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Sample records for talus slopes

  1. Snow cover and ground surface temperature on a talus slope affected by mass movements. Veleta cirque, Sierra Nevada, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; Salvador-Franch, F.

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses the thermal ground behaviour on an alpine talus slope located at the foot of the north wall of the glacial cirque on the Pico del Veleta (3398 m, 37°03'21''N, 3°21'57''W, MAAT: -0,4°C) in Sierra Nevada, SE Spain. There are frequent mass movements on this talus slope, particularly in its central section, caused by the abundant presence of fine-grained sediment and by the water from snowmelt and/or ice degradation in the ground or permafrost (Gómez et al., 2003). To determine the snowmelt pattern and ocurrence of permafrost, a continuous ground surface temperature was kept by installing 6 mini-loggers (HOBO Pendant) along the descending profile of the central talus, which is 170 m long with altitudes ranging from 3180 m at the higher end to 3085 m at the lower end. A thermal borehole was also installed at a depth of 2 m at the base of the slope on an active rock glacier. The results obtained for the period October 2008 - September 2009 show that, in contrast to alpine talus slopes (Luetschg et. al., 2004; Lambiel and Pieracci, 2008), the upper part of the slope is characterized by mean annual ground surface temperatures (MAGST) lower than at the base of the talus, possibly due to the effect of the shadow of the cirque wall. The MAGST oscillate between 0.592°C at the station near the slope apex (S2) and 1.836°C at the station near the base (S5). In winter-spring, when the talus slope is covered with snow, the GST are stabilized at all stations between mid-October and early November. The minimum GST, which express the BTS conditions, oscillate between 0.232 and 0.01°C, depending on the month, with lowest values recorded during the month of April. Only one station (S3, mid-slope) recorded negative values (max. value : - 0.549°C in December and - 0.211 in April ). In summer, the snow disappears fairly quickly between mid- and late July on the intermediate stretch of the talus slope (S3, S4, S6), where the majority of the flows detected occur. In the mid-upper part (S5, S2) the thaw occurs in mid-August. The GST data provide evidence of the current absence of permafrost along the talus slope profile, although some years ago it was detected using BTS methods (Gómez et al., 2003. Gómez-Ortiz, A., Palacios, D., Luengo, E., Tanarro, L. M.; Schulte, L. and Ramos, M., 2003. Talus instability in a recent deglaciation area and its relationship to buried ice and snow cover evolution (Picacho del Veleta, Sierra Nevada, Spain). Geografisca Annaler 85 A (2), 165-182. Lambiel, C. and Pieracci, K. 2008. Permafrost distribution in talus slopes located within the alpine periglacial belt, Swiss Alps. Permafrost and Periglac. Process. 19: 293-304 Luetschg, M.; Stoeckli, M.; Lehning, M.; Haeberli, W., and Ammann, W. 2004. Temperatures in two boreholes at Flüela Pass, Eastern Swiss Alps: the effect of snow redistribution on permafrost distribution patterns in high mountain areas. Permafrost and Periglac. Process. 15: 283-297. Research funded by CGL2009-7343 project, Government of Spain.

  2. Paediatric talus fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Ann-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric talus fractures are rare injuries resulting from axial loading of the talus against the anterior tibia with the foot in dorsiflexion. Skeletally immature bone is less brittle, with higher elastic resistance than adult bone, thus the paediatric talus can sustain higher forces before fractures occur. However, displaced paediatric talus fractures and those associated with high-energy trauma have been associated with complications including avascular necrosis, arthrosis, delayed union, neurapraxia and the need for revision surgery. The authors present the rare case of a talar neck fracture in a skeletally immature young girl, initially missed on radiological review. However, clinical suspicion on the part of the emergency physician, repeat examination and further radiographic imaging revealed this rare paediatric injury.

  3. Evidences of winter ascending air circulation throughout talus slopes and rock glaciers situated in the lower belt of alpine discontinuous permafrost (Swiss Alps)

    OpenAIRE

    Delaloye, Reynald; Lambiel, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    The winter ascending circulation of air throughout an accumulation of coarse slope sediments (the so-called chimney effect) facilitates the cooling of the ground and even the occurrence of permafrost in the lower part of a deposit. Simultaneously, any freezing is unlikely to occur in the upper part. The chimney effect has been reported to date mainly for cold and sometimes perennially frozen scree slopes situated at low elevations, far below the regional limit of the discontinuous mountain pe...

  4. Chondroblastoma of the talus.

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    Ningegowda, Ravish V; Subramanian, Karthik; Suresh, I

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old male child who presented with a painful left ankle. On imaging (radiography and computed tomography scan with 3-dimensional reconstruction views), an osteolytic lesion in the body of the talus was revealed. Open biopsy, curettage, and fibular bone grafting were done, and the specimen was sent for histopathologic examination. The histopathologic report confirmed the specimen to be chondroblastoma of the talus bone. Chondroblastoma is a rare benign cartilaginous neoplasm that accounts for approximately 1% of all bone tumors and characteristically arises in the epiphysis of a long bone, particularly the humerus, tibia, and femur. Chondroblastoma can affect people of all ages. It is, however, most common in children and young adults aged 10 to 20 years. Chondroblastoma in a tarsal bone is a rare entity. Managing chondroblastoma of the talus with curettage and bone grafting has shown good outcomes. PMID:23540757

  5. Fracture Bilateral Talus in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Vinit Verma; Amit Batra; Pradeep Kamboj; Suresh Bhuriya; Raj Singh; Mr. Sumit Kumar; Rakesh Gupta; Narender Kumar Magu

    2013-01-01

    Talar body injuries are rare, particularly in children. To our knowledge, there has not been a single case report of bilateral talus fracture in a child till date. We report two cases of fracture bilateral talus in children. The first case is of a fracture separation of the distal tibial epiphysis and a fracture of the body of the talus with subluxation of ankle on right side and a fracture neck of talus on left side. The second is fracture bilateral talus with epiphyseal injury of left dist...

  6. Surgical treatment of talus fractures.

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    Shakked, Rachel J; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2013-10-01

    Talus fractures result from high-energy mechanisms and usually occur at the neck. Functional outcome after talar neck fracture worsens with increasing Hawkins grade. The mainstay of treatment for talar neck fractures is anatomic reduction and internal fixation. Prompt reduction of dislocations should be performed. Patients should be taken to the operating room as soon as stabilized. Dual incisions and a combination of minifragment plates and screws should be used. Talar body fractures have a high rate of ankle and subtalar arthritis. Lateral process fractures are frequently missed on radiographs. Complications after talus fractures include osteonecrosis, malunion, post-traumatic arthritis, and infection. PMID:24095068

  7. Using cosmogenic nuclides from amalgamated talus cobbles to assess alpine erosion in the Teton Range

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    Tranel, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring spatial patterns and rates of erosion in alpine landscapes is challenging because locations are steep and remote, and hillslope processes including rockfalls, avalanches and landslides are stochastic. This study evaluates how variability between quantitative erosion rates and surface ages and qualitative weathering features on talus deposits may influence interpretations of the spatial distribution of hillslope erosion in the Teton Range. I use cosmogenic nuclide concentrations to estimate erosion rates and surface ages of bedrock and talus deposits. I then compare these cosmogenic nuclide results to talus volumetric estimates of erosion rates. I also compare the quantitative estimates of surface ages and erosion to qualitative weathering observations on talus cobbles. The resulting erosion rates from cosmogenic nuclides are slower than rates estimated from talus volumes, however, both methods produced the same pattern of erosion. The fastest and slowest cosmogenic nuclide and volumetric erosion rates were associated with the same fans. Exposure ages of talus surfaces decrease as elevation of the fans increase. Qualitative observations of weathering on cobble surfaces were not reliable to predict the relative rates of erosion on the talus fans. Using amalgamated samples from hillslope deposits adjacent to steep sided canyons for cosmogenic nuclide analysis has high uncertainty when finding accurate erosion rates or exposure ages due to complicated shielding on steeply sloping walls. The similar patterns of rapid or slow erosion rates, however, suggest that cosmogenic nuclides or volume estimates are both reasonable methods to understand relative timing of hillslope events, even if the absolute age or erosion rate cannot be determined.

  8. Analysis of the slope stability of the Afsin - Elbistan lignite open cast mine (Turkey); Analyse de la stabilite des talus de la mine de lignite d`Afsin - Elbistan (Turquie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, A.M.

    1996-09-27

    The aim of this work was to analyse the slope stability of the Afsin - Elbistan lignite open cast mine (Turkey) taking into account the geological, geotechnical, hydrogeological and seismic factors. The analyses showed the importance to the stability of the following parameters: lithology, bedding structure, hydrogeology, geometrical configuration of the walls and the seismicity. Stability calculations enabled the comparison of several approaches (static and pseudo - static) and calculation methods (Bishop, Carter and Sarma). Finally, this study enabled the proposition of several solutions to achieve wall stability, which need further economic to find the optimal solution. (author) 48 refs.

  9. Vanad sbrad: Poola president htustas rma talus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilves vrustas 28. mrtsil 2011 Viljandimaal rma talus Poola presidenti Bronislaw Komorowskit. Poola riigipea abikaasa Anna Komorowska ja proua Evelin Ilves klastasid Tallinnas ka lastekirjanduse keskust, kus esitleti raamatut "Vike Chopin" ning tegid ekskursiooni Tallinna vanalinnas

  10. Congenital Vertical Talus: Etiology and Management.

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    Miller, Mark; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a rare foot deformity. If left untreated, it causes significant disability, including pain and functional limitations. Although the etiology of vertical talus is likely heterogeneous, recent evidence strongly supports a genetic cause linking it to genes expressed during early limb development. Traditional management for vertical talus involves extensive surgeries that are associated with significant short- and long-term complications. A minimally invasive approach that relies on serial manipulation and casting to achieve most of the correction has been shown to produce excellent short-term results with regard to clinical and radiographic correction in both isolated and nonisolated cases of vertical talus. Although long-term studies are needed, achieving correction without extensive surgery may lead to more flexible and functional feet, much as Ponseti method has done for clubfeet. PMID:26337950

  11. Talus avulsion fractures: are they accurately diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Karen P; Davies, Mark B

    2015-10-01

    Dorsal talus avulsion fractures occurring along the supination line of the foot can cause pain and discomfort. Examination of the foot and ankle using the Ottawa ankle rules does not include examination of the talus, an injury here is easily missed causing concern to the patient. This is a retrospective study carried out in a major trauma centre to look at the assessment and diagnosis of all patients with a dorsal talus and navicular avulsion fractures over a one year period. Nineteen patients with an isolated dorsal talus avulsion fracture and five patients with an isolated dorsal navicular fracture were included. The correct diagnosis was made in 12 of patients with isolated dorsal talus avulsion fractures, 7 patients were given an incorrect diagnosis after misreading of the radiograph. Four patients with a dorsal navicular avulsion fracture were given the correct diagnosis. If not correctly diagnosed on presentation patients can be overly concerned that a 'fracture was missed' which can lead to confusion and anxiety. Therefore these injuries need to be recognised early, promptly diagnosed, treated symptomatically and reassurance given. We recommend the routine palpation of the talus in addition to the examination set out in the Ottawa Ankle Rules and the close inspection of plain radiographs to adequately diagnose an injury in this area. PMID:26190632

  12. A Case Report: Ipsilateral Closed Talus Dislocation and Navicular Fracture

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    Tolga Atay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of the subtalar joint dislocations are rare. Three joint axes associated with that (which, tibiotalar, subtalar and talonavicular talus bone dislocation totally high-energy trauma or sports competitions outcome occurs, and this trauma as a result of complications of neurovascular injury, the talus capsular structure damage, skin necrosis and ligament damage may occur. Result of late term complications are avascular necrosis and degenerative arthritis. Talus fractures often are associated with one of the malleolus fracture or dislocation of the talus. Isolated talus dislocations without malleolus and talus fractures are usually occurs in open wounds. In this case, closed talus dislocation and ipsilateral navicular bone of foot fracture are observed as a result of the high energy trauma without malleolar fractures or fracture of the talus. Closed Talus dislocations are rare in the literature and has very less informations.

  13. Multidisciplinary investigations on coupled rockwall-talus-systems (Turtmann valley, Swiss Alps)

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    Messenzehl, Karoline; Draebing, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Talus slopes covering the base of steep, unstable rockwalls are characteristic periglacial landforms and major sediment storages in mountain systems. In the Turtmann valley (Swiss Alps), rockfall deposits account for 1/8 of the debris volume stored in the hanging valleys. To evaluate the spatio-temporal efficiency of rockfalls for long-term talus evolution, geophysical measurements on rockwalls and talus slopes are increasingly applied during the last decades. However, the correct interpretation of the geophysical data is still a difficult task due to the landforms' specific material properties. Moreover, no comprehensive geophysical study exists investigating the coupled rockwall-talus-system. Here, we studied two rockwalls and corresponding talus slopes in a tributary of the Turtmann valley. The active rockfall source areas dominate on rockwalls, for which a high permafrost probability was modelled (Nyenhuis et al. 2005). Rockwalls were selected based on their contrasting lithology, activity degree and valley location. By combining geophysical, geotechnical and geomorphological methods, we investigated (i) the rockwalls' mechanical characteristics as well as (ii) the material properties of the talus slopes in order to (iii) gain a further process understanding of the coupled rockwall-talus system. (i) At the rockwalls, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Seismic Refraction Tomography (SRT) were applied along 40-50m transects with an electrode/geophone spacing of 1-1.25m. In addition, detailed geotechnical surveys of the rock mass and its discontinuity properties were performed. The combined results reveal that high resistivity (>10'000k?m) and high p-wave velocities (>3'000m/s) correlate with dried bedrock consisting of amphibolites with large joint spacing (52cm) and long persistences (> 220cm). In contrast, the small joint spacing (17cm) and short persistences (electrode spacing, the block sizes (a, b, c-axis) of rockfall deposits were mapped in detail. The specific ERT seems to indicate the specific material properties, as high resistivities at the talus foot are linked to large block sizes, while patches of fine, relatively wet sediments near the apex are reflected by low resistivities. The very high p-wave velocities at the distal base of one of the talus may indicate the existence of ice. (iii) The synthesis of all data indicates that the joint spacing, lithology and the rock moisture patterns are major small-scale controls on the present-day destabilisation of the rockwalls, favouring the activity of wetting-drying and freeze-thaw cycles. Given the absence of permafrost in both rock faces, permafrost seems not to be relevant for the bedrock stability today, instead, unidirectional freezing on near-surface might be an effective breakdown mechanism. Depending on the contrasting rock mechanical and material properties of the rockwalls, different rockfall block sizes may be involved in the talus evolution, respectively. Therefore, our study reveals that the process understanding of the coupled rockwall-talus-system can be improved when geophysical data are interpreted in the light of the specific geotechnical and geomorphological landform conditions. Nyenhuis, M., M. Hoelzle, and R. Dikau, 2005, Rock glacier mapping and permafrost distribution modelling in the Turtmanntal, Valais, Switzerland, Zeitschrift fr Geomorphologie, 49(3), 275-292.

  14. Lopsakalt rahvuslik mood Pulga talus / Tanel Veenre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veenre, Tanel, 1977-

    2009-01-01

    Eesti Moekunstnike Ühenduse näitus "Lillemotiiv moevormil" Eesti Vabaõhumuuseumi Pulga talus. Osalevad Anne Metsis, Anneliis Vabul, Diana Denissova, Monika Kisand, Juta Piirlaid, Anu Hint ja moekunsti õppejõud Yumiko Okazaki Jaapanist. Eksponeeritud rõivamudelid on kaunistatud rahvuslikest tikanditest inspireeritud stiliseeritud kujunditega

  15. Thermal and Hydrologic Attributes of Rock Glaciers and Periglacial Talus Landforms; Sierra Nevada, California, USA

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    Millar, C. I.; Westfall, R. D.; Delany, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    To explore thermal regimes and hydrologic capacity of rock glaciers and related periglacial talus landforms, we deployed mini-thermochrons in and around potentially ice-embedded features of the Sierra Nevada. Results from studies at 13 rock glaciers and 8 taluses indicate that outlet springs from these landforms generally do not desiccate but persist year-round as ice (frozen) in winter and flowing water in the warm season. Temperatures of water (liquid and ice) in rock-glacier outlet springs had an annual mean of -0.2C and mean of 0.6C during the warm season with very low diurnal fluctuation. These and other attributes suggest the existence of internal ice and/or permafrost supplying the springs. Air temperatures of rock-glacier matrices (1 m below the surface) versus surface air corroborate the periglacial nature of internal environments: annual air temperatures of matrices were below freezing (mean, -0.8C). Compared to surface air, especially during the warm season, matrix air temperatures were significantly colder and fluctuated less. Talus landforms followed a similar pattern, although water- and matrix air temperatures were warmer, and contrasts with surface air were not as strong as for rock glaciers. For rock glaciers and talus slopes, matrix air temperatures showed resistance (buffering) to changes in external air temperatures. Unique geomorphic conditions of rock glaciers and periglacial taluses in the Sierra Nevada appear to maintain cool-buffered thermal regimes at least partly decoupled from external air. Springs support persistent wetlands and lakes at their snouts, retaining water in otherwise semi-arid high cirques, and contribute as hydrologic reserves and critical habitat for alpine biota. Daily and seasonal lags and buffering effects suggest that ice within these landforms might resist surface warming on the longer term, which could make these landforms increasingly important as regional climates change.

  16. A RARE CARTILAGINOUS TUMOR OF THE TALUS

    OpenAIRE

    Alok Sobhan; Sudipta De; Anadi; Michael

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes an unusual and rare tumor originating from the talus. A 21 years old female presented with a swelling over the right ankle 4x3.5cms in size for one year. The lesion was osteolytic with surrounded peripheral rim of bone sclerosis. Subsequent pathological study confirmed the case as chondroblastoma. The lesion was curettaged and the resultant defect was filled by autogenous bone graft. Such tumors are as chondroblastoma usually originate from epi...

  17. A RARE CARTILAGINOUS TUMOR OF THE TALUS

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    Alok Sobhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes an unusual and rare tumor originating from the talus. A 21 years old female presented with a swelling over the right ankle 4x3.5cms in size for one year. The lesion was osteolytic with surrounded peripheral rim of bone sclerosis. Subsequent pathological study confirmed the case as chondroblastoma. The lesion was curettaged and the resultant defect was filled by autogenous bone graft. Such tumors are as chondroblastoma usually originate from epiphyseal and apophyeal regions of long bones. Thorough clinical, radiological and histological assessment is required for appropriate management.

  18. Tibiotalar arthrodesis for injuries of the talus

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    Singh Jaswant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fracture-dislocation of the talus is one of the most severe injuries of the ankle. Opinion varies widely as to the proper treatment of this injury. Since Blair′s original description of the tibiotalar fusion in 1943, there is little mention in the literature of his method. The present study reports the results of tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair′s technique. Materials and Methods: Eleven cases of modified Blair ′ s tibiotalar arthrodesis were retrospectively studied. The average age was 32.4 years (range, 26-51 years. Six patients had posttraumatic avascular necrosis; five had neglected fracture-dislocation of the talus. Results: The mean followup is 8 years (range 3-12 years. Tibiotalar fusion was achieved in all the ankles at an average of 20.5 weeks (range 16-28 weeks. Nine cases having 15°-20° tibiopedal motion had excellent results and two ankles having 10°-15° of tibiopedal motion had good result. Conclusion: We achieved good long term results with tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair technique. The principal modification in the present study is retention of the talar body while performing arthrodesis with anterior sliding graft. The retention of the talar body provides intraoperative stability and in the long term, the retained talar body shares the load transmitted to the anterior and middle subtalar joints thus resulting in improved hind foot function and gait.

  19. Environmental impact of introducing plant covers in the taluses of orchard terraces: implications for erosion and agricultural runoff control

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Pleguezuelo, C.R.; Duran Zuazo, V.H.; Francia Martinez, J.R.; Martin Peinado, F.J.; Van de Graaff, J.; Muriel Fernandez, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    South-eastern Spain, and in particular the coastal areas of Granada and Malaga, feature a large area under subtropical crops, with orchards established on terraces built along the slopes of the mountainous areas. The climate, characterized by periodically heavy rainfall, variable in space and time, and with the common agricultural practice of leaving the taluses with bare soil, are the main factors encouraging soil erosion, runoff, and subsequent transport of pollutants. Over a two-year perio...

  20. Ephemeral skin-flows on talus affected by permafrost degradation (Corral del Veleta, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Gómez, A.

    2009-04-01

    In mountain environments, talus formed at the foot of valley sides are frequently affected by hillslope processes, such as skin-flows. The main characteristic of this type of flow is that it only causes the movement of a thin layer of soil, regolith or debris over an inclined plane parallel to the topographical surface of the talus. Some examples of this movement have already been described (Rapp, 1960; Akerman; 1984; White, 1981, Benedict, 1970; Jahn, 1967; Söderman, 1980; Lewkowicz, 1988, Harris, 1987). The causes of the formation of these movements vary, but in general they have been linked primarily with rapid snow melt and/or with degraded permafrost levels (Jahn, 1967; Nyberg, 1991; Rapp and Nyberg, 1988; Strömquist, 1985; Hall, 1985; Thorn, 1988; McRoberts and Morgenstern, 1974, Caine, 1976). Within this context, the aims of this paper are: first, to present and describe the characteristics and temporal and geomorphological evolution of a series of skin-flows which have occurred on the talus which lies at the foot of the Corral del Veleta glacial cirque, and second, to analyze the factors that appear to have triggered them. The Pico del Veleta mountain (3398 m a.s.l.) is one of the main summits in the Sierra Nevada Massif, a group of mountains forming part of the Cordilleras Béticas, in SE Spain (37°03´N, 3°22´W). The Corral del Veleta is a glacial cirque on the northeastern face of the Pico del Veleta, c. 600 m long in a NW-SE direction, with a head is formed by a steep wall which falls more than 250 meters to meet with a wide and irregular talus. The cirque headwall is composed of metamorphic rocks (mainly micaschist), lined up in structural steps or shelves tilted towards the NNW. One of these shelves forms the base of the cirque, on which a series of moraine ridges, tardiglacial or from the Little Ice Age, which close off the cirque towards the North (Gómez et al., 2001). The talus is formed from abundant debris resulting from weathering (gelifraction) and hillslope dynamics (rockfall activity) which affect the headwall (Gómez et al., 2003) and is formed mainly by various talus cones which are irregular in shape and stepped as the accumulated debris covers the remains of the stepped structural shelves which were not destroyed by the glacial erosion. Although the talus debris is basically made up of blocks, it is important to point out the abundant presence of fine material, produced by the weathering of the micaschist. (Castillo and Fedeli, 2002; Gómez et al., 2003). Field work carried out over the last ten years (1998-2008) has allowed observation of the triggering and formation in some years of various skin flows in different sectors of the talus, especially in the late summer of 2002 when four skin flows occurred. Within this timeframe monitoring and analysis of this kind of skin flow has been carried out. On the one hand, the description of the morphology, morphometry and sedimentology of each flow has been completed with the production of detailed geomorphological mapping and from sedimentological analysis. The geomorphological mapping has, in turn, allowed the observation of the geomorphological evolution of the flows from the time they occurred. On the other hand, a study has been made of the variables or factors which seem a priori to control the triggering of the skin flow landslips: the snow melt and the presence of permafrost in the detrital talus. The former has been monitored through photographic control of the snow cover at the end of the summer season, so that for each date analyzed a map was obtained of the snow cover, superimposing in turn the location of the skin flows at that date. A GIS processing of the different snow covers has also allowed a map to be produced with the areas of maximum summer snow cover, which was compared with the sites of the skin flow landslips. The existence of permafrost and its presence in the detrital slope has been detected through the monitoring of the ground temperature (BTS measurements, miniature temperature dataloggers) and geophysical surveys (Gómez et al., 2001, 2003). However, these methods for detecting permafrost (pending more detailed surveys) have shown that the presence of permafrost or buried ice in the slope is discontinuous. The geomorphological interpretation shows that the flows are small scale. The maximum length of the largest flow occurring during the observation period is around 50 m, and its width oscillates between 25-30 m. In general the flow only affects a layer of debris of less than 30 cm. The dislodged layer is made up of fine material and small clasts or gravel and pebble sized fragments, with a significant presence of numerous multiple flows which diverge or divide when they encounter a large block and end up forming small lobes. The interior of these is made up of fine material (clay and silt) and the lobe itself is made of small, tightly compressed fragments. Here it should also be noted that many of the flows are stopped or ended when they collide with a block of larger size, forming a series of lobes. It seems clear that many of these flows, as they are moving only a thin layer of fine material, are controlled by the presence of larger blocks which remain stable on the slope. The location of the skin flows at the base of the snowpatches in late summer seems to be the main factor which triggers their genesis. Here, as has been observed in other areas, the absence of vegetation and the abundant water delivered by the rapid nival fusion or snow melt, stronger here as this is an area with Mediterranean climate and also linked to the presence of abundant fine material, provide the conditions needed to favor the triggering of this kind of movement. However it was observed that some skin flows develop in sectors of the slope where the permafrost is absent and so their origin seems to be clearly related to the snow melt. In addition in these cases, the morphology of the flows once they are formed is not destroyed but rather tends to ‘blur' as the years pass, although it does not completely lose its original shape: the fine material inside the lobes becomes compacted and the multiple lobes become blurred. In contrast, in other sectors of the slope, where the presence of permafrost levels or buried ice has been detected, the skin flows, once formed, change their physiognomy from year to year, which may be related to the influence of the nival dynamic along with the degradation of the permafrost and the dislodgement of the active layer. References Akerman, H, .J, 1984: Notes on talus morphology and processes in Spitsbergen. Geografiska Annaler 66A (4): 267-284. Benedict, J. B. 1970. Downslope soil movement in a Colorado alpine region: rates, processes, and climatic significance, Arctic and Alpine Research, 2(3): 165-226 Caine N (1976). The influence of snow and increased snowfall on contemporary geomorphic processes in alpine areas. In: Steinoff HW, Ives JD (eds) Ecological impacts of snowpack augmentation in the San Juan Mountains. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, pp 145-200 Castillo, A. and Fedeli, B. 2002. Algunas pautas del comportamiento hidrogeológico de rocas duras afectadas por glaciarismo y periglaciarismo en Sierra Nevada (España). Geogaceta, 32: 195-197. Gómez, A., Palacios, D., Ramos, M., Tanarro, L.M., Schulte, L and Salvador, F., 2001: Location of permafrost in marginal regions: Corral del Veleta, Sierra Nevada. Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, 12: 93-110. Gómez, A.; Palacios, D.; Luengo, E.; Tanarro, L. M.; Schulte, L. & Ramos, M. 2003. Talus instability in a recent deglaciation area and its relantionship to buried ice and snow cover evolution (Picacho del Veleta, Sierra Nevada, Spain). Geografiska Annaler, 85 A(2): 165-182. Hall, K., 1985: Some observations on ground temperatures and transport processes at a nivation site in northern Norway. Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, 39: 27-37. Harris, C., 1987: Mechanisms of mass movement in periglacial environments. In: Anderson, M.G. and Richards, K.S. (eds): Slope Stability. John Wiley and Sons. Chichester. 531-559. Jahn, A., 1967: Some features of mass movement on Spitsbergen slopes. Geografiska Annaler, 49A: 213-225. Lambiel, C. and Pieracci, K. 2008. Permafrost distribution in talus slopes located within the alpine periglacial belt, Swiss Alps. Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, 19: 293-304. Lewkowicz, A.G.1988: Slope processes. In: Clark, M.J. (eds): Advances in Periglacial Geomorphology. John Wiley and Sons. Chichester. 325-368. McRoberts, E.C. and Morgenstern, N.R., 1974: The stability of the thawing slopes. Canadian Geotechnical Journal, 11: 447-469. Nyberg, R., 1991: Geomorphic processes at snowpatch sites in the Abisko mountains, northern Sweden. Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie N.F., 35(3): 321-343. Rapp, A. and Nyberg, R., 1988: Mass movements, nivation processes and climatic fluctuations in northern Scandinavian mountains. Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, 42: 245-253. Rapp, A., 1960: Recent development of mountain slopes in Kärkevagge and surroundings, Northen Scandinavia. Geografiska Annaler, 42A(2-3): 1-199. Soderman, G., 1980: Slope processes in cold environments of northern Finland. Fennia, 158: 83-152. Strömquist, L., 1985: Geomorphic impact of snowmelt on slope erosion and sediment production. Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie N. F., 29: 129-138. Thorn, C. E., 1988: Nivation: a geomorphic chimera. In: Clark, M. J. (ed.): Advances in Periglacial Geomorphology: John Wiley and Sons. Chichester. 3-31. White, S.E. 1981: Alpine mass movement forms (non-catastrophic). Arctic and Alpine Research 13: 127-37.

  1. Mixed approach (numerical modeling / equilibrium analysis) for slope stability analysis: development and application to the dams and open pit mining; Une approche mixte (numerique/equilibre limite) pour le calcul de stabilite des ouvrages en terre: developpement et application aux barrages et talus miniers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdey, A.

    2002-09-15

    The determination of the sliding surface of slope (dam, slope natural..) is one of the important and complicated problems in geotechnics. The Analyze of stability by the methods of Limit Equilibrium like the method of slices are the most used methods. They are able to determine a safety factor for a geometrically defined failure surface. These methods well adapted to the homogeneous mediums, have been developed a lot but they do not integrate the basic relations of mechanics (stress-strain). The numerical methods are better adapted to mediums having more complexity (effect of water, seismicity, fracturing,..). But, they are seldom used to determine a sliding surface and a safety factor. Each family offers appreciable advantages in the analysis of slope stability. For that purpose, we have developed a method that combines the advantages of the numerical methods as well as those of Limit Equilibrium allowing obtaining a slip surface determined by the calculated constraints. This slip surface may be imposed or better optimized, thus providing a minimal safety factor. Methods of operation research are used to obtain this surface. They are search methods by level, dynamic research.. or both at the same time. We integrated these developments in an existing computer code based on the method of Finite Differences known as FLAC. The stresses are determined for a linear behavior and for nonlinear. Interfaces and graphic tools are also produced to facilitate the analysis of stability. The validity of this approach was carried out for a standard case of slope, we analyzed and compared the results with the methods of Limit Equilibrium. The parametric study shows that this approach takes account of different parameters, which influences stability. We also kept a particular place for the application on real cases presenting slopes of different nature (dams, mining slops,...). (author)

  2. Multiple, distinct groundwater flow systems of a single moraine-talus feature in an alpine watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, James W.; Hayashi, Masaki

    2009-06-01

    SummaryRecent studies suggest that talus slopes and moraines likely play an important role in groundwater flow and storage in alpine watersheds, though the subsurface processes of these unconsolidated sediment features are not fully understood. To gain insight into these groundwater systems, we investigated the spatial variability in groundwater properties and hydrological trends of a large spring and several nearby (?200 m) springs, discharging from a single moraine-talus feature in an alpine watershed in the Canadian Rockies. A key question was whether groundwater flow in these features is reasonably homogeneous. Hydrograph analyses revealed at least two different groundwater responses to precipitation and melt inputs: a rapid and likely localized response and a slower response indicating a subsurface connection to a nearby lake. There was also a large spread in groundwater composition across the large spring and between springs, including a consistent linear trend in major ion chemistry over a 20-m section of the large spring. The spatial and temporal trends in groundwater chemistry data suggests there are three groundwater components associated with this sediment feature, and that their relative contributions vary temporally, though the component associated with the lake appears dominant. The study findings suggest that unconsolidated sediment features can possess multiple, and possibly disconnected, groundwater flow paths exhibiting unique hydrological and geochemical characteristics, and cannot necessarily be treated as a single, homogeneous groundwater component when modeling the hydrology of alpine watersheds.

  3. A Case Report of Sequela of Operation of Talus Osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Sung-Hun

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The clinic study or report about Oriental Medical treatment about osteonecrosis is very insufficient. Therefore, we report a case about a sequela of operation of talus osteonecrosis treated by Oriental Medical treatments. Methods : The patient was managed by bee venom and Carthami Flos Herbal-Acupuncture, Sa-am and body acupucture, oxibustion, physical theraphy and herbal medicine. We evaluated the patient through Visual Analogue Scale(VAS. Results : After 25 days of treatment, the patient showed that clinical symptoms was decreased and VAS changed from 10 to 2. Conclusion : In this case, Oriental Medical treatments for a sequela of operation of talus osteonecrosis was effective. But further studies are required to confirm the effect of these methods

  4. Congenital vertical talus: Treatment by reverse ponseti technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Atul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The surgery for idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT can lead to stiffness, wound complications and under or over correction. There are sporadic literature on costing with mixed results. We describe our early experience of reverse ponseti technique. Materials and methods: Four cases (four feet of idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT which presented one month after birth were treated by serial manipulation and casting, tendoachilles tenotomy and percutaneous pinning of talonavicular joint. An average of 5.2 (range - four to six plaster cast applications were required to correct the forefoot deformity. Once the talus and navicular were aligned based on the radiographic talus-first metatarsal axis, percutaneous fixation of the talo-navicular joint with a Kirschner wire, and percutaneous tendoachilles tenotomy under anesthesia was performed following which a cast was applied with the foot in slight dorsiflexion. Results: The mean follow-up period for the four cases was 8.5 months (6-12 months. At the end of the treatment all feet were supple and plantigrade but still using ankle foot orthosis (AFO. The mean talocalcaneal angle was 70 degrees before treatment and this reduced to 31 degrees after casting. The mean talar axis first metatasal base angle (TAMBA angle was 60° before casting and this improved to 10.5°. Conclusion: Although our follow-up period is small, we would recommend early casting for idiopathic CVT along the same lines as the Ponseti technique for clubfoot except that the forces applied are in reverse direction. This early casting method can prevent extensive surgery in the future, however, a close vigil is required to detect any early relapse.

  5. Can paleorefugia of cold-adapted species in talus slopes resist global warming?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Vlastimil; Zacharda, M.; Šmilauer, P.; Kučera, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2015), s. 403-412. ISSN 1239-6095 Grant ostatní: GA JU(CZ) 04-142/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : global warming Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.481, year: 2014 http://www.borenv.net/BER/pdfs/ber20/ber20-403.pdf

  6. Morphometric Changes in Talus of Club Foot A Gross Observation in Human Foetuses Cambios Morfomtricos en Talus del Pie Zambo, una Observacin Macroscpica en Fetos Humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Both the feet of six human foetuses of different age groups having unilateral club feet, were dissected for morphological study. Six morphometric parameters considered for comparing gross anatomical changes in normal and deformed feet, were 1-Maximum length of the talus, 2-Longitudinal dimension of head of talus, 3-Anterior trochlear breadth, 4-Maximum medial talar height, 5-Talar neck and calcaneal angle, 6-Talocalcaneal angle. All the foetuses with congenital club feet have almost similar deformity of foot skeleton. The gross anomalies observed were the smaller size of club foot talus and increased medial and planter deviation of a stunted, misshapen head and neck region. A medial plantar subluxation of the navicular bone with a consequent deformity of the articular facets of the talar head was also observed. Uniformity and consistency of anatomical abnormalities were striking features in present study.Para su estudio morfolgico fueron disecados ambos pies de seis fetos humanos de distintas edades, uno de los pies era zambo. Seis parmetros morfomtricos fueron considerados para la comparacin de graves alteraciones anatmicas en los pies normales y deformes; estos fueron: 1. Longitud mxima del talus, 2. Dimensin longitudinal de la cabeza del talus, 3. Ancho troclear anterior, 4. Altura medial mxima del talus, 5. Cuello talar y ngulo calcneo, 6. ngulo talocalcneo. Todos los fetos con pie zambo congnito tienen una deformidad similar del esqueleto del pie. Las anomalas graves observadas fueron el menor tamao del talus del pie zambo, aumento de la desviacin media y retraso en el crecimiento plantar, deformacin de la cabeza y regin del cuello talar. Tambin se observ una subluxacin medial plantar del hueso navicular, con un consecuente deformidad de las facetas articulares de la cabeza del talus. La uniformidad y consistencia de las anomalas anatmicas fueron los rasgos ms llamativos en este estudio.

  7. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  8. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshimori; Nishi, Genzaburo; Tago, Kyoji; Tsuchiya, Daiji; Chiba, Takehiro; Okumura, Hisashi [Aichiken Koseiren Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Ikeda, Takeshi; Wada, Ikuo

    2000-02-01

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  9. Fractures of the neck of the talus: evaluation of reproducibility of Hawkins' classification

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond Filho, Madson Lobato; Verzani, Marcos Aurélio; Rosa, André Frazão; Pimenta, Ciro Jabur; Grynwald, Jean; Cliquet Junior, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of Hawkins' classification for fractures of the neck of the talus. Methods 20 random cases of fracture of the talus were selected, to be defined according to the classification of types by eight orthopedic surgeons, 13 orthopedic residents and 15 radiology residents. Results Using the statistical test of Landis and Koch, measurements of 0.627 and 0.668 were obtained in the first and second evaluations, respectively. The...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Clubfoot and Vertical Talus: A Feasibility Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse, Lisa; Gurnett, Christina A; Hootnick, David; Dobbs, Matthew B.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital vascular alterations of the normal adult arterial pattern have been associated with multiple congenital limb deformities including clubfoot and vertical talus. Investigators have observed absence of the anterior tibial artery and dorsalis pedis artery in most patients with clubfoot, and absence of the posterior tibial artery in all patients with vertical talus. We used magnetic resonance angiography to define the lower extremity vascular anatomy of two patients with left-sided vert...

  11. Congenital vertical talus in four generations of the same family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents four generations of a family with radiographically demonstrated congenital vertical talus (CVT) in whom a HOXD10 gene mutation was identified. Some members of the family with this mutation exhibited cavo-varus foot deformity consistent with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)-like disorder. Physical examination was performed on nearly all of the affected and unaffected family members. DNA was extracted from blood obtained from 14 subjects who showed radiographic and clinical features of CVT (two of whom also had CMT), from two subjects with features of CMT but not CVT, and from 20 related family members who were clinically normal. Radiographs show the appearance of uncorrected CVT in infancy, in childhood, and in adulthood. DNA analysis revealed a mutation in a HOXD10gene located on chromosome 2 in all of the affected but none of the unaffected family members. There is an autosomal-dominant-inherited mutation with complete penetrance which is found in all members of a pedigree with CVT, some of whom exhibit a CMT-like foot disorder. Radiologic findings vary depending on the severity of involvement, treatment provided and age of the patient. (orig.)

  12. TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS BY MEANS OF THEARTHROSCOPY-ASSISTED MICROPERFORATION TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Everton; de Queiroz, Felipe; Lopes, Osmar Valadão; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients affected by osteochondral fractures of the talus who were treated surgically by means of arthroscopy-assisted microperforation. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 24 patients with osteochondral lesions of the talus who underwent microperforation assisted by videoarthroscopy of the ankle. They were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score system before and after the operation. Results: There were 19 men and 5 women, with a mean age of 35.3 years (minimum of 17 years and maximum of 54 years). The minimum follow-up was two years (maximum of 39 months). All the patients showed an improvement in AOFAS score after surgery, with an average improvement of around 22.5 points. Conclusion: Videoarthroscopy-assisted microperforation is a good option for treating osteochondral lesions of the talus and provides good functional results.

  13. Lateral Hindfoot Impingement After Nonunion of Fracture of the Lateral Process of the Talus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Hui; Su, Wei-Ren; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the lateral process of the talus is a relatively uncommon ankle injury, and the diagnosis is easily delayed. Lateral hindfoot impingement is characteristically related to chronic hindfoot valgus malalignment, with lateral ankle pain localized to the subtalar region. In a review of the published data, lateral hindfoot impingement after nonunion of fracture of the lateral process of the talus was not found. We present the case of a patient with such an injury. The patient was treated operatively and was followed for 18 months. PMID:25998474

  14. Impact of land-use change on soil degradation by establishment of terraces with subtropical orchards in sloping areas (Granada, SE Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the coast of Granada, an intensive irrigated agriculture based on subtropical crops has been established. These trees have been planted in highly sloped areas, by the construction of terraces. In this fragile Mediterranean agroecosystem, the removal of native spontaneous vegetation cover and substitution by orchards, increase the susceptibility to soil degradation and eventually brings up the destruction of these structures by rainfall events. To study this net change, we monitored the soil loss and runoff over a two-year period in the taluses of terraces with a mature mango (Mangifera indica L.) orchard. The studied treatments were bare soil (BS) and spontaneous vegetation (NSV), each twice replicated. The erosion plots were 4 m x 4 m in area and were located in the taluses of orchard in the taluses of orchard terraces (65 degree centigrade slope). The average annual soil loss by erosion for BS and NSV was 2.5 and 0.3 Mg ha-1 yr-1, and for runoff 34.1 and 6.8 mm yr-1, respectively. Therefore, soil erosion and runoff from BS plot were 8- and 5-times higher than in NSV, showing the importance of plant covers in the taluses of terraces in reducing this impact. Thus, the removal of plant cover from the taluses under these conditions, represent a high risk of slump and collapse, causing serious environmental and economic problems for farmers of subtropical crops. (Author) 11 refs.

  15. Storage and transmission of groundwater in alpine moraine and talus deposits (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, M.; Hood, J.; Langston, G.; Muir, D.; McClymont, A. F.; Bentley, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    As the timing and amount of snow accumulation and melt are expected to change, temporary storage and release of snowmelt water in soil and groundwater may play important roles in buffering the effects of these changes in mountain headwaters. In high alpine environments devoid of vegetation, coarse deposits of moraine and talus have been reported in the literature as potential groundwater reservoirs, mainly based on chemical and isotopic evidences. However, relatively little is understood on physical processes of groundwater storage and transmission in alpine moraine and talus. We have conducted detailed investigation of groundwater processes in a glaciated catchment in the Canadian Rockies. Geophysical imaging, hydrological monitoring and analysis, tracer tests, and numerical simulations have shown that groundwater is stored in relatively thin saturated zones at the interface between moraine/talus deposits and the underlying bedrock. Flow and storage of groundwater appears to be controlled by the topography of bedrock surface, and location and connectivity of bedrock channels and depressions. Hydrological response times of moraine/talus systems are in the order of a few days to a few months, suggesting that these systems may buffer the changes in snow conditions over a time scale of one season, but not over multiple years.

  16. Case report 533: Tuberculosis of calcaneus and talus with negative tuberculin skin test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case has been presented of a 6-year-old boy, of Pakistanian origin, with tuberculous osteomyelitis in the left calcaneous and talus. Such infections are a result of hematogenous seeding from a primary focus. Despite the existence of a previous infection, and despite 6 months of focal symptoms, the tuberculin skin test was negative. (orig./GDG)

  17. Neglected lateral process of talus fracture presenting as a loose body in tarsal canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bali Kamal

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available ?Abstract?Lateral process fractures of talus are rare injuries with a potential to cause significant morbidity if misdiagnosed. The appropriate management of these fractures is still controversial and only a few reports are avai- lable on this subject. We presented a case of a 37-year-old male with neglected fracture on the lateral process of talus which was misdiagnosed at the time of injury. The patient presented to 7 months after misdiagnosis with a chronic ankle pain. Our case is unique in the sense that it is a rare case of neglected fracture on the lateral process of talus which presented as a loose body in sinus tarsi. However, a surgery with an excision of the loose body presented a satis- factory outcome along with 2 years?follow-up. To our knowledge, it ought to be the first case reported in the English literature. Through this case report, we highlight the importance of high index of suspicion for such rare bony injuries while evaluating trauma to the lateral side of ankle and discuss the principles of management of these fractures. Key words: Joint loose bodies; Subtalar joint; Talus

  18. Stress fracture of the lateral process of the talus--a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Motto, S G

    1993-01-01

    A diagnosis of stress fracture of the lateral process of the talus was made in a 52-year-old tennis player with chronic lateral ankle pain. This uncommon condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle pain in an athlete, as delay in appropriate treatment may lead to considerable morbidity.

  19. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus: appearance at MR imaging and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 59-year-old man with chronic lateral ankle pain following an inversion injury is presented. MR imaging performed to evaluate for soft tissue injury revealed an unsuspected fracture of the lateral process of the talus. The patient underwent surgical exploration of the fracture with debridement of adjacent loose bodies and is currently undergoing aggressive physical rehabilitation. (orig.)

  20. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus: computed tomographic scan diagnosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, J.; Royle, S G

    1992-01-01

    Fracture of the lateral process of the talus is rare but can be mistaken for a simple ankle sprain. A case with normal conventional radiographs is presented to draw attention to this diagnosis in the resistant ankle sprain, and to highlight some of the problems that may be encountered with treatment.

  1. Accumulation of Lead (Pb) in the Talus Lichenes Contained in Mahogany Tree Stands of Roadside of Medan City

    OpenAIRE

    Ashar Hasairin; Nurshara Pasaribu; Lisdar I. Sudirman; Retno Widhiastuti

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the accumulation of lead (Pb) in the talus Lichenes found on roadside stands of mahogany trees in the city of Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia. Samples were taken by purposive, ie location based on the level of traffic density with different air pollution. Pb analysis was performed using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Identified as many as 8 kinds of Lichens with 2 types, namely talus Crustose and foliose. Type of Lepraria incana and Pertusaria amara, which is foun...

  2. Free chondral fragement involving the lateral trochlear ridge of the talus in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A saucer-shaped defect involving the lateral trochlear ridge of the talus and a radiopaque joint fragment were evident on radiographs of the left tarsus in a 6-month-old Rottweiler. Surgical treatment involved removal of the joint fragment and debridement of the defect. Histologic interpretation of the specimen was a chondral fragment. It is important to realize the possibility of a lesion in the location described, as this may be an additional site for osteochondrosis dissecans of the canine tarsus

  3. A Review of Arthroscopic Bone Marrow Stimulation Techniques of the Talus

    OpenAIRE

    Murawski, Christopher D.; Foo, Li Foong; Kennedy, John G

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries following acute and chronic ankle sprains. Numerous surgical treatment strategies have been employed for treating these lesions; arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation is recognized as the first-line technique to provide fibrocartilage infill of the defect site. While the short- and medium-term outcomes of this technique are good, the long-term outcomes are not yet known. An increasing number of studies, however, show a cause for concern in...

  4. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus: appearance at MR imaging and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, T.G.; Morrison, W.B. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall United States Air Force Medical Center, Lackland AFB, TX (United States); Ptaszek, A.J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Foot and Ankle Service, Wilford Hall United States Air Force Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas (United States)

    1999-04-01

    The case of a 59-year-old man with chronic lateral ankle pain following an inversion injury is presented. MR imaging performed to evaluate for soft tissue injury revealed an unsuspected fracture of the lateral process of the talus. The patient underwent surgical exploration of the fracture with debridement of adjacent loose bodies and is currently undergoing aggressive physical rehabilitation. (orig.) With 3 figs., 21 refs.

  5. Assessment of talus deformity by three-dimensional MRI in congenital clubfoot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphological deformity of talus in congenital clubfoot by three-dimensional MRI. Material and method: Subjects were five patients (two male, three female, mean age 5 months) with unilateral congenital clubfoot. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed of both feet using 1.5 T magnet. Based on the resulting magnetic resonance imaging volume data, a three-dimensional surface bone model was reconstructed by the Marching Cubes method. The long axis of the reconstructed model was determined, and in relation to the standard planes including this axis, the degree of talar head and neck deviation, and the relative positioning of the talus and navicular in the talonavicular joint were compared between normal foot and clubfoot. Result: The talar head and neck angle in relation to the talus exhibited significant medial deviation in the clubfoot, but the degree of plantar deviation of the talar head and neck did not show significance. The navicular was located more medially in clubfoot than in normal foot. The volume of the total talar and of the ossific nucleus for the clubfoot was smaller than that for the normal foot. Conclusion: The assessment technique presented herein was shown to be useful in ascertaining the various pathological characteristics associated with clubfoot

  6. Assessment of talus deformity by three-dimensional MRI in congenital clubfoot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itohara, T. E-mail: tomonobu@ort.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sugamoto, K.; Shimizu, N.; Ohno, I.; Tanaka, H.; Nakajima, Y.; Sato, Y.; Yoshikawa, H

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphological deformity of talus in congenital clubfoot by three-dimensional MRI. Material and method: Subjects were five patients (two male, three female, mean age 5 months) with unilateral congenital clubfoot. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed of both feet using 1.5 T magnet. Based on the resulting magnetic resonance imaging volume data, a three-dimensional surface bone model was reconstructed by the Marching Cubes method. The long axis of the reconstructed model was determined, and in relation to the standard planes including this axis, the degree of talar head and neck deviation, and the relative positioning of the talus and navicular in the talonavicular joint were compared between normal foot and clubfoot. Result: The talar head and neck angle in relation to the talus exhibited significant medial deviation in the clubfoot, but the degree of plantar deviation of the talar head and neck did not show significance. The navicular was located more medially in clubfoot than in normal foot. The volume of the total talar and of the ossific nucleus for the clubfoot was smaller than that for the normal foot. Conclusion: The assessment technique presented herein was shown to be useful in ascertaining the various pathological characteristics associated with clubfoot.

  7. Transient bone marrow edema of the talus: MR imaging findings in five patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the MR findings of transient bone marrow edema (TBME) of the talus and to address the differential diagnostic considerations. Design and patients: The imaging findings of TBME of six tali were retrospectively reviewed in five patients with a clinical history of pain without trauma. Inclusion criteria were MR imaging findings that, when compared with clinical data and results of follow-up assessment, allowed the diagnosis of TBME. MR imaging, standard radiography, and bone scintigraphy were performed. The images were reviewed with particular attention to the pattern and distribution of abnormal marrow signal intensity as well as associated findings. Results: In four cases the entire talus was involved, and in two cases only a portion of the bone was affected. No fractures were detected. MR imaging demonstrated diffuse decreased signal intensity of the marrow on T1-weighted images with corresponding increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In all six cases MR imaging detected associated findings, which included joint effusion and soft tissue edema. All patients improved clinically with conservative therapy over a period of 6 months to 1 year. Conclusions: Although unusual, TBME can involve the talus. Marrow edema without evidence of a fracture and in the absence of history of trauma is a characteristic MR imaging feature, allowing confident diagnosis and institution of conservative therapy. (orig.)

  8. Organic and inorganic nitrogen pools in talus fields and subtalus water, Green Lakes Valley, Colorado front range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M.W.; Davinroy, T.; Brooks, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Organic and inorganic pools of nitrogen (N) were measured in talus fines or 'soils' and subtalus water during the summer of 1995 in the alpine Green Lakes Valley catchment of the Colorado Front Range. Nineteen talus soil samples were divided into four classes: subtalus dry, subtalus wet, surface vegetated and surface bare. The size of the individual talus soil patches ranged from 0.5 to 12.0 m2 in area, with bulk density ranging from 0-98 to 1-71 kg m-3 and soil texture ranging from sandy gravel in the subsurface talus to a loam in the vegetated surface. All samples contained KCl-extractable NH4+ and NO3-, organic N and carbon (C), and 17 of 19 samples contained microbial biomass. The mean subtalus values for KCl-extractable NH4-, of 3.2 mg N kg-1, and NO3-, of 1.0 mg N kg-1, were comparable with developed alpine soils on Niwot Ridge. Average microbial biomass in subtalus soils of 5.4 mg N kg-1 and total N of 1000 mg N kg-1 were about an order of magnitude lower than alpine tundra soils, reflecting the reduced amount of vegetation in talus areas. However, these measurements in surface-vegetated patches of talus were comparable with the well-developed soils on Niwot Ridge. These measurements in talus of microbial biomass, total N and KCl-extractable NH4+ and NO3-, show that there is sufficient biotically conditioned 'soil' within talus fields to influence the solute content of interstitial waters. Mean NO3- concentrations of 20 ??eq 1-1 from 29 samples of subtalus water were significantly higher than the 6-7 ??eq 1-1 in snow, while NH4+ concentrations in subtalus water of 0??7 ??eq 1-1 was significantly lower than in snow at 5??2 ??eq 1-1 (p = 0??001). Nitrate concentrations in subtalus water were significantly (p < 0??0001) correlated with concentrations of geochemica??l weathering products such as Ca2+ (r2 = 0??84) and silica (r2 = 0??49). The correlation of NO3- in subtalus water with geochemical weathering products suggests that NO3- concentrations in subtalus water increased with increased residence time, consistent with a biological source for this subtalus water NO3-. The high NO3- concentrations in subtalus water compared with atmospheric deposition of NO3- suggests that NO3- in talus fields may contribute to NO3- in stream waters of high-elevation catchments. ?? 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Groundwater flow and storage within an alpine meadow-talus complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. McClymont

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The different types of geological deposits and rock formations found in alpine watersheds play key roles in regulating the rate and timing of runoff to mountain rivers. Talus and alpine meadows are dominant features in these areas, but scant data exist for their capacity to store and transmit groundwater. To gain further understanding of these processes, we have undertaken a combined geophysical and hydrological study of a small (2100 m2 alpine meadow and surrounding talus within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. Several intersecting ground-penetrating radar (GPR and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles and a seismic refraction profile were acquired to map the thickness of the talus and to image the topography of the bedrock basin that lies under the meadow. From analysis of the GPR and seismic profiles, we estimate that the talus deposits are relatively thin (<6 m. Combined interpretations from the GPR and ERT data show that the fine-grained sediment, that the meadow basin is comprised of, has a total volume of ca. 3300 m3 and has a maximum thickness of ca. 4 m. Annual snow surveys and stream gauging reveal that the total input volume of snowmelt and rainfall to the meadow basin is several times larger than its groundwater storage capacity, giving rise to low total-dissolved species concentrations (14–21 mg/L within the meadow groundwater. Observations from four piezometers established on the meadow show that the water table fluctuates rapidly in response to spring snowmelt and precipitation events but otherwise maintains a relatively stable depth of 0.3–0.4 m below the meadow surface during summer months. A slug test performed on one of the piezometers indicated that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the shallow meadow sediments is 2.5×10−7 m/s. We suggest that a bedrock saddle imaged underneath the southern end of the meadow forms a natural constriction to subsurface flow out of the basin and helps to maintain the stable water-table depth.

