding provided in part by NASA ROSES AMANTISS NNX09AD51G

Slater, Timothy F.; Mendez, B. J.; Schultz, G.; Wierman, T.

2013-01-01

424

Knowledge and attitudes about school bullying in trainee teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Recent research has highlighted the issue of bullying in schools. However, little attention has been paid to the knowledge and beliefs of trainee teachers, who will hold a key position in reducing the problem of bullying in schools. AIMS: To determine (i) trainee teachers' beliefs about some aspects of school bullying; (ii) their recommended strategies for pupils to cope; (iii) their confidence in dealing with bullying issues as future teachers; (iv) the value of specific aspects of training; (v) the importance for these of sex, and primary/secondary training. SAMPLE: This comprised 270 students enrolled on either a one-year postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) course (N =197) or a four-year degree in education (BEd) course (N =73). Age ranged from 18-51 years (mean=28 years). METHODS: Questionnaire completed and returned within a 2-week period. RESULTS: Bullying was seen as an important issue. Some aspects of trainee teachers' knowledge of bullying were accurate, others less so. Telling teachers, and parents, were the strategies most highly recommended to pupils. The great majority were in favour of teacher training courses incorporating information regarding ways of combating bullying. However, they had less confidence about their ability to deal with bullying. Respondents expressed more confidence when dealing with victims rather than bullies and working with the parents of victims rather than the parents of bullies. CONCLUSION: It is important that teacher-training programmes incorporate information about school bullying, and are designed to take account of existing knowledge, and areas in which trainee teachers may feel less confident.

Nicolaides S; Toda Y; Smith PK

2002-03-01

425

Exploring the beliefs of persisting secondary science teachers in general induction programs: A longitudinal study  

Science.gov (United States)

Experienced, prepared, and fully certified teachers have been related with higher student achievement, but teacher retention has been a challenge for many decades, especially retention of secondary science teachers. In order to support teachers and student learning, it is critical to understand what impacts secondary science teachers' decisions to persist in the field. This mixed methods study explored whether teacher beliefs were related to persistence over a three-year period. Participants were beginning secondary science teachers that participated in general induction programs provided by their school or district. These participants were selected due to their representative nature of the average beginning secondary science teacher in the United States. Participants' responses to annual semi-structured interviews were the source of data. Findings from quantitative and qualitative analyses revealed that the persisting teachers' beliefs remained stable over the three-year period. Quantitative analyses also revealed that there were no prevalent beliefs among the persisting teachers, even when the variables of gender and socioeconomic status of their schools were considered. When persisting teachers' beliefs about teaching and beliefs about learning were quantitatively analyzed, no relationship was found. Case study of one persisting teacher and one non-persisting teacher revealed that personal experiences and knowledge impacted their beliefs about teaching and learning. The persisting teacher that participated in inquiry-based experiences held student-centered beliefs, while the non-persisting teacher that participated in verification-type experiences held teacher-centered beliefs. This study contributes to the field of science education by examining science teacher persistence instead of attrition. It focused specifically on secondary science teachers while exploring their beliefs longitudinally. Implications from this study calls for teacher beliefs to be challenged during the induction phase, proper placement of new teachers into their first teaching positions, and mentoring programs that address general and content-specific needs. In order to promote retention, further studies need to be conducted on factors that impact secondary science teacher persistence. Through promoting and supporting teacher persistence, we can increase student learning and assist students in becoming scientifically literate adults.

Wong, Sissy Sze-Mun

426

Manipulating Critical Thinking Skills in Test Taking  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Critical thinking ability is a difficult concept to define. It involves reasoning and active consideration of what is received rather than a forthright acceptance of the ideas. It has been argued that when the focus of testing is the examination itself, the critical thinking ability of the learners cannot be boosted. However, different types and formats of tests can engage the learners in an active critical thinking when they are appropriately prepared. In this paper some of these tests used in the literature and the way they engage the learners in critical thinking activities are explained. The paper concludes that different tests of language can be manipulated so that they can engage the learners in critical thinking activities. Implications for teachers and test developers are also provided.

