WorldWideScience

Sample records for teacher utterances emerged

  1. The Emergent Nature of Strategic Mediation in ESL Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kuldip

    2015-01-01

    This article concentrates on a practitioner-driven approach to teacher education aimed at advancing ESL teachers' instructional knowledge about writing. Based on activity-centred interaction between a group of Malaysian English teachers and their teacher educator, the discussion demonstrates (1) the emergent, unplanned nature of strategic…

  2. Teachers Enacting a Technology-Rich Curriculum for Emergent Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    PictoPal is the name of a technology-rich curriculum with a focus on emergent literacy of Dutch kindergarteners. A case study design was used to examine teacher technology integration within PictoPal along with their perceptions about teaching/learning, technology and technology-based innovations. Observations were undertaken on pupils' engagement…

  3. Personality Type as a Predictor of Teaching Efficacy and Classroom Control Beliefs in Emergency Certification Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Robin K.; Chambers, Sharon M.

    This study examined the personality types of emergency certification teachers as predictors of classroom management and self-efficacy beliefs. Participants were 120 teachers pursuing teacher certification through an emergency permit teacher education program at a mid-sized Texas university. They all held at least a Bachelor's degree, were in their…

  4. Exploring a Two-Dimensional Model of Mentor Teacher Roles in Mentoring Dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasborn, Frank; Hennissen, Paul; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a two-dimensional model of mentor teacher roles in mentoring dialogues, entitled MERID, is explored empirically. Data regarding five aspects of mentoring dialogues were collected, using a sample of 20 transcriptions of mentoring dialogues, in which 112 topics were discussed and 440 mentor teacher utterances emerged. Correlations…

  5. Passionate Utterance and Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Ian

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores Stanley Cavell's notion of "passionate utterance", which acts as an extension of/departure from (we might read it as both) J. L. Austin's theory of the performative. Cavell argues that Austin having made the revolutionary discovery that truth claims in language are bound up with how words perform, then gets bogged by convention…

  6. Exploring a two-dimensional model of mentor teacher roles in mentoring dialogues

    OpenAIRE

    Crasborn, FJAJ (Frank); Hennissen, PPM (Paul); Brouwer, CN (Niels); Korthagen, FAJ (Fred); Bergen, TCM (Theo)

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which mentor teachers are able to address mentees' individual needs is an important factor in the success of mentoring. A two-dimensional model of mentor teacher roles in mentoring dialogues, entitled MERID, is explored empirically. Data regarding five aspects of mentoring dialogues were collected, using a sample of 20 transcriptions of mentoring dialogues, in which 112 topics were discussed and 440 mentor teacher utterances emerged. Correlations between the five...

  7. THE JOURNALISTIC UTTERANCE ON TWITTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Oliveira Teixeira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the impact of the characteristics of the Twitter platform on the application of standard journalistic technique (TRAQUINA, 2008 during the creation and production of news releases as tweets and, at the same time, it seeks to identify their specifications regarding traditional journalistic utterances. Through the analysis of 134 tweets collected from newspaper profiles of Folha de S. Paulo, Zero Hora and Diário Popular, we have obtained indications that led us to confirm our central assumption. In other words, the hierarchical pattern and purpose that guide the creation of standard news, and therefore, the special language that characterizes traditional journalism, begin to give way to models that are more horizontal and interactive, that redesign the standard technique (based on the model of the Inverted Pyramid and thus, modify journalistic writing - interfering in its discursive effects (GOMES, 2000.

  8. Attitude Has a Lot to Do with It: Dispositions of Emerging Teacher Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunzicker, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Part of a larger qualitative study to better understand how teachers learn to exercise informal leadership in the schools and districts where they work, this article illustrates dispositions of emerging teacher leadership by identifying and describing three possible teacher leadership prerequisites through lived experience examples. Eight…

  9. Teacher Design of Technology for Emergent Literacy: An Explorative Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    The active participation of teachers in designing classroom learning experiences contributes to teacher abilities to facilitate learning. This paper reports on a case study of one Dutch teacher designing a technology-rich learning environment for emergent literacy. Data was collected to explore the design and implementation of the learning…

  10. Sounds of Silence: Race and Emergent Counter-Narratives of Art Teacher Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehe, Amelia M.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two Black preservice art teachers and their racialized experiences in art teacher education. Drawing from a critical race theory perspective, their stories are conceptualized as emergent counternarratives of becoming an art teacher. The case studies are based on interviews from an ethnographic investigation of…

  11. A Uniform Treatment of Pragmatic Inferences in Simple and Complex Utterances and Sequences of Utterances

    CERN Document Server

    Marcu, D; Marcu, Daniel; Hirst, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    Drawing appropriate defeasible inferences has been proven to be one of the most pervasive puzzles of natural language processing and a recurrent problem in pragmatics. This paper provides a theoretical framework, called ``stratified logic'', that can accommodate defeasible pragmatic inferences. The framework yields an algorithm that computes the conversational, conventional, scalar, clausal, and normal state implicatures; and the presuppositions that are associated with utterances. The algorithm applies equally to simple and complex utterances and sequences of utterances.

  12. Blogging the Field: An Emergent Continuum for Urban Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domine, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Preparing teachers to work in urban settings poses unique challenges, as urban communities are complex and require systemic understanding of students and their families, culture, and community. Pre-service teachers often harbor misconceptions about what it means to work in urban settings and many bring to their teacher education program minimal…

  13. Differences of Articulation Rate and Utterance Length in Fluent and Disfluent Utterances of Preschool Children Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, HeeCheong; Sawyer, Jean; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate characteristics of four types of utterances in preschool children who stutter: perceptually fluent, containing normal disfluencies (OD utterance), containing stuttering-like disfluencies (SLD utterance), and containing both normal and stuttering-like disfluencies (SLD+OD utterance).…

  14. Evaluation of knowledge and attitude of school teachers about emergency management of traumatic dental injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mala; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Yadav, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) are widespread in the population and are a serious dental public health problem among children. Dental trauma may cause both functional and esthetic problems, with possible impacts on the patient's quality of life. Aim: To investigate teacher's knowledge and attitudes of Mathura city about emergency management of TDIs in children. Materials and Methods: A total of 352 teachers from total 23 schools of Mathura city were included in the study. Data were collected through a survey, which included a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three major parts containing multiple-choice questions. Results: Among the teachers 51.1% were males and 48.9% were females. Majority of the respondents, that is, 33.5% were between 31 and 40 years of age. Most respondents (34%) had more than 10 years of teaching experience. Majority of the teachers (39.2%) had educational qualification other than B.Ed. and M.Ed. degrees. Physical education teachers comprised the largest group of school teachers. Regarding knowledge and attitude, the teachers with 10–20 years of teaching experience, physical education teachers, and the teachers other than B.Ed. and M.Ed. qualifications had given more correct answers to the questions when compared with other groups. Conclusion: For the teachers having a low level of knowledge, there is a need for greater awareness to improve teachers’ knowledge and attitudes related to the emergency management of TDIs in children by organizing educative and motivational programs. PMID:25992335

  15. Coaching Teachers for Emergent Literacy Instruction Using Performance-Based Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Jeanette A.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Hsieh, Wu-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Coaching has garnered support as a professional development approach that helps teachers use research-based instruction to teach emergent literacy skills to young children. However, approaches to coaching vary widely, as do the backgrounds and training of the teachers included in different studies. This study investigated the influence of…

  16. Early Childhood Teacher Education in Ethiopia: Progress and Emerging Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, James; Szente, Judit; Tadesse, Selamawit

    2006-01-01

    This article extends concerns of our National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators (NAECTE) membership beyond the borders of the United States to the continent of Africa. Specifically, it explores the current status of early childhood teacher education in one of the poorest nations of the world--Ethiopia. It includes an analysis of…

  17. Patterns of participation: a framework for understanding the role of the teacher for emerging classroom practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe M.; Østergaard, Camilla H.

    Research on teachers’ knowledge and beliefs has grown big in recent years. The larger parts of these fields are built on acquisitionist interpretations of human functioning. We explore the potentials of a participationist framework for understanding the role of the teacher for emerging classroom practices. The framework is built on social practice theory and symbolic interactionism and adopts a processual approach to understanding the role of the teacher. We use the framework in a qualitative study of two teachers with different prior experiences. The study suggests that the framework has some potential and sheds light on the dynamic relationships between the teacher’s engagement in the practices of the mathematics classroom and other, personally significant, past and present ones.

  18. Knowledge, attitude and practice in emergency management of dental injury among physical education teachers: A survey in Bangalore urban schools

    OpenAIRE

    Mohandas U; Chandan G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of physical education teachers in Bangalore city with regards to emergency management of dental injuries. The questionnaire surveyed the physical education teacher?s background, knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, luxation injuries, it also investigated physical education teacher?s attitude and the way they handle the i...

  19. Knowledge, attitude and practice in emergency management of dental injury among physical education teachers: A survey in Bangalore urban schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohandas U

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of physical education teachers in Bangalore city with regards to emergency management of dental injuries. The questionnaire surveyed the physical education teacher?s background, knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, luxation injuries, it also investigated physical education teacher?s attitude and the way they handle the injuries. The sample consisted 580 teachers from 700 selected schools in Bangalore city. Chi-square test was applied to test the significance between trained and untrained teachers. Among the population 70% were males physical education teachers 30% were females. 95% of the teachers had physical education training and 5% did not have the training. 95% of the population had first aid component and 5% did not have. Only 25% of trained physical education teachers had correct knowledge about tooth identification and 17% among untrained teachers. 81% of trained teachers answered correctly regarding management of fractured anterior teeth against 27.5% of untrained teachers (P< 0.0002. The present report indicates that there is lack of knowledge and practice among physical education teachers in Bangalore city regarding emergency management of dental trauma. Educational programs to improve the knowledge and awareness among the teachers have to be implemented.

  20. Service-Learning and Emergent Communities of Practice: A Teacher Education Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschak, Jennifer Cutsforth; Letwinsky, Karim Medico

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the unexpected emergence of a community of practice in a middle level mathematics and science methods course. The authors describe how preservice teacher participation in a collaborative, project-based service-learning experience resulted in the formation of a community of practice characterized by teamwork, meaningful…

  1. Preschool Teachers and Children's Emergent Writing: Supporting Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Lindsay R.; Votteler, Nancy K.

    2013-01-01

    Early literacy skill development is critical during the preschool years. Under that umbrella is emergent writing, a small but important component of overall literacy development. This article presents two writing strategies: (1) writers' workshop and (2) dictation within the context of storybook reading that preschool teachers can utilize to…

  2. TPACK: An Emerging Research and Development Tool for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Evrim; Chuang, Hsueh-Hua; Thompson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    TPACK (technological pedagogical content knowledge) has emerged as a clear and useful construct for researchers working to understand technology integration in learning and teaching. Whereas first generation TPACK work focused upon explaining and interpreting the construct, TPACK has now entered a second generation where the focus is upon using…

  3. Utterance independent bimodal emotion recognition in spontaneous communication

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Jianhua; Pan Shifeng; Yang Minghao; Li Ya; Mu Kaihui; Che Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Emotion expressions sometimes are mixed with the utterance expression in spontaneous face-to-face communication, which makes difficulties for emotion recognition. This article introduces the methods of reducing the utterance influences in visual parameters for the audio-visual-based emotion recognition. The audio and visual channels are first combined under a Multistream Hidden Markov Model (MHMM). Then, the utterance reduction is finished by finding the residual between the real vis...

  4. Verbalization of Mean Field Utterances in German Instructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayupova O. I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates ways of actualization of mean field utterances used in modern German instructions considering the type of the text. The author determines and analyzes similarities and differences in linguistic means used in mean field utterances in the context of such text subtypes as instructions to household appliances, cosmetic products directions and prescribing information for pharmaceutical drugs use.

  5. Preservice Teachers' Emerging TPACK in a Technology-Rich Methods Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Asli Özgün-Koca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a dearth of research on the mechanisms for preservice teachers' development of the pedagogical knowledge necessary for effective use of such technologies. We explored the emergent Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK (Niess 2005, 2006, 2007 of a group of secondary mathematics preservice teachers in a methods course as they designed and implemented technology-rich teaching materials in field settings. Participant surveys and collected assignments were analyzed through the lens of the TPACK framework. The data were also analyzed to examine the trajectory of the participants’ beliefs about the appropriate role of advanced digital technologies in mathematics. The results indicate that the participants’ understanding of technology shifted from viewing technology as a tool for reinforcement into viewing technology as a tool for developing student understanding. Collected data supports the notion that preservice teacher TPACK development is closely related to a shift in identity from learners of mathematics to teachers of mathematics. In a class where advanced digital technologies were used extensively as a catalyst for promoting inquiry-based learning, preservice teachers retained a great deal of skepticism about the appropriateness of using technology in concept development roles, despite their confidence that they can incorporate technology into their future teaching.

  6. Interrogative Utterances in Surah Al-Baqarah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Bayoumy AIi Oteify

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The Qur’an is singularly distinctive in its style compared to any human composition. Human eloquence, with its remarkable history in the composition of poetry, has failed to compose even a single verse like that of the Qur'an. The Qur'anic composition is a living challenge for human beings to imitate its miraculous style. This inimitable aspect of the Qur'an, among other things, proves that it was revealed by Allah (SWT to Prophet Muhammad (SAAS. In addition, the miracle of its linguistic composition was a means to declare the faith based on monotheism and the introduction of a new order and a theo-centric guidance that was meant to unite humanity. Adopting the monotheistic faith gave rise to a new community, the Muslim ummah that was able to bridge the differences between human beings in culture, race, colour and geographical boundaries. Consequently, the unique style of the Qur’an deserves a careful study. The present study investigates the use of interrogative utterances in surah al-Baqarah and their contribution to the Qur'an's rhetorical style. Hopefully, the results of this study will be useful in later investigations of other parts of the Qur' an...

  7. Linguistic and pragmatic constraints on utterance interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelman, Elizabeth A.

    1990-05-01

    In order to model how people understand language, it is necessary to understand not only grammar and logic but also how people use language to affect their environment. This area of study is known as natural language pragmatics. Speech acts, for instance, are the offers, promises, announcements, etc., that people make by talking. The same expression may be different acts in different contexts, and yet not every expression performs every act. We want to understand how people are able to recognize other's intentions and implications in saying something. Previous plan-based theories of speech act interpretation do not account for the conventional aspect of speech acts. They can, however, be made sensitive to both linguistic and propositional information. This dissertation presents a method of speech act interpretation which uses patterns of linguistic features (e.g., mood, verb form, sentence adverbials, thematic roles) to identify a range of speech act interpretations for the utterance. These are then filtered and elaborated by inferences about agents' goals and plans. In many cases the plan reasoning consists of short, local inference chains (that are in fact conversational implicatures) and, extended reasoning is necessary only for the most difficult cases. The method is able to accommodate a wide range of cases, from those which seem very idiomatic to those which must be analyzed using knowledge about the world and human behavior. It explains how, Can you pass the salt, can be a request while, Are you able to pass the salt, is not.

  8. A cognitive architecture for the coordination of utterances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChiaraGambi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dialogue partners coordinate with each other to reach a common goal. The analogy with other joint activities has sparked interesting observations (e.g., about the norms governing turn taking and has informed studies of linguistic alignment in dialogue. However, the parallels between language and action have not been fully explored, especially with regard to the mechanisms that support moment-by-moment coordination during language use in conversation. We review the literature on joint actions to show (i what sorts of mechanisms allow coordination and (ii which types of experimental paradigms can be informative of the nature of such mechanisms. Regarding (i, there is converging evidence that the actions of others can be represented in the same format as one’s own actions. Furthermore, the predicted actions of others are taken into account in the planning of one’s own actions. Similarly, we propose that interlocutors find it easy to coordinate their acts of production because they can represent their partner’s utterances, they can use these representations to build predictions, which are taken into account in the planning of self-generated utterances. Regarding (ii, we propose a new methodology to study interactive language that combines joint tasks with traditional psycholinguistic methods. In one class of paradigms, two participants are involved in simultaneous production and we manipulate the relationship between their utterances to investigate whether representations of other-generated utterances are built automatically. In a second class of paradigms, the production of an utterance is distributed between two speakers (i.e., they complete each other’s utterances. The timing of their contributions is varied; we are interested in the extent to which predictions about other-generated utterances are integrated in the planning of one’s own utterances. Finally, we argue that our account of joint language use leads to a new view on isolated comprehension.

  9. Utterance independent bimodal emotion recognition in spontaneous communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianhua; Pan, Shifeng; Yang, Minghao; Li, Ya; Mu, Kaihui; Che, Jianfeng

    2011-12-01

    Emotion expressions sometimes are mixed with the utterance expression in spontaneous face-to-face communication, which makes difficulties for emotion recognition. This article introduces the methods of reducing the utterance influences in visual parameters for the audio-visual-based emotion recognition. The audio and visual channels are first combined under a Multistream Hidden Markov Model (MHMM). Then, the utterance reduction is finished by finding the residual between the real visual parameters and the outputs of the utterance related visual parameters. This article introduces the Fused Hidden Markov Model Inversion method which is trained in the neutral expressed audio-visual corpus to solve the problem. To reduce the computing complexity the inversion model is further simplified to a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) mapping. Compared with traditional bimodal emotion recognition methods (e.g., SVM, CART, Boosting), the utterance reduction method can give better results of emotion recognition. The experiments also show the effectiveness of our emotion recognition system when it was used in a live environment.

  10. EMERGING CONCERNS AND PROBLEMS OF ST TEACHER EDUCATION IN 21 CENTUARY

    OpenAIRE

    Puneet Walia; Pooja Walia

    2014-01-01

    The success of any nation depends on education system. The strength and quality of any educational system depends largely upon a sound programme of teacher education. Educational programme are bound to fail if the quality of teachers are compromised. Hence, the teacher education programme is of utmost importance. The teacher educators have to shoulder a great responsibility of educating the teacher trainees. But now these days there is a growing feeling that teacher training c...

  11. MIKHAIL BAKHTIN, LANGSTON HUGHES AND THE POETIC UTTERANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eugene Amsler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical pragmatics finds good grounding in Bakhtin and Voloshinov’s theory of the Utterance in Marxism and the Philosophy of Language (1929. In this essay I explore and extend the notion of ‘reaccenting’ with that of ‘retexting’ and call attention to the role of textualities in the performance and deformance of written language. Critical pragmatic moves beyond stylistics and proposes a more critical linguistic approach to literary texts. I use critical pragmatics informed by Bakhtin’s theory of the utterance to read Langston Hughes’s dialogic lyrics in Montage of a Dream Deferred (1951 and poetic retexting as a literate and critical practice.

  12. Linking School and Community To Build National Recruitment and Preparation Programs for Teachers of Color: Emerging Leadership Qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mildred J.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the emerging leadership qualities needed to establish and administer programs to recruit and prepare teachers of color. The discussion is derived from experience with the Pathways to Teaching Careers initiative funded by the DeWitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund. The importance of linking efforts by educational leaders is stressed. (SLD)

  13. Teachers' Use of Linguistic Scaffolding to Support the Academic Language Development of First-Grade Emergent Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that teachers need to scaffold emergent bilingual students as they develop the complex language associated with school success. This may especially be true in dual language settings, where children are learning two languages simultaneously. In this study, therefore, I investigate the linguistic scaffolding practices of…

  14. Towards professional responsibility for language and literacy: exploring vocational teachersemerging language and literacy understandings and identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Bak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of vocational teachers is complex and evolving (Moodie & Wheelahan 2012. The imperative to also attend to students’ language literacy and numeracy (LLN skills adds to this complexity. Using data from interviews with eight teachers, this paper explores this emergent space in relation to impacts on their sense of capacity and confidence to attend to LLN, and ways this is being incorporated into a renewed, but often still fragile sense of professional identity (Brookfield 2000. Where the focus of discussion is often on LLN requirements, we concentrate here on the perceptions and experiences of the teachers themselves, and how these insights may inform our approach as LLN specialists. We conclude that vocational teachers appear willing travellers on this journey, but often feel they have a distance to go. We make a case for a collaborative dialogic approach to this shared challenge.

  15. Women’s Voice and Religious Utterances in Ancient Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela Giordano

    2011-01-01

    This paper tackles the issue of women and religion through a particular looking glass: religious utterances such as curses, supplication, and prayer, as reflected in some passages from ancient Greek epic and tragedy—pivotal literary genres in the ideological discourse of the Greek polis.

  16. Grammatical Characteristics of Children's Conversational Utterances that Contain Disfluency Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Kenneth J.; LaSalle, Lisa R.

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of disfluent conversational utterances of 14 children who stutter and 14 children (mean age of both groups 52 months) who do not stutter found that for both groups, disfluency clusters were typically produced at clause onset and within the most complex linguistic contexts and that they reflect the effects of producing multiple syntactic…

  17. Revisiting Speech Rate and Utterance Length Manipulations in Stuttering Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomgren, Michael; Goberman, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate stuttering frequency across a multidimensional (2 x 2) hierarchy of speech performance tasks. Specifically, this study examined the interaction between changes in length of utterance and levels of speech rate stability. Forty-four adult male speakers participated in the study (22 stuttering speakers and 22…

  18. Pedagogical perspectives and implicit theories of teaching: First year science teachers emerging from a constructivist science education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Michael James

    Traditional, teacher-centered pedagogies dominate current teaching practice in science education despite numerous research-based assertions that promote more progressive, student-centered teaching methods. Best-practice research emerging from science education reform efforts promotes experiential, collaborative learning environments in line with the constructivist referent. Thus there is a need to identify specific teacher education program designs that will promote the utilization of constructivist theory among new teachers. This study explored the learning-to-teach process of four first-year high school teachers, all graduates of a constructivist-based science education program known as Teacher Education Environments in Mathematics and Science (TEEMS). Pedagogical perspectives and implicit theories were explored to identify common themes and their relation to the pre-service program and the teaching context. Qualitative methods were employed to gather and analyze the data. In depth, semi-structured interviews (Seidman, 1998) formed the primary data for probing the context and details of the teachers' experience as well as the personal meaning derived from first year practice. Teacher journals and teaching artifacts were utilized to validate and challenge the primary data. Through an open-coding technique (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) codes, and themes were generated from which assertions were made. The pedagogical perspectives apparent among the participants in this study emerged as six patterns in teaching method: (1) utilization of grouping strategies, (2) utilization of techniques that allow the students to help teach, (3) similar format of daily instructional strategy, (4) utilization of techniques intended to promote engagement, (5) utilization of review strategies, (6) assessment by daily monitoring and traditional tests, (7) restructuring content knowledge. Assertions from implicit theory data include: (1) Time constraints and lack of teaching experience made inquiry teaching difficult to implement for the first year teachers in this study. (2) Commitment to teaching and supportive relationships at the school helped the first year teachers negotiate a satisfying role. (3) A congruence existed between the first-year teachers' implicit theories and the social/experiential design of TEEMS. This congruence represented a narrowing of the gap between educational theory and practice. Implications for science-teacher education highlight the potential for experiential program designs to narrow the gap between educational theory and practice.

  19. "Butterfly under a Pin": An Emergent Teacher Image amid Mandated Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cheryl J.

    2012-01-01

    The author examines 1 experienced teacher's image of teaching and how it was purposely changed--through external intervention and against the individual's will--from the view of teacher as curriculum maker to the view of teacher as curriculum implementer. Laura's account of the "butterfly under a pin" image, a version of the…

  20. Emerging E-Trends and Models in Teacher Education and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laferriere, Therese; Lamon, Mary; Chan, Carol K. K.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of the knowledge era, teacher education needs to prepare teachers to face the changing technological contexts and to model pedagogies and tools for better forms of learning. Despite much enthusiasm about the roles of technology in education, its role in transforming teacher learning, in ways aligned with advances in the learning…

  1. Engaging Stakeholders in Teacher Pay Reform. Emerging Issues. Report No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Jeffrey; Koppich, Julia E.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of states and school districts are experimenting with new approaches to paying teachers. These efforts to reform teacher pay can involve a range of state and local actors, including governors, state education officials, superintendents, local school boards, teacher unions, private foundations, community organizations, and local…

  2. Utterance and Function in Genre Studies: A Literary Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Though contemporary Genre Studies, and especially American Rhetorical Genre Studies (RGS), has made great progress through prioritizing the functional aspect of genre, there is now much to be gained by giving renewed space to the formal and thematic sides of genre as well, granting the concrete utterances, making up particular genres, equal weight in the theory and analysis of genre. The purpose of this shift is emphatically not to take anything away from current Genre Studies; I admire ...

  3. Utterance and Function in Genre Studies: A Literary Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Though contemporary Genre Studies, and especially American Rhetorical Genre Studies (RGS), has made great progress through prioritizing the functional aspect of genre, there is now much to be gained by giving renewed space to the formal and thematic sides of genre as well, granting the concrete utterances, making up particular genres, equal weight in the theory and analysis of genre. The purpose of this shift is emphatically not to take anything away from current Genre Studies; I admire what is being done in genre research today and want to add to it and expand it by demonstrating some of the possibilities enabled by a modified approach. Findings Current Genre Studies, as encountered in RGS, is an impressive and highly organized body of knowledge. By re-introducing literary and high rhetorical subject matter, which has been under-studied in RGS, into it, the chapter demonstrates some of the complexities involved when Genre Studies confront genres whose utterances are more complex than the “homely discourses” usually discussed in RGS. Formal and thematic features play a far too significant role in literary works to be explicable simply as derivations from function alone. But this is not limited to works of literature. The chapter finds that though more complex genres, literary and high rhetorical, most consistently invite utterance-based interpretations, other genre-based studies can benefit from them as well. Originality/value The chapter offers a perspective on genre which gives renewed weight to formal and thematic interpretations of genre, by allowing the utterances themselves to re-enter center stage. This enables an improved understanding of complex genres. It also revives close reading as a viable approach to understanding genre and thus to inform the rhetorical, linguistic, and sociological perspectives dominant in current genre scholarship. Finally, it improves our understanding of genre in both a systematic and a historical perspective. The chapter demonstrates, thus, that an understanding which puts as much weight on a genre’s utterances, as it does on its function is viable as an interpretation of genres, and is fruitful as an approach to them.

  4. New Literacies and Emerging Technologies: Perspectives from U.S. and Chinese Middle Level Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Hiller A.; Morris, Gwynn; Zhang, Junzheng

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on middle grades teachers from the United States and China, the two countries with the highest Internet use, in an attempt to understand both groups' perspectives on integrating new literacies and technologies into their teaching. Survey and focus group results indicate that, although U.S. and Chinese teachers are operating…

  5. Emerging Teacher Strategies for Mediating "Technology-Integrated Instructional Conversations": A Socio-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Sara; Deaney, Rosemary; Ruthven, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    This article draws on socio-cultural learning theory as a conceptual framework for analysing how teachers structure classroom activities and interactions during "Technology-integrated Instructional Conversations" (TICs). It reports on a collaborative programme of small-scale projects undertaken by 15 teacher-researchers using various forms of…

  6. Building Shared Instructional Leadership: Emerging Roles and Relationships of Teacher Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Pierce, Valeria

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teacher leaders' and principals' perceptions of instructional leadership in a shared context. The multi-stage multiple-case study examined roles and relationships of teacher leaders and principal teams across four schools within a Midwestern urban school district engaging in what has been identified in…

  7. How Accurate Can Mothers and Teachers Be regarding Children's Emergent Literacy Development? A Comparison between Mothers with High and Low Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korat, Ofra

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between mothers' and educators' evaluation of 75 children's emergent literacy levels and actual levels were investigated. Two groups of mothers participated: mothers with a low education and mothers with a high education. The children's emergent literacy was measured. The mothers evaluated their own children and 40 teachers

  8. Acoustic Model Adaptation for Indonesian Language Utterance Training System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Indrayanti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In order to build an utterance training system for Indonesian language, a speech recognition system designed for Indonesian is necessary. However, the system hardly works well due to the pronunciation variants of non-native utterances may lead to substitution/deletion error. This research investigated the pronunciation variant and proposes acoustic model adaptation to improve performance of the system. Approach: The proposed acoustic model adaptation worked in three steps: to analyze pronunciation variant with knowledge-based and data-derived methods; to align knowledge-based and data-derived results in order to list frequently mispronounced phones with their variants; to perform a state-clustering procedure with the list obtained from the second step. Further, three Speaker Adaptation (SA techniques were used in combination with the acoustic model adaptation and they are compared each other. In order to evaluate and tune the adaptation techniques, perceptual-based evaluation by three human raters is performed to obtain the "true"recognition results. Results: The proposed method achieved an average gain in Hit + Rejection (the percentage of correctly accepted and correctly rejected utterances by the system as the human raters do of 2.9 points and 2 points for native and non-native subjects, respectively, when compared with the system without adaptation. Average gains of 12.7 and 6.2 points for native and non-native students in Hit + Rejection were obtained by combining SA to the acoustic model adaptation. Conclusion/Recommendations: Performance evaluation of the adapted system demonstrated that the proposed acoustic model adaptation can improve Hit even though there is a slight increase of False Alarm (FA, the percentage of incorrectly accepted utterances by the system of which the human raters reject. The performance of the proposed acoustic model adaptation depends strongly on the effectiveness of state-clustering procedure to recover only in-vocabulary words. For future research, a confidence measure to discriminate between in-vocabulary and out-vocabulary words will be investigated.

  9. A Coherence-Based Approach to the Interpretation of Non-Sentential Utterances in Dialogue

    OpenAIRE

    Schlangen, David

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the syntax, compositional semantics and contextually-situated interpretation of a certain kind of non-sentential utterance occuring in dialogue, namely one where the utterance, despite its ‘incomplete’ syntactic form, is intended to convey a proposition, a question or a request. Perhaps the most prominent type of such utterances is the short answer, as in “A: Who came to the party? — B: Peter.”, but there are many other types as well. Following (Morga...

  10. Leading Gen Y Teachers: Emerging Strategies for School Leaders. TQ Research & Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrstock, Ellen; Clifford, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    A generational transition is occurring in U.S. public school classrooms. Baby Boom teachers (those born between 1946 and 1964) are approaching retirement age, and many of their colleagues from Generation X (those born between 1965 and 1976) are entering their mid-career stage. The newest generation in the teaching workforce is Generation Y (those…

  11. The Dynamics of Emergent Self-Organisation: Reconceptualising Child Development in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkang; Sankey, Derek

    2010-01-01

    For more than half a century, child development has endured as one of the main components of teacher education. But if children do develop, as developmentalists claim, what precisely is it that develops and how? Traditionally, within education, answers to these questions have drawn heavily on the theories of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky. Piaget…

  12. Race, Class, and Emerging Sexuality: Teacher Perceptions and Sexual Harassment in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Regina; Liston, Delores

    2011-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a highly troubling gendered phenomenon that plagues young women on a daily basis. The way in which sexual harassment is perceived and treated is varied and is largely based on racial and class stereotypes. This paper highlights the findings from a study in which a group of middle and high school teachers were interviewed and…

  13. Utterance Complexity and Stuttering on Function Words in Preschool-Age Children Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richels, Corrin; Buhr, Anthony; Conture, Edward; Ntourou, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the relation between utterance complexity and utterance position and the tendency to stutter on function words in preschool-age children who stutter (CWS). Two separate studies involving two different groups of participants (Study 1, n = 30; Study 2, n = 30) were conducted. Participants were…

  14. Knowledge regarding emergency management of avulsed teeth among elementary school teachers in Jaboatão dos Guararapes, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A de Lima Ludgero

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: A lack of technical information was observed among teachers regarding management of tooth avulsion. Educational campaigns at schools are necessary to modify the behavior of the teachers with regard to management of tooth avulsion. Further studies should be carried out for the assessment of teachers who have participated in educational campaigns to make the treatment of dental trauma a matter of public interest.

  15. Can They Plan to Teach with Web 2.0? Future Teachers' Potential Use of the Emerging Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' potential use of Web 2.0 technologies for teaching. A coding scheme incorporating the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework guided the analysis of pre-service teachers' Web 2.0-enhanced learning activity descriptions. The results indicated that while pre-service teachers

  16. Speech repairs, intonational boundaries and discourse markers: Modeling speakers' utterances in spoken dialog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeman, Peter Anthony

    Interactive spoken dialog provides many new challenges for natural language understanding systems. One of the most critical challenges is simply determining the speaker's intended utterances: both segmenting a speaker's turn into utterances and determining the intended words in each utterance. Even assuming perfect word recognition, the latter problem is complicated by the occurrence of speech repairs, which occur where the speaker goes back and changes (or repeats) something she just said. The words that are replaced or repeated are no longer part of the intended utterance, and so need to be identified. The two problems of segmenting the turn into utterances and resolving speech repairs are strongly intertwined with a third problem: identifying discourse markers. Lexical items that can function as discourse markers, such as 'well' and 'okay,' are ambiguous as to whether they are introducing an utterance unit, signaling a speech repair, or are simply part of the context of an utterance, as in 'that's okay.' Spoken dialog systems need to address these three issues together and early on in the processing stream. In fact, just as these three issues are closely intertwined with each other, they are also intertwined with identifying the syntactic role or part-of-speech (POS) of each word and the speech recognition problem of predicting the next word given the previous words. In this thesis, we present a statistical language model for resolving these issues. Rather than finding the best word interpretation for an acoustic signal, we redefine the speech recognition problem to so that it also identifies the POS tags, discourse markers, speech repairs and intonational phrase endings (a major cue in determining utterance units). Adding these extra elements to the speech recognition problem actually allows it to better predict the words involved, since we are able to make use of the predictions of boundary tones, discourse markers and speech repairs to better account for what word will occur next. Furthermore, we can take advantage of acoustic information, such as silence information, which tends to co-occur with speech repairs and intonational phrase endings, that current language models can only regard as noise in the acoustic signal. The output of this language model is a much fuller account of the speaker's turn, with part-of-speech assigned to each word, intonation phrase endings and discourse markers identified, and speech repairs detected and corrected. In fact, the identification of the intonational phrase endings, discourse markers, and resolution of the speech repairs allows the speech recognizer to model the speaker's utterances, rather than simply the words involved, and thus it can return a more meaningful analysis of the speaker's turn for later processing.

  17. The Re-Emergence of Critical Pedagogy: A Three-Dimensional Framework for Teacher Education in the Age of Teacher Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas J. Shudak

    2014-01-01

    In light of the extensive treatment given over its thirty year existence, this article develops a framework for helping teachers understand the applicability and relevance of critical pedagogy in the classroom during this age of effectiveness and standardization. To do this, critical pedagogy is theoretically framed three-dimensionally. The purpose is to help teachers think through critical pedagogy in a way that might encourage them to analyze their own practices and thus c...

  18. Effect Evaluation of Utterance Length on Speech Dysfluency in Stuttering and Nonstuttering Persian-Speaker Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Haresabadi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The correlation of stuttering and different linguistic factors is assessed in many studies. The obtained results can pave the way to reach a better understanding of stuttering, as well as finding more appropriate treatments. This study investigates the effect of utterance length on speech dysfluency comparing stuttering Persian(Farsi -speaking children and nonstuttering ones.Methods: Ten stuttering and ten nonstuttering Persian-speaking children between 4 and 6 years of age, matched by age and gender where included in this cross-sectional study. All individuals were investigated by ten sets of simple and complex sentences. Morphemes were added one by one to sentences in each set in order to assess the impact of utterance length on dysfluency. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results: In practicing ten sets of sentences, the speech dysfluency shows significant enhance with increase of utterance length in both stuttering and nonstuttering children (p=0.001. Furthermore, while comparing two groups of simple and complex sentences, significant increase of speech dysfluency was observed by length enhance of utterance, in both stuttering and nonstuttering children (p<0.05. The comparison of stuttering and nonstuttering children showed significant difference between the two groups as well (p=0.001. Conclusions: The results of this study show that increase in utterance length in both simple and complex sentences lead to increase in dysfluency in stuttering and nonstuttering children. Stuttering children indicated more dysfluency than nonstuttering ones.

  19. Chinese Secondary School Science Teachers' Understanding of the Nature of Science--Emerging from Their Views of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongming

    2009-01-01

    The findings reported in this paper report on an investigation of Chinese people's understanding of the nature of science in relation to their conceptualisations of Nature. As an exploratory and interpretive study, it uses semi-structured interviews with 25 Chinese secondary school science teachers. The paper first presents these teachers'…

  20. Avaliação do conhecimento dos professores de educação física para reagirem a situações de emergência / Assessment of physical education teachers’ knowledge to react on emergency situations

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Dulce, Esteves; Paulo, Pinheiro; Rui, Brás; Kelly, O’Hara; Ricardo, Rodrigues.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento dos Professores de Educação Física (EF) sobre 1os socorros condiciona a sua atuação em situações de emergência, pelo que é importante avaliá-lo. Neste sentido, desenhou-se um questionário para avaliar (1) o conhecimento teórico sobre como atuar em situações de emergência (KT); (2) o c [...] onhecimento operacional (KO) de atuação face à emergência e (3) de que modo idade, género, habilitações literárias, perceção do conhecimento e fontes de informação influenciam KT e KO. Participaram no estudo 284 professores (57.7% H; 41.9% M; 37.6 ± 7.1 anos), onde 19% dos professores entrevistados têm bom nível de KT e 49,5% bom nível de KO. A idade e habilitações literárias influenciam o conhecimento: os mais jovens mostram melhor KT e KO e os Mestres melhor KT mas um nível igual de KO. O género não influencia nem KT nem KO. Médicos/enfermeiros e formação profissional são as melhores fontes de informação para melhorar KO. Uma vez que 50.5% dos professores apresentam nível mau ou médio de KO, a introdução de módulos de 1os socorros na formação profissional, especialmente se estes forem lecionados por médicos/enfermeiros, pode ser uma estratégia eficiente para melhorar o conhecimento de atuação face à emergência. Abstract in english Physical Education (PE Teachers’ knowledge on 1st aid embraces their action in emergency situations, so it is important to evaluate it. We investigated 284 PE teachers (57.7% Male, 41.9% Female, 37.6 ± 7.1 years) using a questionnaire specially designed to evaluate (1) theoretical knowledge (KT) abo [...] ut how to act in emergency situations, (2) operational knowledge (KO) for action in the face of emergency and (3) how age, gender, education, perception of individual knowledge and information sources of influence KT and KO. 19% of interviewed teachers present good level of KT and 49.5% good level of KO. Age and education influence knowledge: younger teachers show best KT and KO Masters present better KT but an equal level of KO. Gender does not influence neither KT nor KO. Doctors / nurses and professional education are the best information sources to improve KO. 50.5% of teachers have a bad or average KO, which may impair their action face the accident. The introduction of modules in 1st aid training, especially if they are taught by doctors / nurses, seems to be an efficient strategy to improve the knowledge of action on emergency.