  10. Groundwater flow and storage within an alpine meadow-talus complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. McClymont

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The different types of geological deposits and rock formations found in alpine watersheds play key roles in regulating the rate and timing of runoff to mountain rivers. Talus and alpine meadows are dominant features in these areas, but scant data exist for their capacity to store and transmit groundwater. To gain further understanding of these processes, we have undertaken a combined geophysical and hydrological study of a small (2100 m2 alpine meadow and surrounding talus within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. Several intersecting ground-penetrating radar (GPR and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles and a seismic refraction profile were acquired to map the thickness of the talus and to image the topography of the bedrock basin that underlies the meadow. From analysis of the GPR and seismic profiles, we estimate that the talus deposits are relatively thin (<6 m. Combined interpretations from the GPR and ERT data show that the fine-grained sediment comprising the meadow basin has a total volume of ca. 3300 m3 and has a maximum thickness of ca. 4 m. Annual snow surveys and stream gauging reveal that the total input volume of snowmelt and rainfall to the meadow basin is several times larger than its groundwater storage capacity, giving rise to low total-dissolved species concentrations (14–21 mg/L within the meadow groundwater. Observations from four piezometers established on the meadow show that the water table fluctuates rapidly in response to spring snowmelt and precipitation events but otherwise maintains a relatively stable depth of 0.3–0.4 m below the meadow surface during summer months. A slug test performed on one of the piezometers indicated that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the shallow meadow sediments is 2.5×10−7 m/s. We suggest that a bedrock saddle imaged underneath the southern end of the meadow forms a natural constriction to subsurface flow out of the basin and helps to maintain the stable water-table depth.

  11. Groundwater flow and storage within an alpine meadow-talus complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClymont, A. F.; Hayashi, M.; Bentley, L. R.; Muir, D.; Ernst, E.

    2010-06-01

    The different types of geological deposits and rock formations found in alpine watersheds play key roles in regulating the rate and timing of runoff to mountain rivers. Talus and alpine meadows are dominant features in these areas, but scant data exist for their capacity to store and transmit groundwater. To gain further understanding of these processes, we have undertaken a combined geophysical and hydrological study of a small (2100 m2) alpine meadow and surrounding talus within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. Several intersecting ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles and a seismic refraction profile were acquired to map the thickness of the talus and to image the topography of the bedrock basin that underlies the meadow. From analysis of the GPR and seismic profiles, we estimate that the talus deposits are relatively thin (<6 m). Combined interpretations from the GPR and ERT data show that the fine-grained sediment comprising the meadow basin has a total volume of ca. 3300 m3 and has a maximum thickness of ca. 4 m. Annual snow surveys and stream gauging reveal that the total input volume of snowmelt and rainfall to the meadow basin is several times larger than its groundwater storage capacity, giving rise to low total-dissolved species concentrations (14-21 mg/L) within the meadow groundwater. Observations from four piezometers established on the meadow show that the water table fluctuates rapidly in response to spring snowmelt and precipitation events but otherwise maintains a relatively stable depth of 0.3-0.4 m below the meadow surface during summer months. A slug test performed on one of the piezometers indicated that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the shallow meadow sediments is 2.510-7 m/s. We suggest that a bedrock saddle imaged underneath the southern end of the meadow forms a natural constriction to subsurface flow out of the basin and helps to maintain the stable water-table depth.

  12. Osteochondrosis of the lateral trochlear ridge of the talus in seven Rottweiler dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven lesions of osteochondrosis in the lateral trochlear ridge of the talus were diagnosed in seven young Rottweiler dogs. Diagnosis was based on clinical and radiographic evaluations. Defects in the lateral trochlear ridge and osteochondral fragments arising from the dorsal and proximal margins of the ridge were visible radiographically. The dorsal 45 degrees lateral-plantaromedial oblique (D45 degrees L-P1MO) projection was the most useful in identifying the lesions. Exploratory arthrotomies were performed in six affected tarsi. In three cases, histologic examination revealed mineralized osteochondral fragments consistent with a diagnosis of osteochondrosis

  13. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Secondary to an Unreported Ossicle of the Talus: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweed, Tamer Ahmed; Ali, Seyed Asghar; Choudhary, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is a compression neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel. In about 80% of patients, a specific cause can be identified for TTS. We present a case of TTS secondary to an ossicle in close relation to the talus that, to our knowledge, has not previously been reported. A 26-year-old male presented with left ankle and foot pain that increased with activity and playing football. He had a tingling sensation and paresthesia in the sole and medial border of the foot along the distribution of the medial and lateral plantar nerves. Clinically, he had hard swelling at the floor of the tarsal tunnel, and Tinel's sign was positive. Computed tomography showed an accessory ossicle articulating with the posteromedial aspect of the talus, separating the flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tendons, with tenosynovitis of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tendons. Surgical release of the tarsal tunnel and excision of the ossicle were performed. Postoperatively, the patient showed dramatic improvement and had no complications or recurrence of symptoms after 8 months of follow-up. More interestingly, to the best of our knowledge, this ossicle has not been previously reported to cause TTS. PMID:25441278

  14. Possible application of CT morphometry of the calcaneus and talus in forensic anthropological identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Mustafa, Asmaa Mohammed Hishmat; Sogawa, Nozomi; Kanou, Tetsuya; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) data provide information for volumetric and radiographic density analysis. The present study investigated the application of virtual CT volumetry of the tarsal bones to estimation of the sex, stature, and body weight using postmortem CT (PMCT) data of forensic autopsy cases. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the bilateral foot bones of intact Japanese subjects after adolescence (age ≥15 years, n = 179, 100 males and 79 females) were reconstructed on an automated CT image analyzer system. Measured parameters were mass volume, mean CT value (HU), and total CT value of the talus and calcaneus. Mean CT values of these bones showed age-dependent decreases in elderly subjects over 60 years of age for both sexes, with significant sex-related differences especially in the elderly. The mass volumes and total CT values of the talus and calcaneus showed significant sex-related differences, and also moderate correlations with body height and weight for bilateral bones in all cases (r = 0.58-0.78, p sex and stature in forensic identification; however, greater variations should be considered in body weight estimations of females. PMID:26362306

  15. Orthopaedic surgeon’s nightmare: iatrogenic fractures of talus and medial malleolus following tibial nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Intramedullary interlocking nailing is the gold standard for treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The growing use of intramedullary nailing has resulted in an increased number of tibial nailing in daily clinical practice. Despite adequate surgeon experience, tibial nailing is not without complications if proper techniques are not followed. A case of iatrogenic talar neck and medial malleolus frac-tures during intramedullary nailing of tibia in a 24-year-old male is reported. It is believed to be caused by forceful hammering of insertion zig with foot dorsiflexed. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported in the literature. It is possible to reduce the risk of this complica-tion by adoption of preventive measures. Key words: Tibial fracture; Talus; Fracture fixation, intramedullary

  16. RADIOGRAPHIC ABNORMALITIES OF THE TALUS IN PATIENTS WITH CLUBFOOT AFTER SURGICAL RELEASE USING THE MCKAY TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, José Antonio; Hernandes, Andréa Canizares; Buchaim, Thais Paula; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Chertman, Carla; Yamane, Patrícia Corey; da Rocha Corrêa Fernandes, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze morphological abnormalities of the talus in patients with clubfoot after surgical treatment using the McKay technique. Method: Lateral standing-position radiographs of the feet of 14 patients with unilateral clubfoot who underwent treatment by means of the doubleincision McKay technique were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients were operated by the same surgeon, with an average of 6.53 years between surgery and the radiograph. We compared the radiographic characteristics of the talus between the operated and the contralateral foot. We assessed the presence of deformity of the talar dome and head (sphericity evaluation); the talar length and height; the percentage and degree of navicular subluxation; abnormalities of the Gissane angle; and the trabecular bone pattern. Results: Abnormalities of the talar head occurred in 92.8% of the patients; of the talar dome in 92.8%; and of the trabecular pattern in 100%. The talar length ratio between the operated and the contralateral foot ranged from 0.61 to 0.88 (mean 0.79; SD = 0.09), while the height ratio ranged from 0.57 to 0.98 (mean 0.82; SD = 0.12). The Gissane angle was greater in all of the operated feet, and all of them also showed navicular subluxation, at a rate ranging from 6.43 to 59.75% (mean 26.34%; SD = 16.66%). Conclusion: Talar abnormalities occurred in 100% of the feet treated using the McKay technique. It was shown that establishing radiographic parameters to describe and quantify these deformities was feasible, through simple and easy-to-perform techniques. PMID:27047821

  17. Preliminary Slope Stability Study Using Slope/ W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzing the stability of earth structures is the oldest type of numerical analysis in geotechnical engineering. Limit equilibrium types of analyses for assessing the stability of earth slopes have been in use in geotechnical engineering for many decades. Modern limit equilibrium software is making it possible to handle ever-increasing complexity within an analysis. It is being considered as the potential method in dealing with complex stratigraphy, highly irregular pore-water pressure conditions, various linear and nonlinear shear strength models and almost any kind of slip surface shape. It allows rapid decision making by providing an early indication of the potential suitability of sites based on slope stability analysis. Hence, a preliminary slope stability study has been developed to improve the capacity of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in assessing potential sites for Borehole Disposal for Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources. The results showed that geometry of cross section A-A', B-B', C-C' and D-D' achieved the factor of safety not less than 1.4 and these are deemed acceptable. (author)

  18. A sloping gas duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sloping gas duct of the THTR-300 MWe reactor connects the hot gas collection space to the steam raising unit. A sloping perforated plate is provided to even out the speed and temperature distribution at the angle. The perforated plate has circular holes, which are distributed on a regular grid. The perforated plate is made of metal or ceramic material. The free cross-section is at least 50%. (DG)

  19. Road Slope Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about the current road slope can improve several applications in a heavy-duty vehicle such as predictive cruise control and automated gearbox control. In this thesis the possibility of estimating the road slope based on signals from a vehicles air suspension system has been studied. More specifically, the measurement consists of a pressure signal measuring the axle load, and a vertical distance sensor. A variety of suspension systems can be mounted on a Scania truck. During this the...

  20. Closed subtalar dislocation with non-displaced fractures of talus and navicular: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Fotiadis, Elias; Lyrtzis, Christos; Svarnas, Theodoros; Koimtzis, Miltos; Akritopoulou, Kiriaki; Chalidis, Byron

    2009-01-01

    Closed subtalar dislocations associated with talus and navicular fractures are rare injuries. We report on a case of a 43-year-old builder man with medial subtalar dislocation that was further complicated by minimally displaced talar and navicular fractures. Successful closed reduction under general anesthesia was followed by non-weight bearing and ankle immobilization with a below-knee cast for 6 ;weeks. At 3 years post-injury, the subtalar joint was stable, the foot and ankle mobility was i...

  1. Snowboard, wakeboard, dashboard? Isolated fracture of the lateral process of the talus in a high-speed road traffic accident.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, Evangeline Shimei

    2013-01-01

    We present a 23-year-old man who sustained an isolated fracture of the lateral process of the talus (LPT) in a head-on vehicle collision at a combined speed of 200 km\\/h. The driver of the other vehicle sustained fatal injuries at the scene. The LPT was openly reduced and fixed with successful outcome at 3 months. This case is unusual in the method of injury, in particular in relation to the isolated relatively minor injury sustained.

  2. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI guidance for percutaneous retrograde drilling in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (OCDT). Four patients, one juvenile and three adults, with one OCDT lesion each and persisting ankle pain after conservative treatment, were treated with MRI-guided retrograde drilling. All lesions were stable and located in the middle or posterior medial third of the talar dome. Pain relief and the ability to return to normal activities were assessed during clinical follow-up. MRI and plain film radiographs were used for imaging follow-up. Technical success was 100 % with no complications and with no damage to the overlying cartilage. All patients experienced some clinical benefit, although only one had complete resolution of pain and one had a relapse leading to surgical treatment. Changes in the pathological imaging findings were mostly very slight during the follow-up period. MRI guidance seems accurate, safe and technically feasible for retrograde drilling of OCDT. Larger series are needed to reliably assess its clinical value. (orig.)

  3. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerimaa, Pekka; Ojala, Risto; Markkanen, Paula; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oulu (Finland); Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Korhonen, Jussi [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Oulu (Finland); Hyvoenen, Pekka [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Oulu (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI guidance for percutaneous retrograde drilling in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (OCDT). Four patients, one juvenile and three adults, with one OCDT lesion each and persisting ankle pain after conservative treatment, were treated with MRI-guided retrograde drilling. All lesions were stable and located in the middle or posterior medial third of the talar dome. Pain relief and the ability to return to normal activities were assessed during clinical follow-up. MRI and plain film radiographs were used for imaging follow-up. Technical success was 100 % with no complications and with no damage to the overlying cartilage. All patients experienced some clinical benefit, although only one had complete resolution of pain and one had a relapse leading to surgical treatment. Changes in the pathological imaging findings were mostly very slight during the follow-up period. MRI guidance seems accurate, safe and technically feasible for retrograde drilling of OCDT. Larger series are needed to reliably assess its clinical value. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of fractures of the lateral process of the talus, a frequently missed diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although if fractures of the lateral process of the talus (LPT) have been considered rare the widespread diffusion in snowboard practice has resulted in a dramatic increase in their frequency. If unrecognized they can result in secondary osteoarthritis of the ankle and/or talo-calcaneal joints and chronic pain and stiffness. Due to the complex anatomy of the region, these fractures are difficult to detect by standard radiographs. A high degree of suspicion is then necessary to diagnose them. Once suspected on the basis of physical examination and/or non concluding radiographs, computed tomography (CT) is the best modality to confirm the diagnosis and accurately appreciate the number of the fragments and their position which have therapeutic consequences (medical vs. surgical treatment). A better knowledge of these lesions seems necessary to the general radiologist to allow an early diagnosis in order to avoid chronic sequel. The purpose of this article is to report three additional cases of LPT fractures and discuss their pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

  5. Imaging of fractures of the lateral process of the talus, a frequently missed diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonvin, Florent; Montet, Xavier; Copercini, Michele; Martinoli, Carlo; Bianchi, Stefano E-mail: stefano.bianchi@hcuge.ch

    2003-07-01

    Although if fractures of the lateral process of the talus (LPT) have been considered rare the widespread diffusion in snowboard practice has resulted in a dramatic increase in their frequency. If unrecognized they can result in secondary osteoarthritis of the ankle and/or talo-calcaneal joints and chronic pain and stiffness. Due to the complex anatomy of the region, these fractures are difficult to detect by standard radiographs. A high degree of suspicion is then necessary to diagnose them. Once suspected on the basis of physical examination and/or non concluding radiographs, computed tomography (CT) is the best modality to confirm the diagnosis and accurately appreciate the number of the fragments and their position which have therapeutic consequences (medical vs. surgical treatment). A better knowledge of these lesions seems necessary to the general radiologist to allow an early diagnosis in order to avoid chronic sequel. The purpose of this article is to report three additional cases of LPT fractures and discuss their pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Arctic Submarine Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D.; Geissler, W.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine landsliding represents aside submarine earthquakes major natural hazard to coastal and sea-floor infrastructure as well as to coastal communities due to their ability to generate large-scale tsunamis with their socio-economic consequences. The investigation of submarine landslides, their conditions and trigger mechanisms, recurrence rates and potential impact remains an important task for the evaluation of risks in coastal management and offshore industrial activities. In the light of a changing globe with warming oceans and rising sea-level accompanied by increasing human population along coasts and enhanced near- and offshore activities, slope stability issues gain more importance than ever before. The Arctic exhibits the most rapid and drastic changes and is predicted to change even faster. Aside rising air temperatures, enhanced inflow of less cooled Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean reduces sea-ice cover and warms the surroundings. Slope stability is challenged considering large areas of permafrost and hydrates. The Hinlopen/Yermak Megaslide (HYM) north of Svalbard is the first and so far only reported large-scale submarine landslide in the Arctic Ocean. The HYM exhibits the highest headwalls that have been found on siliciclastic margins. With more than 10.000 square kilometer areal extent and app. 2.400 cubic kilometer of involved sedimentary material, it is one of the largest exposed submarine slides worldwide. Geometry and age put this slide in a special position in discussing submarine slope stability on glaciated continental margins. The HYM occurred 30 ka ago, when the global sea-level dropped by app. 50 m within less than one millennium due to rapid onset of global glaciation. It probably caused a tsunami with circum-Arctic impact and wave heights exceeding 130 meters. The HYM affected the slope stability field in its neighbourhood by removal of support. Post-megaslide slope instability as expressed in creeping and smaller-scaled slides are the consequence. Its geometrical configuration and timing is different from submarine slides on other glaciated continental margins. Thus, it raises the question whether slope stability within the Arctic Ocean is governed by processes specific to this environment. The extraordinary thick slabs (up to 1600 m) that were moved translationally during sliding rise the question on the nature of the weak layers associated with this process. Especially theories involving higher pore pressure are being challenged by this observation, because either extreme pore pressures or alternative explanations (e.g. mineralogical and/or textural) can be considered. To assess the actual submarine slope stability and failure potential in the Arctic Ocean, we propose to drill and recover weak layer material of the HYM from the adjacent intact strata by deep drilling under the framework of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. This is the only method to recover weak layer material from the HYM, because the strata are too thick. We further propose to drill into the adjacent deforming slope to identify material properties of the layers acting as detachment and monitor the deformation.

  7. MORPHOMETRY OF THE ARTICULAR FACETS ON THE SUPERIOR, MEDIAL AND LATERAL SURFACES OF THE BODY OF TALUS AND ITS CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goda Jatin B, Patel Shailesh M, Parmar Ajay M, Agarwal GC

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the formation of Ankle joint, tibio-fibular mortice receives superior, medial and lateral articular surfaces of body of Talus. Because of very limited availability of the data on the Morphometry of the articular facets on the Body of the dry human tali, this study was undertaken. Aims: To prepare the database on the articular facets on the superior, medial and lateral surfaces of body of talus, to find if there is statistically significant difference between both the sides of measurements and to compare the results with the previous studies. Methods and Material: 40 Dry Human Tali (20 Right and 20 Left were measured with Digital vernier caliper for the following Measurements: On the Trochlear surface: Medial length, Central length, Lateral length, Anterior width, Central width, Posterior width. On the lateral triangular articular facet: Central height, Central width. On the coma shaped medial articular facet: Central height, Central width. Results: Mean values of Medial, Central and Lateral lengths were 31.02, 30.39 and 29.63mm on Right side and 31.79, 30.65 and 29.45mm on Left side. Mean Anterior, Central and Posterior widths were 28.87, 28.16 and 21.59mm on right side and 29.08, 27.54 and 21.78mm on left side. On the medial articular surface, mean central height was 11.93mm on the right side and 11.29mm on the left side, Mean central width was 27.94mm on the right side and 28.29mm on the left side. On the lateral articular surface, mean central height was 22.14mm on the right side and 22.63mm on the left side. Mean central width was 18.93mm on the right side and 18.99mm on the left side. There is no significant difference between right and left sides of measurements. Conclusion: The trochlear articular surface is wider in front, measurements of opposite talus bone can be used as a control during talus bone replacement surgery, it may help surgeons to plan pre-operatively the complex talar fracture surgeries, to design accurate talus bone prosthesis and talus implants.

  8. A mounded spherical storage tank at Papeete; Une sphere sous talus a Papeete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-09-01

    Because demand for liquid petroleum gas (LPG) in French Polynesia is burgeoning, deliveries of the product are on the rise, in particular from New Zealand. In consideration of this, Gaz de Tahiti has had a mounded 1.800 m{sup 3} spherical propane storage tank built by the Tissot group. The new tank joins the ranks of the standard 2.500 m{sup 3} spherical butane tank that Gaz de Tahiti already has at its Papeete site. The slope consists of earth-filled gabions, which are at least one metre thick at any point of the steel structure. The project is proof once again that Gaz de Tahiti has no reason to envy European companies when it comes to technology and development. (authors)

  9. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi2 (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives

  10. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  11. Anatomy of gravitationally deformed slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Shintaro; Hariyama, Takehiro

    2010-05-01

    Deep-seated gravitational slope deformation is the deformation of rocks as well as slope surfaces, but the internal structures have not been well observed and described before. This is mainly due to the difficulty in obtaining undisturbed samples from underground. We analyzed the internal deformational structures of gravitationally deformed slopes by using high quality drilled cores obtained by hybrid drilling technique, which has been recently developed and can recover very fragile materials that could not be taken by the conventional drilling techniques. Investigated slopes were gravitationally deformed out-facing slopes of pelitic schist and shale. The slope surfaces showed deformational features of small steps, depressions, knobs, and linear depressions, but had no major main scarp and landslide body with well-defined outline. This is indicative of slow, deep-seated gravitational deformation. Most of these small deformational features are hidden by vegetations, but they are detected by using airborne laser scanner. Drilled cores showed that the internal deformation is dominated by the slip and tearing off along foliations. Slippage along foliations is conspicuous in pelitic schist: Pelitic schist is sheared, particularly along black layers, which are rich in graphite and pyrite. Graphite is known to be a solid lubricant in material sciences, which seems to be why shearing occurs along the black layers. Rock mass between two slip layers is sheared, rotated, fractured, and pulverized; undulation of bedding or schistosity could be the nucleation points of fracturing. Tearing off along foliations is also the major deformation mode, which forms jagged morphology of rock fragments within shear zones. Rock fragments with jagged surface are commonly observed in "gouge", which is very different from tectonic gouge. This probably reflects the low confining pressures during their formation. Microscopic to mesoscopic openings along fractures are commonly observed with fractures, which also suggests the low confining pressures. Vertical distribution of gravitational deformation with above features indicates that gravitational shear zones are nucleated in a distributed manner, then gradually connected to each other, and finally cut through the whole slope. This is the transition of gravitational mass rock creep to rock slide. First nucleation points seem to be controlled by the heterogeneity of rock properties. Thick black layers in pelitic schist, shale near thick sandstone beds in sedimentary rocks, were such nuclear points. The geometrical relationships between the distribution of fracture zones and the slope morphology suggest that they are formed in accordance to the valley incision and resultant slope destabilization.

  12. Baroclinic Instability and Isentropic Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, D. O.

    1991-05-01

    The wavelength of maximum baroclinic instability (WMI), maximum growth rate (MGR), phase velocities, and other quantities, are computed for an atmosphere with an internal 100-mb layer having various shears and lapse rates and positioned at various levels in a baroclinically unstable troposphere. It is found that the WMI, MGR, and other properties are more closely related to slope of the isentropes, S, in the layer than to Richardson number, Ri, or to shear and lapse rate individually. The results for the layer positioned in the lower, middle and upper troposphere are similar but show systematic variations. The largest WMIs (3000-6000 km) are found for intermediate isentropic slopes of the order of those observed. Much smaller WMIs are found for small and very large isentropic slopes. The MGRs are of the order of 1 d1 for small and intermediate slopes, but much larger for large slopes (S 6 × 103 or Ri 0.5). The results suggest temporal and upward increases of WMI as shear and static stability develop in association with growth of the baroclinic wave. They also suggest typical WMIs somewhat larger than the 3100 km for the standard atmosphere.

  13. Western Slope of Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Along the western flank of the Andes, 400 km SE of Lima Peru, erosion has carved the mountain slopes into long, narrow serpentine ridges. The gently-sloping sediments have been turned into a plate of worms wiggling their way downhill to the ocean. The image was acquired September 28, 2004, covers an area of 38 x 31.6 km, and is located near 14.7 degrees south latitude, 74.5 degrees west longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Radioecological reliability of slope ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural and technogenic cataclysms taking place in Ukraine bring to the forefront the problem of estimation and forecast of different ecosystems type. Theory and models of the radio capacity and reliability developed by us allow to describe adequately regularities of radionuclide migration and redistribution in slope ecosystems, and carry out mathematical modeling of investigated phenomena. That will give the possibility to use special countermeasures

  15. Exploring Slope with Stairs & Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toni M.; Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan; Peixoto, Nathalia; Suh, Jennifer M.; Bagshaw, Graham; Collins, Laurena K.

    2013-01-01

    As much as ever before, mathematics teachers are searching for ways to connect mathematics to real-life scenarios within STEM contexts. As students develop skill in proportional reasoning, they examine graphical representations of linear functions, learn to associate "slope" with "steepness" and rate of change, and develop…

  16. Kuhse, Singer and slippery slopes.

    OpenAIRE

    Fairbairn, G J

    1988-01-01

    Helga Kuhse and Peter Singer recently examined the view expressed by John Lorber that whereas at times it is permissible to allow severely handicapped infants to die, killing them must never be allowed. In attempting to demonstrate the mistaken nature of Lorber's fear that allowing active infanticide would lead us onto a slippery slope Kuhse and Singer make much use of John Harris's paper in the Journal of Medical Ethics in which he criticised Lorber's views. This paper examines some aspects ...

  17. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  18. Kuhse, Singer and slippery slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, G J

    1988-01-01

    Helga Kuhse and Peter Singer recently examined the view expressed by John Lorber that whereas at times it is permissible to allow severely handicapped infants to die, killing them must never be allowed. In attempting to demonstrate the mistaken nature of Lorber's fear that allowing active infanticide would lead us onto a slippery slope Kuhse and Singer make much use of John Harris's paper in the Journal of Medical Ethics in which he criticised Lorber's views. This paper examines some aspects of the case advanced by Kuhse and Singer and of the earlier paper by Harris. PMID:2972837

  19. Computing boundary slopes of 2-bridge links

    CERN Document Server

    Hoste, J; Hoste, Jim; Shanahan, Patrick D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for computing boundary slopes of 2-bridge links. As an example, we work out the slopes of the links obtained by 1/k surgery on one component of the Borromean rings. A table of all boundary slopes of all 2-bridge links with 10 or less crossings is also included.

  20. In-Place Randomized Slope Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunck, Henrik; Vahrenhold, Jan

    Slope selection, i.e. selecting the slope with rank k among all 􀀀n 2lines induced by a collection P of points, results in a widely used robust estimator for linefitting. In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform slope selection in expected O(n·log2 n) time using only c...

  1. The Influence of Shales on Slope Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Doug

    2016-02-01

    Shales play a major role in the stability of slopes, both natural and engineered. This paper attempts to provide a review of the state-of-the-art in shale slope stability. The complexities of shale terminology and classification are first reviewed followed by a brief discussion of the important physical and mechanical properties of relevance to shale slope stability. The varied mechanisms of shale slope stability are outlined and their importance highlighted by reference to international shale slope failures. Stability analysis and modelling of anisotropic rock slope masses are briefly discussed and the potential role of brittle rock fracture and damage highlighted. A short review of shale slopes in open pits is presented.

  2. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage of the ankle joint: Results after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC)-aided reconstruction of osteochondral lesions of the talus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess cartilage quality using delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus using autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC). Materials and methods: A three-dimensional (3D) spoiled gradient-echo (SGE) sequence at 3 T was used to obtain quantitative T1 relaxation times before and after Gd-DTPA2 (Magnevist, 0.2 mM/kg bod weight) administration to assess 23 cases of AMIC-aided repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus. Delta relaxation rates (ΔR1) for reference cartilage (RC) and repair tissue (RT), and the relative delta relaxation rate (rΔR1) were calculated. The morphological appearance of the cartilage RT was graded on sagittal dual-echo steady-state (DESS) views according to the “magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue” (MOCART) protocol. The study was approved by the institutional review board and written consent from each patient was obtained. Results: The AMIC cases had a mean T1 relaxation time of 1.194 s (SD 0.207 s) in RC and 1.470 s (SD 0.384 s) in RT before contrast medium administration. The contrast-enhanced T1 relaxation time decreased to 0.480 s (SD 0.114 s) in RC and 0.411 s (SD 0.096 s) in RT. There was a significant difference (p > 0.05) between the ΔR1 in RC (1.372 × 10−3/s, range 0.526–3.201 × 10−3/s, SD 0.666 × 10−3/s) and RT (1.856 × 10−3/s, range 0.93–3.336 × 10−3/s, SD 0.609 × 10−3/s). The mean rΔR1 was 1.49, SD 0.45). The mean MOCART score at follow-up was 62.6 points (range 30–95, SD 15.3). Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that repair cartilage resulting from AMIC-aided repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus has a significantly lower glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content than normal hyaline cartilage, but can be regarded as having hyaline-like properties

  3. Enucleación medial de astrágalo abierta: Evolución a medio plazo Medial dislocation of the talus: Medium term evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. García Mata

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de 57 años con enucleación abierta medial del astrágalo izquierdo, con fractura suprasindesmal de peroné, por traumatismo indirecto. Se realizó lavado, limpieza del astrágalo y partes blandas, Friedrich, reducción, fijación con agujas de kirschner, sutura del ligamento deltoideo y osteosíntesis del peroné. No hubo infección superficial ni profunda postoperatoria. Permaneció seis semanas de inmovilización y tres meses en descarga. Dos años después no había signos radiológicos de necrosis avascular. En gammagrafía ósea realizada a los 18 meses de la lesión se observaba necrosis avascular parcial astragalina. Tres años después de la lesión realizaba vida normal, sin dolor en reposo pero sí a la marcha y movilidad con limitación de la dorsiflexión (-20º. Cinco años y medio después de la lesión presentaba hundimiento de cúpula astragalina por la necrosis avascular con sintomatología dolorosa a la marcha y diástasis tibio-peronea distal, que requirió realizar artrodesis tibio-astragalina.Fifty-seven year old patient with open medial dislocation of the left talus, with suprasyndesmotic fracture of the fibula, due to indirect traumatism. The following were carried out: washing, cleaning the talus and the soft parts, Friedrich, reduction, fixing with Kirschner needles, suture of the deltoid ligament, and osteosynthesis of the fibula. There were neither surface nor deep post-operational infections. The patient underwent six weeks of immobilisation and spent three months on discharge. Two years later there were no radiological signs of avascular necrosis. In the osseous gammagraphy carried out 18 months after the lesion, partial avascular necrosis of the talus was observed. Three years after the lesion, the patient was able to carry out a normal life, without pain in repose but with pain whilst moving, and mobility with limitation of dorsoinflection (-20º. Five and a half years after the lesion, the patient presented sinking of the talar dome due to avascular necrosis, with painful symptomatology whilst moving, and tibiofibular distal diastasis, which required ankle arthrodesis.

  4. Precision of SPECT/CT allows the diagnosis of a hidden Brodie's abscess of the talus in a patient with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie's abscess is a rare subacute osteomyelitis that can be found in sickle cell disease along with other bone complications. A 21-year-old female with sickle cell disease was presenting frequently to the medical casualty department for painful vasoocclusive crises and for persistent ankle pain and swelling. Hybrid imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) incidentally revealed Brodie's abscess in the talus bone of the ankle, causing persisting long-standing pain. SPECT-CT is a modern technology used to scan bone to detect both anatomical and functional abnormalities with high specificity. Brodie's abscess is a rare bone inflammation that could be a hidden cause of pain and infection in sickle cell disease. Although rare, this lesion requires more attention in patients with sickle cell disease because their immunocompromised status renders them prone to this infection

  5. Precision of SPECT/CT allows the diagnosis of a hidden Brodie's abscess of the talus in a patient with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al jafar, Hassan [Dept. of Hematology, Amiri Hospital, Kuwait (Kuwait); Al Shemmeri, Eman [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Farwaniya Hospital, Al-Farwania (Kuwait); Al Shemmeri, Jehan; Al Enizi, Saud [Faculty of Medicine, Nuclear Medicine Dept, Kuwait University, Kuwait (Kuwait); Aytglu, Leena [Molecular Imaging Center, Jaber Al-Ahmad Center, Kuwait (Kuwait); Afzai, Uzma [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Farwaniya Hospital, Al-Farwania (Kuwait)

    2015-06-15

    Brodie's abscess is a rare subacute osteomyelitis that can be found in sickle cell disease along with other bone complications. A 21-year-old female with sickle cell disease was presenting frequently to the medical casualty department for painful vasoocclusive crises and for persistent ankle pain and swelling. Hybrid imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) incidentally revealed Brodie's abscess in the talus bone of the ankle, causing persisting long-standing pain. SPECT-CT is a modern technology used to scan bone to detect both anatomical and functional abnormalities with high specificity. Brodie's abscess is a rare bone inflammation that could be a hidden cause of pain and infection in sickle cell disease. Although rare, this lesion requires more attention in patients with sickle cell disease because their immunocompromised status renders them prone to this infection.

  6. Tibiocalcaneal Arthrodesis With a Porous Tantalum Spacer and LockedIntramedullary Nail for Post-Traumatic Global Avascular Necrosis of the Talus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael M; Kazak, Marat

    2015-01-01

    Global avascular necrosis of the talus is a devastating complication that usually occurs as a result of a post-traumatic or metabolic etiology. When conservative options fail, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is generally indicated in conjunction with massive bone grafting to maintain the functional length of the extremity. Several bone grafting options are available, including the use of a freeze-dried or fresh-frozen femoral head allograft or autograft obtained from the iliac crest or fibula, all of which pose their own inherent risks. The noted complications with massive bone grafting techniques have included graft collapse, infection, immune response, donor site morbidity, and nonunion. In an effort to avoid many of these complications, we present a case report involving post-traumatic talar avascular necrosis in a 59-year-old male who was successfully treated with the use of a porous tantalum spacer, an autogenic morselized fibular bone graft, and 30 mL of bone marrow aspirate in conjunction with a retrograde tibiocalcaneal nail. Porous tantalum is an attractive substitute for bone grafting because of its structural integrity, biocompatibility, avoidance of donor site complications, and lack of an immune response. The successful use of porous tantalum has been well-documented in hip and knee surgery. We present a practical surgical approach to tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with a large segmental deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first published report describing an alternative surgical technique to address global avascular necrosis of the talus that could have additional applications in salvaging the ankle with a large bone deficiency. PMID:26002681

  7. Air pocket removal from downward sloping pipes:

    OpenAIRE

    I. W. M. Pothof; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water flow is an undesired condition in water pipelines and hydropower tunnels. Water pipelines and wastewater pressure mains in particular are subject to air pocket accumulation in downward sloping reaches, such as inverted siphons or terrain slopes. Air pockets cause energy losses and an associated capacity reduction. Despite its practical relevance, many phenomena associated with airwater flow in downward sloping pipe reaches are still poorly understood. Deltares and Delft University o...

  8. Slope Estimation from ICESat/GLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Mahoney

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel technique to infer ground slope angle from waveform LiDAR, known as the independent slope method (ISM. The technique is applied to large footprint waveforms (\\(\\sim\\ mean diameter from the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS to produce a slope dataset of near-global coverage at \\(0.5^{\\circ} \\times 0.5^{\\circ}\\ resolution. ISM slope estimates are compared against high resolution airborne LiDAR slope measurements for nine sites across three continents. ISM slope estimates compare better with the aircraft data (R\\(^{2}=0.87\\ and RMSE\\(=5.16^{\\circ}\\ than the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model (SRTM DEM inferred slopes (R\\(^{2}=0.71\\ and RMSE\\(=8.69^{\\circ}\\ ISM slope estimates are concurrent with GLAS waveforms and can be used to correct biophysical parameters, such as tree height and biomass. They can also be fused with other DEMs, such as SRTM, to improve slope estimates.

  9. Slope factor and shallow landslide occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chyi-Tyi

    2014-05-01

    Elevations in a mature mountain are generally normally distributed and slope gradients do. Shallow landslides occur on hill slopes and involve only regolith on the slopes. The slope gradient distribution of shallow landslides (including rock falls) is also a normal distribution; similar to that of natural slopes in shape, but shifting to a higher gradient. A probability of failure curve, which is defined as the ratio of landslide cells and total cells at each interval of a factor, then shows a shape close to a cumulative normal distribution and may be fitted with a Weibull curve. The probability of failure curve commonly shows an increase of failure from gradient about 0.5 to about 1.5, and then become saturated. There are few landslides located at slope less than about 26 degrees and lost its correlation with slope when slope greater than about 56 degrees, indicating landslide type change (rock falls). This is true for the storm-induced landslides. As to the earthquake-induced landslides, there are differences to the storm-induced landslides both in distribution curve and probability of failure curve. Earthquake-induced landslides most occurred at slope gradient from 20 degrees to 54 degrees and shows a mode about 42 degrees, whereas storm-induced landslides most occurred at slope gradient from 20 degrees to 44 degrees and shows a mode about 33 degrees. There are fewer occurrences of rock falls in a storm event than that in an earthquake event. Also, earthquake-induced landslides do not show saturation at higher slope gradients in the probability of failure curve. Normally distributed topographic pattern may skew in young mountains, like those in southern Taiwan or hilly terrain in western Taiwan, and the characteristic Weibull-shaped probability of failure curve may change also. It even becomes not applicable when a very extreme storm event is involved, like typhoon Morakot event in 2009 in southern Taiwan.

  10. Slope of the Slope Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope of slope was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell by applying the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst 'Slope' Tool to a previously created slope...

  11. Internal waves and temperature fronts on slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Thorpe

    Full Text Available Time series measurements from an array of temperature miniloggers in a line at constant depth along the sloping boundary of a lake are used to describe the `internal surf zone' where internal waves interact with the sloping boundary. More small positive temperature time derivatives are recorded than negative, but there are more large negative values than positive, giving the overall distribution of temperature time derivatives a small negative skewness. This is consistent with the internal wave dynamics; fronts form during the up-slope phase of the motion, bringing cold water up the slope, and the return flow may become unstable, leading to small advecting billows and weak warm fronts. The data are analysed to detect `events', periods in which the temperature derivatives exceed a set threshold. The speed and distance travelled by `events' are described. The motion along the slope may be a consequence of (a instabilities advected by the flow (b internal waves propagating along-slope or (c internal waves approaching the slope from oblique directions. The propagation of several of the observed 'events' can only be explained by (c, evidence that the internal surf zone has some, but possibly not all, the characteristics of the conventional 'surface wave' surf zone, with waves steepening as they approach the slope at oblique angles.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (benthic boundary layers; limnology, Oceanography: physical (internal and inertial waves

  12. Rock slopes and reservoirs - lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned about slope stability in the course of four decades of monitoring, and in some cases stabilizing, slopes along British Columbia's hydroelectric reservoirs are discussed. The lessons are illustrated by short case histories of some of the more important slopes such as Little Chief Slide, Dutchman's Ridge, Downie Slide, Checkerboard Creek and Wahleach. Information derived from the monitoring and other investigations are compared with early interpretations of geology and slope performance. The comparison serves as an indicator of progress in slope stability determination and as a measure of the value of accumulated experience in terms of the potential consequences to safety and cost savings over the long life-span of hydroelectric projects.14 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs

  13. Automated sliding susceptibility mapping of rock slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gnther

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a suite of extensions for ARCVIEW GIS (ESRI that allows to map the spatial distribution of first-order mechanical slope-properties in hard rock terrain, e.g. for large slope areas like water reservoir slopes. Besides digital elevation data, this expert-system includes regional continuous grid-based data on geological structures that might act as potential sliding or cutoff planes for rockslides. The system allows rapid automated mapping of geometrical and kinematical slope properties in hard rock, providing the basis for spatially distributed deterministic sliding-susceptibility evaluations on a pixel base. Changing hydrostatic slope conditions and rock mechanical parameters can be implemented and used for simple predictive static stability calculations. Application is demonstrated for a study area in the Harz Mts., Germany.

  14. Slope-scale dynamic states of rockfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliardi, F.; Crosta, G. B.

    2009-04-01

    Rockfalls are common earth surface phenomena characterised by complex dynamics at the slope scale, depending on local block kinematics and slope geometry. We investigated the nature of this slope-scale dynamics by parametric 3D numerical modelling of rockfalls over synthetic slopes with different inclination, roughness and spatial resolution. Simulations were performed through an original code specifically designed for rockfall modeling, incorporating kinematic and hybrid algorithms with different damping functions available to model local energy loss by impact and pure rolling. Modelling results in terms of average velocity profiles suggest that three dynamic regimes (i.e. decelerating, steady-state and accelerating), previously recognized in the literature through laboratory experiments on granular flows, can set up at the slope scale depending on slope average inclination and roughness. Sharp changes in rock fall kinematics, including motion type and lateral dispersion of trajectories, are associated to the transition among different regimes. Associated threshold conditions, portrayed in "phase diagrams" as slope-roughness critical lines, were analysed depending on block size, impact/rebound angles, velocity and energy, and model spatial resolution. Motion in regime B (i.e. steady state) is governed by a slope-scale "viscous friction" with average velocity linearly related to the sine of slope inclination. This suggest an analogy between rockfall motion in regime B and newtonian flow, whereas in regime C (i.e. accelerating) an analogy with a dilatant flow was observed. Thus, although local behavior of single falling blocks is well described by rigid body dynamics, the slope scale dynamics of rockfalls seem to statistically approach that of granular media. Possible outcomes of these findings include a discussion of the transition from rockfall to granular flow, the evaluation of the reliability of predictive models, and the implementation of criteria for a preliminary evaluation of hazard assessment and countermeasure planning.

  15. Factors affecting seismic response of submarine slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biscontin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of submerged slopes on the continental shelf to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and 'local' tsunami hazards worldwide. The geological profile of these slopes typically includes normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated soft cohesive soils with layer thickness ranging from a few meters to hundreds of meters. The factor of safety obtained from pseudo-static analyses is not always a useful measure for evaluating the slope response, since values less than one do not necessarily imply slope failure with large movements of the soil mass. This paper addresses the relative importance of different factors affecting the response of submerged slopes during seismic loading. The analyses use a dynamic finite element code which includes a constitutive law describing the anisotropic stress-strain-strength behavior of normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated clays. The model also incorporates anisotropic hardening to describe the effect of different shear strain and stress histories as well as bounding surface principles to provide realistic descriptions of the accumulation of the plastic strains and excess pore pressure during successive loading cycles. The paper presents results from parametric site response analyses on slope geometry and layering, soil material parameters, and input ground motion characteristics. The predicted maximum shear strains, permanent deformations, displacement time histories and maximum excess pore pressure development provide insight of slope performance during a seismic event.

  16. On the Slope of Fibred Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Barja, M A; Barja, Miguel A.; Zucconi, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Given a relatively minimal non locally trivial fibred surface f: S->B, the slope of the fibration is a numerical invariant associated to the fibration. In this paper we explore how properties of the general fibre of $f$ and global properties of S influence on the lower bound of the slope. First of all we obtain lower bounds of the slope when the general fibre is a double cover. We also obtain a lower bound depending as an increasing function on the relative irregularity of the fibration, extending previous results of Xiao. We construct several families of examples to check the assimptotical sharpness of our bounds.

  17. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector...

  18. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  19. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type....

  20. North Slope, Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for diving birds, gulls and terns, seabirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl for the North Slope of Alaska....

  1. Slope activity in Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution repeat imaging of Aeolis Mons, the central mound in Gale crater, reveals active slope processes within tens of kilometers of the Curiosity rover. At one location near the base of northeastern Aeolis Mons, dozens of transient narrow lineae were observed, resembling features (Recurring Slope Lineae) that are potentially due to liquid water. However, the lineae faded and have not recurred in subsequent Mars years. Other small-scale slope activity is common, but has different spatial and temporal characteristics. We have not identified confirmed RSL, which Rummel et al. (Rummel, J.D. et al. [2014]. Astrobiology 14, 887–968) recommended be treated as potential special regions for planetary protection. Repeat images acquired as Curiosity approaches the base of Aeolis Mons could detect changes due to active slope processes, which could enable the rover to examine recently exposed material.

  2. ElevationOther_SLOPE10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information Used ElevationDEM_DEM10M and the Arc/Info SLOPE command with the "PERCENT_RISE" and ".3048" Z_unit options to create this data layer. Input source dataset is...

  3. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous and freshwater fish species for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector lines in this data set...

  4. 3D geodetic monitoring slope deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Gabriel

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available For plenty of slope failures that can be found in Slovakia is necessary and very important their geodetic monitoring (because of their activity, reactivisations, checks. The paper gives new methodologies for these works, using 3D terrestrial survey technologies for measurements in convenient deformation networks. The design of an optimal type of deformation model for various kinds of landslides and their exact processing with an efficient testing procedure to determine the kinematics of the slope deformations are presented too.

  5. "Overburden stability of rock slopes in quarries"

    OpenAIRE

    Oggeri, Claudio; Del Greco, Otello; Fornaro, Mauro

    2000-01-01

    Many ornamental and industrila stone quarries are located along steep slopes or within particular geostructural domains in the Italian Alpine range. The stability of the overburden formations, such as detritic or cohesionless materials, blocky and altered elements or morainic formations, can be compromised by exploitation activities. In other cases there is a natural evolution of the slope, due to singular but diffused phenomena such as block falls, or due to global movements caused by gravit...

  6. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    Einstein, H.H.; de Sousa, R. L.; Karam, K.; Manzella, Irne; Kveldsvik, V.

    2010-01-01

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical and mechanical models for which recent developments are presented. This leads with appropriate consideration of uncertainties to risk determination and to the description of tools for risk management through active and passive countermeasures, including warning systems. ...

  7. Electrokinetic Geotextile Stabilization Of Embankment Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The choice of repair of slope depends on site conditions and cost. This includes reducing the slope, installing horizontal drains, soil nailing and providing stability by structural methods. All these methods have their limitations and some are very costly. Another alternative is the electrokinetic stabilization of slopes. EKG reinforcement or soil nails not only provide reinforcement, but also increase the shear strength of the soil in which they are placed as well as improving soil-reinforcement bond. The development of EKG materials offers slope stabilisation of embankments and cuttings in fine grained soils, which will significantly increase the factor of safety , address pore pressure changes and also avoids importing earthwork materials or aggregates. By inserting a grid of anodes and a cathode into the ground and applying an electrical potential difference across the slope drives water away, via the cathodes and creates physical changes in the embankment, promoting consolidation of the slope materials. Anodes and cathodes were connected to a DC power circuit and electrified for a calculated period based on water content, strength and electrode spacing. The conductive geotextile used was coir geotextile and it was woven with steel filament in weft direction only. The steel filament made the geotextile conductive. The geotextile used was natural geotextile and it is required after the end of construction of embankment only, till the completion of dissipation of pore pressure.

  8. Seasonal slope surface deformation measured with TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L.; Smethurst, J.; Powrie, W.; Sellaiya, A.

    2014-03-01

    In temperate European climates, soil water removal due to vegetation transpiration peaks in summer and soil rewetting from higher levels of precipitation occurs in winter. In clays of high plasticity, the seasonal cycles of drying and wetting cause the soil to experience a volumetric change, resulting in seasonal shrinking and swelling. For a clay slope exhibiting volume change, such behaviour can lead to excessive deformation and could contribute to strain-softening and progressive slope failure. This can in turn cause traffic disruption and loss of life if roads and railways are founded on or surrounded by such slopes. This paper discusses the driving forces of seasonal surface movement, in particular the role of vegetation, and presents the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to measure the surface movement of a lightly vegetated London Clay slope near Newbury, UK. Two TLS scans were carried out in early and late summer respectively, representing relative wet and dry conditions of the slope. Continuous field measurements of soil water content in upper layers of the slope were obtained from TDR ThetaProbes already installed at the site. The water content data are used to support the results obtained from TLS by indicating the likely volumetric change in the soil due to loss of water.

  9. Contribution of terrestrial and helicopter based laser scanning for studying the Sechilienne rock slope instability (Isre, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulliez, Cindy; Abellan Fernandez, Antonio; Guerin, Antoine; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri; Chanut, Marie-Aurlie; Dubois, Laurent; Duranthon, Jean-Paul

    2015-04-01

    The Sechilienne landslide, which is located in the Romanche valley (France) is a well instrumented mass movements of about 650 m high and 250 m wide, with a potential volume of 3 million cubic meters of material in the active part (Duranthon, 2004; Kasperski, 2010). The slope, which is mainly composed of micaschist, is characterized by the presence of a NE-SW sub-vertical fracturing system involved in the destabilization of the area. Several investigations are being performed by different research groups on this landslide, including fieldwork investigations, remote sensing, seismic acquisitions, geochemistry, deformation analysis by extensometers, etc. There exists a current concern related with the development of a failure that could dam the Romanche River, which could cause flooding with significant consequences for the valley downstream. The rock slope has continuously moving since the eighties decade, with a progressive acceleration during the last years. Furthermore, a higher rockfall activity has been observed in 2013, with two main events within the upper most active part of the landslide, with volumes of 1500 and 2500 m3. In this work, we used Terrestrial Laser Scanning to obtain high resolution point clouds of the rock slope geometry in order to monitor the rock slide displacements in three dimensions. Eight different fieldwork campaigns were performed during the last five years, as follows: Aug. 2009, Jul. 2010, Nov. 2011, Nov. 2012, Jun. and Nov. 2013, Jul. and Oct. 2014, which provides a set of 3D representations of the rock slope topography over time. Furthermore, three helicopter-based laser scanning campaigns were performed in Jan. 2011, Feb. 2012 and Feb. 2014 (Chanut, 2014). Both the type of data are complementary for the study of the movement and allow to have a good spatial vision of the evolution of the most active part. Data processing was carried out through several steps using Polyworks software, as follows: (a) cleaning of scans, (b) alignment of the scans using only the stable areas of the slope, (c) georeferencing, and (d) comparisons among all the scans. As for the results, we obtained positive and negative values of surface changes between the period of study, which enabled us to characterize rockfalls and displacements on the rock slope. In the upper part, we observed that several areas (from 1 to 1000 m3) suffered higher values of displacements (from several decimeters to a maximum value of 4 meters), indicating the presence of a progressive failure in these parts of the slope. The failure mechanism observed on this areas correspond to a toppling. On the lower part of the rock slope we observed the accumulation of the fallen material and a series of surface processes on the talus. Furthermore, we carried out the tracking of hundred blocks in the upper part of the slope in order to identify potential events. Once the individual blocks fell, we used 3DReshaper for calculating their volumes and for determining a power law distribution of rock falls in the slope. The acquisition of dense and accurate terrain information using LiDAR for study the Sechilienne landslide has been useful for investigating the unstable area as regards the failure mechanism, the magnitude of displacements, the rockfall frequency of the most unstable areas, etc.

  10. Slope Failures Triggered by the 1923 Kanto Earthquake and Comparison With Rainfall- induced Slope Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, M.; Hayashi, S.; Komito, Y.; Honda, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Slope failures are major natural hazards in the Tanzawa Mountain adjacent to Tokyo-Yokohama metropolitan region, and rainfall is a main mechanism that triggers slope failures. However, the mountainous area is located on the plate boundary of arc-arc collision type, and the active mountain-building region has experienced the Kanto earthquake (M7.9) in 1923. In a previous paper, Ishikawa et al (2005) pointed out that the Kanto earthquake triggered serious slope failures (about 20,000 places and 58.5 km2 area) in the Tanzawa Mountain and the neighboring mountainous area. Therefore, to assess hazard and risk of slope failures in the mountainous region that will suffer the next catastrophic earthquake it is necessary to understand characteristics of rainfall-induced and earthquake-induced slope failures. In order to compare the impact of the Kanto earthquake on slope failures with that of rainfall, the 182 km2 area in the Tanzawa Mountain was selected as the study area, and a GIS was used to conduct a spatial characterization of the slope failures. Slope failures induced by the Kanto Earthquake were digitized from maps, and rainfall-induced slope failures were identified from 210 aerial photographs taken in 1985 and 1996. Compared with these data, we find that only 0.50 km2 slope failures were induced by rainfalls during 1985-1996, while 20.2 km2 slope failures almost forty times larger than those caused by the rainfalls during 1985-1996 were triggered by the Kanto Earthquake. Assuming that occurrence rate of rainfall-induced slope failures is constant over a long period of time, the total area of the earthquake-induced slope failures is equivalent to that of the rainfall-induced slope failures for 220 years. The major difference in distribution of slope failures between the Kanto earthquake and rainfall was the distribution of elevation. Overall, concentration values of slope failures increase with higher elevation reaching a maximum at highest elevation (1500 m - 1600 m), while those of slope failures caused by the Kanto earthquake show no significant change with elevation from 300 m to 1400 m and diminish beyond elevation of 1400 m where Beech forest occupies. We note that the impact of the Kanto Earthquake on the surface environment of the Tanzawa Mountain is devastating compared to that of rainfall. The seismic hazard and subsequent risk e.g. fresh water depletion and drinking water crisis should be assessed by considering the fact that the Tanzawa Mountain is an important water source for mega-city Yokohama.

  11. Value of magnetic resonance imaging in the mid-term follow-up of osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle and talus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Definition of the prognostic value of clinical and morphological findings in the mid-term follow-up of OCD of the femoral condyle and talus. Demonstration of the consolidation of OCD on MRI depending on different therapies. Materials and Methods: 76 patients were examined before and at an average of 30 months after conservative or surgical therapy using T1 and T2 weighted SE and 3D-FISP sequences and contrast enhanced studies. Six clinical (age, gender, site, duration and severity of symptoms, therapy) and six morphological (size, signal intensity, fragmentation, contrast enhancement, condition of cartilage, staging) data were registered on first MRI and correlated with the degree of consolidation of OCD (partial and complete remission, no change and progression) on control MRI. Results: Patients under 17 years showed partial or complete remissions in 73%, those of 17 years or older in 33%. Conservatively treated patients had a higher remission rate (54%) than those treated with different surgical techniques (drilling 50%, refixation 43%, abrasio 38%). Small OCDs had a higher remission rate than large lesions (63% vs. 33%). OCDs covered with intact cartilage healed better than lesions with chondral defects (61% vs. 26%). Contrast enhancing fragments had a better prognosis than non-enhancing lesions (100% vs. 40%). Conclusions: Prognosis of OCD can be better estimated when size of OCD, condition of cartilage and enhancement of contrast agent is graduated with MRI and patient age is registered. The consequences for therapy planning are great. (orig.)