Mansoor Fahim; Maryam Pezeshki

2012-01-01

427

Observing others' behavior and risk taking in decisions from experience  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper examines how observing other people's behavior affects risk taking in repeated decision tasks. In Study 1, 100 participants performed experience-based decision tasks either alone or in pairs, with the two members being exposed to each others' choices and outcomes. The tasks involved either equiprobable gains and losses or frequent small gains and rare large losses. The results indicated that, in both risk types, the social exposure increased the proportion of risky selection, but its effect was stronger in the rare-loss condition. In Study 2 the rare-loss task was administered to 32 study participants, with a target individual observing the choices of a paired individual. The results showed that observing others, rather than being observed, led to the pattern of increased risk taking. The findings of the two studies indicate the importance of distinguishing different types of risky situations and shed light on contradictory findings in the literature.

Eldad Yechiam; Meir Druyan; Eyal Ert

2008-01-01

428

Teachers' Beliefs and Teaching Beliefs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available On the premise that teacher education programs, with their emphasis on methods, are largely ineffective in improving current teaching practice, this paper examines ways teacher educators can change some of the beliefs of teachers and teacher candidates early in a program so as to optimize the impact of learning new teaching practices. Three central questions are addressed-what technologies are available to teacher educators for changing candidate beliefs, what ethics come into play concerning changing the beliefs of candidates, and what beliefs should we teach-and the problems posed for changing beliefs. The paper then explores the concept of "dispositions," suggesting that if teacher educators could conceptualize the problem as one of "weak dispositions" rather than one of "beliefs," many of the issues would disappear. Three possible dispositions are explored as goals for a teacher education program: knowledge, colleagueship, and advocacy.

James Raths

2001-01-01

429

Impact of grade separator on pedestrian risk taking behavior.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Pedestrians on Delhi roads are often exposed to high risks. This is because the basic needs of pedestrians are not recognized as a part of the urban transport infrastructure improvement projects in Delhi. Rather, an ever increasing number of cars and motorized two-wheelers encourage the construction of large numbers of flyovers/grade separators to facilitate signal free movement for motorized vehicles, exposing pedestrians to greater risk. This paper describes the statistical analysis of pedestrian risk taking behavior while crossing the road, before and after the construction of a grade separator at an intersection of Delhi. A significant number of pedestrians are willing to take risks in both before and after situations. The results indicate that absence of signals make pedestrians behave independently, leading to increased variability in their risk taking behavior. Variability in the speeds of all categories of vehicles has increased after the construction of grade separators. After the construction of the grade separator, the waiting time of pedestrians at the starting point of crossing has increased and the correlation between waiting times and gaps accepted by pedestrians show that after certain time of waiting, pedestrians become impatient and accepts smaller gap size to cross the road. A Logistic regression model is fitted by assuming that the probability of road crossing by pedestrians depends on the gap size (in s) between pedestrian and conflicting vehicles, sex, age, type of pedestrians (single or in a group) and type of conflicting vehicles. The results of Logistic regression explained that before the construction of the grade separator the probability of road crossing by the pedestrian depends on only the gap size parameter; however after the construction of the grade separator, other parameters become significant in determining pedestrian risk taking behavior.

Khatoon M; Tiwari G; Chatterjee N

2013-01-01

430

WEIGHTING OF STUDENTS’ PREFERENCES OF TEACHER’S COMPETENCIES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe the proposed methodology of identification of the students’ weights or preferences of teacher’s managerial competencies at the Faculty of Economics, Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague (CULS). The goal of this article is not to evaluate the teacher’s scientific ability but describe the evaluation of the teacher’s managerial competencies weights from students’ point of view. For setting of weights there are many different methods that varied in the proportion of including the subjective and objective judgement. Commonly diffused method is the Analytic Hierarchy or Network Process by prof. Saaty (AHP or ANP). Because it is not possible to see or to evaluate teacher’s competencies in complexity, we proposed the questionnaires for pairwise comparisons of various teacher’s managerial characteristics and competencies. These answers are then analysed using the AHP method. The AHP is a method deriving global weights from partial weights received as result of pairwise comparisons.