  1. Mean Length of Utterance Levels in 6-Month Intervals for Children 3 to 9 Years with and without Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mabel L.; Smolik, Filip; Perpich, Denise; Thompson, Travis; Rytting, Nathan; Blossom, Megan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The mean length of children's utterances is a valuable estimate of their early language acquisition. The available normative data lack documentation of language and nonverbal intelligence levels of the samples. This study reports age-referenced mean length of utterance (MLU) data from children with specific language impairment (SLI) and…

  2. Waldorf Teachers – Artists Or “Mooncalves”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Skillen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article has been written in the aftermath of the 2015 National Teachers Conference of South Africa, in the closing lecture of which the Waldorf school was described as a “total work of art” (Gesamtkunstwerk with the teachers – each in their individual way – as its co-creators. Such grand words are entirely appropriate for the closing lecture of a national conference, and reminding ourselves about such high ideals is absolutely necessary, but, in being uttered, the words call up the question: how close are we to realising this (in real rather than merely cosmetic terms, and what does it mean anyway?

  3. Structural priming as structure-mapping: children use analogies from previous utterances to guide sentence production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Micah B; Tomlinson, Marc T; Echols, Catharine H; Love, Bradley C

    2011-01-01

    What mechanisms underlie children's language production? Structural priming--the repetition of sentence structure across utterances--is an important measure of the developing production system. We propose its mechanism in children is the same as may underlie analogical reasoning: structure-mapping. Under this view, structural priming is the result of making an analogy between utterances, such that children map semantic and syntactic structure from previous to future utterances. Because the ability to map relationally complex structures develops with age, younger children are less successful than older children at mapping both semantic and syntactic relations. Consistent with this account, 4-year-old children showed priming only of semantic relations when surface similarity across utterances was limited, whereas 5-year-olds showed priming of both semantic and syntactic structure regardless of shared surface similarity. The priming of semantic structure without syntactic structure is uniquely predicted by the structure-mapping account because others have interpreted structural priming as a reflection of developing syntactic knowledge. PMID:21428995

  4. The Effect of Nonverbal Cues on the Interpretation of Utterances by People with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak-Wernicka, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to explore the effect of nonverbal information (gestures and facial expressions) provided in real time on the interpretation of utterances by people with total blindness. Methods: The article reports on an exploratory study performed on two groups of participants with visual impairments who were tested…

  5. An AAC application using speaking partner speech recognition to automatically produce contextually relevant utterances: objective results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisenburn, Bruce; Higginbotham, D Jeffery

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a computer program, Converser, which uses the speech recognition of the speaking partner to predict contextually appropriate utterances and to store relevant noun phrases. The dyads (which consisted of a program user and a speaking partner) tested Converser in two communication tasks: a conversation and an interview. Two conditions were applied: A simple communication aid with an alphabet layout without Converser (alpha-only condition), and an identical aid with Converser (alpha-converser condition). Objective measurements were made concerning the program user's rate and Converser usage. The results showed that the alpha-converser condition generated a faster communication rate than the alpha-only condition. Also, the program users utilized the stored noun phrases in their productions more than the full utterances. Converser allowed for periodic instances of a fast rate of speech, which appeared to have a positive impact on communication. PMID:18465364

  6. Thin slices of creativity: Using single-word utterances to assess creative cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakaran, Ranjani; Green, Adam E.; Gray, Jeremy R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that individual differences in creative cognition can be manifest even in brief responses, such as single-word utterances. Participants (n = 193) were instructed to say a verb upon seeing a noun displayed on a computer screen and were cued to respond creatively to half of the nouns. For every noun–verb pair (72 pairs per subject), we assessed the semantic distance between the noun and the verb, using latent semantic analysis (LSA). Semantic distance was higher i...

  7. Japanese mothers’ utterances about agents and actions during joint picture-book reading

    OpenAIRE

    ToshikiMURASE

    2014-01-01

    This study extended the research on the scaffolding provided by mothers while reading picture books with their children from a focus on conversational styles related to labeling to a focus on those related to agents and actions to clarify the process by which language develops from the one-word to the syntactic stage. We clarified whether mothers decreased the degree of scaffolding in their initiation of conversations, in the responses to their children’s utterances, and in the choice of refe...

  8. An examination of utterance co-representations: How relevant is relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence has shown that in situations of joint action, co-actors form predictive representations of one another’s upcoming actions and hold these in the same format as their representations of their own future actions. Recently, it has been suggested that a similar process occurs with utterances in cases of joint language production (i.e. conversation). The current study investigates this proposition using a joint consecutive picture-naming task to ascertain whether people form rep...

  9. I speak fast when I move fast: The speed of illusory self-motion (vection) modulates the speed of utterance

    OpenAIRE

    TakeharuSeno; KeikoIhaya; YukiYamada

    2013-01-01

    Speed of utterance is an important factor in smooth and efficient conversation. We report a technique to increase utterance speed and that might improve a speaker’s impression and information efficiency in conversation. We used a visual display consisting of optic flows in a large visual field that induced participants’ illusory self-motion perception (vection). The speed of vection corresponded to the speed of the optic flows. Using this method, we investigated whether vection speed affec...

  10. I speak fast when I move fast: the speed of illusory self-motion (vection) modulates the speed of utterances

    OpenAIRE

    Seno, Takeharu; Ihaya, Keiko; Yamada, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    Speed of utterance is an important factor in smooth and efficient conversation. We report a technique to increase utterance speed and that might improve a speaker's impression and information efficiency in conversation. We used a visual display consisting of optic flows in a large visual field that induced participants' illusory self-motion perception (vection). The speed of vection corresponded to the speed of the optic flows. Using this method, we investigated whether vection speed affects ...

  11. Emergent Teacher-Researchers: A Reflection on the Challenges Faced when Conducting Research in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The following narrative reflects on the dilemmas and problems faced by inexperienced researchers working within the field of education. Focusing on a research project completed in fulfilment of an MA in Teaching and Learning, the article recounts the decisions made by one emergent researcher and evaluates how far the chosen methods may have helped…

  12. Thinking soap But Speaking ‘oaps’. The Sound Preparation Period: Backward Calculation From Utterance to Muscle Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Wiedenmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    In this article’s model—on speech and on speech errors, dyscoordinations, and disorders—, the time-course from the muscle innervation impetuses to the utterance of sounds as intended for canonical speech sound sequences is calculated backward. This time-course is shown as the sum of all the known physiological durations of speech sounds and speech gestures that are necessary to produce an utterance. The model introduces two internal clocks, based on positive or negative factors, representing certain physiologically-based time-courses during the sound preparation period (Lautvorspann. The use of these internal clocks show that speech gestures—like other motor activities—work according to a simple serialization principle: Under non-default conditions,
    alterations of the time-courses may cause speech errors of sound serialization, dyscoordinations of sounds as observed during first language acquisition, or speech disorders as pathological cases. These alterations of the time-course are modelled by varying the two internal-clock factors. The calculation of time-courses uses as default values the sound durations of the context-dependent Munich PHONDAT Database of Spoken German (see Appendix 4. As a new, human approach, this calculation agrees mathematically with the approach of Linear Programming / Operations Research. This work gives strong support to the fairly old suspicion (of 1908 of the famous Austrian speech error scientist Meringer [15], namely that one mostly thinks and articulates in a different serialization than is audible from one’s uttered sound sequences.

  13. Changing Roles and Teacher Leadership In Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirk

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the changing nature of teacher leadership roles in six small rural schools without formal teacher leadership roles. Interviews with 28 teachers and principals indicate that small rural schools might see teacher leadership in unique ways. Most frequently mentioned role categories involved emergence of teacher leadership due to…

  14. Proceedings of the eleventh national convention of chemistry teachers and national seminar on emerging trends in green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection to ecology and biodiversities is a challenge before us. Environment friendly chemistry is a need of the time, which will certainly reduce or eliminate hazardous elements of the environment. The seminar on emerging trends in green chemistry will pave a way that will lead to extensive use of green chemistry concept. The brain storming session of the seminar shall have a impact on research and development in this area. The souvenir certainly reflects the novel ideas in the area. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  15. Transformative Learning-Based Mentoring for Professional Development of Teacher Educators in Information and Communication Technologies: An Approach for an Emerging Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakci, Isil; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Kilicer, Kerem

    2010-01-01

    Teacher educators need professional development in effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in order to keep up with the changes and developments in ICT and to pose as a model for teacher candidates. For the purpose of meeting teacher educators' professional development needs in ICT, it is necessary to take…

  16. Japanese mothers’ utterances about agents and actions during joint picture-book reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ToshikiMURASE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study extended the research on the scaffolding provided by mothers while reading picture books with their children from a focus on conversational styles related to labeling to a focus on those related to agents and actions to clarify the process by which language develops from the one-word to the syntactic stage. We clarified whether mothers decreased the degree of scaffolding in their initiation of conversations, in the responses to their children’s utterances, and in the choice of referential ranges of their utterances. We also investigated whether maternal conversational styles contributed to the development of their children’s vocabularies. Eighteen pairs of Japanese mothers and their children were longitudinally observed when the children were 20 and 27 months of age. The pairs were given a picture book depicting 24 animals engaged in everyday behavior. The mothers shifted their approach in the initiation of conversation from providing to requesting information as a function of their children’s age. The proportion of maternal elaborative information-seeking responses was positively correlated with the size of their children’s productive vocabulary. In terms of referential choices, mothers broadened the range of their references as their children aged. In terms of the contribution of maternal conversational styles to children’s vocabulary development, the use of a maternal elaborative information-seeking style when the children were 20 months of age predicted the size of the children’s productive vocabulary at 27 months. These results indicate that mothers decrease the degree of scaffolding by introducing more complex information into the conversations and transferring the role of actively producing information to their children by requesting information as their children develop. The results also indicate that these conversational styles promote the development of children’s vocabularies during the transition from the one-word to the syntactic stage.

  17. Relevant Responding in Pragmatic Language Impairment: The Role of Language Variation in the Information-Soliciting Utterance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Vannesa T.; Eyer, Julia A.; Hardee, W Paul

    2005-01-01

    Responding relevantly to an information-soliciting utterance (ISU) is required of a school-age child many times daily. For the child with pragmatic language difficulties, this may be especially problematic, yet clinicians have had few data to design intervention for improving these skills. This small-scale study looks at the ability of a child…

  18. Interdito e silêncio: análise de alguns enunciados / Interdiction and silence: analysis of some utterances

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fabio Elias Verdiani, Tfouni.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho - situado no campo da Análise do Discurso de Pêcheux (AD), numa interface com a psicanálise - trata o interdito e o silêncio como constitutivos e fundadores do discurso. A lógica subjacente é a lógica lacaniana segundo a qual o excluído ou a contradição funda o possível. Para tal [...] tarefa usamos as quatro modalidades da lógica alética aristotélica e tratamos o quadrado lógico. Propomos e construímos um quadrado do dito e da enunciação. As análises de alguns enunciados indicam a presença do impossível na linguagem, e atestam a importância, bem como a pertinência, de um tratamento modal da linguagem. Abstract in english Within the field of Discourse Analysis (Pêcheux) and psychoanalysis, this work states interdiction and silence as constituents and founders of the discourse. In short, we claim that what makes it possible to say anything is that it is not possible to say it all, so something must remain unsaid. The [...] logic principle here is that the contradiction, the excluded founds the possible. For such task we use the logic square. We also propose and build a square of the saying or of the utterances. The analysis made here points toward the existence of the impossible in language, and also indicates how important a modal approach of language can be.

  19. Coding of intonational meanings beyond F0 : evidence from utterance-final /t/ aspiration in German

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niebuhr, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    An acoustic analysis of a German read-speech corpus showed that utterance-final /t/ aspirations differ systematically depending on the accompanying nuclear accent contour. Two contours were included: Terminal-falling early and late F0 peaks in terms of the Kiel Intonation Model. They correspond to H+L*L-% and L*+HL-% within the autosegmental metrical (AM) model. Aspirations in early-peak contexts were characterized by (a) "short", (b) "high-intensity" noise with (c) "low" frequency values for the spectral energy maximum above the lower spectral energy boundary. The opposite holds for aspirations accompanying late-peak productions. Starting from the acoustic analysis, a perception experiment was performed using a variant of the semantic differential paradigm. The stimuli were varied in the duration and intensity pattern as well as the spectral energy pattern of the final /t/ aspiration. Results revealed that the different noise patterns found in connection with early and late peak productions were able to change the attitudinal meaning of the stimuli toward the meaning profile of the respective F0 peak category. This suggests that final aspirations can be part of the coding of meanings, so far solely associated with intonation contours. Hence, the traditionally separated segmental and suprasegmental coding levels seem to be more intertwined than previously thought.

  20. Teacher development and student well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Winthrop

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved support for teachers’ professional development is vital during emergency, chronic crisis and early reconstruction contexts as teachers can have a significant impact on their students’ well-being.

  1. Assessment of awareness amongst school teachers regarding prevention and emergency management of dentoalveolar traumatic injuries in school children in Pune City, before and 3 months after dental educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Namrata; Shah, Preetam; Bhatia, Mitali; Lakade, Laxmi; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Arora, Nitin; Bhalla, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Children have boundless energy, so, they are continuously engaged in some or the other physical activity. It is seen that when child reaches school age, accidents in the school environment in the form of falls, injuries due to contact sports, fights, abuse, etc. are very common and the main cause of traumatic dental injuries. Trauma may vary from minor enamel chipping or avulsion to extensive maxillofacial damage, more serious neck and brain injury, which may cause pain, disfigurement and mental agony, having immediate and long lasting effects. In such cases, a school teacher is in the right position to handle such an emergency and refer the child to the concerned dental surgeon or a pedodontist for further needful care. The main reason for delayed treatment of dental trauma is that people present at the site of injury are unaware of protocol of rapid and appropriate management leading to improper first aid treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness of a group of school teachers from different schools about the prevention and emergency management of dental trauma in school children, by means of a questionnaire. Then educating them and reassessing their knowledge after a period of 3 months. Unfortunately, the public is unaware of the risks and does not have enough information about first aid emergency treatment or to avoid traumatic injuries. PMID:23404018

  2. POLIFONIA EM ENUNCIADOS NEGATIVOS: VOZES QUE HABITAM O DIZER "NÃO" / Polyphony in Negative Utterances

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Décio Orlando Soares da, Rocha.

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo centra-se na análise de um questionário aplicado, por ocasião de um programa de treinamento, a um grupo de trabalhadores responsáveis pela supervisão das atividades de operários numa fábrica de produção de pneus situada no Brasil. O questionário deveria revelar o "estilo de lideran [...] ça" exercido por cada chefe de equipe, sendo consideradas cinco diferentes possibilidades: os estilos autocrata, demagógico, demissionário, mediador e participativo. O perfil participativo é visto pelo autor do questionário como "o mais adequado", uma vez que promoveria a conciliação entre os objetivos pessoais dos operários e os objetivos industriais. Com base numa concepção polifônica dos enunciados negativos, a análise realizada permitiu concluir que, além dos cinco estilos previstos no questionário, um sexto perfil se deixa entrever, o qual parece coincidir com" a voz da empresa". A presença desse sexto perfil explicita a pluralidade e complexidade dos saberes que se atualizam no contexto das interações em situação de trabalho. Abstract in english This paper focuses on the analysis of a written questionnaire administered to a group of foremen working in a tyre factory in Brazil. The questionnaire is designed to reveal the" style of leadership" carried out by each member of the group, among five possible variants: autocratical, demagogical, re [...] signing, mediative and participative. The participative profile is seen by the author of the questionnaire as "the adequate one", in as much as it harmonises workmen’s personal and organisational interests. On the basis of a polyphonic conception of negative utterances the case is made for a more complex view of the questionnaire: beyond the five profiles critically antecipated, a sixth one is contemplated, which seems to coincide clearly with what we call "the voice of the organisation", putting forward different kinds of knowledge in the context of interactions at work.

  3. Principios de Desarrollo Profesional Docente construidos por y para Profesores de Ciencia: una propuesta sustentable que emerge desde la indagación de las propias prácticas / Principies of Teacher Professional Development built by and for Science Teachers: a sustainable proposal that emerges from the inquiry of self-practices / Principios de desenvolvimento profissional docente construidos por e para professores de Ciencias: uma proposta sustentável que emerge a partir da indagação das próprias práticas

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Corina, González-Weil; Melanie, Gómez Waring; Germán, Ahumada Albayay; Paulina, Bravo González; Exequiel, Salinas Tapia; Damián, Avilés Cisternas; José Luis, Pérez; Jonathan, Santana Valenzuela.

    Full Text Available A transformação das práticas dos docentes na área das ciências, tanto a escolar como a universitária (incluindo formação inicial), constitui uma necessidade urgente se pretendemos alfabetizar científicamente a população. Mostra uma proposta de 5 principios para o desenvolvimento profissional docente [...] em ciências, a partir da indagação colaborativa das práticas de um grupo de docentes de educação primária, secundária e universitária que trabalha, conjuntamente, em um processo de desenvolvimento profissional, há quatro anos. Esses principios incluem a construção de uma visão comum sobre o para que ensinar ciencias, sobre a indagação das práticas a partir das particularidades da educação cientifica, sobre a reflexão individual e coletiva a cerca de tais práticas, sobre a valoração da autoridade da experiencia para a aprendizagem docente e sobre a promoção de um ambiente de desenvolvimento profissional que envolva uma diversidade de contextos e niveis de ensino. Abstract in spanish La transformación de las prácticas de los docentes en el área de ciencias, tanto a nivel escolar como universitario (incluida la formación inicial), constituye una necesidad urgente si pretendemos alfabetizar científicamente a la población. Este estudio muestra una propuesta de cinco principios para [...] el desarrollo profesional docente en ciencias, que emergen desde la indagación colaborativa de las propias prácticas de un conjunto de docentes de educación primaria, secundaria y universitaria, quienes trabajan hace cuatro años en un proceso de desarrollo profesional conjunto. Estos principios incluyen la construcción de una visión común acerca del para qué enseñar ciencias, la indagación de las prácticas a partir de las particularidades de la educación científica, la reflexión individual y colectiva sobre las prácticas, la valoración de la autoridad de la experiencia para el aprendizaje docente y la promoción de un ambiente de desarrollo profesional que involucre diversidad de contextos y niveles de enseñanza. Abstract in english The transformation of teaching practices in the area of sciences, both at school and university levels (including initial training), is an urgent need if we intend to achieve scientific literacy in the population. This study shows a proposal of five principles for teacher professional development in [...] sciences, emerged from the collaborative inquiry of self-practices in a group of primary, secondary and university teachers, who have been working together for four years in a professional development process. These principles include the construction of a common vision on the purpose for teaching sciences; the inquiry of practices starting from the distinctive features of scientific education; individual and collective reflection on practices; the valuation of the authority of experience for teacher learning; and the promotion of an environment of professional development involving diverse contexts and teaching levels. Implications for professional development are discussed.

  4. The Emerging Professional: An Investigation into Teacher Education Students' Developing Conceptions of the Relationship between Theory and Classroom Practice before, during and after a Postgraduate Teaching Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rupert

    2012-01-01

    The role of theory in educational practice has long been seen as problematic (Pring 2004) and within initial teacher education (ITE) specifically, various models linking the two have been proposed (Korthagen 2010). In England, ITE is currently in a state of flux, with the majority of university-based postgraduate programmes operating partly at…

  5. Language, Language Development and Teaching English to Emergent Bilingual Users: Challenging the Common Knowledge Theory in Teacher Education & K-12 School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Popular views about language and how children and youth learn language are based mainly in cognitive approaches in support of a common knowledge theory of language development. This common theory feeds into the efforts to increase teacher and learner accountability as measured on narrow assessments of what it means to use language well and in…

  6. Metaphor and the 'Emergent Property' Problem: A Relevance-Theoretic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Carston

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties; these are properties which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents of the utterance in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. For example, an utterance of ‘Robert is a bulldozer’ may be understood as attributing to Robert such properties as single-mindedness, insistence on having things done in his way, and insensitivity to the opinions/feelings of others, although none of these is included in the encyclopaedic information associated with bulldozers (earth-clearing machines. An adequate pragmatic account of metaphor interpretation must provide an explanation of the processes through which emergent properties are derived. In this paper, we attempt to develop an explicit account of the derivation process couched within the framework of relevance theory. The key features of our account are: (a metaphorical language use is taken to lie on a continuum with other cases of loose use, including hyperbole; (b metaphor interpretation is a wholly inferential process, which does not require associative mappings from one domain (e.g. machines to another (e.g. human beings; (c the derivation of emergent properties involves no special interpretive mechanisms not required for the interpretation of ordinary, literal utterances.

  7. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

  8. Exploring Ethical Tensions on the Path to becoming a Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M. Shaun; Pinnegar, Eliza; Pinnegar, Stefinee

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the authors', two teacher educators' and a pre-service teacher's, understanding of the ethical dilemmas, obligations, and plotlines that emerged in the experiences of a pre-service teacher as she began to develop her identity as a teacher. The inquiry, based in narrative inquiry, used the analysis of narratives from a…

  9. Utterances in vacuo and in Contexts: An Experimental and Theoretical Exploration of Some Interrelationships between What Is Heard and What Is Seen or Imagined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakar, Rolv Mikkel; Rommetveit, Ragnar

    1975-01-01

    Criticizes psycholinguistic experiments where messages are presented in vacuo and where the linguist has no intention of conveying a message to the subject, who fills in his own contextual frame. When utterances were presented with pictures, they were remembered more accurately than when they were repeated ten times. (SCC)

  10. Mean Length of Utterance in Children with Specific Language Impairment and in Younger Control Children Shows Concurrent Validity and Stable and Parallel Growth Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mabel L.; Redmond, Sean M.; Hoffman, Lesa

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Although mean length of utterance (MLU) is a useful benchmark in studies of children with specific language impairment (SLI), some empirical and interpretive issues are unresolved. The authors report on 2 studies examining, respectively, the concurrent validity and temporal stability of MLU equivalency between children with SLI and…

  11. [Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Robert A., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue collects three articles concerning reading-teacher training. "Language, Failure, and Panda Bears" by Patricia M. Cunningham calls attention to dialect difficulties in the classroom and provides ideas for teacher training programs and for public schools to solve this problem. William H. Rupley, in "Improving Teacher Effectiveness in…

  12. Narratives, choices, alienation, and identity: learning from an elementary science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2009-09-01

    As we contemplate on teacher identity research, there is a need to place a teacher's narratives or story-lines at the center of that work. In this forum, in response to the insightful commentary from Stephen Ritchie and Maria Iñez Mafra Goulart and Eduardo Soares, I place a greater emphasis on understanding Daisy's narratives from an existing social identity framework. Narratives tell us intricate and complex actions that a teacher has taken both personally and professionally. Additionally, narratives help us see implicit nature of identity explicitly. Therefore, a greater focus has to be placed on interactions and utterances of a teacher to make sense of who they are and what they do as expressed by their own words (identity and action). Finally, I join with Ritchie and Goulart and Soares to advocate that identity research needs to include participants as co-researchers and co-authors as identities are very personal and complex to be fully understood by the outsiders (researchers).

  13. Learning to Teach as Situated Learning: An Examination of Student Teachers as Legitimate Peripheral Participants in Cooperating Teachers' Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eric J.

    Learning to teach science well is a complex endeavor and student teaching provides a time for emerging teachers to learn how to reason in this uncertain landscape. Many pre-service teachers have rated student teaching as a very important part of their teacher education program (Koerner, Rust, & Baumgartner, 2002; Levine, 2006) and there is little doubt that this aspect of teacher preparation has a great impact (Wilson, Floden, Ferrinin-Mundy, 2001). It is surprising, therefore, that the interaction between the cooperating teacher and student teacher represents a gap in the literature (Cochran-Smith & Zeichner, 2005). In fact, little effort has been made in science education "to understand the contributions of cooperating teachers and teacher educators" (p. 322). Research is needed into not only how teacher preparation programs can help pre-service teachers make this transition from student teacher to effective teacher but also how the expertise of the cooperating teacher can be a better articulated part of the development of the student teacher. This instrumental case study examines the nature and substance of the cooperating teacher/student teacher conversations and the changes in those conversations over time. Using the theoretical framework of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Lave, 1996) the movement of the student teacher from their position on the periphery of practice toward a more central role is examined. Three cooperating teacher/student teacher pairs provided insight into this important time with case data coming from pre and post interviews, baseline surveys, weekly update surveys, and recorded conversations from the pair during their time together. Four major themes emerged from the cases and from cross case comparisons with implications for student teachers regarding how they react to greater responsibility, cooperating teachers regarding how they give access to the community of practice, and the teacher preparation community regarding the role it plays in helping to facilitate this process.

  14. Practicing Teachers' Perceptions of Teacher Trainees: Implications for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoda, Alice Merab; Sentongo, John

    2015-01-01

    Practicing teachers are partners in preparation of teacher trainees. However, little is known about their perceptions of the teacher trainees they receive every year in their schools. Ninety three practicing teachers from twenty schools participated in this study. The objectives were to find out the practicing teachers' perceptions of teacher

  15. Teacher Adaptation to Open Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterator, Scott; Deed, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The "open classroom" emerged as a reaction against the industrial-era enclosed and authoritarian classroom. Although contemporary school architecture continues to incorporate and express ideas of openness, more research is needed about how teachers adapt to new and different built contexts. Our purpose is to identify teacher reaction to…

  16. Creating Motivating Learning Environments: Teachers Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This article shares thoughts about motivating young adolescents from the perspective of middle level students. The most compelling thread to emerge from the interviews with students was the fact that teachers matter. Teachers have a direct and significant impact on students' motivation to achieve. This article identifies three ways in which…

  17. Non-native Chinese Foreign Language (CFL) Teachers: Identity and Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Native Chinese foreign language (CFL) teacher identity is an emerging subject of research interest in the teacher education. Yet, limited study has been done on the construction of Non-native CFL teachers in their home culture. Guided by a concept of teacher identity-in-discourse, the paper reports on a qualitative study that explores how three Non-native CFL teachers construct their teacher identity as they interact with Danish students while teaching CFL at one Danish university. Data...

  18. Technical Analysis of Teacher Responses to the Self-Evaluation Scale-Teacher (SES-T) Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T.; Lowe, Samantha; Chang, Catherine Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Self-Evaluation Scale--Teacher version, used to assess teacher perceived self-esteem of students, was analyzed. A unidimensional model emerged from exploratory factor analysis, with cautious acceptance of data fit. Reliability and external aspects of validity were supported by the Self-Evaluation Scale--Teacher data.

  19. Enunciados do tipo injuntivo em géneros de texto publicitários sobre o vinho / Injuntive utterances on advertising textual genres about wine

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carla, Teixeira.

    Full Text Available A partir de um corpus de géneros de texto publicitários, rótulos e contrarrótulos de garrafa de vinho e anúncios sobre o vinho, neste trabalho, serão analisados os enunciados injuntivos em ocorrência para averiguar as relações que se estabelecem entre marcas comerciais e consumidores, o tipo de info [...] rmação veiculada e as representações linguisticamente construídas destes sujeitos. Situando-se no âmbito da Teoria do Texto e combinando patamares de análise linguística com a dimensão social, esta investigação convoca ainda o Interacionismo Sociodiscursivo que defende uma perspetiva ontogenética da linguagem, consentânea com uma abordagem discursivo-textual da Linguística. A análise dos dados indica que os domínios sociais ou as atividades envolvidas, publicitária e de produção e de comercialização do vinho, preconizam imagens do consumidor ideal de vinho no que diz respeito à prova de vinho, a um comportamento socialmente adequado e sobre as boas propriedades do vinho. Abstract in english In this paper, we will analyse the occurrence of injunctive utterances in a corpus of genres such as advertising texts, labels and back labels in wine bottles and also advertisements about wine. The purpose of this research is to investigate the relations established between commercial brands and co [...] nsumers, as well as the type of information conveyed and the linguistically constructed representations of these subjects. Within the framework of Text Theory and combining linguistic analysis levels with the social dimension, this research also calls upon Socio-Discursive Interactionism, which defends an ontogenetic perspective of language, consistent with a discursive and textual approach to Linguistics. Data analysis shows that the social domains or the activities involved, namely those of advertising, production and commercialization of wine, support the images of the ideal wine consumer, on what concerns wine tasting, appropriate social behaviour and good properties of the wine.

  20. Teacher's Hourly Wages: A Comparison across Michigan Schools and Alternative Occupations. Policy Report 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Debbi; Burian-Fitzgerald, Marisa

    2005-01-01

    When teacher salaries are discussed, two very different pictures often emerge. The first of these portrays teachers as underpaid, overworked servants of the public good. The second paints a picture of an overpaid group of civil servants who spend very little time actually working. This report looks at Michigan teacher salaries. Teacher salaries…

  1. Salient Beliefs of Secondary School Mathematics Teachers Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kan Kan

    2015-01-01

    Even though dynamic geometry software (DGS) is becoming an emergent instructional tool for mathematics teachers, many teachers are still in the process of consideration about whether to use it. In order to encourage teachers to use DGS, this study seeks to discover mathematics teachers' salient beliefs about the use of DGS in mathematics class.…

  2. Preparing Sustainability-Literate Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: This article explores sustainability as an emerging paradigm for preservice preparation of teachers. Sustainability education, which is rooted in Deweyan ideas about the fundamental social purposes of schooling, attends to the tensions created by the interconnectedness of environmental, economic, and social equity systems.…

  3. Navigating Hybridized Language Learning Spaces through Translanguaging Pedagogy: Dual Language Preschool Teachers' Languaging Practices in Support of Emergent Bilingual Children's Performance of Academic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gort, Mileidis; Sembiante, Sabrina Francesca

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest among policymakers, practitioners, and researchers in early bilingual development and the unique role of the educational setting's language policy in this development. In this article, we describe how one dual language preschool teacher, in partnership with two co-teachers, navigated the…

  4. "It Is Like Putting Fire in the Children's Hands": A Comparative Case Study of Pre-Service Teachers' Knowledge of and Beliefs about Education for Democracy in an Established and Emerging Post-Conflict Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanahan, Brian K.; Phillips, Michele S.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents and compares two cases of pre-service elementary teachers' beliefs about democracy and education for democracy in the USA and Bosnia and Herzegovina along with contextual factors influencing the similarities and differences among these beliefs. Findings suggest that US pre-service elementary teachers have a…

  5. Preservice Teachers' Perspectives of the Emphasis on Stewardship from Their Initial Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yontz, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The stewardship of schools is central to the renewal and preservation of that which is precious in our nation's schools. This study examined perceptions of future teachers as to the degree to which their teacher preparation program emphasized the idea of stewarding schools. In addition this article outlines specific emerging aspects of the…

  6. Responding to Expert Arguments. Emerging Lay Topoi in Focus Group Interviews on GM-Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    HorsbØl, Anders

    2009-01-01

    This paper challenges the view that attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) crops in agriculture are "utterly resistant to persuasion", as Scholderer (2005) humorously suggests in a review of the literature. Methodologically, this is achieved by studying opinions as they emerge in situated interaction (Myers 2004), in casu in focus groups interviews with both GM-experts and lay persons without specific knowledge on GM-crops. The paper analyses the lay persons' responses to persuasive expert utterances as inventive contributions to the discussion, not just as reactions showing either support or rejection. That is, the paper analyses the topoi, the argumentative ‘places', realized by the lay persons in dealing with and making sense of the new knowledge presented by the experts. Finally, the paper identifies the social identities as participants in a public debate, which are enacted by the lay contributions.

  7. Preparing Teachers for Emerging Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kevin M.; Stallings, Dallas T.

    2014-01-01

    Blended learning environments that merge learning strategies, resources, and modes have been implemented in higher education settings for nearly two decades, and research has identified many positive effects. More recently, K-12 traditional and charter schools have begun to experiment with blended learning, but to date, research on the effects of…

  8. Chapter 10. Emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergency preparedness is a set of measures the aim of which is to mitigate possible impacts of incident radiation accidents at nuclear installations and their consequences to the environment. Emergency Response Centre of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) was established as a technical support tool of UJD to evaluate the technical conditions of nuclear installations and also for assessment of radiation situation in case of accident and for prognosis of development of possible accident and evolution of its impact on the population and the environment. At the same time it serves as an advisory body for the national Emergency Commission for the Radiation Accidents for planning of optimal protective measures focusing on minimising the impact on population and the vicinity of NPP. Besides of completion of emergency procedures related to NPPs Bohunice also the first part of procedures for NPP Mochovce and procedures using a new EU code system RODOS. In 2000 UJD focused activities in emergency preparedness area on inspections, approval of on-site emergency plans of nuclear installations, review of emergency transport orders and of-site emergency plans. In accordance with an UJD inspection plan the inspectors of UJD carried out several inspections in area of emergency preparedness at all NPPs. The inspections were focused on checking the emergency exercises, review of preparedness of NPP staff in the area of emergency planning and review of documentation. There were no important insufficiencies revealed during the inspections. During the year 2000 the exercises were performed at all nuclear installations and the emergency transport orders were exercised as well. Testing of communication, preparedness of individual members of emergency headquarters, co-operation, operability of emergency centres and exchange of information were the main tasks of these exercises. In March the emergency exercise at the National Radioactive waste Repository on Mochovce site was performed, in April the emergency transport order of the Slovak Energetic Company was exercised, there was a large scale exercise organised at the NPP Mochovce in May, in October the exercises were organised at VUJE facility in Bohunice and radioactive waste treatment enterprise SE-VYZ. In November large scale on-site exercise was organised at NPP Bohunice and also the emergency transport order of Slovak Railways was exercised. Besides all this two representatives of UJD took part in exercises abroad with aim to acquire new knowledge and experience in area of public relations and information in case of incident or accident oat nuclear facility and also in area of international co-operation. The assistance of European commission continued in frame of so called RAMG project, determined to strengthen the regulatory authority. Thanks to this project UJD obtained computer equipment by which the capacity of the emergency response centre was increased substantially particularly in area of data processing in case of decision making in case of incident or accident at nuclear facility. Upgrading of hardware platform of the emergency response centre enabled the application of information systems (GIS), which contain important pieces of information for decision making (geography, demography, statistic, etc.) in case of incident or accident. Installation of GIS enabled also the extension of data sets transferred from facilities and creation of corresponding database. The co-operation with U.K. in area of emergency planning was finished. Representatives of U.K. assistance declared that the level of emergency preparedness of UJD is high enough and UJD can take a role of teacher for countries where the emergency centres are being built. In the year 2000 a further phase of EU RODOS system implementation continued in the Slovak Republic. First version of RODOS code package was successfully installed. This code will enable to implement the same approach to evaluation of incidents and accident in all European countries. A development and adaptation to conditions of the Sl

  9. Teachers Who Grow As Collaborative Leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Sawyer

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The following narratives examine three teachers over a course of ten years as they first entered teaching and began to collaborate with other teachers on curriculum. Specifically, the study examines how the teachers 1 developed as collaborators and 2 perceived elements of support from both within and outside the classroom for their collaborative efforts. The article argues that the successful collaborative efforts helped deepen their sense of agency and initiative within their teaching and, to a lesser degree, stimulated reform and change within their schools. In turn and to varying degrees, the process of collaboration supported their personal renewal in their work. The article suggests that structural support for these teachers that connected to their emerging personal practical knowledge was crucial for their development as teacher collaborators. The article concludes by suggesting how schools may be restructured to start to become sites of authentic leadership that build on the talents, meaning, voice, and knowledge of teachers.

  10. Factors that motivate Turkish EFL teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkaya, Odiléa Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers’ motivation has been an extensive topic of discussion among researchers for over two decades. What has been missing in the discussion, though, is the perspective of those who teach English as a Foreign Language (EFL, especially those who work in Turkey. Therefore, the purpose of this case study was to investigate factors that motivated Turkish EFL teachers working at a Preparatory English Program of a university in Turkey and ways to enhance their motivation. Eight teachers took part in the study. To collect data, unstructured interviews were used. Then, codes were written and themes on teachers’ motivation and demotivation, and ways to motivate teachers emerged. The results can be understood by looking at expectancy theory, more specifically on the focus of the theory: intrinsic (personal and extrinsic (environmental motives. The analysis of what the teachers believed to be their source of motivation and demotivation helped the researcher to propose ways to enhance their motivation.

  11. Emergency Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Emergency Checklist If someone may have been poisoned, call the ... visit to the emergency room. Below is a checklist to help you in the event of a ...

  12. Chemical Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your School Prepare Your Workplace Types of Emergency Chemical Emergency Drought Preparedness Earthquake Home Fire Flood Flu Food Safety Heat Wave Highway Safety Hurricane Landslide Pet Safety Poisoning Power Outage Terrorism Thunderstorm Tornado Tsunami Volcano Water Safety Wildfire Winter ...

  13. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  14. Ophthalmologic Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gulen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmologic emergencies include many diseases in a wide spectrum. Although only a small portion of the patients who admitted to emergency services with eye complaints have urgency, it should be certainly questioned about the existence of real ophthalmic emergencies that may cause a loss of vision which is one of the most important senses of us. In this compilation, ophthalmological emergencies have been reviewed in the light of current informations.