  12. Decision Guide for Roof Slope Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings.

  13. Valley Evolution and Controls on Present-Day Rock Slope Processes in the Matter and Saas Valleys, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, K.; Kos, A.; Löw, S.; Moore, J.

    2009-04-01

    Landforms in the Matter and Saas Valleys (Kanton Valais, Switzerland) indicate a progressive upstream transition from fluvially dominated to glacially dominated terrains. Large glaciers currently reside in the headwaters of both valleys, and the region was a major ice contributor to the Rhone Valley during the LGM. Characteristic geomorphic indicators linked to morphology, extent of glacial sediments and ice-rock contact surfaces, as well as river and terrace profiles within the two valleys suggest a parallel temporal evolution, despite variations in catchment size, lithology, and glacial input. Slope morphology and fan deposits indicate a concentration of high-energy rock slope activity (such as rock falls, topples, and slides) within a transitional geomorphic domain in the lower 1/3 of both valleys. This transitional domain is defined by a characteristic moderate gradient, linear, river profile. It separates a downstream detachment-limited fluvial domain from a transport-limited domain upstream, where a broad alluvial plain forms a thick infill in the relict glacial valley. Hillslope erosional processes appear considerably less developed and active in these neighboring domains. While the rock slope activity in the transitional domain initially seems to be a clear process response to renewed Holocene fluvial incision in the lower section of the valleys, mapping of glacial landforms indicates only limited incision may have taken place. Activity is concentrated on steep valley walls which extend up to 700m above the current valley floor. These are buttressed by significant talus deposits, which combined with the topography, mean there is likely to be little direct connection from the post-glacial fluvial activity to the erosional hillslope processes. Initial investigations suggest that a combination of repeated glacial erosion and debuttressing, as well as fluvial processes during interglacials may have lead to a significant, consistent differences in post-glacial stress redistribution in each domain. Large deviatoric stresses associated with high relief, and the removal of sedimentary buttresses in the transitional domain, may have induced fracturing of the rock mass through exfoliation and static fatigue, and conditioned rock slopes for ongoing failure.

  14. Centrifuge model test of rock slope failure caused by seismic excitation. Plane failure of dip slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it is necessary to assess quantitatively seismic safety of critical facilities against the earthquake induced rock slope failure from the viewpoint of seismic PSA. Under these circumstances, it is essential to evaluate more accurately the possibilities of rock slope failure and the potential failure boundary, which are triggered by earthquake ground motions. The purpose of this study is to analyze dynamic failure characteristics of rock slopes by centrifuge model tests for verification and improvement of the analytical methods. We conducted a centrifuge model test using a dip slope model with discontinuities limitated by Teflon sheets. The centrifugal acceleration was 50G, and the acceleration amplitude of input sin waves increased gradually at every step. The test results were compared with safety factors of the stability analysis based on the limit equilibrium concept. Resultant conclusions are mainly as follows: (1) The slope model collapsed when it was excited by the sine wave of 400gal, which was converted to real field scale, (2) Artificial discontinuities were considerably concerned in the collapse, and the type of collapse was plane failure, (3) From response acceleration records observed at the slope model, we can say that tension cracks were generated near the top of the slope model during excitation, and that might be cause of the collapse, (4) By considering generation of the tension cracks in the stability analysis, correspondence of the analytical results and the experimental results improved. From the obtained results, we need to consider progressive failure in evaluating earthquake induced rock slope failure. (author)

  15. The Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen

    By overcoming the barriers that limit access to financial liquidity and human resource, the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) can promote rural livelihood diversification. This paper examines this effect using a household survey data set spanning the 1999 implementation of the Sloping land...... conversion program. Our results show that SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention on rural livelihood diversification. In addition, the findings demonstrate that there exist heterogeneous effects of SLCP implementation on livelihood diversification across different rural income groups. The lower...... income group was more affected by the program in terms of income diversification....

  16. Radial slope measurement of dynamic transparent samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An interferometric method to measure the radial slope of dynamic transparent samples is presented. We have implemented a simultaneous phase shifting MachZehnder radial-shear interferometer (SPS-MZRI) using a phase grating to replicate the interference patterns and phase shifts modulated by polarization; the interferometer is capable of processing the optical phase data through the acquisition of n-interferograms captured simultaneously. The SPS-MZRI is capable of obtaining the radial phase derivative and associating it with its corresponding radial slope. The experimental results for static and dynamic samples are presented in this work, as well as the experimental evidence for the generation of spiral patterns. (paper)

  17. The Salpeter Slope of the IMF Explained

    OpenAIRE

    Oey, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    If we accept a paradigm that star formation is a self-similar, hierarchical process, then the Salpeter slope of the IMF for high-mass stars can be simply and elegantly explained as follows. If the instrinsic IMF at the smallest scales follows a simple -2 power-law slope, then the steepening to the -2.35 Salpeter value results when the most massive stars cannot form in the lowest-mass clumps of a cluster. It is stressed that this steepening MUST occur if clusters form hierarchically from clump...

  18. Evaluation of Slope Stability Performance in Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoullah Namdar,

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of liquefaction is changing respect to level of underground water, soil mechanical properties, time, direction and magnitude of forces. In this research work to understanding slope failure mechanism the limit equilibrium code employed to evaluating slope stability and assessing failure. The result revealed that thefailure of slope could be predicted if accurate slope behavior investigated. For increasing soil structure stability and loads mitigation this is essential of appropriate selection of slope geometry based on evaluating of slope at different slope geometry.

  19. Automatic delineation of geomorphological slope units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Marchesini, Ivan; Fiorucci, Federica; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Reichenbach, Paola; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Slope units are portions of land surface, defined by the general requirement of maximizing homogeneity within a single unit and heterogeneity between different units, but whose formal characterization and practical delineation has been done in different ways. This is often justified by the statement that the slope unit partitioning of a territory can be used to describe a variety of landforms and processes, and for the assessment of natural hazards. As a result, they need to be tailored according to the specific model in use. This may result in an ambiguous definition of such objects, while an objective definition is highly desirable, which would also allow their reproducibility. We have developed a publicly accessible Web Processing Service (WPS) with the aim of incrementally achieve a satisfactory definition of slope unit. The service allows any user to connect to a CNR-IRPI (Perugia) server, upload his own Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and optional additional data, specify parameters constraining the size and aspect of slope units, and quickly obtain the result in a layer in vector format. The calculation is performed using a parallel algorithm, resulting in a processing time short enough to allow the user to tune the input parameters, repeating the process for a sufficient number of times in order to obtain a satisfactory result. We use quantitative criteria to define and draw the slope units, depending on the input parameters. The algorithm starts from a hydrologically consistent partition of the study area into half-basins with a large number of contributing DEM cells. Each of the half-basins is then checked against a few requirements: maximum area required by the user and maximum standard deviation of the aspect on two orthogonal directions. Those specific half-basin that do not meet the requirements are partitioned further, requiring a lower number of contributing cells. The process is iterated until no half-basin exceeds the user-specified thresholds. Our aim is to encourage users to test the algorithm on a large number of areas with different topographies so that new, meaningful requirements on the individual half-basins can be defined and included in our process, in order to achieve a robust and reproducible algorithm embodying a vast class of desiderata in the slope unit definition. This will eventually constitute a performing and customizable tool for the investigation of a variety of geomorphological phenomena.

  20. Slope reinforcement design using geotextiles and geogrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setser, Darrell M.

    1990-08-01

    A geotextile is defined by ASTM as: any permeable textile material used with foundation, soil, rock, earth, or any other geotechnical engineering related material, as a integral part of a man-made project, structure, or system. A geogrid is defined as: any geotextile-related material used in a similar manner to geotextiles. They are usually made of plastic, but can be metal or wood. Geotextiles and geogrids are collectively referred to as geosynthetics in this paper. Geosynthetic reinforcement of slopes is a relatively new option available to the civil engineer. Slope angles can be increased and 'poor' soil can be used to construct economical soil-geosynthetic facilities. Uncertainties exist in the complex interaction between the soil and the geosynthetic but there are numerous procedures which ignore this in the design. The design procedures available may be conservative yet still may be an economical alternative when compared to more conventional options.

  1. The Alaska North Slope spill analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports Alaska North Slope crude oil spills, provides information to help operators identify risks and presents recommendations for future risk reduction and mitigation measures that may reduce the frequency and severity of future spills from piping infrastructure integrity loss. The North Slope spills analysis project was conducted during 2010 by compiling available spill data, and analyzing the cause of past spills in wells and associated piping, flowlines, process centers with their associated piping and above ground storage tanks, and crude oil transmission pipelines. An expert panel, established to provide independent review of this analysis and the presented data, identified seven recommendations on measures, programs, and practices to monitor and address common causes of failures while considering information provided from regulators and operators. These recommendations must be evaluated by the State of Alaska which will consider implementation options to move forward. Based on the study observations, future analyses may show changes to some of the observed trends.

  2. Clustering Moving Objects Using Segments Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. El-Sharkawi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Given a set of moving object trajectories, we show how to cluster them using k-meansclustering approach. Our proposed clustering algorithm is competitive with the k-means clusteringbecause it specifies the value of “k” based on the segment’s slope of the moving object trajectories. Theadvantage of this approach is that it overcomes the known drawbacks of the k-means algorithm, namely,the dependence on the number of clusters (k, and the dependence on the initial choice of the clusters’centroids, and it uses segment’s slope as a heuristic to determine the different number of clusters for thek-means algorithm. In addition, we use the standard quality measure (silhouette coefficient in order tomeasure the efficiency of our proposed approach. Finally, we present experimental results on both realand synthetic data that show the performance and accuracy of our proposed technique.

  3. Pipeline modeling and assessment in unstable slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, Carlos Nieves [Oleoducto Central S.A., Bogota, Cundinamarca (Colombia); Ordonez, Mauricio Pereira [SOLSIN S.A.S, Bogota, Cundinamarca (Colombia)

    2010-07-01

    The OCENSA pipeline system is vulnerable to geotechnical problems such as faults, landslides or creeping slopes, which are well-known in the Andes Mountains and tropical countries like Colombia. This paper proposes a methodology to evaluate the pipe behaviour during the soil displacements of slow landslides. Three different cases of analysis are examined, according to site characteristics. The process starts with a simplified analytical model and develops into 3D finite element numerical simulations applied to the on-site geometry of soil and pipe. Case 1 should be used when the unstable site is subject to landslides impacting significant lengths of pipeline, pipeline is straight, and landslide is simple from the geotechnical perspective. Case 2 should be used when pipeline is straight and landslide is complex (creeping slopes and non-conventional stabilization solutions). Case 3 should be used if the pipeline presents vertical or horizontal bends.

  4. Wildlife response on the Alaska North Slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognizing the need for a comprehensive plan to deal with potentially oiled wildlife on the Alaskan North Slope, a multifaceted wildlife protection strategy was developed and implemented during 1991. The strategy incorporated all aspects of wildlife response including protection of critical habitat, hazing, capture and stabilization, long term rehabilitation, and release. The primary wildlife response strategy emphasizes controlling of the release and spreading of spilled oil at the source to prevent or reduce contamination of potentially affected species and/or their habitat. A secondary response strategy concentrates on keeping potentially affected wildlife away from an oiled area through the use of deterrent techniques. Tertiary response involves the capture and treatment of oiled wildlife. Implementation of the strategy included the development of specialized training, the procurement of equipment, and the construction of a bird stabilization center. The result of this initiative is a comprehensive wildlife response capability on the Alaskan North Slope. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Back analysis of reinforced soil slopes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, P.; Trčková, Jiřina

    Southampton : WIT Press, 2012 - (Mammoli, A.; Brebbia, C.), s. 423-432 ISBN 978-1-84564-602-8. ISSN 1743-3533. [Computational methods and experiments in material characterisation /3./. Material Characterisation 2007. Bologna (IT), 13.06.2007-15.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2119402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : back analysis * numerical and experimental modelling * slopes Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  6. Viscous liquid flow on Martian dune slopes

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The observed temporary dark streaks on some dune slopes on Mars may be due to thin sheets of water (or some other liquid) trickling downhill. This note corrects conceptual errors in a previous paper (M\\"{o}hlmann and Kereszturi 2010, Icarus 207, 654-658) which affect the velocity profile of such flows, and produce over-estimates of their depths and mass fluxes by factors of almost two.

  7. Assessment of slope stability endangered by groundwater

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, P.; Trčková, Jiřina

    Southampton : WIT Press, 2006 - (Brebbia, C.; Conti, M.; Tiezzi, E.), s. 709-718 ISBN 978-1-84564-048-4. [Ravage of Planet. Baryloche (AR), 12.12.2006-14.12.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2119402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : physical and numerical modelling * slope stability * groundwater Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  8. Overview of gas hydrates in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds consisting of hydrogen-bonded water molecules that form a rigid crystal lattice stabilized by encaged gas molecules. Their stability is confined to low-temperature, high-pressure regimes such as those found in permafrost regions and under the seafloor on continental slopes. In-situ natural gas hydrate deposits are typically located in marine sediments at temperatures of 5 to 10 degrees C. The critical factors influencing hydrate formation and stability are pressure, temperature, gas composition, volume of bulk free water, salinity, gas availability, sediment type, and the presence of catalysts or inhibitors. Circumstantial evidence suggests that large submarine landslides along the continental margins can be triggered by the weakening of hydrate bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation results in loss of solid material, production of free gas, and increased fluid pressures, all which have the effect of reducing sediment strength. These underwater landslides have the potential to destroy offshore equipment, jeopardize safety of personnel, and generate tsunamis. This paper presented recent results and advances on the intersection of gas hydrates and submarine slope stability, with particular reference to the role of gas hydrates in triggering or propagating submarine mass movements. It was concluded that the cause of slope failures is not fully understood because of the complexities of gas hydrates and their interactions with the host sediment, combined with the high cost of laboratory and field investigations. 35 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project

  10. Stability of nuclear crater slopes in rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Army Engineer Nuclear Cratering Group was established in 1962 to participate with the Atomic Energy Commission in a joint research and development program to develop nuclear engineering and construction technology. A major part of this research effort has been devoted to studies of the engineering properties of craters. The program to date has included field investigations of crater properties in various media over a broad range of chemical and nuclear explosive yields, studies of man-made and natural slopes, and studies directed toward the development of analytical and empirical methods of crater stability analysis. From this background, a general understanding has been developed of the effects of a cratering explosion on the surrounding medium and of physical nature of the various crater zones which are produced. The stability of nuclear crater slopes has been a subject of prime interest in the feasibility study being conducted for an Atlantic-Pacific sea-level canal. Based on experimental evidence assembled to date, nuclear crater slopes in dry dock and dry alluvium have an initially stable configuration. There have been five nuclear craters produced to date with yields of 0.4 kt or more on which observations are based and the initial configurations of these craters have remained stable for over seven years. The medium, yield, crater dimensions, and date of event for these craters are summarized. It is interesting to note that the Sedan Crater has been subjected to strong seismic motions from nearby detonations without adverse effects

  11. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Koerner, R.M. [Geosynthetic Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bonaparte, R. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  12. Slope stability monitoring from microseismic field using polarization methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Kolesnikov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of seismoacoustic emission (SAE associated with fracturing in zones of shear stress concentration shows that SAE signals are polarized along the stress direction. The proposed polarization methodology for monitoring of slope stability makes use of three-component recording of the microseismic field on a slope in order to pick the signals of slope processes by filtering and polarization analysis. Slope activity is indicated by rather strong roughly horizontal polarization of the respective portion of the field in the direction of slope dip. The methodology was tested in microseismic observations on a landslide slope in the Northern Tien-Shan (Kyrgyzstan.

  13. High slope waste dumps – a proven possibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Svrkota

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an overview of dumping operations on High Slope Waste Dump at Veliki Krivelj open pit copper mine, RTB Bor, Serbia. The High Slope Waste Dump in Bor is the highest single slope waste dump in the world with the slope height of 405 m. The paper gives the basics and limitations of the designed dumping technology, the redesigned technology, gives an overview of the 13 year long operation and gathered experiences and addresses the main issues of dumping operations in high slope conditions as well as the present condition of the High Slope Waste Dump.

  14. Erosion Protection for Soil Slopes Along Virginia's Highways

    OpenAIRE

    Jessee A. Scarborough; Filz, George M.; James K. Mitchell; Thomas L. Brandon

    2000-01-01

    A survey of the state of practice for designing slope erosion control measures within VDOT's nine districts has been conducted. On the basis of the survey, it is clear that there are no specific design procedures currently in use within VDOT for dealing with slope erosion. VDOT designers generally try to limit erosion by diverting runoff from adjacent areas, controlling concentrated flows on slopes, and establishing vegetation on slopes as quickly as possible. In addition, the Federal Highway...

  15. Outerplanar graph drawings with few slopes

    CERN Document Server

    Knauer, Kolja; Walczak, Bartosz

    2012-01-01

    We consider straight-line outerplanar drawings of outerplanar graphs in which the segments representing edges are parallel to a small number of directions. We prove that Delta-1 directions suffice for every outerplanar graph with maximum degree Delta>=4. This improves the previous bound of O(Delta^5), which was shown for planar partial 3-trees, a superclass of outerplanar graphs. The bound is tight: for every Delta>=4 there is an outerplanar graph of maximum degree Delta which requires at least Delta-1 distinct edge slopes for an outerplanar straight-line drawing.

  16. Western Ross Sea continental slope gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Arnold L.; Orsi, Alejandro H.; Muench, Robin; Huber, Bruce A.; Zambianchi, Enrico; Visbeck, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water of the world ocean is derived from dense Shelf Water that is carried downslope by gravity currents at specific sites along the Antarctic margins. Data gathered by the AnSlope and CLIMA programs reveal the presence of energetic gravity currents that are formed over the western continental slope of the Ross Sea when High Salinity Shelf Water exits the shelf through Drygalski Trough. Joides Trough, immediately to the east, offers an additional escape route for less saline Shelf Water, while the Glomar Challenger Trough still farther east is a major pathway for export of the once supercooled low-salinity Ice Shelf Water that forms under the Ross Ice Shelf. The Drygalski Trough gravity currents increase in thickness from ˜100 to ˜400 m on proceeding downslope from ˜600 m (the shelf break) to 1200 m (upper slope) sea floor depth, while turning sharply to the west in response to the Coriolis force during their descent. The mean current pathway trends ˜35° downslope from isobaths. Benthic-layer current and thickness are correlated with the bottom water salinity, which exerts the primary control over the benthic-layer density. A 1-year time series of bottom-water current and hydrographic properties obtained on the slope near the 1000 m isobath indicates episodic pulses of Shelf Water export through Drygalski Trough. These cold (34.75) pulses correlate with strong downslope bottom flow. Extreme examples occurred during austral summer/fall 2003, comprising concentrated High Salinity Shelf Water (-1.9 °C; 34.79) and approaching 1.5 m s -1 at descent angles as large as ˜60° relative to the isobaths. Such events were most common during November-May, consistent with a northward shift in position of the dense Shelf Water during austral summer. The coldest, saltiest bottom water was measured from mid-April to mid-May 2003. The summer/fall export of High Salinity Shelf Water observed in 2004 was less than that seen in 2003. This difference, if real, may reflect the influence of the large iceberg C-19 over Drygalski Trough until its departure in mid-May 2003, when there was a marked decrease in the coldest, saltiest gravity current adjacent to Drygalski Trough. Northward transport of cold, saline, recently ventilated Antarctic Bottom Water observed in March 2004 off Cape Adare was ˜1.7 Sv, including ˜0.4 Sv of High Salinity Shelf Water.

  17. Transhumanism, medical technology and slippery slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, M J; Edwards, S D

    2006-09-01

    In this article, transhumanism is considered to be a quasi-medical ideology that seeks to promote a variety of therapeutic and human-enhancing aims. Moderate conceptions are distinguished from strong conceptions of transhumanism and the strong conceptions were found to be more problematic than the moderate ones. A particular critique of Bostrm's defence of transhumanism is presented. Various forms of slippery slope arguments that may be used for and against transhumanism are discussed and one particular criticism, moral arbitrariness, that undermines both weak and strong transhumanism is highlighted. PMID:16943331

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Slope for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope of Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Slope for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope of Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  20. Drilling wastes management for Alaskas North Slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on drilling wastes management for Alaska's North Slope. In the early 1980s the State of Alaska's Department of Environmental Conservation determined that drilling waste disposal practices at the oil fields on the North Slope were not adequately protecting the environment. New regulations were promulgated in october, 1987 that required improved containment of wastes and better monitoring of waste disposal sites. Industry and the state have been working together to develop methods that will meet the requirements of the new regulations and a number of these methods have been tried in the field over the past few years. The methods, including waste reduction, injection of drilling wastes, deep hole burial using permafrost for containment, shallow hole burial using permafrost for containment, and treatment of waste for use as construction material, are discussed in context with the status in the development of each technology, concerns for each technology that the state has, and regulatory schemes that have been developed for each technology

  1. High slope waste dumps – a proven possibility

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Svrkota; Radoje Pantović; Miodrag Žikić; Saša Stojadinović; Dejan Petrović

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an overview of dumping operations on High Slope Waste Dump at Veliki Krivelj open pit copper mine, RTB Bor, Serbia. The High Slope Waste Dump in Bor is the highest single slope waste dump in the world with the slope height of 405 m. The paper gives the basics and limitations of the designed dumping technology, the redesigned technology, gives an overview of the 13 year long operation and gathered experiences and addresses the main issues of dumping operations in high slope condi...

  2. Multi Rotor Uav at Different Altitudes for Slope Mapping Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahar, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Most of consultation work only involves a small area, especially for slope mapping studies. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of slope mapping results from different altitudes at semi-undulated area and undulated area. Multi-rotor UAV is used as an instrument for data acquisition for this study. The images of slope were captured from five different altitudes in the same study area. All images were processed using photogrammetric software to produce digital elevation models and digital orthophoto. In this study, slope map from all different altitudes were identified and recorded for analysis purposes. It was found that the accuracy of slope is increase when altitude is increase. In conclusion, the condition of slope such as semi-undulated and undulated area did have an influence on the slope accuracy.

  3. Methodologies for risk analysis in slope instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an approach to the different methodologies used in conducting landslide risk maps so that the reader can get a basic knowledge about how to proceed in its development. The landslide hazard maps are increasingly demanded by governments. This is because due to climate change, deforestation and the pressure exerted by the growth of urban centers, damage caused by natural phenomena is increasing each year, making this area of work a field of study with increasing importance. To explain the process of mapping a journey through each of the phases of which it is composed is made: from the study of the types of slope movements and the necessary management of geographic information systems (GIS) inventories and landslide susceptibility analysis, threat, vulnerability and risk. (Author)

  4. Seismic Stability of Reinforced Soil Slopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzavara, I.; Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Y.; Psarropoulos, P.N.

    Over recent decades increased research interest has been observed on the dynamic response and stability issues of earth walls and reinforced soil structures. The current study aims to provide an insight into the dynamic response of reinforced soil structures and the potential of the geosynthetics...... to prevent the development of slope instability taking advantage of their reinforcing effect. For this purpose, a onedimensional (SDOF) model, based on Newmark’s sliding block model as well as a two-dimensional (plane-strain) dynamic finite-element analyses are conducted in order to investigate the...... impact of the most significant parameters involved, such as the flexibility of the sliding system, the mechanical properties of the soil and of the geosynthetics material, the frequency content of the excitation and the interface shear strength....

  5. On Front Slope Stability of Berm Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    reshaping of a large Norwegian breakwater exposed to the North Sea waves. As a motivation for applying the Van der Meer formula a discussion of design parameters related to berm breakwater stability formulae is given. Comparisons of front erosion predicted by the use of the Van der Meer formula with model......The short communication presents application of the conventional Van der Meer stability formula for low-crested breakwaters for the prediction of front slope erosion of statically stable berm breakwaters with relatively high berms. The method is verified (Burcharth, 2008) by comparison with the......, relative berm width, method of armour stone placement, and hydraulic parameters. The formulae should cover the structure range from statically stable berm breakwaters to conventional double layer armoured breakwaters....

  6. Rapid drawdown in slopes and embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyol, Nria M.; Alonso, Eduardo E.; Olivella, Sebasti

    2008-05-01

    The rapid drawdown condition arises when submerged slopes experience a rapid reduction of the external water level. Classical procedures developed to determine the flow regime within the slope and the resulting stability conditions are reviewed in the paper. They are grouped in two classes: the "stress-based" undrained approach, recommended for impervious materials, and the flow approach, which is specified for rigid pervious materials (typically a granular soil). Field conditions often depart significantly from these simplified cases and involve materials of different permeability and compressibility arranged in a complex geometry. The drawdown problem is presented in the paper as a fully coupled flow-deformation problem for saturated/unsaturated conditions. Some fundamental concepts are first discussed in a qualitative manner and, later, explored in more detail in synthetic examples, solved under different hypotheses, including the classical approaches. Some design rules, which include a few fundamental parameters for the drawdown problem, have also been solved in a rigorous manner to illustrate the limitations of simplified procedures. A significant portion of the paper is devoted to the discussion of a comprehensive case history. In Shira, earth dam pore pressures were recorded at different points inside the embankment during a controlled drawdown. Predictions of four calculation procedures (instantaneous drawdown, pure flow, coupled flow-elastic, and coupled flow-elastoplastic, all of them for saturated/unsaturated conditions) are compared with measured pressure records. Only the coupled analysis provides a consistent and reasonable solution. The role of the different soil properties in explaining the phenomena taking place during drawdown is finally discussed.

  7. Nocturnal flow on a western Colorado slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy sponsored Atomspheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program has conducted a research program designed to increase our knowledge and understanding of terrain-dominated flows with specific emphasis on nocturnal flows within mountain valleys. ASCOT has sponsored both field studies and numerical modeling efforts to improve our understanding of the wind, temperature and turbulence structure of nocturnal drainage flows. One of the most recent ASCOT sponsored field studies involves a study within the Mesa Creek Basin in western Colorado to investigate the seasonal frequency of occurrence of drainage flows along the sloped surfaces and within the basin, and to evaluate the effect of the ambient meteorology on their development. The Mesa Creek Basin, situated on the north slope of the Grand Mesa, encompasses a roughly 10 x 20 km area that is approximately 30 km east of Grand Junction. The observational segment of the study was undertaken jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and involved the operation of network of eight meteorological towers and a monostatic sodar within the Mesa Creek study area over a period of one year that extended from December 1988 through November 1989. These measurements were augmented by tethersonde observations to define the vertical wind and temperature structure during a few nights. The modeling portion of the study is being undertaken by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory using a three-dimensional prognostic boundary layer model to gain further insight into the dynamics of the seasonal variations and the effect of cloud cover on the development of the drainage flows. It is the purpose of this paper to present preliminary results form a numerical simulation done as part of this study. 4 refs., 7 figs

  8. ASPECTS OF DRIP IRRIGATION ON SLOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Radu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, water and its supply raise problems of strategic importance, of great complexity, being considered one of the keys to sustainable human development. Drip irrigation consists in the slow and controlled administration of water in the area of the root system of the plants for the purposes of fulfilling their physiological needs and is considered to be one of the variants of localized irrigation. Water is distributed in a uniform and slow manner, drop by drop, in a quantity and with a frequency that depend on the needs of the plant, thanks to the exact regulation of the water flow rate and pressure, as well as to the activation of the irrigation based on the information recorded by the tensiometer with regard to soil humidity. This method enables the exact dosage of the water quantity necessary in the various evolution stages of the plant, thus eliminating losses. By applying the irrigation with 5 liters of water per linear meter, at a 7 days interval, in the month of august, for a vine cultivated on a slope, in layers covered with black film and irrigated via dropping, soil humidity immediately after irrigation reaches its highest level, but within the limits of active humidity, on the line of the irrigation band. Three days later, the water content of the soil in the layer is relatively uniform, and, after this interval, it is higher in the points situated at the basis of the film. This technology of cultivation on slopes favors the accumulation, in the soil, of the water resulted from heavy rains and reduces soil losses as a result of erosion.

  9. Dendrogeomorphic approach to estimating slope retreat, Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dendrogeomorphic study of slope retreat was conducted at the Maxey Flats nuclear-waste disposal site in northeastern Kentucky. Tree roots exposed by surface lowering were used as an indicator of ground surface at the time of germination. The amount of lowering was measured and divided by tree-ring-determined tree age. Surface lowering and slope degradation rates were estimated for three slopes below waste-burial trenches and compared with data obtained from sediment troughs and erosion frames at the site. Mean rates of slope retreat ranged from 1.92 to 3.16 mm/yr. Sediment-trough results are two to three orders of magnitude less than dendrogeomorphic and erosion-frame estimates of slope degradation, which suggests that piping and solution-weathering processes may be important in slope degradation. Slope aspect and declivity may be important factors affecting retreat of slopes with a uniform lithology. Dendrogeomorphic techniques provide results comparable to those in the literature and offer a rapid method for estimating slope retreat that integrates slope processes over many years

  10. Dendrogeomorphic approach to estimating slope retreat, Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Cliff R.; Carey, William P.

    1990-07-01

    A dendrogeomorphic study of slope retreat was conducted at the Maxey Flats nuclear-waste disposal site in northeastern Kentucky. Tree roots exposed by surface lowering were used as an indicator of ground surface at the time of germination. The amount of lowering was measured and divided by tree-ring-determined tree age. Surface lowering and slope degradation rates were estimated for three slopes below waste-burial trenches and compared with data obtained from sediment troughs and erosion frames at the site. Mean rates of slope retreat ranged from 1.92 to 3.16 mm/yr. Sediment-trough results are two to three orders of magnitude less than dendrogeomorphic and erosion-frame estimates of slope degradation, which suggests that piping and solution-weathering processes may be important in slope degradation. Slope aspect and declivity may be important factors affecting retreat of slopes with a uniform lithology. Dendrogeomorphic techniques provide results comparable to those in the literature and offer a rapid method for estimating slope retreat that integrates slope processes over many years.

  11. Model tests of geosynthetic reinforced slopes in a geotechnical centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geosynthetic-reinforced slopes and walls became very popular in recent years because of their financial, technical, and ecological advantages. Centrifuge modelling is a powerful tool for physical modelling of reinforced slopes and offers the advantage to observe the failure mechanisms of the slopes. In order to replicate the gravity induced stresses of a prototype structure in a geometrically 1/N reduced model, it is necessary to test the model in a gravitational field N times larger than that of the prototype structure. In this dissertation, geotextile-reinforced slope models were tested in a geotechnical centrifuge to identify the possible failure mechanisms. Slope models were tested by varying slope inclination, tensile strengths of the geotextiles, and overlapping lengths. Photographs of the geotextile reinforced slope models in flight were taken with a digital camera and the soil deformations of geotextile reinforced slopes were evaluated with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The experimental results showed that failure of the centrifuge models initiated at midheight of the slope, and occurred due to geotextile breakage instead of pullout. The location of the shear surface is independent of the tensile strength of the geotextile; it is dependent on the shear strength of the soil. It is logical to see that the required acceleration of the centrifuge at slope failure was decreased with increasing slope inclination. An important contribution to the stability of the slope models was provided by the overlapping of the geotextile layers. It has a secondary reinforcement effect when it was prolonged and passed through the shear surface. Moreover, the location of the shear surface observed with PIV analysis exactly matches the tears of the retrieved geotextiles measured carefully after the centrifuge testing. It is concluded that PIV is an efficient tool to instrument the slope failures in a geotechnical centrifuge.(author)

  12. Characterization of the collagen component of cartilage repair tissue of the talus with quantitative MRI: comparison of T2 relaxation time measurements with a diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state sequence (dwDESS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzschmar, M.; Hainc, N.; Studler, U. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Bieri, O. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Miska, M. [University Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiewiorski, M.; Valderrabano, V. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the collagen component of repair tissue (RT) of the talus after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) using quantitative T2 and diffusion-weighted imaging. Mean T2 values and diffusion coefficients of AMIC-RT and normal cartilage of the talus of 25 patients with posttraumatic osteochondral lesions and AMIC repair were compared in a cross-sectional design using partially spoiled steady-state free precession (pSSFP) for T2 quantification, and diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state (dwDESS) for diffusion measurement. RT and cartilage were graded with modified Noyes and MOCART scores on morphological sequences. An association between follow-up interval and quantitative MRI measures was assessed using multivariate regression, after stratifying the cohort according to time interval between surgery and MRI. Mean T2 of the AMIC-RT and cartilage were 43.1 ms and 39.1 ms, respectively (p = 0.26). Mean diffusivity of the RT (1.76 μm{sup 2}/ms) was significantly higher compared to normal cartilage (1.46 μm{sup 2}/ms) (p = 0.0092). No correlation was found between morphological and quantitative parameters. RT diffusivity was lowest in the subgroup with follow-up >28 months (p = 0.027). Compared to T2-mapping, dwDESS demonstrated greater sensitivity in detecting differences in the collagen matrix between AMIC-RT and cartilage. Decreased diffusivity in patients with longer follow-up times may indicate an increased matrix organization of RT. (orig.)

  13. Characterization of the collagen component of cartilage repair tissue of the talus with quantitative MRI: comparison of T2 relaxation time measurements with a diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state sequence (dwDESS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the collagen component of repair tissue (RT) of the talus after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) using quantitative T2 and diffusion-weighted imaging. Mean T2 values and diffusion coefficients of AMIC-RT and normal cartilage of the talus of 25 patients with posttraumatic osteochondral lesions and AMIC repair were compared in a cross-sectional design using partially spoiled steady-state free precession (pSSFP) for T2 quantification, and diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state (dwDESS) for diffusion measurement. RT and cartilage were graded with modified Noyes and MOCART scores on morphological sequences. An association between follow-up interval and quantitative MRI measures was assessed using multivariate regression, after stratifying the cohort according to time interval between surgery and MRI. Mean T2 of the AMIC-RT and cartilage were 43.1 ms and 39.1 ms, respectively (p = 0.26). Mean diffusivity of the RT (1.76 μm2/ms) was significantly higher compared to normal cartilage (1.46 μm2/ms) (p = 0.0092). No correlation was found between morphological and quantitative parameters. RT diffusivity was lowest in the subgroup with follow-up >28 months (p = 0.027). Compared to T2-mapping, dwDESS demonstrated greater sensitivity in detecting differences in the collagen matrix between AMIC-RT and cartilage. Decreased diffusivity in patients with longer follow-up times may indicate an increased matrix organization of RT. (orig.)

  14. Numerical analysis of slope failure in granitic soil slopes : main types of instability and remediation measures

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Manuel João Niza das

    2015-01-01

    Slope stability is a worldwide problem which above all affects people’s safety. However, in tropical or temperate regions (such as the Mediterranean), a combination of their topographic, geologic and climate settings contributes to an increased landslide hazard. A full understanding of this topic, and what it entails, requires an accurate knowledge of its triggers and awareness to the different instability mechanisms that may occur. Furthermore, the instability phenomenon may present differen...

  15. Characterization of rock slopes through slope mass rating using 3D point clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Riquelme Guill, Adrin; Toms Jover, Roberto; Abelln Fernndez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Rock mass classification systems are widely used tools for assessing the stability of rock slopes. Their calculation requires the prior quantification of several parameters during conventional fieldwork campaigns, such as the orientation of the discontinuity sets, the main properties of the existing discontinuities and the geo-mechanical characterization of the intact rock mass, which can be time-consuming and an often risky task. Conversely, the use of relatively new remote sensing data for ...

  16. Calculation method of solar radiation incident upon slopes considering topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When radiation in a basin is calculated, slope inclination, slope orientation and topography of surroundings have to be taken into account. The method of approximation to topography by triangles proposed by Miura et al. is employed to take slope characteristics and topography of surroundings into account. Authors prepared 360 directions' shades altitudes, i.e. every degree of angle, for each triangle in advance, and used these shades' altitudes to calculate both direct radiation on a slope diffuse radiation taking topography of surroundings into account. And authors show how to estimate hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation from hourly horizontal global radiation and synthesize hourly slope global radiation on slopes

  17. Improvement parameters in dynamic compaction adjacent to the slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghanbari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic compaction is a cost-effective method commonly used for improvement of sandy soils. A number of researchers have investigated experimentally and numerically the improvement parameters of soils using dynamic compaction, such as crater depth, improvement depth, and radial improvement, however, these parameters are not studied for improvement adjacent to the slopes or trenches. In this research, four different slopes with different inclinations are modeled numerically using the finite element code ABAQUS, and impact loads of dynamic compaction are applied. The static factors of safety are kept similar for all trenches and determined numerically by application of gravity loads to the slope using strength reduction method (SRM. The analysis focuses on crater depth and improvement region which are compared to the state of flat ground. It can be observed that compacted area adjacent to the slopes is narrower and slightly away from the slope compared to the flat state. Moreover, crater depth increases with increase in slope inclination.

  18. Overpressure, Flow Focusing, Compaction and Slope Stability on the continental slope: Insights from IODP Expedition 308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expepedition 308 used direct measurements of pore pressure, analysis of hydromechanical properties, and geological analysis to illuminate how sedimentation, flow focusing, overpressure, and slope stability couple beneath the seafloor on the deepwater continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico. We used pore pressure penetrometers to measure severe overpressures (60% of the difference between lithostatic stress and hydrostatic pressure) that extend from the seafloor for 100’s of meters. We ran uniaxial consolidation experiments on whole core and found that although permeability is relatively high near the seafloor, the sediments are highly compressible. As a result, the coefficient of consolidation (the hydraulic diffusivity) is remarkably constant over a large range of effective stresses. This behavior accounts for the high overpressure that begins near the seafloor and extends to depth. Forward modeling suggests that flow is driven laterally along a permeable unit called the Blue Unit. Calculations suggest that soon after deposition, lateral flow lowered the effective stress and triggered the submarine landslides that we observe. Later in the evolution of this system, overpressure may have pre-conditioned the slope to failure by earthquakes. Results from IODP Expedition 308 illustrate how pore pressure and sedimentation control the large-scale form of continental margins, how submarine landslides form, and provide strategies for designing stable drilling programs.

  19. Look Ahead Cruise Control: Road Slope Estimation and Control Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kozica, Ermin

    2005-01-01

    Look ahead cruise control is a relatively new concept. It deals with the possibility of making use of recorded road slope data in combination with GPS, inorder to improve vehicle cruise control. This thesis explores the possibility ofestimating road slope as well as investigating the sensitivity of two look aheadcontrollers, with respect to errors in estimation of mass, wheel radius and roadslope. A filter using GPS and standard vehicle sensors is used for estimation ofroad slope. The filter is...

  20. On the global density slope-anisotropy inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Ciotti, Luca; Morganti, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the central density slope-anisotropy theorem of An and Evans (2006), recent investigations have shown that the involved density slope-anisotropy inequality holds not only at the center, but at all radii (i.e. globally) in a very large class of spherical systems with positive phase-space distribution function. Here we present some additional analytical cases that further extend the validity of the global density slope-anisotropy inequality. These new results, several numerical ev...

  1. Analysis of hydrological processes in unstable clayey slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaard, T. A.

    2001-01-01

    In slope stability research a ground water level increase is often the critical factor for failure. High ground water levels (or more properly stated: high pore water pressures) reduce the internal strength of the slope. It is recognised for quite some time that fast infiltration of precipitation towards the (perched) ground water table can induce high pore pressures and thus instability within formerly stable slopes. However, deeper located landslides are affected on the lo...

  2. [Analysis of related factors of slope plant hyperspectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Qi; Zhao, Yun-Sheng; Tu, Lin-Ling

    2014-09-01

    In the present paper, the slope gradient, aspect, detection zenith angle and plant types were analyzed. In order to strengthen the theoretical discussion, the research was under laboratory condition, and modeled uniform slope for slope plant. Through experiments we found that these factors indeed have influence on plant hyperspectral remote sensing. When choosing slope gradient as the variate, the blade reflection first increases and then decreases as the slope gradient changes from 0° to 36°; When keeping other factors constant, and only detection zenith angle increasing from 0° to 60°, the spectral characteristic of slope plants do not change significantly in visible light band, but decreases gradually in near infrared band; With only slope aspect changing, when the dome meets the light direction, the blade reflectance gets maximum, and when the dome meets the backlit direction, the blade reflectance gets minimum, furthermore, setting the line of vertical intersection of incidence plane and the dome as an axis, the reflectance on the axis's both sides shows symmetric distribution; In addition, spectral curves of different plant types have a lot differences between each other, which means that the plant types also affect hyperspectral remote sensing results of slope plants. This research breaks through the limitations of the traditional vertical remote sensing data collection and uses the multi-angle and hyperspectral information to analyze spectral characteristics of slope plants. So this research has theoretical significance to the development of quantitative remote sensing, and has application value to the plant remote sensing monitoring. PMID:25532352

  3. Boundary slopes of 2-bridge links determine the crossing number

    CERN Document Server

    Hoste, J E; Hoste, Jim E.; Shanahan, Patrick D.

    2006-01-01

    A diagonal surface in a link exterior M is a properly embedded, incompressible, boundary incompressible surface which furthermore has the same number of boundary components and same slope on each component of the boundary of M. We derive a formula for the boundary slope of a diagonal surface in the exterior of a 2-bridge link which is analogous to the formula for the boundary slope of a 2-bridge knot found by Hatcher and Thurston. Using this formula we show that the diameter of a 2-bridge link, that is, the difference between the smallest and largest finite slopes of diagonal surfaces, is equal to the crossing number.

  4. Design of Overall Slope Angle and Analysis of Rock Slope Stability of Chadormalu Mine Using Empirical and Numerical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Rasouli Maleki; Mohammad Mahyar; Kambiz Meshkabadi

    2011-01-01

    In engineering projects associated with rock mechanic science like open pit mines, assessment and slope stability of mine walls is one of the important performance in generate of these structures. Estimating and knowledge of stable slope angle is one of main parts that should be occurring to special attention in open pit mines studies phase. Considering the importance of economic costs in mining issues, the need for appropriate design slope angle that can cause an adverse minimize project cos...

  5. A complementary mild-slope equation derived using higher-order depth function for waves obliquely propagating on sloping bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tai-Wen; Lin, Ta-Yuan; Wen, Chih-Chung; Ou, Shan-Hwei

    2006-08-01

    In this paper a complementary mild-slope equation (CMSE) is derived in order to investigate the transformation of progressive waves obliquely propagating over the sloping bottom more realistically. We introduce a new depth function which includes the wave refraction and the influence of the bottom slope ?, perturbed to the second-order in the integral equation. A new depth-integrated mild-slope equation is derived, by using the above mentioned depth function, to model a time-harmonic motion of small amplitude waves in varying water depth. The simulated results reveal that the proposed model provides a significant improvement in the calculation of the wavenumber and the group velocity at different bottom slopes. With the increasing bottom slope, the discrepancies in the reflection coefficient of Bragg scattering between the analytical solution and the one calculated from the conventional mild-slope equation (MSE) and the modified MSE (MMSE) are seen to steadily increase. The group velocity of the waves, when compared with the conventional MSE and MMSE, also shows its dependence on the bottom slope and wave propagating angle. The present model is observed to be quite efficient in taking into account the effect of steeper bottom slope.

  6. Analysis of one gravitational slope cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palis, Edouard; Lebourg, Thomas; Vidal, Maurin; Tric, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Since about twenty years of studies on landslides, we realized the role and subtle interactions that existed between the structural complexity, masses dynamics and complex internal circulation of fluids. The La Clapire DSL (Deep-Seated Landslide) is now very well known by the scientific community (volume, impact, challenges, observations...), but this mass of knowledge, has not yet been compiled nor looked through a coupled analysis of its spatial and temporal variability. Since 2007, a will to share and access to uniform data was set up by the Versant Instabilities Multidisciplinary Observatory (OMIV, National Service of French Observation (SNO)). This observatory (with associated laboratories) allowed the installation of permanent and autonomous measuring stations: GPS, meteorology, seismology, water chemistry sources. For two years now, a permanent electrical tomography device is installed at the bottom of the slope to complement the current monitoring system, and allowed a deeper understanding of the physical changes in the massif. The analysis of these data allows to observe different dynamic regimes, as well as different responses to external factors: instantaneous, delayed, long-term variability. The purpose of this synthesis study is to analyze the temporal and spatial evolution of the electrical resistivity, displacement and hydrometeors for one year cycle (November 2012 to November 2013). Thus, a qualitative and statistical approach by clusters, principal component analysis (PCA), and temporal pseudo-3D of these variables was established. This new statistical study also explains the major role of the fault and the base of the landslide, as well as the chronology of the water flow in the massif, allowing a better understanding of the complex and uneven in time dynamic in this area.

  7. Biogeochemistry of southern Australian continental slope sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment cores from the middle to lower slope of the southern continental margin of Australia between the Great Australian Bight and western Tasmania are compared in terms of marine and terrigenous input signals during the Holocene. The mass accumulation rates of carbonate, organic carbon, biogenic Ba. and Al are corrected for lateral sediment input (focusing), using the inventory of excess 230Th in the sediment normalised to its known production rate in the water column above each site. The biogenic signal is generally higher in the eastern part of the southern margin probably due to enhanced productivity associated with seasonal upwelling off southeastern South Australia and the proximity of the Subtropical Front, which passes just south of Tasmania. The input of Al, representing the terrigenous signal, is also higher in this region reflecting the close proximity of river runoff from the mountainous catchment of southeastern Australia. The distribution pattern of Mn and authigenic U, together with pore-water profiles of Mn++, indicate diagenetic reactions driven by the oxidation of buried organic carbon in an oxic to suboxic environment. Whereas Mn is reduced at depth and diffuses upwards to become immobilised in a Mn-rich surface layer. U is derived from seawater and diffuses downward into the sediment, driven by reduction and precipitation at a depth below the reduction zone of Mn. The estimated removal rate of U from seawater by this process is within the range of U removal measured in hemipelagic sediments from other areas, and supports the proposition that hemipelagic sediments are a major sink of U in the global ocean. Unlike Mn, the depth profile of sedimentary Fe appears to be little affected by diagenesis, suggesting that little of the total Fe inventory in the sediment is remobilised and redistributed as soluble Fe. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Hydrologic design for riprap on embankment slopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste impoundments for uranium tailings and other hazardous substances are often protected by compacted earth and clay, covered with a layer of loose rock (riprap). The report outlines procedures that could be followed to design riprap to withstand forces caused by runoff resulting from extreme rainfall directly on the embankment. The Probable Maximum Precipitation for very small areas is developed from considerations of severe storms of short duration at mid-latitudes. A two-dimensional finite difference model is then used to calculate the runoff from severe rainfall events. The procedure takes into account flow both beneath and above the rock layer and approximates the concentration in flow which could be caused by a non-level or slumped embankment. The sensitivity to various assumptions, such as the shape and size of the rock, the thickness of the layer, and the shape of the embankment, suggests that peak runoff from an armored slope could be attenuated with proper design. Frictional relationships for complex flow regimes are developed on the basis of flow through rock-filled dams and in mountain streams. These relationships are tested against experimental data collected in laboratory flumes; the tests provide excellent results. The resulting runoff is then used in either the Stephenson or safety factor method to find the stable rock diameter. The rock sizes determined by this procedure for a given flow have been compared with data on the failure of rock layers in experimental flumes, again with excellent results. Computer programs are included for implementing the method. 15 refs., 21 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Handling Correlations between Covariates and Random Slopes in Multilevel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael David; Castellano, Katherine E.; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses estimation of multilevel/hierarchical linear models that include cluster-level random intercepts and random slopes. Viewing the models as structural, the random intercepts and slopes represent the effects of omitted cluster-level covariates that may be correlated with included covariates. The resulting correlations between

  10. Wave energy saturation on a natural beach of variable slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Holman, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Time series of flow were measured across the inner surf zone during a storm. These data were used to quantify the dependence of wave height (transformed from measured flow) and velocity on local slope and depth. Local depth increased with local slope and was independent of deepwater wave steepness.-from Authors

  11. RMS slope of exponentially correlated surface roughness for radar applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    In radar signature analysis, the root mean square (RMS) surface slope is utilized to assess the relative contribution of multiple scattering effects. For an exponentially correlated surface, an effective RMS slope can be determined by truncating the high frequency tail of the roughness spectrum...

  12. Behavior analysis by model slope experiment of artificial rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Cheol

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we performed a model slope experiment with rainfall seepage, and the results were compared and verified with the unsaturated slope stability analysis method. In the model slope experiment, we measured the changes in water content and matric suction due to rainfall seepage, and determined the time at which the slope failure occurred and the shape of the failure. In addition, we compared and verified the changes in the factor of safety and the shape of the failure surface, which was calculated from the unsaturated slope stability analysis with the model experiment. From the results of experiment and analysis, it is concluded that the unsaturated slope stability analysis can be used to accurately analyze and predict rainfall-induced slope failure. It is also concluded that in seepage analysis, setting the initial conditions and boundary conditions is very important. If engineers will use the measured porewater pressure or matric suction, the accuracy of analysis can be enhanced. The real-time monitoring system of porewater pressure or matric suction can be used as a warning of rainfall-induced slope failure.

  13. Assessing slope stability in unplanned settlements in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Malcolm G; Holcombe, Liz; Renaud, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Unplanned housing in developing countries is often located on steep slopes. Frequently no building code is enforced for such housing and mains water is provided with no drainage provision. Both of these factors can be particularly significant in terms of landslide risk if, as is so often the case, such slopes lack any planned drainage provision. There is thus a need to develop a model that facilitates the assessment of slope stability in an holistic context, incorporating a wide range of factors (including surface cover, soil water topographic convergence, slope loading and point source water leakage) in order that appropriate advice can be given as to the general controls on slope stability in such circumstances. This paper outlines a model configured for this specific purpose and describes an application to a site in St. Lucia, West Indies, where there is active slope movement in an unplanned housing development on relatively steep topography. The model findings are in accord with the nature of the current failure at the site, provide guidance as to the significance of slope drainage and correspond to inferences drawn from an application of resistance envelope methods to the site. In being able to scenario test a uniquely wide range of combinations of factors, the model structure is shown to be highly valuable in assessing dominant slope stability process controls in such complex environments. PMID:17107745

  14. An experimental model for slopes subject to weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, C.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an experimental prototype model to study the influence of cracks on the morphologic evolution of natural cliffs subject to progressive retreat induced by weathering is presented. A set of small scale laboratory tests is designed to investigate weathering induced successive landslides. Weathering is applied to the slope model by wetting the slope crest through a rainfall simulator device. The moisture content and the suction of the soil during the tests are monitored by soil moisture sensors and tensiometers that are buried inside the slope model. High resolution cameras record the behaviour of the slope model and GeoPIV is used to analyse the frames and obtain the deformations of the slope model during the tests. After a short time of rainfall, vertical cracks appear in the slope model with significant vertical deformations developing. Experimental results indicate that there is a strong connection between moisture content - thus degree of weathering - and the occurrence of a landslide. A prediction model of slope failures can be introduced based on the observed moisture content response of the slope models.

  15. Slope Stability of Geosynthetic Clay Liner Test Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourteen full-scale field test plots containing five types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) were constructed on 2H:IV and 3H:IV slopes for the purpose of assessing slope stability. The test plots were designed to simulate typical final cover systems for landfill. Slides occurr...

  16. Slope spectrum variation in a simulated loess watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fayuan; Tang, Guoan; Wang, Chun; Cui, Lingzhou; Zhu, Rui

    2015-07-01

    A simulated loess watershed, where the loess material and relief properly represent the true loess surface, is adopted to investigate the variation in slope spectrum with loess watershed evolution. The evolution of the simulated loess watershed was driven by the exogenetic force of artificial rainfall. For a period of three months, twenty artificial rainfall events with different intensities and durations were carried out. In the process, nine DEM data sets, each with 10 mm grid resolution, were established by the method of close-range photogrammetry. The slope spectra were then extracted from these DEMs. Subsequent series of carefully designed quantitative analyses indicated a strong relationship between the slope spectrum and the evolution of the simulated loess watershed. Quantitative indices of the slope spectrum varied regularly following the evolution of the simulated loess watershed. Mean slope, slope spectrum information entropy (H), terrain driving force (T d ), Mean patch area (AREA_MN), Contagion Index (CONTAG), and Patch Cohesion Index (COHESION) kept increasing following the evolution of the simulated watershed, while skewness (S), Perimeter-Area Fractal Dimension (PAFRAC), and Interspersion and Juxtaposition Index (IJI) represented an opposite trend. All the indices changed actively in the early and active development periods, but slowly in the stable development periods. These experimental results indicate that the time series of slope spectra was able to effectively depict the slope distribution of the simulated loess watershed, thus presenting a potential method for modeling loess landforms.

  17. Culture of Sharing: North Slope Leaders Forge Trail into Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkotak, Elise Sereni

    2010-01-01

    To create a strong local economy, the community needs a workforce. In Native communities, the workforce should be grounded in the local culture and values. On the North Slope of Alaska, this has long been a goal of leaders. To achieve this goal, North Slope leaders came together February 2010 in Barrow, Alaska, for the "Tumitchiat" Leadership…

  18. DESIGN INFORMATION REPORT: PROTECTION OF WASTEWATER LAGOON INTERIOR SLOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A problem common to many wastewater treatment and storage lagoons is erosion of the interior slopes. Erosion may be caused by surface runoff and wind-induced wave action. The soils that compose the steep interior slopes of lagoons are especially susceptible to erosion and slumpin...