BROŽOVÁ, Helena

2011-01-01

431

Forming spiritual culture of future teachers of physical education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The necessity of forming spiritual culture of future teachers of physical education of musical rhythmic employments facilities is grounded. Is shown the necessity of construction of teaching and educational process of preparation future teachers on a basis of update and orientation of maintenance on development of culture of thought. A purpose, tasks, maintenance and method of teaching of course of ??????? and choreography, is certain. The special course is offered "Method of musical rhythmic employments at school". The special course is rendered by an assistance the increase of level of professional preparation of future teachers to the leadthrough musically-rhythmic employments on the lessons of physical culture at school.

Zolochevskiy V.V.; Roschenko O.O.

2010-01-01

432

Embracing Contraries: Combining Assistance and Assessment in New Teacher Induction  

Science.gov (United States)

Though induction literature traditionally recommends separating assistance and assessment, there has been growing recognition that assessment is integral to promoting and gauging teacher quality. This has led to increased interest in approaches to new teacher induction that meld support, development, assessment and accountability. This article provides images of mentoring from two well-regarded induction programs â the Peer Assistance and Evaluation Program in Cincinnati and the Santa Cruz New Teacher Project â that integrate assistance and assessment to promote quality teaching. This article highlights the possibilities and pitfalls of each approach.

Yusko, Brian; Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

2010-10-15

433

76 FR 39705 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Operation of Offshore...  

Science.gov (United States)

...also a potential for take by injury or mortality of ringed seals from ice road construction activities. Because of the slow speed of hovercraft and vessels used for Northstar operations, it is highly unlikely that there would be any take from...

2011-07-06

434

78 FR 61821 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; Harbor Porpoise Take...  

Science.gov (United States)

NMFS issues this final rule to amend the regulations implementing the Harbor Porpoise Take Reduction Plan (Plan). This rule revises the Plan by eliminating the consequence closure strategy enacted in 2010, based on deliberations by the Harbor Porpoise Take Reduction Team (Team). This action is necessary to prevent the improper triggering of consequence closure areas based on target harbor......

2013-10-04

435

75 FR 16754 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Conducting Precision...  

Science.gov (United States)

...training during Precision Strike Weapons (PSW) tests in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM...the taking of marine mammals incidental to PSW testing and training within the Eglin Gulf...The species that Eglin AFB may take during PSW testing and training are Atlantic...

2010-04-02

436

76 FR 7548 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Conducting Precision...  

Science.gov (United States)

...training during Precision Strike Weapons (PSW) testing and training in the Gulf of Mexico...the taking of marine mammals incidental to PSW testing and training within the Eglin Gulf...species that Eglin AFB may take during PSW testing and training are Atlantic...

2011-02-10

437

Is channeling of fission tracks taking place?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A single crystal of natural zircon which is sliced to have (010) basal plane and thinned by ion thinning is electron microscopically observed after slow neutron irradiation to ascertain whether channeling of the nuclear fission fragments is taking place or not. A fairly large number of the induced fission tracks are recognized at low magnification images where a considerable number of them are parallel to low-index lattice planes such as 100, 001, 101, 301, 103 though their directions changed some time up to several degrees. High resolution images of fission tracks often show a variety of zigzag passing of the tracks along low-index lattice planes in atomistic level. The rate of the tracks which are parallel to these low-index lattice planes is fairly high as about 45%, which strongly suggests that channeling of the fission tracks is taking place.

1999-01-01

438

Features of physical training of teachers of postdiploma pedagogical education.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The tendencies of education are considered during all of life. The categories of respondent which 30 years were more senior are chosen. Actuality and necessity of postdiploma education for the professional competence of specialists on a physical culture is grounded. Directions of organization of continuous education of physical culture teachers are certain: informative education; perfection of motive abilities and skills; creative development. For development of creative activity of physical culture teachers is recommended to leadthrough scientific practical seminars in form of disputes, dialogs, exchange by work experience, presentations of the opened lessons. Noted importance of creation of the differential programs which would take into account national traditions and had a correction, restoration, health influence. It is set that a leading place in the professional competence of teachers of physical culture is level of their motive abilities and skills.

Bezuglaya L. I.