  15. Assessment of Student Teachers by Supervising Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattie, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Supervising teachers appear to reliably evaluate student teachers and tend to perceive student teachers in terms of two major factors: preparation and presentation. There were differences between primary and secondary level supervisors. (Author/PN)

  16. The Effectiveness of "Teach for America" and Other Under-certified Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Ildiko Laczko-Kerr; David C. Berliner

    2002-01-01

    The academic achievements of students taught by under-certified primary school teachers were compared to the academic achievements of students taught by regularly certified primary school teachers.  This sample of under-certified teachers included three types of under-qualified personnel: emergency, temporary and provisionally certified teachers.  One subset of these under-certified teachers was from the national program "Teach For America (TFA)."  Recent college graduates are placed by TF...

  17. THE SCHOOL TEACHER’S RULE IN THE EDUCATION OF THE FUTURE TEACHER OF SCIENCE : a discourse in silence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle de Souza Paula

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus our attention on the Supervised Internship teacher`s practice, specifically in relations established between the individuals involved (professor, schools, and students, seeking to identify papers about this subject as the approaches to the students of the school and the school-teacher’s role in this process. We identified a school teacher’s lack of knowledge and also a lack of appreciation of their practice and related it to the prospect of silencing in Discourse Analysis of the French Line – DA. We affiliate this silence to its historicity seeking clues on the construction of this discourse. We conclude that the naturalized absence of the school-teachers and of their knowledge in the education of the future teachers is produced by academy speeches that ignore them and silence about them. Also formed on this basis, the teacher of basic education builds his senses, for example, perceiving himself absent from the process, assuming a position and, consequently, a role that placed him in silence, even after the emergence of a new discourse produced from practice valuation in the initial teacher education.

  18. TEACHER NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

  19. Ocular emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe clinical data about ocular emergencies (OE) and their management. Material and Methods: A comprehensive analysis of the computer record available for admitted ocular emergencies was undertaken in terms of gender, age, etiology, procedure performed and hospital stay. Results: Ocular emergencies (1961) were 18.49% of total admissions. Male to female ratio was 2:1. Non-traumatic ocular emergencies were 1058 (53.95%) with male to female ratio of 1.47:1. In the non-traumatic ocular emergencies, majority (67.2%) were 40 years or above. Traumatic ocular emergencies were 925 (47.16%) with male to female ratio of 2.77:1. Majority (83.78%) of traumatic ocular emergencies were below 40 years and 562 (60.75%) below 20 years of age. Only 150 (16.21%) cases were 40 years and above. Corneal ulcers (44.51%) and glaucoma (24.38%) were the most common non-traumatic ocular emergencies, whereas, open globe injuries (73.4%) were leading the traumatic ocular emergencies. Total surgical procedures performed were 1382 (13.7% of total major ophthalmic surgery). Average stay in hospital was 5.5 days. Conclusion: Ocular emergencies predominantly affected the males in this series. Trauma related OE are almost as common as non-traumatic. Majority of OE need surgical intervention and the average hospital stay is longer than routine admissions. (author)

  20. Swimming Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Beerman, Stephen B.

    1988-01-01

    Persons who have undergone swimming emergencies are seen in emergency departments everywhere. They are frequently young healthy citizens. In some instances they will receive better care in large specialized referral hospitals. Other problems can be managed well at local facilities. This article attempts to equip all family physicians with some knowledge and management guidelines for dealing with swimming emergencies, submersion injuries including near-drowning, accidental hypothermia, and tri...

  1. Teacher workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

  2. language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The Le Rosey Institute at Rolle (autumn and spring) and Gstaad (winter) is looking for part-time language teachers of ?Bulgarian, Farsi, Hindi, Korean and Romanian for the start of the autumn term in September 2007. For further details, please contact : www.rosey.ch Please send applications with CVs to job@rosey.ch

  3. Pedagogical innovation in teacher teams – an organisational learning design model for continuous competence development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal design-based research project examining how to enable reflection and pedagogical innovation in teacher teams. The article identifies and analyses the teachers’ learning trajectories and innovative strategies when working together in the IT-pedagogical Think Tank for Teacher Teams (after this: ITP4T) (Weitze, 2014a), a competence development model, which was developed in an earlier phase of the research project. By using theoretical lenses from innovative knowledge development frameworks to examine the teachersutterances, interactions and new learning designs, the research aims to clarify what kind of knowledge is being developed and shared in the teacher teams, and how this contributes to the organisational learning process. The context is Global Classroom, an innovative synchronous hybrid videoconference concept, where adult students can choose between participating in class on campus or from home via videoconference on a daily basis. The ITP4T model is a response to the needs and challenges the teachers and the organisation at VUC Storstrøms´ Global Classroom have been experiencing in this new teaching environment. The teachers find that they need to be pedagogically innovative when teaching in this learning environment, particularly when aiming to create equal learning conditions for the students in class and at home; in other words, they need to reframe their learning designs. The ITP4T model thus aims at creating a continuous practise for the teachers to be able to create their own competence development in teams in which the manager participates. The use of this new practice inside the school empowered the teachers in the organisation and created a new organisational learning design, which can innovate, help unravel complex questions, create new organisational knowledge and anchor new knowledge and practises. The teachers became both their own and the organisation’s continuous competence developers when working in this learning design/innovative model. They experienced this as an efficient way of working which made them feel empowered.

  4. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this tool to play your goals. Hot Topics Stress & Coping Center Writing a Paper Abusive Relationships Dynamic Stretching A Guy's Guide to Body Image Emergency Contraception KidsHealth > Teens > Sexual Health > Birth Control > Emergency Contraception Print A A A Text ...

  5. Innovations in Science and Technology Education through Science Teacher Associations

    OpenAIRE

    Ben B. Akpan

    2010-01-01

    One emerging issue highlighted in a UNESCO booklet (Fensham, 2008, p6)is to draw attention to the need for students to receive science education from able science teachers. The booklet emphasizes that quality science learning time, albeit less, is preferable to the damage done by underequipped science teachers. It also draws attention to the important role of science teacher associations, where its members not only have the insights and experience, but also the interest in helping science tea...

  6. Psychiatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakal, S

    1972-06-01

    Dr. Bayrakal believes that the time has come for the family physician to deal with minor psychiatric disturbances in his office as well as psychiatric emergencies in the emergency department. The newly emerging medico-social philosophy of both the federal and provincial governments, he says, is giving greater responsibility and authority to the family physician in every area of medicine, including psychiatry.The author discusses major psychiatric emergencies (suicide, suicidal attempt, homicide, social scandal, as well as other psychiatric emergencies) on the ward including adolescent psychiatry. (The descriptions and treatment procedures are given on a concrete clinical level without theoretical overload.)In the family physician's work, psychological understanding is of profound importance. Giving him the added scope of psychiatric consideration to see the patient in bio-psycho-social totality will enable him to practice a more humanized form of medicine. PMID:20468779

  7. Hypertensive emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Poppi, Nilson Tavares; Guimarães, Hélio Penna

    2008-09-01

    Emergencies and hypertensive crises are clinical situations which may represent more than 25% of all medical emergency care. Considering such high prevalence, physicians should be prepared to correctly identify these crises and differentiate between urgent and emergent hypertension. Approximately 3% of all visits to emergency rooms are due to significant elevation of blood pressure. Across the spectrum of blood systemic arterial pressure, hypertensive emergency is the most critical clinical situation, thus requiring special attention and care. Such patients present with high blood pressure and signs of acute specific target organ damage (such as acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, acute pulmonary edema, eclampsia, and stroke). Key elements of diagnosis and specific treatment for the different presentations of hypertensive emergency will be reviewed in this article. The MedLine and PubMed databases were searched for pertinent abstracts, using the key words "hypertensive crises" and "hypertensive emergencies". Additional references were obtained from review articles. Available English language clinical trials, retrospective studies and review articles were identified, reviewed and summarized in a simple and practical way. The hypertensive crisis is a clinical situation characterized by acute elevation of blood pressure followed by clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms may be mild (headache, dizziness, tinnitus) or severe (dyspnea, chest pain, coma or death). If the patient presents with mild symptoms, but without acute specific target organ damage, diagnosis is hypertensive urgency. However, if severe signs and symptoms and acute specific target organ damage are present, then the patient is experiencing a hypertensive emergency. Some patients arrive at the emergency rooms with high blood pressure, but without any other sign or symptom. In these cases, they usually are not taking their medications correctly. Therefore, this is not a hypertensive crisis, but rather non-controlled chronic hypertension. This type of distinction is important for those working in emergency rooms and intensive care unit. Correct diagnosis must be made to assure the most appropriate treatment. PMID:25307099

  8. Mature Teachers Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher

  9. Teachers and Educational Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Dee Ann

    1996-01-01

    Examines the recent phenomenon of educators attacking their own on the issue of professionalizing teachers and improving teacher education. Explores the issue of the professionalization of teaching and discusses the role of teachers in educational reform. Concludes that teacher "bashing" may hamper attracting potential teacher education students…

  10. Pre-Service Teachers' Reflections during Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassan, Omayya; Al-Barakat, Ali; Al-Hassan, Yazid

    2012-01-01

    This research study investigates pre-service teachers' perceptions of their field experience in kindergartens and schools in Jordan. A total of 57 pre-service early years teachers wrote weekly reflective journals describing and commenting on their experiences during placement in kindergartens and elementary schools. Three major themes emerged from…

  11. Innovations in Science and Technology Education through Science Teacher Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Ben B.

    2010-01-01

    One emerging issue highlighted in a UNESCO booklet (Fensham, 2008, p6) is to draw attention to the need for students to receive science education from able science teachers. The booklet emphasizes that quality science learning time, albeit less, is preferable to the damage done by underequipped science teachers. It also draws attention to the…

  12. What do you mean by "teacher"?psychological research on teacher professional identity O que você entende por "professor"?pesquisa psicológica sobre identidade profissional do docente

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Tateo

    2012-01-01

    Teacher Professional Identity is today an autonomous theoretical construct. The paper explores the dimensions of TPI stressed in psychological and educational research, presenting different answers provided to questions such as: Which dimensions have been taken into account to define what a teacher is? The image of teachers actually emerging from literature analysis points out vectors of tension between "mainstream" Social Representations of teacher and everyday experience; between different ...

  13. Finnish Cooperating Physics Teachers' Conceptions of Physics Teachers' Teacher Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2010-06-01

    This article examines Finnish cooperating physics teachers’ conceptions of teacher knowledge in physics. Six experienced teachers were interviewed. The data was analyzed to form categories concerning the basis of teacher knowledge, and the tradition of German Didaktik and Shulman’s theory of teacher knowledge were used in order to understand the results. The results show that the teachers strongly emphasize knowledge related to day-to-day teaching practice. In German Didaktik, this means knowledge of the best instructional methods, while in Shulman’s categorization it belongs to the category of representations, strategies, and methods. It was also found that the teachers appear to lack some of the essential key ideas of modern physics teacher education, such as a holistic view of instructional approaches.

  14. TEACHERS NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English Language Programme of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire has two teaching posts available for la rentrée 2001. 1. Part-time teacher of Primary-level English Candidates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree and teaching qualification. The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system. Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée. Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team. Induction & training are offered. 2. Part-time teacher of Secondary-level history-geography Candididates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree in history or geography and also a strong interest in the other subject. They should have a relevant teaching qualification and be confident classroom practioners. For more information on either of these posts please contact the school office on 04.50.40.82...

  15. Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks: On the Continuing Education of Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard

    The emergence of globalization and its impact on knowledge, communications, economies, social structures, and institutions such as education is rapidly changing the context, content, and methods of teachers' work. Consequently, the continuing professional development of teachers, especially in Australia with its aging teacher force, is essential.…

  16. Using Virtual Technology to Enhance Field Experiences for Pre-Service Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Glenna M.; Scheuermann, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher educators of pre-service teachers of students with special needs face challenges in providing the unique knowledge and skills required of highly qualified special education teachers. The emerging use of various forms of virtual technology, however, offers realistic solutions to these problems. This systematic review of literature examines…

  17. A New Era of Teacher Preparation: Meeting the Challenge for Alternative Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnadinger, Cindy Meyers

    2006-01-01

    The face of teacher education is rapidly changing. Teacher shortages, legislative changes, and adult career changers have prompted colleges and universities across the nation to develop new programs or redesign existing programs for teacher preparation. For universities, the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program has emerged as the panacea for…

  18. Developing an Open Resource Bank for Interactive Teaching of STEM: Perspecives of School Teachers and Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Bjoern; Hennessy, Sara; Knight, Simon; Connolly, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current literature related to Open Educational Resource (OER) development and practice concentrates on higher education, although a growing body of work is also emerging for the primary and secondary school sectors. This article examines the user perspectives of teachers and teacher educators, regarding: discovery of teaching…

  19. Emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    'Exit block' describes situations when hospital staff cannot move patients out of emergency departments (EDs) into inpatient beds. According to the College of Emergency Medicine, it affects around half a million patients a year. To help managers and clinicians reduce crowding in their EDs, the college has produced a guideline that explains the causes and consequences of crowding and suggests ways of reducing the effects and improving safety in EDs. Crowding in Emergency Departments can be accessed online at tinyurl.com/exit-block NHS England and Monitor have endorsed the resource in their winter planning guidance. PMID:25355122

  20. The Inclusion of Minority Religious Education in the Finnish Comprehensive School: A Teacher and Teacher Coordinator Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Zilliacus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Finnish education system offers faith-specific religious education throughout the comprehensive school. Today separate minority religious classes are offered parallel to the majority Lutheran and secular ethics education. The purpose of this study is to investigate how minority RE teachers and teacher coordinators view the inclusion of minority religious education in the school culture. Teacher and coordinator perspectives are investigated through an interview study with 23 religion teachers and 3 teacher coordinators in the Helsinki metropolitan area. The results show that teachers and coordinators experienced education as gaining stronger acceptance and equality in the school culture. However, issues of exclusion and discrimination emerged which raise questions on the viability of the current system of RE. The study argues for a need to improve structural issues in education as well as increased teacher participation and dialogue in the school culture.

  1. Teachers' scientific knowledge, teaching practice, and students' learning activities: Cases of three elementary classroom teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shinho

    The purposes of this dissertation study are to better understand what specific types of scientific knowledge and practice three elementary teachers exhibit, and to examine how they use their scientific knowledge in their classroom teaching practice to provide students' opportunities to learn science when teaching condensation in the context of a unit on the water cycle. By comparing and contrasting three cases of elementary classroom teaching, this study discusses what kinds of scientific knowledge and practice are fundamental for teaching elementary science for scientific understanding. The data include structured interviews (content, pre- and post- observation, and stimulated recall), videotaped classroom observations, and collections of teachers' and students' written artifacts. Data were collected prior to, during, and after the three teachers taught condensation to fifth grade students. The data were analyzed in three contexts: interviews, teaching practices, and students' classroom activities. This made it possible to clarify which characteristics of teacher's scientific knowledge influenced which aspects of their teaching practice. Data analysis shows that teachers' scientific knowledge were closely associated with their teaching practice and students' classroom activities. Two characteristics of the teachers' scientific reasoning emerged as especially important. The first concerned how teachers connected observations of condensation with patterns in those observations (e.g., condensation occurs when warm moist air cools) and with explanations for those patterns (e.g., condensation is water vapor that changes to liquid water). Two teachers were careful to connect observations with patterns in their own thinking and in their classroom teaching. One of those teachers also connected the observations and patterns to scientific explanations. In contrast, the third teacher focused on listing scientific terms with little elaboration with specific observations and patterns. The second important characteristic of teachers' scientific reasoning concerned their views of science. One teacher enacted a largely inductive, empirical view, helping her students to observe examples of condensation, to find patterns in their observations, and to label the patterns as condensation. The second teacher engaged the students in a detailed series of experiments and data-based arguments designed to demonstrate that the liquid water in condensation was originally water vapor in the air. The third teacher focused on teaching students facts and vocabulary from authoritative sources, including their textbook and dictionaries. This study discusses what it means to have a deep understanding of fundamental science for elementary teachers. Making connections among observations, patterns, and explanations is important for students to understand the scientific world. Scientific practices, inquiry and application, play an important role to help teachers and students connect observations, patterns, and explanations. The implications to elementary science teacher education are discussed, considering how we can prepare elementary teachers to use scientific knowledge in their teaching practice.

  2. Rheumatologic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis Arturo

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatological conditions can sometimes present as emergencies. These can occur due to the disease process or infection; contrary to what many people think, rheumatologic emergencies like a pain, rheumatic crisis, or attack gout do not compromise the patient's life. This article mentioned only true emergencies: catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (cAPS), kidney-lung syndrome, central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis, anti-Ro syndrome (neonatal lupus), and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). The management of above emergencies includes critical care, immunosuppression when indicated, and use of a diagnostic flowchart as well as fast laboratory profile for making decisions. Anticoagulants have to be used in the management of antiphospholipid syndrome. A good understanding of these conditions is of paramount importance for proper management. PMID:26099604

  3. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions is the same: If the person is unconscious or unresponsive, call 911 or your local emergency number immediately. If an unconscious person exhibits life-threatening conditions, place the person ...

  4. Emergent Modernism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen Margrethe

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the problems of historizing modernism in the light of developments within world literature and theories about world literature. It draws upon Wlad Godzich's concept of emergence and Lyotard's concept of "evènement".

  5. Studying Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia; Rodegher, Sandra; Allende, Carlo Altamirano; Burnam-Fink, Michael; DiVittorio, Corinne; Glerup, Cecilie; Keys, Cameron; Kimball, Mindy; Liao, Miao; Monfreda, Chad; Trinidad, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The Emerge event, held in Tempe, AZ in March 2012, brought together a range of scientists, artists, futurists, engineers and students in order to experiment with innovative methods for thinking about the future. These methodological techniques were tested through nine workshops, each of which made use of a different format; Emerge as a whole, then, offered an opportunity to study a diverse set of future-oriented engagement practices. We conducted an event ethnography, in which a team of 11 resea...

  6. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through pro...

  7. Pre-service teachers as innovators (2013)

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathon Henderson

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework that shows how K-12 pre-service teachers can begin their careers engaged with emerging technologies, thinking of themselves as contributors to scholarship of education, and to recognize the importance of critical pedagogy in education. This is accomplished through a five part framework that challenges students to create lessons grounded in the theory of critical pedagogy that use emerging technologies, and then produce a scholarly work for submission to confer...

  8. Introducing the Cycle of Inquiry System: A Reflective Inquiry Practice for Early Childhood Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Jane Tingle; Hong, Seong Bock

    2011-01-01

    The Cycle of Inquiry (COI) is a tool for emergent curriculum planning and for professional development of early childhood teachers and teacher education students. The COI includes a sequence of five organizational forms connecting analysis of documentation data with intentional planning for long-term emergent inquiry inspired by the Reggio Emilia…

  9. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  10. EMERGENCY CALLS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  11. Effective Behavior Management in Preschool Classrooms and Children's Task Orientation: Enhancing Emergent Literacy and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Oates, Jennifer; Kaderavek, Joan N.; Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among preschool teachers' behavior management, children's task orientation, and children's emergent literacy and language development, as well as the extent to which task orientation moderated the relation between teachers' behavior management and children's emergent literacy and language development.…

  12. ELEMENTARY PRE-SERVICE TEACHER EDUCATION IN KARNATAKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURENDRA.K.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The teacher in the emerging Indian society has a very pivotal role to play in the social reconstruction and in transmission of wisdom, knowledge and experiences of one generation to another. Children are the potential wealth of a nation. They are always exposed to the information of the teacher. It is therefore necessary to realize that the emerging Indian society can achieve all round development with the help of the teachers who acts as a powerful agency in transmitting its cherished values.

  13. State Teacher Evaluation and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Gregory J.; David, Kristine A.; Rodgers, Deborah; German, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Current accountability trends suggest an increasing role in state mandates regarding teacher evaluation. With various evaluation models and components serving as the basis for quality teaching, teacher education programs need to recognize the role teacher evaluation plays and incorporate aspects where appropriate. This article makes that case and…

  14. Hematologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Vallisa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the surprising progress made in other areas of hematology (advances in the understanding of leukemogenesis, improved transplant techniques has been conspicuously absent in the management of hematologic emergencies. And yet, every step toward greater knowledge, every new treatment option will be of little value unless we are able to manage the acute complications of hematologic diseases. These complications are better defined as hematologic emergencies, and they are characterized by a high rate of mortality. This review is based on a search of the literature that was initially confined to articles published in the journal Hematology from 2000 to 2009. The search was then extended to the Cochrane Library and to Pub Med in February 2010 with the following Keywords emergencies; urgencies; hematology. The same key words were employed in a search of the archives of Blood and the New England Journal of Medicine from 2000 to 2010. The results confirm that hematologic emergencies can be caused by hematologic malignancies as well as by non-neoplastic hematologic diseases. Within the former category; this review examines the causes; manifestations; treatment and prevention of disseminated intravascular coagulation; superior vena caval syndrome; spinal cord compression; tumor lysis syndrome; hyperleukocytosis; and hypercalcemia. We also review emergency situations associated with non-neoplatic haematological diseases; such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; drug-induced hemolytic anemia; and acute sickle-cell crisis.

  15. Emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear activities are exercised so as to prevent the accidents. They are subjected to a rule whom application is controlled by the Asn. The risk of grave accident is so limited to a very low level of probability. He cannot be however completely pushed aside. The expression ' radiological emergency situation ' indicates a situation which ensues from an incident or of an accident risking to lead to an emission of radioactive materials or a level of radioactivity susceptible to strike a blow at the public health. The term ' nuclear crisis ' is used for the events which can lead to a radiological emergency situation on a nuclear basic installation or during a transport of radioactive materials. The preparation and the management of emergency situations, that they are of natural, accidental or terrorist origin, became a major concern of our society. We propose you of to know more about it in this file. (N.C.)

  16. Emergency preparedness

    CERN Document Server

    Cennini, E; Oortman Gerlings, P

    2009-01-01

    On September 19th 2008, a technical fault was at the centre of a sequence of events which hampered the performance of certain equipments of the LHC 3-4 sector. Once the first effects of this sequence of events were detected, the behaviour of the CERN staff confronted to this complex and critical situation became the centre of the risk control process. During such a downward spiral the preparation of all stakeholders is essential and should respect the (apparently) basic principles of emergency preparedness. Preparedness towards normal operation of CERN facilities towards minor up to major emergency situations will be presented. The main technical, organisational and legal frameworks of the CERN emergency preparedness will be recalled, highlighting the CERN risk management and risk control strategy. Then, the sequence of events experienced by different stakeholders on September 19th will be reported, thus starting the learned lessons process.

  17. EMERGING MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE CARALICEA-M?RCULESCU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The emerging markets are winning the currency war, because at this very moment its the battle of global financial institutions , as to who is more vulnerable and more exposed to the debt crisis and have their hands in more risky assets. US and Euro with their intertwining the financial stuff of the nation, the banks and the corporations are in a deep mess. One goes down, takes the other ones too. Right now , they all are struggling and getting beaten up , while the emerging markets are quiet and not really expressing their stands on the current situation except are reacting by all only putting their own houses in order.

  18. Emergent spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Weinfurtner, Silke

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the possibility that spacetime geometry may be an emergent phenomenon. This idea has been motivated by the Analogue Gravity programme. These are systems where the kinematics of small perturbations are dominated by an effective gravitational field. In these models there is no obvious connection between the "gravitational" field tensor and the Einstein equations, as the emergent spacetime geometry arises as a consequence of linearising around some classical field. After a brief introduction on this topic, we present our recent contributions to the field.

  19. Fixing Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Because they focus on the quality of instruction, teacher evaluations can be powerful catalysts for teacher and school improvement. But today, the typical teacher evaluation consists of a single, fleeting classroom visit by an administrator untrained in evaluation. Often he or she wields a checklist of classroom conditions and teacher behaviors…

  20. Exposure management systems in emergencies as comprehensive medical care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emergency management of nuclear hazards relies on a comprehensive medical care system that includes accident prevention administration, environmental monitoring, a health physics organization, and a medical institution. In this paper, the care organization involved in the criticality accident at Tokai-mura is described, and the problems that need to be examined are pointed out. In that incident, even the expert was initially utterly confused and was unable to take appropriate measures. The author concluded that the members of the care organization were all untrained for dealing with nuclear hazards and radiation accidents. The education and training of personnel at the job site are important, and they are even more so for the leaders. Revisions of the regional disaster prevention plans and care manual are needed. (K.H.)

  1. Emergency Preparedness

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The trends of RPC work in the area of preparedness for nuclear and radiological accidents are listed. RPC in cooperation with Swedish Government developed the project on preparation for iodine prophylaxis in case of accident at Ignalina NPP and arranged seminar on emergency preparedness issues in 2001.

  2. Tecnologías emergentes en la educación: una experiencia de formación de docentes que fomenta el diseño de ambientes de aprendizaje / Technologies émergentes dans l'enseignement: une expérience de formation d'enseignants qui construit le panorama d'environnements d'apprentissage / Emerging technologies in education: a teacher training experience that encourages the design of learning environments

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Oscar Rafael, Boude Figueredo.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Este texto describe los resultados obtenidos en una experiencia de formación de docentes, que son estudiantes de la Maestría en Informática Educativa de la Universidad de La Sabana, dentro de la asignatura electiva Tecnologías Emergentes en la Educación, que cuyo objetivo es: "ofrecer al estudiante [...] un espacio de reflexión y conceptualización sobre las principales tecnologías emergentes (TE) y sus usos en la educación". Entre los principales resultados, se encuentra que los estudiantes analizaron, indagaron y reflexionaron sobre las siguientes TE: Computación en la Nube, Inteligencia Colectiva, Mashups de Datos, Webs en Colaboración y Redes sociales. Asimismo, propusieron definiciones desde el punto de vista académico de cada una de ellas y diseñaron ocho ambientes de aprendizaje que integran de forma pedagógica una o varias TE en diferentes contextos educativos. Abstract in english This paper describes the results of a teacher training experience with a group of students taking the elective Emerging Technologies in Education (in the Maestría en Informática Educativa course at Universidad de La Sabana), whose aim is to "offer students a space for reflection and conceptualizatio [...] n on main emerging technologies (ET) and their uses in education". Among the main results, we find that students analyze, investigate and reflect on the following ETs: Cloud Computing, Collective Intelligence, Data Mashups, Collaborative Webs and Social Networks. They also proposed definitions for each of these ETs from the academic point of view, and designed eight learning environments that integrate, in a pedagogical way, one or more ETs in different educational contexts.

  3. Emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995, major efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) were focused on tasks associated with completion and incorporation of the Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of NRA SR in emergency planning and crisis management. Construction of the ERC had begun based on NRA SR's knowledge, as well as recommendations of Regulatory Assistance Management Group (RAMG) International Mission in 1993 and follow-up missions in 1994. Early in 1994, re-construction of selected rooms had been done and early in 1995, supported by the UK and U.S.A. Government's funding, technical equipment was purchased. The equipment was necessary for ERC operation as tools to improve NRA SR readiness for the management of emergency situations at nuclear installations. NRA SR commenced operation of the Centre in April 1995. The Centre has been on-line connected to a teledosimetric system of Radiation Monitoring Laboratory in Trnava. The basic software for assessment of radiation consequences of a NPP accident was supplied were also focused on cooperation with state administration authorities and organizations which were involved in an emergency planning structure. In September 1995, staffing of the ERC was completed and parallel, the first document concerning the ERC prime task, i.e. activities and procedures of of NRA SR Crisis crew in case of an accident at a nuclear installation on the territory of the Slovak Republic, was approved by the NRA SR's Management. In the period that is being assessed, NRA SR made significant progress in events classification and emergency planning terminology in order to unify the above between both the Slovak NPPs

  4. Language teachers and teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Ben Said, Selim

    2013-01-01

    This volume gathers contributions from a range of global experts in teacher education to address the topic of language teacher education. It shows how teacher education involves the agency of teachers, which forms part of their identity, and which they take on when integrating into the teaching community of practice. In addition, the volume explores the teachers' situated practice dynamic negotiation of classroom situations, socialization into the professional teaching culture, and ""on the ground experimentation"" with pedagogical skills/techniques.

  5. Gauss Modular-Arithmetic Congruence = Signal X Noise PRODUCT: Clock-model Archimedes HYPERBOLICITY Centrality INEVITABILITY: Definition: Complexity= UTTER-SIMPLICITY: Natural-Philosophy UNITY SIMPLICITY Redux!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, E. E.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Clock-model Archimedes [http://linkage.rockeller.edu/ wli/moved.8.04/ 1fnoise/ index. ru.html] HYPERBOLICITY inevitability throughout physics/pure-maths: Newton-law F=ma, Heisenberg and classical uncertainty-principle=Parseval/Plancherel-theorems causes FUZZYICS definition: (so miscalled) "complexity" = UTTER-SIMPLICITY!!! Watkins[www.secamlocal.ex.ac.uk/people/staff/mrwatkin/]-Hubbard[World According to Wavelets (96)-p.14!]-Franklin[1795]-Fourier[1795;1822]-Brillouin[1922] dual/inverse-space(k,w) analysis key to Fourier-unification in Archimedes hyperbolicity inevitability progress up Siegel cognition hierarchy-of-thinking (HoT): data-info.-know.-understand.-meaning-...-unity-simplicity = FUZZYICS!!! Frohlich-Mossbauer-Goldanskii-del Guidice [Nucl.Phys.B:251,375(85);275,185 (86)]-Young [arXiv-0705.4678y2, (5/31/07] theory of health/life=aqueous-electret/ ferroelectric protoplasm BEC = Archimedes-Siegel [Schrodinger Cent.Symp.(87); Symp.Fractals, MRS Fall Mtg.(89)-5-pprs] 1/w-"noise" Zipf-law power-spectrum hyperbolicity INEVITABILITY= Chi; Dirac delta-function limit w=0 concentration= BEC = Chi-Quong.

  6. Study abroad as professional development for FSL teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Wernicke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In July 2009, a group of over 80 FSL teachers from British Columbia (BC participated in a two-week sojourn at the Centre d’Approches vivantes des Langues et des Médias (CAVILAM in Vichy, France, as part of an initiative to address the critical shortage of qualified French language teachers in the province. After almost four decades of study abroad (SA research, the literature offers little insight into teachers’ professional development abroad. The following article attempts to situate the recent sojourn of the BC teachers within the field by presenting an overview of some of the major research trends of SA research as well as summarizing how teachers have been acknowledged in the literature to date. A description of the program at CAVILAM and the current research study is presented to highlight some of the emerging opportunities for future research on teacher education within a SA context.

  7. Las consonantes del español de Chile pronunciadas por hablantes de inglés estadounidense que aprenden español como segunda lengua (Chilean-Spanish consonants as uttered by American-English native speakers who are learning Spanish as a foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Pradel Suárez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se presentan los resultados de un análisis auditivo y acústico en el que se comparan los segmentos consonánticos españoles producidos por catorce hablantes de inglés estadounidense que aprenden español como lengua extranjera, con aquellos producidos por una hablante nativa de español de la ciudad de Concepción, Chile. Los segmentos consonánticos se agruparon en cinco categorías principales, según las características fonético-fonológicas identificadas en estos sonidos articulados por los hablantes extranjeros. (This article displays the results of an auditory and acoustic analysis of Spanish consonants as uttered by fourteen American learners of Spanish as a foreign language. These results were compared with an analysis of the same consonants produced by a Spanish native speaker from Concepción, Chile. The segments were grouped into five main categories according to the main phonetic and phonological traits identified during their utterance by foreign speakers.

  8. Is it an Emergency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Is it an Emergency? Medical emergencies can be frightening and ... situation. Here you can find information about emergencies. It is essential to know how to recognize the ...

  9. Teacher agency: : what is it and why does it matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sarah; Priestley, M.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of teacher agency has emerged in recent literature as an alternative means of understanding how teachers might enact practice and engage with policy (e.g. Lasky, 2005; Leander & Osbourne, 2008; Ketelaar et al., 2012; Priestley, Biesta & Robinson, 2013). But what is agency? Agency remains an inexact and poorly conceptualised construct in much of the literature, where it is often not clear whether the term refers to an individual capacity of teachers to act agentically or to an emergent ‘ecological’ phenomenon dependent upon the quality of individuals’ engagement with their environments (Biesta & Tedder, 2007). In this chapter, we outline the latter conception of agency, developing a conceptual model for teacher agency that emphasizes the temporal and relational dimension of the achievement of agency. Why does this matter? Recent curriculum policy in many countries heralds a [re]turn to the centrality of the teacher in school-based curriculum development. In many cases, this renewed emphasis on teachers is explicitly tied to change agendas, with teachers described as agents of change. And yet such change agentry (Fullan, 2003) and teacher agency more broadly are often circumscribed by features of the contexts within which teachers work – for example accountability mechanisms and other forms of output regulation of teachers’ work – leading to engagement with policy that is often instrumental and blighted by unintended consequences. In the chapter, we illustrate how a detailed understanding of teacher agency and the conditions under which it is achieved offer considerable potential in enabling teachers to engage with curricular policy in more meaningful ways.

  10. Correlação entre vocabulário expressivo e extensão média do enunciado em crianças com alteração específica de linguagem Correlation between expressive vocabulary and mean length utterance in children with language disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Maria Befi-Lopes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: verificar a influência da idade no desempenho lexical e gramatical, e investigar a existência de correlação entre vocabulário expressivo e as medidas de extensão média de enunciado em crianças com alteração específica de linguagem. MÉTODO: participaram do estudo trinta sujeitos com diagnóstico de alteração específica de linguagem, entre 4:0 a 6:11 anos, sendo dez de cada faixa etária. Todos realizaram de forma completa a prova de vocabulário expressivo (ABFW e de Extensão Média do Enunciado, independente de gênero ou escolaridade. O estudo foi retrospectivo e a coleta de dados se baseou nas filmagens e gravações das provas acima mencionadas. RESULTADOS: o desempenho gramatical não apresentou diferença estatística entre as idades, mas foi observada correlação positiva entre o vocabulário expressivo e o uso de palavras de classe fechada, e entre o vocabulário expressivo e a extensão de palavras por enunciado (p-valor PURPOSE: to check the influence of age on the lexical and grammatical performance, and investigate the correlation between the number of usual verbal description in expressive vocabulary test and measures for mean length of utterance in children with Specific Language Impairment. METHOD: thirty children with Specific Language Impairment between 4:0 and 6:11 year-old took part in the study, and ten were selected from each age range that had the Expressive Vocabulary Test (ABFW and Mean Length of Utterance Test, independent gender or education. The study was retrospective, based on filming and recordings of those tests as for the data collection. RESULTS: no statistical difference was found in the grammatical performance among ages, but positive correlation was observed among the usual verbal description and parameters MG-2 and EME-P for Mean Length of Utterance Test (p< 0.05. CONCLUSION: age alone is not enough to predict improvement of vocabulary and grammar; however the expansion of nouns in vocabulary promotes the increase in the length of produced utterances and the use of grammar function words.

  11. Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemzell-Danielsson K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous attempts to control fertility after unprotected sexual intercourse. From very bizarre methods like the vaginal application of Coca Cola to the more serious attempts using calcium antagonists influencing fertility parameters in sperm to hormonal methods or intrauterine devices. So far, hormonal methods preventing or delaying ovulation have proved to be the most popular starting with the combination of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel, known as the Yuzpe regimen. The first dose had to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, a second one 12 hours later. Later on, levonorgestrel alone, at first in a regimen similar to the Yuzpe method (2 × 0.75 mg 12 hours apart showed to be more successful, eventually resulting in the development of a 1.5 mg levonorgestrel pill that combined good efficacy with a high ease of use. It has become the standard method used up to this day in most countries. Since the mid 1970s copper IUDs have been used for emergency contraception, which show a high efficacy. Their disadvantages lie in the fact that emergency contraception is considered an off label use and that they might not be acceptable for every patient. Mifepristone in doses of 10 or 25 mg is being used successfully as an emergency contraceptive in China, but has never received any significant consideration in Western countries. The most recent development is the approval of the selective progesterone receptor modulator ulipristal acetate in the dosage of 30 mg for emergency contraception up to 5 days after unprotected intercourse, combining the safe and easy application of the single dose levonorgestrel pill with an even higher efficacy. Several efficacious and easy to use methods for emergency contraception are available on the market today with the most widely spread being levonorgestrel in a single dose of 1.5 mg (given as one tablet of 1.5 mg or 2 tablets of 0.75 mg each for administration up to 3 days after unprotected intercourse. Its limitations are the non-optimal efficacy which is decreasing the later the drug is taken and the fact that it can only be used for up to 72 hours after UPSI. Mifepristone in the dosages of 10 or 25 mg is used with good results as an emergency contraceptive in China for up to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse. Recently the selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM ulipristal acetate in the dose of 30 mg has been introduced in Europe for emergency contraception. It has shown to be more efficacious than levonorgestrel and can be used for up to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse. Independent of the substance it should be noted that, if there is a choice, the intake of an oral emergency contraceptive pill should happen as soon as possible after the risk situation.

  12. Emerging Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Peter

    2007-01-01

    South Korean and Taiwanese brands have long been household names. Today, however, the names of transnational companies (TNCs) from an increasingly diverse set of emerging and developing economies are regularly making if not the dinner table conversation then at least the headlines of the international business press. This reflects that companies such as Mittal and Tata (India), China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC), Haier and Lenovo (PRC), Embraer (Brazil), SAPMiller (South Africa), an...

  13. Emergent spin

    OpenAIRE

    Creutz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and relativity in the continuum imply the well known spin-statistics connection. However for particles hopping on a lattice, there is no such constraint. If a lattice model yields a relativistic field theory in a continuum limit, this constraint must "emerge" for physical excitations. We discuss a few models where a spin-less fermion hopping on a lattice gives excitations which satisfy the continuum Dirac equation. This includes such well known systems such...