  19. Slope mass rating and kinematic analysis of slopes along the national highway-58 near Jonk, Rishikesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Siddique

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The road network in the Himalayan terrain, connecting remote areas either in the valleys or on the hill slopes, plays a pivotal role in socio-economic development of India. The planning, development and even maintenance of road and rail networks in such precarious terrains are always a challenging task because of complexities posed by topography, geological structures, varied lithology and neotectonics. Increasing population and construction of roads have led to destabilisation of slopes, thus leading to mass wasting and movement, further aggravation due to recent events of cloud bursts and unprecedented flash floods. Vulnerability analysis of slopes is an important component for the “Landslide Hazard Assessment” and “Slope Mass Characterisation” guide planners to predict and choose suitable ways for construction of roads and other engineering structures. The problem of landslides along the national highway-58 (NH-58 from Rishikesh to Devprayag is a common scene. The slopes along the NH-58 between Jonk and Rishikesh were investigated, which experienced very heavy traffic especially from March to August due to pilgrimage to Kedarnath shrine. On the basis of slope mass rating (SMR investigation, the area falls in stable class, and landslide susceptibility score (LSS values also indicate that the slopes under investigation fall in low to moderate vulnerability to landslide. More attentions should be paid to the slopes to achieve greater safe and economic benefits along the highway.

  20. Soil erosion processes on sloping land using REE tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheet erosion is the main performance in the slope soil erosion process at the primary stage of natural rainfall. For three times of rainfall during experiment, the ratios of sheet erosion to total erosion account for 71%, 48% and 49% respectively, which showed that the sloping erosion was still at the primary stage from sheet erosion to rill erosion. With the rainfall going, the rill erosion amount increase. It showed that soil erosion was changing from sheet erosion to rill erosion. The sources of sediment from different sections of the plot were analyzed, and the results indicated that whatever the sheet erosion changed, the ratio erosion of upper part of surface soil was always lower than 10%. Sheet erosion came mainly from the lower section of surface soil. With the ratios to the amount of total rill erosion changes, the rill erosion amount of each section regularly changes too. The general conclusion is that when the rainfall ends, relative erosion of different slope element to the foot of slope is: 1 meter away accounts for 16%, 2-4 meters away is 6% and 5-9 meters away is 3%. The ratio of rill erosion amount of these three slope element is 5:2:1, which shows the rill erosion amount are mainly from the slope element of 4 meters from the foot of slope. (authors)

  1. Slopes of Western Galapagos volcanoes from airborne interferometric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Rowland, Scott K.; Garbeil, Harold

    The distribution of slopes on the six basaltic shield volcanoes in the Western Galapagos Islands is investigated using a digital elevation model derived from airborne interferometric radar (TOPSAR) data. These measurements have a spatial sampling of 10 m/pixel, a vertical accuracy of 3 to 5 m, and constitute the highest resolution, most complete, topographic data set available for the islands. Volcano heights are determined to range from 1,124 m (Sierra Negra) to 1,710 m (Wolf). Over extensive areas of each volcano, slopes exceed 25°, with the highest slopes being ˜37° on Wolf and ˜36° on Fernandina. We confirm that two morphologic subgroups exist: Cerro Azul, Fernandina, and Wolf, with deep calderas (depth between 40-60% of the subaerial height of the volcano) and steep (>20°) maximum slopes at elevations between ˜60 and 80% of the volcano height; and Alcedo, Darwin, and Sierra Negra, with shallow calderas (depth <25% of subaerial height) and slopes that remain <15° until ˜90% of the total height is reached. Our data show that steep slopes are not uniquely correlated with the occurrence of arcuate fissures at the summit, leaving the origin of the steep slopes unresolved.

  2. Pleistocene tectonic accretion of the continental slope off Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, E.A.

    1972-01-01

    Interpretation of reflection profiles across the Washington continental margin suggests deformation of Cascadia basin strata against the continental slope. Individual reflecting horizons can be traced across the slope-basin boundary. The sense of offset along faults on the continental slope is predominantly, but not entirely, west side up. Two faults of small displacement are seen to be west-dipping reverse faults. Magnetic anomalies on the Juan de Fuca plate can be traced 40-100 km eastward under the slope, and structural interpretation combined with calculated rates of subduction suggests that approximately 50 km of the outer continental slope may have been formed in Pleistocene time. Rocks of Pleistocene age dredge from a ridge exposing acoustic "basement" on the slope, plus the results of deep-sea drilling off northern Oregon, are consistent with this interpretation. The question of whether or not subduction is occurring at present is unresolved because significant strain has not affected the upper 200 m of section in the Cascadia basin. However, deformation of the outer part of the slope has been episodic and may reflect episodic yield, deposition rate, subduction rate, or some combination of these factors. ?? 1972.

  3. Geotechnical characteristics and slope stability in the Gulf of Cadiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Baraza, J.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentological and geotechnical analyses of thirty-seven core samples from the Gulf of Cadiz continental margin were used to define the regional variability of sediment properties and to assess slope stability. Considering the sediment property data set as a whole, there is an association between grain size, plasticity and water content. Any one of these properties can be mapped regionally to provide an indication of the dominant surface sediment lithology. Based on static sediment strength, a simplified slope stability analysis showed that only steep slopes (> 16??for even the most vulnerable sediment) can fail under static loading conditions. Accordingly, transient loads, such as earthquakes or storms, are needed to cause failure on more moderate slopes. A regional seismic slope stability analysis of the Cadiz margin was performed based on detailed geotechnical testing of four gravity core samples. The results showed that the stability of these slopes under seismic loading conditions depends upon sediment density, the cyclic loading shear strength, the slope steepness, and the regional seismicity. Sediment density and cyclic loading shear strength are dependent upon water content, which can act as a proxy for plasticity and texture effects. Specifically, Sediment in the water content range of 50-56% is most vulnerable to failure under cyclic loading within the Cadiz margin. As a result, for a uniform seismicity over the region, susceptibility to failure during seismic loading conditions increases with increasing slope steepness and is higher if the sediment water content is in the 50-56% range than if it is not. The only sampled zone of failure on the continental slope contains sediment with water content in this critical range. Storm-wave-induced instability was evaluated for the continental shelf. The evaluation showed that a storm having hundreds of waves with a height in the range of 16 m might be capable of causing failure on the shelf. However, no sediment failures were observed on the shelf that might have been caused by this mechanism.

  4. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Takacs, Peter Z.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2010-07-09

    We overview the results of a broad US collaboration, including all DOE synchrotron labs (ALS, APS, BNL, NSLS-II, LLNL, LCLS), major industrial vendors of x-ray optics (InSync, Inc., SSG Precision Optronics-Tinsley, Inc., Optimax Systems, Inc.), and with active participation of HBZ-BESSY-II optics group, on development of a new generation slope measuring profiler -- the optical slope measuring system (OSMS). The desired surface slope measurement accuracy of the instrument is<50 nrad (absolute) that is adequate to the current and foreseeable future needs for metrology of x-ray optics for the next generation of light sources.

  5. A modified risk evaluation method of slope failure in a heavy rain. For application to slopes in widespread area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A risk evaluation method of slope failure has developed to combine gas-liquid two phase flow analysis as a rainfall infiltration analysis and elastic-plastic finite element analysis as a slope stability analysis and has applied to a slope field. This method, however, had a difficulty to apply to many slopes since it needed many parameters to calculate the risk of the slope failure. The method was simplified to lessen input parameters which included an inclination and length of a slope, a depth of bedrock and a rainfall pattern assuming that hydraulic properties and mechanical properties were similar for the same geological unit. The method was also modified to represent a water collection structure, a surface runoff, an existence of a forest road and a water level variation of a downward river / pond which could affect infiltration phenomena. Results of the simplification and the modification made it possible to enhance a prediction precision of the method and create a hazard map of slopes in widespread area. (author)

  6. Hadronic Cross Sections, Elastic Slope and Physical Bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Fagundes, D A

    2012-01-01

    An almost model-independent parametrization for the ratio of the total hadronic cross section to elastic slope is discussed. Its applicability in studies of asymptotia and analyses of extensive air shower in cosmic-ray physics is also outlined.

  7. The swans and geese of Alaska's arctic slope

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior A midsummer aerial search was made on the 23,000 square miles of waterfowl habitat on Alaskas Arctic slope. Observations included 159 whistling swan Olor...

  8. Impact Analysis of Blasting Vibration on the Slope and Dump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang De

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As known that the blasting on the slope is very dangerous in the exploration of the mine andneeds complex analysis and calculation on the slope and dump. In the study it adopts the regression method in the analysis of important parameters of the vibration experiments of iron ore stope which influence the stability of slope and vibration velocity of mine blasting, vibration acceleration, etc., it makes the analysis of power spectrum and dynamic response. Through the model of landslide dynamic response it analyzes the rule of blasting vibration and the blasting vibration influence on the stability of slope, the research can provide a safety criterion in the exploitation of the iron ore.

  9. North Slope, Alaska ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for brown bears, caribou, and muskoxen for the North Slope, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set...

  10. Goose banding, Koyukuk and north slope Alaska, 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Goose drive trapping and banding was successfully conducted in the Galena and North Slope areas of Alaska in 1978. This was the fourth year of a five consecutive...

  11. Slope movements in Callejón de Huyalas, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilímek, V.; Zapata, M. L.; Stemberk, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 35, supplementum (2003), s. 39-51. ISSN 0300-5402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : slope movements * natural hazards * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  12. Adaptive slope compensation for high bandwidth digital current mode controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taeed, Fazel; Nymand, Morten

    converter duty cycle. The adaptive slope compensation provides optimum controller operation in term of bandwidth over wide range of operating points. In this paper operation principle of the controller is discussed. The proposed controller is implemented in an FPGA to control a 100 W buck converter. The......An adaptive slope compensation method for digital current mode control of dc-dc converters is proposed in this paper. The compensation slope is used for stabilizing the inner current loop in peak current mode control. In this method, the compensation slope is adapted with the variations in...... experimental results of measured loop-gain at different operating points are presented to validate the theoretical performance of the controller....

  13. North Slope, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for whales, seals, walruses, and polar bears for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector polygons in this data...

  14. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type....

  15. Submarine landslides along the eastern Mediterranean Israeli continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuven, Einav; Katz, Oded; Aharonov, Einat

    2013-04-01

    Numerous shallow submarine slope failures (scars and deposits) are observed in recent high resolution bathymetric grids of the continental slope off the Israeli eastern Mediterranean coast. The nature of these slope failures is currently not comprehensively understood as well as the question of whether the eastern Mediterranean continental slope is continuously or episodically unstable. We report here first steps towards understanding the present state of this submarine landslide system, which include mapping and analyzing the geology of the landslides and the hosting slopes. The continental slope extends from water depths of about 150 to more than 1000 meters with a slope of less than 5 degrees in general. Bathymetric grids with pixel resolution of 15 m till water depth of 700 m and 50 m till water depth of 1700 m were used. Analyzing the bathymetry revealed three main submarine surface features: (a) numerous shallow landslides, within the upper sequence of the post-Messenian sediments. Landslide widths range between hundreds to thousand of meters at the scar, with scar heights up to hundred meters. The toes of the landslides are not always mapable and lay up to a few kilometers down slope from the scar. Slope angles within the scars are 5 to more than15 degrees. At least two types of landslides were detected: presumably young slides with sharp scars, and presumably old slides with secondary slides and secondary drainage systems developed within the scar area; (b) a few kilometers long, north striking step-like lineaments. Step heights are up to 100 meters and the slopes are up to 20 degrees. The offset between parallel steps is less than a kilometer to a few kilometers. The steps are interpreted as surface expressions of growth faults rooted at the Messinian evaporates up to 1.5 kilometers below surface; (c) a few north striking channels were also detected with steep walls of more than 15 degrees, up to two kilometers width and a few kilometers length. The nature of these channels is not clear yet. Field relations show that the landslides, both young and old, either emerge from the over-steepened steps, or are displaced by them, and hence submarine landslides and steps are apparently contemporaneous. In addition this suggests that salt dynamics at depth is a main drive for at least some of these shallow slides. The above preliminary results testify to the complicated and highly dynamic nature of the studied continental slope, yet to be revealed.

  16. Mass movement hazard assessment model in the slope profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, A. C.

    2003-04-01

    The central aim of this work is to assess the spatial behaviour of critical depths for slope stability and the behaviour of their correlated variables in the soil-regolith transition along slope profiles over granite, migmatite and mica-schist parent materials in an humid tropical environment. In this way, we had making measures of shear strength for residual soils and regolith materials with soil "Cohron Sheargraph" apparatus and evaluated the shear stress tension behaviour at soil-regolith boundary along slope profiles, in each referred lithology. In the limit equilibrium approach applied here we adapt the infinite slope model for slope analysis in whole slope profile by means of finite element solution like in Fellenius or Bishop methods. In our case, we assume that the potential rupture surface occurs at soil-regolith or soil-rock boundary in slope material. For each slice, the factor of safety was calculated considering the value of shear strength (cohesion and friction) of material, soil-regolith boundary depth, soil moisture level content, slope gradient, top of subsurface flow gradient, apparent soil bulk density. The correlations showed the relative weight of cohesion, internal friction angle, apparent bulk density of soil materials and slope gradient variables with respect to the evaluation of critical depth behaviour for different simulated soil moisture content levels at slope profile scale. Some important results refer to the central role of behaviour of soil bulk-density variable along slope profile during soil evolution and in present day, because the intense clay production, mainly Kaolinite and Gibbsite at B and C-horizons, in the humid tropical environment. A increase in soil clay content produce a fall of friction angle and bulk density of material, specially when some montmorillonite or illite clay are present. We have observed too at threshold conditions, that a slight change in soil bulk-density value may disturb drastically the equilibrium of stress-strength tensions at potential rupture surface with its consequent loss of stability and increase of landslide event production risk.

  17. Exploring Benthic Biodiversity Patterns and Hotspots on European Margin Slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Danovaro; Miquel Canals; Serge Heussner; Nikolaos Lampadariou; Ann Vanreusel

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that continental slope ecosystems represent one of the major repositories of benthic marine biodiversity. The enhanced levels of biodiversity along slopes are hypothesized to be a source of biodiversity for continental shelves and deeper basins. Continental margins are increasingly altered by human activities, but the consequences of these anthropogenic impacts on benthic biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are almost completely unknown. Thus, there is an urgen...

  18. Exploring benthic biodiversity patterns and hotspots on European margin slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Danovaro, R.; M. Canals; Gambi, C.; S. Heussner; Lampadariou, N.; Vanreusel, A.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that continental slope ecosystems represent one of the major repositories of benthic marine biodiversity. The enhanced levels of biodiversity along slopes are hypothesized to be a source of biodiversity for continental shelves and deeper basins. Continental margins are increasingly altered by human activities, but the consequences of these anthropogenic impacts on benthic biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are almost completely unknown. Thus, there is an urgen...

  19. A new vision of carbonate slopes: the Little Bahama Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Thierry; Gillet, Hervé; Hanquiez, Vincent; Reijmer, John J.; Tournadour, Elsa; Chabaud, Ludivine; Principaud, Mélanie; Schnyder, Jara; Borgomano, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Recent data collected in November 2014 (RV Walton Smith) on the upper slope of the Little Bahama Bank (LBB) between 30 and 400 m water depth allowed to characterize the uppermost slope (Rankey et al., 2012) over a surface of 170 km2. The new data set includes multibeam bathymetry and acoustic imagery, 3.5 kHz very-high resolution (VHR) seismic reflection lines, 21 gravity cores and 11 Van Veen grabs. The upper slope of the LBB does not show a steep submarine cliff as known from western Great Bahama Bank. The carbonate bank progressively deepens towards the basin through a slighty inclined plateau. The slope value is genus Halimeda. Sediments collected in the deeper part of the basin (water depth = 1080 m) on the distal lobe consist of massive fine to medium well-sorted aragonitic sand. This suggests that carbonate slope systems are able to sort sediment despite the relative short slope distance. Sorting could either be due to flow spilling above the terraces identified in the canyon heads (Mulder et al., 2012) or could result from bottom currents. In this area, flow velocity profiles in the water column show the presence of two superposed water masses with a pycnocline at about 600-700 m water depth. Mulder, T., Ducassou, E., Gillet, H., Hanquiez, V., Tournadour, E., Combes, J., Eberli, G.P, Kindler, P., Gonthier, E., Conesa, G., Robin, C., Sianipar, R., Reijmer, J.J.G., and François A. Canyon morphology on a modern carbonate slope of the Bahamas: Evidence of regional tectonic tilting. Geology, 40(9), 771-774. Rankey, E.C, and Doolittle, D.F. (2012). Geomorphology of carbonate platform-marginal uppermost slopes: Insights from a Holocene analogue, Little Bahama Bank, Bahamas. Sedimentology, 59, 2146-2171.

  20. Slope Stability Evaluations by Limit Equilibrium and Finite Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Aryal, Krishna Prasad

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with slope stability evolutions carried out by commonly used limit equilibrium (LE) and finite element (FE) methods. The study utilizes two LE based software (SLOPE/W and SLIDE) and one FE based software (PLAXIS). The principal difference between these two analyses approaches is that the LE methods are based on the static of equilibrium whereas FE methods utilise the stress‐strain relationship or constitutive law. To fulfil one of the aims of the study, the LE based method...

  1. How general is the global density slope-anisotropy inequality?

    OpenAIRE

    Ciotti, Luca; Morganti, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Following the seminal result of An & Evans, known as the central density slope-anisotropy theorem, successive investigations unexpectedly revealed that the density slope-anisotropy inequality holds not only at the center, but at all radii in a very large class of spherical systems whenever the phase-space distribution function is positive. In this paper we derive a criterion that holds for all spherical systems in which the augmented density is a separable function of radius and potential: th...

  2. Slope Stability Evaluations by Limit Equilibrium and Finite Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Aryal, Krishna Prasad

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with slope stability evolutions carried out by commonly used limit equilibrium (LE) and finite element (FE) methods. The study utilizes two LE based software (SLOPE/W and SLIDE) and one FE based software (PLAXIS). The principal difference between these two analyses approaches is that the LE methods are based on the static of equilibrium whereas FE methods utilise the stress‐strain relationship or constitutive law. To fulfil one of the aims of the study, the LE based methods...

  3. Assessment of cropland area on sloping land in DPRK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the famines of the mid 1990s, the government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) authorized cultivation on sloping land before deciding, in the years 2000, to limit this practice on slopes above 15 degrees in order to reduce erosion. There are still many cultivated fields on slopes and their total estimated area ranges from 300,000 ha to more than 2 million ha. This study aims at assessing cropland areas on slopes above 10 and 15 degrees by using high to very high resolution remote sensing satellite imagery. For this purpose, a grid of points was superimposed over the DPRK territory and stratified according to slope, as derived from two DEMs, the 30 m ASTER GDEM V2 and the 3 arc second (∼90 m) SRTM Dem V4. A sample of about 2100 points was drawn using an optimal allocation sampling plan, based on a preliminary assessment of the variance of the estimated cropland percentage per class of slope. These 2100 points were interpreted into cropland, no cropland and doubt using mostly Google Earth imagery acquired after 2004. For slopes above 10 degrees, the area cropped was estimated to be around 1,000,000 ha (5.6% CV) and 742,000 ha (8.1% CV) according to the ASTER and SRTM DEM respectively. Above 15 degrees, the estimated cropland area ranges from 360,000 ha (9.7% CV) with SRTM to 540,000 ha (6.6.% CV) with ASTER. To decide between these two estimations, a validation of the two DEMs should be carried out on a region with similar relief. Alternatively, a higher accuracy DEM such as the one to be derived from the TanDEM-X mission in 2014 should provide more accurate estimates of the cropland area on sloping land

  4. The effect of a single point on correlation and slope

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Farnsworth

    1990-01-01

    By augmenting a bivariate data set with one point, the correlation coefficient and/or the slope of the regression line can be changed to any prescribed values. For the target value of the correlation coefficient or the slope, the coordinates of the new point are found as a function of certain statistics of the original data. The location of this new point with respect to the original data is investigated.

  5. Problems of definitive slopes mining at Doly Nastup Tusimice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instability of slopes influents mining business in many aspects at open-cast mining. The temporary decrease of intended mined volumes due to land slips is common and sometimes there is necessary to change origin-mining plans. It has impact to economy and other essential costs for rehabilitation are required. In case of definitive slopes formation in contact to traffic and communication networks, watercourses and infrastructures of seats stability of slope security there is even more important. Monitoring of rock massive stability plays an important role. Everything which stability of slopes is concerned belongs to essential tasks for mining technicians at open-cast mining. The article explains what ways for definitive slope formation near mining boundary were selected at Severoceske doly j.s.c., Doly Nastup Tusimice mining site. The precautions refer to mining technology, preventive and reconstruction precautions for stabilization of slopes must to solve, are to described. Tasks, which mining engineers, surveyors, geologists and geotechnics have to solve are described. (authors)

  6. Alternative method for direct measurement of tibial slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijak Lazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The tibial slope is one of the most frequently cited anatomical causes of anterior cruciate ligament trauma. The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of direct measuring of the tibial slope of the knee without prior soft tissue dissection in cadavers. Methods. Measurement was performed on the two groups of samples: osteological and cadaveric. The osteological group consisted of 102 matured tibiae and measurement was performed: indirectly by sagittal photographing of the tibia, and directly by a set of parallel bars. The cadaveric group consisted of 50 cadaveric knees and measurement was performed directly by a set of parallel bars. The difference and correlation between indirect and the direct measurements were observed, which included also measuring of the difference and correlation of the tibial slope on the medial and lateral condyles. Results. A statistically significant difference between the direct and indirect method of measuring (p 0.05. However, the slope on the medial condyle, as well as indirect measurement showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01. Conclusion. By the use of a set of parallel bars it is possible to measure the tibial slope directly without removal of the soft tissue. The results of indirect, photographic measurement did not statistically differ from the results of direct measurement of the tibial slope.

  7. Interaction between slope flows and an urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgilli, Marco; Moroni, Monica; Monti, Paolo; Cenedese, Antonio

    The local atmospheric circulation due to a city located at the bottom of a valley is reproduced by laboratory experiments analyzing the interaction between an urban heat island (UHI) and anabatic or katabatic slope flows. Slope flows are generated by the horizontal temperature difference between air adjacent to a mountain slope and the ambient air at the same altitude over the neighboring plane (or over the valley center). The thermal disomogeneity is a consequence of the daily heating due to the solar radiation and to the nightly cooling related to the infrared radiation emitted by the ground. Assuming clear sky and weak synoptic wind conditions, the slope flow is upslope (anabatic) during the daytime and downslope (katabatic) during the nighttime. The cool air settles down in the valley, starting the cold pool formation, a still and steady stratified environment. The slope flows present counter current compensating flows of lower velocity and larger thickness. The circulation associated to slope flows was studied in the past via field observations (Manins and Sawford, 1979; Hunt et al., 2003), analytical (Prandtl, 1952; Horst and Doran, 1983), numerical (Tripoli and Cotton, 1989) and experimental investigations (Fernando et al., 2000; Cenedese and Monti, 2004). Buoyancy-driven UHI circulation has been investigated in experimental and analytical study by Lu et al. (1997). The experiments described here are performed in a temperature controlled water-tank, the same employed by Cenedese and Monti (2003) and (2004) to investigate urban heat islands and sea-breeze flows, respectively.

  8. Relating weak layer and slab properties to snow slope stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schweizer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Snow slope stability evaluation requires considering weak layer as well as slab properties – and in particular their interaction. We developed a stability index from snow micro-penetrometer measurements and compared it to 129 concurrent point observations with the compression test (CT. The index considers the SMP-derived micro-structural strength and the additional load which depends on the hardness of the surface layers. The new quantitative measure of stability discriminated well between point observations rated as either "poor" or "fair" (CT < 19 and those rated as "good" (CT ≥ 19. However, discrimination power within the intermediate range was low. We then applied the index to gridded snow micro-penetrometer measurements from 11 snow slopes to explore the spatial structure and possibly relate it to slope stability. Stability distributions on the 11 slopes reflected various possible strength and load (stress distributions that naturally can occur. Their relation to slope stability was poor possibly because the index does not consider crack propagation. Hence, the relation between spatial patterns of point stability and slope stability remains elusive. Whereas this is the first attempt of a truly quantitative measure of stability, future developments should consider a better reference of stability and incorporate a measure of crack propagation.

  9. Soil properties in high-elevation ski slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippa, Gianluca; Freppaz, Michele; Letey, Stéphanie; Corti, Giuseppe; Cocco, Stefania; Zanini, Ermanno

    2010-05-01

    The development of winter sports determines an increasing impact on the high altitude ecosystems, as a consequence of increased participation and an increasing demand of high quality standards for skiable areas. The construction of a ski slope is associated with a certain impact on soil, which varies as a function of the degree of human-induced disturbance to the native substrata. In this work, we provide a description of the characteristics of alpine tundra ski-slope soils and their nutrient status, contrasted with undisturbed areas. The study site is located in the Monterosaski Resort, Aosta Valley, NW Italy (45°51' N; 7°48' E). We chose 5 sites along an altitudinal gradient between 2700 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Per each site, one plot was established on the ski slope, while a control plot was chosen under comparable topographic conditions a few meters apart. Soils were described and samples were collected and analysed for main chemical-physical properties. In addition an evaluation of N forms, organic matter fractionation and microbial biomass was carried out. Soil depth ranged between 10 to more than 70 cm, both on the ski slope and in the undisturbed areas. A true organo-mineral (A) horizon was firstly identified at 2500 m a.s.l., while a weathering horizon (Bw) was detected at 2400 m a.s.l.. However, a Bw horizon thick enough to be recognised as diagnostic for shifting soil classification order from Entisols to Inceptisols (USDA-Soil Taxonomy) was detected only below 2400 m a.s.l.. Lithic Cryorthents were predominant in the upper part of the sequence (above 2500 m a.s.l.), both in the ski slope and the undisturbed areas; Typic Cryorthents were identified between 2500 and 2400 m a.s.l., while Inceptisols were predominant between 2400 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Chemical-physical properties will be discussed focusing on the main differences between ski slope and undisturbed soils, as determined by the ski slope construction. Pedogenetic processes at high altitude are strongly limited by extreme climatic conditions, resulting in low resistance and resilience with respect to any human-induced changes; therefore, it is key to quantify the impact of ski slope construction and management on such fragile pedo-ecosystems. KEYWORDS: alpine tundra, pedogenesis, ski slope construction, ski slope management

  10. Comprehensive evaluation of high-steep slope stability and optimal high-steep slope design by 3D physical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xing-ping; Shan, Peng-fei; Cai, Mei-feng; Ren, Fen-hua; Tan, Wen-hui

    2015-01-01

    High-steep slope stability and its optimal excavation design in Shuichang open pit iron mine were analyzed based on a large 3D physical simulation technique. An optimal excavation scheme with a relatively steeper slope angle was successfully implemented at the northwest wall between Nos. 4 and 5 exploration lines of Shuichang Iron Mine, taking into account the 3D scale effect. The physico-mechanical properties of rock materials were obtained by laboratory tests conducted on sample cores from exploration drilling directly from the iron mine. A porous rock-like composite material was formed for the model, and the mechanical parameters of the material were assessed experimentally; specifically, the effect of water on the sample was quantitatively determined. We adopted an experimental setup using stiff modular applied static loading to carry out a visual excavation of the slope at a random depth. The setup was equipped with acoustic emission (AE) sensors, and the experiments were monitored by crack optical acquirement, ground penetrating radar, and close-field photogrammetry to investigate the mechanisms of rock-mass destabilization in the high-steep slope. For the complex study area, the model results indicated a clear correlation between the model's destabilization resulting from slope excavation and the collected monitoring information. During the model simulation, the overall angle of the slope increased by 1-6 degrees in different sections. Dramatically, the modeled excavation scheme saved over 80 million tons of rock from extraction, generating enormous economic and ecological benefits.

  11. Slope Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using ArcGIS's Spatial Analyst 'Slope' Tool. Slope describes the maximum steepness of a...

  12. Quantifying Slopes with Digital Elevation Models of the Verdugo Hills, California: Effects of Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Burbank, D. W.; Duncan, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    Quantification of surface slope angles is valuable in a wide variety of earth sciences. Slopes measured from digital elevation models (DEMs) or other topographic data sets depend strongly on the length scale or window size used in the slope calculations.

  13. Impacts of Habitat Slope on Plant from of Astracantha adscendens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Khajeddin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Astracantha adscendens is an endemic species in Iran growing on alpine and above alpine timberline habitats on the Zagross Mountain Range. These habitats are characterized by steep slopes, heavy snowfalls and long ice formation periods. The present study was carried out in Chelgerd, Bakhtiari, and Fereidan, Isfahan. Slopes, elevation above sea-level, and magnetic north azimuth were measured. The canopy cover was also measured along four radii in upward, downward, left and right directions. Regression analysis was performed for the measured values of plant and environmental factors. The results revealed that the upward radius had a high negative correlation with slope changes while the downward radius showed no relationship with slope variations. The two left and right radii had a high and positive relationship with each other, both reducing in length as the slope steepness increased. Shrub volume decreases with increasing slope steepness. Plant shape was classified into seven groups using Sorenson similarity index and constructing the dendrogram. Snow pressure bends the stem toward the soil surface. Snow gliding pressure scratches stem and its base buds above the bent stem. Soil and debris move downward the slope as a result of snow gliding and rainfall runoff as well as wildlife and domestic animals. Snow gliding along with other natural factors have various effects on A. adscendens plant form which can be grouped under three categories: direct mechanical effect of snow, physiological effect of snow, and indirect effect of precipitation and wildlife. The environmental factors and plant physiological responses to them change the A. adscendens plant form from a funnel or ob-conical shape to a semi-funnel or semi ob-conical form.

  14. Landslides induced by heavy rainfall in July 2012 in Northern Kyushu District, Japan and the influence of long term rainfall increase comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Aditian, Aril

    2013-04-01

    1. Objective We had a deluge in July 2012 in the northern Kyushu district with intense rainfall of 800mm and 108mm/hr. This intensity yielded countless traces of debris flow and landslides, slope failures that induced tremendous damage and causalities in the area. Hence, several field investigations and reconnaissance tasks were conducted to delve into this sediment-related disaster. The various results and the information obtained through this investigation were reported, mentioning the damage, the meteorological condition, geologic-geomorphologic features and hydraulic characteristics of the debris flows, vegetation effects, and the influence of the climate change. Increase in rainfall that may be induced by the global climate change is obvious in Kyushu district, Japan, according to the analysis of rain data observed in various locations including mountainside points that are not influenced by local warming due to urbanization. On this point of view, we are intrigued to elucidate the response of landslide to this increase in rainfall. Hence, its long term impact on this landslide disaster is also analyzed comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking. 2. Method and target areas Field investigation on landslides slopes, slope failures and torrents where debris flows occurred are conducted to obtain the geologic data, geo-structure, vegetation feature, soil samples and topographic data i.e. cross sections, then soil shear tests and soil permeability tests are also conducted. The rainfall data at the nearest rain observatory were obtained from the database of Japan meteorological agency. The long term impact on the slope stability at some slopes in the area is analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) combined with rain infiltration and seepage analysis with the long term rainfall fluctuation data, obtaining factor of safety ( Fs) on real landslide slopes. The results are compared with the destabilized influence on the slopes due to the soil strength reduction by seismic shaking. The target areas are located in northern Kyushu district, western Japan where they often have severe landslide disasters. The geology in research areas consists of Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks (mainly schist, slate) and Quaternary volcanic sediment such as Aso volcano body. The vegetation consists of mainly Japanese cypress, cedar or bamboo. 3. Result and consideration Consequently, the long term rainfall increase in the region such as increment of approximately 20 mm/hr for rain intensity Ri in 36 years is confirmed statistically using Kendall's rank correlation, and it is found that its impact on slope stability is considerable and critical in other cases. In the sample landslide slopes, even the increase in rain of duration for only 10 years has impact to a certain extent on their stabilities in terms of Fs. The Fs calculated with rains in previous decade is higher than 1.0 that corresponds to stable state, whereas the Fs with present rains is lower than 1.0 such as 0.99 which means unstable state. Extremely heavy rainfall with this impact is generally cause extreme ground water pressure in the slope. It is also obvious that the extreme ground water content rendered even small landslides liquefied to be source of destructive debris flows. In this disaster, especially in the Aso volcanic region, tremendous number of debris flow occurred and even the talus cone slopes which are usually stable collapsed to flow down. However, the influence of the long term rainfall increase on the slopes (such as 1% decrease in Fs) is not relatively small compared with the destabilization of the slopes due to the reduction of soil strength by seismic shaking (8~9 % reduction in Fs after seismic shaking of even 490gal). 4. Conclusion In the disaster in July 2012, many landslides and debris flows originated from landslides induced by concentrated underground water supplied by the heavy rainfall occurred. The increase of rainfall due to climate change with the increasing rate such as 20 mm/hr surely has impact on almost landslide slopes in aspects of slope stability, although the influence of the long term rainfall increase on the slopes is relatively small compared with the destabilization of the slopes due to the reduction of soil strength by seismic shakings. Therefore, with this rain increase rate, it is possible for many forest slopes or natural slopes to become unstable and cause landslide disasters especially after potential strong earthquake in the near future.

  15. Very rare Q-slope none overcome by electropolishing and baking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discovered the very rare Q-slope none overcome by electropolishing and baking at 120degC for 48 hours. The Q-slope is not related to 'Hydrogen disease'. The Q-slope is not improved by the wiping and steam so that we recognize that the Q-slope is not caused by some cohesion things of the cavity's surface. The rare Q-slope is categorized a low, medium and high rare Q-slope. In this paper, we report the Rare Q-slope and the categorized rare Q-slope. (author)

  16. Robustness for slope stability modelling under deep uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Susana; Holcombe, Liz; Pianosi, Francesca; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Landslides can have large negative societal and economic impacts, such as loss of life and damage to infrastructure. However, the ability of slope stability assessment to guide management is limited by high levels of uncertainty in model predictions. Many of these uncertainties cannot be easily quantified, such as those linked to climate change and other future socio-economic conditions, restricting the usefulness of traditional decision analysis tools. Deep uncertainty can be managed more effectively by developing robust, but not necessarily optimal, policies that are expected to perform adequately under a wide range of future conditions. Robust strategies are particularly valuable when the consequences of taking a wrong decision are high as is often the case of when managing natural hazard risks such as landslides. In our work a physically based numerical model of hydrologically induced slope instability (the Combined Hydrology and Stability Model - CHASM) is applied together with robust decision making to evaluate the most important uncertainties (storm events, groundwater conditions, surface cover, slope geometry, material strata and geotechnical properties) affecting slope stability. Specifically, impacts of climate change on long-term slope stability are incorporated, accounting for the deep uncertainty in future climate projections. Our findings highlight the potential of robust decision making to aid decision support for landslide hazard reduction and risk management under conditions of deep uncertainty.

  17. Effect of floor slope and load carriage on standing posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Raoul F; Dalton, Elan A

    2005-01-01

    Posture has been linked to low back pain and other ailments. While heeled shoes have been investigated, the effect of floor slope and load carriage on posture has received little attention. Therefore, the goal of this investigation was to assess these factors. Twenty-one men and 22 women (all healthy) of college age provided university-approved informed consent prior to participation. After familiarization, subjects stood motionless on the slope (facing up and down at 10 degrees and 20 degrees as well as the level), then bent over picking up a milk crate from the floor (men = 25kg, women = 15kg), and returned to a motionless standing position with the crate at knuckle height. Six trials were performed in each condition with the last three averaged to produce representative results in both standing conditions for each slope. Right sagittal plane kinematics and surface EMG of the erector spinae and middle trapezius were recorded. A static inverse model calculated moments at L5/S1. Significant differences (p trends existed in the low-back, knee, and ankle angles when standing without the load (p < 0.001) while the same parameters plus hip angle and L5/S1 moment were significantly different across floor slope with the load (p < = 0.026). In conclusion, both floor slope and load carriage should be considered when assessing ergonomic factors related to standing posture. PMID:15850077

  18. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  19. Retrieval of short ocean wave slope using polarimetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a passive optical remote sensing technique for recovering shape information about a water surface, in the form of a two-dimensional slope map. The method, known as polarimetric slope sensing (PSS), uses the relationship between surface orientation and the change in polarization of reflected light to infer the instantaneous two-dimensional slope across the field-of-view of an imaging polarimeter. For unpolarized skylight, the polarization orientation and degree of linear polarization of the reflected skylight provide sufficient information to determine the local surface slope vectors. A controlled laboratory experiment was carried out in a wave tank with mechanically generated gravity waves. A second study was performed from a pier on the Hudson River, near Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. We demonstrated that the two-dimensional slope field of short gravity waves could be recovered accurately without interfering with the fluid dynamics of the air or water, and water surface features appear remarkably realistic. The combined field and laboratory results demonstrate that the polarimetric camera gives a robust characterization of the fine-scale surface wave features that are intrinsic to wind-driven air–sea interaction processes

  20. Predicting moisture problems in low-slope roofing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Byars, N.A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States). Dept. of Engineering Technology

    1998-11-01

    Moisture intrusion is the major reason why low-slope roofing systems fail prematurely. With approximately 75% of all roofing activity being reroofing, the roofing professional is faced with deciding what to do with an existing wet roof on almost a daily basis. This paper describes finite-difference computer modeling that has been performed to address moisture control in low-slope roof systems. Based on a large database of finite difference modeling results, algorithms have been developed that allow the roofing practitioners to simply determine if a roofing system design requires a vapor retarder or if the system can be modified to enhance its tolerance for small leaks. This paper illustrates how modeling results were obtained, describes the process employed to develop the algorithms, and demonstrates how these algorithms can be used to design a moisture tolerant low-slope roof. The range of applicability and limitations of these algorithms is also detailed.

  1. Slope-reversed Mott transition in multiorbital systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aaram J.; Choi, MooYoung; Jeon, Gun Sang

    2015-09-01

    We examine finite-temperature phase transitions in the two-orbital Hubbard model with different bandwidths by means of the dynamical mean-field theory combined with the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. It is found that there emerges a peculiar slope-reversed first-order Mott transition between the orbital-selective Mott phase and the Mott insulator phase in the presence of Ising-type Hund's coupling. The origin of the slope-reversed phase transition is clarified by the analysis of the temperature dependence of the energy density. It turns out that the increase of Hund's coupling lowers the critical temperature of the slope-reversed Mott transition. Beyond a certain critical value of Hund's coupling the first-order transition turns into a finite-temperature crossover. We also reveal that the orbital-selective Mott phase exhibits frozen local moments in the wide orbital, which is demonstrated by the spin-spin correlation functions.

  2. Newton slopes for Artin-Schreier-Witt towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Wan, Daqing; Xiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We fix a monic polynomial f(x)∈Fq[x] over a finite field and consider the Artin-Schreier-Witt tower defined by f(x); this is a tower of curves ⋯→Cm→Cm−1→⋯→C0=A1, with total Galois group Zp. We study the Newton slopes of zeta functions of this tower of curves. This reduces to the study of the Newton...... slopes of L-functions associated to characters of the Galois group of this tower. We prove that, when the conductor of the character is large enough, the Newton slopes of the L-function form arithmetic progressions which are independent of the conductor of the character. As a corollary, we obtain a...

  3. VARIABILITY OF ARABLE AND FOREST SOILS PROPERTIES ON ERODED SLOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawe? Wi?niewski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic method of reducing soil and land erosion is a change of land use, for example, from arable to forest. Particularly effective as a protective role according to the Polish law soil-protecting forests. The thesis presents differences in the deformation of the basic soil properties on moraine slopes, depending on land use. There has been presented the function and the efficiency of the soil-protecting forests in erosion control. The soil cross section transects and soil analysis displayed that soil-protecting forests are making an essential soil cover protection from degradation, inter alia, limiting the decrease of humus content, reduction of upper soil horizons and soil pedons layer. On the afforested slopes it was stated some clear changes of grain size and chemical properties of soils in relation to adjacent slopes agriculturally used.

  4. Sensitivity of atypical lateral fire spread to wind and slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Colin. C.; Sharples, Jason J.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents new knowledge of the environmental sensitivity of a dynamic mode of atypical wildland fire spread on steep lee-facing slopes. This is achieved through a series of idealized numerical simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF-Fire coupled atmosphere-fire models. The sensitivity of the atypical lateral fire spread across lee slopes is tested for a varying background wind speed, wind direction relative to the terrain aspect, and lee slope steepness. The results indicate that the lateral spread characteristics are highly sensitive to each of these environmental conditions, and there is a broad agreement with the empirical thresholds calculated for lateral spread events observed in the 2003 Canberra bushfires. A theory to explain these environmental thresholds and their apparent interdependency is presented. The results are expected to have important implications for the management of wildland fires in rugged terrain.

  5. Violating the General Density-Slope Anisotropy Inequality

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Jeremy A

    2014-01-01

    We examine the robustness of the well-known empirical relationship between the density slope and the velocity anisotropy of collisionless systems. This relation, known as the Global Density-Slope Anisotropy Inequality (GDSAI) (Ciotti & Morganti, 2010), posits that no collisionless system with a globally positive distribution function exists where the anisotropy exceeds half of the power-law of the density slope. We significantly extend previous indications that the GDSAI is not a universal rule by identifying a class of models where violation occurs. These models possess a globally positive DF, have an isotropic central core, but are not guaranteed to be stable. Our analysis suggests that stability criteria provide a stronger basis for determining if a DF represents an equilibrium solution for a collisionless system.

  6. Forest harvesting influence on slope erosion in Baikal Basin Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchin, A. A.; Borisov, A. N.; Burenina, T. A.

    2009-04-01

    Post-logging recovery of forest water protection and erosion prevention functions can occur different ways on slopes and in big river catchments. While erosion decreases several times during only three to five years after logging on slopes, as compared to its immediate post-logging rate, water silt load in big rivers can remain high for decades after forest logging in their catchments. Among other factors, this can be attributable to erosion of timber transportation roads and skidding trails, which become extremely eroded 10-15 years following forest logging. One should not underestimate a probable sediment load increase resulting from post-logging channel runoff changes. Disregarding this increase leads to contradictory conclusions about post-logging recovery of forest water protecting capability. Investigating this issue requires to clearly determine the type of the forest site of interest (a certain slope, an elementary or a complex catchments) and to consider the experience gained so far in estimating erosion rate changes depending on changing forest areas of continents. Therefore, hierarchical river catchments ranking should be recognized effective and useful for forest hydrology. This approach will allow systematizing the existing information and facilitating the development of fruitful analysis of water protection and erosion prevention functions of forest in areas of different ranks. This study used an approach that enabled a single-model description of the rate of soil erosion previously estimated by different models for areas of various ranks, from a micro slope to elementary catchments. An elementary catchments is defined as the smallest drainage area characterized by uniform surface, ground, and vegetation structures and having a single well-pronounced channel, with hydro network being practically absent. Using runoff slope length as the argument and introducing a dummy variable that describes specific investigation methodologies ensured high generality of this model. The model describing soil erosion rates on separate slopes and in elementary catchments is: ln M=-9,3+0,95lnX-0,064NlnL+0,069lnXlnm/lnL+5,03K+1,49lnI+ +0,0162ln((X-W)/In)i-0,00026ln((X-W)/In)i2 R2 =0,86; =1,04; FС=221; where M is sediment load module, t/km2; N is time since the last disturbance (fire or logging), years; X is precipitation amount, mm; I is precipitation rate, mm/min; m is soil mineralization level, %; L is length of slope where surface runoff occurs, m; W is forest floor moisture capacity, mm; In is soil water permeability, mm/min; i is slope, degrees; K is investigation methodology indicator (it is assumed to equal 1 in the case of area sprinkling and 2 in erosion observations on permanent runoff sample sites and in catchments); R² is multiple determination coefficient; is standard deviation, ton per km2; and FС is Fisher criterion. All coefficients are 95% confident. This model shows a monotonous increase in sediment load module with increasing total moisture in an area and soil mineralization on burned or harvested sites. This module decreases with increasing forest floor moisture capacity and soil water permeability. These trends, as well as slope-caused soil erosion changes, were reported by earlier studies. Our experimental data obtained by other methods did not impact the earlier identified relationships. Therefore, estimating slope length precipitation rate influences on sediment load and predicting soil erosion slowdown on disturbed sites present a great interest. Numerical experiments with this model showed the sediment load module to increase with increasing precipitation rate and to decrease with increasing slope length. This decrease might be attributable to soil particle re-deposition in the lower parts of a slope. Re-deposited erosion products do not get into streams and become involved again in soil development.

  7. The relevance of periglacial cover beds for slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhorst, Birgit; Bodo, Damm; Franz, Ottner

    2010-05-01

    The occurrence and distribution of periglacial cover beds provides information on the landscape evolution in space and time. On the one hand requests on age classification of landslide areas and their activity can be solved in the application of the concept of periglacial cover beds. On the other hand, soil mechanical parameters of the cover beds are responsible for the preparation of landslides. On the basis of two examples in Central European low mountain areas, the survey of periglacial cover beds is connected to questions concerning slope stability and the assessment of hazardous zones. 1) At the slopes of the Jurassic cuesta scarp in SW-Germany, pedological and mineralogical investigations were carried out in landslide areas. So far, it is possible to distinguish two well-defined landslide areas, one of them belonging to the Pleistocene, the other one characterised by Holocene movements. In general, the distribution of soils and sediments is strongly linked to the age of landslide deposits and therefore give information on the hazard potential as well. In Pleistocene landslide areas, the parent material of the studied soils is formed by periglacial cover beds of Upper Pleistocene age, consisting of Jurassic, aeolian and volcanic components. The upper periglacial cover bed was recognised as the most important marker horizon in the studied slope areas. There, the existence of minerals originating from the eruption of the Laacher See volcano, dated to 12.900 yr BP, could be demonstrated for the first time. Most of the Pleistocene landforms are characterised by well-developed soils, like Clayic and Vertic Cambisols, whereas relic soils exclusively occur in the oldest parts of landslide deposits. Landslide areas affected by Holocene slope processes do not exhibit periglacial layers, as mass movements removed periglacial sediments and former soils extensively. By consequence, the parent material is different from those of Pleistocene landslide areas. 2)The Rhenodanubian Flysch zone of the eastern Alps of Austria is considered to be susceptible to landslides. In the study area, an undulating low mountain landscape of the eastern European Prealps, the Flysch bedrock is superimposed by Quaternary periglacial cover beds and loess. Both, the petrography of the bedrock and the soil mechanical properties of Quaternary sediments control the slope dynamics. The study analyses slope stability in the light of slope formation phases with respect to weathering, erosion and geology. Furthermore, geomorphological and soil-geographical methods are combined with soil-mechanical calculations. The application of the concept of periglacial cover beds facilitates the distinction between Holocene and Pleistocene landforms and slide masses in the research area. As a result, the study shows that the properties of Quaternary sediments and the occurrence of the densely bedded basal cover beds are responsible for landslide susceptibility. The variable permeability in loess layers, in contrast to that in the underlying basal cover beds, consisting mainly of marls and clayey material, is one of the fundamental controlling factors of mass movements. In a temporal context it is evident that the stability of slopes in the study area is influenced by several phases of slope formation. The synopsis of field survey, morphometrical, geotechnical as well as laboratory analyses, and slope stability calculation, gives evidence of five morphodynamic phases that partly reoccur in an alternating pattern. After having passed all phases, the stability of the slopes studied is increased, because modified soil- mechanical properties of the slide masses become important. As a consequence, the critical slope angle is raised by 3- 5°.

  8. Velocity analysis with local event slopes related probability density function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Lu, Wenkai; Zhang, Yingqiang

    2015-12-01

    Macro velocity model plays a key role in seismic imaging and inversion. The performance of traditional velocity analysis methods is degraded by multiples and amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) anomalies. Local event slopes, containing the subsurface velocity information, have been widely used to accomplish common time-domain seismic processing, imaging and velocity estimation. In this paper, we propose a method for velocity analysis with probability density function (PDF) related to local event slopes. We first estimate local event slopes with phase information in the Fourier domain. An adaptive filter is applied to improve the performance of slopes estimator in the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situation. Second, the PDF is approximated with the histogram function, which is related to attributes derived from local event slopes. As a graphical representation of the data distribution, the histogram function can be computed efficiently. By locating the ray path of the first arrival on the semblance image with straight-ray segments assumption, automatic velocity picking is carried out to establish velocity model. Unlike local event slopes based velocity estimation strategies such as averaging filters and image warping, the proposed method does not make the assumption that the errors of mapped velocity values are symmetrically distributed or that the variation of amplitude along the offset is slight. Extension of the method to prestack time-domain migration velocity estimation is also given. With synthetic and field examples, we demonstrate that our method can achieve high resolution, even in the presence of multiples, strong amplitude variations and polarity reversals.

  9. Wetting Front Advance From a Point Source in Sloping Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Mostafazadeh

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of field slope, emitter discharge, irrigation water volume and soil texture on soil moisture profile and soil surface wetted shape from a point source, field data were collected on three different soil types, three emitter discharges (4, 8, and 12 lph, four slopes (0, 2, 5, and 10%, and five irrigation water volumes (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 liters with three replications. The results showed that the surface-wetted area increases as the emitter discharge increases. The surface-wetted area decreased with a corresponding increase in emitter discharge in experimental fields with light-textured soils. In experimental fields with heavy textured soils and slopes greater than 5%, the changes in surface-wetted area due to the emitter discharge increases, were higher compared to slopes of less than 5%. Since, a higher emitter discharge would result in higher surface-wetted area, the results showed that for an equal volume of irrigation water, the soil moisture profile was deeper for lower emitter discharge. In general, the volume of wetted zone was higher for greater emitter discharges. It was found that as the volume of irrigation water increased, the volume of wetted zone would increase correspondingly. This effect is more prominent than that of emitter discharge. In general, the depth of wetting front was lower and the wetted surface area was greater for heavy textured soils as compared to the light textured soils. The wetted-surface area and the shape of wetting front in the direction of slope were affected by the soil infiltration, emitter discharge and volume of irrigation water where these effects were more critical in higher sloping lands.

  10. Development of a GIS-based failure investigation system for highway soil slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Raghav; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Tanyu, Burak F.

    2015-06-01

    A framework for preparation of an early warning system was developed for Maryland, using a GIS database and a collective overlay of maps that highlight highway slopes susceptible to soil slides or slope failures in advance through spatial and statistical analysis. Data for existing soil slope failures was collected from geotechnical reports and field visits. A total of 48 slope failures were recorded and analyzed. Six factors, including event precipitation, geological formation, land cover, slope history, slope angle, and elevation were considered to affect highway soil slope stability. The observed trends indicate that precipitation and poor surface or subsurface drainage conditions are principal factors causing slope failures. 96% of the failed slopes have an open drainage section. A majority of the failed slopes lie in regions with relatively high event precipitation ( P>200 mm). 90% of the existing failures are surficial erosion type failures, and only 1 out of the 42 slope failures is deep rotational type failure. More than half of the analyzed slope failures have occurred in regions having low density land cover. 46% of failures are on slopes with slope angles between 20° and 30°. Influx of more data relating to failed slopes should give rise to more trends, and thus the developed slope management system will aid the state highway engineers in prudential budget allocation and prioritizing different remediation projects based on the literature reviewed on the principles, concepts, techniques, and methodology for slope instability evaluation (Leshchinsky et al., 2015).

  11. Conceptual model for reinforced grass on inner dike slopes:

    OpenAIRE

    ComCoast

    2005-01-01

    A desk study has been carried out in order to develop a conceptual model for the erosion of inner dike slopes with reinforced grass cover. Based on the results the following can be concluded: The presence of a geosynthetic in a grass slope can be taken into account in the EPM method by increasing the critical flow velocity. In particular, a factor Cgeo has been added to the Mirtskhoulava formula. The value of Cgeo in this formula is unknown. Prediction of the failure of a reinforced grass...

  12. Wave Run-Up on Sloping Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouck, J. De; Troch, P.; Ronde, J. De; Frigaard, Peter; Gent, M. R. A. van

    2001-01-01

    Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which are taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. The crest level design of these structures is mainly based on physical scale model results.......Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which are taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. The crest level design of these structures is mainly based on physical scale model results....

  13. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands—where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in A...

  14. Slope Stability Analysis by Shear Strength Reduction Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Farshidfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research uses the shear strength reduction method to study soil slopes stability. In this method shear strength is considered to be reduced as less as failure occurs. It uses Plaxis, which is capable of calculating deformations rates and safety factors by gaining geometry data of a problem and soil specifications and using the finite element method (FEM. The analysis is performed at both static and pseudo-static modes. The effects of different parameters on slopes stability are shown by performing several analyses. Finally, the analyses performed by this method are compared with the ones obtained by finite difference method (FDM.

  15. Random wave-induced current on mild slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Ong, Muk Chen

    2015-12-01

    This paper provides a simple analytical method for calculating the wave-induced current due to long-crested random waves on mild slopes. The approach is based on assuming the waves to be a stationary random process, adopting the Battjes and Groenendijk (2000) wave height distribution for mild slopes. An example is included to demonstrate the application of the analytical method for practical purposes using data typical for field conditions; the significant values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport are calculated. The present results can be used to make assessment of the random wave-induced current based on available wave statistics.

  16. Morphodynamics and slope stability at Mergui Ridge, off western Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, J.; Gross, F.; Krastel, S.; Jintasaeranee, P.; Bunsomboonsakul, S.; Winkelmann, D.; Weinrebe, W.