2012-01-01

439

How do good teachers teach? Bases and values  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available There are certain basis in teaching that already exist before the actual teaching takes place. These bases are not the result of classroom practices or the use of methods or techniques, they are part of the necessary requirements for the act of teaching something to someone. These bases are not the components of a recipe or a set of rules that we have to use mechanically. They are the guidelines, criteria, perspectives, options, points of view that make teaching and learning meaningful. In this paper we analyze an interview carried out with a “memorable teacher” to find out the grounds, perspectives and options from those teachers who have left a deep mark in their students. Even though many teachers are seeking a list of tips, tools or methods to face their classes, we are not offering any. We are just analyzing hints, gestures or traces, what Fried (1995:47) calls “the connection between passion for teaching and quality learning”.

María Cristina Martínez; Silvia Branda; Luis Porta

2013-01-01

440

The Interaction in the Learning of the Mathematics: Teachers’ Stories  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This work is product of the analysis of stories presented by twenty-two teachers who decided to share their classroom experiences of mathematics education considered by them like successful. One looks for analyzing the forms of teachers understanding what it is “to be successful” during the process of “mathematizing”, seen like a reflective activity of education that looks for to understand and to modify the reality. The study reveals that the pedagogical practice that considers problems rooted in the concrete experiences of the daily life, besides to reveal the reality of the school, it takes to the teacher to reflect on its practice and on the accomplishment of “didactic mediation” that promotes more pleasant teaching-learning situations that can elevate the student self-esteem.

ANA MARIA CARNEIRO-ABRAHÃO

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
441

Variations in Primary Teachers’ Responses and Development during Three Major Science In- Service Programmes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper reports on how different types of teachers responded to in-service aimed at developing investigative-based science education (IBSE) in primary schools, and the extent to which they applied their new skills in the classroom. Common items from evaluation questionnaires allowed data to be combined from three major in-service programmes. Using complete data sets from 120 teachers, cluster analysis enabled three teacher types to be identified: a small group of ‘science unsures’, with low attitude scores and little confidence, who showed no response to the innovation; ‘holistic improvers’, who showed the largest improvement in science teaching confidence; and ‘high level, positive progressives’, who were very positive to science teaching throughout and showed gains in confidence in teaching physics and chemistry, as well as in demonstrating the relevance of science to their pupils. Taking account of these teacher types alongside interviews and observations, nine developmental stages in how teachers apply their new expertise in the classroom and the whole school are suggested. Major factorsinfluencing application in the classroom are the teachers’ initial science knowledge and pedagogical expertise, and motivating feedback to teachers when pupils responded positively to the innovation. Assessing teachers’ initial level of subject knowledge and science pedagogical expertise to inform the approach and amount of in-service provision is important. Subsequent mentoring as well as support from the school principal when teachers first try IBSE with pupils promotes successful implementation in the classroom.

Tina Jarvis; Anthony Pell; Philip Hingley

2011-01-01

442

Take part in the Poster Forum  

CERN Multimedia

The CERN Control Week will run from 17 to 23 May 2008. For the first time, the IT-CO group will be organising a "poster forum" on the theme of process control, which will be held in the main hall of Building 500 in Meyrin, near Restaurant No. 1 (see Bulletin No. 16/2008). If you wish to take part, there is still time to send your posters to Mathias Dutour or Stefan Lueders.

2008-01-01

443

Taking perspective: context, culture, and history.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There are important lessons to be learned from taking a comparative perspective in considering migration. Comparative examination of immigration experiences provides a way to glean common denominators of adaptation while considering the specificity of sending and receiving contexts and cultures. Equally important is a historical perspective that provides a way for us to consider how we may have gone through similar travails in the past while recognizing that we face particular challenges in this moment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Suárez-Orozco MM; Suárez-Orozco C

2013-09-01

444

Bradycardia in a patient taking black cohosh.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cimicifuga racemosa, better known as black cohosh, has been widely used in Western cultures as a herbal treatment for relieving symptoms of menopause. It has previously been linked to cases of liver toxicity. We report a case of reversible complete heart block in a woman who had recently begun taking a herbal supplement containing black cohosh. We review the known side effect profile of black cohosh and its relationship to our case. PMID:20955128

McKenzie, Scott C; Rahman, Atifur

2010-10-18

445

Bradycardia in a patient taking black cohosh.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Cimicifuga racemosa, better known as black cohosh, has been widely used in Western cultures as a herbal treatment for relieving symptoms of menopause. It has previously been linked to cases of liver toxicity. We report a case of reversible complete heart block in a woman who had recently begun taking a herbal supplement containing black cohosh. We review the known side effect profile of black cohosh and its relationship to our case.