  14. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  15. Emerging jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  16. Emerging jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Weiler, Andreas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  17. Emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According the conception of the Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA), and the obtained experience from exercises, and as well as on the basis of recommendations of international missions, the NRA SR started, in 1997 the ERC extension. The new room enable the work for radiation protection group, reactor safety and logistic group separately. At the same time special room was build for work of the NECRA Technical Support Group of the Emergency Commission for Radiation Accidents of the SR.This group co-operates closely with ERC while evaluation the situation, and by using the information system of the NRA and database of ERC to generate the conditions of nuclear facilities in once of emergency. Extension of the mentioned rooms was carried out. The financing by the European Union helped to build the project RAMG. In this way the NRA gained a working site which, with its equipment and parameters belongs to the top working sites of regulatory bodies of developed European countries. The NRA preparation of exercise and special staff education was carried out in 1997, for employees of the NRA and members of Emergency Headquarters (EH) for work in ERC in case of nuclear installation accident. The task of education of member of EH was their preparation for carrying out three exercises. These exercises are described. In the area of emergency preparedness, in accordance with inspection plan of the Office, 7 team inspections were carried out in individual localities; in NPP Bohunice, two in NPP Mochovce and one in Bohunice Conditioning Centre for radioactive wastes. Solution of the task of development of science and technology in the area of 'Development of technical and programme means for analyses of accidents and solutions of crisis situations'continued in 1997. Another regulations were elaborated for activity of members of EH of the NRA. The following was was carried out: selection of data for transfer and the following display of the selected data from Technological Information System NPP Bohunice data from Teledosimetric System NPP Bohunice and meteorological data from from Slovak Hydro-meteorological Institute

  18. Teacher Involvement in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kevin O.

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers in the field of teacher education have proposed the formation of partnerships between teachers and teacher educators, without explicitly stating what additional roles teachers might play in the teacher preparation process. This article describes how some pre-service teacher education programmes have increased the involvement of…

  19. `You Have to Give Them Some Science Facts': Primary Student Teachers' Early Negotiations of Teacher Identities in the Intersections of Discourses About Science Teaching and About Primary Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Anna T.; Warwick, Paul

    2014-04-01

    In the broadest sense, the goal for primary science teacher education could be described as preparing these teachers to teach for scientific literacy. Our starting point is that making such science teaching accessible and desirable for future primary science teachers is dependent not only on their science knowledge and self-confidence, but also on a whole range of interrelated sociocultural factors. This paper aims to explore how intersections between different Discourses about primary teaching and about science teaching are evidenced in primary school student teachers' talk about becoming teachers. The study is founded in a conceptualisation of learning as a process of social participation. The conceptual framework is crafted around two key concepts: Discourse (Gee 2005) and identity (Paechter, Women's Studies International Forum, 26(1):69-77, 2007). Empirically, the paper utilises semi-structured interviews with 11 primary student teachers enrolled in a 1-year Postgraduate Certificate of Education course. The analysis draws on five previously identified teacher Discourses: `Teaching science through inquiry', `Traditional science teacher', `Traditional primary teacher', `Teacher as classroom authority', and `Primary teacher as a role model' (Danielsson and Warwick, International Journal of Science Education, 2013). It explores how the student teachers, at an early stage in their course, are starting to intersect these Discourses to negotiate their emerging identities as primary science teachers.

  20. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There are numerous conditions that affect mainly or exclusively the pediatric population. These constitute true emergencies, related to patient's health. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of abdominal non-traumatic emergencies may result in rapid deterioration, peritonitis, sepsis, even death or in severe complications with subsequent morbidity. Abdominal emergencies in children mostly present with pain, tenderness, occasionally coupled by vomiting, fever, abdominal distension, and failure to pass meconium or stools. Diarrhea, blood per rectum, abnormal laboratory tests and lethargy may also be manifestations of acute abdominal conditions. Abdominal emergencies have a different aetiology, depending on age and whether the pain is acute or chronic. Symptoms have to be matched with age and gender. Newborns up to 1 months of age may have congenital diseases: atresia, low obstruction including Hirschsprung's disease, meconium ileus. Meconium plug is one of the commonest cause of low obstruction in newborns that may also develop necrotizing enterocolitis, incarcerated inguinal hernia and mid-gut volvulus. Past the immediate postnatal period, any duodenal obstruction should be considered midgut volvulus until proven otherwise and patients should undergo ultrasonography and/or properly performed upper GI contrast study that records the exact position of the deduno-jejunal junction. Infants 6 months-2 years carry the risk of intussusception, mid-gut volvulus, perforation, acute pyelonephritis. Preschool and school-aged children 2-12 years carry the risk of appendicitis, genito-urinary abnormalities including torsion, urachal abnormalities, haemolytic uremic syndrome and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Children above 12 years suffer from the same conditions as in adults. Most conditions may affect any age despite age predilection. Abdominal solid organ ultrasonography (US) coupled with gastrointestinal ultrasonography is the principle imaging modality in radiosensitive children and young individuals with abdominal pain. Sensitivity and specificity for US in diagnosing intussusception, midgut volvulus, urinary tract abnormalities and appendicitis is over 90%. US, occasionally with x-rays, usually suffice for an accurate diagnosis. Upper GI contrast studies are indicated in suspected malrotation, volvulus and atypical high obstruction cases. Lower GI contrast studies are indicated in low/colonic obstruction. CT and/or MRI should be reserved for atypical, complex cases when US and conventional radiography are equivocal or inconclusive. The radiologist should engage oneself to act immediately, consider and actively exclude those diagnoses that could be a threat to the child's health or life. The appropriate modality should be chosen and proper technique should be applied. Radiologists should function as clinicians, take initiative and discuss options and alternative diagnoses. Lack of experience should not delay performance of tests. Our job is finished when a diagnostic test has a written report provided that we make sure the child is managed properly.

  1. Teacher Representations of English as a Foreign Language: Case Study of Two Teachers in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Turkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a developing nation like Turkey, the English language plays a significant role in educational and socioeconomic mobility. English is acquired and taught as a foreign language (EFL primarily in the classrooms. However, the ways in which English language is represented in classroom instruction have been hardly examined and understood. With that, this paper aims to depict two teachers’ representations of the English language as influenced by a university entrance English language test administered in 2008 in Turkey. The two teachers’ representations of the English language are projected from a 12th grade classroom at an Anatolian Lycee located in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Doyle's task framework is employed, specifically in order to map what content representations emerged out of the teachers' classroom practices. Data sources include biweekly teacher logs, biweekly interviews, and biweekly classroom observations. The paper highlights that the two teachers' classroom representations of English were entrenched with the idea of highstakes test preparation for university admissions as they deemed test preparation as a major part of their classroom instruction. That is, representations of the English language were contracted to tested structures and items. The paper illustrates the teachers’ representations of reading and grammar with the insight that division of labour, though not in the form of collaboration, made it possible for the teachers to cope with the contraction effect of test preparation

  2. Teachers' Beliefs, Teachers' Goals and Teachers' Classroom Management: A Study with Primary Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers' beliefs and teachers' practices tend to fit together. However exceptions seem to be significant. This study, carried out with primary teachers (N = 279, explores the relation of teachers' classroom management beliefs to teachers' classroom goals and teachers' practices. A cluster analysis identified three distinct teaching beliefs' profiles: teacher-centered, student-centered and ambivalent/inconsistent. Clusters somehow overlap in the teaching goals they most value but some striking differences are also apparent. Classroom reported practices clearly differentiate clusters. Somehow surprisingly almost a quarter of participants are ambivalent/inconsistent. For these teachers the mismatch between teaching beliefs, teaching goals and classroom practices seems to elicit some puzzling behaviors (e. g. «humiliating students in classroom that show inappropriate behaviors» that deserve further research.

  3. Protecting Teachers' Privacy Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Ray C.; Hoffman, Darlene Haffner

    2001-01-01

    Addresses concerns about school personnel records and legal precedents regarding privacy. Recommends inclusion in teacher education of content about teachers' privacy rights. Lists fair information practices for schools regarding the accuracy of and access to personnel records. (SK)

  4. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    DR.S.KAYARKANNI

    2012-01-01

    Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusin...

  5. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  6. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  7. Teacher Orientation Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, James; Perkins, Phyllis

    This handbook presents an orientation program for volunteer reading teachers. Four units covered include an overview of the volunteer tutoring program, the classroom teacher's public relations role in the program, implementation of the tutoring program, and the classroom teacher's administrative or managerial role in the volunteer tutoring…

  8. The Master Science Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Kok-Aun; Tsoi, Mun-Fie

    2008-01-01

    The dire need of some schools to boost the academic performance of their students inevitably rests with their ability to attract highly qualified teachers. As such, the UK has put in place the Advanced Skills Teacher (AST) scheme, while the US has set the ball rolling in laying down standards for the certification of the master science teacher, to…

  9. Teacher Education in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Henry

    The trend in Scandinavia is to broaden teacher education and training for academic secondary school teachers in order to overcome excessive specialization. The context of apprenticeship of pre-school, primary teachers is changing toward a more academically oriented program. However, the affective part of the learning/teaching process is becoming…

  10. ESL Teacher and ICT:Teachers' Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua Pei Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of Information Communication and Technologies (ICTs has made tremendous changes in the twenty-first century. ICT is said to bring a variety of benefits in facilitating the teaching and learning process. Therefore, ICT has been the emphasis in school and higher institutions of education nowadays. However, to integrate ICT in education is not problem free, problems are faced by the teachers. This paper aims to investigate the ESL teachers’ perception toward the use of ICT in KT, Malaysia. Data were collected via interviews with four Form 4 English teachers in a secondary school in Kuala Terengganu. Findings show teachers have a positive perception towards the use of ICT. However, teachers claimed they face challenges in using ICT especially due to insufficient facilities.

  11. When Nature of Science Meets Marxism: Aspects of Nature of Science Taught by Chinese Science Teacher Educators to Prospective Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhi Hong; Wong, Siu Ling; Zhan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Nature of science (NOS) is beginning to find its place in the science education in China. In a study which investigated Chinese science teacher educators' conceptions of teaching NOS to prospective science teachers through semi-structured interviews, five key dimensions emerged from the data. This paper focuses on the dimension, "NOS content to be…

  12. AN EVALUATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCY AMONG UNTRAINED TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Education without teacher is just like a body without soul, as the quality of citizens depends on the quality of their education and quality of education depends on the quality of teacher. Teacher in the emerging society has a pivotal role in the social reconstruction and in the transmission of wisdom, knowledge and experience of one generation to another. Hence, there is a great need of competent teachers to meet the ever changing demand of the present society. The present study focuses on “An e va l u a ti o n o f p ro fe ssi o n a l competencies among untrained teachers in Rajouri District of Jammu & Kashmir (India. For the present study data have been collected from a sample of 100 teachers without B. Ed, D. Ed and E.T.T and others types of training working in different schools of Rajouri of Jammu and Kashmir. The present study concluded that the teachers appointed without prior teacher training (B. Ed, D. Ed and E.T.T are professionally untrained, don’t meet the challenges of present era of education system and teaching by such teachers is injustice to the students.

  13. Chemical Emergencies Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Health Matters What's New A - Z Index Chemical Emergencies Overview The CDC has a key role ... information on chemical emergencies For more information… What chemical emergencies are A chemical emergency occurs when a ...

  14. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR.S.KAYARKANNI

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusing on effective classroom management will enhance a teacher's skills and performance in the classroom.

  15. Teacher Transformation: An Exploration of Science Teachers' Changing Professional Identities, Knowledge, and Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Michelle Phillips

    This qualitative, multiple case study examines five teachers' experiences with a National Science Foundation-funded professional development (PD) program focused on science literacy. Using a three dimensional conceptual framework combining transformative learning theory, communities of practice, and sociocultural conceptions of identity it explores: the ways the "Science Literacy through Science Journalism" (SciJourn) project built professional community and influenced teacher learning; the influence of the project on participating science teachers' professional identities, knowledge, and classroom practices; and the ways teachers were or were not transformed by participation in the project. To this end, data from surveys and phenomenological interviews were analyzed through qualitative textual analysis and narrative analysis. Four of the teachers experienced a change in their stories to live by, aka, an identity shift. Three predominant themes emerged across these cases. These included a changed conceptualization of science literacy, the importance of student engagement and authenticity, and the value of SciJourn's professional development and community. The changed conceptualization of science literacy was particularly salient as it challenged these teachers' assumptions, led them to rethink how they teach science literacy, and also influenced them to re-evaluate their teaching priorities beyond the PD. Consequently, this study concludes that PD efforts should focus as much, or more, on influencing teachers' ideas regarding what and how they teach and less on teaching strategies. A close comparison between two teachers' diverging experiences with the program showed that student engagement played a significant role in teachers' perceptions of the value of project, suggesting that whether or not teachers sustain a new practice is closely tied to their students' feedback. Additionally, this analysis showed that a teacher's individualized needs and sense of efficacy in implementing a specific reform effort are of consequence. Thus, in order to be influential, PD must somehow speak to a teacher's individualized needs, whether or not these needs are specifically stated at the program's onset. Aside from wanting to implement a project, a teacher also needs to believe that he or she is capable of successfully doing so. In considering transformative learning theory as a conceptual framework, the research presented here gives evidence that certain phases of transformation may be more significant than others, and phase two (self-examination with feelings of fear, anger, guilt, or shame) should be expanded to include a wider range of emotions.

  16. Emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Rabe, Thomas; Cheng, Linan

    2013-03-01

    There have been numerous attempts to control fertility after unprotected sexual intercourse (UPSI). From very bizarre methods like the vaginal application of Coca Cola to the more serious attempts using calcium antagonists influencing fertility parameters in sperm to hormonal methods or intrauterine devices. So far, hormonal methods preventing or delaying ovulation have proved to be the most popular starting with the combination of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (LNG), known as the Yuzpe regimen. The first dose had to be taken within 72 hours of UPSI, a second one 12 hours later. Later on, LNG alone, at first in a regimen similar to the Yuzpe method (2?×?0.75?mg 12 hours apart) showed to be more successful, eventually resulting in the development of a 1.5?mg LNG pill that combined good efficacy with a high ease of use. Several efficacious and easy to use methods for emergency contraception (EC) are available on the market today with the most widely spread being LNG in a single dose of 1.5?mg (given as one tablet of 1.5?mg or 2 tablets of 0.75?mg each) for administration up to 3 days (according to WHO up to 5 days) after UPSI. Its limitations are the non-optimal efficacy which is decreasing the later the drug is taken and the fact that it is only approved for up to 72 hours after UPSI. This regimen has no effect on the endometrium, corpus luteum function and implantation, is not abortive and don't harm the fetus if accidentally taken in early pregnancy. It has no impact on the rate of ectopic pregnancies. It has become the standard method used up to this day in most countries. Since the mid 1970s copper IUDs have been used for EC, which show a high efficacy. Their disadvantages lie in the fact that EC is considered an off label use for most IUDs (not for the GynFix copper IUD in the European Union) and that they might not be acceptable for every patient. Furthermore IUD-insertion is an invasive procedure and it is required trained providers and sterilized facilities. Mifepristone in the dosages of 10 or 25?mg is used with good results as an emergency contraceptive in China for up to 120 hours after UPSI, but has never received any significant consideration in Western countries. While high doses of mifepristone has an effect on endometrial receptivity and will inhibit ovulation if given in the follicular phase and prevent implantation if given in the early luteal phase, low doses such as 10?mg has no impact on the endometrium. Mifepristone does not increase the rate of ectopic pregnancies. The most recent development is the approval of the selective progesterone receptor modulator ulipristal acetate (UPA) in the dosage of 30?mg for EC up to 5 days after UPSI, combining the safe and easy application of the single dose LNG pill with an even higher efficacy. It has shown to be more efficacious than LNG and can be used for up to 120 hours after UPSI; the difference in efficacy is highest for 0-24 hours, followed by 0-72 hours following UPSI. No VTE has been reported following UPA-administration or any progesterone receptor modulator. No effect on endometrium, corpus luteum function and implantation has been observed with doses used for EC. Independent of the substance it should be noted that, if there is a choice, the intake of an oral emergency contraceptive pill should happen as soon as possible after the risk situation. A pre-existing pregnancy must be excluded. Possible contraindications and drug interactions must be considered according to the individual special product informations. PMID:23437846

  17. Science teachers' perceptions and implementation of classroom inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, Michael Jerald

    U.S. students' test scores on National and International science assessments have not improved despite the flurry of science education reform efforts. Why have the reforms been largely ineffective? To what extent have teachers come to understand and implement the current reform initiatives? These are questions that need answers in order to help us accomplish our goal of providing students with a well-rounded science education. The purpose of this study is to start answering these questions by examining the relationship between teachers' perception and implementation of inquiry instruction, as well as their students' perception and performance on inquiry activities. Two research questions, how do teachers perceive and implement inquiry teaching and how are teachers' beliefs about student learning reflected in their pedagogy, were used to guide this study. A group of 6 science teachers and their students from grades 7 to 12 were the subjects for this study. A mixed methodology was utilized using both qualitative and quantitative data. Data from surveys of teachers and students, classroom observations, and interviews of teachers and students was analyzed and then categorized into similar groups and subgroups in order to answer the research questions. The common themes and conclusions that emerged from this study were that: Teachers exhibit a continuum of inquiry, ranging from teachers who incorporate a little inquiry into their instruction to those who have integrated it as a part of their normal instruction. Teachers' beliefs about student learning and inquiry instruction are related to their pedagogical practices. Another finding is that students have little say into what occurs instructionally in the classroom. Lastly, there exists an incongruity between the data from the surveys and the interview data, which further illustrates the usefulness of using a mixed methodological approach. Further research is recommended to examine how to best use information on teacher's epistemological beliefs about student learning and inquiry to help teachers move along the inquiry continuum towards a more inquiry-based classroom.

  18. Beginning teachers’ challenges in their pursuit of effective teaching practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Confait

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the context and experiences of three beginning teachers in their effort to improve their teaching and to implement and align themselves with their schools’ expectations of effective teaching practices. Research findings emerging from a sociocultural-ethnographic framework revealed that participants challenged their own beliefs about effective teaching practices in aligning themselves with their schools’ expectations. In complying with routine expectations, they embraced predominantly teacher-centred practices, rather than a student-centred approach. Given the ongoing effort to augment the quality of education in the Seychelles, beginning teachers’ implementation of and access to evidenced-based practices could be recognised as part of this endeavour.

  19. Emerging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  20. Emerging memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Livio; Bez, Roberto; Sandhu, Gurtej

    2014-12-01

    Memory is a key component of any data processing system. Following the classical Turing machine approach, memories hold both the data to be processed and the rules for processing them. In the history of microelectronics, the distinction has been rather between working memory, which is exemplified by DRAM, and storage memory, exemplified by NAND. These two types of memory devices now represent 90% of all memory market and 25% of the total semiconductor market, and have been the technology drivers in the last decades. Even if radically different in characteristics, they are however based on the same storage mechanism: charge storage, and this mechanism seems to be near to reaching its physical limits. The search for new alternative memory approaches, based on more scalable mechanisms, has therefore gained new momentum. The status of incumbent memory technologies and their scaling limitations will be discussed. Emerging memory technologies will be analyzed, starting from the ones that are already present for niche applications, and which are getting new attention, thanks to recent technology breakthroughs. Maturity level, physical limitations and potential for scaling will be compared to existing memories. At the end the possible future composition of memory systems will be discussed.

  1. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Sharpening Skills for Our Century (Valerie von Frank); (2) Lessons from a Coach: First, I Assess How Teachers Learn (Julie…

  2. Teacher Educator Identity Development of the Nontraditional Teacher Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The development of a professional teacher educator identity has implications for how one negotiates the duties of a teacher, scholar, and learner. The research on teacher educator identity in the USA has been largely conducted on traditional teacher educators, or those who have started their careers as public school teachers and then went on to…

  3. Strengthening Teacher Education Program: Keys to Develop through Teacher Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Tecnam Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Teacher performance assessment is a part of a global trend based on teacher education program. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the American Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) program, to identify some of the features in creating a system for pre-service teachers in developing countries, and to suggest an ideal TPA model for strengthening the teacher education program.

  4. Violence in public school: reports of teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Carneiro Ferreira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the perception of violence from the reports of teachers of elementary and high school in a public state school in Fortaleza, Ceará. Method: A qualitative descriptive study conducted with 26 teachers, in the period from January to May 2006. To collect the data we adopted the following procedures: the discussion on school violence during the meetings of the teacher training week; the reading of the school regulations and the distribution of an instrument with the guiding question about the concept of violence as from the school reality, among the participants of the study. Afterwards, the thematic analysis of the reports was carried out. Results: Through the reports of teachers emerged the following categories: physical aggression, verbal aggression and fights as the most cited; to hide personal belongings, cursing, shoving and disrespect for the teacher and pranks were also mentioned. Conclusion: From the reports it appears that violence is perceived in physical, dimension moral and symbolic, and these “typologies” corroborate the descriptions found in literature as bullying or incivility, which dominate the school context.

  5. Correlação entre vocabulário expressivo e extensão média do enunciado em crianças com alteração específica de linguagem / Correlation between expressive vocabulary and mean length utterance in children with language disorder

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Debora Maria, Befi-Lopes; Camila de Oliveira, Nuñes; Ana Manhani, Cáceres.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: verificar a influência da idade no desempenho lexical e gramatical, e investigar a existência de correlação entre vocabulário expressivo e as medidas de extensão média de enunciado em crianças com alteração específica de linguagem. MÉTODO: participaram do estudo trinta sujeitos com diagnó [...] stico de alteração específica de linguagem, entre 4:0 a 6:11 anos, sendo dez de cada faixa etária. Todos realizaram de forma completa a prova de vocabulário expressivo (ABFW) e de Extensão Média do Enunciado, independente de gênero ou escolaridade. O estudo foi retrospectivo e a coleta de dados se baseou nas filmagens e gravações das provas acima mencionadas. RESULTADOS: o desempenho gramatical não apresentou diferença estatística entre as idades, mas foi observada correlação positiva entre o vocabulário expressivo e o uso de palavras de classe fechada, e entre o vocabulário expressivo e a extensão de palavras por enunciado (p-valor Abstract in english PURPOSE: to check the influence of age on the lexical and grammatical performance, and investigate the correlation between the number of usual verbal description in expressive vocabulary test and measures for mean length of utterance in children with Specific Language Impairment. METHOD: thirty chil [...] dren with Specific Language Impairment between 4:0 and 6:11 year-old took part in the study, and ten were selected from each age range that had the Expressive Vocabulary Test (ABFW) and Mean Length of Utterance Test, independent gender or education. The study was retrospective, based on filming and recordings of those tests as for the data collection. RESULTS: no statistical difference was found in the grammatical performance among ages, but positive correlation was observed among the usual verbal description and parameters MG-2 and EME-P for Mean Length of Utterance Test (p

  6. Reaching the teachers

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The fourth edition of CERN's High School Teachers programme welcomed 38 teachers to the Laboratory this July. For three weeks the teachers were immersed in the life of CERN, giving them a unique experience to take back to their classrooms.   Participants and organisers of the HST 2001 programme. The pupils of the teachers who attended the High School Teachers (HST) programme at CERN will notice a difference when they meet their teachers at the beginning of next term. They'll see a new-found enthusiasm in their eyes, and this will be thanks to the three weeks they spent at the Laboratory attending the summer students' lectures and working with other teachers from around the world. 'This experience fires you up again!,' explains Wim Peeters, a Belgian teacher at CERN for the second time. For many teachers of physics, university is a long time ago. Physics research has moved on, and there are many new things to learn. That's why CERN has the HST, so that teachers can mix with university students in ...

  7. Making a Difference: Measuring the Effectiveness of Mississippi Teacher Corps Teachers as Compared to Non-Mississippi Teacher Corps Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, James Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi Teacher Corps (MTC) was founded in 1989. Over the past 23 years more than 500 MTC participants have taught in critical-needs schools in Mississippi. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Mississippi Teacher Corps teachers as compared to non-Mississippi Teacher Corps teachers. The method of research was a…

  8. Current Issues in Teacher Autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    WI?NIEWSKA, DANUTA

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a review of a selection of the literature in the field of English foreign language teaching related to teacher autonomy. The focus is on the core themes recurring in the literature, which comprise: rationale for teacher autonomy, definitions of the concept, descriptions of an autonomous teacher, recognition of the constraints on autonomy and suggestions for teacher education promoting teacher autonomy.

  9. Teacher Knowledge: A Complex Tapestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoniou, Misty

    2015-01-01

    Teachers need to know a great deal, in many areas and in multiple ways. Teacher knowledge is a complex tapestry, and teachers must successfully weave the multiple threads. In this article, I present a conceptualisation of teacher knowledge that provides a framework for describing the complexity of teacher knowledge. The framework describes three…

  10. More than Measurement: The TAP System's Lessons Learned for Designing Better Teacher Evaluation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerald, Craig D.; Van Hook, Kristan

    2011-01-01

    Teacher evaluation has emerged as a major focus for reform at the highest levels of education policymaking, and for good reason. Most evaluations are based on scant evidence of actual effectiveness, produce inflated ratings, and provide teachers with little useful feedback. This paper offers policymakers and practitioners important "lessons…

  11. Integrating Collaborative PBL with Blended Learning to Explore Preservice Teachers' Development of Online Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-chu

    2010-01-01

    This study integrated collaborative problem-based learning (collaborative PBL) with blended learning to explore the emerging process and function of online learning communities among preservice teachers. Thirty-two preservice teachers participated in a 16-week instruction program. Analyses of online group discussions and portfolios found that (a)…

  12. Parent and Teacher Ratings of Communication among Children with Severe Disabilities and Visual Impairment/Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Paul W.; Trief, Ellen; Bruce, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Three trends emerged from independent parent and teacher ratings of receptive communication and expressive forms and functions among students with severe disabilities and visual impairment/blindness. Parents had higher ratings than teachers, receptive communication was rated the highest, and no skills occurred often. Implications are discussed for…

  13. Teaching Style, ICT Experience and Teachers' Attitudes toward Teaching with Web 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Ugur; Goh, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis on 21st Century Skills development has increased expectations on teachers to take advantages of emerging technologies to support student learning. Yet it is not clear whether teachers are well equipped with the necessary skills, support, and positive attitudes toward integrating them in their practices. Even though student-centered…

  14. The "Trainer in Your Pocket:" Mobile Phones within a Teacher Continuing Professional Development Program in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Christopher S.; Power, Tom; Khatoon, Masuda; Biswas, Sudeb Kumar; Paul, Ashok Kumar; Sarkar, Bikash Chandra; Griffiths, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Examples of mobile phones being used with teachers to provide continuing professional development (CPD) in emerging economies at scale are largely absent from the research literature. We outline English in Action's (EIA) model for providing 80,000 teachers with CPD to improve their communicative language teaching in Bangladesh over nine…

  15. Japanese Nursery and Kindergarten Teachers' Beliefs and Practices Regarding Developmentally Appropriate Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Archana V.; Sugita, Chisato; Crane-Mitchell, Linda; Averett, Paige

    2014-01-01

    This study explored Japanese day nursery and kindergarten teachers' beliefs and practices regarding developmentally appropriate practices. Data were collected using in-depth interviews. Teacher interviews provided insights into the merger of the childcare and education systems of Japan. Six themes emerged from the analysis of the day nursery…

  16. Developing a Scale for Teacher Integration of Information and Communication Technology in Grades 1-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S.

    2010-01-01

    There is no unified view about how teachers' integration of information and communication technology (ICT) should be measured. While many instruments have focused on the technological aspects, recent studies have suggested teachers' pedagogical considerations, professional development, and emerging ethical and safety issues should be included when…

  17. Professional Mathematics Teacher Identity: Analysis of Reflective Narratives from Discourses and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjuland, Raymond; Cestari, Maria Luiza; Borgersen, Hans Erik

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the methodological use of reflective narratives from discourses and activities of an experienced primary teacher as evidence of her professional identity. The teacher's reflective narratives emerge from her participation in a 3-year developmental and research project, Learning Communities in Mathematics, conducted at the…

  18. Já jako u?itelka: profesní sebepojetí studentky u?itelství v posledním ro?níku pregraduální p?ípravy. / My teacher self: Professional self-concept of a student teacher in the last year of undergraduate training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Pravdová

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the professional self-concept of a student teacher in the last year of undergraduate training. The study reflects overview studies dealing with the issue of self-concept and the professional self-concept of the teacher. The importance of positive professional self-concept at the onset of professionaldevelopment is documented and terms are conceptualized to suit needs of qualitative research. Content analysis of a free utterance and an in-depth interview concentrates on the search for dominating aspects of self-concept, the description of the selfconcept in relation to the self-discrepancy theory and the thoughts about a possibledevelopment of the professional self. It shows that the most significant aspect of the student’s self-concept is the fear emanating from the discrepancy between the ideal self and the real self, between the ought self and the real self. Despite the factthat the student is formulating her self-concept as a teacher, it is constructed almost exclusively on experience gained in the role of a pupil. Following up this findings, the study discusses the question in what way the forming of professional self-concept should be influenced during the undergraduate teacher training.

  19. Human Rights Education Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Todd

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a set of human rights education standards for classroom teachers and, by implication, outcomes for teacher preparation programs. The discussion includes a brief description of human rights education and concludes with recommendations for teacher preparation programs.

  20. "Our teacher speaks English at all times!" The mining of profesors usage of language at forin language lesson"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Sešek

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Different approaches to foreign language teaching can entail very different approaches to the use of the target language in the classroom. The currently prevailing opinion is that the teacher should not primarily use the learners' mother tongue but the target language, as far as that is possible and meaningful. This is important even though today's learners of mainstream-taught foreign languages in Slovenia are much more exposed to their target language outside of school than they were even 10 years ago. The teacher's use of the target language namely represents not only a source of input and a model of its active usage but is also a means of establishing authority and a tool for execution of classroom activities. In order to successfully carry out all of her/his increasingly demanding professional tasks, the teacher should maintain and develop their target language competences in terms of accuracy, appropriateness and modification strategies to adapt to learner needs. It is also very useful to look at the teacher's target language use from a functional perspective to become aware of how different types of utterances / speech acts / language forms can contribute to achieving different educational goals.

  1. Greek Teachers Programme 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The 3rd edition of this year's Greek Teachers Programme was co-organized by CERN Education Group and the Hellenic Physical Society and took place from 8 to 12 November 2015. The programme targets physics high-school teachers from all over Greece. It aims to help teachers inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers by motivating their students to understand and appreciate how science works at the world's largest physics laboratory, whereby increasing their interest in pursuing studies in STEM fields in secondary and post-secondary education. 33 teachers took part in this programme which comprised lectures by Greek members of the CERN scientific community, with visits to experimental facilities, hands-on activities and dedicated sessions on effective and creative ways through which participants may bring physics, particle physics and CERN closer to their school classroom. In 2015, more than 100 teachers took part in the three editions of the Greek Teachers Programme.

  2. Innovations in Science and Technology Education through Science Teacher Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben B. Akpan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One emerging issue highlighted in a UNESCO booklet (Fensham, 2008, p6is to draw attention to the need for students to receive science education from able science teachers. The booklet emphasizes that quality science learning time, albeit less, is preferable to the damage done by underequipped science teachers. It also draws attention to the important role of science teacher associations, where its members not only have the insights and experience, but also the interest in helping science teacher colleagues. This paper highlights the various contributions possible from Science Teacher Associations (STAs to the development and delivery of innovative science and technology education in a world that is increasinglydriven by the outputs of science and technology. It stresses the key role of such professional bodies in developing teacher ownership, the sharing of experience at a collaborative level and to be guided to take active responsibility for the interpretations of the intended Government curriculum so as to provide innovative science education best suited to students within their school. Any shift away from ‘teaching the textbook information’,‘teaching to the examination’ and towards ‘assessment for learning’(formative assessment will be heavily enhanced by the setting up ofmultiple professional fora for enhancing the development of teacher’s PCK(pedagogical content knowledge.

  3. Place-based education: An impetus for teacher efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tamara Chase

    This research investigated professional development in place-based (PB) methodology on the efficacy of science teachers. While teachers are expected to use best practices they do not always implement them due to a lack of efficacy in implementation. A professional development program (PD) was designed to increase confidence among teachers planning to incorporate PB methods. Place-based education (PBE) is recognized as a best-practice among professional educators. PBE includes the selection, design and engagement with science using the geographic place as the content. The literature reports that student learning and teacher efficacy will improve when teachers are prepared effectively in PB practices. This dissertation research examined the effects of PD in PB methodology and its influence on the efficacy of seven science teachers who participated in this research. An exploratory, qualitative research approach was used to study the characteristics of change among teachers. Qualitative information was collected about the teachers' confidence with PBE methodology and practices through interviews, in reflective journals and through observations of them working with students in PB settings. Changes in teacher efficacy were accompanied by their becoming more intentional with PBE, networking with experts and expressing a commitment to connect content with the community. The consistency of changes in efficacy among the seven teachers in the study was mixed. Three of the teachers became more confident in their approach to teaching using PB methods and reported the gain in confidence was influenced by the PBE professional development. Three teachers reported that the PD had little effect on their efficacy as teachers to implement PBE. These teachers cited complications from more critical issues in their careers such as time to prepare PBE lessons and meaningful participation in the PD. Those difficulties proved to be hindrances in developing efficacy in implementing PBE. Themes emerging from this research are: PBE is accepted by teachers as a positive methodology to improve efficacy; PBE was recognized as connecting students with and engaging them in learning about their local community and environment; longevity in teaching does not equate with efficacy, and the level of efficacy improves when teachers meaningfully engage in PBE.

  4. WEIGHTING OF STUDENTS’ PREFERENCES OF TEACHER’S COMPETENCIES

    OpenAIRE

    BROŽOVÁ, Helena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the proposed methodology of identification of the students’ weights or preferences of teacher’s managerial competencies at the Faculty of Economics, Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague (CULS). The goal of this article is not to evaluate the teacher’s scientific ability but describe the evaluation of the teacher’s managerial competencies weights from students’ point of view. For setting of weights there are many different methods that varied in th...

  5. Teacher Sorting, Teacher Quality, and Student Composition : Evidence from Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Bonesrønning, Hans; Falch, Torberg; Strøm, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    Using panel data for Norwegian schools, we establish a two-equation supply and demand model for teachers with approved education. Taking into account nationally determined teacher pay and a strict teacher appointment rule, the data enable us to separately estimate supply and demand functions for certified teachers. The results clearly indicate that the student body composition, and in particular students belonging to ethnic minorities, influences both teacher supply and teacher demand. The im...

  6. Quality Teacher Educators = Quality Teachers? Conceptualizing Essential Domains of Knowledge for Those Who Teach Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, A. Lin; Kosnik, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Becoming a teacher educator involves more than a job title. One becomes a teacher educator as soon as one does teacher education, but one's professional identity as a teacher educator is constructed over time. Developing an identity and practices in teacher education is best understood as a process of becoming. Though the work of teaching…

  7. Teachers and Bullying Developing a Deeper Understanding of Teachers' Perceptions of Teacher-to-Student Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerillo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Students report that teachers bully them, but a review of the literature indicates that little attention has been given to teacher-to-student bullying. This study used a mixed-methods approach to investigate elementary teachers' perceptions of seriousness and their intent to intervene in teacher bullying incidents. Results indicated that teachers

  8. Qualifying online teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide there is an increasing demand for educational institutions to offer part of their educations online and mixed mode. For institutions to comply with these demands, it is necessary to prepare teachers (and other members of the staff), to fulfil their responsibilities within the virtual environment. Teachers must be able to organize their courses pedagogically according to different conditions, i.e., subject domains, group sizes, variations within communication and interaction. Teachers m...

  9. Teacher Test Accountability.

    OpenAIRE

    Ludlow, Larry H.

    2001-01-01

    Given the high stakes of teacher testing, there is no doubt that every teacher test should meet the industry guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Unfortunately, however, there is no public or private business or governmental agency that serves to certify or in any other formal way declare that any teacher test does, in fact, meet the psychometric recommendations stipulated in the Standards. Consequently, there are no legislated penalties for faulty ...

  10. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Folkestad, Lars; Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs.

  11. Music teacher training in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik

    2008-01-01

    The present study analyses views of early childhood music teachers and conservatory teachers on relations between theory and practice and between teacher training and teaching practice. Tentative conclusions were a.o. that teachers and even more educators tend to value practical over theoretical knowledge; educators tend to understand teacher training in terms of apprenticeship rather than acquisition of theoretical as well as practical based professional competence in teaching; teacher training...

  12. La construcción de sentido: el caso de los enunciados metafóricos y el discurso académico / The Construction of Sense: The Case of Metaphoric Utterance in Academic Discourse

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Beatriz, Hall.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available En las últimas décadas, el discurso académico se ha convertido en objeto de estudio de numerosas investigaciones que, a partir de diferentes marcos teóricos, se proponen distintos objetivos. Por otra parte, si bien la llamada metáfora ha sido motivo de reflexión teórica desde la antigüedad, en los ú [...] ltimos años la cantidad y variedad de estudios que se han desarrollado y siguen desarrollándose en torno a este objeto de estudio ha aumentado considerablemente. En tal contexto de múltiples propuestas teóricas y metodológicas, este trabajo tiene por objetivo demostrar que, tanto el estudio de la metáfora como el del discurso académico, involucra decisivamente conceptos que no siempre aparecen explicitados. Nos referimos, entre otros, a los conceptos de lengua, sujeto, sentido, sentido literal y sentido metafórico. Por nuestra parte, desde un punto de vista semántico discursivo no referencialista de la lengua (Schulz, 2000; 2002; 2004), recogemos los aportes provenientes del Análisis del Discurso (línea francesa-brasileña). Así, partimos de la definición de discurso como efecto de sentido entre locutores y lo estudiamos en su relación constitutiva con las condiciones de producción. Entendemos que las condiciones de producción y circulación de los textos se materializan en mecanismos discursivos, según las representaciones imaginarias de los sujetos. De acuerdo con esta línea investigativa, finalmente, proponemos caracterizar las llamadas metáforas como construcciones semánticas insertas en una dinámica discursiva y, en este sentido, las redefinimos como enunciados metafóricos. Abstract in english In recent decades academic discourse has changed into an object of study of numerous investigations that, starting from different theoretical frameworks, propose different objectives. n the other hand, if the so-called metaphor has been the motive of theoretical reflection since ancient times, in re [...] cent years the quantity and variety of studies that have been developed and continue to be developed around this object of study have risen considerably. In such a context of multiple theoretical and methodological proposals, this work has as its objective to demonstrate that both the study of metaphor and that of academic discourse decisively involve concepts that don't always appear to be explicitated. We are referring to, among others, the concepts of language, subject, meaning, literal meaning, and metaphorical meaning. or our part, from a semantic discursive non referentialist point of view of language (Schulz, 2000; 2002; 2004) we gather the contributions from Discourse Analysis (the French-Brazilian variety). hus we start from the definition of discourse as a meaning effect between speakers and we study it in its constitutive relationship with the production conditions. e understand that the production conditions and circulation of texts materialize in discursive mechanisms according to the imaginary representations of the subjects. inally in accordance with this investigative line we propose characterizing the so-called metaphors as semantic constructions inserted in discursive dynamics and in this sense, we redefine them as metaphoric utterances.