    2012-04-01

    2D seismic data from the top and the western slope of the Mergui Ridge (200 km off the Thai west coast) have been acquired during MASS cruise III in January 2011 in water depths between 300 and 2200 m. The Mergui Ridge is a part of the outer shelf slope off the Thai-Malay Peninsula and forms the eastern boundary of the East Andaman Basin. Structural features in the working area include faulted older slope sediments at the transition from Mergui Ridge to East Andaman Basin that are onlapping on the (acoustic) basement of Mergui Ridge. At their top these sediments are bordered by a pronounced erosive unconformity. Younger sedimentary units on top include three E-W elongated carbonate platforms. Moreover, drift sediments are deposited on top of the ridge, comprising features such as large scale sediment waves and moats around the platforms indicating transport and reworking of the sediments. These sediments are thinning towards the edge of the ridge where a zone of non-sedimentation prevails. In the East Andaman Basin younger sediments comprise disturbed and partially faulted units that are overlain by plastered drifts with increasing thickness towards south, where pronounced sediment waves within the drifts may indicate slope normal sediment transport by bottom currents. At the basin ridge transition, within the drift sediments on top of Mergui Ridge, and at the edge of the ridge several smaller scale mass transport deposits were identified. These MTDs indicate a general instability of the slope. Instability and general morphology of the slope may result from long-term tectonic processes such as extension due to backarc basin formation in the Andaman Sea basin. Moreover, phases of uplift, erosion and subsidence may have contributed to faulting and deformation of older units in our working area. Ongoing tectonics might still cause deformation and instability. In addition, bottom currents may presently play an important role concerning morphodynamic development by transporting and reworking drift sediment units and thereby shaping their morphology by along slope transport on top of the Mergui Ridge and slope normal transport in the East Andaman Basin.

  17. Spatial distribution models of erosion on slopes cultivated with vineyards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils cultivated with vineyards have high rates of erosion. In the Mediterranean area, this is related to the environmental characteristics and the management of cultivation techniques. Indeed, in this region the rainfall intensity and the location of vineyards on slopes favour the erosive activity of runoff. The total area of vineyards in La Rioja (Spain) is currently almost 40,000 ha. Vineyards are located on hillsides between 400 and 60 m.a.s.l. Of the vineyards of La Rioja 81,7% are planted on slopes with a gradient between 3 degree centigrade and 9 degree centigrade. (Author) 5 refs.

  18. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska's Arctic Slope. Although it is concentrated on snow of the R{sub 4}D project area, it is important to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.

  19. Detecting regular dynamics from time series using permutations slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyebe Fouda, J. S. Armand; Koepf, Wolfram

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present the entropy related to the largest slope of the permutation as an efficient approach for distinguishing between regular and non-regular dynamics, as well as the similarities between this method and the three-state test (3ST) algorithm. We theoretically establish that for suitably chosen delay times, permutations generated in the case of regular dynamics present the same largest slope if their order is greater than the period of the underlying orbit. This investigation helps making a clear decision (even in a noisy environment) in the detection of regular dynamics with large periods for which PE gives an arbitrary nonzero complexity measure.

  20. The Perceptual Experience of Slope by Foot and by Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnal, Alen; Abdul-Malak, Daniel T.; Durgin, Frank H.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the bodily senses have often been regarded as impeccable sources of spatial information and as being the teacher of vision. Here, the authors report that the haptic perception of slope by means of the foot is greatly exaggerated. The exaggeration is present in verbal as well as proprioceptive judgments. It is shown that this…

  1. Slope failure on Eros- Implications for regolith properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Murchie, S.; Cheng, A.; Robinson, M.

    2001-12-01

    The physical properties of regolith record processes important in the surface evolution of asteroids. For example, grain size is affected by the rates and style of cratering, and in turn affects spectral properties. In this study, we combine results acquired from the NEAR laser rangefinder (NLR) and the multispectral imager (MSI) to gain insight into physical characteristics of the regolith. By comparing the most recent NLR shape model to MSI albedo maps of Eros, we can determine the regional slope at which regolith fails. High albedos have been identified by the MSI team primarily in regions of steep slope, and attributed to exposure of the subsurface by mass-wasting processes. We determine the angles at which slope failure occurs by mapping individual NLR transects through high albedo regions visible in the MSI images, and use slope stability analyses to estimate the range of regolith grain sizes required to obtain failure at the observed angle. Preliminary results suggest that the regolith of Eros associated with these failures is coarse and possibly gravel-sized.

  2. Data compression by a decreasing slope-threshold test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinrock, L.

    1973-01-01

    Resolution can be obtained at large compression ratios with method for selecting data points for transmission by telemetry in television compressed-data system. Test slope of raw data stream and compare it to symmetric pair of decreasing thresholds. When either threshold is exceeded, data are sampled and transmitted; thresholds are reset, and test begins again.

  3. Breaking of Waves over a Steep Bottom Slope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten S.

    The thesis deals with the wave breaking process of waves propagating over a steep submerged bottom slope. The amount of energy dissipated in the wave breaking process is focused upon. An extensive number of experimental tests (>400) using regular and irregular waves breaking over a simulated reef...

  4. Modeling the voice source in terms of spectral slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garellek, Marc; Samlan, Robin; Gerratt, Bruce R; Kreiman, Jody

    2016-03-01

    A psychoacoustic model of the voice source spectrum is proposed. The model is characterized by four spectral slope parameters: the difference in amplitude between the first two harmonics (H1-H2), the second and fourth harmonics (H2-H4), the fourth harmonic and the harmonic nearest 2 kHz in frequency (H4-2 kHz), and the harmonic nearest 2 kHz and that nearest 5 kHz (2 kHz-5 kHz). As a step toward model validation, experiments were conducted to establish the acoustic and perceptual independence of these parameters. In experiment 1, the model was fit to a large number of voice sources. Results showed that parameters are predictable from one another, but that these relationships are due to overall spectral roll-off. Two additional experiments addressed the perceptual independence of the source parameters. Listener sensitivity to H1-H2, H2-H4, and H4-2 kHz did not change as a function of the slope of an adjacent component, suggesting that sensitivity to these components is robust. Listener sensitivity to changes in spectral slope from 2 kHz to 5 kHz depended on complex interactions between spectral slope, spectral noise levels, and H4-2 kHz. It is concluded that the four parameters represent non-redundant acoustic and perceptual aspects of voice quality. PMID:27036277

  5. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  6. THE SLOPE OF THE BARYONIC TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) study for a local sample of relatively isolated disk galaxies. We derive a BTFR with a slope near 3 measured over about 4 dex in baryon mass for our combined H I and bright spiral disk samples. This BTFR is significantly flatter and has less scatter than the TFR (stellar mass only) with its slope near 4 reported for other samples and studies. A BTFR slope near 3 is in better agreement with the expected slope from simple ?CDM cosmological simulations that include both stellar and gas baryons. The scatter in the TFR/BTFR appears to depend on W20: galaxies that rotate slower have more scatter. The atomic gas-to-stars ratio shows a break near W20 = 250 km s-1 probably associated with a change in star formation efficiency. In contrast, the absence of such a break in the BTFR suggests that this relation was probably set at the main epoch of baryon dissipation rather than as a product of later galactic evolution.

  7. The Slope of the Baryonic Tully-Fisher Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, Sebastin; Freeman, Kenneth; Jerjen, Helmut; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Puerari, Ivnio

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of a baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) study for a local sample of relatively isolated disk galaxies. We derive a BTFR with a slope near 3 measured over about 4 dex in baryon mass for our combined H I and bright spiral disk samples. This BTFR is significantly flatter and has less scatter than the TFR (stellar mass only) with its slope near 4 reported for other samples and studies. A BTFR slope near 3 is in better agreement with the expected slope from simple ?CDM cosmological simulations that include both stellar and gas baryons. The scatter in the TFR/BTFR appears to depend on W 20: galaxies that rotate slower have more scatter. The atomic gas-to-stars ratio shows a break near W 20 = 250 km s-1 probably associated with a change in star formation efficiency. In contrast, the absence of such a break in the BTFR suggests that this relation was probably set at the main epoch of baryon dissipation rather than as a product of later galactic evolution.

  8. Stability Analysis of Nonlinear Systems with Slope Restricted Nonlinearities

    OpenAIRE

    Xian Liu; Jiajia Du; Qing Gao

    2014-01-01

    The problem of absolute stability of Lur'e systems with sector and slope restricted nonlinearities is revisited. Novel time-domain and frequency-domain criteria are established by using the Lyapunov method and the well-known Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov (KYP) lemma. The criteria strengthen some existing results. Simulations are given to illustrate the efficiency of the results.

  9. Stability Analysis of Nonlinear Systems with Slope Restricted Nonlinearities

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xian; Du, Jiajia; Gao, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The problem of absolute stability of Lur’e systems with sector and slope restricted nonlinearities is revisited. Novel time-domain and frequency-domain criteria are established by using the Lyapunov method and the well-known Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov (KYP) lemma. The criteria strengthen some existing results. Simulations are given to illustrate the efficiency of the results.

  10. Stability analysis of nonlinear systems with slope restricted nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian; Du, Jiajia; Gao, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The problem of absolute stability of Lur'e systems with sector and slope restricted nonlinearities is revisited. Novel time-domain and frequency-domain criteria are established by using the Lyapunov method and the well-known Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov (KYP) lemma. The criteria strengthen some existing results. Simulations are given to illustrate the efficiency of the results. PMID:24592160

  11. Spider (Araneae) communities of scree slopes in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Vlastimil; Klimeš, Leoš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2005), s. 280-289. ISSN 0161-8202 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6007401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508; CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : scree slopes * environmental factors * ice formation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.557, year: 2005

  12. Overtopping And Rear Slope Stabillity Of Reshaping Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans Falk; Lykke Andersen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of overtopping and rear slope stability of reshaping breakwaters has been carried out. The variation of those two parameters with crest width, crest freeboard and sea state was investigated. The tests showed that the variation in overtopping discharge with crest freeboard was...

  13. Slope versus Elasticity and the Burden of Taxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Philip E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Criticizes the standard presentation, in introductory economics, of the burden of a tax as an application of elasticity. Argues that using the slopes of a supply and demand curve is the simplest and easiest way to clarify tax incidence. Includes three graphs illustrating this approach. (MJP)

  14. 30 CFR 785.15 - Steep slope mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steep slope mining. 785.15 Section 785.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY...

  15. 30 CFR 716.2 - Steep-slope mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., residential or public land uses of 30 CFR 715.13 has been achieved except for the requirement at § 715.13(d)(3... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steep-slope mining. 716.2 Section 716.2 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL...

  16. Slope stability assessment for historical monument management, Machu Picchu, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan

    Zittau : DGGT, 2009. s. 413. [Conference on Engineering Geology and Forum Young Engineering Geologists /17./. 07.05.2009-10.05.2009, Zittau] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/09/P383 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : slope stability Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  17. The Psychological Mechanism of the Slippery Slope Argument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corner, Adam; Hahn, Ulrike; Oaksford, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Slippery slope arguments (SSAs) have a bad philosophical reputation. They seem, however, to be widely used and frequently accepted in many legal, political, and ethical contexts. Hahn and Oaksford (2007) argued that distinguishing strong and weak SSAs may have a rational basis in Bayesian decision theory. In this paper three experiments

  18. Slope histogram distribution-based parametrisation of Martian geomorphic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Zita; Székely, Balázs; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    The application of geomorphometric methods on the large Martian digital topographic datasets paves the way to analyse the Martian areomorphic processes in more detail. One of the numerous methods is the analysis is to analyse local slope distributions. To this implementation a visualization program code was developed that allows to calculate the local slope histograms and to compare them based on Kolmogorov distance criterion. As input data we used the digital elevation models (DTMs) derived from HRSC high-resolution stereo camera image from various Martian regions. The Kolmogorov-criterion based discrimination produces classes of slope histograms that displayed using coloration obtaining an image map. In this image map the distribution can be visualized by their different colours representing the various classes. Our goal is to create a local slope histogram based classification for large Martian areas in order to obtain information about general morphological characteristics of the region. This is a contribution of the TMIS.ascrea project, financed by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG). The present research is partly realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4.A/2-11-1-2012-0001 high priority "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and Operating an Inland Student and Researcher Personal Support System convergence program" project's scholarship support, using Hungarian state and European Union funds and cofinances from the European Social Fund.

  19. Consequence assessment of large rock slope failures in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Horton, Pascal; Sandy, Gro; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Bhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2014-05-01

    Steep glacially carved valleys and fjords in Norway are prone to many landslide types, including large rockslides, rockfalls, and debris flows. Large rockslides and their secondary effects (rockslide-triggered displacement waves, inundation behind landslide dams and outburst floods from failure of landslide dams) pose a significant hazard to the population living in the valleys and along the fjords shoreline. The Geological Survey of Norway performs systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway and has detected more than 230 unstable slopes with significant postglacial deformation. This large number necessitates prioritisation of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic displacement measurements, continuous monitoring and early-warning systems. Prioritisation is achieved through a hazard and risk classification system, which has been developed by a panel of international and Norwegian experts (www.ngu.no/en-gb/hm/Publications/Reports/2012/2012-029). The risk classification system combines a qualitative hazard assessment with a consequences assessment focusing on potential life losses. The hazard assessment is based on a series of nine geomorphological, engineering geological and structural criteria, as well as displacement rates, past events and other signs of activity. We present a method for consequence assessment comprising four main steps: 1. computation of the volume of the unstable rock slope; 2. run-out assessment based on the volume-dependent angle of reach (Fahrbschung) or detailed numerical run-out modelling; 3. assessment of possible displacement wave propagation and run-up based on empirical relations or modelling in 2D or 3D; and 4. estimation of the number of persons exposed to rock avalanches or displacement waves. Volume computation of an unstable rock slope is based on the sloping local base level technique, which uses a digital elevation model to create a second-order curved surface between the mapped extent of the unstable rock slope. This surface represents the possible basal sliding surface of an unstable rock slope. The elevation difference between this surface and the topographic surface estimates the volume of the unstable rock slope. A tool has been developed for the present study to adapt the curvature parameters of the computed surface to local geological and structural conditions. The obtained volume is then used to define the angle of reach of a possible rock avalanche from the unstable rock slope by using empirical derived values of angle of reach vs. volume relations. Run-out area is calculated using FlowR; the software is widely used for run-out assessment of debris flows and is adapted here for assessment of rock avalanches, including their potential to ascend opposing slopes. Under certain conditions, more sophisticated and complex numerical run-out models are also used. For rock avalanches with potential to reach a fjord or a lake the propagation and run-up area of triggered displacement waves is assessed. Empirical relations of wave run-up height as a function of rock avalanche volume and distance from impact location are derived from a national and international inventory of landslide-triggered displacement waves. These empirical relations are used in first-level hazard assessment and where necessary, followed by 2D or 3D displacement wave modelling. Finally, the population exposed in the rock avalanche run-out area and in the run-up area of a possible displacement wave is assessed taking into account different population groups: inhabitants, persons in critical infrastructure (hospitals and other emergency services), persons in schools and kindergartens, persons at work or in shops, tourists, persons on ferries and so on. Exposure levels are defined for each population group and vulnerability values are set for the rock avalanche run-out area (100%) and the run-up area of a possible displacement wave (70%). Finally, the total number of persons within the hazard area is calculated taking into account exposure and vulnerability. The method for conse

  20. Prótese do tornozelo híbrida em um caso de necrose avascular pós-traumática do tálus Hybrid ankle prosthesis in a case of post-traumatic avascular necrosis of the talus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jorge Gomes de Sousa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas do astrágalo originam frequentemente artrose pós-traumática tardia. Nestes casos, a utilização de próteses do tornozelo não cimentadas de última geração tem sido evitada pela presença de necrose avascular. Relatamos o caso de um paciente com 65 anos que se apresenta quatro anos após uma fratura do colo do astrágalo. Apresentava uma artrose do tornozelo dolorosa (escala AOFAS do retropé e tornozelo 19 e necrose avascular com colapso de toda a cúpula astragalina. Dada a extensão da necrose, foi decidido cimentar o componente protésico astragalino. Um ano após a cirurgia, o paciente apresenta bom resultado clínico e radiológico (escala AOFAS do retropé e tornozelo 87 e está satisfeito com o procedimento. Não temos conhecimento de nenhum relato semelhante na literatura.Talus fractures often lead to late post-traumatic arthrosis. In such cases, the use of latest generation, cementless prostheses has been hindered by the presence of avascular necrosis. We report the case of a 65-year-old patient who presented four years after a talus neck fracture. He had painful ankle arthrosis (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 19 and avascular necrosis, with collapse of the entire talar dome. Given the extent of the necrosis, it was decided to cement the talus prosthetic component. One year after the surgery, the patient shows good clinical and radiological results (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 87 and is satisfied with the procedure. We are not aware of any similar reports in the literature.

  1. Distribution of solar radiation including slope effect in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Shin Chul; Park, Jong-Hwa; Na, Sang Il; Park, Jin-Ki

    2012-10-01

    Agriculture and ecosystems are very solar radiation-sensitive making them useful for monitoring the impact on future food production. Accurate solar radiation data are necessary to evaluate major physiological reaction of crops and an impact of climate change. For most upland crops and orchard plants growing in sloping terrain, however the meteorological data are often limited. Considering the scarcity of detailed meteorological data around the country, there is a need for methods which can estimate reference solar radiation with limited data. This study describes a method to estimate monthly average daily solar radiation of considering the slope distribution. It was calculated using the 2010's meteorological data and KT method which is entered DEM and spatial interpolation data of both monthly average daily extraterrestrial radiation and monthly average daily radiation on land surface. Extracted slope from the DEM in South Korea include range between 0? to 77? and most of the land is mountainous. According to the slope, solar radiation characteristic show to have high value in spring season (April) relatively other season. Summer season interrupt to reach direct solar radiation, cause is unstable atmospheric and cloud. The distributions of monthly accumulated solar radiation indicated that differences caused by the topography effect are more important in winter than in other season because of the dependency on the solar altitude angle and duration of sunshine. Result of KT method is confirmed to overestimate monthly average 1.38MJ?m􀬶?day than solar radiation weather station measurement values. Solar radiation of slope error value will need continuous research and correction through both fields survey and topography factor.

  2. The dependence of sheet erosion velocity on slope angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev Sergey Nikolaevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method for estimating the erosion velocity on forested natural area. As a research object for testing the methodology the authors selected Neskuchny Garden - a city Park on the Moskva river embankment, named after the cognominal Palace of Catherine's age. Here, an almost horizontal surface III of the Moskva river terrace above the flood-plain is especially remarkable, accentuated by the steep sides of the ravine parallel to St. Andrew's, but short and nameless. The crests of the ravine sides are sharp, which is the evidence of its recent formation, but the old trees on the slopes indicate that it has not been growing for at least 100 years. Earlier Russian researchers defined vertical velocity of sheet erosion for different regions and slopes with different parent (in relation to the soil rocks. The comparison of the velocities shows that climatic conditions, in the first approximation, do not have a decisive influence on the erosion velocity of silt loam soils. The velocities on the shores of Issyk-Kul lake and in Moscow proved to be the same. But the composition of the parent rocks strongly affects the sheet erosion velocity. Even low-strength rock material reduces the velocity by times. Phytoindication method gives a real, physically explainable sheet erosion velocities. The speed is rather small but it should be considered when designing long-term structures on the slopes composed of dispersive soils. On the slopes composed of rocky soils sheet erosion velocity is so insignificant that it shouldn't be taken into account when designing. However, there may be other geological processes, significantly disturbing the stability of slopes connected with cracks.

  3. HIRESSS: a physically based slope stability simulator for HPC applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rossi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HIRESSS (HIgh REsolution Slope Stability Simulator is a physically based distributed slope stability simulator for analyzing shallow landslide triggering conditions in real time and on large areas using parallel computational techniques. The physical model proposed is composed of two parts: hydrological and geotechnical. The hydrological model receives the rainfall data as dynamical input and provides the pressure head as perturbation to the geotechnical stability model that computes the factor of safety (FS in probabilistic terms. The hydrological model is based on an analytical solution of an approximated form of the Richards equation under the wet condition hypothesis and it is introduced as a modeled form of hydraulic diffusivity to improve the hydrological response. The geotechnical stability model is based on an infinite slope model that takes into account the unsaturated soil condition. During the slope stability analysis the proposed model takes into account the increase in strength and cohesion due to matric suction in unsaturated soil, where the pressure head is negative. Moreover, the soil mass variation on partially saturated soil caused by water infiltration is modeled.

    The model is then inserted into a Monte Carlo simulation, to manage the typical uncertainty in the values of the input geotechnical and hydrological parameters, which is a common weak point of deterministic models. The Monte Carlo simulation manages a probability distribution of input parameters providing results in terms of slope failure probability. The developed software uses the computational power offered by multicore and multiprocessor hardware, from modern workstations to supercomputing facilities (HPC, to achieve the simulation in reasonable runtimes, compatible with civil protection real time monitoring.

    A first test of HIRESSS in three different areas is presented to evaluate the reliability of the results and the runtime performance on large areas.

  4. Parallel processing for efficient 3D slope stability modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Ivan; Mergili, Martin; Alvioli, Massimiliano; Metz, Markus; Schneider-Muntau, Barbara; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    We test the performance of the GIS-based, three-dimensional slope stability model r.slope.stability. The model was developed as a C- and python-based raster module of the GRASS GIS software. It considers the three-dimensional geometry of the sliding surface, adopting a modification of the model proposed by Hovland (1977), and revised and extended by Xie and co-workers (2006). Given a terrain elevation map and a set of relevant thematic layers, the model evaluates the stability of slopes for a large number of randomly selected potential slip surfaces, ellipsoidal or truncated in shape. Any single raster cell may be intersected by multiple sliding surfaces, each associated with a value of the factor of safety, FS. For each pixel, the minimum value of FS and the depth of the associated slip surface are stored. This information is used to obtain a spatial overview of the potentially unstable slopes in the study area. We test the model in the Collazzone area, Umbria, central Italy, an area known to be susceptible to landslides of different type and size. Availability of a comprehensive and detailed landslide inventory map allowed for a critical evaluation of the model results. The r.slope.stability code automatically splits the study area into a defined number of tiles, with proper overlap in order to provide the same statistical significance for the entire study area. The tiles are then processed in parallel by a given number of processors, exploiting a multi-purpose computing environment at CNR IRPI, Perugia. The map of the FS is obtained collecting the individual results, taking the minimum values on the overlapping cells. This procedure significantly reduces the processing time. We show how the gain in terms of processing time depends on the tile dimensions and on the number of cores.

  5. Recent slope mobilizations in the Storegga Slide area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, C.; Crutchley, G.; Karstens, J.; Dumke, I.; Duennbier, K.

    2012-12-01

    With ~3500 km3 of mobilized material the Storegga Slide off mid-Norway is one of the largest known sub-marine slope failures. It occurred approximately 8150 years ago and there is strong evidence suggesting that the slide caused a large tsunami that propagated through the North Atlantic and affected the coasts of Norway, Iceland and the U.K. In the Nyegga area along the northern side wall of the slide numerous shallow faults exist. These faults detach within the top 100 m below the sea floor at various stratigraphic levels below, at, and above the main slide plain of the Storegga Slide. Previous studies proposed that these faults are evidence for partial slope movements during the Storegga Slide event indicating that the adjacent slopes were deformed due to the stress variations caused by the Storegga Slide. New high-resolution Parasound data that we have collected in May 2012 onboard RV Meteor show offsets of reflectors that are buried less than 3 m below the sea floor. Assuming that the sedimentation rates derived from a near-by Marion Dufresne sediment core, can be extrapolated to the study area, these reflector offsets suggest that the faults are younger than the Storegga Slide. Given a several million year-long history of repeated slope failures in the area it is important to obtain more precise dates for the activity of the faults in order to assess if these faults can be used as an indicator for future slope failures in the area or if they are the result of small-scale adjustments of the head wall topography in the wake of the Storegga Slide.

  6. Dynamic and Static Combination Analysis Method of Slope Stability Analysis during Earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Lu; Zongjian Wang; Xiaoyuan Huang; Bin Zheng; Katsuhiko Arai

    2014-01-01

    The results of laboratory model tests for simulating the slope failure due to vibration, including unreinforced slope and the slope reinforced by using geotextile, show that the slope failure occurs when a cumulative plastic displacement exceeds a certain critical value. To overcome the defects of conventional stability analysis, which evaluates the slope characteristics only by its strength parameters, a numerical procedure considering the stiffness and deformation of materials and geosynthe...

  7. The assessment of slope stability and rock excavatability in a limestone quarry

    OpenAIRE

    Karaman, Kadir; Ercikdi, Bayram; Kesimal, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the stability and excavatability of newly stripped rock slopes (slope 1 (SN–1), slope 2 (SN–2), and slope 3 (SN–3)) in a limestone quarry. These are new production sites with comparable geological formations along the southern part of the quarry where three planar failures were previously observed. For this reason, detailed fieldwork was performed to determine the properties (spacing, roughness, etc.) of the discontinuities of the rock slopes in the study ...

  8. Model slope infiltration experiments for shallow landslides early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, E.; Greco, R.; Guida, A.; Olivares, L.; Picarelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    Occurrence of fast landslides has become more and more dangerous during the last decades, due to the increased density of settlements, industrial plants and infrastructures. Such problem is particularly worrying in Campania (Southern Italy), where the fast population growth led a diffuse building activity without planning: indeed, recent flowslides caused hundreds of victims and heavy damages to buildings, roads and other infrastructures. Large mountainous areas in Campania are mantled by loose pyroclastic granular soils up to a depth of a few meters from top soil surface. These soils have usually a grain size that falls in the domain of silty sands, including pumice interbeds (gravelly sands), with saturated hydraulic conductivities up to the order of 10-1 cm/min. Such deposits often cover steep slopes, which stability is guaranteed by the apparent cohesion due to suction under unsaturated conditions, that are the most common conditions for these slopes [Olivares and Picarelli, 2001]. Whereas rainfall infiltration causes soil to approach saturation, suction vanishes and slope failure may occur. Besides soil physical properties, landslide triggering is influenced by several factors, such as rainfall intensity, soil initial moisture and suction, slope inclination, boundary conditions. Whereas slope failure occurs with soil close to being saturated, landslide may develop in form of fast and destructive flowslide. Calibration of reliable mathematical models of such a complex phenomenon requires availability of experimental observations of the major variables of interest, such as soil moisture and suction, soil deformation and displacements, pore water pressure, during the entire process of infiltration until slope failure. Due to the sudden trigger and extremely rapid propagation of such type of landslides, such data sets are rarely available for natural slopes where flowslides occurred. As a consequence landslide risk assessment and early warning in Campania rely on simple empirical models [Versace et al., 2003] based on correlation between some features of rainfall records (cumulated height, duration, season etc.) and the correspondent observed landslides. Laboratory experiments on instrumented small scale slope models represent an effective way to provide data sets [Eckersley, 1990; Wang and Sassa, 2001] useful for building up more complex models of landslide triggering prediction. At the Geotechnical Laboratory of C.I.R.I.AM. an instrumented flume to investigate on the mechanics of landslides in unsaturated deposits of granular soils is available [Olivares et al. 2003; Damiano, 2004; Olivares et al., 2007]. In the flume a model slope is reconstituted by a moist-tamping technique and subjected to an artificial uniform rainfall since failure happens. The state of stress and strain of the slope is monitored during the entire test starting from the infiltration process since the early post-failure stage: the monitoring system is constituted by several mini-tensiometers placed at different locations and depths, to measure suction, mini-transducers to measure positive pore pressures, laser sensors, to measure settlements of the ground surface, and high definition video-cameras to obtain, through a software (PIV) appositely dedicated, the overall horizontal displacement field. Besides, TDR sensors, used with an innovative technique [Greco, 2006], allow to reconstruct the water content profile of soil along the entire thickness of the investigated deposit and to monitor its continuous changes during infiltration. In this paper a series of laboratory tests carried out on model slopes in granular pyroclastic soils taken in the mountainous area north-eastern of Napoli, are presented. The experimental results demonstrate the completeness of information provided by the various sensors installed. In particular, very useful information is given by the coupled measurements of soil water content by TDR and suction by tensiometers. Knowledge of soil water content at the occurrence of slope failure is of key importance, since high soil moisture, in such loose granular soils, may lead the landslide to develop in a fast flowslide, either by modifying the rehological properties of the mud, or by affecting slope equilibrium. However, actual water content is not predictable from suction measurements alone, because soil water retention curve is modified by shear stress and by soil bulk volume change under wet conditions. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The research was co-financed by the Italian Ministry of University, by means of the PRIN 2006 PRIN program, within the research project entitled ‘Definition of critical rainfall thresholds for destructive landslides for civil protection purposes'. REFERENCES Damiano, E., 2004, Meccanismi d'innesco di colate di fango in terreni piroclastici, Ph.D. Thesis, Seconda Università degli studi di Napoli, Italy. Eckersely, J. 1990. Instrumented laboratory flowslides. Géotechnique, 40(3): 489-502 Greco, R., 2006, Soil water content inverse profiling from single TDR waveforms, Journal Hydrol., Vol. 317, pp. 325-339. Olivares, L. and Picarelli, L., 2001, Susceptibility of loose pyroclastic soils to static liquefaction - Some preliminary data, Int. Conf. Landslides - Causes, countermeasures and impacts. Davos Olivares, L., Damiano, E. and Picarelli, L., 2003, Wetting and flume tests on a volcanic ash, International Conference on Fast Slope Movements - Prediction and Prevention for Risk Mitigation, Naples, Italy, pp. 399-404. Olivares, L. and Picarelli, L., 2006, Modelling of flowslides behaviour for risk mitigation, General Report, Int. Conf. on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics, Hong Kong, Vol. 1, pp. 99-113. Olivares, L., Damiano, E., Greco, R., Zeni, L., Picarelli, L., Minardo, A., Guida, A. and Bernini, R., 2007, An instrumented flume for investigation of the mechanics of rainfall-induced landslides in unsaturated granular soils. Subbmitted for publication in ASTM Geotechnical Testing Journal. Versace, P., Sirangelo, B. and Capparelli, G., 2003, Forewarning model of landslides triggered by rainfall. Proc. 3rd International Conference on Debris-Flow Hazards Mitigation: Mechanics, Prediction and Assessment, Davos. Wang, G. and Sassa, K., 2001, Factors affecting rainfall-induced flowslides in laboratory flume tests. Géotechnique, 51(7): 587-599.

  9. Shelf-Slope Exchange in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, P. J.; Wilkin, J.

    2004-12-01

    A high resolution model (ROMS, the Regional Ocean Modeling System) of U.S. East Coast circulation from Newfoundland to Cuba is used to explore features of alongshelf freshwater transport, residence time, and shelf-sea/deep-ocean exchange. The focus of the analysis is the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf-slope system which, like continental shelves throughout the world, contributes to the oceanic budgets of heat, salt, and fresh water. In addition, the "continental shelf pump" transfers carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean through fluxes of dissolved organic carbon and particulate organic carbon off the shelves. Solar radiation, evaporation, rainfall, riverine input, gas exchange with the atmosphere, and biological production all modify the character of shelf waters. In the MAB, the shelf-slope front separates shallow coastal waters from slope waters and the Gulf Stream, extending residence times on the shelf and maintaining coastal salinities at significantly lower levels than those offshore. The southwestward coastal mean flow exchanges weakly with slope waters along most of the MAB, with the strongest offshore flow occurring at Cape Hatteras where much of the flow is entrained into the Gulf Stream front. The shelf circulation is influenced by input from the Hudson and Delaware Rivers and Chesapeake Bay. Along the shelf break, exchange is modulated by warm-core rings from the Gulf Stream and variability of the shelf-break front. Key features of the seasonal circulation such as the MAB "Cold Pool" are captured by the simulation. Measurements suggest that DOC in shelf and shallow slope waters of the MAB include both old marine carbon and a young terrestrial-riverine-estuarine component, and these carbon cycling processes are being studied with a companion primary production, nitogen and carbon cycle model directly coupled to ROMS. Results showing salinity, idealized dye and Lagrangian float tracking results from a ROMS simulation of the MAB shelf circulation are presented. Shelf and slope water freshwater budgets are quantified, including regional variability in onshore/offshore exchange rates, and trhese are compared to observational estimates.

  10. Alaska North Slope oil-field restoration research strategy. Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document provides a research strategy to support ecological restoration of disturbances related to oil and gas developments on the North Slope of Alaska that is mutually beneficial to the arctic ecorestoration research community and the arctic regulatory community (including at least the following entities: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, EPA, National Marine Fisheries, US FWS, BLM, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, and the North Slope Borough). The purpose of this strategy is to: (1) identify major information or knowledge gaps that have inhibited restoration activities or slowed the regulatory decision process, (2) determine the potential for filling knowledge gaps through research, and (3) suggest tentative priorities for research that are based on the needs identified in steps one and two

  11. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  12. Desirable plant root traits for protecting unstable slopes against landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A.; Atger, C.; Bengough, G.; Fourcaud, T.; Sidle, R. C.

    2009-04-01

    A trait is defined as a distinct, quantitative property of organisms, usually measured at the individual level and used comparatively across species. Plant quantitative traits are extremely important for understanding the local ecology of any site. Plant height, architecture, root depth, wood density, leaf size and leaf nitrogen concentration control ecosystem processes and define habitat for other taxa. An engineer conjecturing as to how plant traits may directly influence physical processes occurring on sloping land just needs to consider how e.g. canopy architecture and litter properties influence the partitioning of rainfall among interception loss, infiltration and runoff. Plant traits not only influence abiotic processes occurring at a site, but also the habitat for animals and invertebrates. Depending on the goal of the landslide engineer, the immediate and long-term effects of plant traits in an environment must be considered if a site is to remain viable and ecologically successful. When vegetation is considered in models of slope stability, usually the only root parameters taken into consideration are tensile strength and root area ratio. Root system spatial structure is not considered, although the length, orientation and diameter of roots are recognized as being of importance. Thick roots act like soil nails on slopes, reinforcing soil in the same way that concrete is reinforced with steel rods. The spatial position of these thick roots also has an indirect effect on soil fixation in that the location of thin and fine roots will depend on the arrangement of thick roots. Thin and fine roots act in tension during failure on slopes and if they cross the slip surface, are largely responsible for reinforcing soil on slopes. Therefore, the most important trait to consider initially is rooting depth. To stabilize a slope against a shallow landslide, roots must cross the shear surface. The number and thickness of roots in this zone will therefore largely determine slope stability. Rooting depth is species dependent when soil conditions are not limiting and the number of horizontal lateral roots borne on the vertical roots usually changes with depth. Therefore, the number and orientation of roots that the shear surface intersects will change significantly with rooting depth for the same plant, even for magnitudes of only several cm. Similarly, depending on the geometry of the root system, the angle at which a root crosses the shear surface can also have an influence on its resistance to pullout and breakage. The angle at which a root emerges from the parent root is dependent on root type, depth and species (when soil conditions are not limiting). Due to the physiology of roots, a root branch can be initiated at any point along a parent root, but not necessarily emerge fully from the parent root. These traits, along with others including size, relative growth rate, regeneration strategies, wood structure and strength will be discussed with regard to their influence on slope stability. How each of these traits is influenced by soil conditions and plantation techniques is also of extreme importance to the landslide engineer. The presence of obstacles in the soil, as well as compaction, affects root length and branching pattern. Roots of many species of woody plants on shallow soils also tend to grow along fractures deep into the underlying bedrock which allows roots to locate supplies of nutrient and water rich pockets. Rooting depths of herbaceous species in water-limited environments are highly correlated with infiltration depth, but waterlogged soils can asphyxiate tree roots, resulting in shallow root systems. The need to understand and integrate each of these traits for a species is not easy. Therefore, we suggest a hierarchy whereby traits are considered in order of importance, along with how external factors influence their expression over time.

  13. Hydraulic Characteristics of a Stepped-slope Floating Breakwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stepped-slope floating breakwater is developed to provide wave protection to small ports and harbours. The width of the structure can be enhanced by increasing the number of breakwater units that are placed side-by-side to each other. This produces three types of test model, i.e. single-row, double-row and triple-row breakwaters. The test models have been tested in monochromatic waves in a wave flume to determine their hydraulic performance in various wave conditions. The incident and reflected wave profiles in the vicinity of the test models are recorded and analysed by using moving-probe method. The hydraulic performance of the test models are quantified by the coefficients of transmission, reflection and energy loss. The experimental results showed that the stepped-slope floating breakwater is an effective anti-reflection structure and a reasonably good wave attenuator.

  14. Integration of Indoor Ski Slopes into the Urban Recreation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Urbonaitė

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Indoor ski slope is an innovative type of active indoor recreation. This new urban character is simulating the concept of mountain ski resort and is considered to be a strong attraction point all year-round. Due to a big scale and complexity, sustainable integration into an urban context should be very carefully considered. Economical, social, environmental and aesthetic impact on surrounding territories is an important factor to be evaluated. International practice shows that the appropriate integration of the above mentioned typology into urban parks increase their popularity and use of the recreation zone. On the other hand, the alien architecture and egocentric dominance of complexes can cause conflict with the existing urban territories and natural environment. Having indoor ski slopes in mind at the stages of regional and town territorial planning is an important point. Only complex development can bring positive results for sustainable town development, town economy, tourism and social life. Article in Lithuanian

  15. Prehispanic agriculture and climate on the Pacific slope of Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Wilcut

    The relationship between agriculture and social complexity is a complicated one through both time and space; this is no less true in prehispanic Mesoamerica. Human occupation of the Pacific Coast of Gualtemala prior to Spanish contact was affected by humans' relationship with their physical environment, including the vegetation and climate. I examined multiple lines of evidence, including phytolith, pollen, and settlement data, seeking to detect changes within the paleoenviromental, paleoclimatic, and socio-cultural records from the Middle and Late Formative (1000 BC to AD 150) through the Classic (AD 150 to 600) and Post-Classic (ca. AD 1000) periods. This work reveals that social complexity on the Pacific Slope of Gualtemala developed alongside agricultural intensification. More significantly, however, it also reveals that while there was a population "collapse" on the Pacific Slope at the end of the Late Formative period, there was not the correlating drought or decline in agriculture seen in other areas of the Maya homeland.

  16. Slope-deviation measurement of Fresnel-shaped mold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefel, Peter; Hornung, Thorsten; Nitz, Peter; Reinecke, Holger

    2016-03-10

    Molds are used to dictate their shape to other materials in embossing or filling processes. In optics fabrication especially, the exact surface slope of the polymer replica is of high relevance. The quality control of molds is challenging: non-invasive, optical metrologies struggle with shiny surfaces that minimize the scattering of light. In addition, the inspection of complex shaped molds with a stepped optical surface can be difficult. In response, the authors show a backward ray-tracing approach combined with fringe-reflection technique to determine the slopes of a Fresnel-shaped mold surface with topography features in the magnitude order of a quarter millimeter. The error is kept small by stitching together several measurements with different sample rotations. PMID:26974807

  17. Speckle correlation method used to detect an object's surface slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smíd, Petr; Horváth, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav

    2006-09-01

    We present a technique employing a speckle pattern correlation method for detection of the slope of an object's surface. Controlled translation of an object under investigation and numerical correlation of speckle patterns recorded during its motion give information used to evaluate the tilt of the object. The proposed optical setup uses a symmetrical arrangement of detection planes in the image field and enables one to detect the tilt of an object's surface within the interval (10°-30°). Simulation analysis shows how to control the measuring range. The presented theory, simulation analysis, and setup are verified through an experiment by measurement of the slope of a surface of a cube made out of steel.

  18. Quantitative laboratory observations of internal wave reflection on ascending slopes

    CERN Document Server

    Gostiaux, L; Didelle, H; Sommeria, J; Viboud, S; Gostiaux, Louis; Dauxois, Thierry; Didelle, Henri; Sommeria, Joel; Viboud, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Internal waves propagate obliquely through a stratified fluid with an angle that is fixed with respect to gravity. Upon reflection on a sloping bed, striking phenomena are expected to occur close to the slope. We present here laboratory observations at moderately large Reynolds number. A particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique is used to provide time resolved velocity fields in large volumes. The generation of the second and third harmonic frequencies are clearly demonstrated in the impact zone. The mechanism for nonlinear wavelength selection is also discussed. Evanescent waves with frequency larger than the Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency are detected and experimental results agree very well with theoretical predictions. The amplitude of the different harmonics after reflection are also obtained.

  19. Centrifuge modelling of discrete pile rows to stabilise slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Boung Shik

    2008-01-01

    Discrete pile rows are widely used for improving the stability of potentially unstable slopes, where columns of reinforced concrete are constructed in the ground to reinforce it and inhibit instability. The method becomes more cost effective with wider pile spacings, but simultaneously there is also increasing risk that the soil will flow through the gap between adjacent piles, rather than arching across it. The impact of pile spacing along the row, which is likely to have a significant effec...

  20. Edge capillary-gravity waves on a sloping beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Sergey V.; Bulgakov, Sergey N.; Duran-Matute, Matias

    2005-04-01

    It is shown how the solution for velocity potential may be determined when the effect of surface tension is included in the linearized theory of Ursell-type edge waves over a plane-sloping beach. The problem is examined without making a hydrostatic assumption. Explicit solutions for edge capillary-gravity waves are given and the dispersion equation is obtained. The influence of capillarity on gravity waves is discussed.

  1. ASTRONOMICAL ALGORITHMS OF EGYPTIAN PYRAMIDS SLOPES AND THEIR MODULES DIVIDER

    OpenAIRE

    Aboulfotouh, Hossam M. K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to show the astronomical design principles that are encoded in the geometrical forms of the largest five pyramids of the fourth Egyptian dynasty, in Giza and Dahshur plateaus, based on using the pyramids’ design-modules that are mentioned in the so-called Rhind Mathematical Papyrus. It shows the astronomical algorithms for quantifying the slopes of pyramids, with reference to specific range of earth’s axial tilt, within spherical co-ordinates system. Besid...

  2. Slope influence diagnostics in conditional heteroscedastic time series models

    OpenAIRE

    Zevallos, Mauricio; Hotta, Luiz Koodi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide useful and simple expressions for slope influence diagnostics of several conditional heteroscedastic time series models under innovative model perturbations. These expressions are obtained by establishing a connection between the local influence and residual diagnostics. Monte Carlo experiments provided good results in terms of the size and power of the proposed statistics. To illustrate the results, we analyze the financial time series returns of the S&P500 and DJIA...

  3. Wave Run-Up on Sloping Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouck, J. De; Troch, P.; Ronde, J. De; Frigaard, Peter

    Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which is taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. Until recently, solely physical model results were used for the crest level design. However, prototype measurements have indicated that scale models...... underestimate wave run-up. Therefore wave run-up is studied in detail comparing prototype measurements and physical modelling....

  4. Deformation and failure mechanism of slope in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Yingfa Lu

    2015-01-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) slope deformation and failure mechanism and corresponding stability analyses are crucially important issues in geotechnical engineering. In this paper, the mechanisms of progressive failure with thrust-type and pull-type landslides are described in detail. It is considered that the post-failure stress state and the pre-peak stress state may occur at different regions of a landslide body with deformation development, and a critical stress state element (or ...

  5. Experimental Study on Flow Characteristic in Sloping Weir

    OpenAIRE

    Joongu Joongu Kang; Sungjoong Kim; Hongkoo Yeo; Namjoo Lee

    2014-01-01

    Drop structure is a key hydraulic structure used in river improvement projects for flood control purposes. However, as demand for riparian construction techniques with environmental considerations is increasing both domestically and internationally, discontinuation of aquatic organisms as a result of high head is raised as a serious issue associated with the existing drop structures. Accordingly, it has become necessary to install a drop structure with a mild slope r...

  6. Bed-load transport flume experiments on steep slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Recking, A.; FREY, P.; Paquier, A.; Belleuy, P.; Champagne, J. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted over uniform gravel bed materials to obtain 143 friction factor values under bedload equilibrium flow conditions in an attempt to add to the scarce data available on slopes between 1% and 9% for Shields numbers between 0.08 and 0.29. Analyses showed that when only flows over flat beds are considered, a distinction must be made between flows with and without bedload. More particularly, fitting flow resistance equations indicated that the roughness parameter increases...

  7. Aerial Photogrammetric Analysis of a Scree Slope and Cliff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Greg; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Mapping the physical features of landslide tracks provides information about factors controlling landslide movement. The increasing availability of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provides the opportunity to efficiently and cost effectively map terrain. The main goal of this field study is to create a streamlined work-flow from acquisition to interpretation for the photogrammetric analysis of landslide tracks. Here an open source software package MicMac is used for ortho-image and point-cloud creation. A series of two flights were conducted over a scree (rockfall) slope in Kolsas, Norway. The slope runs roughly 500 m north-south with a maximum width of 60 m. A cliff to the west is the source area for the scree. The cliff consists of conglomerate, basalt, and porphyry from bottom to top respectively. The grain size of boulders in the scree slope apparently varies due to lateral differences in the cliff composition. The flights were completed under cloud cover and consisted of multiple lengthwise passes over the scree field. There was a minimum of 75% overlap between images. During the first flight the altitude was roughly 100 m, the camera was positioned normal to the scree (60 degrees from horizontal), and the resolution was 2.7 cm per pixel. The second flight had an altitude of 200 m, the camera orientation was 30 degrees from horizontal, and the resolution was 4.0 cm per pixel. Using the Micmac engine, Ortho-photos and Digital Elevation Models (DEM) were created for both the scree and the cliff. This data will allow for analysis of grain-size, surface roughness, grain-shape, fracture plane orientation, as well as geological mapping. Further work will focus the quantitative assessment of the significance different camera altitudes and angles have on the results. The work-flow used in this study provides a repeatable method for aerial photogrammetric surveys of scree slopes.

  8. Coal database for Cook Inlet and North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Gary D.; Spear, Brianne D.; Sprowl, Jennifer M.; Dietrich, John D.; McCauley, Michael I.; Kinney, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    This database is a compilation of published and nonconfidential unpublished coal data from Alaska. Although coal occurs in isolated areas throughout Alaska, this study includes data only from the Cook Inlet and North Slope areas. The data include entries from and interpretations of oil and gas well logs, coal-core geophysical logs (such as density, gamma, and resistivity), seismic shot hole lithology descriptions, measured coal sections, and isolated coal outcrops.

  9. Modelling of Downhill Timber Skidding: Bigger Load – Bigger Slope

    OpenAIRE

    Đuka, Andreja; Pentek, Tibor; Horvat, Dubravko; Poršinsky, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Skidder mobility during timber extraction is defined by: 1) basic dimensional features of the vehicle, 2) ability to overcome obstacles during movement, 3) traction performance and 4) environmental soundness. Traction performance depends on the ground conditions (soil bearing capacity) and the total effect of all forces on the vehicle. In downhill skidding, the skidder is under great influence of parallel component of forces, adhesion weight and longitudinal terrain slope, which combined resu...

  10. Unraveling bed slope from relative roughness in initial sediment motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prancevic, Jeff P.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding incipient sediment transport is crucial for predicting landscape evolution, mitigating flood hazards, and restoring riverine habitats. Observations show that the critical Shields stress increases with increasing channel bed slope, and proposed explanations for this counterintuitive finding include enhanced form drag from bed forms, particle interlocking across the channel width, and large bed sediment relative to flow depth (relative roughness). Here we use scaled flume experiments with variable channel widths, bed slopes, and particle densities to separate these effects which otherwise covary in natural streams. The critical Shields stress increased with bed slope for both natural gravel (?s = 2.65 g/cm3) and acrylic particles (?s = 1.15 g/cm3), and adjusting channel width had no significant effect. However, the lighter acrylic particles required a threefold higher critical Shields stress for mobilization relative to the natural gravel at a fixed slope, which is unexpected because particle density is accounted for directly in the definition of Shields stress. A comparison with model predictions indicates that changes in local velocity and turbulence associated with increasing relative roughness for lighter materials are responsible for increasing the critical Shields stress in our experiments. These changes lead to concurrent changes in the hydraulic resistance and a nearly constant critical stream power value at initial motion. Increased relative roughness can explain much of the observed heightened critical Shields stresses and reduced sediment transport rates in steep channels and also may bias paleohydraulic reconstructions in environments with exotic submerged densities such as iron ore, pumice, or ice clasts on Titan.

  11. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  12. Review of the Frontier Workshop and Q-slope results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2005-09-20

    Over the last few years, significant progress has been made to produce field emission free niobium surfaces. Nowadays, the major limitation towards achieving the critical field in radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities made of bulk niobium of high purity is represented by the so-called ''high field Q-slope'' or ''Q-drop''. This phenomenon is characterized by a sharp decrease of the cavity quality factor, in absence of field emission, starting at a peak surface magnetic field of the order of 100 mT. It has been observed that these losses are usually reduced by a low-temperature ''in-situ'' baking, typically at 100-120 C for 24-48 h. Several models have been proposed to explain the high field Q-slope and many experiments have been conducted in different laboratories to validate such models. A three-day workshop was held in Argonne in September 2004 to present and discuss experimental and theoretical results on the present limitations of superconducting rf cavities. In this paper, we will focus on the high field Q-slope by reviewing the results presented at the workshop along with other experimental data. In order to explain the Q-drop and the baking effect we will discuss an improved version of the oxygen diffusion model.

  13. Mixing along continental slopes affects North Atlantic Deep Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2011-08-01

    In the northern Atlantic Ocean, cold salty water from the Arctic Ocean sinks to form North Atlantic Deep Water, a current that hugs the bottom of the ocean as it travels south toward Antarctica. The formation of this water mass is vital to large-scale global ocean circulation and the spread of heat and nutrients across the planet's waterswhen deep waters surface, they form warm surface currents such as the Gulf Stream, which are swept by wind back to the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink, beginning the cycle anew. In the Faroe-Shetland Channel, so named because it lies between Scotland's Shetland Islands and Denmark's Faroe Islands, deep water masses that are tributaries to North Atlantic Deep Water abut the steep continental slopes that bracket the channel. The ebb and flow of ocean tides there produce horizontal and vertical waves that travel long distances and may break on the slopes like waves on a beach. These waves, called internal tides, were monitored and modeled by Hall et al., who sought to understand how they affect the mixing of different water masses that pass through the channel. They found that strong mixing due to internal tides on the slopes that bound the Faroe-Shetland Channel may be an important mechanism by which North Atlantic Deep Water acquires the physical and chemical properties that it carries across the globe. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, doi:10.1029/2010JC006213, 2011)

  14. Meteorological, elevation, and slope effects on surface hoar formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, S.; Schirmer, M.; Jamieson, B.

    2015-08-01

    Failure in layers of buried surface hoar crystals (frost) can cause hazardous snow slab avalanches. Surface hoar crystals form on the snow surface and are sensitive to micro-meteorological conditions. In this study, the role of meteorological and terrain factors was investigated for three layers of surface hoar in the Columbia Mountains of Canada. The distribution of crystals over different elevations and aspects was observed on 20 days of field observations during a period of high pressure. The same layers were modelled over simplified terrain on a 2.5 km horizontal grid by forcing the snow cover model SNOWPACK with forecast weather data from a numerical weather prediction model. Modelled surface hoar growth was associated with warm air temperatures, high humidity, cold surface temperatures, and low wind speeds. Surface hoar was most developed in regions and elevation bands where these conditions existed, although strong winds at high elevations caused some model discrepancies. SNOWPACK simulations on virtual slopes systematically predicted smaller surface hoar on south-facing slopes. In the field, a complex combination of surface hoar and sun crusts were observed, suggesting the simplified model did not adequately resolve the surface energy balance on slopes. Overall, a coupled weather-snow cover model could benefit avalanche forecasters by predicting surface hoar layers on a regional scale over different elevation bands.

  15. An Adaptive Slope Compensation Circuit and its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guanghua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To resolve over-compensation problem in the current mode PWM switch power, a new adaptive slope compensation circuit is proposed in this study. In the circuit, the difference between the output and input voltage is positive correlative with the duty cycle of switch signal which is used to generate the control signal varying with the duty ratio. The control signal is used to control the gate voltage of MOS operating in linear region which changes the linear drain-source resistance. With clamping circuit, a proportional ramp voltage with controllable slope is produced and amplified for compensation system by two stage amplifier. This compensation voltage is almost ideal which can reduce the negative effect of over-compensation farthest. This circuit is applied to an LED driver IC and simulated in Cadence with CSMC 0.5um BiCMOS library. The results show that the boost driver circuit using adaptive compensation has about 28% dynamic response time reducing compared with the settled slope compensation. Therefore the proposed compensation circuit can improve systems dynamic responsibility effectively.

  16. The slope of the GRB Variability/Peak Luminosity Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Guidorzi, C; Montanari, E; Rossi, F; Amati, L; Gomboc, A; Mundell, C G

    2006-01-01

    From a sample of 32 GRBs with known redshift (Guidorzi et al. 2005) and then a sample of 551 BATSE GRBs with derived pseudo-redshift (Guidorzi 2005), the time variability/peak luminosity correlation (V vs. L) found by Reichart et al. (2001) was tested. For both samples the correlation is still found but less relevant due to a much higher spread of the data. Assuming a straight line in the logL-logV plane (logL = m logV + b), as done by Reichart et al., the slope was found lower than that derived by Reichart et al.: m = 1.3_{-0.4}^{+0.8} (Guidorzi et al. 2005), m = 0.85 +- 0.02 (Guidorzi 2005), to be compared with m = 3.3^{+1.1}_{-0.9} (Reichart et al. 2001). Reichart & Nysewander (2005) attribute the different slope to the fact we do not take into account in the fit the variance of the sample, and demonstrate that, using the method by Reichart (2001), the data set of Guidorzi et al. (2005) in logL-logV plane is still well described with slope m = 3.4^{+0.9}_{-0.6}. Here we compare the results of two metho...