McKenzie SC; Rahman A

2010-10-01

446

Malaysia`s Malakoff takes on Janamanjung  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Malaysian developer Malakoff Berhad is taking stakes in gas and coal-fired power plants, in particular in the Janamanjung project which is to rely on imported coal, and has been vulnerable since the currency crisis in 1997. It is probable that Indonesian coal will be used, partly for mutual trade reasons between Indonesia and Malaysia, and partly to aid hedging deals. 2 tabs.

NONE

1998-06-01

447

Occupational history-taking in the RSA.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Medical practitioners need to elicit a comprehensive occupational history from their patients, since this may play an integral part in establishing the diagnosis, may indicate the most appropriate form of management, and will ensure that claims for Workmen's Compensation are initiated when appropriate. This history can also assist in identifying undetected workplace hazards and in formulating and testing hypotheses concerning the relationship of work to health. The particular problems encountered in taking an occupational history effectively in the RSA are discussed.

Zwi AB; Ehrlich RI

1986-11-01

448

The International Teacher: Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Preferred Teacher-Student Interpersonal Behaviour in Two United World Colleges  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study investigated students' and teachers' views of preferred teaching in terms of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship. Interpersonal teacher behaviour was studied by means of the Model for Interpersonal Teacher Behaviour. Data was gathered from 176 students and 39 teachers from two United World Colleges, one in Norway and one in…

van Oord, Lodewijk; den Brok, Perry

2004-01-01

449

Directions of improving the quality of in-service teacher training in Serbia: the perspective of primary school teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents one part of the findings of a research that deals with teachers’ perceptions of educational reforms in Serbia. More specifically, the paper focuses on the segment of the research that was aimed at exploring teachers’ views on the ways of improving the system and practice of in-service teacher training. Pursuing this topic is very important since the findings of recent studies have shown that this aspect of education system needs considerable improvement, while the authors who deal with educational change point to the importance of consulting the teachers in the development of the new system solutions. The questionnaire was used to collect the data from 326 teachers from 125 Serbian primary schools. The teachers provided answers to open-ended questions on what needs to be done in order to improve the quality of their in-service training. Content analysis was used to process the data - response categories were created inductively on the basis of teachers’ answers, and then their frequency was established. The results indicate that, according to teachers, in-service teacher training has to be improved, primarily through increased funding, higher quality of programmes/seminars, diversification of types of training, as well as through creating a more encouraging system and school setting for in-service teacher training. These results are significant from the aspect of the in-service training system since they point to developmental priorities, as well as to the necessity of a more complex and comprehensive approach to the reform of this segment of education system. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47008: Predstave o obrazovnim promenama u Srbiji - refleksije o prošlosti, vizije budu?nosti ?iju realizaciju finansira Švajcarska agencija za razvoj i saradnju, Unapre?ivanje kvaliteta i dostupnosti obrazovanja u procesima modernizacije Srbije i br. 179034: Od podsticanja inicijative, saradnje i stvaralaštva u obrazovanju do novih uloga i identiteta u društvu

Stankovi? Dejan; ?eri? Ivana; Milin Vladeta

2013-01-01

450

Are We Turning Our Backs on Teacher Preparation? Lessons from France's System of Teacher Training  

Science.gov (United States)

Not surprisingly, in an increasingly neo-liberal context of international competition for educational prestige, conversations about teaching and teacher preparation have taken hold across the globe. Further complicating these matters is that ideas about teaching, learning, and learning to teach cannot be understood or analyzed in a vacuum; that…

Berchini, Christina N.

2013-01-01

451

Taking care of one's brain: how manipulating the brain changes people's selves.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The increasing attention to the brain in science and the media, and people's continuing quest for a better life, have resulted in a successful self-help industry for brain enhancement. Apart from brain books, foods and games, there are several devices