  13. Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  14. Recognizing medical emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swallowing a poisonous substance Upper abdominal pain or pressure BE PREPARED Determine the location and quickest route to the nearest emergency department before an emergency happens. Keep emergency phone numbers posted by the phone. Everyone in your ...

  15. 21ST CENTURY TEACHER EDUCATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JACQUELINE KAREEM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching today is no longer a craft passed on without change from one generation to the next. Teaching as one has seen teaching done, or teaching as one has been taught is the trend of the day. Teacher education is a tentacle in the educational system which has policies and procedures designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, attitudes, behaviors and skills they require to perform their tasks effectively in the classroom, school and wider community. The main function of teacher education is to develop professionalism in the teacher trainees. The enhancement of teacher quality and professionalism of teachers is in the hands of the teacher educators. Who is a Teacher Educator.? A simple answer would be anyone who educates teachers. In this paper the author has defined a Teacher Educator as one who provides formal instruction and conduct research and development for educating prospective and practicing teachers. Teacher educators provide the professional education component of pre-service programs and the staff development component of in-service programs. The paper discusses the standards for teacher educators set by Association of Teacher Educators, Virgina, USAand its relevance to Indian teacher educators. Some of the areas discussed are teaching, cultural competence, professional development, program development, research etc ,. A more systemic orchestrated approach to selection, preparation, and renewal of teacher educators is the need of the hour. Teacher educators should explore new options for determining their roles and how those roles in working with teacher candidates are to be defined.

  16. Contracting to Demonstrate Teacher Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, John E.

    1979-01-01

    The Lincoln, Nebraska, Teacher Corps' contracting process offers an effective model for team teaching, individualizing/personalizing instruction, and demonstrating both teacher and learner levels of competency. (JMF)

  17. Children as Art Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    A goal of art learning is always independence, for everyone to become their own art teacher. Teaching for artistic independence can never start too early. As art teachers, children acquire confidence in their art, and in coming to school as artists. Children should be considered artists in residence and visiting artists in schools. It makes sense…

  18. Managing Serious Teacher Misbehaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Damien

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of five head teachers who were responsible for the management of serious teacher misbehaviour (TMB) in England. In cases that included the downloading of extreme pornography on a school laptop and a sexual relationship with a pupil, the multiple impacts of TMB were potentially devastating to the…

  19. RAP Coaching with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Suzanne; Shields, Julie; Chesman, Jodi; Langsam, Fred; Langsam, Jonathan; Strauss, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Training for special education teachers rarely addresses how to work with students who are in crisis or who are displaying aggression. Often teachers are instructed that disruptive students should be punished or excluded from the classroom. The behavior management style becomes one of authority, power, and control rather than problem solving.…

  20. Why Teachers Burn Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This survey involving 1,211 teachers from 2 independent school districts in western Canada addressed teacher burnout issues. Findings of this qualitative/quantitative study indicate that experiences other than prolonged work stress may lead to burnout. These other factors include depersonalization and status dissatisfaction. (TJH)

  1. Teachers and Faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the roles that faith and vocation play in teaching. Faith can lead to a sense of calling that impacts the identity and integrity of the teacher, which, in turn, influences the holistic development of students. Therefore, teachers of faith who respect the limits of religious belief in public schools are essential contributors to…

  2. Disrupting Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are increasingly recognized as the most important in-school factor in student achievement, yet the quality of the country's K-12 teaching force is not up to snuff. Much of the blame has been placed on education schools, which have come under fire for failing to produce enough high-performing teachers. Both initial certification…

  3. Teachers as Verbal Perpetrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Weagraff, Pat; Donaldson, Diane

    This paper briefly discusses: violence as a context for verbal abuse; the legacy of student discipline in schools; a model indicating that verbal abuse is learned; data showing teachers do verbally abuse students; and a variety of ways to deal with this problem. Factors inducing teachers to exhibit aggressive behavior are identified and include:…

  4. Aquaculture. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan S.

    This color-coded guide was developed to assist teachers in helping interested students plan, build, stock, and run aquaculture facilities of varied sizes. The guide contains 15 instructional units, each of which includes some or all of the following basic components: objective sheet, suggested activities for the teacher, instructor supplements,…

  5. Meditation and Teacher Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Imre Emeric; Buchanan, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood teachers can be relaxed and peaceful as they create playful and harmonious classrooms, even if they work in stressful contexts. However, the stressors faced by teachers may lead to negative consequences that can undermine their ability to sustain personal health and positive interactions. In the absence of positive coping…

  6. Revisiting Teachers as Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Liz

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of teachers as learners within the context of radical changes that have taken place within the education system in England over the past 25 years. The concept of "professional courage" is discussed and examined in relation to questions and issues raised by Paulo Freire in a series of letters to teachers (1997).…

  7. Focus on the Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Carol

    2012-01-01

    This article begins with a brief overview of some of the salient issues that have impacted on teaching practice in recent years. In order to canvass teacher concerns regarding these issues, a questionnaire was given to a class of practising teachers studying for a Masters degree in ELT at a Turkish university asking them to rate a number of key…

  8. Why Teacher Voice Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.; Potter, Halley

    2014-01-01

    Kahlenberg and Potter report on research that shows when teachers are engaged in school decisions and collaborate with administrators and each other, school climate improves. The authors add, this promotes a better learning environment for students, which raises student achievement, and a better working environment for teachers, which reduces…

  9. The teacher under stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjaji? Stevan B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical records consistently point to the fact that the phenomenon of stress is characteristic of service professions, especially of teacher’s. Although stress in teachers is a problem of public interest, it is still a relatively new field of empirical investigations. Data available show that stress in teachers can have negative effects on school as an organization teacher professional achievement, his/her and his/her family psychosocial status. The most frequent symptoms of a prolonged professional stress are anxiety, depression, frustration, unfriendly behavior towards students and colleagues, emotional weariness, and extreme tension. Health and psychological problems cause, most frequently, the reduction of self-esteem job dissatisfaction, job resignation, absenteeism, and wrong decision-making. In an attempt to call professional public attention to negative effects of stress on the outcomes of teacher work, we have analyzed four important aspects of stress teachers experience in their everyday work (a definition and measurement of stress, (b distribution and sources of stress (problem behaviors in students, poor working conditions, lack of time, poor school ethos, (c teacher personality traits (sex, age, work experience, locus of control, job satisfaction, intention to resign absenteeism, (d strategies for overcoming and reducing negative effects of stress (direct action techniques, palliative techniques.

  10. Facilitating Teacher Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, Sharon; Beauchat, Katherine A.

    2008-01-01

    Although literacy coaching means many different things, all coaching initiatives have one common commitment: the goal of building teacher expertise. In the authors' work as coaches and with coaches, they have relied on teacher study groups as a main strategy for accomplishing this task. Their understanding of the potential for study groups has…

  11. Evolution. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershad, Carol

    This teacher's guide was developed to assist teachers in the use of multimedia resources for the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) program, "Evolution." Each unit uses an inquiry-based approach to meet the National Science Education Standards. Units include: (1) "What is the Nature of Science?"; (2) "Who Was Charles Darwin?"; (3) "What is the…

  12. Teachers in Early Christianity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the idea that the Early Church supported teachers as one of the ministry offices within the local church. These teachers worked to mature the spiritual life of the congregation and so helped to free the pastoral ministry to focus on other duties, many of which fall on pastors. Most ministers, pastors, and others teach at one…

  13. The Media Teacher's Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarratt, Elaine, Ed.; Davison, Jon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Media Teacher's Handbook" is an indispensible guide for all teachers, both specialist and non-specialist, delivering Media Studies and media education in secondary schools and colleges. It is the first text to draw together the three key elements of secondary sector teaching in relation to media study--the "theoretical", the "practical" and…

  14. Dewey's Challenge to Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Stephen M.; McCarthy, Lucille

    2010-01-01

    Given the serious social problems confronting Americans and others worldwide, the authors propose that Dewey's 1932 challenge to teachers is worthy of reconsideration by educators at all levels. In times similar to our own, Dewey challenged teachers to cultivate students' capacities to identify their happiness with what they can do to improve the…

  15. The Celluloid Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Though the filmed portrayal of teachers can be inspiring or humorously satirical, the stereotype offered in those films might tell us much about how the larger culture views traditionally trained teachers and how schools can be reformed. It is argued here that Hollywood's emphasis on the need for outsiders to come in and rescue students from…

  16. Wanted: Two Million Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southworth, Samuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Faced with dwindling supplies of teachers (particularly in specific areas), many states are offering tempting recruitment initiatives. Factors that make school districts attractive to applicants include fair pay, bonuses, a safe and attractive living environment, parent participation in schools, new teacher mentoring, community valuing of…

  17. Alchemy and the Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Clifford

    2003-01-01

    In order for teachers to reflect deeply upon themselves, they need powerful models and images to guide their introspection. In teacher reflectivity, as in the therapeutic processes, psychic energy must ultimately be "contained" by models and modalities that enable one to make sense out of one's inner and outer experiences. This enables those…

  18. Teacher talk about science: An examination of the constructed understanding of science held by four elementary school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert John

    The elementary school teacher's personal understanding of science has not been a primary focus of consideration in educational reform discussions. This study examines how four elementary school teachers have constructed their personal understanding of science. The purpose of this study is to explore core understandings about science held by these teachers, and to examine the origins of these ideas. This study assumes that a teacher's understanding of science is unique and constructed on personal experiences affected by influences. This study further explores the relationship of the teachers understanding to the school's stated curriculum. The theoretical framework of this research recognizes three guiding assumptions: science exists as a set of ideas that have developed over time through competing discourses; the teacher plays an important role in the implementation of the science curriculum; and the guiding influences of a teacher's understanding of science are associated with power that emerges from discourse. The methodology in this qualitative study is closely associated with narrative inquiry. Data collection methods include a questionnaire, focus group sessions, and individual interviews. Teachers' stories were collected through collaborative interview opportunities between the researcher and the participants. The findings are presented through the narratives of the four teachers, and are organized through the guiding influences, and talk related to the stated science curriculum. The teachers' talk can be categorized by three broad guiding influences: family, education, and an image of science. The talk related to the stated curriculum illustrates both conflicts, and a relationship between the teachers' understanding of science and the curriculum. The finding of this study provides evidence that each teacher's understanding of science is unique and developed over time. Additionally, this understanding plays a role in how the stated curriculum is discussed and understood. This investigation recommends that teachers' personal understanding of science, as revealed through narrative inquiry, becomes a focus in developing new educational opportunities for elementary school teachers. This study further recommends challenging a hegemony related to positivism that exists in science curricula, and the addition of the valued voice of elementary teachers to the discourse of science education.

  19. Effective Teacher’s Attitudes According to Teacher’s Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayfer ?AH?N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research is to determine the qualifications which an effective teacher should have and to designate these qualifications according to their importance in the light of teachers? perception.Teachers working in K?r?ehir city center have been the environment for this research.A specific sample hasn?t been choosen because all the environment has been reached.The questionnaire which has been made by the researcher has been used in order to collect data and these data have been analysed by using techniques of frequency and percentage and then interpreted in schedules.At the end of the research,effective teacher attitudes in the light of their perceptions have been classified as „?personality??, „?professional sufficiency??, „?behaviour to students??, „?branch knowledge?? and determined order of their importance.According to the teachers in this working group, preference orders of effective theacher qualifications have not changed in terms of their branches.

  20. Emotionally intelligent teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Cabello

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the importance of complementing teachers’ training with the learning and development of social and emotional aspects. It is in this way that Emotional Intelligence (EI –understood as a complement of the cognitive development of teachers and students– is to play a role in the educational context. We review Mayer & Salovey’s ability model (1997, some of the programmes of socio-emotional improvement that are also designed for teachers and several activities for the development of teachers’ EI. In addition, we examine the implications for teachers derived from the development of their EI to enhance their capacity to appropriately perceive, understand and manage one’s own emotions and those of others.

  1. Comparing Teacher Dispositions in China and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Kun; Tamashiro, Roy

    2013-01-01

    In studies conducted in the USA, teacher dispositional factors such as enthusiasm, professional esteem and learning motivation often emerge as the most significant variables affecting student learning and achievement from the primary grades through higher education. Do these factors play as significant a role in student learning and achievement in…

  2. The Secret to Finland's Success: Educating Teachers. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlberg, Pasi

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, Finland has emerged as the leading OECD country in educational achievement. In examining the sources of Finland's dramatic rise to the top, research shows one key element that has impacted Finland's success above all others: excellent teachers. This policy brief details the key elements of Finland's successful system, examining…

  3. Methodology and Resources of the Itinerant Speech and Hearing Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion-Martinez, Jose J; de la Rosa, Antonio Luque

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Having spent twenty years of business and professional development from the emergence of speech and hearing teacher traveling, it seems appropriate to reflect on the role he has been playing this figure in order to apprehend the things considered to improve the approach to adopt towards to promote the quality of its educational…

  4. Coordination and Teacher Development in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Pauline; Hopkins, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper shares some of the experiences in online coordination and teacher development which have emerged in the English Language Department at the "Universitat Oberta de Catalunya". The advantages and disadvantages of coordination in an asynchronous computer-mediated environment form the backdrop to those issues which we consider to be vital,…

  5. Coaching Teachers: An Important Principal Role. Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    A principal's most important role is instructional leader. There is a growing recognition of the importance of working with teachers, serving as a mentor and coach. Coaching has emerged as one of the more effective professional development options for adult learners. It is an important tool because it is an investment in human capital and in the…

  6. Professional Development for Biology Teachers in the Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiser, Simone; Knight, Bruce Allen

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, the general media cover new advancements and research in the field of biology. Stem cell research, emerging diseases and bioethics are some of the issues gaining public attention. The rate of increase of these new developments creates additional challenges to teachers of biology as they try to remain abreast of new information and…

  7. Teacher Observations on the Implementation of the Tools of the Mind Curriculum in the Classroom: Analysis of Interviews Conducted over a One-Year Period

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Petrosino; Susan Imholz

    2012-01-01

    The following pilot study reports on teacher observations and reflections of implementing the Tools of the Mind curriculum in pre-k and kindergarten classrooms in an east coast urban school district in the US. The study followed five teachers over the course of a school year. Structured interviews were conducted with each teacher individually shortly after Tools of the Mind teacher training sessions took place. The analysis reports on themes that emerged in these conversations. Findings addre...

  8. Teacher Performance Assessment in Teacher Education: An Example in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Andrea; Mayer, Diane

    2012-01-01

    As part of a cross-cultural collaboration, a teacher performance assessment (TPA) was implemented during 2009 in three Malaysian institutes of teacher education. This paper reports on the TPA for graduating primary teachers in Malaysia. The investigation focused on the pre-service teachers' perceptions about whether the TPA provided them with an…

  9. Perception of Teacher Education and Professional Identity among Novice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Hanna; Gilat, Izhak; Sagee, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This study examines student teachers' perceptions of teacher education and its contribution to their professional life, when they become novice teachers during their internship period. The sample comprised 97 student teachers in their fourth year of studies for a BEd degree. Data were collected through questionnaires which included both a…

  10. Teacher Leadership Development in PDSs: Perceptions of 22 Veteran Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    Although there is no common definition for teacher leadership, the concept is continually advanced as a key component for both the success of schools and professionalization of teachers. Many view teacher leadership as specific administrative roles while others view it as any opportunity in which teachers contribute to the decision-making process.…

  11. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' role in the professional development of teachers, exploring challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Making a Serious Study of Classroom Scenes: High School Faculty Develops Away to Observe and Learn from Each Other (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools for…

  12. Teacher Control and Affiliation: Do Students and Teachers Agree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekelmans, Mieke; Mainhard, Tim; den Brok, Perry; Wubbels, Theo

    2011-01-01

    Using an interpersonal circumplex model, we examined whether teachers and students in secondary education apply a similar frame of reference when thinking about how a teacher relates to students. We also examined the alignment of teacher and student perceptions of two dimensions of the teacher-student relationship: Control and Affiliation. Results…

  13. AVID Teacher Leadership: Administrator and Teacher Perceptions of Leadership Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Shirley J.; Huerta, Jeffery J.; Watt, Karen M.; Martinez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of teachers and administrators with regard to AVID (Advancement via Individual Determination) teacher leaders. The purpose was to compare whether teachers and administrators agree on the types of attributes needed for teacher leaders involved in implementing AVID as a school reform effort. Results revealed that…

  14. Fifth Year Teacher Perceptions of Induction Programs upon Teacher Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Arleen Norris

    2011-01-01

    Due to teacher shortages, school districts have offered incentives and alternative licensure programs. Recently, however, school districts have shifted the focus from recruitment to one of teacher retention which places an emphasis upon beginning teacher induction programs. These programs help teachers improve in their craft of teaching, help…

  15. Teachers’ Approaches to Digital Stories - Tensions Between New Genres and Established Assessment Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toril Aagaard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available New practices in technology-rich schools call for teachers who can be responsive to change. This article explores a group of Norwegian upper-secondary school teachers’ approach to students’ digital stories – a multimodal genre recently introduced to many classrooms. The concept of inscription (Latour, 1992 is used in an abductive analysis to show teachers’ struggle with identifying the premises of digital stories and, consequently, how to assess such texts. The analysis demonstrates that established assessment conventions tend to guide teachers’ assessment of digital stories, thereby resulting in tensions between traditional and emerging practices.

  16. Constructing constructivism: The voyage of elementary science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Andrea Beth

    This study examined how participation in a professional development institute, which provided a constructivist learning environment affected the interactions between teachers and students in elementary science classrooms. The investigation considered teacher gender and experience, and also compared the less experienced participants with their non-participating mentors. A multiple case study design was utilized. Six self-selected teachers participated. Data was gathered through videotaped observations of science lessons and audiotaped teacher interviews. The research was guided by the following questions: (1) How do teachers perceive changes in their own teaching as a result of participation in a two week professional development institute using constructivist strategies? (2) How do teachers' perceptions of the changes in their teaching as a result of the summer institute measure against what is seen during the observations? (3) Are the teaching strategies of the less experienced participating teachers distinguishable from the strategies used by the non-participating teachers who were judged similar in style prior to the institute, but did not attend the institute? (4) Do differences emerge based on length of teaching experience? This study revealed some interesting findings: (1) results based on gender indicated that the women in the study interacted approximately twice as often as the men; (2) a marked difference existed between the interactions of TASK participants compared with the interactions of the non-TASK participants; and (3) a professional development experience that provides a constructivist learning environment for participants may be effective in helping teachers to transfer the experience to their classrooms or in reinforcing and validating teachers' current practices.

  17. Developing teachers' social and emotional competence: a humanistic psychology perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Palomero Fernández

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The social and emotional competences of teachers have a notable influence on the type of teaching that is carried out and on the type of relationships that are built in the classroom. Training teachers in personal aspects is a current urging need. Since the end of the last century there have a great deal of enriching research, courses and publications on teachers' emotional and social intelligence. From the point of view of training, this article presents some limitations of certain emerging proposals. Next, an alternative is proposed, based on the principles of humanistic psychology and promoting the development of five attitudes directly related to the teacher's emotional and social competence: phenomenological disposition, autonomy, responsibility, criteria independence and cooperative disposition. Finally, some the possible shortcomings and negative aspects of the proposed model are discussed, highlighting the need to further investigate the efficiency and relevance of training proposals such as the one presented here in order to increase their social impact.

  18. The Language Teacher’s Role in the Age of the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagisa MORITOKI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Internet can have a strong influence on students learning the Japanese language in Slovenia, as well as in other parts of Europe. Almost all freshmen have come into contact with Japanese pop culture via the Internet. The aim of this paper is to discuss the teacher’s role in overcoming certain problems associated with learning the Japanese language in the age of the Internet. First, looking at a general survey of the current situation surrounding teaching Japanese language in Slovenia, we identify the advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet when learning the language. However, the disadvantages of the Internet that lead to learner problems are, in fact, the problems that we also face in daily communication. So, as a teacher, I propose following three strategies to lead the learner: first, let the learner’s interests stimulate him to explore a wider and deeper world; second, lead the learner to reconstruct his world; and third, lead the learner to self expression so that he can be understood by the listener and improve his communication skills. Such are teacher’s strategies for interactive communication based on individual standpoint versus a world view, which has emerged in teaching Japanese language when the learner seeks language skills not solely for practical purposes as in Slovenia. Considering this, I additionally propose for Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR ideology that those strategies aim to achieve “an expertise of the relationship with the Other” (Zarate, Gohard-Radenkovic, Lussier, & Penz. 2004, p. 11.

  19. Enabling Distributed Learning Communities via Emerging Technologies--Part One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Chris

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses that emerging devices, tools, media and virtual environments offer opportunities for creating new types of learning communities for students and teachers. Examples of learning communities include a national mix of kids working together to create an online encyclopedia about Harry Potter's fictional world, or…

  20. Development environmental attitude of prospective science teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the last three decades or so, we have witnessed the growing concern of human beings, all over the world, to adopt measures to conserve and preserve environment of the planet earth, because the same has been threatened by human activity and by way of our unparalleled intervention in the otherwise balanced environment. This awareness and concern has emerged as a need of incorporating environmental Issues into the normal curricula, so that we can educate the young generation to become informed decision-makers of the future. UNESCO and UNEP have advocated (since the last three decades) to teach environmentalised science to students. In Pakistan, there have been attempts to change curricula in accordance with the need of the time. Teachers need new kinds of skills, attitudes and commitment to teach science in an environmentalised fashion. This article discusses the impact of a semester-course on change in environmental attitudes of prospective science-teachers. A pre-test, post-test method was used to ascertain any change in environmental attitude of prospective science-teachers, after studying the environmental education course. It has been shown that there was a change in the environmental attitude of science-teachers as a result of the one-semester course, but the change or the level of attitude was not substantial or satisfactory. There seems to be a need of adopting a comprehensive approach to environmental education, and introducing teaching of environmental concepts at a very early age. (author)

  1. Mobile Learning in Maths Teacher Education: Using iPads to Support Pre-Service Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Matthew; Maher, Damian

    2013-01-01

    An emerging body of literature explores mobile learning in teacher education contexts. A common theme is the facilitation of collaborative, authentic professional learning experiences, often leveraged by the immediate and spontaneous nature of learning in informal settings. This paper takes a snapshot of current developments with mobile learning…

  2. Non-native Chinese Foreign Language (CFL) Teachers: Identity and Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chun

    Abstract Native Chinese foreign language (CFL) teacher identity is an emerging subject of research interest in the teacher education. Yet, limited study has been done on the construction of Non-native CFL teachers in their home culture. Guided by a concept of teacher identity-in-discourse, the paper reports on a qualitative study that explores how three Non-native CFL teachers construct their teacher identity as they interact with Danish students while teaching CFL at one Danish university. Data collected from in-depth interviews over a period of two years show that the Non-native CFL teachers face tensions and challenges in constructing their identities as CFL teachers, and the tensions and challenges that arose from Danish teaching culture could influence the Non-native CFL teachers' contributions to CFL teaching in their home cultures. The findings further show that in order to cope with the tensions and challenges, the Non-native CFL teachers create an alternative space in ways that enable them to construct their identities as Non-native CFL teachers.

  3. Emerging and re-emerging infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor K E Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An emerging infection is defined as aninfection that has newly appeared in a population whilea re-emerging infection would be one that has existedin the past but its incidence has increased in recenttimes. The reasons for the emergence or reemergenceof an infection are not completely understood butthey are multifactorial and complex in the nature oftheir interactions. These factors may be related to theetiological organism, the host or the environment.Human activity appears to be a major driver. Malaysiahad to deal with outbreaks of several emerging infectionsover the last two decades. They include Nipah virusinfection, SARS and avian influenza. Infections likedengue, tuberculosis and leptospirosis are re-emergingin Malaysia. Both human activity and climatic changesappear to be key factors in the emergence and reemergenceof infections in Malaysia. Our countryneeds to put in place a comprehensive plan to meetthe challenge of emerging diseases. A multidisciplinaryapproach is required and the strategies involved shouldnot merely confined to medical and health strategies.

  4. IN-SERVICE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMME : TEACHERS' PERCEPTION

    OpenAIRE

    Suman Dala; N. N. Neetu Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Teacher education – both pre-service and in-service is responsible for developing quality teaching work-force. It is generally observed that the quality of pre-service teacher education is low. It does not equip prospective teachers with requisite knowledge, skills and attitudes to perform effectively in their work-situation.So,in-service education of teachers is considered to be key aspect of school improvement efforts. The training, retraining and updating of teachers are wi...

  5. Teachers' and School Administrators' Perceptions and Expectations on Teacher Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Semra K?ranl?

    2013-01-01

    In this study it is aimed to find out primary school teachers’ and principals’ expectations and perceptions related to teachers’ leadership. The population of this survey consists of primary school teachers and principals in Odunpazar?, one of the two central municipalities in Eski?ehir, in 2011-2012 educational year. Teachers and principals of eight primary schools were taken as a sample among low, middle, high socio-economic level primary schools in Odunpazar?. 195 teachers and principals p...

  6. Teachers' Organisations and Their Role in Teachers Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Bijendr Pradhan

    2012-01-01

    The paper is aimed at to acquaint regarding teachers organizations and their role inteacher welfare. Teachers' organization has to play decisive role in back drop of therecent educational reforms. The role of teachers' organizations in fosteringprofessionalism and initiating teachers into social action can hardly is overemphasizedgiven the key position that the teacher holds in a society. The obligations whichconstitute the academic ethics are not the same as a comprehensive code of conduct f...

  7. Science Education in Early Childhood Teacher Education: Putting Forward a Case to Enhance Student Teachers' Confidence and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Dawn

    2003-08-01

    New Zealand is moving towards increased qualification requirements for early childhood educators. There is an underlying assumption that there is a correlation between quality early childhood education, teacher qualifications and quality practices in teaching and learning. Two fields of literature, early childhood pedagogy and science specific pedagogy, are reviewed briefly to provide a framework with which to consider why student teachers' attitudes, misunderstandings and misconceptions in science can limit their ability and willingness to create quality teaching and learning opportunities. The study reported in this paper highlights, in general, that early childhood student teachers' subject knowledge in science was poor. It also emerged that the student teachers were unaware of how little they knew and how this might affect their ability to provide appropriate science experiences for young children.

  8. Modulation for emergent networks: serotonin and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Juyang; Paslaski, Stephen; Daly, James; VanDam, Courtland; Brown, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    In autonomous learning, value-sensitive experiences can improve the efficiency of learning. A learning network needs be motivated so that the limited computational resources and the limited lifetime are devoted to events that are of high value for the agent to compete in its environment. The neuromodulatory system of the brain is mainly responsible for developing such a motivation system. Although reinforcement learning has been extensively studied, many existing models are symbolic whose internal nodes or modules have preset meanings. Neural networks have been used to automatically generate internal emergent representations. However, modeling an emergent motivational system for neural networks is still a great challenge. By emergent, we mean that the internal representations emerge autonomously through interactions with the external environments. This work proposes a generic emergent modulatory system for emergent networks, which includes two subsystems - the serotonin system and the dopamine system. The former signals a large class of stimuli that are intrinsically aversive (e.g., stress or pain). The latter signals a large class of stimuli that are intrinsically appetitive (e.g., pleasure or sweet). We experimented with this motivational system for two settings. The first is a visual recognition setting to investigate how such a system can learn through interactions with a teacher, who does not directly give answers, but only punishments and rewards. The second is a setting for wandering in the presence of a friend and a foe. PMID:23294763

  9. Teacher Turnover: A Conceptual Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Cynthia; Slate, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the available literature concerning teacher turnover. The seriousness of this issue was addressed as cause for concern is clearly present. Issues we examined in this conceptual analysis were the federal government's role in public education, the No Child Left Behind Act, teacher turnover, teacher retention, teacher

  10. Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

  11. Quality Requirements for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, B.; Brekelmans, M.; Korthagen, F.; Wubbels, T.

    2005-01-01

    This study deals with the quality requirements that are needed for teacher educators. The tasks teacher educators have to do and the competencies they should possess (a professional profile), according to their fellow teacher educators, were identified. On the basis of a literature search on tasks and competencies of teacher educators, we made a…

  12. Fijian Teachers' Conceptions of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Hem Chand; Lingam, Govinda Ishwar

    2015-01-01

    Teacher's conceptions are important as they could have a strong influence on their professional practices. This study set out to explore Fijian teacher's conceptions of assessment. Seventy teachers enrolled in an assessment course at a university in Fiji were involved in this study. Data was collected by asking teachers to write a reflection on…

  13. The perceptions of teachers and school principals of each other's disposition towards teacher involvement in school reform

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cassie, Swanepoel.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide teachers are faced with the task of continuously facilitating and implementing educational reform that has been designed without their participation. This exclusion of the key agents, who must mediate between the change agenda and actual change in the classroom, from the planning and decis [...] ion-making processes, is detrimental to educational reform. Although school-based management has recently emerged as the instrument to accomplish the decentralisation of decision-making powers to school level, the success thereof depends largely on school principals' disposition regarding teacher involvement. It is argued that the expectation of principals regarding their own leadership role, as well as the professional role teachers should fulfil, is a primary determinant of principals' willingness to involve teachers in responsibility-taking processes outside the classroom. The results from an empirical investigation revealed that principals' perception, of the wishes of teachers regarding involvement, significantly underestimated teachers' actual involvement wishes. Likewise, the expectation of teachers regarding the willingness of principals to involve them was a significant underestimation of the involvement level principals are actually in favour of. These misperceptions probably discourage actual school-based management and could jeopardize the implementation of educational reform in general.

  14. The Effectiveness of "Teach for America" and Other Under-certified Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko Laczko-Kerr

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The academic achievements of students taught by under-certified primary school teachers were compared to the academic achievements of students taught by regularly certified primary school teachers.  This sample of under-certified teachers included three types of under-qualified personnel: emergency, temporary and provisionally certified teachers.  One subset of these under-certified teachers was from the national program "Teach For America (TFA."  Recent college graduates are placed by TFA where other under-qualified under-certified teachers are often called upon to work, namely, low-income urban and rural school districts. Certified teachers in this study were from accredited universities and all met state requirements for receiving the regular initial certificate to teach.  Recently hired under-certified and certified teachers (N=293 from five low-income school districts were matched on a number of variables, resulting in 109 pairs of teachers whose students all took the mandated state achievement test. Results indicate 1 that students of TFA teachers did not perform significantly different from students of other under-certified teachers, and 2 that students of certified teachers out-performed students of teachers who were under-certified.  This was true on all three subtests of the SAT 9—reading, mathematics and language arts.  Effect sizes favoring the students of certified teachers were substantial.  In reading, mathematics, and language, the students of certified teachers outperformed students of under-certified teachers, including the students of the TFA teachers, by about 2 months on a grade equivalent scale.  Students of under-certified teachers make about 20% less academic growth per year than do students of teachers with regular certification.  Traditional programs of teacher preparation apparently result in positive effects on the academic achievement of low-income primary school children.  Present policies allowing under-certified teachers, including those from the TFA program, to work with our most difficult to teach children appear harmful.  Such policies increase differences in achievement between the performance of poor children, often immigrant and minority children, and those children who are more advantaged.

  15. Analyzing stories told by an elementary science teacher in a fifth-grade classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Alicia M.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to analyze and interpret the stories told by one teacher, Ms. M, in a fifth grade science classroom. In this study, stories are defined as teacher utterances that are used in first person or third person narrative view, and are related to an experience that occurred outside the classroom. This research answers questions concerning: (a) what types of stories Ms. M tells during science instruction; (b) when these stories occur in the classroom; and (c) what pedagogical functions do these stories serve in the classroom. Utilizing theories on the social construction of knowledge and narrative cognition, stories told may be formed through multiple paths that follow no logical expression to make sense of the context and to connect to its audience. Therefore, this study provides insight into how Ms. M made sense of science with her stories and the ways in which they worked with her students. The results illlustrated that the types of stories found with Ms. M were autobiographical, biographical, fictional, or based on current events. These stories occurred when the teacher initiated the discussion by bringing forth a definition, a question or reinforcing a concept. However, the stories were triggered by students to a greater degree with their questions, concerns, observations or their own stories or explanations. Finally, all pedagogical functions of stories were identified with Ms. M's stories: promotion of engagement or attention of students, building community, clarifying concepts or vocabulary, activation and building of background knowledge and disclosure of teacher role and voice. Ms. M stories exemplified her sense-making of science and connections to her own life that her students were eventually able to make for themselves.

  16. Becoming a Content-ESL Teacher: A Dialogic Journey of a Science Teacher and Teacher Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Lori C.; Newman, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    This dialogical narrative describes the observations and changes in instruction of an 8th-grade science teacher in an English language learner (ELL) sheltered science class before and after receiving instruction in ESL methods, and the backdrop for the teacher's growth, as narrated by the second language teacher educator who directed the teacher's…

  17. The Emergence of Student Creativity in Classroom Settings: A Case Study of Elementary Schools in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younsoon; Chung, Hye Young; Choi, Kyoulee; Seo, Choyoung; Baek, Eunjoo

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the emergence of student creativity in classroom settings, specifically within two content areas: science and social studies. Fourteen classrooms in three elementary schools in Korea were observed, and the teachers and students were interviewed. The three types of student creativity emerging in the teaching and learning…

  18. Child Behavior Questionnaire-Short Form for Teachers: Informant Correspondences and Divergences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teglasi, Hedwig; Schussler, Laura; Gifford, Kathleen; Annotti, Lee Ann; Sanders, Catherine; Liu, Huili

    2015-12-01

    Discrepancies among independent sources of information about presumably identical constructs argue against reliance on a single perspective. To fill the need for temperament questionnaires for teacher and parent informants, we adapted the popular parent/caregiver Child Behavior Questionnaire-Short Form for preschool and kindergarten teachers. Informant correspondences were low as expected, but patterns were consistent with hypotheses drawn from person perception models. Internal consistencies of the teacher scales were adequate, comparing favorably with those of parent-rated scales. Anticipated relations of temperament scales emerged with social competence and tasks of executive attention for both parent and teacher informants. Confirmatory factor analyses conducted separately for parent and teacher scales supported the familiar three-factor model when allowances were made for cross-loadings and correlated errors. A multigroup confirmatory factor analyses with parent and teacher data indicated that the factor structures of the two questionnaires are similar but not equivalent. PMID:25573857

  19. Teachers and Health.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ?ehulka, E.; ?ehulková, Oliva

    Wien : FACULTAS Buchhandels und Verlags, 2003. s. 268. [European Congress of Psychology /8./. 06.07.2003-11.07.2003, Wien] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : teacher * health * well - being Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  20. As an Infused or a Separated Theme? Chinese Science Teacher Educators' Conceptions of Incorporating Nature of Science Instruction in the Courses of Training Pre-Service Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhi Hong; Wong, Siu Ling

    2013-01-01

    Teaching nature of science (NOS) is beginning to find its place in science education in China. This exploratory study interviewed twenty-four Chinese science teacher educators about their conceptions of teaching NOS to pre-service science teachers. Although five dimensions emerged, this paper mainly focuses on reporting the findings relevant to…

  1. Teachers as mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike; Pratt, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of lower secondary English teaching in South West England, this study identifies in broad terms the competing goals between which English teachers mediate and the explicit and hidden tensions that result. To understand the interactions of competing goals, teachers’ goal-oriented behaviours are referenced to a set of idealised ‘role types’ based on the dimensions of goals, norms, discourses and practices. It is asserted that competing goals, significant to particular educationa...

  2. Teacher – parents communication

    OpenAIRE

    Grilj, Alenka

    2011-01-01

    This diploma paper shows the meaning of communication as the basis of relationship between people, and its meaning in the teacher – parent relationship. In the beginning I present the facts of communication and its rules and I follow with the importance of communication between teacher and parents. This communication represents the main topic as it is very important for a more quality life of children within a family and school. I emphasise the meaning and value of effective communication...

  3. Teachers and Humanism

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie Devineau

    2010-01-01

    Following the large investigation in the labor universe, teachers give a good illustration for “Working to be happy” (Christian Baudelot, Michel Gollac, 2003). But the question is about the reasons: what are the anthropological needs that profession answer through its sociological organization? This article investigates the cohesion of the French teachers of all grades, from pre-school level to university, manifest in the last social movement, and which can be understood as an expression of v...

  4. Wind Energy Teachers Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    anon.

    2003-01-01

    This guide, created by the American Wind Association, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is a learning tool about wind energy targeted toward grades K-12. The guide provides teacher information, ideas for sparking children's and students' interest, suggestions for activities to undertake in and outside the classroom, and research tools for both teachers and students. Also included is an additional resources section.

  5. Mathematics teachers’ professional knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Ponte, João Pedro da

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the study of teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, conceptions and practices, presenting some illustrations from the area of problem solving. In mathematics education, the teacher has attracted much less work than the student. This may be due, in part, to the different knowledge base of interest in each case. Regarding students, we are concerned with their learning of mathematics. The nature of mathematical knowledge is itself problematic, yet that does not seem to raise too many...

  6. 'ICTs' IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Girdhar lal Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Education in the Indian region faces a number of problems. These problems include the shortage of qualified teachers, very large student populations, high drop-out rates of students and teachers, and weak curriculum. All of these negative aspects result in poor delivery of education. The education crisis is worsened by the devastating effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, increasing poverty, a brain drain in the teaching community, budgetary constraints, poor communication, and inadequa...