  17. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, B; Singh, M K; Inkratas, C; Fleming, I R; McBean, E

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use "generic" published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects. PMID:17897819

  18. Agricultural terraces and slope instability at Cinque Terre (NW Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandolini, Pierluigi; Cevasco, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Cinque Terre, located in the eastern Liguria, are one of the most representative examples of terraced coastal landscape within the Mediterranean region. They are the result of a century-old agricultural practice and constitute an outstanding example of human integration with the natural landscape. For this highly unusual man-made coastal landscape, the Cinque Terre have been recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1997 and became National Park in 1999. The complex network of retaining dry stone walls and drainage networks ensured through times the control of shallow water erosion and therefore, indirectly, favoured debris cover stability. The lack of maintenance of terracing due to farmer abandonment since the 1950s led to widespread slope erosion phenomena. The effects of such phenomena culminated during the 25 October 2011 storm rainfall event, when slope debris materials charged by streams gave rise to debris floods affecting both Monterosso and Vernazza villages. As the analysis of the relationships between geo-hydrological processes and land use in the Vernazza catchment highlighted, abandoned and not well maintained terraces were the most susceptible areas to shallow landsliding and erosion triggered by intense rainfall. As a consequence, the thousands of kilometres of dry stone walls retaining millions of cubic metres of debris cover at Cinque Terre currently constitute a potential menace for both villages, that are mainly located at the floor of deep cut valleys, and tourists. Given the increasing human pressure due to tourist activities, geo-hydrological risk mitigation measures are urgently needed. At the same time, restoration policies are necessary to preserve this extraordinary example of terraced coastal landscape. In this framework, the detailed knowledge of the response of terraced areas to intense rainfall in terms of slope instability is a topic issue in order to identify adequate land planning strategies as well as the areas where interventions should be focused primarily. In this study, with the aim to contribute to a better understanding of geo-hydrological hazards at basin scale, the main types of slope instability phenomena that occurred on agricultural terraces at Cinque Terre following the 25 October 2011 rainfall event are presented in relation to different geological and geomorphological conditions. In particular, selected examples of shallow landslides and erosive slope processes due to running water affecting abandoned or cultivated terraces for vineyards and olive grooves will be shown.

  19. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects

  20. The runup on a multilinear sloping beach model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Mauricio A.; Ruiz, Javier A.; Riquelme, Sebastin

    2015-05-01

    A general method of solution for the runup evolution and some analytical results concerning a more general bathymetry than a canonical sloping beach model are presented. We studied theoretically the water wave elevation and runup generated on a continuous piecewise linear bathymetry, by solving analytically the linear shallow water wave equations in the 1+1 dimensional case. Non-horizontal linear segments are assumed and we develop an specific matrix propagator scheme, similar to the ones used in the propagation of elastic seismic wave fields in layered media, to obtain an exact integral form for the runup. A general closed expression for the maximum runup was computed analytically via the Cauchy's residue Theorem for an incident solitary wave and isosceles leading-depression N wave in the case of n + 1 linear segments. It is already known that maximum run-up strongly depends only on the closest slope to the shore, although this has not been mathematically demonstrated yet for arbitraries bathymetries. Analytical and numerical verifications were done to check the validity of the asymptotic maximum runup and we provided the mathematical and bathymetrical conditions that must be satisfied by the model to obtain correct asymptotic solutions. We applied our model to study the runup evolution on a more realistic bathymetry than a canonical sloping beach model. The seabed in a Chilean subduction zone was approximated-from the trench to the shore-by two linear segments adjusting the continental slope and shelf. Assuming an incident solitary wave, the two linear segment bathymetry generates a larger runup than the simple sloping beach model. We also discussed about the differences in the runup evolution computed numerically from incident leading-depression and leading-elevation isosceles N waves. In the latter case, the water elevation at the shore shows a symmetrical behaviour in terms of theirs waveforms. Finally, we applied our solution to study the resonance effects due to the bathymetry modelled by linear segments, which is in agreement with published studies and numerical tests.

  1. Soil roughness, slope and surface storage relationship for impervious areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borselli, Lorenzo; Torri, Dino

    2010-11-01

    SummaryThe study of the relationships between surface roughness, local slope gradient and maximum volume of water storage in surface depressions is a fundamental element in the development of hydrological models to be used in soil and water conservation strategies. Good estimates of the maximum volume of water storage are important for runoff assessment during rainfall events. Some attempts to link surface storage to parameters such as indices of surface roughness and, more rarely, local gradient have been proposed by several authors with empirical equations often conflicting between them and usually based on a narrow range of slope gradients. This suggests care in selecting any of the proposed equations or models and invites one to verify the existence of more realistic experimental relationships, based on physical models of the surfaces and valid for a larger range of gradients. The aim of this study is to develop such a relation for predicting/estimating the maximum volume of water that a soil surface, with given roughness characteristics and local slope gradient, can store. Experimental work has been carried out in order to reproduce reliable rough surfaces able to maintain the following properties during the experimental activity: (a) impervious surface to avoid biased storage determination; (b) stable, un-erodible surfaces to avoid changes of retention volume during tests; (c) absence of hydrophobic behaviour. To meet the conditions a-c we generate physical surfaces with various roughness magnitude using plasticine (emulsion of non-expansible clay and oil). The plasticine surface, reproducing surfaces of arable soils, was then wetted and dirtied with a very fine timber sawdust. This reduced the natural hydrophobic behaviour of the plasticine to an undetectable value. Storage experiments were conducted with plasticine rough surfaces on top of large rigid polystyrene plates inclined at different slope gradient: 2%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%. Roughness data collected on the generated plasticine surfaces were successfully compared with roughness data collected on real soil surfaces for similar conditions. A set of roughness indices was computed for each surface using roughness profiles measured with a laser profile meter. Roughness indices included quantiles of the Abbot-Firestone curve, which is used in surface metrology for industrial application to characterize surface roughness in a non-parametric approach ( Whitehouse, 1994). Storage data were fitted with an empirical equation (double negative exponential of roughness and slope). Several roughness indices resulted well related to storage. The better results were obtained using the Abbot-Firestone curve parameter P100. Beside this storage empirical model (SEM) a geometrical model was also developed, trying to give a more physical basis to the result obtained so far. Depression geometry was approximated with spherical cups. A general physical model was derived (storage cup model - SCM). The cup approximation identifies where roughness elevation comes in and how it relates to slope gradient in defining depression volume. Moreover, the exponential decay used for assessing slope effect on storage volume in the empirical model of Eqs. (8) and (9) emerges as consistent with distribution of cup sizes.

  2. Slopes To Prevent Trapping of Bubbles in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Harold E.; Lee, Michael C.; Smith, J. Anthony; Willis, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The idea of designing a microfluidic channel to slope upward along the direction of flow of the liquid in the channel has been conceived to help prevent trapping of gas bubbles in the channel. In the original application that gave rise to this idea, the microfluidic channels are parts of micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. It is necessary to prevent trapping of gas bubbles in these devices because uninterrupted liquid pathways are essential for sustaining the electrical conduction and flows that are essential for CE. The idea is also applicable to microfluidic devices that may be developed for similar terrestrial microCE biotechnological applications or other terrestrial applications in which trapping of bubbles in microfluidic channels cannot be tolerated. A typical microCE device in the original application includes, among other things, multiple layers of borosilicate float glass wafers. Microfluidic channels are formed in the wafers, typically by use of wet chemical etching. The figure presents a simplified cross section of part of such a device in which the CE channel is formed in the lowermost wafer (denoted the channel wafer) and, according to the present innovation, slopes upward into a via hole in another wafer (denoted the manifold wafer) lying immediately above the channel wafer. Another feature of the present innovation is that the via hole in the manifold wafer is made to taper to a wider opening at the top to further reduce the tendency to trap bubbles. At the time of reporting the information for this article, an effort to identify an optimum technique for forming the slope and the taper was in progress. Of the techniques considered thus far, the one considered to be most promising is precision milling by use of femtosecond laser pulses. Other similar techniques that may work equally well are precision milling using a focused ion beam, or a small diamond-tipped drill bit.

  3. Temporal characteristics of different cryosphere-related slope movements in high mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Wirz, Vanessa; Beutel, Jan; Buchli, Bernhard; Gruber, Stephan; Limpach, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of processes and factors affecting slope instability is essential for detecting and monitoring potentially hazardous slopes. The overall aim of this study is to detect and characterize different slope movements in alpine periglacial environments, with the ultimate goal to understand the broad range of phenomena and processes encountered. In this article, a potential strategy for analyzing the spatio-temporal (seasonal and intra-annual) velocity fluctuations of various slope movement...

  4. Stability of slopes in residual soils Estabilidad de taludes en suelos residuales

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Wesley

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines and discusses a number of factors that make slope stability assessments, and slope engineering in residual soils somewhat different from sedimentary soils. In particular, slopes are generally steeper and of higher permeability. They are also likely to be more heterogeneous and thus less amenable to analytical assessment than slopes in sedimentary soils. These factors are discussed in some detail. It is explained that climate and weather influence is much greater in residua...

  5. Frictional behaviour of geosynthetics and slope stability of lining systems

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, H.; Berroir, G.; Gourc, J.P.; Mathieu, G.

    1994-01-01

    Studies carried out by several French laboratories on the frictional behaviour of geosynthetics in order to define a design method for slope stability of lining systems are describes in the paper. The work program, wich has lasted since 1990, consisted of laboratory friction tests and of the improvement of an existing computer program. / Des études faites par plusieurs laboratoires français sur le comportement sous friction de géosynthétiques en vue de définir une méthode pour la stabilité en...

  6. Conservation laws for shallow water waves on a sloping beach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Akyildiz

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Shallow water waves are governed by a pair of non-linear partial differential equations. We transfer the associated homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems, (corresponding to constant and sloping depth, respectively, to the hodograph plane where we find all the non-simple wave solutions and construct infinitely many polynomial conservation laws. We also establish correspondence between conservation laws and hodograph solutions as well as Bäcklund transformations by using the linear nature of the problems on the hodogrpah plane.

  7. Cooperative Three-Robot System for Traversing Steep Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, Ashley; Huntsberger, Terrance; Aghazarian, Hrand; Younse, Paulo; Garrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Teamed Robots for Exploration and Science in Steep Areas (TRESSA) is a system of three autonomous mobile robots that cooperate with each other to enable scientific exploration of steep terrain (slope angles up to 90 ). Originally intended for use in exploring steep slopes on Mars that are not accessible to lone wheeled robots (Mars Exploration Rovers), TRESSA and systems like TRESSA could also be used on Earth for performing rescues on steep slopes and for exploring steep slopes that are too remote or too dangerous to be explored by humans. TRESSA is modeled on safe human climbing of steep slopes, two key features of which are teamwork and safety tethers. Two of the autonomous robots, denoted Anchorbots, remain at the top of a slope; the third robot, denoted the Cliffbot, traverses the slope. The Cliffbot drives over the cliff edge supported by tethers, which are payed out from the Anchorbots (see figure). The Anchorbots autonomously control the tension in the tethers to counter the gravitational force on the Cliffbot. The tethers are payed out and reeled in as needed, keeping the body of the Cliffbot oriented approximately parallel to the local terrain surface and preventing wheel slip by controlling the speed of descent or ascent, thereby enabling the Cliffbot to drive freely up, down, or across the slope. Due to the interactive nature of the three-robot system, the robots must be very tightly coupled. To provide for this tight coupling, the TRESSA software architecture is built on a combination of (1) the multi-robot layered behavior-coordination architecture reported in "An Architecture for Controlling Multiple Robots" (NPO-30345), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 65, and (2) the real-time control architecture reported in "Robot Electronics Architecture" (NPO-41784), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 1 (January 2008), page 28. The combination architecture makes it possible to keep the three robots synchronized and coordinated, to use data from all three robots for decision- making at each step, and to control the physical connections among the robots. In addition, TRESSA (as in prior systems that have utilized this architecture) , incorporates a capability for deterministic response to unanticipated situations from yet another architecture reported in Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command and Sensing (NPO-43635), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 10 (October 2008), page 40. Tether tension control is a major consideration in the design and operation of TRESSA. Tension is measured by force sensors connected to each tether at the Cliffbot. The direction of the tension (both azimuth and elevation) is also measured. The tension controller combines a controller to counter gravitational force and an optional velocity controller that anticipates the motion of the Cliffbot. The gravity controller estimates the slope angle from the inclination of the tethers. This angle and the weight of the Cliffbot determine the total tension needed to counteract the weight of the Cliffbot. The total needed tension is broken into components for each Anchorbot. The difference between this needed tension and the tension measured at the Cliffbot constitutes an error signal that is provided to the gravity controller. The velocity controller computes the tether speed needed to produce the desired motion of the Cliffbot. Another major consideration in the design and operation of TRESSA is detection of faults. Each robot in the TRESSA system monitors its own performance and the performance of its teammates in order to detect any system faults and prevent unsafe conditions. At startup, communication links are tested and if any robot is not communicating, the system refuses to execute any motion commands. Prior to motion, the Anchorbots attempt to set tensions in the tethers at optimal levels for counteracting the weight of the Cliffbot; if either Anchorbot fails to reach its optimal tension level within a specified time, it sends message to the other robots and the commanded motion is not executed. If any mechanical error (e.g., stalling of a motor) is detected, the affected robot sends a message triggering stoppage of the current motion. Lastly, messages are passed among the robots at each time step (10 Hz) to share sensor information during operations. If messages from any robot cease for more than an allowable time interval, the other robots detect the communication loss and initiate stoppage.

  8. HDMR methods to assess reliability in slope stability analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, Janusz; Pula, Wojciech; Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Stability analyses of complex rock-soil deposits shall be tackled considering the complex structure of discontinuities within rock mass and embedded soil layers. These materials are characterized by a high variability in physical and mechanical properties. Thus, to calculate the slope safety factor in stability analyses two issues must be taken into account: 1) the uncertainties related to structural setting of the rock-slope mass and 2) the variability in mechanical properties of soils and rocks. High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) (Chowdhury et al. 2009; Chowdhury and Rao 2010) can be used to carry out the reliability index within complex rock-soil slopes when numerous random variables with high coefficient of variations are considered. HDMR implements the inverse reliability analysis, meaning that the unknown design parameters are sought provided that prescribed reliability index values are attained. Such approach uses implicit response functions according to the Response Surface Method (RSM). The simple RSM can be efficiently applied when less than four random variables are considered; as the number of variables increases, the efficiency in reliability index estimation decreases due to the great amount of calculations. Therefore, HDMR method is used to improve the computational accuracy. In this study, the sliding mechanism in Polish Flysch Carpathian Mountains have been studied by means of HDMR. The Southern part of Poland where Carpathian Mountains are placed is characterized by a rather complicated sedimentary pattern of flysh rocky-soil deposits that can be simplified into three main categories: (1) normal flysch, consisting of adjacent sandstone and shale beds of approximately equal thickness, (2) shale flysch, where shale beds are thicker than adjacent sandstone beds, and (3) sandstone flysch, where the opposite holds. Landslides occur in all flysch deposit types thus some configurations of possible unstable settings (within fractured rocky-soil masses) resulting in sliding mechanisms have been investigated in this study. The reliability indices values drawn from the HDRM method have been compared with conventional approaches as neural networks: the efficiency of HDRM is shown in the case studied. References Chowdhury R., Rao B.N. and Prasad A.M. 2009. High-dimensional model representation for structural reliability analysis. Commun. Numer. Meth. Engng, 25: 301-337. Chowdhury R. and Rao B. 2010. Probabilistic Stability Assessment of Slopes Using High Dimensional Model Representation. Computers and Geotechnics, 37: 876-884.

  9. Ratio of slopes method for quantitative analysis in ceramic bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative x-ray diffraction analysis technique developed at University of Sheffield was adopted, rather than the previously widely used internal standard method, to determine the amount of the phases present in a reformulated whiteware porcelain and a BaTiO sub 3 electrochemical material. This method, although still employs an internal standard, was found to be very easy and accurate. The required weight fraction of a phase in the mixture to be analysed is determined from the ratio of slopes of two linear plots, designated as the analysis and reference lines, passing through their origins using the least squares method

  10. Landslide boost from entrainment of erodible material along the slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, M.; Mangeney, A.; Roche, O.; Ionescu, I.; Hungr, O.

    2011-12-01

    Landslides, debris flows, pyroclastic flows and avalanches are natural hazards that threaten life and property in mountainous, volcanic, coastal and seismically active areas. The granular mass tends to accelerate as gravity pulls it down the slope, and will slow on more gentle slopes, when interaction forces dissipating energy overcome the driving forces. The entrainment of underlying sediments or debris into the gravitational granular flows is suspected to be critical to their dynamics, but direct measurement of material entrainment in natural flows is very difficult. Nevertheless, qualitative and quantitative field observations suggest that material entrainment can either increase or decrease flow velocity and deposit extent, depending on the geological setting and the type of gravitational flow. Based on laboratory experiments on dry granular flows, we show here that erosion of granular material already present on the bed can significantly increase the size and mobility of the flow and possibly generate surges. We present laboratory experiments of granular material flowing over an inclined plane covered by an erodible bed, designed to mimic erosion processes of natural flows traveling over deposits built up by earlier events. The controlling parameters are the inclination of the plane and the thickness of the erodible layer. Different methods are used to prepare the erodible bed, thus leading to various degrees of compaction. We show that erosion processes increases the flow mobility (i. e. runout) by up to 40 % over slopes with inclination close to the repose angle of the grains. The effect is observed even for very thin erodible beds. We demonstrate that the increase of mass of the flowing grains caused by entrainment of the erodible layer is not enough to explain the observed increase in velocity and runout of the granular mass. Erosion efficiency is shown to strongly depend on the slope and on the nature (i. e. degree of compaction) of the erodible bed. Entrainment begins to affect the flow at inclination angles exceeding a critical angle, almost equal to half of the repose angle. Triangular shaped frontal surges are observed at high inclination angles over both rigid or erodible beds. Erosion effects are smaller as the compaction of the erodible granular bed increases and larger as the initial height-to-length ratio and volume of the released mass increase. The avalanche excavates the erodible layer immediately at the flow front, behind which waves travelling downstream that help removing grains from the erodible bed are observed. When increasing the depth of the erodible bed, the excavation depth first increases and then stabilizes to a critical value, and then decreases. Finally, numerical simulations using a 3D visco-plastic model are performed to obtain insight into the physical processes at work during entrainment processes.

  11. A New Formula for Front Slope Recession of Berm Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2010-01-01

    The front slope stability of breakwaters with a homogeneous berm was studied in a large number of two dimensional model tests at Aalborg University, Denmark. The results are presented together with a new formula for prediction of the berm recession which is the most important parameter for...... describing the reshaping. The formula has also been calibrated and validated against model test data from other researchers. The significance of the new design formula is that it predicts berm recession much better than the existing methods, especially in case of more stable structures....

  12. The Socioeconomic Assessment of Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen

    effects of the implementation of the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) on livelihood diversification, which is thought to be the solution to poverty and environmental dilemmas. Our results show that SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention on rural livelihood diversification. In addition...... treatment effects, propensity score matching, which can give a randomized evaluation, is employed in a second stage. The main results show that the SLCP significantly improved the productivity of participants in the first funding period which are mostly from efficiency improvements, while the effects...

  13. Strategies for Testing Slope Differences. Research Report. ETS RR-09-32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tim; Klockars, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The robustness and power of 9 strategies for testing the differences in groups' regression slopes were assessed under nonnormality and residual variance heterogeneity. For the conditions considered, the most robust strategies were the trimmed and Winsorized slope estimates used with the James second-order test, the Theil-Sen slope estimates used…

  14. Slope angle studies from multibeam sonar data on three seamounts in Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.

    Slope angles are powerful morphometric tools. Slope angle studies in manganese nodule areas using the Multi Beam Sonar (MBS) data is useful to the mining geologist. A technique to convert depth grid generated from MBS data to slope angle values data...

  15. Value of magnetic resonance imaging in the mid-term follow-up of osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle and talus; Die Bedeutung der Magnetresonanztomographie fuer die Verlaufskontrolle der Osteochondrosis dissecans am Knie- und Sprunggelenk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, G.; Rominger, M.; Rau, W.S. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie; Juergensen, I. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Orthopaedische Klinik

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: Definition of the prognostic value of clinical and morphological findings in the mid-term follow-up of OCD of the femoral condyle and talus. Demonstration of the consolidation of OCD on MRI depending on different therapies. Materials and Methods: 76 patients were examined before and at an average of 30 months after conservative or surgical therapy using T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} weighted SE and 3D-FISP sequences and contrast enhanced studies. Six clinical (age, gender, site, duration and severity of symptoms, therapy) and six morphological (size, signal intensity, fragmentation, contrast enhancement, condition of cartilage, staging) data were registered on first MRI and correlated with the degree of consolidation of OCD (partial and complete remission, no change and progression) on control MRI. Results: Patients under 17 years showed partial or complete remissions in 73%, those of 17 years or older in 33%. Conservatively treated patients had a higher remission rate (54%) than those treated with different surgical techniques (drilling 50%, refixation 43%, abrasio 38%). Small OCDs had a higher remission rate than large lesions (63% vs. 33%). OCDs covered with intact cartilage healed better than lesions with chondral defects (61% vs. 26%). Contrast enhancing fragments had a better prognosis than non-enhancing lesions (100% vs. 40%). Conclusions: Prognosis of OCD can be better estimated when size of OCD, condition of cartilage and enhancement of contrast agent is graduated with MRI and patient age is registered. The consequences for therapy planning are great. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bewertung von MRT-Befunden und klinischen Daten als Prognoseparameter fuer den mittelfristigen Heilungsverlauf der Osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD) an Knie- und Sprunggelenk. Zudem wird die Konsolidierung der OCD unter verschiedenen Therapieformen untersucht. Material und Methoden: 76 Patienten wurden vor und durchschnittlich 30 Monaten nach konservativer bzw. chirurgischer Therapie einer OCD MR-tomographisch untersucht (T{sub 1}-gewichtete SE-Sequenz ohne und mit Kontrastmittel, T{sub 2}-gewichtete SE-Sequenz, FISP-3D-Sequenz). Klinische Daten (Alter, Geschlecht, Lokalisation, Anamnesedauer, Symptomatik und Art der Therapie) und MRT-Befunde (Groesse, Signal, Sinterung, Kontrastmittelaufnahme, Knorpelzustand, Stadium) wurden mit dem im Kontroll-MRT erkennbaren Heilungszustand (partielle bzw. komplette Remission Konstanz, Progression) korreliert. Ergebnisse: Bei Patienten unter 17 Jahren wurde eine partielle bzw. komplette Remission in 73%, bei Patienten ueber 17 Jahren in 33% registriert. Die konservative Behandlung fuehrte zu einer etwas hoeheren Remissionsrate (54%) als die chirurgischen Therapieformen (Bohrung 50%, Refixation 43%, Abrasio 38%). Kleine OCDs heilten besser als grosse (63% vs. 33%), Herde mit intaktem Knorpel besser (61%) als jene mit Knorpeldefekten (26%) und nach Kontrastmittelgabe anreichernde Fragmente wesentlich haeufiger (100%) als nicht anreichernde (40%). Schlussfolgerung: Wichtigster klinischer Parameter fuer die Prognose der OCD ist das Alter. Unter den MRT-Kriterien stehen die Groesse des Defekts, der Zustand des Knorpelbelags und die Kontrastmittelaufnahme im Fragment an der Spitze. Die Konsequenzen dieser Befunde fuer die Therapieplanung sind betraechtlich. (orig.)

  16. Bioengineering case studies sustainable stream bank and slope stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Wendi; McCullah, John

    2014-01-01

    This unique volume describes and evaluates 30 projects from across the United States where bio-stabilization was employed to address a detrimental naturally occurring process or byproduct of the built environment. Bio-stabilization (or soil bioengineering) refers to the use of plant materials, primarily live cuttings, arranged in the ground in different arrays to reinforce soils and protect upland slopes and/or stream banks against surficial erosion and shallow slope failures. Examples included in the collection represent different regions of the country and their specific conditions and challenges. Each project is illustrated with a number of distinctive photographs to support the reader's understanding and showcase the wide scope of projects and techniques presented. This book also: ·         Presents a range of well-documented case studies on key techniques and best practices for bio-stabilization projects ·         Emphasizes evaluation and comparison of different techniques and challeng...

  17. Sport Injuries in Iranian Skiers (Shemshak Slope 2000-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Motamedy

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sport medicine is a relatively new scientific branch in Iran. In order to evaluate sport injuries in Iranian skiers we examined and followed all ski players who was injured while skiing in Shemshak slope during a skiing season (January to April 2000. Materials and Methods: During a period of 3 months, a total of 32050 persons skied in Shemshak slope and 76 case of injuries were identified; the injury rate was calculated as 2.3/1000 skiers. Among the injured organs knee (32% and head and neck region (20% were respectively the most common sites of injury. Sprain of the medial collateral ligament was the most frequent knee injury (28% of the cases. 26.7% of the injured cases were amateurs and 21% of them used hired ski instruments. Results: In this study such factors as lack of exercise before skiing, fatigue and time of skiing (beginning or end of the season were not found to be related to the injury rate. However, head and neck injuries in contrast to knee injuries were most frequent in the end of the season (P<0.01. Conclusion: This study confirms the necessity of greater care of knee joints during skiing and probable need of wearing helmet for head protection in the end of skiing season. More studies are necessary to clarify other details regarding sport injuries in skiers.

  18. Geotechnical properties of cemented sands in steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B.D.; Sitar, N.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation into the geotechnical properties specific to assessing the stability of weakly and moderately cemented sand cliffs is presented. A case study from eroding coastal cliffs located in central California provides both the data and impetus for this study. Herein, weakly cemented sand is defined as having an unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of less than 100 kPa, and moderately cemented sand is defined as having UCS between 100 and 400 kPa. Testing shows that both materials fail in a brittle fashion and can be modeled effectively using linear Mohr-Coulomb strength parameters, although for weakly cemented sands, curvature of the failure envelope is more evident with decreasing friction and increasing cohesion at higher confinement. Triaxial tests performed to simulate the evolving stress state of an eroding cliff, using a reduction in confinement-type stress path, result in an order of magnitude decrease in strain at failure and a more brittle response. Tests aimed at examining the influence of wetting on steep slopes show that a 60% decrease in UCS, a 50% drop in cohesion, and 80% decrease in the tensile strength occurs in moderately cemented sand upon introduction to water. In weakly cemented sands, all compressive, cohesive, and tensile strength is lost upon wetting and saturation. The results indicate that particular attention must be given to the relative level of cementation, the effects of groundwater or surficial seepage, and the small-scale strain response when performing geotechnical slope stability analyses on these materials. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  19. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. PMID:25480048

  20. SNOW ACCUMULATION DYNAMICS ON SLOPES AND DITCHES FOR UNSOLVED GROOVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Alimova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the problem. The problems of estimating a residual snow load capacity for unopen grooves and predicting the beginning of snow accumulation on the driveway have been discussed.Results. The mathematical model for the calculation of snow accumulation on slopes and in ditches of grooves is presented which takes into account snowfall accumulations. The balance equation for the calculation of snow accumulations in an unopen groove is suggested. The calculation formula of snow container for a typical unopen groove, which takes into account its depth is presented. The dates of full filling of unopen grooves, slopes and ditches have been predicted. The calculations are performed for typical cross-section profiles of hollow of over 1.0 m in depth.Conclusions. It has been concluded that a knowledge about snow accumulations is necessary in the calculation and predicting the beginning of snow accumulation on the driveway. The problem of a further research addressing the choice of a proper snow removal technique based on the re-sults of engineering monitoring has been discussed.

  1. Wood-soil interactions in soil bioengineering slope stabilization works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscatelli MC

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose the use of soil quality indicators with the aim of assessing the environmental impact of soil bioengineering works. This study was carried out in central Italy where soil bioengineering slope stabilization works were established using chestnut wood. In particular the goal of this study was to determine the occurrence of a wood-effect, that is changes of soil properties due to the presence of decomposing logs in two sites characterized by different time span since works setting up. The presence of the logs did not affect soil physico-chemical properties. Conversely, soil biochemical properties such as soil microbial biomass, basal and cumulative respiration activities as well as microbial indexes, were influenced by the presence of the logs confirming the role of these bioindicators as early predictors of changes occurring in soil. Although a general positive trend was observed for the biochemical properties at both sites with respect to the control soils, significant differences were recorded mainly at the site where works were established six years before soil sampling. Soil bioengineering slope stabilization works establish a positive feed-back which ultimately can benefit plants; in fact the increase in microbial mineralization activity can enhance nutrient cycling and thus promote adequate growth conditions for the plant cuttings used in the wooden-work.

  2. Tolerable Time-Varying Overflow on Grass-Covered Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Hughes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Engineers require estimates of tolerable overtopping limits for grass-covered levees, dikes, and embankments that might experience steady overflow. Realistic tolerance estimates can be used for both resilient design and risk assessment. A simple framework is developed for estimating tolerable overtopping on grass-covered slopes caused by slowly-varying (in time overtopping discharge (e.g., events like storm surges or river flood waves. The framework adapts the well-known Hewlett curves of tolerable limiting velocity as a function of overflow duration. It has been hypothesized that the form of the Hewlett curves suggests that the grass erosion process is governed by the flow work on the slope above a critical threshold velocity (referred to as excess work, and the tolerable erosional limit is reached when the cumulative excess work exceeds a given value determined from the time-dependent Hewlett curves. The cumulative excess work is expressed in terms of overflow discharge above a critical discharge that slowly varies in time, similar to a discharge hydrograph. The methodology is easily applied using forecast storm surge hydrographs at specific locations where wave action is minimal. For preliminary planning purposes, when storm surge hydrographs are unavailable, hypothetical equations for the water level and overflow discharge hydrographs are proposed in terms of the values at maximum overflow and the total duration of overflow. An example application is given to illustrate use of the methodology.

  3. Soil slips and debris flows on terraced slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G. B.; Dal Negro, P.; Frattini, P.

    Terraces cover large areas along the flanks of many alpine and prealpine valleys. Soil slips and soil slips-debris flows are recurrent phenomena along terraced slopes. These landslides cause damages to people, settlements and cultivations. This study investigates the processes related to the triggering of soil slip-debris flows in these settings, analysing those occurred in Valtellina (Central Alps, Italy) on November 2000 after heavy prolonged rainfalls. 260 landslides have been recognised, mostly along the northern valley flank. About 200 soil slips and slumps occurred in terraced areas and a third of them evolved into debris flows. Field work allowed to recognise the settings at soil slip-debris flow source areas. Landslides affected up to 2.5 m of glacial, fluvioglacial and anthropically reworked deposits overlying metamorphic basement. Laboratory and in situ tests allowed to characterise the geotechnical and hydraulic properties of the terrains involved in the initial failure. Several stratigraphic and hydrogeologic factors have been individuated as significant in determining instabilities on terraced slopes. They are the vertical changes of physical soil properties, the presence of buried hollows where groundwater convergence occurs, the rising up of perched groundwater tables, the overflow and lateral infiltration from superficial drainage network, the runoff concentration by means of pathways and the insufficient drainage of retaining walls.

  4. Soil-root Shear Strength Properties of Some Slope Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid development in hilly areas in Malaysia has become a trend that put a stress to the sloping area. It reduces the factor of safety by reducing the resistant force and therefore leads to slope failure. Vegetation plays a big role in reinforcement functions via anchoring the soils and forms a binding network within the soil layer that tied the soil masses together. In this research, three plant species namely Acacia mangium, Dillenia suffruticosa and Leucaena leucocaphala were assessed in term of their soil-root shear strength properties. Our results showed that Acacia mangium had the highest shear strength values, 30.4 kPa and 50.2 kPa at loads 13.3 kPa and 24.3 kPa, respectively. Leucaena leucocaphala showed the highest in cohesion factor, which was almost double the value in those of Dillenia suffruticosa and Acacia mangium. The root profile analysis indicated Dillenia suffruticosa exhibited the highest values in both root length density and root volume, whilst Leucaena leucocaphala had the highest average of root diameter. (author)

  5. Effects of equipment loadings on geosynthetic-lined slope behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun I; Lee, Seung R

    2005-06-01

    When combined in the lining and covering of waste-containment facilities, soil and geosynthetic components protect the environment by acting as a hydraulic barrier. Equipment loading may significantly increase the tensile stress induced in geosynthetic components, leading to a potential stability problem. Large equipment loadings may also result in a localized circular slip surface during construction operations. New analytical method based on discrete element modelling is proposed for estimating the distribution of tensile force developed in the individual geosynthetic components of the lining system and for evaluating the safety factor of slope failure due to equipment loading. The analytical results of an example are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the analytical method for the lining system of a waste landfill. The analyses of the example show that equipment loading provide a substantial increase in the tensile forces of the geosynthetic components of a lining system and that the possibility of shallow failure due to equipment loading increases as the slope becomes steeper. This method is a useful tool for analysing the lining system of waste landfills with complex lining components. PMID:15988943

  6. The Influence of Increasing Rain and Earthquake Activities on Landslide Slope Stability in Forest Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T.; Aditian, A.

    2014-12-01

    Deriving the analysis of rainfall data in various mountainous locations, increase in rainfall that is deemed to be induced by the global climate change is obvious in Kyushu district, western Japan. On this point of view, its long term impact on the forest slope stability is analyzed with field investigation and numerical simulation such as finite element method (FEM). On the other hand, the influence of earthquake such as cracks on the slope due to seismic vibration was also analyzed with FEM. In this case, the slope stability analysis to obtain the factor of safety "Fs" is conducted. Here, in case of the Fs > 1.0, the slope is stable. In addition, the slope stabilizing effect of the forest mainly due to the roots strength is evaluated on some unstable slopes. Simultaneously, a holistic estimation over landslide groups is conducted by comparing "Fs" on forest slopes with non- forest slopes. Therefore, the following conclusions are obtained: 1) Comparing the Fs without increased rainfall from the previous decade and the one with actual rainfall, the former case is 1.04 ~1.06 times more stable than the latter. 2) On the other hand, the forest slopes are estimated to be up to approximately 1.5 to 2.5 times more stable than the slope without forest. Therefore, the slope stabilizing effect by the forest is much higher than the increasing rainfall influence i.e. the climate change effect. These results imply that an appropriate forest existence is important under the climate change condition to prevent forest slope degradation. 3) Comparing with the destabilization of the slope by seismic activities (vibration) due to the reduction of soil strength and "cracks = slope deformation" (8~9 % to 30% reduction in Fs even after an earthquake of 490gal), the influence of the long term rainfall increase on slopes (such as 1% decrease in Fs) is relatively small in the study area.

  7. Variance-in-Mean Effects of the Long Forward-Rate Slope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper contains an empirical analysis of the dependence of the long forward-rate slope on the long-rate variance. The long forward-rate slope and the long rate are described by a bivariate GARCH-in-mean model. In accordance with theory, a negative long-rate variance-in-mean effect for the long...... forward-rate slope is documented. Thus, the greater the long-rate variance, the steeper the long forward-rate curve slopes downward (the long forward-rate slope is negative). The variance-in-mean effect is both statistically and economically significant....

  8. Estimating significances of differences between slopes: A new methodology and software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco M. N. C. S. Vieira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining the significance of slope differences is a common requirement in studies of self-thinning, ontogeny and sexual dimorphism, among others. This has long been carried out testing for the overlap of the bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals of the slopes. However, the numerical random re-sampling with repetition favours the occurrence of re-combinations yielding largely diverging slopes, widening the confidence intervals and thus increasing the chances of overlooking significant differences. To overcome this problem a permutation test simulating the null hypothesis of no differences between slopes is proposed. This new methodology, when applied both to artificial and factual data, showed an enhanced ability to differentiate slopes.

  9. Slope wavenumber spectrum models of capillary and capillary-gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yongjun; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yanfeng

    2010-03-01

    Capillary and capillary-gravity waves possess a random character, and the slope wavenumber spectra of them can be used to represent mean distributions of wave energy with respect to spatial scale of variability. But simple and practical models of the slope wavenumber spectra have not been put forward so far. In this article, we address the accurate definition of the slope wavenumber spectra of water surface capillary and capillary-gravity waves. By combining the existing slope wavenumber models and using the dispersion relation of water surface waves, we derive the slope wavenumber spectrum models of capillary and capillary-gravity waves. Simultaneously, by using the slope wavenumber models, the dependence of the slope wavenumber spectrum on wind speed is analyzed using data obtained in an experiment which was performed in a laboratory wind wave tank. Generally speaking, the slope wavenumber spectra are influenced profoundly by the wind speed above water surface. The slope wavenumber spectrum increases with wind speed obviously and do not cross each other for different wind speeds. But, for the same wind speed, the slope wavenumber spectra are essentially identical, even though the capillary and capillary-gravity waves are excited at different times and locations. Furthermore, the slope wavenumber spectra obtained from the models agree quite well with experimental results as regards both the values and the shape of the curve.

  10. Spatial Coupling Among Landslides, Geological Structures, Cataclinal Slopes, and Fluvial Knick Zones in Nepal Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, T. P.; DeCelles, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    This work aims to identify potential landslide hazard zones in the event of heavy precipitation and seismic activity by examining spatial relationships among existing landslides, earthquake epicenters, fault zones, cataclinal (dip) slopes, anaclinal (escarp) slopes, and river steepness index in the Nepal Himalaya. In order to understand this relationship we have mapped existing landslides on Google Earth images and ESRI base maps, assembled high-resolution digital topographic data by digitizing Nepal Government published topographic maps, and gathered geological data from detailed field mapping and compilation of published geological maps. Slope angle and aspect, and dip direction and angle were extracted from GIS-based digital topographical and geological datasets to develop the new slope maps with cataclinal (dip) and anaclinal (escarp) slope distributions. Longitudinal river profiles were also extracted from high resolution DEM's derived from manually digitized contours. The slope maps with cataclinal and anaclinal slope distributions, earthquake epicenters, major geological structures, longitudinal river profiles, and landslide inventories were visualized in ESRI ArcMap 10.2 to examine the spatial correlation among landslides, fault zones, cataclinal slopes and river steepness index. We have found that landslides are spatially correlated with cataclinal slopes and fluvial knick zones with high steepness index in certain thrust boundaries. The main finding of this work is that the topographic slope threshold alone is a crude measure of landslide susceptibility. The analysis of slope using the geometric relationship among topography and geological bedding is crucial for determining landslide susceptibility in the Himalayan region.

  11. Research on the Slope Green and Environment Protection Using Dynamical Game Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the slope green and environment protection in China. In ecological slope protection, the plant roots can achieve the ecological vegetation restoration of the slope surface. Hence the slope environment can be protected significantly. However, there is still lack of efficient policy to support the implementation of nationwide slope green program to facilitate the development of slope green and environment protection technologies. Hence, the reasonable relationship between the slope green and environment protection and the national policy is very important. Literature review indicates that very little work has been done to address this issue. In order to investigate the relationship between the slope green and environment protection and the national policy, this study presents a new analysis method based on the dynamical Game theory. The game between the slope green and environment protection and the national policy can be regarded as a dynamical economic process, the optimized implementation strategy for the slope green and environment protection under the national support can be obtained by the use of dynamical game analysis. The stability analysis and the balance analysis have been discussed for the proposed game model. The analysis result shows that the government should increase financial support as well as establish corresponding punishment mechanism to encourage different policies and practices for slope green and environment protection and hence a win-win situation can be achieved.

  12. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping. PMID:26560103

  13. Stability Analysis for Loosened Rock Slope of Jinyang Grand Buddha in Taiyuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, Jinzhong; TIAN, Xiaofu; GUAN, Xudong; YU, Yonggui; YANG, Xiusheng

    On the basis of the status quo of Jinyang Grand Buddha in Taiyuan, some factors such as topography, geological structures, climate, hydrology, and engineering geology that influence the stability of the Buddha slope are considered, and several working situations of the slope that possibly suffered are presented in this article. The Buddha slope stands upright and the rock masses are composed of thick Permian sandstone, which dips slightly inward to the slope. Affected by both the incision of regional joints and the load relief to the free surface, the rock mass of the Buddha slope has turned into loosened blocks. Numerical stability analysis by FLAC-2D on the basis of the strength reduction method reveals that the localized deformation of the rock masses near the vertical surface of the slope may trigger reversing of rock beddings making the back dip slope convert into a dip slope with the possibility of plane sliding failure. Furthermore, the pseudostatic method for the dynamic process and limit equilibrium method for the static process are applied to different working situations of the Buddha slope. The analytical results illustrate that plane sliding failure will not occur when the slope is affected only by seism. However, water filling in the cracks of the loosened rock mass may greatly contribute to the potential plane sliding failure. When horizontal seism-force and hydrostatic pressure are coupled, the Buddha slope can hardly keep stable. Additionally, the loosened rock masses are prone to block toppling failure when influenced by the seism force.

  14. Dynamic stability and failure modes of slopes in discontinuous rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of rock slopes during earthquakes are of great concern in rock engineering works such as highway, dam, and nuclear power station constructions. As rock mass in nature is usually discontinuous, the stability of rock slopes will be geverned by the spatial distribution of discontinuities in relation with the geometry of slope and their mechanical properties rather than the rock element. The authors have carried out some model tests on discontinuous rock slopes using three different model tests techniques in order to investigate the dynamic behaviour and failure modes of the slopes in discontinuous rock mass. This paper describes the findings and observations made on model rock slopes with various discontinuity patterns and slope geometry. In addition some stability criterions are developed and the calculated results are compared with those of experiments. (author)

  15. Soil erosion spatial distribution patterns of different slopes by using 137Cs tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil erosion spatial patterns of several slopes were studied through measuring 137Cs in the top layer soil on the different slopes. The results show that all the soil erosion spatial distribution patterns are in fluctuate trend. The soil erosion is more severe in the middle part on the short farmland slope. The erosion pattern of the gully base show violent head ward erosion. Because of the influence of vegetation cover and other factor, the erosion patterns on the gully slopes are complex. The soil erosion differs obviously with the compound slopes of the same slope gradient and slope length. In general, the main factor that influence soil erosion is the change of the micro-landforms in a long period

  16. Check dams effects on sediment transport in steep slope flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Recking, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Depending on many influences (geology, relief, hydrology, land use, etc.) some mountainous watershed are prone to cause casualties and facilities damages. Large amounts of sediments episodically released by torrents are often the biggest problem in torrent related hazard mitigation. Series of transversal structures as check dams and ground sills are often used in the panel of risk mitigation technics. A large literature exits on check dams and it mainly concerns engineering design, e.g. toe scouring, stability stress diagram, changes in upper and lower reaches equilibrium slopes. Check dams in steep slope rivers constitute fixed points in the bed profile and prevent general bed incision. However their influence on sediment transport once they are filled is not yet clear. Two flume test campaigns, synthetize in Table 1, were performed to investigate this question: Table 1 : experiment plan Run (duration) Ref1 (50h)CD1a (30h)CD1b (30h)Ref2 (92h)CD2 (18h) Solid feeding discharge (g.s^-1) 44 44 44 60 60 Number of check dams none 1 3 none 2 A nearly 5-m-long, 10-cm-wide and 12%-steep flume was used. The water discharge was set to 0,55 l/s in all runs. A mixture of poorly sorted natural sediments with diameters between 0.8 and 40 mm was used. An open solid-discharge-feeding circuit kept the inlet sediment flux constant during all experiments. As both feeding rates did not present variation, changes in outlet solid discharge were assumed to be due to bed variations in the bed storage. We observed strong fluctuations of solid flux and slope in each reaches of all runs between: (i) steep aggradating armoured bed and (ii) less steep and finer bed releasing bedload sheets during erosion events and inducing bedload pulses. All experiments showed consistent results: transported volume associated with erosion event decreased with the length between two subsequent check dams. Solid transversal structures shorten the upstream erosion-propagation and avoid downstream change in the bed level. As long as they are not buried by too strong aggradation they allow a 'bed level independence' between reaches. On the long term, as the total inlet flux is kept constant, a decrease in transported volumes induces an increase in the erosion event frequency: sediment releases are more frequent but littler. As proposed by Poncet (1995), check dams participate efficiently in hazard mitigation because 'they release in retail what torrents would too abruptly delivered wholesale'. Reference : Poncet, A. "Restauration et conservation des terrains en montagne." Office national des forêts, Paris (1995).

  17. Deformation and failure mechanism of slope in three dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfa Lu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding three-dimensional (3D slope deformation and failure mechanism and corresponding stability analyses are crucially important issues in geotechnical engineering. In this paper, the mechanisms of progressive failure with thrust-type and pull-type landslides are described in detail. It is considered that the post-failure stress state and the pre-peak stress state may occur at different regions of a landslide body with deformation development, and a critical stress state element (or the soil slice block exists between the post-failure stress state and the pre-peak stress state regions. In this regard, two sorts of failure modes are suggested for the thrust-type and three sorts for pull-type landslides, based on the characteristics of shear stress and strain (or tensile stress and strain. Accordingly, a new joint constitutive model (JCM is proposed based on the current stability analytical theories, and it can be used to describe the mechanical behaviors of geo-materials with softening properties. Five methods, i.e. CSRM (comprehensive sliding resistance method, MTM (main thrust method, CDM (comprehensive displacement method, SDM (surplus displacement method, and MPM (main pull method, for slope stability calculation are proposed. The S-shaped curve of monitored displacement vs. time is presented for different points on the sliding surface during progressive failure process of landslide, and the relationship between the displacement of different points on the sliding surface and height of landslide body is regarded as the parabolic curve. The comparisons between the predicted and observed load–displacement and displacement–time relations of the points on the sliding surface are conducted. The classification of stable/unstable displacement–time curves is proposed. The definition of the main sliding direction of a landslide is also suggested in such a way that the failure body of landslide (simplified as “collapse body” is only involved in the main sliding direction, and the strike and the dip are the same as the collapse body. The rake angle is taken as the direction of the sum of sliding forces or the sum of displacements in collapse body, in which the main slip direction is dependent on progressive deformation. The reason of non-convergence with finite element method (FEM in calculating the stability of slope is also numerically analyzed, in which a new method considering the slip surface associated with the boundary condition is proposed. It is known that the boundary condition of sliding surface can be described by perfect elasto-plastic model (PEPM and JCM, and that the stress and strain of a landslide can be described properly with the JCM.

  18. Comparison of rill flow velocity over frozen and thawed slopes with electrolyte tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yunyun; Lei, Tingwu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Freeze-thaw erosion is the primary soil water erosion form in high altitude and/or high latitude regions. The water flow velocity along an eroding rill over frozen and thawed slopes is vital to understanding of rill erosion hydrodynamics. This study experimentally measured rill flow velocity over frozen and thawed slopes using electrolyte trace method under Pulse Boundary Model. The experiments used three flow rates of 1, 2, and 4 L min-1, three slope gradients of 5°, 10°, and 15°. The temperature of the rill flow water was supplied at 0 °C as controlled with ice-water mixture. Seven sensors were used to measure flow velocity by tracing the solute transport process at 10, 110, 210, 310, 410, 510, and 610 cm distances from the electrolyte injection position. The measured velocity became steady at a distance of about 3 m from the electrolyte injection location, where the effect of the pulse boundary condition on the analytic solution to the partial differential equation becomes negligible. Results showed that flow velocity increased with slope gradient and flow rate on frozen slopes. A significant effect was observed on the steepest slope or at the highest flow rate over the thawed slope, which changed slightly on the gentle slopes and low flow rates. Flow velocity was about 25%, 30%, and 40% higher on the frozen soil than on the thawed slope at 5°, 10°, and 15° slopes and about 30% higher over the frozen slope at all flow rates. This study demonstrates that water over a frozen slope flows much faster than over a thawed slope. This study helps in the study and further understanding of the hydrodynamics of soil erosion and sediment transport behaviors of frozen and thawed slopes.

  19. Slope Hazard and Risk Assessment in the Tropics: Malaysia' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Zakaria; Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Ahmad, Ferdaus; Manap, Mohamad Abdul; Ramli, Zamri; Ahmad, Azhari; Mohamed, Zainab

    2015-04-01

    The increasing number of geological hazards in Malaysia has often resulted in casualties and extensive devastation with high mitigation cost. Given the destructive capacity and high frequency of disaster, Malaysia has taken a step forward to address the multi-scale landslide risk reduction emphasizing pre-disaster action rather than post-disaster reaction. Slope hazard and risk assessment in a quantitative manner at regional and national scales remains challenging in Malaysia. This paper presents the comprehensive methodology framework and operational needs driven by modern and advanced geospatial technology to address the aforementioned issues in the tropics. The Slope Hazard and Risk Mapping, the first national project in Malaysia utilizing the multi-sensor LIDAR has been critically implemented with the support of multi- and trans-disciplinary partners. The methodological model has been formulated and evaluated given the complexity of risk scenarios in this knowledge driven project. Instability slope problems in the urban, mountainous and tectonic landscape are amongst them, and their spatial information is of crucial for regional landslide assessment. We develop standard procedures with optimal parameterization for susceptibility, hazard and risk assessment in the selected regions. Remarkably, we are aiming at producing an utmost complete landslide inventory in both space and time. With the updated reliable terrain and landscape models, the landslide conditioning factor maps can be accurately derived depending on the landslide types and failure mechanisms which crucial for hazard and risk assessment. We also aim to improve the generation of elements at risk for landslide and promote integrated approaches for a better disaster risk analysis. As a result, a new tool, notably multi-sensor LIDAR technology is a very promising tool for an old geological problem and its derivative data for hazard and risk analysis is an effective preventive measure in Malaysia. Geological, morphological, and physical factors coupled with anthropogenic activities made the spatiotemporal prediction of possible slope failures very challenging. Changing climate and land-use-and-land-cover required a dynamic geo-system approach for assessing multi-hazard in Malaysia and it is still a great challenge to be dealt with. We also critically discussed the capability, limitation and future direction of geo-information tools particularly the active sensors for systematically providing the spatial input towards landslide hazard and possible risk. The cost-and-benefit of developed methods compared to traditional mapping techniques is also elaborated. This paper put forth the critical and practical framework ranging from updating landslide inventory to mitigating landslide risk as an attempt to support the establishment of a comprehensive landslide risk management in Malaysia. The advancement of multistage processing sequence based on airborne-, and ground-based laser remote sensing technology coupling with the sophisticated satellite positioning system, advanced geographical information system and expert knowledge leading to a better understanding of the landslide processes and their dynamics in time and space. Given the state-of-the-art of multi-sensor-LIDAR and complexity of tropical environment, this first landslide project carried out at the national scale provides a better indication and recommendation on the use of modern and advanced mapping technology for assessing tropical landslide geomorphology in an objective, reproducible and quantitative manner.

  20. REVIEW OF HIGH FIELD Q SLOPE, CAVITY MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2008-01-23

    One of the most interesting phenomenon occurring in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk niobium is represented by a sharp decrease of the quality factor above peak surface magnetic field of about 90 mT and is referred to as "high field Q-slope" or "Q-drop". This phenomenon was observed first in 1997 and since then some effort was devoted to the understanding of the causes behind it. Still, no clear physical interpretation of the Q-drop has emerged, despite several attempts. In this contribution, I will review the experimental results for various cavities measured in many laboratories and I will try to identify common features and differences related to the Q-drop.

  1. Air-cushion tankers for Alaskan North Slope oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    A concept is described for transporting oil from the Arctic to southern markets in 10,000-ton, chemically fueled air-cushion vehicles (ACV's) configured as tankers. Based on preliminary cost estimates the conceptual ACV tanker system as tailored to the transportation of Alaskan North Slope oil could deliver the oil for about the same price per barrel as the proposed trans-Alaska pipeline with only one-third of the capital investment. The report includes the description of the conceptual system and its operation; preliminary cost estimates; an appraisal of ACV tanker development; and a comparison of system costs, versatility, vulnerability, and ecological effect with those of the trans-Alaska pipeline.

  2. Shallow Water Turbulent Surface Wave Striking an Adverse Slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Sujit K.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a sinusoidal wave crest striking an adverse slope due to gradual elevation of the bed is relevant for coastal sea waves. Turbulence based RANS equations are used here under turbulence closure assumptions. Depth-averaging the equations of continuity and momentum, yield two differential equations for the surface elevation and the average forward velocity. After nondimensionalization, the two equations are converted in terms of elevation over the inclined bed and the discharge, where the latter is a function of the former satisfying a first order differential equation, while the elevation is given by a first order evolution equation which is treated by Lax-Wendroff discretization. Starting initially with a single sinusoidal crest, it is shown that as time progresses, the crest leans forwards, causing a jump in the crest upfront resulting in its roll over as a jet. Three cases show that jump becomes more prominent with increasing bed inclination

  3. End depth in steeply sloping rough rectangular channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhasish Dey

    2000-02-01

    The paper presents a theoretical model to compute the end depth of a free overfall in steeply sloping rough rectangular channels. A momentum equation based on the Boussinesq approximation is applied to obtain the equation of the end depth. The effect ofstreamline curvature at the free surface is utilized to develop the differential equation for the flow profile upstream of the free overfall of a wide rectangular channel. As direct solutions for the end depth and flow profile cannot be obtained owing to implicit forms of the developed equations, an auto-recursive search scheme is evolved to solve these equations simultaneously. A method for estimation of discharge from the known end depth and Nikuradse equivalent sand roughness is also presented. Results from the present model correspond satisfactorily with experimental observations except for some higher roughnesses.