  7. Teachers doing science: An authentic geology research experience for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemler, D.; Repine, T.

    2006-01-01

    Fairmont State University (FSU) and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (WVGES) provided a small pilot group of West Virginia science teachers with a professional development session designed to mimic experiences obtained by geology majors during a typical summer field camp. Called GEOTECH, the program served as a research capstone event complimenting the participants' multi-year association with the RockCamp professional development program. GEOTECH was funded through a Improving Teacher Quality Grant administered by West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Over the course of three weeks, eight GEOTEACH participants learned field measurement and field data collection techniques which they then applied to the construction of a surficial geologic map. The program exposed participants to authentic scientific processes by emphasizing the authentic scientific application of content knowledge. As a secondary product, it also enhanced their appreciation of the true nature of science in general and geology particular. After the session, a new appreciation of the effort involved in making a geologic map emerged as tacit knowledge ready to be transferred to their students. The program was assessed using pre/post instruments, cup interviews, journals, artifacts (including geologic maps, field books, and described sections), performance assessments, and constructed response items. Evaluation of the accumulated data revealed an increase in participants demonstrated use of science content knowledge, an enhanced awareness and understanding of the processes and nature of geologic mapping, positive dispositions toward geologic research and a high satisfaction rating for the program. These findings support the efficacy of the experience and document future programmatic enhancements.

  8. Emotional Support Consistency and Teacher-Child Relationships Forecast Social Competence and Problem Behaviors in Prekindergarten and Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Laura L.; Curby, Timothy W.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' ratings of conflict and closeness as well as observed emotional support are known predictors of children's social functioning. Consistency in emotional support represents an emerging line of research. The goal of the present study is to understand whether the relation between the consistency of teachers' emotional support…

  9. "We Can't Change Much Unless the Exams Change": Teachers' Dilemmas in the Curriculum Reform in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunmei

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study of English secondary teachers' perceptions of and implementation of the New English Curriculum Reform in China. Triangulated data collection methods were employed to gather information about teachers' perceptions of the New Curriculum and their teaching behaviours in Central China. An implementation gap emerged

  10. An Examination of Early Childhood Teacher Education in Four West African Nations: Ghana, Mali, Senegal, and the Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Alicia I.

    This paper examines opportunities and challenges in early childhood teacher education in Ghana, Mali, Senegal, and the Gambia. It reviews socioeconomic and political issues, current and emerging policies for early childhood and primary education, teacher preparation strategies, and examples of successful programs. Information was collected during…

  11. Social Media Use--and Misuse--by Teachers: Looking to the Courts for Human Resource Policy Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Susan C.; Bathon, Justion; Balzano, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    School districts are facing a sensationalized and alarming trend of unprofessional conduct and social media misuse by public school teachers. Likewise, recent court cases as well as highly publicized scandals raise concern that inappropriate relationships between teachers and students can be initiated through online social media. These emergent

  12. What Is a Principal's Quality Mark? Issues and Challenges in Leadership Progression among Primary Teachers in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions about teacher progression among Jamaica's primary school teachers should force society to stop and ask itself several questions. Are these perceptions accurate? If not, how did these perceptions emerge and what can national leaders and those in positions of authority do to "manage" if not resolve these perceptions? If…

  13. Infusing Technology to Enhance Science Lessons: Prospective Teachers as Action Researchers Learning to Teach for Conceptual Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaid, M. Randall

    Today's high school students have grown up in technology-rich environments with video games, personal computers, instant communications, and Internet access. These students are naturally more interested and involved in a technology-infused classroom. Emerging technologies change the teacher's role in the classroom. Professional teachers need to…

  14. Secondary content area teachers speak about literacy and technology: Tensions, complexities, conceptualizations, and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Elizabeth Joy Petroelje

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to share the details, complexities, contradictions, parallels, conceptualizations, and practices of secondary content area teachers' use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to enhance literacy practices and learning. Specifically, the research questions were: How do English, Science, and Social Studies teachers conceptualize the impacts ICTs have on literacy practices and learning? What is the relationship between English, Science, and Social Studies teachers' conceptualizations and their use of ICTs in their everyday pedagogical practices to enhance literacy practices and learning? I used the notions of literacy as a social practice to frame the study and writing as a method of inquiry to analyze the teachers' conceptualizations and practices. Through observations and interviews, I learned the teachers' stories. Within these stories, four tensions emerged in regard to how the teachers negotiate between their conceptualizations and classroom practices: (1) access to ICTs adequate for the task; (2) sufficient levels of ICT knowledge for the task; (3) fear of the unknown; and (4) identification of who benefits form the ICTs and how these benefits can be determined. The conclusions, or major themes highlighted in the teachers' stories, are that: (a) technology seems to be an add-on to support well-established practices, (b) teachers cling to traditional literacy practices, (c) teachers take up and use ICTs and literacy for unique purposes based on their individual classroom contexts, and (d) teachers' tensions limit their ability to envision beyond what they currently see and do in regards to ICTs and literacy.

  15. Teacher Education and Teacher Identity in Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fern Snart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Within current Canadian learning environments, learners bring sophistication in areas such as communication/technology, a wide diversity of learning needs, and often an orientation towards social justice. This commentary refers to the ongoing responsiveness of teacher education programs to these evolving learner attributes, using as exemplars the areas of global citizenship education and technology integration. A backdrop for this discussion is the observation that the knowledge and skills that contribute to successful adult lives are also evolving.

  16. Dog Bite Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  17. OEM Emergency Preparedness Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management compiles a wide variety of information in support of Emergency Preparedness, including certain elements of the System for Risk...

  18. Searle on Emergence.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlík, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 19, Supp.2 (2012), s. 40-48. ISSN 1335-0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : emergence * mind * consciousness * emergent property * system property Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  19. Emergency Nurses Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 13-15 New Emergency Nurses Association Study Examines Moral Distress in Emergency Nurses 09-30-15 ENA ... Renew Membership Member Communities State Councils and Chapters Education Online Learning Conferences Conference Faculty ENPC/TNCC Educational ...

  20. HANARO radiation emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emergency plan of HANARO (High-flux advanced Neutron Application Reactor) is prepared based on the Korea Atomic Law, the Civil Defence Law, Disaster Protection Law and the emergency related regulation guides such as the NUREG series from USNRC to ensure adequate response capabilities to the emergency event which would cause a significant risk to the KAERI staffs and the public near to the site. Periodic training and exercise for the reactor operators and emergency staffs will reduce accident risks and the release of radioactivities to the environment. The plan describes the organization and staff's duties in the radiation emergency, classification on the radiation accidents, urgent actions of reactor operators in the early state, emergency response activities, maintenance of emergency equipment, training and exercise to improve response capabilities against emergency accidents. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs.

  1. EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging contaminants are receiving increasing media and scientific attention. These chemicals are sometimes referred to as compounds of emerging concern or trace organic compounds, and include several groups of chemicals including endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), and phar...

  2. Teachers’ Problems and Misconceptions Relate to “Solar System And Beyond: Space Puzzle” Unit: A Case Study Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay ?ENEL ÇORUHLU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to emerge science and technology teachers problems and misconceptions relate to “The Solar System and Beyond: Space Puzzle” Unit. Case study research method was used in this study. The sample of the study consisted of 10 science and technology teachers. Semi structured interview question and observation form were used in the data collection process. Semi structured interview conducted with 10 science and technology teachers. Observation study was done in 2 science and technology teachers’ class. These observations take 14 hours. At the end of the study; it was found that teachers faced problems to attract students’ attention to the unit. Also half of the teachers faced difficulty to answer students’ problems because of the insufficient content knowledge. Textbook including misconception relate to planet orbits can led to teachers’ misconceptions

  3. Harwell emergency handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Harwell Laboratory Emergency Handbook 1987 contains emergency procedures to deal with any incident which might occur at AERE Harwell involving radioactive or toxic material releases. The Handbook gives details of the duties of members of the Site Emergency Organization and other key members of staff, the methods by which incidents are controlled, the communication links and liaison arrangements with other organizations and the possible consequences and actions that may be needed following an emergency. (UK)

  4. Teacher Enhancement Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Bradley, Tina

    1994-01-01

    During the 1980's, a period of intense concern over educational quality in the United States, few indicators of U.S. student achievement garnered the interest of policy makers and pundits as successfully as the results of international testing in mathematics and science. This concern was so great that as a part of the Goals 2000 initiative, President George Bush indicated that 'By the year 2000, U.S. students should be first in the world in mathematics and science.' The Clinton Administration is placing a major emphasis, not only on rigorous academic standards and creating a new system for assessing students' progress, but also including professional development as a major focus. The argument being that teachers need more sustained, intensive training to prepare them to teach to higher standards. Executive order 12821 mandates that national laboratories 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science'. These and other issues led to the development of ideas for a project that addresses the need for excellence in mathematics, science and technology instruction. In response to these initiatives the NASA/LaRC Teacher Enhancement Institute was proposed. The TEI incorporated systemic reform perspectives, enhanced content knowledge for teachers, and teacher preparation. Emphasis was also placed on recruiting those educators who teach in impoverished urban school districts with at-risk student populations who have been traditionally under represented in science, mathematics, technology and engineering. Participants in the Teacher Enhancement Institute were 37 teachers from grades K-8, teaching in Region 2 in the state of Virginia, as well as 2 preservice teachers from Norfolk State University and one teacher from Dublin, Virginia, where a Science/Mathematics model school has been established. Teachers selected for this project represented school systems where income levels are extremely low, and students served tend not to receive innovative instruction in mathematics and science and their use of technology is limited. The Teacher Enhancement Institute contained several features, that when combined, allowed for a unique experience. Some of these features included local teachers, administrators and school board members as presenters, instruction and use of technology every day, tours of select features of the research facility, briefings by NASA/LaRC scientists, engineers and researchers as well as individuals from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Another unique feature of this program is to have participants convene on three separate occasions throughout the academic year to discuss strategies for information dissemination and implementation results. Teachers' attitudes towards the use of technology, their ability to develop lessons using technology and their ability to develop lessons using information obtained through TEI were assessed using instruments developed by TEI summer faculty members. Data from these instruments were analyzed and reported in a final report submitted to the director of the Office of Education.

  5. Emerging technology and ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Wakunuma, Kutoma

    2011-01-01

    This e-book on Emerging Technologies and Ethics includes a collection of essays which explore the future and ethics of emerging information and communication technologies. Articles in the collection include an overview of the legal implications which may be relevant to the ethical aspects of emerging technologies and also ethical issues arising from the mass-take up of mobile technologies.

  6. Qualifying online teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide there is an increasing demand for educational institutions to offer part of their educations online and mixed mode. For institutions to comply with these demands, it is necessary to prepare teachers (and other members of the staff), to fulfil their responsibilities within the virtual environment. Teachers must be able to organize their courses pedagogically according to different conditions, i.e., subject domains, group sizes, variations within communication and interaction. Teachers must acquire knowledge and skills in handling Information and Communication Techniques (ICT) as well as pedagogical possibilities and constraints inherited in the software available. Several studies demonstrate that technical obstacles are easier to overcome than lack of communication skills. Also the consequenses of communication breakdowns tend to create serious problems that technology cannot solve. These problems concern how teachers function satisfactory as mediators and coaches in collaborative, knowledge sharing virtual environments. For example, how teachers support their students in becoming online-students and how they facilitate complex discussions on difficult topics. This is a big challenge for everybody involved in e-learning, and the challenge is not met by offering introductory courses for university teachers. Based on basis of a recent examination of concrete actions and strategies for the future within 11 Danish universities, the auther argues that there exists a severe mismatch between the organisational expectations and strategies and the competence-evolving activities that the same organisations offer to their staff. A recent case study of a university pedagogy course on e-learning for university teachers demonstrates and identifies some of the consequences of the mismatch. Finally the author suggests strategies to meet the demands of the future online university.

  7. Reading strategy instruction and teacher change: implications for teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda M Klapwijk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I report on teacher change in the context of a reading strategy instruction intervention. Reading Strategy Instruction (RSI was implemented by three teachers, new to the concept, over a period of 15 weeks. Observations of these teachers showed that a multitude of factors affect the uptake of RSI as part of everyday teaching practice, and that teachers seem to move through distinct phases in their uptake of RSI. The article focuses on teachers' reaction to RSI and highlights a number of issues that are important to the implementation of RSI, not the least of which is that a clear need exists for changes to in-service teacher training and support and pre-service teacher training. In an effort to address these training issues the article contains specific recommendations for pre-service teacher training in particular.

  8. ATTITUDE AND KNOWLEDGE TOWARDS TOOTH AVULSION AMONG SPORTS TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARHEEN USTAD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tooth avulsion is one of the commonest types of physical sport injury. Themanagement of these cases is critical in order to prevent complete loss of tooth and its subsequentconsequences. The prognosis of such avulsed tooth depends on prompt treatment. The emergencymanagement of such avulsed tooth is made by the sports teacher who is present at the sports ground. Thefirst–aid knowledge about tooth avulsion is must for the sports teacher. Aim: The objective of the presentstudy was to evaluate the knowledge about management of tooth avulsion among sports teachers inAhmednagar District. Methods: A sample of 60 sports teachers were interviewed from different schools.The data was collected using a self administered questionnaire containing seven items which wasdistributed among the sports teacher from different schools. Results: we found that 90% of the sportsteachers were not having the first-aid knowledge about the emergency management of avulsed tooth andthe benefit of timely care. This demands an effort to properly educate sports teachers about first-aidmanagement and consequently change their attitude towards dental trauma.

  9. Teachers View on Social and Emotional Aspect of Pedagogical Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Belousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Bologna process challenges European higher education area by comparability and compatibility of several issues including educators? professional competence. However, through their educational philosophy and activity educators have discovered and shaped their own sense and meaning of pedagogical competence. During the time when teacher professional standard has been reexamined nationally, teachers? voice in Latvia is still poorly considered. Therefore, this article aims to provide a balance between two directions-?from-above? that implies policy and legislation and ?from-below? that stands for practitioners? own voice. Approach: This study is an attempt to enter into professional world of elementary school teachers and to describe how they interpret meaning of their pedagogical competence embodied in educational activity. Thus, this basic interpretive study reflects characteristics of phenomenology and constructionism. The data are collected through semi-structured interviews. The sample (n = 14 is created by snowball approach and includes teachers who represent different length of service, main ethnic backgrounds and geographical parts of Latvia. The data analysis implies identification of recurrent themes that emerge through the data. Results: As a result, the study provides a description of developed themes that illustrate elementary school teachers? understanding of social and emotional aspect of pedagogical competence. Conclusion: The developed themes are discussed in the context of Bologna initiatives in higher education, holistic understanding of pedagogical competence and sustainable development of teacher education.

  10. Medical emergencies in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddichha Sahoo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most emergencies in Goa arise due to road traffic accidents and drowning, which have been compounded by the rise in number of recorded accidents in 2007 to be above 4000. It is believed that 11 people meet with an accident on Goa?s roads every day and this is expected to rise by 10% by next year. Similar is the case with drownings and other medical emergencies. We therefore aimed to conduct a cross-sectional survey of medical emergencies and identify various types of emergencies presenting to emergency departments. Materials and Methods: Using a stratified random sampling design, all emergencies presenting to the three government hospitals in Goa, which handle 90% of all emergencies currently, were studied on specially designed data sheets in order to collect data. Emergency medical technicians (ETs were placed in the Casualty Ward of the medical colleges and they recorded all emergencies on the data sheet. The collected data were then analyzed for stratification and mapping of emergencies. Results: GMC Hospital attended to majority of emergencies (62%, which were mainly of the nature of accidents or assaults (17% and fever related (17%. Most emergencies were noncritical and about 1% expired. Maximum emergencies also presented from Salcette and Bardez, and occurred among young males in the age group of 19-45 years. Males were also more prone to accidents while females had pregnancies as emergencies. Conclusion: Potential emergency services need to target young males with higher concentrations required in Salcette in South Goa and Bardez in North Goa.

  11. Teachers' Opinions on the Evaluation of ELT Teachers' Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haedong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify differences in opinions on the evaluation of ELT teachers' books between pre-service and in-service teachers. In literature, it has been argued that the development of teachers' books for EFL teachers can be assisted by the results of a needs analysis. A total of 65 pre-service and 50 in-service secondary…

  12. Attitudes of Student-teachers towards Written Teacher’s Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Lea Baratz; Sara Hauptman

    2012-01-01

    The literature on Teacher’s Guides combines knowledge of discipline-related content and pedagogy-related content in reference to the objectives and contents of the Ministry of Education curriculum. It serves as a self-study tool that provides guidelines of how to teach in light of the various changing goals and needs of the teacher. The corpus on which this research focused was the Teacher’s Guide for Hebrew literature and the question we focused on was: Do student-teachers of Hebrew literatu...

  13. Rural elementary teachers' perceptions of science education reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Christine Corby

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into rural elementary teachers' perceptions about current elementary school science reform goals and their thinking about factors that might facilitate and constrain them in this rural setting. Perceived science educational needs of elementary school teachers and implications for professional development will also be discussed. This was a qualitative case study with triangulation between focus group interviews, teacher reflective journals, and critiques of Chapters 3,4 and 6 of the National Science Education Standards. The researcher also took field notes during each session recording participant's reactions, as well as the researcher's own impressions of emerging research themes. Data analysis involved a process of sorting and grouping data into meaningful clusters. The general feeling of this researcher, was that these rural elementary teachers felt uncomfortable teaching science, believing they lacked the ability to be quality science teachers. Consequently this has brought about a poor attitude or dislike for science and science education, resulting in a trend toward avoidance of teaching science in their classrooms. Reasons for this discomfort were thought to be the constraints they experiences: physical and logistical barriers, role of the rural school, and the pressures they perceived from various members of the school community. The study has implications for staff development planners, as well as teacher education institutions. Since rural teachers are not willing to drive a great distance for professional development, educational opportunities could be brought to them. Courses or workshops could be taught in a collaborative effort with university professors and a local science teacher to bridge the gap between university and teacher beliefs about learning and teaching. Workshops should be provided for all who participate in local science reform, and learn about science standards. Opportunities for a countywide professional development school may be feasible encouraging a nearby university and the county-wide school districts to work together in a more collaborative effort. The re-establishment of the county-wide inservice would provide opportunities for teachers to share with other teachers in the area. High priority should be placed on teacher input and assessment.

  14. The nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planning of the response to emergencies in nuclear plants is regulated by the Basic Nuclear Emergency Plan (PLABEN). This basic Plan is the guidelines for drawing up, implementing and maintaining the effectiveness of the nuclear power plant exterior nuclear emergency plans. The five exterior emergency plans approved as per PLABEN (PENGUA, PENCA, PENBU, PENTA and PENVA) place special emphasis on the preventive issues of emergency planning, such as implementation of advance information programs to the population, as well as on training exercises and drills. (Author)

  15. "Teachers, Let's Take Back Our Birthrights!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsmann, Leanna

    1982-01-01

    In an interview, Barbara Koppman, a classroom teacher, reading specialist, and curriculum writer, expresses her opinions on professional standards, teacher morale, teacher evaluation, the use of master teachers, professional organizations for teachers, teacher image in the media, and the school's role in solving social problems. (JN)

  16. Empowering Teacher Leadership in Professional Development Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecos, Mary Anne; Cassella, Carol; Evans, Cynthia; Leahy, Cathy; Liess, Enid; Lucas, Tina

    2000-01-01

    George Mason University, Virginia, prepares teachers through a professional development school model, which empowers teachers to assume leadership roles as clinical faculty and site coordinators. Classroom teachers and the former Director of Teacher Education describe the effects of teachers' experiences as teacher educators on their roles within…

  17. Opportunities of the Collaborative Mentoring Relationships between Teachers and Student Teachers in the Classroom: The Views of Teachers, Student Teachers and University Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderibigbe, Semiyu Adejare

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the views of teachers, student teachers and university tutors about the opportunities of the collaborative mentoring relationships between teachers and student teachers. A qualitative approach was employed to conduct the study using a semi-structured type of interview with teachers, student teachers and university tutors.…

  18. Teacher Temperament: Correlates with Teacher Caring, Burnout, and Organizational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teven, Jason J.

    2007-01-01

    This study utilized the Big Five personality measure to assess the relationships among teacher temperament, caring orientation, and dimensions of teacher burnout. Perceptions of supervisor caring, job satisfaction, and teacher motivation were assessed. Respondents in this study were 48 college faculty teaching a variety of classes at a…

  19. Building Teacher Education on What We Know about Teacher Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korthagen, Fred; Russell, Tom

    Based on an analysis of the nature of theory that is relevant to teachers, this paper presents an approach to teacher education, the realistic approach, and reports on its use in two countries. The paper uses the concepts of episteme and phronesis to introduce a new way of looking at theory that is relevant for teacher development. Section 1…

  20. Teachers Know Best: Making Data Work for Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's broader efforts to improve educational opportunities for all students, the "Teachers Know Best" research project seeks to encourage innovation in K-12 education by helping product developers and those who procure resources for teachers better understand teachers' views. The original…

  1. Personality Characteristics and Teacher Beliefs among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Lauren E.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper asks three questions about pre-service teachers. First, what are the prevalent beliefs about teaching among pre-service teachers? Second, what are the personality characteristics of pre-service teachers? Third, in what ways do personality traits and other demographic attributes predict beliefs about teaching? Participants were…

  2. A Study of Early Childhood Teacher Beliefs: Primary Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodek, Bernard; Rucinski, Elizabeth Anne

    By asking three first-grade teachers to respond to actions taking place in their classrooms, researchers made an attempt to identify the beliefs or constructs that underlie teacher decisions. The following research questions were addressed: Is there a system of professional constructs that can be identified in early childhood teachers? and, To…

  3. Motivation, Work Satisfaction, and Teacher Change among Early Childhood Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Brigid Daly; French, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the explanatory power of Deci and Ryan's (1985) self-determination theory as a framework for describing how interactions between early childhood teachers and the systems within which their work is embedded influence motivation for professional growth and change in teaching practice. Fifty-four early childhood teachers and teacher

  4. Depth of Teachers' Knowledge: Frameworks for Teachers' Knowledge of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Vicki-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This article describes seven teacher knowledge frameworks and relates these frameworks to the teaching and assessment of elementary teacher's mathematics knowledge. The frameworks classify teachers' knowledge and provide a vocabulary and common language through which knowledge can be discussed and assessed. These frameworks are categorized into…

  5. Teachers' Evaluation of Their Pre-Service Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aypay, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate pre-service teacher training of a faculty of education based on graduates' responses. The teachers were the graduates of this institution and currently have been practicing teaching in schools. The study used an instrument entitled as the Pre-Service Preparation of Teachers to Teaching. The instrument was…

  6. Emotion, Identity and Teacher Learning: Becoming a Primary Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgen, Jeremy; Askew, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Teacher change in mathematics education is recognised to be a difficult and at times painful process. This is particularly so in countries such as England where primary mathematics is taught by non-specialist teachers, who have often had negative experiences of their own school mathematics. In this paper we explore primary teachers' emotional…

  7. Emergent Properties of the System ???????????? ???????? ???????

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geseleva N. V.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approaches to definition of the “emergency” notion and provides foundations of emergent properties of the system and emergent strategies of enterprise management.? ?????? ??????????? ??????? ? ??????????? ??????? «??????????????», ?????????? ?????? ???????????? ??????? ??????? ? ???????????? ????????? ?????????? ????????????.

  8. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future. PMID:26470448

  9. Insights for Teachers of Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the field of adult learners from the teachers’ perspective. Firstly, I identify the characteristics of adults as learners and their particular needs, which teach- ers must be aware of and deal with. Secondly, I propose a combination of adult learners’ characteristics with ‘teaching orientations’, as a basis for further research on teachers of adults’ professional development. Some competencies can be taught in formal settings, but a large amount of the teacher’s career i...

  10. PhysicsTeachers@CERN2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    PhysicsTeachers@CERN is a three day conference for high school teachers. It is a great opportunity to meet colleagues from other countries and keep up-to-date with today's physics. The conference is designed to provide a valuable experience for high school physics teachers and give them new insights into contemporary particle physics. The conference is open to physics teachers from all CERN member states.

  11. Teacher Networking through Electronic Mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannehill, Deborah; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study that examined the impact of the use of electronic mail and a newsgroup on practicing physical education teachers and physical education doctoral students at Ohio State University. Topics include the effect of electronic communication on teachers; problems with electronic networking; and teacher perceptions, especially regarding…

  12. Implementing Measures of Teacher Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, Brian; Garet, Mike; Holtzman, Deborah; Hamilton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    An initial look at work being done in a reform project sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation finds that evaluations of teacher performance aren't as unpopular with teachers who have experienced the new system as some would have us believe. Leaders acknowledge that the new approach to teacher evaluation takes more time than traditional…

  13. Teacher Burnout: A Laughing Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kemberly Elaine

    2009-01-01

    This study employed a quantitative research method and examined the relationship among teacher burnout, job-related stress and humor coping styles in 306 high school teachers from the south suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. In particular, this study sought to determine if a relationship existed among the three variables by examining if teacher burnout…

  14. Teacher Evaluation: Archiving Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lance D.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher evaluation is a current hot topic within music education. This article offers strategies for K-12 music educators on how to promote their effectiveness as teachers through archival documentation in a teacher portfolio. Using the Danielson evaluation model (based on four domains of effective teaching practices), examples of music teaching…

  15. The Cage-Busting Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    "The Cage-Busting Teacher" adopts the logic of "Cage-Busting Leadership" and applies it to the unique challenges and opportunities of classroom teachers. Detailed, accessible, and thoroughly engaging, it uncovers the many ways in which teachers can break out of familiar constraints in order to influence school and classroom…

  16. Teacher of primary English

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed for September 2003 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply see http://enpferney.org/staff_vacancies.htm English National Programme, Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire (http://enpferney.org/)

  17. TEACHER OF ENGLISH NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed for September 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before 8 July. English National Programme, Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire.

  18. The Math teachers know

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Brent

    2013-01-01

    What sorts of mathematics competencies must teachers have in order to teach the discipline well? This book offers a novel take on the question. Most research is focused on explicit knowledge-that is, on the sorts of insights that might be specified, catalogued, taught, and tested. In contrast, this book focuses on the tacit dimensions of teachers' mathematics knowledge that precede and enable their competencies with formal mathematics. It highlights the complexity of this knowledge and offers strategies to uncover it, analyze it, and re-synthesize it in ways that will make it more available

  19. [Students as teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, A.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of near-peer teaching is reviewed in this article. Theories of learning support the rationale for using students as teachers by explaining how near-peers as opposed to experts may have a superior understanding of the needs of the taught students and a better basis for identifying and addressing their problems. Empirical studies support these theories and show that high levels of satisfaction are associated with near-peer teaching without compromising the learning outcome. In addition, student teachers achieve a substantial learning benefit from teaching. Much more research is needed into the pros and cons of this concept Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10/27

  20. On Teacher’s Accomplishment Orientation in the “Internet +” Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan JIANG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A teacher’s “accomplishment” plays an important role in education by “soul to soul influence”, especially in the era that Internet changes human life, how to recognize the teacher still has a very large space for improvement. In the era of “Internet +”, the developmental pursuits of students have undergone great changes, but real existence of teacher remains unchanged, so teachers should properly treat the accomplishment of change and unchanged: To highlight the humanities of tolerance, sincerity and kindness; integrate individuation and innovation in profession; accumulate the beauty of client and data thinking.

  1. A extensão média do enunciado (EME como medida do desenvolvimento de linguagem de crianças com síndrome de Down Mean length utterance (MLU as a measure of language development of children with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Fernanda Marques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a extensão média de enunciados em morfemas (EME-m e palavras (EME-p produzida por crianças com síndrome de Down (SD e verificar a eficácia da utilização da EME-p como medida do desenvolvimento linguístico geral de crianças com SD. MÉTODOS: Participaram 15 crianças com SD, com idades entre cinco e 12 anos, que foram submetidas à situação de interação livre. As crianças foram divididas em três grupos, com base na idade cronológica e mental, a partir da aplicação do Primary Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. Os 100 primeiros enunciados foram analisados quanto a: número de morfemas gramaticais para artigos, substantivos e verbos (MG-1 e pronomes, preposições e conjunções (MG-2; extensão média dos enunciados considerando-se morfemas (EME-m e palavras (EME-p. RESULTADOS: A comparação intergrupos mostrou que quanto maior a idade, mais altas foram as médias obtidas, havendo diferença para todas as variáveis, com exceção de MG-2. Os mesmos resultados foram obtidos na comparação intragrupo para todas as variáveis. Houve forte correlação entre EME-m e EME-p. CONCLUSÃO: A EME-p pode ser utilizada como medida de identificação de desenvolvimento linguístico geral. No entanto, ressalta-se que a utilização de todas as variáveis relacionadas à extensão média de enunciados fornece maior eficiência na identificação do desenvolvimento linguístico e na análise de suas alterações.PURPOSE: To characterize the mean length utterance in morphemes (MLU-m and words (MLU-w produced by children with Down syndrome (DS, and to verify the effectiveness of using EME-w as a measure of general language development of children with DS. METHODS: Participants were 15 children with ages between 5 and 12 years, who were submitted to a free interaction situation. They were divided into three groups, according to chronological and mental age, as established by the results of the Primary Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. The first 100 utterances were analyzed considering: number of grammatical morphemes (GM for articles, nouns and verbs (GM-1, and pronouns, prepositions and conjunctions (GM-2; mean length utterance for morphemes (MLU-m and words (MLU-w. RESULTS: The between-groups comparison showed that the MLU averages were higher for older groups, and differences were found for all variables, except for GM-2. The same results were obtained in the within-group comparison, for all variables. There was a strong correlation between MLU-m and MLU-w. CONCLUSION: MLU-w can be used as an identification measure of general linguistic development. However, it is emphasized that the use of all MLU variables provides more efficacy in the characterization of linguistic development and the analysis of language impairments.

  2. A extensão média do enunciado (EME) como medida do desenvolvimento de linguagem de crianças com síndrome de Down / Mean length utterance (MLU) as a measure of language development of children with Down syndrome

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Suelen Fernanda, Marques; Suelly Cecilia Olivan, Limongi.

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a extensão média de enunciados em morfemas (EME-m) e palavras (EME-p) produzida por crianças com síndrome de Down (SD) e verificar a eficácia da utilização da EME-p como medida do desenvolvimento linguístico geral de crianças com SD. MÉTODOS: Participaram 15 crianças com SD, c [...] om idades entre cinco e 12 anos, que foram submetidas à situação de interação livre. As crianças foram divididas em três grupos, com base na idade cronológica e mental, a partir da aplicação do Primary Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. Os 100 primeiros enunciados foram analisados quanto a: número de morfemas gramaticais para artigos, substantivos e verbos (MG-1) e pronomes, preposições e conjunções (MG-2); extensão média dos enunciados considerando-se morfemas (EME-m) e palavras (EME-p). RESULTADOS: A comparação intergrupos mostrou que quanto maior a idade, mais altas foram as médias obtidas, havendo diferença para todas as variáveis, com exceção de MG-2. Os mesmos resultados foram obtidos na comparação intragrupo para todas as variáveis. Houve forte correlação entre EME-m e EME-p. CONCLUSÃO: A EME-p pode ser utilizada como medida de identificação de desenvolvimento linguístico geral. No entanto, ressalta-se que a utilização de todas as variáveis relacionadas à extensão média de enunciados fornece maior eficiência na identificação do desenvolvimento linguístico e na análise de suas alterações. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To characterize the mean length utterance in morphemes (MLU-m) and words (MLU-w) produced by children with Down syndrome (DS), and to verify the effectiveness of using EME-w as a measure of general language development of children with DS. METHODS: Participants were 15 children with ages be [...] tween 5 and 12 years, who were submitted to a free interaction situation. They were divided into three groups, according to chronological and mental age, as established by the results of the Primary Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. The first 100 utterances were analyzed considering: number of grammatical morphemes (GM) for articles, nouns and verbs (GM-1), and pronouns, prepositions and conjunctions (GM-2); mean length utterance for morphemes (MLU-m) and words (MLU-w). RESULTS: The between-groups comparison showed that the MLU averages were higher for older groups, and differences were found for all variables, except for GM-2. The same results were obtained in the within-group comparison, for all variables. There was a strong correlation between MLU-m and MLU-w. CONCLUSION: MLU-w can be used as an identification measure of general linguistic development. However, it is emphasized that the use of all MLU variables provides more efficacy in the characterization of linguistic development and the analysis of language impairments.

  3. The impact of school leaders as participants in teacher professional learning programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff

    Research shows that school leaders play a key role in influencing outcomes for teachers from their professional learning. The study reported here widened this potential influence of school leaders from facilitators of teacher professional learning to active participants in it. The professional learning program aimed to enhance teaching of numeracy in the middle years through eight half-day workshops over a two-year period with further in-school support between the workshops. Additionally, the school leaders were invited to engage in the professional learning program as co-participants with the teachers. This paper reports the findings to our research question: What are the teachers’ and leaders’ perceptions of the impact on teacher professional learning brought about by the inclusion of school leaders as active participants?Data were collected using multiple open response surveys and semi-structured interviews and the participants’ comments were recorded during workshops. The survey and interview questions were based on the Interconnected Model of Teacher Professional Growth (IMTPG) (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002). This model is comprised of four change domains that interact to influence teachers’ professional growth within the change environment in which the teacher works. These domains include the external domain (e.g., workshop input, professional reading, interaction with colleagues), personal change (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, knowledge), change to practice (e.g., planning, teaching strategies), and salient outcomes (e.g., conceptual understanding, student engagement). Thematic analysis of the data was conducted to identify themes within each of the different elements of the IMTPG. The analysis revealed distinct differences between teachers whose school leaders participated and those whose leaders did not. The teachers with participant leaders suggested that leadership involvement influenced their growth across the domains and contributed to positive perceptions of their capacity to enact change. Themes that emerged within the change domains included collegiality, support, and sustainability. The teachers without school leader involvement tended to feel less positive about their capacity to enact change in their schools. The participating school leaders’ perceptions echoed those of the teachers and identified advantages including enhanced communication, empathy, and reflective practice.The findings of this study show clearly that involvement by school leaders in teacher professional learning programs has multiple advantages and impacts on teachers’ perceptions and their capacity to grow professionally and enact change in their classrooms. These findings have implications for school leaders, teacher educators, and designers of teacher professional learning.Clark, D., & Hollingsworth, H. (2002). Elaborating a model of teacher professional growth. Teaching and Teacher Education, 18, 947-967.

  4. Learning to Lead: A New Teacher’s Perspectives on Teacher Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Kristie Bridges

    2008-01-01

    The question of teacher leadership is inextricably tied to teacher effectiveness. Leadership forms the foundation of classroom management and permeates all aspects of the curriculum. While many new teachers have visions of the kinds of leaders they wish to become, this vision is often complicated by the everyday realities of classroom life. Faced with increasingly difficult circumstances, it becomes infinitely more important for teachers to foster the trust and confidence required to make mea...

  5. Teachers’ interactions and mathematics learning within a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Terra Salles

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technology brings new ways of enrolment and motivation of individuals. These technologies have been an important vehicle for sharing information and constitute various communities. For this reason, it is necessary analysis of learning in virtual environments. The aim of this article focuses on the analysis of teachers interactions in the environment Virtual Math Team (VMT-Chat in addressing one problem of taxicab geometry. We study learning through different forms of participation of individuals within the environment. The results shows that the identification of different types of interlocution (evaluative, interpretative, informative and negociative allows the teacher the creation of strategies to contribute with the continuity of the debate and to promote the development of mathematical ideas emerged from interlocutions. The analysis also illustrates how teachers interacted online with the use of combinatorial analysis on the metric in taxicab geometry.

  6. The SUPERCOMET 2 Project: Teacher Seminar and Teacher Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, V.; Ireson, G.; Latal, H.; Mathelitsch, L.; Michelini, M.; Peeters, W.; Rath, G.

    2008-05-01

    The Leonardo da Vinci pilot projects SUPERCOMET (2001-2004) and SUPERCOMET 2 (2004-2007) developed and tested teacher training materials for active, minds-on learning of electromagnetism and superconductivity at the level of upper secondary school. New multimedia materials for the pupils supported the teacher materials, including a teacher seminar in 4 half-day modules detailing the scientific contents, teaching methods, using ICT in physics teaching and learning, online collaboration and further resources for exploring the selected topics. The aim of these projects were to improve the quality of physics teaching on a European level, involving a combined total of 45 partners in 16 countries, and conducting trials at 67 schools with approx. 230 teachers, 280 trainee teachers and 2200 pupils. New follow-up projects develop hands-on materials for carrying out the activities described in the teacher guide and seminars and additional teacher materials involving modelling, simulations and data logging.

  7. Reflexões sobre as vozes contribuintes para a constituição da subjetividade profissional do docente alfabetizador / Reflections about the voices contributing to the constitution of the literacy teacher's professional subjectivity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria Lidia Sica, Szymanski; Ivete Janice de Oliveira, Brotto.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A angústia com relação ao processo de alfabetização é uma constante entre alfabetizadores, seja porque várias teorias de ensino e aprendizagem da língua materna são veiculadas pelo discurso acadêmico e bibliográfico, seja porque as políticas educacionais as adotam. Neste artigo, objetiva-se abordar, [...] por meio de enunciados de professores alfabetizadores, quais as diferentes vozes que os constituíram profissionalmente, determinando o que se configura como base teórica em suas práticas pedagógicas. A coleta de dados se realizou por meio de filmagens das atividades desenvolvidas em um curso de extensão, as quais, depois de editadas, foram analisadas com base nos pressupostos bakhtinianos de linguagem e dialogia. Os enunciados docentes revelam suas crenças e incertezas sobre os métodos de alfabetizar, apropriados de maneira fragmentada e superficial. É na compreensão de uma concepção de linguagem como interlocução, focalizando sujeito e história, que o professor alfabetizador poderá superar modismos e se fortalecer enquanto responsável pelo ensino crítico da leitura e da escrita escolarizada. Abstract in english The anxiety about the literacy process is constant among literacy educators, either because the various theories come through the academic and bibliographic discourse, or because the educational policies adopt them. This article aims at discussing, through the utterances of literacy teachers, which [...] voices are contributing to their professional subjectivity, determining what makes up the theoretical basis of their pedagogical practice. Data collection was performed by filming the activities carried out in an extension course, edited and then analyzed based on Bakhtinian concepts of language and dialogism. The utterances reveal their teaching beliefs and uncertainties about the appropriate literacy methods, learned in a fragmented and superficial way. It is through the process of understanding a language concept as interlocution, focusing on the subject and his/her history, that the literacy teacher may surpass fads and strengthens himself/herself as the individual responsible for the critical appropriation of reading and writing as taught in school.