  4. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  5. SOIL SEQUENCES ALONG A SLOPE OF THE OPALENICA PLAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kozłowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a study on differentiation of the morphological structure of soil and selected physical and chemical properties of soils in toposequence of the Opalenica Plain. The study was conducted in a 1200 m long transect running through a typical soil toposequence for the Polish Lowland, and therefore the results presented in this study can be extrapolated to similar geomorphological conditions of the area. On the basis of pedological cross-section, the following soil units were distinguished: PWspgl – Albic Luvisols (Arenic with glossic properties, PAt – Albic Glossic Retisols (Loamic, PAsp – Albic Glossic Retisols (Aric, Arenic, PAspgg – Albic Glossic Retisols (Aric, Arenic, Oxyaquic, PWsggl – Albic Luvisols (Aric, Arenic, Stagnic with glossic properties, PWgggl – Albic Luvisols (Aric, Loamic, Stagnic with glossic properties, CZgg – Mollic Reductigleyic Eutric Gleysols (Aric, Loamic, CFt – Fluvic Phaeozems (Aric, Arenic. Each of these units has its own specific position in toposequence but the occurrence of Fluvic Phaeozems (Aric, Arenic are associated with geogenetic processes of Mogilnica river. In this work, using a multiple regression analysis a statistically significant relationships between the position of the soils in relief and the terrain slopes and the organic carbon content in Ap horizon, the cation exchangeable capacity, the sum of exchangeable bases and the pH were obtained. Systematic variability of most soil properties of Ap horizon have shown two distances of spatial variation. The first concerns the systematic changes in shorter distance (from 132 to 344 m and can be associated with differences in soil properties between separate soil units. The second distance of spatial correlation ranges from 431 m to 792 m, which testify to the fact that quantitative changes in the properties of soils are realized gradually and distinctly, together with the differentiation of the slope, over several separate cartographic units.

  6. Monte-Carlo Modeling of Some Niger Delta Slope Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Oladapo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte-Carlo modeling has been utilized in this study to simulate seismic P-wave events on four horizons (AA, BB, CC and DD in a Niger Delta Slope environment with the aim of generating AVO attributes. Monte-Carlo modeling undertaken on a well log from the Gulf of Mexico served as a generic model and control. Trends analysis regressions generated in the environment served as input for the models while default parameter in SAVIOR (fluid method was used for establishing reservoir fluid properties. Fourier velocity served as velocity function. The results of the modeling are presented as AVO crossplots for brine sand (background, residual hydrocarbon and commercial hydrocarbon. For each event, offset-dependent synthetic seismograms are also generated using Zoeppritz equations. The AA horizon is typified by incoherent orientations of AVO crossplots. The horizon is thus presumed unconsolidated. The synthetic seismogram generated shows no perceptible amplitude variation with offset on all the models. AVO crossplot of the encountered BB horizon show that most of the commercial hydrocarbon plots and some of the residual hydrocarbon plots fall on quadrant III (bright spot quadrant. Synthetic seismic generated for BB horizon exhibits positive AVO response (soft kick on the commercial hydrocarbon model. A similar but marginal response was obtained on brine saturated BB model. Brine saturated model of the AVO crossplot for CC horizon model plotted mostly on hard sand quadrant. Conversely, presumed commercial hydrocarbon saturated CC is split between the hard sand and soft sand quadrants with low background normal values. The DD horizon is similar to the deep model of the Gulf of Mexico and hence exhibits similar crossplot. Curiously, high background normal (Bn characterized residual hydrocarbon models while unconsolidated gas sand horizons exhibit anomalous characteristics. The AVO crossplot obtained from the Monte-Carlo model could be a robust tool for mapping reservoirs within the Niger Delta Slope.

  7. Limitations of Deterministic Modelling of Slope Stability on Volcanic Edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, R. V.; Pinkerton, H.; Binley, A.

    2004-12-01

    The conditions leading to the 18 May 1980 sector collapse of Mount St Helens have been the subject of a number of detailed investigations. Preservation of the initial failure plane(s) allowed Voight et al. (1983) and Donnadieu et al. (2001) to undertake back analyses and determine a range of possible failure conditions. While the models proposed offer major insights into potential failure mechanisms, we will demonstrate that deterministic analyses are of limited usefulness because many of the model parameters, such as cohesion, internal friction and pore pressure, are very poorly constrained. This creates problems of non-uniqueness in the solution. An alternative approach involves a series of Monte Carlo simulations to identify potential combinations of parameters that will produce the observed failure plane. Initial input ranges are specified for each parameter and the predetermined model is run repeatedly, with the parameter values for each model selected at random from within the input ranges. The interaction between parameters can be examined in detail, providing a better understanding of the potential failure conditions. This approach, which has been tested initially on a theoretical slope with predetermined failure conditions, highlights the fact that it is impossible to generate a unique model that fits the data when the slope has poorly defined strength parameters. This has clear implications for the validity of commonly used deterministic approaches. This probabilistic back analysis approach has been used to reanalyse the conditions that led to the May 18 collapse on Mount St Helens. Donnadieu, F., Merle, O., and Besson, J.C., 2001, Volcanic edifice stability during cryptodome intrusion, Bulletin of Volcanology, vol 63, p61-72. Voight, B., Janda, R.J., Glicken, H., and Douglass, P.M., 1983, Nature and Mechanics of the Mount St-Helens Rockslide-Avalanche of 18 May 1980, Geotechnique, vol 33, p243-273.

  8. The slope-background for the near-peak regimen of photoemission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We propose a method that accounts for the change in the background slope of XPS data. •The slope-background can be derived from Tougaard–Sigmund's transport theory. •The total background is composed by Shirley–Sherwood and Tougaard type backgrounds. •The slope-background employs one parameter that can be related to REELS spectra. •The slope, in conjunction with the Shirley–Sherwood background, provides better fits. -- Abstract: Photoemission data typically exhibits a change on the intensity of the background between the two sides of the peaks. This step is usually very well reproduced by the Shirley–Sherwood background. Yet, the change on the slope of the background in the near-peak regime, although usually present, is not always as obvious to the eye. However, the intensity of the background signal associated with the evolution of its slope can be appreciable. The slope-background is designed to empirically reproduce the change on the slope. Resembling the non-iterative Shirley method, the proposed functional form relates the slope of the background to the integrated signal at higher electron kinetic energies. This form can be predicted under Tougaard–Sigmund's electron transport theory in the near-peak regime. To reproduce both the step and slope changes on the background, it is necessary to employ the slope-background in conjunction with the Shirley–Sherwood background under the active-background method. As it is shown for a series of materials, the application of the slope-background provides excellent fits, is transparent to the operator, and is much more independent of the fitting range than other background methods. The total area assessed through the combination of the slope and the Shirley–Sherwood backgrounds is larger than when only the Shirley–Sherwood background is employed, and smaller than when the Tougaard background is employed

  9. The slope-background for the near-peak regimen of photoemission spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Gomez, A., E-mail: aherrera@qro.cinvestav.mx [CINVESTAV-Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico); Bravo-Sanchez, M. [CINVESTAV-Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico); Aguirre-Tostado, F.S. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Vazquez-Lepe, M.O. [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Jalisco 44430 (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •We propose a method that accounts for the change in the background slope of XPS data. •The slope-background can be derived from Tougaard–Sigmund's transport theory. •The total background is composed by Shirley–Sherwood and Tougaard type backgrounds. •The slope-background employs one parameter that can be related to REELS spectra. •The slope, in conjunction with the Shirley–Sherwood background, provides better fits. -- Abstract: Photoemission data typically exhibits a change on the intensity of the background between the two sides of the peaks. This step is usually very well reproduced by the Shirley–Sherwood background. Yet, the change on the slope of the background in the near-peak regime, although usually present, is not always as obvious to the eye. However, the intensity of the background signal associated with the evolution of its slope can be appreciable. The slope-background is designed to empirically reproduce the change on the slope. Resembling the non-iterative Shirley method, the proposed functional form relates the slope of the background to the integrated signal at higher electron kinetic energies. This form can be predicted under Tougaard–Sigmund's electron transport theory in the near-peak regime. To reproduce both the step and slope changes on the background, it is necessary to employ the slope-background in conjunction with the Shirley–Sherwood background under the active-background method. As it is shown for a series of materials, the application of the slope-background provides excellent fits, is transparent to the operator, and is much more independent of the fitting range than other background methods. The total area assessed through the combination of the slope and the Shirley–Sherwood backgrounds is larger than when only the Shirley–Sherwood background is employed, and smaller than when the Tougaard background is employed.

  10. Short-term vegetation recovery after a spring grassland fire in Lithuania. Effect of time and slope position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is study the effects of a grassland fire in vegetation recuperation according to fire severity, slope exposition and position. We designed two experimental plots, one located in an east faced slope (Slope A and other in a west faced (Slope B. Vegetation recuperation was assessed 10, 17, 31 and 46 days after the fire. The results showed that fire severity was higher in slope B, than in slope A. In both slopes vegetation recuperation was different according position. Bottom positions recovered faster than slope and upslope positions, that it is attributed to fire severity (higher in slope and upslope areas and ash and soil transport and deposition in bottom areas. The vegetation recuperated faster in slope B and 46 days after the fire, 100% of the plot was covered. This was attributed to higher severity, more complex topography, and inclination of Slope A, that delayed the vegetation recover.

  11. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile and Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Valbuzzi, Elena; Frattini, Paolo; Valagussa, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Deep canyon incision into Tertiary paleosurfaces and large slope instabilities along the canyon flanks characterize the landscape of western slope of the Andes of northern Chile and South Peru. This area belongs to the Coastal Escarpment and Precordillera and is formed by coarse-grained clastic and volcanoclastic formations. The area is characterized by intense seismicity and long-term hyperaridity (Atacama Desert). Landslides along the canyon flanks affect volumes generally up to 1 km3 and locally evolved in large rock avalanches. We prepared a landslide inventory covering an area of about 30,000 km2, extending from Iquique (Chile) to the South and Tacna (Peru) to the North. A total of 606 landslides have been mapped in the area by use of satellite images and direct field surveys, prevalently including large phenomena. The landslides range from 1 10-3 km2 to 464 km2 (Lluta landslide). The total landslide area, inclusive of the landslide scarp and of the deposit, amounts to about 2,130 km2 (about 7% of the area). The mega landslides can be classified as large block slides that can evolve in large rock avalanches (e.g. Minimini landslide). Their initiation seems to be strongly associated to the presence of secondary faults and large fractures transversal to the slope. These landslides show evidence suggesting a re-incision by the main canyon network. This seems particularly true for the Lluta collapse where the main 'landslide' mass is masked or deleted by the successive erosion. Other landslides have been mapped along the Coastal Escarpment and some of the major tectonic escarpments with an E-W trend. We examined area-frequency distributions of landslides by developing logarithmically binned, non-cumulative size frequency distributions that report frequency density as a function of landslide planar area A. The size frequency distribution presents a strong undersampling for smaller landslides, due to the extremely old age of the inventory. For landslides larger than 2 000 m2, the distribution exhibits a power-law behaviour with scaling exponent, β, equal to -2.24. For comparison, we analysed the power-law behaviour of other earthquake-induced landslide inventories, obtaining similar results, although the geological and seismic conditions may have been very different (Buller, New Zealand, β = -2.42; Iningahua, New Zealand, β = -2.53; Northridge, USA, β = -2.39; Chi-Chi, Taiwan, β = -2.30; Wenchuan Earthquake, China, β = -2.19). Volume estimates and slope stability modelling have been completed to characterize the phenomena and the possible triggering mechanisms. For volume estimate, we reconstructed the pre-failure surface for tens of landslides, in order to characterize the area-volume relationship. By using this relationship, we assigned a volume to all landslides of the inventory. The study area is subject to a high seismicity associated to earthquakes of different type: interplate (superficial and intermediate depth), subduction zone earthquakes, and earthquake along the Coastal Escarpment. By analysing the frequency size relationships for earthquake-induced landslides from literature, it is possible to observe that the higher the earthquake Magnitude, the higher the frequency density curve. To quantify this observation, we used the power-law relationships derived for each inventory to calculate the frequency density associated to selected areas, and we plotted these frequencies as a function of the magnitude of the respective earthquakes. By fitting these values, we derived the expected Magnitude required to generate the landslide distribution of the study area. In conclusion, we argue that the evolution of these landslides is controlled by: deep valley incision, canyon walls undercutting and lateral migration of the river controlled by valley flank instabilities, the Presence of weak lithologies and weak basal layers, the river incision debuttressing the slope toe and especially brings to daylighting the weak basal layers observed at some landslide sites, the possible deep groundwater flow above the deep imperm

  12. Research on the Relationship between Landslide of Farming Terraces and the Intensity of Rainfall and Slope Angle Based on the Indoor Rainfall Slide Slope Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqin Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increase of geographical disaster in China, it is necessary to study the formation mechanism to make a preparation for the future prevention of geological disasters and effectively reduce the unnecessary financial loss and casualties. We found there is a powerful connection between heavy rainfall and landslide slope. Thus, this article takes the accumulation of gravel soil as the research material to set up indoor rainfall and landslide model test. By comparing the rules of pore water pressure and soil pressure responding to different rainfall intensity and slope angle, we discussed over the effects of rainfall intensity and slope angle on the sliding of accumulation gravelly soil.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-12-01

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. Coreflood, quarter 5-spot study, compositional simulation, wettability, relative permeability study and streamline-based simulation were conducted in this project. 1D compositional simulation results agree reasonably well with those of the slim tube experiments. Injection of CO{sub 2}-NGL is preferable over that of PBG-NGL. MME is sensitive to pressure (in the range of 1300-1800 psi) for the injection of PBG-NGL, but not for CO{sub 2}-NGL. Three hydrocarbon phases form in this pressure range. As the mean thickness of the adsorbed organic layer on minerals increases, the oil-water contact angle increases. The adsorbed organic films left behind after extraction of oil by common aromatic solvents used in core studies, such as toluene and decalin, are thinner than those left behind by non-aromatic solvents, such as cyclohexane. The force of adhesion for minerals aged with just the asphaltene fraction is similar to that of the whole oil implying that asphaltenes are responsible for the mixed-wettability in this reservoir. A new relative permeability model for a four-phase, mixed-wet system has been proposed. A streamline module is developed which can be incorporated in an existing finite-difference based compositional simulator to model water flood, gas flood and WAG flood. Horizontal wells increase well deliverability over vertical wells, but sweep efficiency can decrease. The well performance depends on the well length, position, heterogeneity, and viscosity ratio. The productivity increase due to electromagnetic heating is a function of power intensity, flow rate, and frequency etc. The productivity of a well can be doubled by electromagnetic heating. A high-pressure quarter 5-spot model has been constructed to evaluate the sweep efficiency of miscible WAG floods. WAG displacement reduces bypassing compared to gas floods and improves oil recovery in cores. As the WAG ratio decreased and slug size increased, oil recovery increased. Oil was recovered faster with increased slug size and decreased WAG ratio in the simulations for field cases studied.

  14. Research activities on submarine landslides in gentle continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, S.; Goto, S.; Miyata, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Kitahara, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In the north Sanrikuoki Basin off Shimokita Peninsula, NE Japan, a great number of buried large slump deposits have been identified in the Pliocene and younger formations. The basin has formed in a very gentle continental slope of less than one degree in gradient and is composed of well-stratified formations which basically parallel to the present seafloor. This indicates that the slumping have also occurred in such very gentle slope angle. The slump units and their slip surfaces have very simple and clear characteristics, such as layer-parallel slip on the gentle slope, regularly imbricated internal structure, block-supported with little matrix structure, widespread dewatering structure, and low-amplitude slip surface layer. We recognize that the large slump deposits group of layer-parallel slip in this area is an appropriate target to determine 'mechanism of submarine landslides', that is one of the subjects on the new IODP science plan for 2013 and beyond. So, we started some research activities to examine the feasibility of the future scientific drilling. The slump deposits were recognized basically by 3D seismic analysis. Further detailed seismic analysis using 2D seismic data in wider area of the basin is being performed for better understanding of geologic structure of the sedimentary basin and the slump deposits. This will be good source to extract suitable locations for drill sites. Typical seismic features and some other previous studies imply that the formation fluid in this study area is strongly related to natural gas, of which condition is strongly affected by temperature. So, detailed heat flow measurements was performed in the study area in 2013. For that purpose, a long-term water temperature monitoring system was deployed on the seafloor in October, 2012. The collected water temperature variation is applied to precise correction of heat flow values. Vitrinite reflectance analysis is also being carried out using sediments samples recovered by IODP Expedition 337, which is conducted in a part of the study area from July through September in 2012. The values of vitrinite reflectance will be available for modeling thermal history in the sedimentary basin. A science meeting and a field trip were held in Miyazaki Prefecture in September , 2012. At the field trip, we observed typical geologic structures related to slumping and dewatering in Nichinan Group, which are good onshore objects so as to share the aspects of the slump deposits in the Sanrikuoki Basin among the community. This occasion is aimed at sharing better scientific understanding on slumping and related dewatering and also at identifying the issues for planning the scientific drilling. This study uses the 3D seismic data from the METI seismic survey 'Sanrikuoki 3D' in 2008. The seismic analysis, the vitrinite reflectance analysis, and the science meeting and the field excursion in Miyazaki were supported by the foundation of feasibility studies for future IODP scientific drillings by JAMSTEC CDEX in 2012-2013.

  15. Effect of table top slope and height on body posture and muscular activity pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassane, M; Hamaoui, A; Zanone, P-G

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of table top slope and height on body posture and muscular activity pattern. Twelve asymptomatic participants performed a 5-min reading task while sitting, in six experimental conditions manipulating the table top slope (20 backward slope, no slope) and its height (low, medium, up). EMGs recordings were taken on 9 superficial muscles located at the trunk and shoulder level, and the angular positions of the head, trunk and pelvis were assessed using an inertial orientation system. Results revealed that the sloping table top was associated with a higher activity of deltoideus pars clavicularis (P<0.05) and a smaller flexion angle of the head (P<0.05). A tentative conclusion is that a sloping table top induces a more erect posture of the head and the neck, but entails an overload of the shoulder, which might be harmful on the long run. PMID:25267452

  16. Finite Element Analysis for Bearing Capacity of Rectangular Footing Resting Near Sloped Cohesive soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawdat K. Abbas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Finite element method is used to investigate the ultimate bearing capacity of rectangular footing resting on cohesive soil near slope. The effect of footing aspect ratio (L/B, distance ratio (b/B, and slope angle (β on the bearing capacity are calculated. A new reduction factor (Rs is proposed to compute the ultimate bearing capacity for rectangular footing adjacent to slope of cohesive soil from ultimate bearing capacity for similar rectangular footing resting on ground level of cohesive soils. This study shows that the ultimate bearing capacity for rectangular footing adjacent to slope of cohesive soils decreases when slope angle (β and aspect ratio (L/B increases.  Also the ultimate bearing capacity increases when the distance ratio (b/B increases. Finally The effect of slope diminishes as the distance ratio (b/B equal, or exceeds 0.75.

  17. Evaluation and forecast distribution of radionuclides and dose in the model slope ecosystems for landscape ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.П. Петрусенко

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  For the analysis of ecological safety in typical of slope`s ecosystem the block-scheme of ecosystem is created. From nature  of data and on the basis of the theoretical analysis the parameters of speeds of transitions of pollutant (Cs-137 are chosen. On this basis modeling processes of migration and relocation of radionuclides  in a typical slope by a method of box models is carried out. Is shown, that actively and quickly enough redistributes radionuclides. As a result of modeling it is possible to estimate and  to prognose  of dynamics  of distribution radionuclides  in typical of slope`s  ecosystem and to establish probable   of dose   loading on the people, which use parts such  slope`s ecosystem.

  18. Flow Ejecta and Slope Landslides in Small Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This high resolution picture of a moderately small impact crater on Mars was taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter Camera (MOC) on October 17, 1997 at 4:11:07 PM PST, during MGS orbit 22. The image covers an area 2.9 by 48.4 kilometers (1.8 by 30 miles) at 9.6 m (31.5 feet) per picture element, and is centered at 21.3 degrees N, 179.8 degrees W, near Orcus Patera. The MOC image is a factor of 15X better than pervious Viking views of this particular crater (left, Viking image 545A49).The unnamed crater is one of three closely adjacent impact features that display the ejecta pattern characteristic of one type of 'flow-ejecta' crater. Such patterns are considered evidence of fluidized movement of the materials ejected during the cratering event, and are believed to indicate the presence of subsurface ice or liquid water.Long, linear features of different brightness values can be seen on the on the steep slopes inside and outside the crater rim. This type of feature, first identified in Viking Orbiter images acquired over 20 years ago, are more clearly seen in this new view (about 3 times better than the best previous observations). Their most likely explanation is that small land or dirt slides, initiated by seismic or wind action, have flowed down the steep slopes. Initially dark because of the nature of the surface disturbance, these features get lighter with time as the ubiquitous fine, bright dust settles onto them from the martian atmosphere. Based on estimates of the dust fall-out rate, many of these features are probably only a few tens to hundreds of years old. Thus, they are evidence of a process that is active on Mars today.Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  19. Spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemical transport on Arctic hill slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, R.; Harms, T.; Jones, J.

    2013-12-01

    Water tracks, saturated regions of the hill slope in permafrosted Arctic catchments, likely deliver the majority of water entering streams in these regions, and may play a central role in delivery of nutrients. Fate of dissolved nutrients and carbon as they are transported in water tracks has a substantial effect on stream ecosystems, as water tracks may cover up to 35% of the catchment land area. Water tracks are distinguished from adjacent areas of the hillslope by higher rates of hydrologic transport, greater woody biomass, and increased pools of nutrients. Substantial spatial heterogeneity within and between water tracks may influence their role in transfer of materials between the terrestrial and aquatic landscape. We examined spatial variability of hydrologic and chemical characteristics within and between water tracks in the Kuparuk Basin of northern Alaska to increase understanding of the factors influencing nutrient export from arctic catchments. We studied a sedge-dominated water track with perennial surface water flow with shrub-dominated water tracks containing intermittent surface flow. Nominal transit times of water in the perennial site was 5 hours, compared to 15.5 h in an ephemeral track over a 50 meter reach, indicating substantial variation in water residence time and opportunity for biogeochemical reaction across sites. We evaluated spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemical characteristics within 25-m reaches at each site with a grain size of 10 m. Dissolved CH4 concentration was elevated above atmospheric equilibrium only at the perennial water track, where CH4 concentration varied by more than 15-fold within the water track, indicating hot spots of anaerobic microbial activity. Dissolved CO2 concentration was 9 times greater on average at the perennial water track, compared to the ephemeral site, suggesting that continuous water flow supports more rapid microbial activity. CO2 concentration was also more variable in the perennial water track, with a CV of 64% compared to 11% in an ephemeral water track. Despite spatial heterogeneity in dissolved gas concentrations within the perennial site, NH4+ concentration in surface and soil water was less variable, with a CV of 38%. In contrast, NH4+ concentration was more variable (CV=41%) than dissolved gases within the ephemeral site, and mean concentration was 2 times greater than at the perennial site, suggesting less active biological retention of nitrogen at the ephemeral site. These differences in dissolved gases and nutrient concentrations among water tracks indicate that nutrient processing during hydrologic transport on hill slopes varies across the catchment, which will likely result in spatially heterogeneous responses of elemental cycles in response to permafrost loss.

  20. Landslide trigger factors on populated, unstable slopes, Tusion, Tajikistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domej, Gisela

    2015-04-01

    The Pamir region close to the Tajik-Afghan border is regularly affected by severe landslides threatening local population, their livelihood and infrastructure. In addition to landslides appearing as immediate consequence of earthquake, a high number of ground movements without previous seismic activity are also observed. The number of reported events and problem areas has strongly increased within the last ten to fifteen years. Consequently, a study was conducted to determine the triggering factors of these landslides without seismic cause. For accessibility reasons, the community of Tusion, southeast of Khorog, Gorno-Badakhshan, southern Tajikistan, where the capital township is located on a slowly moving slope, was chosen for the pilot project, and geologic mapping as well as seismic refraction and Schlumberger geoelectrics were applied. The geologic survey showed that the valley flanks around Tusion are covered with large amounts of postglacial and fluvial debris as well as moraine deposits. The absence of glacial ice and the retreat of remaining glaciers caused unstable valley flanks at many sites and, in consequence, extensive gravitational mass movements in the past, which are responsible for the today's layered ground structure as well as many secondary slumps. The latter often damage irrigation lines, which tends to further destabilize the slope. To obtain an accurate image of the superposed layers, the geophysical survey was conducted on three inhabited flanks. Arguments in favour for those three locations were not only the possibility of direct risk estimation for the region, but also the fact that the number of landslides increases constantly with population growth. Seismic and electric methods were applied in parallel to distinguish soil types and structural properties as well as to estimate the degree of water saturation. Despite of the methods' simplicity, they revealed precise explanations on triggering factors of landslides. The geophysical survey showed different density and electric conductivity regimes in the upper layers resulting from exposure and decomposition during the last centuries and especially from uncontrolled irrigation since the 1990s. The electric prospection showed a high water saturation in the weathering layers which is explained on one hand by a higher porosity of the material close to the surface, and on the other hand by the fact that crystalline rocks decompose to clay which, in turn, is able to take up water. Almost all landslides start in a depth where surveys show firstly a rapid decrease of water saturation, and secondly a transition to more compact material. Thus, it can be concluded that decomposition and irrigation provoke a (re-)activation of sliding surfaces inside the postglacial debris body. The upper layers slide on a humid surface and create the frequently observed landslides in inhabited areas.

  1. Problems of definitive slopes mining at Doly Nástup Tušimice

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Vrubel; Dana Sládková

    2007-01-01

    The instability of slopes influents mining business in many aspects at opencast mining. The temporary decrease of intended mined volumes due to landslips is common and sometimes there is necessary to change origin-mining plans. It has impact to economy and other essential costs for rehabilitation are required. In case of definitive slopes formation in contact to traffic and communication networks, watercourses and infrastructures of seats stability of slope security there is even more importa...

  2. Measuring slope to improve energy expenditure estimates during field-based activities

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Glen E; Lester, Jonathan; Migotsky, Sean; Higgins, Lisa; Borriello, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    This technical note describes methods to improve activity energy expenditure estimates using a multi-sensor board (MSB) by measuring slope. Ten adults walked over a 2.5-mile course wearing an MSB and mobile calorimeter. Energy expenditure was estimated using accelerometry alone (base) and four methods to measure slope. The barometer and GPS methods improved accuracy 11% from the base (Ps < 0.05) to 86% overall. Measuring slope using the MSB improves energy expenditure estimates during field-b...

  3. Deformation monitoring and modeling based on LiDAR data for slope stability assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Time dependent deformation is a common process in soil slopes but never the less a challenging task for stability assessment. Slope failure and the land subsidence originating not only from extensive constructions and mining but also due to geological processes are common problems, which adversely influence environment, human safety and economic development. In order to pursue an advanced methodology for management and mitigation of soil slope failure, such points as adequate monitoring techn...

  4. Development of a ground displacement measurement method for failed slopes at the toes of landslides

    OpenAIRE

    Higuchi, K.; K. Fujisawa; Tohei, M.; Okawa, S.; Shimomura, H.; Sakata, T.

    2008-01-01

    Sediments produced by a slope failure of the toe of a landslide are assumed to prevent the spread of the failure. Thus, sediment removal is an emergency measure that must be done safely while the slope is observed. Observation must also be done safely without requiring workers to enter the failed slope to avoid secondary disasters.

    Generally, a non-prism type totalstation is useful to measure ground displacement under such circumstances, because this type of totalstation ...

  5. GIS/RS-based Rapid Reassessment for Slope Land Capability Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T. Y.; Chompuchan, C.

    2014-12-01

    Farmland resources in Taiwan are limited because about 73% is mountainous and slope land. Moreover, the rapid urbanization and dense population resulted in the highly developed flat area. Therefore, the utilization of slope land for agriculture is more needed. In 1976, "Slope Land Conservation and Utilization Act" was promulgated to regulate the slope land utilization. Consequently, slope land capability was categorized into Class I-IV according to 4 criteria, i.e., average land slope, effective soil depth, degree of soil erosion, and parent rock. The slope land capability Class I-VI are suitable for cultivation and pasture. Whereas, Class V should be used for forestry purpose and Class VI should be the conservation land which requires intensive conservation practices. The field survey was conducted to categorize each land unit as the classification scheme. The landowners may not allow to overuse land capability limitation. In the last decade, typhoons and landslides frequently devastated in Taiwan. The rapid post-disaster reassessment of the slope land capability classification is necessary. However, the large-scale disaster on slope land is the constraint of field investigation. This study focused on using satellite remote sensing and GIS as the rapid re-evaluation method. Chenyulan watershed in Nantou County, Taiwan was selected to be a case study area. Grid-based slope derivation, topographic wetness index (TWI) and USLE soil loss calculation were used to classify slope land capability. The results showed that GIS-based classification give an overall accuracy of 68.32%. In addition, the post-disaster areas of Typhoon Morakot in 2009, which interpreted by SPOT satellite imageries, were suggested to classify as the conservation lands. These tools perform better in the large coverage post-disaster update for slope land capability classification and reduce time-consuming, manpower and material resources to the field investigation.

  6. Study of Real-Time Slope Stability Monitoring System Using Wireless Sensor Network(WSN)

    OpenAIRE

    Dave Ta Teh Chang; Yuh-Show Tsai; Kai-Chun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Traditional monitoring instruments have been found difficult to meet the requirement for real-time monitoring. This study applied Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to slope stability monitoring, In recent years, the slopes in Taiwan have frequently caused disasters after heavy rains, and traand understand the process of slope instability from the characterization variation of new concepts. In the first stage, the Mems Sensors were selected and calibrated, and the accuracy was selected as 0.1 ?...

  7. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  8. Diffraction slopes for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at low momentum transfer values. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slopes is approximated by various analytic functions. The expanded "standard" logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range reasonably. Various approximations differ from each other both in the low energy and very high...

  9. Seismic response of rock slopes: Numerical investigations on the role of internal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L.; Applegate, K.; Gibson, M.; Wartman, J.; Adams, S.; Maclaughlin, M.; Smith, S.; Keefer, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The stability of rock slopes is significantly influenced and often controlled by the internal structure of the slope created by such discontinuities as joints, shear zones, and faults. Under seismic conditions, these discontinuities influence both the resistance of a slope to failure and its response to dynamic loading. The dynamic response, which can be characterized by the slope's natural frequency and amplification of ground motion, governs the loading experienced by the slope in a seismic event and, therefore, influences the slope's stability. In support of the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) project Seismically-Induced Rock Slope Failure: Mechanisms and Prediction (NEESROCK), we conducted a 2D numerical investigation using the discrete element method (DEM) coupled with simple discrete fracture networks (DFNs). The intact rock mass is simulated with a bonded assembly of discrete particles, commonly referred to as the bonded-particle model (BPM) for rock. Discontinuities in the BPM are formed by the insertion of smooth, unbonded contacts along specified planes. The influence of discontinuity spacing, orientation, and stiffness on slope natural frequency and amplification was investigated with the commercially available Particle Flow Code (PFC2D). Numerical results indicate that increased discontinuity spacing has a non-linear effect in decreasing the amplification and increasing the natural frequency of the slope. As discontinuity dip changes from sub-horizontal to sub-vertical, the slope's level of amplification increases while the natural frequency of the slope decreases. Increased joint stiffness decreases amplification and increases natural frequency. The results reveal that internal structure has a strong influence on rock slope dynamics that can significantly change the system's dynamic response and stability during seismic loading. Financial support for this research was provided by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) under grant CMMI-1156413.

  10. Slope shape effect on runoff and soil erosion under natural rainfall conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Sensoy H; Kara

    2014-01-01

    Slope is often non-uniform along the hillslope, with variations describing concave and convex shapes associated with natural hillslopes. This is because runoff generations vary significantly over short distances, with changes in surface alteration during or between flow events on different slope shapes. The aim of this research is to determine the effects of slope shapes on runoff and soil erosion. A field experiment was conducted from September 2007 to September 2009 on hillside field plots ...

  11. Passive prosthetic ankle-foot mechanism for automatic adaptation to sloped surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Nickel, MS; Jonathon Sensinger, PhD; Andrew Hansen, PhD

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of a prototype prosthetic ankle-foot system that passively adapts to surface slopes on each step of walking. Engineering analyses were performed to design the cam clutch and clutch engagement and disengagement mechanism. The prototype was tested by a veteran with a unilateral transtibial amputation. Kinematic and kinetic data were recorded while the subject walked on a treadmill at slopes ranging from −10 to +10 degrees. After each slope condition, the s...

  12. Laboratory and 3-D-distinct element analysis of failure mechanism of slope under external surcharge

    OpenAIRE

    Li, N; Y. M. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient details. There are however increasing interest on the consequences af...

  13. The spatial variance of hill slope erosion in Loess Hilly Area by 137Cs tracing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on analysis of 137Cs activities in soil profiles on hill slope of different slope lengths in the Loess Hilly Area in China, the spatial variance of erosion was studied. The results show that the slope length has great impact on the spatial distribution of the soil erosion intensity, and the soil erosion intensity on loess hill slope was in a fluctuating tendency. In the influx process of runoff in a small watershed, net soil loss intensity increased first and then decreased with flow distance. (authors)

  14. Bistatic-radar estimation of surface-slope probability distributions with applications to the moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M. N.; Tyler, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    A method for extracting surface-slope frequency distributions from bistatic-radar data has been developed and applied to the lunar surface. Telemetry transmissions from orbiting Apollo spacecraft were received on the earth after reflection from the lunar surface. The echo-frequency spectrum was related analytically to the probability distribution of lunar slopes. Standard regression techniques were used to solve the inverse problem of finding slope distributions from observed echo-frequency spectra. Data taken simultaneously at two wavelengths, 13 and 116 cm, have yielded diverse slope statistics.

  15. Slope Gradient and Vegetation Cover Effects on The Runoff and Sediment Yield in Hillslope Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Obaid ur Rehman; Muhammad Rashid; Rahina Kausar; Sarosh Alvi; Riaz Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of field crops is a challenge and risky business in sloping areas. A study was conducted as a demonstration model for the sloppy lands of Fateh Jang, Pakistan. The objectives of this study were to monitor the runoff water and soil sediment loss under different vegetative covers and slope gradients in comparison with bare fallow on each slope gradient. Three artificial slope gradients i.e., 1%, 5% and 10% were established and three crops i.e., Wheat, Gram and Lentil were cultivated...

  16. Asynchronism effect of cell population on the initial slope of dose-effect curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of the initial slope both for survival and dose curves and mutation inductions under the effect of various radiation types, is proved. It is established that the initial slope of the survival curve is proportional to the dose in all types of ionizing radiations, and its value changes regularly depending on the cell position in the cycle. In the case of asynchronous cell population, the initial slope of the survival curve can be determined by the most sensitive cells. The estimation of the value of this slope by studying cell survival can be rather difficult

  17. Geotechnical characteristics and slope stability on the Ebro margin, western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraza, J.; Lee, H.J.; Kayen, R.E.; Hampton, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Sedimentological and geotechnical analyses of core samples from the Ebro continental slope define two distinct areas on the basis of sediment type, physical properties and geotechnical behavior. The first area is the upper slope area (water depths of 200-500 m), which consists of upper Pleistocene prodeltaic silty clay with a low water content (34% dry weight average), low plasticity, and high overconsolidation near the seafloor. The second area, the middle and lower slope (water depths greater than 500 m), contains clay- and silt-size hemipelagic deposits with a high water content (90% average), high plasticity, and a low to moderate degree of overconsolidation near the sediment surface. Results from geotechnical tests show that the upper slope has a relatively high degree of stability under relatively rapid (undrained) static loading conditions, compared with the middle and lower slopes, which have a higher degree of stability under long-term (drained) static loading conditions. Under cyclic loading, which occurs during earthquakes, the upper slope has a higher degree of stability than the middle and lower slopes. For the surface of the seafloor, calculated critical earthquake accelerations that can trigger slope failures range from 0.73 g on the upper slope to 0.23 g on the lower slope. Sediment buried well below the seafloor may have a critical acceleration as low as 0.09 g on the upper slope and 0.17 g on the lower slope. Seismically induced instability of most of the Ebro slope seems unlikely given that an earthquake shaking of at least intensity VI would be needed, and such strong intensities have never been recorded in the last 70 years. Other cyclic loading events, such as storms or internal waves, do not appear to be direct causes of instability at present. Infrequent, particularly strong earthquakes could cause landslides on the Ebro margin slope. The Columbretes slide on the southwestern Ebro margin may have been caused by intense earthquake shaking associated with volcanic emplacement of the Columbretes Islands. Localized sediment slides on steep canyon and levee slopes could have been caused by less intense shaking. In general, the slope is stable under present environmental loading conditions and is fundamentally constructional. Nevertheless, rapid progradation caused by high sedimentation rates and other processes acting during low sea-level periods, such as more intense wave loading near the shelfbreak, may have caused major instability in the past. ?? 1990.

  18. Submarine slope failures along the convergent continental margin of the Middle America Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harders, Rieka; Ranero, CSar R.; Weinrebe, Wilhelm; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2011-06-01

    We present the first comprehensive study of mass wasting processes in the continental slope of a convergent margin of a subduction zone where tectonic processes are dominated by subduction erosion. We have used multibeam bathymetry along 1300 km of the Middle America Trench of the Central America Subduction Zone and deep-towed side-scan sonar data. We found abundant evidence of large-scale slope failures that were mostly previously unmapped. The features are classified into a variety of slope failure types, creating an inventory of 147 slope failure structures. Their type distribution and abundance define a segmentation of the continental slope in six sectors. The segmentation in slope stability processes does not appear to be related to slope preconditioning due to changes in physical properties of sediment, presence/absence of gas hydrates, or apparent changes in the hydrogeological system. The segmentation appears to be better explained by changes in slope preconditioning due to variations in tectonic processes. The region is an optimal setting to study how tectonic processes related to variations in intensity of subduction erosion and changes in relief of the underthrusting plate affect mass wasting processes of the continental slope. The largest slope failures occur offshore Costa Rica. There, subducting ridges and seamounts produce failures with up to hundreds of meters high headwalls, with detachment planes that penetrate deep into the continental margin, in some cases reaching the plate boundary. Offshore northern Costa Rica a smooth oceanic seafloor underthrusts the least disturbed continental slope. Offshore Nicaragua, the ocean plate is ornamented with smaller seamounts and horst and graben topography of variable intensity. Here mass wasting structures are numerous and comparatively smaller, but when combined, they affect a large part of the margin segment. Farther north, offshore El Salvador and Guatemala the downgoing plate has no large seamounts but well-defined horst and graben topography. Off El Salvador slope failure is least developed and mainly occurs in the uppermost continental slope at canyon walls. Off Guatemala mass wasting is abundant and possibly related to normal faulting across the slope. Collapse in the wake of subducting ocean plate topography is a likely failure trigger of slumps. Rapid oversteepening above subducting relief may trigger translational slides in the middle Nicaraguan upper Costa Rican slope. Earthquake shaking may be a trigger, but we interpret that slope failure rate is lower than recurrence time of large earthquakes in the region. Generally, our analysis indicates that the importance of mass wasting processes in the evolution of margins dominated by subduction erosion and its role in sediment dynamics may have been previously underestimated.

  19. Failure Modes and Stability of Rock Mass Slope Containing Multi-weak Interlayer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Jie-Qun; Chen Lu-Wang; Liu Jin-Long

    2013-01-01

    The phenomena of rock mass slope with multi-weak interlayer can be found in real engineering frequently. It is worthy to study the influence of multi-weak interlayer on failure of rock mass slope. Based on the shear strength reduction finite element method, stability and failure surface of rock mass slope with different parameters had been studied, the failure mechanism of rock mass slope containing multi-weak interlayer has been analyzed. It can be found that the stability of consequent rock...

  20. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Barber, Samuel; Domning, Edward E.; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas

    2009-09-11

    A new low budget slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought to operation at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. The design, instrumental control and data acquisition system, initial alignment and calibration procedures, as well as the developed experimental precautions and procedures are described in detail. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology is verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high quality test optics. The directions of future work to develop a surface slope measuring profiler with nano-radian performance are also discussed.

  1. Efficiency of Timber Jack 450C with Different Loading Volumes in Different Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Lotfalian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary transportation is an upper time, expensive and hard labour. The most skidding are with using of rubber wheel of Timber jack 450C in Iran country that has devoted 60% of utilization expenses. In order to, investigate of slope and loading volume effects on time of loaded traveling had used time study for Timberjack 450C. In one of strip roads in parcel eleven of district two of Langa management plan forest (Kelardasht region in North of Iran determined 5 and 3 different slopes classes and volumes classes, respectively. Then, time study was performed in slope classes with different loading volume in downward skidding. The first, collection of data have noted in special form and then have converted to uniform unit of m sec-1. Descriptive statistics for each data set were calculated using the SPSS software. With presupposition that loading volume and slope are effective on the obtained time, these parameters have analyzed. ANOVA and Tukey test were used for loading volume factor. For investigation slope factor had used of Mann Whitney non-parametric test in order to comparison of loaded traveling speed in different slopes. Results of present research had showed that influence of loading volume on the loaded traveling time is insignificant, but loaded traveling speed in different slope classes is significant (in slopes >30% as, speed of skidder machine is decreased with increase of slope variable.

  2. Efficiency of Timber Jack 450C with different loading volumes in different slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfalian, Majid; Daliri, Hasan Sam; Kooch, Yahya

    2007-10-15

    Primary transportation is an upper time, expensive and hard labour. The most skidding are with using of rubber wheel of Timber jack 450C in Iran country that has devoted 60% of utilization expenses. In order to, investigate of slope and loading volume effects on time of loaded traveling had used time study for Timberjack 450C. In one of strip roads in parcel eleven of district two of Langa management plan forest (Kelardasht region in North of Iran) determined 5 and 3 different slopes classes and volumes classes, respectively. Then, time study was performed in slope classes with different loading volume in downward skidding. The first, collection of data have noted in special form and then have converted to uniform unit of m sec(-1). Descriptive statistics for each data set were calculated using the SPSS software. With presupposition that loading volume and slope are effective on the obtained time, these parameters have analyzed. ANOVA and Tukey test were used for loading volume factor. For investigation slope factor had used of Mann Whitney non-parametric test in order to comparison of loaded traveling speed in different slopes. Results of present research had showed that influence of loading volume on the loaded traveling time is insignificant, but loaded traveling speed in different slope classes is significant (in slopes >30%) as, speed of skidder machine is decreased with increase of slope variable. PMID:19093479

  3. Examination of composite enamel layer systems by ion beam slope cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-mechanical, new method of sample preparation - the ion beam slope cutting - is presented. On the basis of a mechanically produced ground plane illustrating the composite enamel interface on an extracted free from caries tooth in usual manner a defined slope is made at an angle of 45 degrees to the interface by means of inert gas ions over a diaphragm. The resulting slope plane is neither mechanically deformed nor directly influenced by ions. First examination results (SEM) allow to draw conclusions about filler construction, defective adhesion and cohesive defects. The ion beam slope cutting is a completion of examination possibilities. (author)

  4. Estimated prospective tanker rates for Alaska North Slope crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the next ten years, three significant events will affect the structure of tankering costs for the Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil fields. These are: the double hulling requirement of the Oil Spill Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA90); the ageing of the tanker fleet; and the decline in ANS and West Coast oil production, which will eliminate more costly shipments to the Gulf Coast. The purpose of this paper is to estimate how these will affect tankering costs over the next twenty years. As baseline, the existing fleet is described, followed by a detailed discussion of the above factors. Company specific shipping requirements are calculated as compared to ship-by-ship tonnage availability (based on the current fleet) pursuant to these events, and the resultant tonnage deficit. A model is presented that derives a hypothetical reconstruction scheme to eliminate the deficits on a company specific ship-by-ship basis. The resulting costs are then translated into a weighted average per barrel ANS cost. The specific double hull costs are segregated. (author)

  5. Constraining slope parameter of symmetry energy from nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Inakura, T

    2015-01-01

    Four quantities deducible from nuclear structure experiments have been claimed to correlate to the slope parameter $L$ of the symmetry energy; the neutron skin thickness, the cross section of low-energy dipole (LED) mode, dipole polarizability $\\alpha_D$, and $\\alpha_D S_0$ (i.e. product of $\\alpha_D$ and the symmetry energy $S_0$). By the calculations in the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation with various effective interactions, we compare the correlations between $L$ and these four quantities. The correlation derived from different interactions and the correlation from a class of interactions that are identical in the symmetric matter as well as in $S_0$ are simultaneously examined. These two types of correlations may behave differently, as exemplified in the correlation of $\\alpha_D$ to $L$. It is found that the neutron skin thickness and $\\alpha_DS_0$ correlate well to $L$, and therefore are suitable for narrowing down the value of $L$ via experiments. The LED emergence and upgrowth makes the $\\...

  6. STABILIZATION OF A FAILED SLOPE WITH PILED STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rifat KAHYAOĞLU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neogene aged units of a densely populated region of Western Turkey along the Aegean Sea coastline is susceptible to landslides causing frequent economic loss especially following raining seasons. Several landslides took place in the area covering a narrow band of the coastline between Izmir and Söke (Aydın. Countermeasures against these relatively small-scale slope failures in the region often involve construction of either reinforced concrete retaining walls or stabilizing piles, which can be easily constructed by local contractors. In this study borings, in-situ and laboratory soil mechanics tests, geophysical and geological investigations have been performed in order to investigate the landslide occurred in the yard of an elementary school in Söke township. The analysis of two rows of piled retaining system constructed to reuse the school building against a potential slides are presented. Three inclinometer measurements have been performed after completion of the bored pile system. It has been concluded that the measured and the calculated displacement values are both small. There is no problem of the built project by means of moments and displacements.

  7. Temperature statistics above a deep-ocean sloping boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Cimatoribus, Andrea A

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the statistics of temperature in an oceanographic observational dataset. The data is collected using a moored array of thermistors, 100m tall and starting 5m above the bottom, deployed during four months above the slopes of a seamount in the North Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Turbulence at this location is strongly affected by the semidiurnal tidal wave. Mean stratification is stable in the entire dataset. We compute structure functions, of order up to 10, of the distributions of temperature increments. Strong intermittency is observed in particular during the downslope phase of the tide, and farther from the solid bottom. In the lower half of the mooring during the upslope phase, the statistics of temperature are consistent with those of a passive scalar. In the upper half of the mooring, the statistics of temperature deviate from those of a passive scalar, and evidence of turbulent convective activity is found. The downslope phase is generally thought to be more shear dominated,...

  8. Commercial possibilities for stranded conventional gas from Alaska's North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Stranded gas resources are defined for this study as gas resources in discrete accumulations that are not currently commercially producible, or producible at full potential, for either physical or economic reasons. Approximately 35 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of stranded gas was identified on Alaska’s North Slope. The commercialization of this resource requires facilities to transport gas to markets where sales revenue will be sufficient to offset the cost of constructing and operating a gas delivery system. With the advent of the shale gas revolution, plans for a gas pipeline to the conterminous US have been shelved (at least temporarily) and the State and resource owners are considering a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export project that targets Asian markets. This paper focuses on competitive conditions for Asian gas import markets by estimating delivered costs of competing supplies from central Asia, Russia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Australia in the context of a range of import gas demand projections for the period from 2020 to 2040. These suppliers’ costs are based on the cost of developing, producing, and delivering to markets tranches of the nearly 600 TCF of recoverable gas from their own conventional stranded gas fields. The results of these analyses imply that Alaska’s gas exports to Asia will likely encounter substantial competitive challenges. The sustainability of Asia’s oil-indexed LNG pricing is also discussed in light of a potentially intense level of competition.

  9. Site Scientist for the North Slope of Alaska Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinde, Johannes [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Under this grant our team contributed scientific support to the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Program’s (DOE-ARM) Infrastructure team to maintain high quality research data at the DOE-ARM North Slope of Alaska with special emphasis on the radars. Under our guidance two major field campaigns focusing on mixed-phase Arctic clouds were conducted that greatly increased the community’s understanding of the many processes working together to control the evolution of single-layer cloud mixed-phase clouds. A series of modeling and observational studies revealed that the longevity of the radiatively important liquid phase is strongly dependent on how the ice phase develops in mixed-phase clouds. A new ice microphysics parameterization was developed to capture better the natural evolution of ice particle growth in evolving environments. An ice particle scattering database was developed for all ARM radar frequencies. This database was used in a radar simulator (Doppler spectrum and polarimetric variables) to aid in the interpretation of the advanced ARM radars. At the conclusion of this project our team was poised to develop a complete radar simulator consistent with the new microphysical parameterization, taking advantage of parameterization’s advanced characterization of the ice shape and ice density.

  10. Evolution of revegetated ski slopes in different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argenti G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Revegetation of ski slopes is a useful technique to limit soil erosion, reduce the visual impact of the tracks and lengthen the duration of snow cover. Restoration is often performed with commercial forage mixtures with the aim of creating a fast soil cover, then allowing the natural recolonization of artificial swards in the mid-long term. To investigate on the recolonization dynamics, data were collected from 21 different plots from the Alps and the Apennines (Valtellina, Plan de Corones, Sappada, Cimone. Knowledge of both the original mixtures used for restoration and the timespan since intervention (ranging from 1 to 21 years allowed to throw light on the naturalization process for the studied plots. Ground cover, floristic richness and relative presence of sown and native species were measured along linear transects established on the analyzed ski tracks. Results showed the effectiveness of plant restoration, in terms of soil coverage and (in some cases persistence of species of the original mixtures. Recovery of autochthonous species was strongly affected by site elevation and time elapsed since restoration. Moreover, the distance of ski lanes from forest edges seems to influence the dynamics of recolonisation process. Renaturalization was remarkably faster in the lower-altitude Apennine study plot. Application of a regression analysis revealed that elevation and timespan since restoration may be considered useful predictors of the level of naturalization of the restored canopies.

  11. Slope instability related to permafrost changes on Mexican volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Granados, Hugo; Molina, Victor Soto

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost is present above 4,500 meters at the three highest Mexican mountains, Citlaltépetl, Popocatépetl and Iztaccihuatl (5,675, 5,452 and 5,286m asl, respectively), all active volcanoes. During the rainy season in the central region of Mexico, the occurrence of small debris-flows in the ice-free parts of the mountains, as well as small lanslides is frequent. At Popocatépetl volcano, flows are mostly related to a combination of the eruptive activity and climatic factors. However, the volcanic activity is different at Citlaltépetl and Iztaccihuatl where there is no eruptive activity, but landslides have occurred in recent years on their steep slopes because its stability has been altered as a result of an increase in the air temperature which in turn has caused variations in the thickness of the active layer of permafrost, causing as a consequence, the increase of an even more unstable soil. Additionally, cracks in the rock walls are subject to an increasing hydrostatic pressure due to continuous daily freezing and thawing of seasonal water produced by a warmer and less solid precipitation accumulating in the cracks over time and in the unconsolidated potentially unstable material.

  12. Geomorphological research of large-scale slope instability at Machu Picchu, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilímek, Vít; Zvelebil, Jiří; Klimeš, Jan; Patzelt, Zdeněk; Astete, Fernando; Kachlík, Václav; Hartvich, Filip

    2007-09-01

    A multidisciplinary approach has been adopted to study the slope movements and landscape evolution at the archaeological site of Machu Picchu and its immediate surroundings. The basic event in the paleogeomorphological evolution of the area was the large-scale slope movement, which destroyed the originally higher ridge between Mt. Machupicchu and Mt. Huaynapicchu. Within remnants of that primary deformation, several younger generations of slope movements occurred. The laboratory analyses of granitoids revealed highly-strained zones on the slopes of Mt. Machupicchu, which strongly affect the largest slope deformation. The borders of the largest slope deformation are structurally predisposed by the existence of fault zones. The majority of various types of slope movements on the so-called Front Slope (E facing) and Back Slope (W facing) are influenced by the alignment between topography and joints. Along with slope movements, fluvial erosion and tectonic disturbance of the rocks have been affecting the evolution of the landscape. A monitoring network for dilatometric and extensometric measurements was used to detect the present-day activity of rock displacements within the archaeological site. In addition to standard mapping of surface hydrogeological phenomena, eleven express slug tests were conducted to verify the infiltration potential of precipitation. The results of these surveys indicate that recent large-scale slope movement as suggested by some previous studies is doubtful, and the detected movements can be explained by individual movements of rock blocks or several other mechanisms including sinking of archaeological structures, subsurface erosion and annual changes in the water content of the soils.

  13. Impact of vegetation on stability of slopes subjected to rainfall - numerical aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switala, Barbara Maria; Tamagnini, Roberto; Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Recent years brought a significant development of soil bioengineering methods, considered as an ecological and economically effective measure for slope stabilization. This work aims to show the advantages of the soil bioengineering solutions for a slope subjected to a heavy rainfall, with the help of a numerical model, which integrates most of the significant plant and slope features. There are basically two different ways in which vegetation can affect stability of a slope: root reinforcement (mechanical impact) and root water uptake (evapotranspiration). In the numerical model, the first factor is modelled using the Cam-Clay model extended for unsaturated conditions by Tamagnini (2004). The original formulation of a constitutive model is modified by introducing an additional constitutive parameter, which causes an expansion of the yield surface as a consequence of an increase in root mass in a representative soil element. The second factor is the root water uptake, which is defined as a volumetric sink term in the continuity equation of groundwater flow. Water removal from the soil mass causes an increase in suction in the vicinity of the root zone, which leads to an increase in the soil cohesion and provides additional strength to the soil-root composite. The developed numerical model takes into account the above mentioned effects of plants and thus considers the multi-phase nature of the soil-plant-water relationship. Using the developed method, stability of some vegetated and non-vegetated slopes subjected to rainfall are investigated. The performance of each slope is evaluated by the time at which slope failure occurs. Different slope geometries and soil mechanical and hydrological properties are considered. Comparison of the results obtained from the analyses of vegetated and non-vegetated slopes leads to the conclusion, that the use of soil bioengineering methods for slope stabilization can be effective and can significantly delay the occurrence of a rainfall induced landslide. On the contrary, vegetation removal can have serious consequences, especially on steep and forested slopes.