  8. Cross-disciplinary Participatory & Contextual Design Research: Creating a Teacher Dashboard Application

    OpenAIRE

    Troy D. Abel; Michael Evans

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of Human Computer Interaction have crossed disciplinary boundaries allowing the discovery of underlying stakeholder affordances to emerge during the design research phase of system design. For the current scenario, middle school mathematics teachers as data-driven decision makers are inundated with diagnostic and assessment data, resulting in data deluge. The situation is unlikely to subside as digital technologies and media are broadly adopted for instruction and learning. Teachers ...

  9. Realising the Pedagogical Potential of Multilingual Pre-service Primary Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Jackie Coleman

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a small, qualitative study undertaken by an early career researcher in an Australian university into the meanings which multilingual and bilingual pre-service teachers attach to their linguistic ‘funds of knowledge’ (Moll, Amanti, Neff and Gonzalez, 1992) in relation to their university studies, and to their emerging identities as teachers. Current pedagogical best practice in Australia indicates that drawing on students’ existing funds of knowledge in teaching and learn...

  10. The Use of Visual-based Simulated Environments in Teacher Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon Judge; Jonna Bobzien; Ann Maydosz; Sabra Gear; Petros Katsioloudis

    2013-01-01

    While virtual technology for training in the simulation field has a long history in medicine, aviation, and the military, the application of similar emerging and innovative technologies in teacher preparation and education has been limited. TLE TeachLive™ (Teaching Learning Environment, Teaching in a Virtual Environment) [TLE] is an inventive mixed-reality environment (the blending of real and synthetic content) where prospective teachers can interact with a group of virtual students. The pur...

  11. Beyond Pedagogical Content Knowledge: The Importance of TPACK for Informing Preservice Teacher Education in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Finger, Glenn; Jamieson-Proctor, Romina; Albion, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Since the emergence of computers in schools during the 1980's, there have been considerable developments by education systems and schools to develop policies and expectations for the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance learning and teaching. These have not always translated into practice, which has resulted in a focus on the need for improvements in preservice teacher education programs and professional development of practising teachers. This paper starts from ...

  12. When Teachers Give Up: Teacher Burnout, Teacher Turnover and Their Impact on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Anthony Gary

    A large-scale sociological study of teacher burnout in the public schools is summarized. Data presented in the study consist of: a sample of 3,500 teachers in Houston, whose attitudes were monitored in 1977; exit interviews of every teacher in the initial sample who subsequently quit teaching over a 5-year period; achievement and attendance…

  13. TEACHER MOTIVATION: A THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushwinder Kaur

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is the motivation of teachers that moves the wheels in educational institutions. Quality of education essentially depends upon teacher motivation. Motivation varies from individual to individual and also in the individual at different times and in different situations. Self-beliefs of efficacy play a key role in the self-regulation of motivation. Both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation are important for a teacher. Teacher motivation leads to improved learning quality, better student achievement, school effectiveness, advancement of educational reforms and for the satisfaction and fulfilment of teachers themselves.

  14. PERSONALITY TRAITS OF ENGLISH TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LENKA HRUŠKOVÁ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a teacher cannot be replaced by textbooks, through moralizing or by a set of punishments and encouragements. The example set by a teacher and the influence of their personality are irreplaceable. A teacher’s work often has a far reaching, long term and suggestive impact on the development of a pupil’s personality, their behaviour and feelings. In our paper we try to describe some of the personality traits of English teachers in primary education in selected schools in the Czech Republic with the use of standardized psychological tests (quantitative method and personal interview (qualitative method.

  15. Emergencies and Democratic Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeule, Cornelius Adrian; Posner, Eric A.

    2006-01-01

    Critics of emergency measures such as the U.S. government’s response to 9/11 invoke the Carolene Products framework, which directs courts to apply strict scrutiny to laws and executive actions that target political or ethnic minorities. The critics suggest that such laws and actions are usually the product of democratic failure, and are especially likely to be so during emergencies. However, the application of the Carolene Productsframework to emergencies is questionable. Democratic failure i...

  16. Emergence and Reflexive Downward

    OpenAIRE

    John Symons

    2002-01-01

    This paper responds to Jaegwon Kim's powerful objection to the very possibility of genuinely novel emergent properties Kim argue that the incoherence of reflexive downward causation means that the causal power of an emergent phenomenon is ultimately reducible to the causal powers of its constituents. I offer a a simple argument showing how to characterize emergent properties m terms of the effects of structural relations an the causal powers of that constituents.

  17. Historicism and Industry Emergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, David; Moeen, Mahka; Wadhwani, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Management and organization scholars have increasingly turned to historical sources to examine the emergence and evolution of industries over time. This scholarship has typically used historical evidence as observations for testing theoretically relevant processes of industry emergence. In this chapter, an alternative approach is explored that focuses on reconstructing causes and processes that time and theory have erased. The emergence of three industries—plant biotechnology, savings banking, a...

  18. Energy emergency handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This Handbook identifies selected state and federal measures available to mitigate the impact of an energy emergency, and provides a comprehensive energy emergency communications directory. In the case of state remedial actions, particular emphasis has been placed on typical implementation procedures and likely impacts. The discussions of federal actions focus on initation and implementation procedures. The directory is designed to facilitate communications of all types (telephone, Telex, TWX, or facsimile) among key energy emergency officials in the federal and state governments.

  19. Quantization of Emergent Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2013-01-01

    Emergent gravity is based on a novel form of the equivalence principle known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as spacetime admits a symplectic structure, in other words, a microscopic spacetime becomes noncommutative (NC). If gravity emerges from U(1) gauge theory on NC spacetime, this picture of emergent gravity suggests a completely ne...

  20. Postmethod Era and Glocalized Language Curriculum Development: A Fresh Burden on Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrshad Ahmadian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The disappearance of method from academic discussions and the rise of the postmethod debate emanating from both the postmodernist philosophy and a globalized world have stirred a fresh round of discussion in academic circles in the field of the second language (L2 teaching profession. As a result of postmethod pedagogy, the teacher comes to the center of language learning and teaching and his/her beliefs, experiences and knowledge are greatly valued. Although postmethodists favor teacher autonomy, they do not favor the one-way flow of information inherent in a top-down syllabus, and provide a theoretical basis for the re-emergence of a learner-centered process syllabus and the negotiated contributions to syllabus development by both teachers and learners. Finally, although postmethod pedagogy favors a glocalized learner-centered curriculum, it is highly teacher-dependent since this is the postmethod teacher who can fulfill postmethod promises.

  1. Teacher as Public Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    In this article "teacher as public art" is used as a metaphor to describe and explain the all-too-common perceptions and experiences of professors of color, especially women, within the academy. Highlighted throughout this discussion are: (1) the relevance of locating self within the context of people and place; and (2) the importance of bringing…

  2. Letting Teachers Specialize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzin, Sarah M.; Carroll, Robin; Lutz, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    Six years ago, South Heights Elementary School was the lowest-performing school in Kentucky's Henderson County School District. Teachers blamed poverty lack of parent involvement, poor discipline, and high staff turnover for the situation. Few expected to meet the state goals. Yet by 2004, South Heights was the fifth-highest-performing school in…

  3. Studying Teacher Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In July 2011, Bill Gates told the "Wall Street Journal," "I'm enough of a scientist to want to say, "What is it about a great teacher?"" As a "practitioner" of sorts, the author has wondered the same thing for 15 years. The K-12 school sector generates little empirical research of any sort. And of this small amount, most is targeted to…

  4. SOCMATICAS Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Laurence

    Instructions for use of Socmaticas, a bilingual (Spanish-English), multicultural, multidisciplinary sports learning program are given in this teacher's guide. The program is based on the use of World Soccer team rosters (which include lists of players' names, ages, heights, weights, etc.) to teach English as a second language or Spanish. Students…

  5. Questions English Teachers Ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, R. Baird

    This volume is based on the responses of 374 English teachers at the secondary and college levels to a letter asking them to describe the questions that most perplex them professionally. Answers are provided by 88 leaders in English education, including James R. Squire, Walter H. MacGinitie, R. Baird Shuman, Sheila Schwartz, and Ken Macrorie. The…

  6. Teacher Networks Companion Piece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ami Patel; Rulli, Carolyn; Schiff, Daniel; Fradera, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Network building vitally impacts career development, but in few professions does it impact daily practice more than in teaching. Teacher networks, known as professional learning communities, communities of practice, peer learning circles, virtual professional communities, as well as other names, play a unique and powerful role in education. In…

  7. The Language Teacher, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Laura, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This journal is a monthly publication of the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), a nonprofit professional organization of language teachers dedicated to the improvement of language learning and teaching in Japan. JALT's publications and events serve as vehicles for the exchange of new ideas and techniques, and a means of keeping…

  8. The Language Teacher, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bill, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This journal is a monthly publication of the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), a nonprofit professional organization of language teachers dedicated to the improvement of language learning and teaching in Japan. JALT's publications and events serve as vehicles for the exchange of new ideas and techniques, and a means of keeping…

  9. Teachers as Servant Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joe D.

    2010-01-01

    In today's political environment with the emphasis on testing, standards, and accountability, teachers can easily feel frustrated by the amount of time and resources left over for teaching--for guiding students not only in academics but also in character education. Educators can find themselves losing focus of what initially inspired them to…

  10. Teacher as Prophetic Trickster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Jim

    2009-01-01

    There are a multitude of powerful cultural archetypes and images of the school teacher. These include nurturing caregiver, guardian of morality, champion of the global economy, self-sacrificing do-gooder, cultural worker, intellectual, tyrant, and many more metaphors. Jim Garrison's essay introduces another figure, a mythological persona, to the…

  11. Counseling Talented Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of counseling needs of gifted learners reviews the literature on affective and self-concept issues and discusses strategies for addressing students' psychosocial, academic counseling, and career counseling needs. Counselor, parent, and teacher roles are addressed. Tables link student characteristics to counseling approaches, counseling…

  12. Helping Teachers Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Jane; Russell, Beth; Shumate, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Personality type theory describes normal differences in how people are energized, take in information, make decisions, and approach work and life--all key elements in how people teach and learn. Understanding one another's personality type preferences helps teachers share their instructional strategies and classroom information. Type theory…

  13. It's the Teacher, Stupid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Geoffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    The author has taken the liberty of borrowing from past candidate (and president) Bill Clinton's "War Room" mantra to suggest that those who are working toward preparing schools for online assessments of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) might be forgetting the most important element in the process: the classroom teacher. The author argues that…

  14. Combating Teacher Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheryl Scott

    2012-01-01

    Generation Y teachers--those under 30 years of age--have higher expectations for technology than their colleagues from earlier generations--for good reason. Improved instructional and networking technology is one important aspect of a modern high-performing workplace. This generational difference is important, since a majority of seasoned…

  15. Recruiting Teachers in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a system of special schools in Colombia which introduces students to teaching careers as early as the 8th grade. The Colombian system is based on a simple idea: Every student is a potential teacher. Principals talk about molding "ciudadano-pedagogos"--citizen-educators who view teaching as a way of…

  16. Training Teachers for Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzara, Judy

    2000-01-01

    By emphasizing practical technology applications, a Fairfax County (Virginia) school won national recognition. The principal built a model technology center by utilizing an assistant principal's expertise, developing teacher training via voluntary summer sessions and inservice programs, hiring a full-time technology advisor, and securing adequate…

  17. Computers Help Teachers Too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Rhonda L.; DeBold, Joanne P.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of management computer technology for both classroom and resource teachers of the hearing impaired are described. Their advantages in planning and organization tasks are illustrated by examples of the management system at Rochester School for the Deaf and its use in two specific areas: the reading checklist file and speech production…

  18. Teacher, where Are You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Diane P.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, much has been made of the increase in student absenteeism. However, an issue that has not received as much attention, but one that is equally critical to childhood education, is that of teacher absenteeism. It is important to note that schools are not only centers of learning, but also institutions that provide continuity for…

  19. Improving Teacher Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Andrew J.; Youngs, Peter; Fleischman, Steve

    2005-01-01

    A common problem faced by new teachers is lack of supervisory support and learning on the job through trial and error can often dishearten the rookie enough to abandon the job and often the profession. Suggestions are offered on how to redress this problem and a starting point could be the implementation of what the Alliance for Excellent…

  20. Water Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaroni, Charles W.; And Others

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on water pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of water pollution and involves students in processes of…

  1. Teachers as Literacy Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jennifer D.; Applegate, Mary DeKonty; Applegate, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors make the case that literacy leadership is not a quality restricted to specialists with extra certifications. Instead, literacy leadership qualities are within the grasp of every conscientious classroom teacher who is willing to take advantage of opportunities for personal and professional growth.

  2. Air Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaroni, Charles W.; O'Donnell, Patrick A.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on air pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of air pollution and involves students in processes of…

  3. Teachers' Assessment Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.; Cab, Victor Pech; Cisneros-Cohernour, Edith J.

    This paper summarizes main findings from an investigation of the familiarity and importance of assessment practices from the perspectives of Mexican teachers, counselors, and administrators. A survey that listed 74 practices, sampling 7 areas of competencies, was assembled from the Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education, the Standards for…

  4. Biology Teachers and Peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, L. Jack

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that biology teachers can serve an important role in turning humankind from nuclear warfare to peaceful cooperation. Argues that the school should lead the world in teaching about the universal will to live exhibited by all organisms and about the insanity of nuclear armament. (DC)

  5. Risk communications & emergency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranski, S.C. [EQUINOX Environmental, Inc., Shushan, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This talk outlines the interface between good risk communication and emergency planning. The major topics include the following: What is risk communication and how is it applied to emergency planning; crisis communication and the need to know and how to integrate crisis communication and risk communication; the face of the emergency: spokespersons, public information; The Media`s role in emergency Public information and risk communication; Developing the risk communication message; How to respond to continuing need for 24 hours communications; the EAS and Risk communication and Crisis communication; and finally where is risk communication heading and how it can help.

  6. Humanism in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, S

    1993-09-01

    Emergency medicine has not yet appropriated "humanism" as a term of its own. Medical humanism needs to be interpreted in a way that is consistent with the practical goals of emergency medicine. In this essay, humanism in emergency medicine is defined by identifying the dehumanizing aspects of sudden illness and exploring of ways for sustaining the humanity of emergency department patients. Excerpts from Dr Oliver Sacks' autobiographical work A Leg to Stand On give voice to the human needs created by sudden illness and its treatment. PMID:8363690

  7. Emergency exercise methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimczak, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Competence for proper response to hazardous materials emergencies is enhanced and effectively measured by exercises which test plans and procedures and validate training. Emergency exercises are most effective when realistic criteria is used and a sequence of events is followed. The scenario is developed from pre-determined exercise objectives based on hazard analyses, actual plans and procedures. The scenario should address findings from previous exercises and actual emergencies. Exercise rules establish the extent of play and address contingencies during the exercise. All exercise personnel are assigned roles as players, controllers or evaluators. These participants should receive specialized training in advance. A methodology for writing an emergency exercise plan will be detailed.

  8. Emergency exercise methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimczak, C.A.

    1993-03-01

    Competence for proper response to hazardous materials emergencies is enhanced and effectively measured by exercises which test plans and procedures and validate training. Emergency exercises are most effective when realistic criteria is used and a sequence of events is followed. The scenario is developed from pre-determined exercise objectives based on hazard analyses, actual plans and procedures. The scenario should address findings from previous exercises and actual emergencies. Exercise rules establish the extent of play and address contingencies during the exercise. All exercise personnel are assigned roles as players, controllers or evaluators. These participants should receive specialized training in advance. A methodology for writing an emergency exercise plan will be detailed.

  9. Relationship among science teacher personality characteristics and degree of teacher classroom implementation after in-service workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechler, Phares Lochiel Coleman

    State departments of public instruction require that teachers periodically update their licenses throughout their teaching careers. Various professional development events such as in-service workshops, university offerings, and special innovative programs provide opportunities for novice and experienced teachers to grow professionally. The "Team Science" workshop was designed from models supported by research that described guidelines for successful workshop strategies. In evaluating the workshop, the question was asked "Why did not all teachers implement the ideas from the workshop in their science classrooms?" This study investigates the possible relationship between teacher personality characteristics and implementation of technology innovations. Team Science was an extensive workshop program planned to develop science teachers' expertise in using computer and video technology to teach in physical science, chemistry, and physics classrooms in rural school in North Carolina. Upon evaluating the four-year effort, it was found that the 23 participants implemented the technological strategies at various levels. At the higher end of the range of technology use, some teachers exhibited complete integration of the computers and interfacing devices into both the laboratory work and the classroom inquiry. At the lower end of the range, some teachers used the technology very little. The resulting question emerged from the data collected: Do specific teacher personality characteristics (independent variables) correlate with the degree of implementation (dependent variable) of the innovative ideas and tools used in the teacher's science classroom after the in-service workshop? To determine if there were any significant personality traits, each teacher was given five personality tests. The tests were Hunt's Conceptual Development Test, the Paragraph Completion Test; James Rest's Defining Issues Test; Simmons Personal Survey, an emotional tendency test; the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator; and Riggs and Enochs Self-Efficacy Test. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, multiple regression, and factor analysis to see what variables were predictors of implementation. The regression analysis revealed that subtests from Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Simmons Personal Survey, Hunt's Paragraph Completion Test, and Rest's Defining Issues Test could be used to predict implementation. Factor analysis indicated teachers who implemented the technology were "risk takers" and "flexible planners."

  10. Doing Better: Illuminating a Framework of Equitable Science Pedagogy through a Cross- Case Analysis of Urban High School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Manali J.

    Students of color are routinely asked to participate in science education that is less intellectually rich and self-affirming. Additionally, teachers have trouble embarking on professional growth related to issues of equity and diversity in science. The purpose of this dissertation research is to develop a multi-dimensional framework for equitable science pedagogy (ESP) through analyzing the efforts and struggles of high school science teachers. This study is grounded in a conceptual framework derived from scholarship in science education, multicultural education, critical science studies, and teacher learning. The following questions guide this research: 1) What visions and enactments emerge in teachers' practices towards equitable science pedagogy? 2) How are teachers' practice decisions towards ESP influenced by their personal theories of race/culture, science, and learning and sociocultural contexts? 3) Why are there consistencies and variances across teachers' practices? This study employs a qualitative multiple case study design with ethnographic data collection to explore the practices of three urban high school science teachers who were identified as being committed to nurturing the science learning of students of color. Data include over 120 hours of classroom observation, 60 hours of teacher interviews, and 500 teacher- and student-generated artifacts. Data analysis included coding teachers' practices using theory- and participant generated codes, construction of themes based on emergent patterns, and cross-case analysis. The affordances and limitations of the participants' pedagogical approaches inform the following framework for equitable science pedagogy: 1) Seeing race and culture and sharing responsibility for learning form foundational dimensions. Practices from the other three dimensions--- nurturing students' identities, re-centering students' epistemologies, and critiquing structural inequities---emerge from the foundation. As emergent practices, they are constituted by but not reduced to practices in the initial dimensions. 2) Ideas from the foundational dimensions are filtered through teachers' stances on science. Thus, teachers' practices in the emergent dimensions and the foundational dimensions are mediated by teachers' pedagogical ideas about science and school science. 3) Teachers' articulations of practice influence the possibility of on-going work towards equitable science pedagogy.

  11. Inspection of Emergency Arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) was tasked by the NEA CNRA to examine and evaluate the extent to which emergency arrangements are inspected and to identify areas of importance for the development of good inspection practices. WGIP members shared their approaches to the inspection of emergency arrangements by the use of questionnaires, which were developed from the requirements set out in IAEA Safety Standards. Detailed responses to the questionnaires from WGIP member countries have been compiled and are presented in the appendix to this report. The following commendable practices have been drawn from the completed questionnaires and views provided by WGIP members: - RBs and their Inspectors have sufficient knowledge and information regarding operator's arrangements for the preparedness and response to nuclear emergencies, to enable authoritative advice to be given to the national coordinating authority, where necessary. - Inspectors check that the operator's response to a nuclear emergency is adequately integrated with relevant response organisations. - Inspectors pay attention to consider the integration of the operator's response to safety and security threats. - The efficiency of international relations is checked in depth during some exercises (e.g. early warning, assistance and technical information), especially for near-border facilities that could lead to an emergency response abroad. - RB inspection programmes consider the adequacy of arrangements for emergency preparedness and response to multi-unit accidents. - RBs assess the adequacy of arrangements to respond to accidents in other countries. - The RB's role is adequately documented and communicated to all agencies taking part in the response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. - Inspectors check that threat assessments for NPPs have been undertaken in accordance with national requirements and that up-to-date assessments have been used as the basis for developing emergency plans for NPPs. - Where RBs have an influence over land use around NPPs, they use the knowledge of their local or resident inspectors to inform decisions. - Inspectors check that appropriate action levels or criteria to identify an actual or radiological emergency are clearly defined and readily available to decision makers. - When observing emergency exercises inspectors check that: an appropriate and timely declaration is made, plant operators respond in accordance with the emergency plan and emergency instructions, and an appropriate level of response is initiated on and off-site. - RBs conduct follow-up inspections after real events, to ensure that the correct emergency response has been followed. - Inspectors verify that reliable data will be used to support the evaluation of environmental impact from a nuclear or radiological emergency, to the extent that this is within the jurisdiction of the RB. - Routine inspections and emergency exercise observations include a check that lines of communication are sufficiently resilient. - When observing emergency exercises inspectors, where practicable, check that timely, accurate and consistent information is provided to the public, in accordance with the off-site emergency plan. - RBs inspect the ability of the operator to give accurate medical and radiological information about casualties, to enable the correct treatment to be given. - Additional emergency equipment that is held in reserve off-site, provided to enhance resilience (post Fukushima), is included in the RB planned inspection and/or emergency exercise programme. - Inspectors check that licensee staff are adequately trained to connect and use additional equipment provided to enhance resilience. - Inspectors utilise the NPP operator's approved on-site emergency plan when inspecting on-site emergency arrangements. - RBs include human factors staff in emergency exercise evaluation teams to consider safety culture and human performance. - RBs consider the need for exercise scenarios to be undisclosed to exercise participants. - Bilateral trans-national inspection pro

  12. Foreign Language Teachers’ Attitude toward Authentic Assessment in Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Bengü Aksu Ataç

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: A rapidly increasing interest has been observed in finding alternatives to traditional forms of assessment in education. For at least three decades, teachers, curriculum developers and program administrators have been studying hard to identify appropriate procedures to assess the knowledge and abilities of students. The term “authentic assessment” has emerged from this need in the field of education, and can be described as “the multiple forms of assessment that reflect stu...

  13. Foreign Language Teachers’ Attitude toward Authentic Assessment in Language

    OpenAIRE

    Aksu Ataç, Bengü

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: A rapidly increasing interest has been observed in finding alternatives to traditional forms of assessment in education. For at least three decades, teachers, curriculum developers and program administrators have been studying hard to identify appropriate procedures to assess the knowledge and abilities of students. The term “authentic assessment” has emerged from this need in the field of education, and can be described as “the multiple forms of assessment that reflect stu...

  14. Teaching science to English Language Learners: Instructional approaches of high school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Betty-Vinca N.

    Students who are English Language Learners (ELLs) form the fastest growing segment of the American school population. Prompted by the call for scientific literacy for all citizens, science educators too have investigated the intersection of language and science instruction of ELLs. However these studies have typically been conducted with elementary students. Few studies have explored how high school science teachers, particularly those who have not received any special training, approach science instruction of ELLs and what supports them in this endeavor. This was a qualitative case study conducted with five science teachers in one small urban high school that predominantly served ELLs. The purpose of this study was to examine instructional approaches used by teachers to make science accessible to ELLs and the factors that supported or inhibited them in developing their instructional approaches. This goal encompassed the following questions: (a) how teachers viewed science instruction of ELLs, (b) how teachers designed a responsive program to teach science to ELLs, (c) what approaches teachers used for curriculum development and instruction, (d) how teachers developed classroom learning communities to meet the needs of ELLs. Seven instructional strategies and five perceived sources of support emerged as findings of this research. In summary, teachers believed that they needed to make science more accessible for their ELL students while promoting their literacy skills. Teachers provided individualized attention to students to provide relevant support. Teachers engaged their students in various types of active learning lessons in social contexts, where students worked on both hands-on and meaning-making activities and interacted with their peers and teachers. Teachers also created classroom communities and learning spaces where students felt comfortable to seek and give help. Finally, teachers identified several sources of support that influenced their instructional approaches including, the structure of the school, working on instructional teams, collaborating and working with other teachers especially English teachers and including science teachers, and participating in various professional development activities. The findings indicated that the instructional approaches used by teachers were largely supported by literacy education and science education done at elementary level. Findings also revealed that teachers in this study encouraged their ELLs to participate in classroom conversations and involved them in answering open-ended questions. However, not all teachers in this study had the same repertoire of instructional strategies for their ELL students and some teachers demonstrated a better understanding of these approaches than others. All teachers perceived that the structure of the school as well as collaborating and working with other teachers, especially English teachers, as their main source of support in designing instructional approaches. This study suggests that teacher educators and professional development providers need to develop courses and programs to help high school teachers learn about how to design instructional activities that simultaneously promote both academic science and English literacy. Also, administrators need to create conditions at their schools that would allow teachers to interact, collaborate, and learn from each other.

  15. Teaching as practice: Blending the intellectual and moral in pursuit of science teachers' practical knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Sara Labib

    This study aimed to (a) explore and understand the intricacy of science teaching as a morally committed practice engaging teachers' practical knowledge; (b) explore science teacher practical knowledge by probing and understanding teachers' interpretations, commitments, and dialectic interactions between them; and (c) scrutinize science teachers' actions in terms of their interpretations and commitments as they go about realizing 'internal goods' of their practice and resolving dilemmas of everyday science teaching practice. Case studies of three physical science teachers in different socioeconomic contexts in Lebanon were conducted using ethnographic methods of indepth dialogues, observation, and artifact analysis. An interpretive approach to data analysis was adopted to ensure that the generated themes and assertions reflected participant teachers' interpretation and commitments. A commitment of preparing students for the official exams and doing well in them prevailed across the three contexts. This commitment originated from the teachers' interpretations of their duty as 'good' teachers who will not let students and the school down. In the public schools, teachers saw that students' passing the Brevet exams gains them a right of passage to a safe zone. In the private school, the teacher saw her duty to have student attain high grades in preparation for their future educational and career plans. Each teacher's case was described in terms of a teacher's standing commitments, associated interpretations, and manifestations in action. A characterization for each teacher's practice was offered in light of interactions between commitments, interpretations and actions. Characterizations that emerged included: a disciplining governess, role model with missionary tendencies, and good employee with a mission. The concept of gap-closing (between interpretations and commitments) was used to explain development of teachers' practical knowledge. Nature of gap closing and its forms are discussed in light of the case studies. A view of teachers' knowledge involving a practical moral dimension is discussed utilizing the concept of 'phronesis.' Phronetic knowledge is compared with other forms of teacher knowledge within major science education research traditions: Constructivism and sociocultural perspectives. Finally, implications of such a view of knowledge are presented as they pertain to professional development, teacher education, and research in science education.

  16. Relationship between Emergent Literacy and Early Social-Emotional Development in Preschool Children from Low-Income Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Minghua; Dobbs-Oates, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Sixty-one preschool children and their parents and teachers participated in a cross-sectional study of the social-emotional correlates of emergent literacy skills. The children's emergent literacy skills were assessed with the standard language and literacy tests: "Expressive Vocabulary Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test" (third…

  17. The International Teacher: Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Preferred Teacher-Student Interpersonal Behaviour in Two United World Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oord, Lodewijk; den Brok, Perry

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated students' and teachers' views of preferred teaching in terms of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship. Interpersonal teacher behaviour was studied by means of the Model for Interpersonal Teacher Behaviour. Data was gathered from 176 students and 39 teachers from two United World Colleges, one in Norway and one in…

  18. Knowledge of Emergency Management of Traumatized Teeth among Schoolteachers in Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mehrabkhani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Dental trauma is an important oral health problem in children that requires immediate and appro-priate management for long term success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of elementary school teach-ers about emergency management of traumatic dental injuries in children. Materials and methods. A total of 163 teachers from 21 elementary schools from Mashhad, Iran participated in this study. Data were collected using a two-part questionnaire comprised of questions regarding demographic data and partici-pants' knowledge about dental trauma. Results. The level of the teachers' knowledge was moderate (53.3%. Of the 163 participants, 104 (63.8% were females and 59 (36.2% were males. Among several predictors that were surveyed in this study, only the age of respondents signifi-cantly impacted the teachers' knowledge (P = 0.004. Conclusion. The results of this study showed the moderate level of knowledge of teachers regarding emergency manage-ment of traumatized teeth. Adding dental trauma management courses in the teacher training curriculum and requiring teachers to be updated in regards to this issue can improve their knowledge and thus led to better management of traumatic dental injuries in children.

  19. [Ultrasound in emergency medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapostolle, F; Deltour, S; Petrovic, T

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed. PMID:26574136

  20. The national emergency organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In any emergency situation, the organisation of the response in France is based on predetermined emergency response plans. These plans define worst-case accident scenarios in terms of safety and the measures necessary to control the accident and to protect the personnel on the sites as well as the general public. (authors)

  1. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  2. Emergency exercise scenario tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plant emergency exercises require a realistically presented accident situation which includes various aspects: plant process, radioactivity, radiation, weather and people. Experiences from nuclear power plant emergency exercises show that preparing accident scenarios even for relatively short exercises is tedious. In the future modern computer technology and past experience could be used for making exercise planning more effective. (au)

  3. Emergency Percutaneous Nephrostomy

    OpenAIRE

    Regalado, Sidney P.

    2006-01-01

    The primary indication for the urgent percutaneous nephrostomy is to relieve an obstructed and infected renal collecting system (pyonephrosis). Percutaneous nephrostomy catheter placement is a safe procedure with a high technical success rate. This article will discuss all aspects regarding the emergent placement of nephrostomy catheters, including the indications, techniques, results, and complications. Differences between emergent and nonemergent placement of percutaneous nephrostomy cathet...

  4. Architecture humanitarian emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Guillamon, Maria; Eskemose Andersen, Jørgen; Contreras, Jorge Lobos; Popovic Larsen, Olga; Lee, Daniel Sang-Hoon; Pirondi, Ciro; Lund, Lene Dammand

    2013-01-01

    Introduced by scientific articles conserning architecture and human rights in light of cultures, emergencies, social equality and sustainability, democracy, economy, artistic development and science into architecture. Concluding in definition of needs for new roles, processes and education of architecture. Followed by articles focusing on interdisciplinary research and design of emergency shelters as well as educational environments. Finally concretized in 35 studies from international workshops...

  5. Using Remote Labs to Serve Different Teacher’s Needs - A Case Study with VISIR and RemotElectLab

    OpenAIRE

    Andre Vaz Fidalgo; Gustavo Ribeiro Alves; Maria Arcelina Marques; Maria Clara Viegas; Maria Cristina Costa-Lobo; Unai Hernandez; Javier Garcia-Zubia; Ingvar Gustavsson

    2012-01-01

    Remote Laboratories are an emergent technological and pedagogical tool at all education levels, and their widespread use is an important part of their own improvement and evolution. This paper describes several issues encountered on laboratorial classes, on higher education courses, when using remote laboratories based on PXI systems, either using the VISIR system or an alternate in-house solution. Three main issues are presented and explained, all reported by teachers that gave support to st...

  6. Electric power emergency handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labadie, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Emergency Electric Power Administration's Emergency Operations Handbook is designed to provide guidance to the EEPA organization. It defines responsibilities and describes actions performed by the government and electric utilities in planning for, and in operations during, national emergencies. The EEPA Handbook is reissued periodically to describe organizational changes, to assign new duties and responsibilities, and to clarify the responsibilities of the government to direct and coordinate the operations of the electric utility industry under emergencies declared by the President. This Handbook is consistent with the assumptions, policies, and procedures contained in the National Plan for Emergency Preparedness. Claimancy and restoration, communications and warning, and effects of nuclear weapons are subjects covered in the appendices.

  7. Quantization of Emergent Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2013-01-01

    Emergent gravity is based on a novel form of the equivalence principle known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as spacetime admits a symplectic structure, in other words, a microscopic spacetime becomes noncommutative (NC). If gravity emerges from U(1) gauge theory on NC spacetime, this picture of emergent gravity suggests a completely new quantization scheme where quantum gravity is defined by quantizing spacetime itself, leading to a dynamical NC spacetime. Therefore the quantization of emergent gravity is radically different from the conventional approach trying to quantize a phase space of metric fields. This approach for quantum gravity allows a background independent formulation where spacetime as well as matter fields is equally emergent from a universal vacuum of quantum gravity.

  8. Nanotechnology and Secondary Science Teacher's Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Elena K.

    The recommendations of the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the multi-agency National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) identified the need to prepare the workforce and specialists in the field of nanotechnology in order for the United States to continue to compete in the global marketplace. There is a lack of research reported in recent literature on the readiness of secondary science teachers to introduce higher level sciences---specifically nanotechnology---in their classes. The central research question of this study examined secondary science teachers' beliefs about teaching nanotechnology comfortably, effectively, and successfully. Bandura's self-efficacy theory provided the conceptual framework for this phenomenological study. A data analysis rubric was used to identify themes and patterns that emerged from detailed descriptions during in-depth interviews with 15 secondary science teachers. The analysis revealed the shared, lived experiences of teachers and their beliefs about their effectiveness and comfort in teaching higher-level sciences, specifically nanotechnology. The results of the study indicated that, with rare exceptions, secondary science teachers do not feel comfortable or effective, nor do they believe they have adequate training to teach nanotechnology concepts to their students. These teachers believed they were not prepared or trained in incorporating these higher level science concepts in the curriculum. Secondary science teachers' self-efficacy and personal beliefs of effectiveness in teaching nanotechnology can be an important component in achieving a positive social change by helping to familiarize high school students with nanotechnology and how it can benefit society and the future of science.

  9. Cultural Initiative and Persistence of Individual Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyuan ZHANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Individual teachers are the entities which shape the teacher culture and the teacher cultural system. They are also subjects that transform the teacher culture, so they have cultural initiative and awareness. However, they might also impede the development of the progressive teacher culture by creating the out-fashioned teacher culture. When the cultural model of individual teachers has not yet been shared the teaching group, individual teachers transform themselves from the explicit cultural creators to an “invisible me.” The realization of cultural persistence is an important aspect for the reconstruction of the teacher culture.

  10. The Role of Teacher Leaders in School Improvement through the Perceptions of Principals and Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Akert; Barbara N Martin

    2012-01-01

    These researchers examined the perceptions of fifteen principals and 96 classroom teachers regarding the role of teacher leadership in school improvement. The data revealed significant differences in how principals and teachers perceive teachers’ involvement in teacher leadership roles, in ratings of involvement of teachers in leadership roles when compared to the ratings of how involved they would like to be in those same roles, and how principals and teachers perceived the impact of teacher...

  11. Teachers under examination: reflections on teacher assessment policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneida Oto Shiroma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the current proposals of teacher assessment in Brazil. Based on historical materialism, we analysed national and international documents aiming at identifying the goals of this sort of assessment, the justifications for its implementation and debates about its outcomes. We found convergences between the policies recommended by the multilateral agencies, especially by the World Bank and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and those adopted in Brazil, which indicates the great interest and influence of multilateral organizations in the development of policies for teachers. The first reactions of teachers, researchers, teacher associations and training institutions, added to the experiences of other countries that have adopted teacher assessment policies earlier, help us to understand possible outcomes and implications of these policies for teachers as a class, their careers and unions.

  12. A Versatile Teacher – A Timely Alternate To Ancient Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.G.IMMANUEL

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In education, a teacher is a person who provides schooling for pupils and students. Ateacher who facilitates education for an individual student may also be described as a personal tutor. The role of teacher is often formal and ongoing, carried out by way of occupation or profession at a school or other place of formal education.In ancient days, the teachers were worshipped as gods. Learners call them “GURUS” and the word 'GURU' had a magical impact on the students. The students willingly surrendered themselves to the teachers and had unquestionable trust, faith and respect on their teachers. Whatever the teachers taught was accepted wholeheartedly because it was new and interesting to them as here was no much growth in information acquisition. But today the educational scenario is completely different and the learning process has undergone rapid changes in which the educator has to take an entirely new 'avatar' altogether.

  13. Mirror Images: New Reflections on Teacher Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, Casey; Reason, Clair

    2011-01-01

    What inspires teachers to see themselves as leaders? "Mirror Images" takes a comprehensive look at what teacher leadership means today and how teachers can transform the future of their profession. Included are ten iconic images of teacher leadership roles to help teachers move beyond teaching as they were taught. The authors make a compelling…

  14. Language Teacher Research in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Christine, Ed.; Barlow, Lisa, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    An openness to new ways of teaching and learning is vital for growth among English language teachers, teacher educators, teachers in training, and students. This volume in the Language Teacher Research Series (Thomas S. C. Farrell, series editor) shares the studies and reflections of teacher researchers working in Middle Eastern countries with…

  15. How Can We Improve Teacher Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on teacher quality is not definitive. But, we know that developing high-quality teachers requires a multipronged approach: We need to recruit promising teachers. We need to retain and reward effective early career teachers. We need mechanisms to dismiss those who don't improve. We need to focus teacher preparation on the foundations of…

  16. 2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The "2011 State Teacher

  17. 2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The "2011 State Teacher

  18. Teaching language teachers scaffolding professional learning

    CERN Document Server

    Maggioli, Gabriel Diaz

    2012-01-01

    Teaching Language Teachers: Scaffolding Professional Learning provides an updated view of as well as a reader-friendly introduction to the field of Teaching Teachers, with special reference to language teaching. By taking a decidedly Sociocultural perspective, the book addresses the main role of the Teacher of Teachers (ToT) as that of scaffolding the professional learning of aspiring teachers.

  19. A Hybrid Approach Benefits Beginning Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Eric D.; Desimone, Laura M.; Porter, Andrew C.; Polikoff, Morgan S.; Schwartz, Robert; Johnson, L. Joy

    2015-01-01

    Formal mentoring is the cornerstone of most teacher induction programs, but teachers receive support from informal mentors as well. The authors report on findings from a study of 57 first-year mathematics teachers in 11 school districts to describe who teachers' formal and informal mentors are, how teachers work with them, and how the functions of…

  20. Exploring what stabilizes teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' scientific thinking in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer

    Teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' disciplinary thinking is critical for promoting students' disciplinary engagement and learning, yet such attention is rare and fleeting in American classrooms. In this dissertation, I aim to learn more from teachers who do attend and respond to students' scientific ideas while teaching. I explore the classroom practices of three focal teachers in a professional development program who consistently place students' ideas at the core of their instruction with an eye toward the following research question: What might stabilize teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' scientific thinking during sustained classroom episodes? Examining three episodes from each teacher, I identify aspects within these episodes that are salient to the teachers and plausibly interrelated with their attention and responsiveness to student thinking. My primary data chapters include analyses of specific pairs of episodes that speak to my broader research question as well as other relevant topics in the literature on attending and responding to student thinking. The first data chapter makes the case that professional development efforts aimed at supporting responsiveness to student thinking primarily help teachers within planned discussions or progressions, but struggle to help teachers adapt their ongoing instruction in response to unexpected directions from students. I examine two episodes in which the discussions that emerged were not preplanned but rather emergent from students' contributions, with an eye toward what initiated and sustained teachers' responsiveness. The second data chapter contributes to discussions on what constitutes favorable change in attending and responding to the substance of student thinking, emphasizing the importance of disciplinary-specific considerations. Finally, I draw on the entire data set in noting specific commonalities within and across teachers, suggesting two complementary professional development approaches: 1) remaining open to and aware of what hooks and sustains individual teachers and their classroom practice, and 2) emphasizing aspects that cut across teachers, which might serve as meaningful foci for professional development efforts aimed at promoting an instructional focus on students' ideas.

  1. A Prospective Investigation of Teacher Preference and Children's Perceptions of the Student-Teacher Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Sterett H.; DeRosier, Melissa E.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated teacher preference, the degree to which a teacher likes a specific student, as a predictor of students' perceptions of teacher preference as well as conflict and support in the student-teacher relationship. Child and teacher reports of teacher preference and child reports of conflict and support were provided in the fall…

  2. The Motivation of Teachers to Assume the Role of Cooperating Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonett, Connie L. Foye

    2009-01-01

    The Motivation of Teachers to Assume the Role of Cooperating Teacher This study explored a phenomenological understanding of the motivation and influences that cause experienced teachers to assume pedagogical training of student teachers through the role of cooperating teacher. The research question guiding the study was what motivates teachers to…

  3. What Do Today's Teachers Want (and Not Want) from Teacher Leaders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jason; Doring, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article looks across six years of teacher leadership research to explore what today's teachers want (and don't want) from teacher leaders. A secondary analysis was conducted on volumes of teacher leader data, focused on teacher leader-teacher interactions, using a "justice" and "integrity"-oriented framework.…

  4. Being a Teacher and a Teacher Educator--Developing a New Identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The shift towards school-led teacher education steered by the government in England challenges the "traditional" model of experienced teachers leaving school and entering the higher education sector to become teacher educators. More teachers are undertaking the dual role of teacher and teacher educator, leading the professional learning…

  5. An "Education Professions Performance Development Act": A Prospectus for Providing "Highly Qualified" and More Motivated Teachers and Leaders for America's Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James W.

    2005-01-01

    Classroom teachers are among the few remaining employee groups whose evaluations and remuneration are generally unrelated to their performance. However, it is difficult to appraise a teacher's effectiveness by achievement of pupils because learning is not under an instructor's complete influence. New measurement techniques are emerging, however,…

  6. High school science teachers' perceptions of telecommunications utilizing a Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slough, Scott Wayne

    The purpose of this study was to describe high school science teachers' perceptions of telecommunications. The data were collected through open-ended ethnographic interviews with 24 high school science teachers from five different high schools in a single suburban school district who had been in an emerging telecommunications-rich environment for two and one-half years. The interview protocol was adapted from Honey and Henriquez (1993), with the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) (Bailey & Palsha, 1992) providing a conceptual framework for data analysis. For this study, the emerging telecommunications-rich environment included a district-wide infrastructure that had been in place for two and one-half years that included a secure district-wide Intranet, 24 network connections in each classroom, full Internet access from the network, four computers per classroom, and a variety of formal and informal professional development opportunities for teachers. Categories of results discussed include: (a) teacher's profession use of telecommuunications; (b) teachers' perceptions of student's use of telecommunications; (c) teachers' perceptions of barriers to the implementation of telecommunications; (d) teachers' perceptions of supporting conditions for the implementation of telecommunications; (e) teachers' perceptions of the effect of telecommunications on high school science instruction; (f) teachers' perceptions of the effect of telecommunications on student's learning in high school science; and (g) the demographic variables of the sex of the teacher, years of teaching experience, school assignment within the district, course assignment(s), and academic preparation. Implications discussed include: (a) telecommunications can be implemented successfully in a variety of high school science classrooms with adequate infrastructure support and sufficient professional development opportunities, including in classes taught by females and teachers who were not previously computer experts; (b) confirmation of the basic tenets of the CBAM model; (c) the need for a model that addresses nonstatic innovations; (d) the need for a model that addresses concerns of teachers who choose not to implement telecommunications; (e) the need for new assessment strategies; (f) informal professional development, teachers teaching other teachers, is essential in implementing telecommunications; (g) the pressure that telecommunications places upon the science curriculum; and (h) space and safety concerns associated with telecommunications in the science laboratory space.

  7. Emergent cosmology revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Satadru; Sahni, Varun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411007 (India); Shtanov, Yuri [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Unnikrishnan, Sanil, E-mail: satadru@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: shtanov@bitp.kiev.ua, E-mail: sanil@lnmiit.ac.in [Department of Physics, The LNM Institute of Information Technology, Jaipur 302031 (India)

    2014-07-01

    We explore the possibility of emergent cosmology using the effective potential formalism. We discover new models of emergent cosmology which satisfy the constraints posed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We demonstrate that, within the framework of modified gravity, the emergent scenario can arise in a universe which is spatially open/closed. By contrast, in general relativity (GR) emergent cosmology arises from a spatially closed past-eternal Einstein Static Universe (ESU). In GR the ESU is unstable, which creates fine tuning problems for emergent cosmology. However, modified gravity models including Braneworld models, Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Asymptotically Free Gravity result in a stable ESU. Consequently, in these models emergent cosmology arises from a larger class of initial conditions including those in which the universe eternally oscillates about the ESU fixed point. We demonstrate that such an oscillating universe is necessarily accompanied by graviton production. For a large region in parameter space graviton production is enhanced through a parametric resonance, casting serious doubts as to whether this emergent scenario can be past-eternal.

  8. Emergent cosmology revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the possibility of emergent cosmology using the effective potential formalism. We discover new models of emergent cosmology which satisfy the constraints posed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We demonstrate that, within the framework of modified gravity, the emergent scenario can arise in a universe which is spatially open/closed. By contrast, in general relativity (GR) emergent cosmology arises from a spatially closed past-eternal Einstein Static Universe (ESU). In GR the ESU is unstable, which creates fine tuning problems for emergent cosmology. However, modified gravity models including Braneworld models, Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Asymptotically Free Gravity result in a stable ESU. Consequently, in these models emergent cosmology arises from a larger class of initial conditions including those in which the universe eternally oscillates about the ESU fixed point. We demonstrate that such an oscillating universe is necessarily accompanied by graviton production. For a large region in parameter space graviton production is enhanced through a parametric resonance, casting serious doubts as to whether this emergent scenario can be past-eternal

  9. The Renaissance Teacher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Skafte

    2002-01-01

    The teacher of the new renaissance engineer must be able to draw on all of his or her possible resources, while inspiring students to do likewise. A somewhat pedestrian tabular method is proposed for analysing what skills and propensities are available or desirable and for managing their balanced embedding into the teaching activities. Also, to avoid the pitfall of intimidating students with the apparently massive renaissance-style demands, a method of camouflaging the learning tasks is outlined and briefly illustrated.

  10. A gifted teacher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notwithstanding his many and important papers on basic problems in physics, it may well be that Léon Van Hove's influence on the physics community is in a large part due to the fact that he was a gifted and devoted teacher. It is perhaps unfortunate that the period of his life during which he was a university professor and gave basic training to young students in theoretical physics was rather short

  11. Teacher Test Accountability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Ludlow

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the high stakes of teacher testing, there is no doubt that every teacher test should meet the industry guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Unfortunately, however, there is no public or private business or governmental agency that serves to certify or in any other formal way declare that any teacher test does, in fact, meet the psychometric recommendations stipulated in the Standards. Consequently, there are no legislated penalties for faulty products (tests nor are there opportunities for test takers simply to raise questions about a test and to have their questions taken seriously by an impartial panel. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems (NES in their 1999 Massachusetts Educator Certification Test (MECT Technical Report, and more specifically, to identify those technical characteristics of the MECT that are inconsistent with the Standards. A second purpose of this article is to call for the establishment of a standing test auditing organization with investigation and sanctioning power. The significance of the present analysis is twofold: a psychometric results for the MECT are similar in nature to psychometric results presented as evidence of test development flaws in an Alabama class-action lawsuit dealing with teacher certification (an NES-designed testing system; and b there was no impartial enforcement agency to whom complaints about the Alabama tests could be brought, other than the court, nor is there any such agency to whom complaints about the Massachusetts tests can be brought. I begin by reviewing NES's role in Allen v. Alabama State Board of Education, 81-697-N. Next I explain the purpose and interpretation of standard item analysis procedures and statistics. Finally, I present results taken directly from the 1999 MECT Technical Report and compare them to procedures, results, and consequences of procedures followed by NES in Alabama.

  12. The science teacher as the organic link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakos, Konstantinos

    2007-10-01

    This study began as an exploration of the following questions: What do individual science teachers bring into their teaching that frames and mediates their teaching philosophy and of what, if any, value is it in science education? Drawing from a life history case study of Anna, an in-service science teacher, I show that her moral beliefs, perceptions, experiences, and interests dialectically frame and mediate her views of science teaching. Anna brings into her classroom her personal philosophy of teaching and learning. This is in contrast to studies concluding that different aspects of teachers' personal philosophies, such as their understanding of the nature of science and their behavior and pedagogical decisions are not connected and may be neatly segregated from one another. In the "transmission" [Transmission is presented in quotes because in this manuscript it is used dialectically, as opposed to a one-directional and "objective" process. The science teacher is not just a "lens" for the transmission of cultural capital; the cultural capital "transmitted" though Anna is seen as existing in a state of creation/recreation.] of cultural capital, Anna embodies dialectical relationships and processes, not just as a mediator of culture, but also as an organic entity that contributes to how culture is created, recreated and exchanged in a science classroom, and as such, is referred to here as an organic link. Science teacher identity and science teaching philosophy are thus seen as much closer to the human experience—merging the intellectual, the personal, the cultural, the political, and the environmental with the relationships and the processes that connect each to the others and to the whole. They are viewed as, at once, being mediated by as well as mediating one another. I argue that the total of what science teaching is exceeds the sum of its commonly "measurable" parts, like content and pedagogical knowledge. Although the designing and framing of this study was initially a life history investigation, a dialectical approach and analysis were found to be necessary to develop the theoretical conceptualization of the emerging interwoven themes, illustrating how the researcher's own philosophy and development are dialectically intertwined with, and at once affect and are effects of the research process and outcomes.

  13. The use of German aha in the classroom: Teachers’ demonstration and instrumentalization of aha as a response to the storytelling of children with cochlear implants : The use of German aha in the classroom with cochlear-implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    Response particles serve a variety of interactional purposes and are as such an essential element of conversations. One of the purposes response particles are used for is to index a change of state, that is to the display that the speaker has undergone a shift from being un-informed to being informed. In this paper I investigate one specific type of response particle, the German change-of-state token ‘aha’ and how it is used by a teacher in the classroom with prelingually deafened and cochlear-implanted children. ‘Aha’ has been documented to display surprise, thus indicating that an utterance has informed the speaker and marking an epistemic shift from that of –K (not knowing) to + K (knowing) of the producer. Based on 60 storytellings of children with cochlear-implants I show that the teacher in fact uses ‘aha’ for two purposes: firstly, as a demonstration of news receipt after unknown information within the story and secondly, as a tool to acknowledge the child’s effort to improve his/her language production. I conclude with a summary of the findings, discussing the implications the teacher’s differentiated use of ‘aha’ may have for the children and their acquisition of interactional competence.

  14. WOMEN TEACHERS: A SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekar. C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the women teachers: a sociological analysis. Women teachers played an important role in teaching profession. Teacher education is manifested locally, as lived experience, in women teacher educators' working lives. particularly through the social regulation of gender conflicts in the workplace - the terms and conditions upon which women are expected to function as 'workers' in the changing contexts of teacher education. Particular attention is paid to intensified research cultures, assessments of professionalism and fiscal restraints. Teacher education is seen as a key example where tensions surrounding female workers are often complex and contradictory, and where reforms have been implemented cross-nationally in a profession which maintains very specific historical and local patterns of work.

  15. A Comparative Study Among Sports Teachers And Non-sports Teachers Respect To Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Syed Javeed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study to find out the personality characteristics among sports teachers and non-sports teachers. Personality Inventory (N.E.O.P.I by Paul T. Costa, Jr., Ph.D. & Robert R. McCrae, Ph.D. 1989, 1992. Besides a PDS was used to get other necessary information about the teachers. Hypotheses of the study There will be significant difference between Sports teachers and Non-Sports teachers on the dimension of personality i e Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness and Neuroticism. Conclusion 1. Sports Teachers have significantly high openness than Non- Sports Teachers. 2. Sports Teachers have significantly high conscientiousness than Non- Sports Teachers. 3. Sports Teachers have significantly high extraversion than Non- Sports Teachers. 4. There were no significant differences in between Sports Teachers and Non- Sports Teachers dimension of agreeableness. 5. Sports Teachers have significantly high neuroticism than Non- Sports Teachers.

  16. Identification and Interpretation: A Framework of Naturalistic Epistemology Perceived by Korean Pre-Service Science Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Jang Song

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The epistemology of science and teachers' perspectives on it have been major lines of investigation in science education research. The role that epistemology should play in science education has become increasingly relevant because of its incorporation within some important curriculum reform movements around the world. Improving teachers' perspectives and designing advanced teaching-learning sequences along them have been substantial parts of the science education reform. Such efforts are having been active when a new epistemological position emerged. The present inquiry has been conducted at the interface of these two lines of research. The main focus of the study is analyzing the way Korean pre-service teachers interpret epistemological aspects of scientific knowledge. A questionnaire to explore pre-service teachers' epistemological beliefs was developed for developing frameworks of naturalized epistemology. The questionnaire is composed of items using Likert scale and open-ended items. Two groups of pre-service teachers participated in this exploration: in an elementary teacher education universities and a secondary science teacher education university. Epistemological beliefs of prospective elementary teachers were identified through qualitative analysis of the answers to the open ended questions as well. Suggestions for curricula change and teaching-learning strategies being involved in the incorporation of scientific epistemology are considered. 

  17. Reconceptulizing the Design and Delivery of Teacher Preparatory Programmes: Insights from Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Mswazie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the design and delivery of an innovative teacher education programme that was intended to produce a prototype primary school teacher. The study was prompted by unprecedented resistance to the programme by the intended beneficiaries of the programme namely post-sixth form student teachers. The primary purpose of the study was to assess the adequacy and efficacy of the faculty based teacher education programme in transforming post-sixth form students into prototype primary school teachers. The Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM was utilized as a conceptual and interpretive framework for conducting the study whereas Wang (1983 concept of critical programme dimensions provided a framework for identifying aspects of the programme to be evaluated. The participants in the study consisted of 54 post-sixth form student teachers who were the first group to pioneer a pre-service primary teacher education degree programme for post-sixth form students, 15 teacher educators and 12 school based mentors participating in the implementation of the programme. The results of the study indicate that design and operational flaws of the programme subvert the impacts of the programme. More precisely, the design weaknesses of the programme which include among other things, an inadequate needs assessment system, rationalist top-down curriculum development strategies, ambiguous goals, skewed content and a costly format in terms of resources undermines the impacts of the innovative teacher education programme. Operationally, the programme was found to lack an adequate emotional support infrastructure, informed and motivated implementers and an adequate budget. More significantly, the programme lacked social and moral props to sustain student teachers’ interests and concerns in primary teaching. In light of the above this study proposes a major overhaul in the conceptualisation, design and delivery of post sixth form pre-service primary teacher education programmes. First, the socio-moral concerns of post-sixth form should be regarded as problematic and should be accorded space in both the design and delivery of primary teacher education programmes. Secondly, successful implementation of pre-service primary teacher education programmes require more than the mastery of teacher education technologies. It requires among other things effective emotional support systems, quality pre-implementation planning, faculty wide cohesion among university departments and motivated teams of implementers seeking to attain shared goals. For such a landscape to emerge in primary teacher education, systemic and concerns- based approaches should be incorporated in the design and delivery of teacher education programmes.

  18. Acute oncological emergencies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  19. [Emerging parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel Galluzzo, C; Wagner, N; Michel, Y; Jackson, Y; Chappuis, F

    2014-05-01

    Travels, migration and circulation of goods facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases often unrecognized outside endemic areas. Most of emerging infections are of viral origin. Muscular Sarcocystis infection, an acute illness acquired during short trips to Malaysia, and Chagas disease, a chronic illness with long incubation period found among Latin American migrants, are two very different examples of emerging parasitic diseases. The former requires a preventive approach for travelers going to Malaysia and must be brought forth when they return with fever, myalgia and eosinophilia, while the latter requires a proactive attitude to screen Latin American migrant populations that may face difficulties in accessing care. PMID:24908745

  20. The valuation of knowledge and normative reflection in teacher qualification. A comparison of teacher educators, novice and experienced teachers.

    OpenAIRE

    Caspersen,Joakim

    2012-01-01

    The transition from teacher education to work in schools has been described as an “epistemic clash”. Teacher educators’, novice teachers’ and experienced teachers’ valuation of the academic, practical and normative demands of teaching are compared using survey data from teacher education and schools. All groups value academic knowledge and practical skills highly. Teacher educators take a more positive attitude toward inclusion, and differ in their views of the normative demands of teaching. ...

  1. Pedagogical innovation in teacher teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal design-based research project examining how to enable reflection and pedagogical innovation in teacher teams. The article identifies and analyses the teachers’ learning trajectories and innovative strategies when working together in the IT-pedagogical Think Tank for Teacher Teams (after this: ITP4T) (Weitze, 2014a), a competence development model, which was developed in an earlier phase of the research project. By using theoretical lenses from inn...

  2. Coping styles of music teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Staniçi, Jelena; Stankovi, Ivana; Bogunovi, Blanka

    2009-01-01

         The previous findings have shown that musicians as well as music teachers differ in personality characteristics from the general population. There are strong indications that musicians are exposed to numerous stressful situations during their education and professional life. We aimed to: identify preferred coping styles of music teachers and their possible difference in comparison to non-music teachers* coping styles, as well as to depict their relationship taking into consideration c...

  3. Efficacy in German Teacher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald Kiel; Sabine Weiß; Thomas Eberle

    2012-01-01

    At the present time German teacher training is confronted with a great political will to bring about change. International comparative studies of recent years have shown a dissatisfying learning outcome. The most dramatic result is a strong interdependence of school success and social background. German teachers experience their profession as problematic. At present only 35% work until the normal pension age. The article discusses structural differences in teacher training compared to other c...

  4. Mixed Duopoly with Motivated Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Manna, Ester

    2013-01-01

    I study the self-selection of motivated teachers between public and private schools in a mixed duopoly environment. The quality is influenced by the effort exerted by the teachers. Teachers' motivation may have a positive impact on the levels of effort and, then, on the quality. The effect of motivation strictly depends on the degree of differentiation of the programs offered by the two schools. When both schools offer similar programs, the Nash equilibrium is the one in which both schools hi...

  5. 29 CFR 541.303 - Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...teachers engaged in automobile driving instruction; aircraft flight instructors; home economics teachers; and vocal or instrumental music instructors. Those faculty members who are engaged as teachers but also spend a considerable amount of...

  6. 75 FR 57907 - Teacher Incentive Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ...ED-2010-OESE-0016] RIN 1810-AB08 Teacher Incentive Fund ACTION: Interim final...amends the final requirements for the Teacher Incentive Fund program to authorize the...and Secondary Education (Attention: Teacher Incentive Fund Comments), U.S....

  7. Fostering Leadership Skills in Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuejin; Patmor, George

    2012-01-01

    Teacher leadership is about empowering teachers to take a more active role in school improvement. Current pathways to teacher leadership, namely the Teacher Leader Master (TLM) degree program and teacher-led professional development, mainly target in-service teachers. Less attention has been paid to teacher leadership training in current teacher

  8. Teachers of high ability pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cándido Genovard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyze the characteristics of gifted and talented students’ expert teachers. The subject background and the specific proprieties of the instructional process to meet gifted students’ educational needs are analyzed. The value of teacher-student interactions and of teaching and learning styles are highlighted. Also, we include different action guidelines and instructional resources to use in the classroom to teach these students. There is not an ideal teacher for high ability students. However, teachers must know what the teaching-learning processes are and how these work, and the diverse psychological, content and contextual variables involved in such processes.

  9. Teachers’ challenges education for equality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Anguita Martínez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Gender equality among women and men has been, and still is a key issue regarding the development of formal education systems. In some way, it can be seen as the cornerstone of equity. Although the most visible gender issues are drawing back in our country, others specially related to the hidden curriculum are still present. Teacher´s initial and lifelong training constitute the best tool to minimize the aforementioned hidden-curriculum-related gender inequalities. However, there is not much done with this regard in our current teacher´s formal training system.

  10. Insights for Teachers of Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Lea

    In this paper, I examine the field of adult learners from the teachers’ perspective. Firstly, I identify the characteristics of adults as learners and their particular needs, which teach- ers must be aware of and deal with. Secondly, I propose a combination of adult learners’ characteristics with ‘teaching orientations’, as a basis for further research on teachers of adults’ professional development. Some competencies can be taught in formal settings, but a large amount of the teacher’s career is spent in the classroom where (s)he manage the teaching by practising, and hopefully learning by experience in the field.

  11. Dialogical Emergency Management and StrategicAwareness in Emergency Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Artman, Henrik; Brynielsson, Joel; Johansson, Björn JE; Trnka, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces two concepts—dialogical emergency management and strategic awareness—as means touse and understand the content of social media for the purpose of emergency communication. Dialogicalemergency management denotes that the emergency management organizations follow what people publish invarious social media on emergencies and ongoing emergency response, and then adjust their informationstrategies in a way that matches the expectations and needs for emergency information of th...

  12. Emergency medicine in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lowan H; Trunkey, Donald; Rebagliati, G Steve

    2007-01-01

    Recent events, including the development of space tourism and commercial spaceflight, have increased the need for specialists in space medicine. With increased duration of missions and distance from Earth, medical and surgical events will become inevitable. Ground-based medical support will no longer be adequate when return to Earth is not an option. Pending the inclusion of sub-specialists, clinical skills and medical expertise will be required that go beyond those of current physician-astronauts, yet are well within the scope of Emergency Medicine. Emergency physicians have the necessary broad knowledge base as well as proficiency in basic surgical skills and management of the critically ill and injured. Space medicine shares many attributes with extreme conditions and environments that many emergency physicians already specialize in. This article is an introduction to space medicine, and a review of current issues in the emergent management of medical and surgical disease during spaceflight. PMID:17239732

  13. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  14. Federal Emergency Management Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FEMA App Receive alerts from the National Weather Service, customize your emergency checklist, submit disaster related photos, ... Official website of the Department of Homeland Security End of web page.

  15. Emerging topics in FXTAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Deborah A; Birch, Rachael C; Anheim, Mathieu; Jønch, Aia E; Pintado, Elizabeth; O'Keefe, Joanne; Trollor, Julian N; Stebbins, Glenn T; Hagerman, Randi J; Fahn, Stanley; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Leehey, Maureen A

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes key emerging issues in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) as presented at the First International Conference on the FMR1 Premutation: Basic Mechanisms & Clinical Involvement in 2013.

  16. Neonatal dermatological emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragunatha S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The neonates are unique in several ways in comparison with older children and adults which render them highly susceptible to severe, sometimes life threatening dermatological disorders. The neonatal dermatological emergencies are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A wide range of dermatoses such as infections, genodermatoses, metabolic disorders and vascular tumors may require emergency care. The clinical presentation also varies from generalized involvement of skin to localized disease with or without systemic symptoms. Irrespective of the etiology and clinical presentation, these disorders are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. With the availability of effective drugs and monitoring facilities, and awareness of need for immediate care, there has been a significant decline in the fatality rate associated with neonatal dermatological emergencies. Knowledge of clinical presentations, rapid diagnostic methods, emergency care and monitoring of progress of the disease helps in comprehensive multidisciplinary care of neonates with these disorders.

  17. Reduction, Emergence and Renormalization

    CERN Document Server

    Butterfield, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    In previous work, I described several examples combining reduction and emergence: where reduction is understood a la Ernest Nagel, and emergence is understood as behaviour or properties that are novel (by some salient standard). Here, my aim is again to reconcile reduction and emergence, for a case which is apparently more problematic than those I treated before: renormalization. Renormalization is a vast subject. So I confine myself to emphasizing how the modern approach to renormalization (initiated by Wilson and others between 1965 and 1975), when applied to quantum field theories, illustrates both Nagelian reduction and emergence. My main point is that the modern understanding of how renormalizability is a generic feature of quantum field theories at accessible energies gives us a conceptually unified family of Nagelian reductions. That is worth saying since philosophers tend to think of scientific explanation as only explaining an individual event, or perhaps a single law, or at most deducing one theory ...

  18. [Emerging viral diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases have again entered the public arena in recent years. This is due to factors such as evolving lifestyles, ecological and socio-political upheavals, and recent diagnostic advances. Numerous pathogens, including viruses like West Nile, Chikungunya and Japanese encephalitis on the one hand, and hemorrhagic fever viruses like Ebola and Maburg, are particular concerns. Recently, the Corona virus responsible for SARS, which caused an epidemic sufficiently worrisome to challenge crisis management concepts, was successfully isolated. It is in this context that so-called "bird flu'", may be on the verge of causing a human pandemic. Pox and Monkeypox are "virtually emerging" viruses that have potential for use in bioterrorism. The management and treatment of these emerging infectious diseases calls for new approaches, organizations and infrastructures. PMID:17140098

  19. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  20. Emergency data handbook

    CERN Document Server

    McColl, N P

    2002-01-01

    When responding to serious emergencies involving the release of radionuclides into the environment, a large quantity and range of information and data will be required in a readily accessible format. This handbook provides a compilation of such information.

  1. Emergent Universe by Tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Labrana, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    In this work we propose an alternative scheme for an Emergent Universe scenario where the universe is initially in a static state supported by a scalar field located in a false vacuum. The universe begins to evolve when, by quantum tunneling, the scalar field decays into a state of true vacuum. The Emergent Universe models are interesting since they provide specific examples of nonsingular inflationary universes.

  2. Book review: Africa emerges

    OpenAIRE

    Elbra, Ainsley

    2013-01-01

    "Africa Emerges." Robert I. Rotberg. Polity. April 2013. --- Many countries in Sub–Saharan Africa are now enjoying significant economic growth and political progress. The new Africa has begun to banish the miseries of the past, and appears ready to play an important role in world affairs. Africa Emerges draws on a wealth of empirical data to explore the key challenges Africa must overcome in the coming decades, from peacekeeping to health and disease, from energy needs to education. Ainsle...

  3. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsson, Maija; Tapper, Anna-Maija; Colmorn, Lotte Berdiin; Lindqvist, Pelle G; Klungsøyr, Kari; Krebs, Lone; Børdahl, Per E; Gottvall, Karin; Källén, Karin; Bjarnadóttir, Ragnheiður I; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Gissler, Mika

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and risk factors of emergency peripartum hysterectomy. DESIGN: Nordic collaborative study. POPULATION: 605 362 deliveries across the five Nordic countries. METHODS: We collected data prospectively from patients undergoing emergency peripartum hysterectomy within 7 days of delivery from medical birth registers and hospital discharge registers. Control populations consisted of all other women delivering on the same units during the same time period. MAIN OUTCOME...

  4. An emergency exercise experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergency exercises are held to satisfy regulatory requirements and to hopefully improve emergency response. Unfortunately, simply satisfying the requirement is often the principle concern of those who plan drills. Argonne National Laboratory has detailed emergency plans, and each Division is required to have an emergency exercise at least once each year. However, the pressure to minimize time taken from research efforts reduces the value of many exercises. During the past year, the Health Physics Section at ANL made an effort to optimize the information and training obtained in the time allotted for a drill. The purpose of this presentation is to share our approach and the results of one experience with the anticipation that it will stimulate others to critically look at emergency exercises in their organizations. To be of value, an emergency response exercise must have clear objectives, allow organized reporting, contain a documented follow-up critique, and provide for correction of deficiencies in training and in the emergency plan. A mock criticality incident at ANL was used to test specific emergency response capabilities. The objectives of the 45 minute exercise included testing: (1) how well Health Physics, Fire Department, and Medical personnel would deal with the unexpected find of an unconscientious, contaminated person in a high radiation field; (2) the capability to quickly predict environmental radioactivity concentration for a surprise mock stack release of fission products; (3) the time required and accuracy for dose assessment from personnel dosimeters, criticality dosimeters and samples of blood and hair which were irradiated to known doses in the Argonne Janus reactor; (4) how well Health Physics personnel would identify and sort 'exposed persons' who had no dosimeters (small radioactive sources were hidden on select persons); and (5) how persons from the evacuated building would be accounted for. As a result of findings, special Health Physics training on criticality was provided and support capabilities are being refined. (author)

  5. When will Consciousness emerge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imants Vilks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is a short rewiev about one particular but important and essential question in the field of AI: the consciousness. The main idea is to cast away non-scientific pronouncements about mystics and impossibility in the field. To clear up the basic notions (emergence and define the main theme - consciousness. The article proposes temporary definition of consciousness, consciousness emergence conditions and how to recognize and test the consciousness.

  6. On Engineering and Emergence

    OpenAIRE

    Fromm, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    The engineering and design of self-organizing systems with emergent properties is a long-standing problem in the field of complex and distributed systems, for example in the engineering of self-organizing Multi-Agent Systems. The problem of combining engineering with emergence - to find a simple rule for a complex pattern - equals the problem of science in general. Therefore the answers are similar, and the scientific method is the general solution to the problem of engineer...

  7. When will Consciousness emerge?

    OpenAIRE

    Imants Vilks

    2013-01-01

    The article is a short rewiev about one particular but important and essential question in the field of AI: the consciousness. The main idea is to cast away non-scientific pronouncements about mystics and impossibility in the field. To clear up the basic notions (emergence) and define the main theme - consciousness. The article proposes temporary definition of consciousness, consciousness emergence conditions and how to recognize and test the consciousness.

  8. Preparing for Emergency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiors, Jacob; Todsen, Tobias; Nilsson, Philip Mørkeberg; Wennervaldt, Kasper; Charabi, Birgitte; Bøttger, Morten; Konge, Lars; von Buchwald, Christian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Emergency cricothyrodotomy (EC) is a lifesaving procedure. Evidence-based assessment of training effects and competency levels is relevant to all departments involved in emergency airway management. As most training uses low-fidelity models, the predictive value of good performance on such a model becomes relevant with regard to performance on a high-fidelity model (cadaver). This requires a valid assessment tool for EC performance. STUDY DESIGN: Psychometric study on low-fidelity mod...

  9. Neonatal dermatological emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ragunatha S; Inamadar Arun

    2010-01-01

    The neonates are unique in several ways in comparison with older children and adults which render them highly susceptible to severe, sometimes life threatening dermatological disorders. The neonatal dermatological emergencies are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A wide range of dermatoses such as infections, genodermatoses, metabolic disorders and vascular tumors may require emergency care. The clinical presentation also varies from generalized involvement of skin to localized disease ...

  10. Emerging contaminants in groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M E; Manamsa, K.; J. C. Talbot; Crane, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    The term ‘emerging contaminants’ is generally used to refer to compounds previously not considered or known to be significant to groundwater (in terms of distribution and/or concentration) which are now being more widely detected. As analytical techniques improve, previously undetected organic micropollutants are being observed in the aqueous environment. Many emerging contaminants remain unregulated, but the number of regulated contaminants will continue to grow slowly over th...

  11. Ten Questions about Emergence

    OpenAIRE

    Fromm, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    Self-Organization is of growing importance for large distributed computing systems. In these systems, a central control and manual management is exceedingly difficult or even impossible. Emergence is widely recognized as the core principle behind self-organization. Therefore the idea to use both principles to control and organize large-scale distributed systems is very attractive and not so far off. Yet there are many open questions about emergence and self-organization, ...

  12. Emergence from irreversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Córdoba, P.; Isidro, J. M.; Perea, Milton H.

    2013-06-01

    The emergent nature of quantum mechanics is shown to follow from a precise correspondence with the classical theory of irreversible thermodynamics. Specifically, the linear (or Gaussian) regime of the latter can be put in a 1-to-1 map with the semiclassical approximation to quantum mechanics. The very possibility of reinterpreting quantum mechanics as a thermodynamics proves that the former is an emergent phenomenon. That is, quantum mechanics is a coarse-grained description of some underlying degrees of freedom.

  13. Mapping mentor teachers' roles in mentoring dialogues

    OpenAIRE

    Hennissen , Paul; Crasborn, Frank; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen , Theo

    2008-01-01

    The dialogue between a mentor teacher and a prospective teacher is a key element in the supervision of prospective teachers in the workplace. This literature study deals with the issue of how to conceptualize the supervisory behaviour of mentor teachers in mentoring dialogues by systematically examining empirical literature on aspects of mentor teachers' behaviour during dialogues with prospective teachers. From the findings a model is derived which can be used to describe and map mentor teac...

  14. Teachers who bully students: a hidden trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Twemlow, S. W.; Fonagy, P; Sacco, F. C.; Brethour, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The study examined teachers' perceptions of bullying by other teachers to see what causes and characteristics were attributed to such bullying teachers, and how often teachers were themselves bullied by students.Method: 116 teachers from seven elementary schools completed an anonymous questionnaire reflecting their feelings and perceptions about their own experiences of bullying, and how they perceive colleagues over the years.Results: Results confirmed that teachers who experience...

  15. Research trends in mathematics teacher education

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Jane-Jane; Van Zoest, Laura R

    2014-01-01

    Research on the preparation and continued development of mathematics teachers is becoming an increasingly important subset of mathematics education research. Such research explores the attributes, knowledge, skills and beliefs of mathematics teachers as well as methods for assessing and developing these critical aspects of teachers and influences on teaching.Research Trends in Mathematics Teacher Education focuses on three major themes in current mathematics teacher education research: mathematical knowledge for teaching, teacher beliefs and identities, and tools and techniques to support teac

  16. Integrating Ict Into Teacher Education Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Geeta Thakur

    2012-01-01

    Teacher educators are faced with the challenges of preparing a new generation of teachers to effectively use the new learning tool in their teaching practices. ICT is an ocean. This paper focuses the possible usage of ICT in teacher education. ICT teacher training can take many forms. We can organize various ICTuse as: Main content focus of teacher training, Part of teaching methods, Core technology for delivering teacher training, and Facilitate professional development & networking. ICT can...

  17. Teacher Behavior under Performance Pay Incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Michael D. Jones

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade many districts have implemented performance pay incentives to reward teachers for improving student test scores. Economic theory suggests that these programs could alter teacher work effort, cooperation, and retention. Because teachers can choose to work in a performance pay district that has characteristics correlated with teacher behavior, I use the distance between a teacher’s undergraduate institution and the nearest performance pay district as an instrumental varia...

  18. Accident and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  19. Emergency reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An emergency nuclear reactor cooling device comprises a water reservoir, emergency core cooling water pipelines having one end connected to a water feeding sparger, fire extinguishing facility pipelines, cooling water pressurizing pumps, a diesel driving machine for driving the pumps and a battery. In a water reservoir, cooling water is stored by an amount required for cooling the reactor upon emergency and for fire extinguishing, and fire extinguishing facility pipelines connecting the water reservoir and the fire extinguishing facility are in communication with the emergency core cooling water pipelines connected to the water feeding sparger by system connection pipelines. Pumps are operated by a diesel power generator to introduce cooling water from the reservoir to the emergency core cooling water pipelines. Then, even in a case where AC electric power source is entirely lost and the emergency core cooling system can not be used, the diesel driving machine is operated using an exclusive battery, thereby enabling to inject cooling water from the water reservoir to a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container by the diesel drive pump. (N.H.)

  20. Teacher education towards teacher (and learner) autonomy : what can be learnt from teacher development practices?

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Flávia; Barbosa, Isabel Maria Antunes; Paiva, Madalena; Fernandes, Isabel Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Teacher education towards teacher and learner autonomy is an ideological, value-laden choice whose purpose and outcomes need to be continuously scrutinised. The authors present three case studies where pre-service student teacher development practices were investigated, and discuss their value and shortcomings as regards their transformative direction. Our experience shows that criticality and role democratisation are difficult to achieve in this context, and that we need to...