  14. Static Linear and Nonlinear Analysis of R.C Building on Sloping Ground with Varying Hill Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S.L.Nikhila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake field investigations repeatedly confirm that irregular structures suffer more damage than their regular counterparts. This is recognized in seismic design codes, and restrictions on abrupt changes in mass and stiffness are imposed. Irregularities in dimensions affect the distribution of stiffness, and in turn affect capacity, while mass irregularities tend to influence the imposed demand. Elevation irregularities have been observed to cause story failures due to non-uniform distribution of demand-to-supply ratios along the height. Plan irregularities, on the other hand, cause non-uniform demand-to-capacity ratios amongst the columns. In this paper the structure chosen for study is a 4, 5 storied commercial complex building. The building is located in seismic zone IV on a rock soil site. Three dimensional mathematical models for the same are generated in ETABS software. The structural elements, M40 grade of concrete, floor diaphragms are assumed to be rigid. Seismic loads were considered acting in the horizontal direction along either of the two principal directions and the ground slope choosen in between 0° and 25° and building that which produce less torsion effect for setback - stepback with irregular configuration in horizontal and vertical direction is modeled and analyzed.

  15. Experimental Observations On Turbidity Currents Flowing Over Low Bed Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnaro, M.; Bolla Pittaluga, M.

    2012-12-01

    Turbidity currents are gravity-driven, sediment-laden turbulent flows moving on a sloping bottom, which take place in oceans and lakes. Due to the difficulties to predict and observe this kind of phenomena in nature, in the recent past many experimental apparatus were set up to increase the comprehension of the currents. We developed an experimental apparatus able to reproduce such kind of currents in our Marchi Environmental Laboratory. The experiments were performed in an horizontal flume U shaped in plan, 30 m long, characterized by two straight tracks approximately 12 m in length, and a bend with a constant radius of curvature equal to 2.5 m. The flume, made in plexiglass, has a rectangular cross section 0.6 m wide and 0.5 m deep. The particular shape of the channel let us study the spatial development of turbidity (or saline) currents in the straight reach and the adjustment of the flow in the channel bend. We have created a concrete fixed bed with an uniform bottom slope of 0.005 developing both along the first straight and the constant curvature bend and continuing 3 meters after the bend exit. The first set of experimental observations were performed employing an 'hybrid' turbidity current, in that the density excess was created by adding both salt and fine sediments (d50=4 micron) to clear water. Each run, characterized by the same initial and boundary conditions (fractional density excess, discharge of the mixture, inlet and outlet conditions) and by the same geometry, was repeated many times in order to measure vertical velocity and density profiles in different cross sections along the straight and bend reaches. Both longitudinal and lateral velocity measurements were performed, as well as density profiles. The velocity profiles were acquired using an ultrasound Doppler velocimeter profiler. In this way we recorded the longitudinal velocity in the channel axis with a spatial resolution of 1 m along the flume and, coupling the data of two probes aligned in the cross section with different angles, we were able to obtain the vertical profiles of the secondary flow in the central region of the flume. The density profiles were obtained using two ranks of siphons that take samples of the current water at different heights from the bottom. The ongoing experimental observations will allow to provide detailed measurements on both flow velocity and suspended sediment concentration of subcritical turbidity currents flowing in constant curvature bend and shed some light on the ongoing debate concerning the orientation of secondary flow in submarine channels. At present we have completed the first set of runs, performed with a flow discharge Q=2 l/s and a density of the mixture ?_{mix}=1021 kg/m^3 that provides a relative excess density equal to 0,023. The current was subcritical both in the straight and curved reach and characterized by an average densimetric Froude number approximately equal to 0.70. Secondary flow in the curved bend was characterized by a river like orientation, i.e. inward oriented close to the bed and outward oriented above. In the next sets of experiments we plan to perform further runs by changing the density of the mixture and the flow discharge in order to observe their effect on the evolution of the turbidity current. These further results will be hopefully presented at the meeting.

  16. Large gravitational rock slope deformation in Romsdalen Valley (Western Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Saintot

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Large gravitational rock slope deformation affects Precambrian gneisses at four localities of the Romsdalen valley of Western Norway. At each locality, detailed studies have allowed to determine the mechanism of deformation and to assess the degree of susceptibility for failure. 1 Svarttinden is a 4.3 Mm³ translational rockslide. Its single basal detachment developed along a foliation-parallel cataclastic fault. Although a rockslide occurred along the same detachment and the deposits reached the edge of the plateau, no displacement of the current instability is detected. 2 At Flatmark distinct 2-25 Mm³ blocks detached from the edge of the plateau by an opening along the steep foliation. The collapse of the blocks is explained by a complex mechanism of sliding and toppling. No displacement is actually detected on the instabilities. 3 At Børa blocks located at the edge of the plateau deformed by the same mechanism as at Flatmark. They have a maximum volume of 0.5 Mm3 and displacement rates of 0.2-2 cm/year. The deformation at Børa has affected a large part of the plateau and the entire deformed volume would be of 50-200 Mm³ but it is currently inactive. 4 A wedge failure at the edge of Mannen plateau is inferred to allow the 4-5 cm/year downward displacement of a 2-3.5 Mm³ instability. The high susceptibility of failure led to a permanent monitoring of the site since 2009.

  17. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  18. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables

  19. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits

  20. 50 CFR Table 27 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat Conservation Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat Conservation Areas 27 Table 27 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 27 Table 27 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat...

  1. The establishment of Atlantic Water transport as a topographically trapped slope current off Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Atlantic Water, with its origin in the western Atlantic, enters the Nordic Seas partly as a barotropic current following the continental slope. This water mass is carried across the Atlantic by the baroclinic North Atlantic Current (NAC. When the NAC meets the continental slope at the east side of the Atlantic, some of the transport is converted to barotropic transport over the slope before continuing northward. Here, we show that this baroclinic to barotropic conversion is in agreement with geostrophic theory. Historical observations show that the transport of the slope current increases significantly from the Rockall Channel (RC to the FaroeShetland Channel (FSC. Geostrophy predicts that with a northward decreasing buoyancy, baroclinic currents from the west will be transferred into northward topographically steered barotropic flow. We use hydrographic data from two sections crossing the continental slope, one located in the RC and another in the FSC, to estimate baroclinic and barotropic transport changes over the slope, within the framework of geostrophic dynamics. Our results indicate that ~1 Sv of the cross-slope baroclinic flow is mainly converted to northward barotropic transport above the 200500m isobaths, which is consistent with observed transport changes between the RC and the FSC. Similar processes are also likely to occur further south, along the eastern Atlantic margin. This shows that AW within the slope current in the FSC is derived from both the eastern and the western Atlantic, in agreement with earlier studies of AW inflow to the Nordic Seas.

  2. Index of streamflow and water quality records to September 30, 1978, Arctic Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Patsy J.

    1980-01-01

    This report, which is one of a series of reports for Alaska, lists stations in Arctic Slope, Alaska, at which streamflow and water quality data have been collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. Included are a hydrologic subregion map of Arctic Slope, Alaska, and a table listing the types of data collected and periods of record. (USGS)

  3. Laboratory Experiments on Steady State Seepage-Induced Landslides Using Slope Models and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra G. Catane

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of the failure initiation process is crucial in the development of physicallybased early warning system for landslides and slope failures. Laboratory-scale slope models were constructed and subjected to instability through simulated groundwater infiltration. This is done by progressively increasing the water level in the upslope tank and allowing water to infiltrate laterally towards the toe of the slope. Physical changes in the slope models were recorded by tilt sensors and video cameras. When the model slope was destabilized, the chronology of events occurred in the following sequence: (1 bulging at the toe, (2 seepage at the toe, (3 initial failure of soil mass, (4 piping, (5 retrogressive failure, (6 formation of tension cracks and (7 major failure of soil mass. Tension cracks, piping and eventual failure are manifestations of differential settlements due to variations in void ratio. Finite element analysis indicates that instability and subsequent failures in the model slope were induced primarily by high hydraulic gradients in the toe area. Seepage, initial deformation and subsequent failures were manifested in the toe area prior to failure, providing a maximum of 36 min lead time. Similar lead times are expected in slopes of the same material as shown in many case studies of dam failure. The potential of having a longer lead time is high for natural slopes made of materials with higher shear strength thus evacuation is possible. The tilt sensors were able to detect the initial changes before visual changes manifested, indicating the importance of instrumental monitoring.

  4. Systematic of the slope-mass-correlations in diffractive dissociation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of several results of the Three Components Deck Model for Diffractive Dissociation Reactions is presented. News and recently published results are summarized to obtain a general overview of the model, its predictions and comparison with experimental results. Two kinds of correlations and amplitudes are given: The slope-mass cos theta sup(GJ) correlation and slope-mass partial wave. (Author)

  5. Bootstrap method for characterizing the effect of uncertainty in shear strength parameters on slope reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to propose a bootstrap method for characterizing the effect of uncertainty in shear strength parameters on slope reliability. The procedure for a traditional slope reliability analysis with fixed distributions of shear strength parameters is presented first. Then, the variations of the mean and standard deviation of shear strength parameters and the Akaike Information Criterion values associated with various distributions are studied to characterize the uncertainties in distribution parameters and types of shear strength parameters. The reliability of an infinite slope is presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. The results indicate that the bootstrap method can effectively model the uncertain probability distributions of shear strength parameters. The uncertain distributions of shear strength parameters have a significant influence on slope reliability. With the bootstrap method, the slope reliability index is represented by a confidence interval instead of a single fixed index. The confidence interval increases with increasing factor of slope safety. Considering both the uncertainties in distribution parameters and distribution types of shear strength parameters leads to a higher variation and a wider confidence interval of reliability index. - Highlights: • A bootstrap method is proposed to characterize effect of uncertainty on reliability. • An infinite slope is studied to demonstrate validity of bootstrap method. • The bootstrap method can effectively model uncertain probability distributions. • Slope reliability index is a confidence interval instead of a single fixed index. • Confidence interval of reliability index increases with increasing factor of safety

  6. The Relationship Between Lithology and Slope Morphology in the Tucson Mountains, Arizona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Khanchoul

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between lithology and slope morphology is investigated at eight sites on granitic, andesitic, andsedimentary hillslopes in the Tucson Mountains, Arizona. Several methods are used in the study. Topographic profi lesare constructed. Skewness indices, slope length, and mean slope angles of the different slope profi les are computed andcompared with each other. Debris size analysis has permitted for some profi les, the determination of hillfront/piedmontjunctions. The nature and structural characteristics of the bedrock are the ones that determine the hillslope morphologyin this semi-arid region. There are, as a matter of fact, variations in profi les on the same bedrock nature but differentlyexposed. More precise morphologic studies have been also done in comparing the different lithologic pairs. They havepermitted to show some similarities in shapes. The granitic-andesitic slopes and andesiic-sedimentary slopes are thebest comparisons which show the relationship between lithology and slope morphology. The granitic-sedimentary sloperelationship is shown in the hillfront concavities, mountain front and piedmont mean slope angles.

  7. Laboratory and 3-D-distinct element analysis of failure mechanism of slope under external surcharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient details. There are however increasing interest on the consequences after the initiation of failure which includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more details and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM and laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanism and the post-failure mechanism of slope will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  8. Toe clearance and velocity profiles of young and elderly during walking on sloped surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begg Rezaul K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most falls in older adults are reported during locomotion and tripping has been identified as a major cause of falls. Challenging environments (e.g., walking on slopes are potential interventions for maintaining balance and gait skills. The aims of this study were: 1 to investigate whether or not distributions of two important gait variables [minimum toe clearance (MTC and foot velocity at MTC (VelMTC] and locomotor control strategies are altered during walking on sloped surfaces, and 2 if altered, are they maintained at two groups (young and elderly female groups. Methods MTC and VelMTC data during walking on a treadmill at sloped surfaces (+3°, 0° and -3° were analysed for 9 young (Y and 8 elderly (E female subjects. Results MTC distributions were found to be positively skewed whereas VelMTC distributions were negatively skewed for both groups on all slopes. Median MTC values increased (Y = 33%, E = 7% at negative slope but decreased (Y = 25%, E = 15% while walking on the positive slope surface compared to their MTC values at the flat surface (0°. Analysis of VelMTC distributions also indicated significantly (p th percentile (Q1 values in the elderly at all slopes. Conclusion The young displayed a strong positive correlation between MTC median changes and IQR (interquartile range changes due to walking on both slopes; however, such correlation was weak in the older adults suggesting differences in control strategies being employed to minimize the risk of tripping.

  9. Monitoring System for Slope Stability under Rainfall by using MEMS Acceleration Sensor IC tags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time warning system for slope failure under rainfall is available to disaster prevention and mitigation. Monitoring of multi-point and wireless measurements is effective because it is difficult to conclude the most dangerous part in a slope. The purpose of this study is to propose a method of monitoring system with multi-point and wireless measurements for a slope stability using MEMS acceleration sensor IC tags. MEMS acceleration sensor IC tag is an acceleration sensor microminiaturized by a technology of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems on board IC tag. Especially, low cost of the sensor will yield to the realization of the system. In order to investigate the applicability of the proposed system, a large-scale model test of artificial slope subjected to rainfall has been performed. MEMS acceleration sensor IC tags has been located on the slope and ground acceleration caused by forced vibration has been measured until the model slope collapses. The experimental results show that the MEMS acceleration sensor IC tag is comfortably available under rainfall, the characteristics of ground accelerations varies with changing the condition of the slope subjected to rainfall, and the proposed method can be applied to a real-time monitoring system for slope failure under rainfall.

  10. Hydrological heterogeneity in Mediterranean reclaimed slopes: runoff and sediment yield at the patch and slope scales along a gradient of overland flow

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    L. Merino-Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological heterogeneity is recognized as a fundamental ecosystem attribute in drylands controlling the flux of water and energy through landscapes. Therefore, mosaics of runoff and sediment source patches and sinks are frequently identified in these dry environments. There is a remarkable scarcity of studies about hydrological spatial heterogeneity in restored slopes, where ecological succession and overland flow are interacting. We conducted field research to study the hydrological role of patches and slopes along an "overland flow gradient" (gradient of overland flow routing through the slopes caused by different amounts of run-on coming from upslope in three reclaimed mining slopes of Mediterranean-continental climate. We found that runoff generation and routing in non-rilled slopes showed a pattern of source and sink areas of runoff. Such hydrological microenvironments were associated with seven vegetation patches (characterized by plant community types and cover. Two types of sink patches were identified: shrub Genista scorpius patches could be considered as "deep sinks", while patches where the graminoids Brachypodium retusum and Lolium perenne dominate were classified as "surface sinks" or "runoff splays". A variety of source patches were also identified spanning from "extreme sources" (Medicago sativa patches; equivalent to bare soil to "poor sources" (areas scattered by dwarf-shrubs of Thymus vulgaris or herbaceous tussocks of Dactylis glomerata. Finally, we identified the volume of overland flow routing along the slope as a major controlling factor of "hydrological diversity" (heterogeneity of hydrological behaviours quantified as Shannon diversity index: when overland flow increases at the slope scale hydrological diversity diminishes.

  11. Hydrological heterogeneity in Mediterranean reclaimed slopes: runoff and sediment yield at the patch and slope scales along a gradient of overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Martín, L.; Moreno-de las Heras, M.; Pérez-Domingo, S.; Espigares, T.; Nicolau, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrological heterogeneity is recognized as a fundamental ecosystem attribute in drylands controlling the flux of water and energy through landscapes. Therefore, mosaics of runoff and sediment source patches and sinks are frequently identified in these dry environments. There is a remarkable scarcity of studies about hydrological spatial heterogeneity in restored slopes, where ecological succession and overland flow are interacting. We conducted field research to study the hydrological role of patches and slopes along an "overland flow gradient" (gradient of overland flow routing through the slopes caused by different amounts of run-on coming from upslope) in three reclaimed mining slopes of Mediterranean-continental climate. We found that runoff generation and routing in non-rilled slopes showed a pattern of source and sink areas of runoff. Such hydrological microenvironments were associated with seven vegetation patches (characterized by plant community types and cover). Two types of sink patches were identified: shrub Genista scorpius patches could be considered as "deep sinks", while patches where the graminoids Brachypodium retusum and Lolium perenne dominate were classified as "surface sinks" or "runoff splays". A variety of source patches were also identified spanning from "extreme sources" (Medicago sativa patches; equivalent to bare soil) to "poor sources" (areas scattered by dwarf-shrubs of Thymus vulgaris or herbaceous tussocks of Dactylis glomerata). Finally, we identified the volume of overland flow routing along the slope as a major controlling factor of "hydrological diversity" (heterogeneity of hydrological behaviours quantified as Shannon diversity index): when overland flow increases at the slope scale hydrological diversity diminishes.

  12. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in friction angle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamed Farshbaf Aghajani; Hossein Salehzadeh; Habib Shahnazari

    2015-09-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of anisotropy of shear strength parameter on the stability of a sandy slope by performing the limit equilibrium analysis. Because of scarcity of mathematical equation for anisotropic friction angle of sand, at first, all results of principal stress rotation tests are processed by artificial neural network and a computational procedure is developed for determining sand friction angle subjected to various loading directions. By implementing this procedure, slope stability analysis is performed in both isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The results indicate that while isotropic slope stability overestimates the factor of safety between 5 and 25% which the deviation is more for flatter slope, the location of critical slip surface is coincident in both conditions. Also in specific slip surface, the parameters of face angle, geometry of slip surface and soil properties relating to anisotropy are the main factors governing the result of anisotropic slope stability.

  13. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Okorokov, V A

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various fitting functions differ from each other both in low energy and very high energy domains. Predictions for diffraction slope parameter are obtained for elastic proton-proton scattering at NICA, RHIC and LHC energies, for proton-antiproton elastic reaction in FAIR energy domain for various approximation functions at intermediate square of momentum transfer. Difference of nuclear slopes for proton-antiproton and proton-proton scattering is investigated in wide momentum transfer range also.

  14. Geometry and significance of stacked gullies on the northern California slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, M.E.; Gardner, J.V.; Prior, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    Recent geophysical surveys off northern California reveal patterns of gullies on the sea floor and preserved within continental-slope deposits that represent both erosional and aggradational processes. These surveys, conducted as part of the STRATAFORM project, combined multibeam bathymetry and backscatter with high-resolution seismic profiles. These data provide a new basis for evaluating gully morphology, distribution, and their significance to slope sedimentation and evolution. The continental margin off northern California exhibits an upper slope that has undergone both progradation and aggradation. The slope surface, which dips at geometries were preserved and migrated upwards with time. The processes that produce aggraded gully drape also resulted in laterally continuous strata and were most likely related to a period when the sediment source was dispersed from a more distal (10s of km) source, such as during present conditions. The draped sequences also contain a few new gullies, which indicates that gullies can be initiated at all or most stages of slope growth.

  15. Sex differences and errors in the use of terrain slope for navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Daniele; Holmes, Corinne A; Newcombe, Nora S; Weisberg, Steven M

    2015-09-01

    Unlike most of the spatial cues that have received attention, a sloping terrain can be perceived by multimodal sensory inputs (vision, balance, and kinesthesia), making it potentially very salient for navigation. Furthermore, a homogeneous slope can be used like a compass to identify directions (e.g., uphill, downhill, and sideways), but not to determine distances. We briefly review recent evidence on navigation with slope, emphasizing two main findings. On the one hand, we focus on the conspicuous sex difference found in the ability to localize a target in a square, tilted enclosure; this has emerged in human adults and children, and we suggest that it is related to lower awareness of the slope for females. On the other hand, we describe the general pattern of errors that arises when localizing the target during the task; these errors indicate the use of a bi-coordinate representation of the slope. Limitations and ideas for future studies are proposed. PMID:26216758

  16. Footwear traction and three-dimensional kinematics of level, downhill, uphill and cross-slope walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannop, John W; Worobets, Jay T; Ruiz, Rodrigo; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor activities are a popular form of recreation, with hiking being the most popular outdoor activity as well as being the most prevalent in terms of injury. Over the duration of a hike, trekkers will encounter many different sloped terrains. Not much is known about the required traction or foot-floor kinematics during locomotion on these sloped surfaces, therefore, the purpose was to determine the three-dimensional foot-floor kinematics and required traction during level, downhill, uphill and cross-slope walking. Ten participants performed level, uphill, downhill and cross-slope walking along a 19° inclined walkway. Ground reaction force data as well as 3D positions of retro reflective markers attached to the shoe were recorded using a Motion Analysis System. Peak traction coefficients and foot-floor kinematics during sloped walking were compared to level walking. When walking along different sloped surfaces, the required traction coefficients at touchdown were not different from level walking, therefore, the increased likelihood of heel slipping during hiking is potentially due to the presence of loose material (rocks, dirt) on hiking slopes, rather than the overall lack of traction. Differences in required traction were seen at takeoff, with uphill and cross-sloped walking requiring a greater amount of traction compared to level walking. Changes in sagittal plane, frontal plane and transverse plane foot-floor angles were seen while walking on the sloped surfaces. Rapid foot-floor eversion was observed during cross-slope walking which could place the hiker at risk of injury with a misstep or if there was a slight slip. PMID:24684947

  17. Modelling the seasonal variability of the Antarctic Slope Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mathiot

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main features of the oceanic circulation along Antarctica is the Antarctic Slope Current (ASC. This circumpolar current flows westwards and contributes to communication between the three major oceanic basins around Antarctica. The ASC is not very well known due to remote location and the presence of sea ice during several months, allowing in situ studies only during summertime. Moreover, only few modelling studies of this current have been carried out. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of this simulated current to four different resolutions in a coupled ocean-sea ice model and to two different atmospheric forcing sets. Two series of simulations are conducted. For the first series, global model configurations are run at coarse (2° to eddy-permitting (0.25° resolutions with the same atmospheric forcing. For the second series, simulations with two different atmospheric forcings are performed using a regional circumpolar configuration (south of 30° S at 0.5° resolution. The first atmospheric forcing is based on a global atmospheric reanalysis and satellite data, while the second is based on a downscaling of the global atmospheric reanalysis by a regional atmospheric model calibrated to Antarctic meteorological conditions.

    Sensitivity experiments to resolution indicate that a minimum model resolution of 0.5° is needed to capture the dynamics of the ASC in terms of water mass transport and recirculation. Sensitivity experiments to atmospheric forcing fields shows that the wind speed along the Antarctic coast strongly controls the water mass transport and the seasonal cycle of the ASC. An increase in annual mean of easterlies by about 30 % leads to an increase in the mean ASC transport by about 40 %. Similar effects are obtained on the seasonal cycle: using a wind forcing field with a larger seasonal cycle (+30 % increases by more than 30 % the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of the ASC. To confirm the importance of wind seasonal cycle, a simulation without wind speed seasonal cycle is carried out. This simulation shows a decrease by more than 50 % of the amplitude of the ASC transport seasonal cycle without changing the mean value of ASC transport.

  18. Minimal Power Latch for Single-Slope ADCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Column-parallel analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) for imagers involve simultaneous operation of many ADCs. Single-slope ADCs are well adapted to this use because of their simplicity. Each ADC contains a comparator, comparing its input signal level to an increasing reference signal (ramp). When the ramp is equal to the input, the comparator triggers a latch that captures an encoded counter value (code). Knowing the captured code, the ramp value and hence the input signal are determined. In a column-parallel ADC, each column contains only the comparator and the latches; the ramp and code generation are shared. In conventional latch or flip-flop circuits, there is an input stage that tracks the input signal, and this stage consumes switching current every time the input changes. With many columns, many bits, and high code rates, this switching current can be substantial. It will also generate noise that may corrupt the analog signals. A latch was designed that does not track the input, and consumes power only at the instant of latching the data value. The circuit consists of two S-R (set-reset) latches, gated by the comparator. One is set by high data values and the other by low data values. The latches are cross-coupled so that the first one to set blocks the other. In order that the input data not need an inversion, which would consume power, the two latches are made in complementary polarity. This requires complementary gates from the comparator, instead of complementary data values, but the comparator only triggers once per conversion, and usually has complementary outputs to begin with. An efficient CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) implementation of this circuit is shown in the figure, where C is the comparator output, D is the data (code), and Q0 and Q1 are the outputs indicating the capture of a zero or one value. The latch for Q0 has a negative-true set signal and output, and is implemented using OR-AND-INVERT logic, while the latch for Q1 uses positive- true signals and is implemented using AND-OR-INVERT logic. In this implementation, both latches are cleared when the comparator is reset. Two redundant transistors are removed from the reset side of each latch, making for a compact layout. CMOS imagers with column-parallel ADCs have demonstrated high performance for remote sensing applications. With this latch circuit, the power consumption and noise can be further reduced. This innovation can be used in CMOS imagers and very-low-power electronics

  19. Studying the Hydrology of Landslides: Pore Water Pressure, Preferential Flow and Feedbacks Between Slope Displacement and Hillslope Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaard, T.; Greco, R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrology is one of the most important triggering factors for slope destabilization. When a slope becomes unstable, cracks and fissures develop during slope deformation. These discontinuities affect both geotechnical and hydrological conditions of the slope. The crucial role of water flow, and especially the important role of preferential flow in unstable slopes, is generally recognized. However, in hydrological modelling, the unstable slope is characterized using static subsurface properties. The dynamic feedback between slope deformation and slope hydrology, being positive or negative depending on other geotechnical conditions, is not taken into account although it influences the pore pressure distribution and as such the overall stability. This research aims to highlight and quantify the dynamic nature of the subsurface hydrological conditions in unstable slopes. We focus on the role preferential flow has on slope destabilization and more specifically on the feedbacks between differential displacement and hydrological behaviour of the subsurface in natural slopes. We will present examples of field experimental work where we measured the hydrological influence of fissures, theoretical analysis and case study modelling of combined hydrology and slope stability, including feedbacks. The results show the subtle trade-off of increased infiltration and storage capacity in a slope and the increased drainage capacity of well connected preferential flow paths. We will furthermore highlight the current status of our knowledge as well as identify the knowledge gaps we face and the importance of cross- and multidisciplinary approach to better understand the internal dynamics of slope deformation and hillslope hydrology.

  20. Comparing Potential Unstable Sites and Stable Sites on Revegetated Cut-Slopes of Mountainous Terrain in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ho Kil

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study employs a diverse set of variables to explain slope stabilization on stable versus failure-prone revegetated cut-slopes in Korea. A field survey was conducted at potential unstable sites and stable sites using 23 variables. Through a non-parametric test of the field survey results, 15 variables were identified as primary determinants of slope failure. Of these variables, one described physical characteristics (elapsed year; four variables described vegetation properties (plant community, vegetation coverage rate, number of trees, and number of herbs; and 10 variables represented soil properties (porosity, soil hardness, water content, sand ratio and silt ratio of soil texture, tensile strength, permeability coefficient, soil depth, soil acidity, salt concentration, and organic matter. Slope angle, which was mainly considered in previous studies, of variables in physical characteristics was not statistically selected as one of the 15 variables because most of sites were located on steep slopes. The vegetation community, vegetation coverage, and number of trees influence slope stabilization. Vegetation coverage is highly correlated with other soil and vegetation variables, making it a major indicator of slope stabilization. All soil variables were related to slope failure such that subsequent slope failure was related to the method of slope revegetation rather than the environmental condition of the slope. Slope failure did not occur in revegetated slopes that matched the characteristics of the surrounding landscape and contained a large number of native trees. Most soil and vegetation variables showed differing values for whether a revegetated slope is potentially unstable or stable.

  1. Slope gradient and lithology as controls on the initiation of submarine slope gullies; Insights from the North Carnarvon Basin, Offshore NW Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prlat, Amandine; Pankhania, Shyam S.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Hodgson, David M.

    2015-11-01

    Slope-confined submarine gullies are present on many continental margins, yet the controls on their initiation and demise are poorly understood because modern or recently active systems are rarely if ever monitored, and exhumed systems, typically formed in very fine-grained successions, are poorly preserved at outcrop. We use 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from offshore NW Australia to investigate long-term (~ 40 Myr) variations in the geomorphology of Eocene-to-Miocene gullies that developed in mixed carbonate-clastic clinothems. Through time, clinoform slope gradient increases from 1.6 to 3.2, with gullies forming when the clinoform slope exceeds 2.5. After their inception, gullies increase in width (from 350 m to 770 m) and depth (from 37 m to 60 m). Slope steepening appears to coincide with a change from poorly cemented, fine-grained carbonate to better-cemented, coarse-grained carbonate, implying a secondary, lithological control on slope dip and, ultimately, gully formation.

  2. Geological Aspect of Slope Failure and Mitigation Approach in Bireun - Takengon Main Road, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibnu Rusydy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A soil and rock slope assessment survey was conducted along Bireun – Takengon main road in Aceh Province, Indonesia. The slope assessment survey was carried out to determine the geological condition, verify and identify the potential areas of slope failure and to study what type of slope stability and protection method could be applied to the road. Several research methodologies were conducted in the field such as rock and soil identification, and slope assessment. The survey was conducted in four selected areas along Bireun – Takengon main road. In study area I, soil creep occurred because of a presence of montmorillonite clay. The mitigation methods to reduce soil creeping in this area are building a retaining wall and pile. The shotcrete, wire mesh, net rock bolting, and rock removal method is suitable to apply in study area II. The shotcrete and soil nails were used because the type of rocks in those areas is sedimentary rock such as shale, sandstone, siltstone, and a boulder of a volcanic rock. The same approach shall be applied in study area IV. study area III was the best spot to learn about the mitigation approach for slope stability and provides many lessons learned. Aceh Province experience active tectonic movement, high intensity of rain, geological structures, a high degree of weathering, and high intensity of earthquake,as primary factors which trigger landslides. The techonology of slope stabilizing and protection methods can be applied to mitigate landslides.

  3. Review of Soil Erosion on Purple-soil Sloping Croplands in Three Gorges Reservoir Area

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    ZHENG Hong-li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purple sloping farmland is an important cropland resource in the Three Gorges Reservoir area, and the main source of soil erosion and sediment into the Reservoir. Soil erosion monitoring methods, soil erosion intensity,sediment particle features,nutrient loss on purple soil sloping croplands in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area are summarized. The erosion monitoring methods mainly include runoff plot observation, artificial simulated rainfall, erosion pin observation, nuclide tracing, model simulation, RS monitoring. The publications show that soil erosion rates of the purple sloping croplands range from 3 464 to 9 452 t/km2·a, and the most serious erosion usually occurs on the slope from 15° to 25°,wich is also the focus slope gradient for preventing soil erosion on sloping cropland in the future. The loss of sediment is dominated by aggregates (<0.02mm and clay (<0.002mm. The silty(0.002~0.02mm and clay soils(<0.002mm are the main carrier of soil nutrient loss on the purple sloping croplands. Hedgerows, contour tillage and terracing are given a significant effect in preventing soil erosion. The erosion simulation using physical model, the structure and function of ridge and suitability evaluations of soil conservation measures are recommended for further study in this particular geographical unit.

  4. QRS slopes for assessment of myocardial damage in chronic chagasic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the slopes of the QRS complex are evaluated for determination of the degree of myocardial damage in chronic chagasic patients. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of the slope indices to reflect alterations in the conduction velocity of the cardiac impulse. Results obtained in the present study show that chronic chagasic patients have significantly flatter QRS slopes as compared to healthy subjects. Not only that but the extent of slope lessening turns out to be proportional to the degree of myocardial damage caused by the disease. Additionally, when incorporating the slope indices into a classification analysis together with other indices indicative of the presence of ventricular late potentials obtained from high resolution electrocardiography, results show that the percentages of correct classification increase up to 62.5%, which means eight points above the percentages obtained prior to incorporation of the slope indices. It can be concluded that QRS slopes have great potential for assessing the degree of severity associated with Chagas' disease

  5. Erosion protection Phytoreinforcement of SCARP steep slopes of the holy virgin’s DITCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darchiya Valentina Ivanovna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Erosion protection landscaping embedment of steep subsoil slopes is a time-sensitive issue of road construction and planning of recreational area that are often fit on a challenging picturesque terrain unsuitable for site development. The article provides the results of a 4-year experiment on landscaping and plant fixing of up to 4.5 m soil slopes with 1:1 and 2:1 grades; the experiment was carried out by the MGSU on the territory of a convent in the south of the Nizhniy Novgorod region. The site has slopes oriented towards all cardinals. At some places the slopes are bedimmed by trees. All these factors create a wide range of geo-ecological conditions for lawns. All the slopes are fixed with geo-fibrefill grids; slopes with 2:1 grade are strengthened by auxiliary grids made of reinforced metal bars, anchors and braces on the bottom of the Holy Moat. The paper recommends composition of grass plants as well as techniques to build up lawns suitable for various micro-climate conditions. It also advises the structure of multi-tier plant entity. The suggested methods are tested during a 3-year maintenance of slopes built for constant use.

  6. QRS slopes for assessment of myocardial damage in chronic chagasic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pueyo, E [Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon (13A), and CIBER-BBN, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Laciar, E [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Anzuola, E [Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon (13A), and CIBER-BBN, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Laguna, P [Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon (13A), and CIBER-BBN, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Jane, R [Department ESAII, CREB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    In this study the slopes of the QRS complex are evaluated for determination of the degree of myocardial damage in chronic chagasic patients. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of the slope indices to reflect alterations in the conduction velocity of the cardiac impulse. Results obtained in the present study show that chronic chagasic patients have significantly flatter QRS slopes as compared to healthy subjects. Not only that but the extent of slope lessening turns out to be proportional to the degree of myocardial damage caused by the disease. Additionally, when incorporating the slope indices into a classification analysis together with other indices indicative of the presence of ventricular late potentials obtained from high resolution electrocardiography, results show that the percentages of correct classification increase up to 62.5%, which means eight points above the percentages obtained prior to incorporation of the slope indices. It can be concluded that QRS slopes have great potential for assessing the degree of severity associated with Chagas' disease.

  7. The relationship between the slope angle and the landslide size derived from limit equilibrium simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Li; Liu, Chun-Guo; Chang, Zu-Feng; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Katz et al. (2014) carried out a study of controls on the size and geometry of landslides using two-dimensional discrete element numerical simulations. One of their conclusions is that in addition to the peak strength of the slope material, the initial slope angle is another factor that controls the amount of material available for landslides, thus the size, of the resultant landslide. It means that in steeper slopes, more material disintegrates for a given material strength, and consequently the produced landslide is larger. However, in our studies based on limit equilibrium simulations, the sliding mass volume decreases with the increasing slope angle for a given material strength, just contrary to the result of Katz et al. One possible explanation is that when the slope angle in our model increases, the geometry of the potential critical slip surface changes, leading to a decrease of the amount of material available for potential sliding that compensates the increasing gravity effect owing to the enlargement of the slope angle. It suggests that there exist different controls of the slope angle on the landslide size for given material strength.

  8. Interaction of along-slope and down-slope sedimentation processes on the Argentina/Uruguayan slope - First seismo-acoustic results from the Meteor cruise M78/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, T.; Preu, B.; Krastel, S.; Fekete, N.; Meyer, M.; Lindhorst, K.; Anasetti, A.; Domnina, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Down-slope and along-slope sediment transport processes play a prominent role by shaping of passive continental margins. Mass wasting phenomena at continental margins have become a hot topic in recent time because of their coastal geo-hazard potential. In addition, deposition (and erosion) related to along-slope transport processes documents the impact of bottom currents in time and space. The Argentina/Uruguay margin forms a setting that is well suited to study the interaction of both processes. First, the area is characterized by the huge sediment discharge of the Rio de la Plata draining an extensive hinterland, which leads to a high potential of sedimentary instability and finally favors mass wasting phenomena. Additionally, several canyons deeply incised into the slope contribute to down-slope sediment transport. Second, the area is not only influenced by the Malvinas-Brazil Current confluence, a prominent element in global surface water circulation, but forms also a key location in the intermediate and deep water global conveyor belt, with both the latter having a major impact on lateral sediment transport by strong contour currents. Therefore, the area has been chosen to be one major target of a new project “Slope architecture and evolution of sedimentary regimes” at the MARUM (Center for Marine Environmental Sciences) at the University of Bremen, Germany. During RV Meteor Cruise M78/3 in May-July 2009 (carried out in cooperation between the MARUM, Bremen and the IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel) sediment transport and depositional patterns from the coast to the deep-sea were be investigated offshore Argentina and Uruguay by means of bathymetric swath-sounder, sediment echosounder, high-resolution multichannel seismic as well as coring. On the slope, the work concentrated one two study areas. North of the Rio de la Plata Mouth, slides, scarps and drift features were be imaged and mapped. In front of and south of the Rio de la Plate Mouth, the Mar del Plate canyon was studied. This canyon evolved on a terrace in water depths around 1000 meters and extends down to the deep sea. North of the canyon, prominent contourites have been formed. Analyses of these contourites should shed light on temporal and spatial changes of depocenters and its interaction with the neighbored canyon.

  9. Hydrological heterogeneity in Mediterranean reclaimed slopes: runoff and sediment yield at the patch and slope scales along a gradient of overland flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Merino-Martín

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological heterogeneity is recognized as a fundamental ecosystem attribute in drylands controlling the flux of water and energy through landscapes. Therefore, mosaics of runoff and sediment sinks and source patches are frequently identified in these dry environments. There is a remarkable scarcity of studies about hydrological spatial heterogeneity in restored slopes, where ecological succession and overland flow are interacting. We conducted a field research to study the hydrological role of patches and slopes along an overland flow gradient in three reclaimed slopes coming from mining reclamation in a Mediterranean-continental climate. We found that runoff generation and routing in non-rilled slopes showed a pattern of source and sink areas of runoff. Such hydrological microenvironments were associated to seven vegetation patches (characterized by plant community types and cover. Two types of sink patches were identified: shrub Genista scorpius patches could be considered as a "deep sink", while patches where the graminoids Brachypodium retusum and Lolium perenne dominate were classified as "surface sinks" or "runoff splays". A variety of source patches were also identified spanning from "extreme sources" (Medicago sativa patches; equivalent to bare soil to "poor sources" (areas scattered by dwarf-shrubs of Thymus vulgaris or herbaceous tussocks of Dactylis glomerata. Finally, we identified the volume of overland flow routing along the slope as a controlling major factor of hydrological diversity: when overland flow increases at the slope scale hydrological diversity diminishes.

  10. Fiber Bragg grating-based performance monitoring of a slope model subjected to seepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Hu; Shi, Bin; Yan, Jun-Fan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Bao-Jun

    2014-09-01

    In the past few years, fiber optic sensing technologies have played an increasingly important role in the health monitoring of civil infrastructures. These innovative sensing technologies have recently been successfully applied to the performance monitoring of a series of geotechnical structures. Fiber optic sensors have shown many unique advantages in comparison with conventional sensors, including immunity to electrical noise, higher precision and improved durability and embedding capabilities; fiber optic sensors are also smaller in size and lighter in weight. In order to explore the mechanism of seepage-induced slope instability, a small-scale 1 g model test of the soil slope has been performed in the laboratory. During the model’s construction, specially fabricated sensing fibers containing nine fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors connected in a series were horizontally and vertically embedded into the soil mass. The surcharge load was applied on the slope crest, and the groundwater level inside of the slope was subsequently varied using two water chambers installed besides the slope model. The fiber optic sensing data of the vertical and horizontal strains within the slope model were automatically recorded by an FBG interrogator and a computer during the test. The test results are presented and interpreted in detail. It is found that the gradually accumulated deformation of the slope model subjected to seepage can be accurately captured by the quasi-distributed FBG strain sensors. The test results also demonstrate that the slope stability is significantly affected by ground water seepage, which fits well with the results that were calculated using finite element and limit equilibrium methods. The relationship between the strain measurements and the safety factors is further analyzed, together with a discussion on the residual strains. The performance evaluation of a soil slope using fiber optic strain sensors is proved to be a potentially effective approach.

  11. Influence of Lithology and Slope Gradient to Infiltration of the Mount Malabar, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, A.; Irawan, D. E.; Susanto, A.; Ardi, R. D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Volcano is an area which serves as a catchment area for the lowlands. Ability of rock or weathered-soil to absorb the rain water depends on several things, such as lithology and large of slope. Different lithology has different characteristics, including in terms of porosity which is directly related to the ability of rock to store water. Characteristics of lithology in volcanic area can change rapidly, both vertically and laterally. Large of slope in volcanic area that change significantly also can affect the infiltration rate (the seepage of rain) in rock or weathered-soil. Therefore, the influence of lithology and large of slope to the infiltration rate should be proven to predict the infiltration zone in volcanic area. Observations has been conducted on the eastern slopes of Mount Malabar with an area 78 km2, at coordinates 7003'28.04" LS - 7010'32.05" LS and 107038'37.64" BT - 107041'50.6" BT. The infiltration rate observed on the weathered-soil using simple single infiltrometer made of PVC pipe 50 cm long, on March-April 2015. The measurement is carried out at several points where the weathered-rock result has been known, as much two times for different slope in each point. 26 measurement points have been obtained from different slopes and weathered-soil of different five-lithology. The results showed that the infiltration rate proportional to the percentage of rock porosity and large of slope. Infiltration rate sequence from the smallest to the greatest are weathered-soil andesites, basaltic andesite, laharic breccias, alteration of dacite, and pyroclastic breccias. The greatest infiltration rate obtained is 10.11 cm/minute in pyroclastic breccia with 25o slope, while the smallest is 0.0437 cm/minute in pyroclastic breccias with 4o slope.

  12. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  13. Data acquisition system for soil degradation measurements in sloping vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidoccu, Marcella; Opsi, Francesca; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2013-04-01

    The agricultural management techniques and mechanization adopted in sloping areas under temperate and sub-continental climate can affect the physical and hydrological characteristics of the soil with an increase of the soil erosion rates. Vineyards have been reported among the land uses most prone to erosion. Agricultural operations can be conducted to enhance the soil conservation, it is therefore important to know the site-specific characteristics and conditions of adopted practices. A long-term monitoring to evaluate the influence of management systems in hilly vineyard on erosion and runoff and soil properties has been carried out in the north-western Italy since 2000. Three different inter-rows tillage systems were compared: conventional tillage (CT), reduced tillage (RT) and controlled grass cover (GC). To record the rainfall amount and duration, an agro-meteorological station was located near experimental plots. The three plots are hydraulically isolated, thus runoff and sediment have been collected at the bottom by a drain, connected with a tipping bucket device to measure the discharge of runoff. The system was implemented with electromagnetic counters that allow the automatic accounting with data capture by a control unit, powered by a photovoltaic panel and transmitted to a data collection center for remote viewing via web page. A portion of the runoff-sediment mixture was usually sampled and analyzed for soil and nutrients losses. In order to analyze with more detail the erosion process by means of predictive models, a micro-plot system was placed in the experimental site in 2012. Splash cups have been installed in each plot since 2011 to evaluate how the soil management affects the in-field splash erosion process. Rapid measurement of soil moisture content and temperature were performed starting from August 2011 to allow continuous monitoring of parameters that can provide an evaluation of space-time hydrological processes, determining the surface runoff response to a given precipitation events. Electromagnetic sensors were installed in the topsoil and measures were recorded in one-hour intervals by a data collection device. Some physical and hydrological properties were considered to provide information on the degree of soil compaction and its influence on soil status. The parameters analyzed are bulk density by core method and soil compaction by static and dynamic recording penetrometers. Since autumn 2011 the reduced tillage management was replaced with conventional tillage with a grass strip in the bottom of each inter-row (CTS). At the same time the grass cover of the GC plot was renewed after execution of tillage operation. Recurring measurements of the soil water content up to a depth of 60 cm and hydraulic conductivity tests with the Simplified Falling Head Technique (SFH) have been started in 2012, to observe the spatial and temporal variability of hydraulic behavior in the experimental plots.

  14. Pulling up the runaway: the effect of new evidence on euthanasia's slippery slope.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    The slippery slope argument has been the mainstay of many of those opposed to the legalisation of physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. In this paper I re-examine the slippery slope in the light of two recent studies that examined the prevalence of medical decisions concerning the end of life in the Netherlands and in Australia. I argue that these two studies have robbed the slippery slope of the source of its power--its intuitive obviousness. Finally I propose that, contrary to the warn...

  15. A New Method to Track Line Segment in Sequence of Images Using Only its Slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A.K. Azzou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel approach to track a line segment in the sequence of images obtained by camera in motion. We use the slope of segment as feature to track. The proposed method is based only on the formalism of the slope of the segment. We use the definition of the projection of points and the relation which exists between the slopes of the segment in various images. The approach developed not needs the calibration of camera or any knowledge about its movements. To resolve the tracking problem, two segments in three images are necessary. Experiment showed feasibility as well as robustness of the algorithm.

  16. Measurement of the quadratic slope parameter in the KL→3π0 decay Dalitz plot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a value of -[3.3±1.1 (stat)±0.7(sys)]x10-3 for the quadratic slope parameter h in the Dalitz plot of the KL→3π0 decay. This result is obtained from a sample of 5.1x106 decays. The validity of the ΔI=1/2 rule in the quadratic term is investigated using this result. This is the first measurement of the 3π0 slope parameter, and also the most sensitive measurement of any of the quadratic slope parameters for the charged or neutral kaons

  17. Two-Step Single Slope/SAR ADC with Error Correction for CMOS Image Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Conventional two-step ADC for CMOS image sensor requires full resolution noise performance in the first stage single slope ADC, leading to high power consumption and large chip area. This paper presents an 11-bit two-step single slope/successive approximation register (SAR) ADC scheme for CMOS image sensor applications. The first stage single slope ADC generates a 3-bit data and 1 redundant bit. The redundant bit is combined with the following 8-bit SAR ADC output code using a proposed error ...

  18. Influence of rainfall intensity on infiltration and deformation of unsaturated soil slopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the understanding of the influence of rainfall intensity on infiltration and deformation behavior of unsaturated soil slopes, numerical 2D analyses are carried out by a three-phase elasto-viscoplastic seepage-deformation coupled method. From the numerical results, it is shown that regardless of the saturated permeability of the soil slope, the increase in the pore water pressure (reduction in suction) during rainfall infiltration is localized close to the slope surface. In addition, the generation of the pore water pressure and the lateral displacement are mainly controlled by the ratio of the rainfall intensity to the saturated permeability of the soil.

  19. Effect of slope position on physico-chemical properties of eroded soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmanullah Khan, Zubair Hayat, Waqar Ahmad,

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The research work was conducted on eroded soil (Missa Series in Samarbagh, District Lower Dir to determine the effect of slope position on soil physico-chemical properties. Soil samples were collected from top-slope, mid-slope and bottom slope positions at horizon-A, B and C. Results showed a significant difference among the physico-chemical properties of top, mid and bottom slope soils. Bulk density of the top-slope (1.51 g cm-3 was the highest followed by mid (1.39 g cm-3 and bottom slopes (1.32 g cm-3. Conversely, electrical conductivity EC-2.47 dS m-1, phosphorus (3.40 mg kg-1, Potassium (118.8 mg kg-1, Organic matter content (1.52 %, clay content (20.39 % and silt content (49.17% were the highest at bottom slope followed by mid and top-slopes, respectively. Soil A, B and C horizons were also significantly (p<0.05 different in their physico-chemical properties. Mean values showed that horizon Ap had the highest bulk density (1.43 g cm-3 and lower electrical conductivity (1.74 dS m-1, phosphorus (2.29 mg kg-1, potassium (84.86 mg kg-1, organic matter (1.08%, clay (12.83% and silt content (40.49% than both the B and C horizons. The deterioration in physico-chemical properties of top slope as compared to mid and bottom slopes and that of Ap horizon as compared to B and C horizons were presumed to be due to past soil erosion effect that removed the finer soil particles including soil organic matter and other plant nutrients. This study concluded that increasing extent of erosion due to slope effect can further deteriorate soil properties. The control of such damaging effects would require soil conservation strategies such as proper land levelling, afforestation, terracing and inclusion of restorative crops in cropping systems on these lands.

  20. Alterações radiográficas do tálus no pé torto congênito após liberação cirúrgica pela técnica de McKay Radiographic changes of the talus in congenital clubfoot after surgical release using the mckay procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Pinto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as alterações morfológicas do tálus após o tratamento cirúrgico do pé torto congênito pela técnica de McKay. MÉTODOS: Foram analisadas, retrospectivamente, radiografias em perfil com carga dos pés de 14 pacientes com pé torto congênito unilateral submetidos ao tratamento pela técnica de McKay por dupla incisão. Todos os pacientes foram operados pelo mesmo cirurgião, com média de 6,53 anos entre a cirurgia e a radiografia. Comparamos as características do tálus dos pés operados com os parâmetros radiográficos dos pés contralaterais. Avaliamos a presença de deformidade do dômus e da cabeça do tálus (avaliação da esfericidade, a altura e o comprimento do tálus, a presença e grau de subluxação do navicular, a alteração do ângulo de Gissane e o padrão do trabeculado ósseo. RESULTADOS: Alterações da cabeça do tálus ocorreram em 92,8% dos casos; do dômus, em 92,8%; e do trabeculado, em 100%. A relação entre o comprimento do tálus do pé operado sobre o contralateral variou de 0,61 a 0,88 (média de 0,79; DP = 0,09, e da altura de 0,57 a 0,98 (média de 0,82; DP = 0,12. O ângulo de Gissane aumentou em todos os pés operados, e todos apresentaram subluxação do navicular, com índice variando de 6,43 a 59,75% (média de 26,34%; DP = 16,66%. CONCLUSÕES: Alterações talares ocorreram em 100% dos pés tratados pela técnica de McKay. Estabelecer parâmetros radiográficos para descrever e quantificar essas deformidades mostrou-se viável através de técnicas simples e de fácil execução.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the morphologic changes of the talus after surgical treatment of congenital clubfoot using the McKay procedure. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed lateral standing radiographs of the feet in 14 patients with unilateral clubfoot treated by the McKay procedure. All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, with an average of 6.53 years between surgery and the radiograph. We compared the characteristics of the talus between the operated foot and the contralateral foot. We evaluated the deformity of the domus and the head of the talus (sphericity evaluation, the talar length and height, the presence and percentage of navicular subluxation, changes in the Gissane angle, and the trabecular pattern of the bone. RESULTS: Deformities of the head of the talus were observed in 92.8% of the patients; of the domus in 92.8%; and of the trabecular pattern in 100%. The ratio between the talar lengths of the operated foot and the contralateral foot ranged from 0.61 to 0.88 (Mean 0.79, SD = 0.09, while the height ratio ranged from 0.57 to 0.98 (Mean 0.82, SD = 0.12. The Gissane angle was increased in all of the operated feet, which also showed some degree of navicular subluxation, ranging from 6.43 to 59.75% (Mean 26.34%, SD = 16.66%. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal talar findings were observed in 100% of the feet treated using the McKay procedure. The establishment of radiographic parameters to describe and quantify these deformities was feasible through simple and easy techniques.

  1. Influence of respiration in the very low frequency modulation of QRS slopes and heart rate variability in cardiomyopathy patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando, David; Alcaine, A; Pueyo, Esther; Laguna, Pablo; Arcentales, Andrés; Giraldo Giraldo, Beatriz; Voss, Andreas; Bayés-Genís, Antoni; Bailón, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the very low frequency (VLF) modulation of QRS slopes and heart rate variability (HRV). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiratory flow signal were acquired from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy. HRV as well as the upward QRS slope (IUS) and downward QRS slope (IDS) were extracted from the ECG. The relation between HRV and QRS slopes in the VLF band was measured using ordinary coherence in 5-minute segments. Partial coherence was then use...

  2. Ship Sensor Observations for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce Hourly measurements made by selected ship sensors on the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007" expedition sponsored by the...

  3. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ofu and Olosega Islands, Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery....

  4. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  5. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce Slope is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  6. Slope 5m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  7. Slope Grid Derived from Gridded Bathymetry for Selected U.S. Locations in the Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded multibeam bathymetry. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in degrees) in elevation between neighboring cells derived with...

  8. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, and IKONOS derived depth values. Cell values...

  9. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, and IKONOS derived depth values. Cell values...

  10. Bathymetry 5M Slope, US Virgin Islands, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce This dataset contains an ESRI Grid representing the slope (in degrees) of the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John...

  11. Prediction of slope stability using artificial neural network (case study: Noabad, Mazandaran, Iran)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of failures of soil masses are subjects touching both geology and engineering. These investigations call the joint efforts of engineering geologists and geotechnical engineers. Geotechnical engineers have to pay particular attention to geology, ground water, and shear strength of soils in assessing slope stability. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are very sophisticated modeling techniques, capable of modeling extremely complex functions. In particular, neural networks are nonlinear. In this research, with respect to the above advantages, ANN systems consisting of multilayer perceptron networks are developed to predict slope stability in a specified location, based on the available site investigation data from Noabad, Mazandaran, Iran. Several important parameters, including total stress, effective stress, angle of slope, coefficient of cohesion, internal friction angle, and horizontal coefficient of earthquake, were used as the input parameters, while the slope stability was the output parameter. The results are compared with the classical methods of limit equilibrium to check the ANN model's validity. (author)

  12. A study on the creep mechanism of slate slope using model test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Meng-Chia; Lo, Chia-Ming; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Ting-Feng; Su, Yu-Hsuan

    2013-04-01

    Typhoon Morakot struck southern Taiwan in 2009 and brought the most extreme precipitation ever recorded in this area. The extreme amount of rain triggered lots of enormous landslides in the Lawnon River basin. Therefore, this research aims to explore the mechanism of slate slope failure in the Lawnon River basin. When the slate slope is influenced by wet deterioration and gravitation for a long time, significant creep deformation will develop between the foliation of slate and folds and faults will form in the rock mass. To simulate this phenomenon by discrete element method in the future, a series of physical model experiments with simplified mechanism were firstly performed in the laboratory. Based on the experimental setup, the influencing factors of the sliding behaviors, including the volume of rock block, topography, slope, foliation orientation were investigated. The result of this research showed that the creep deformation may deform more quickly under the condition of higher degree of slopes and foliations.

  13. Slope 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce Slope is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  14. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  15. NK landscapes difficulty and Negative Slope Coefficient: How Sampling Influences the Results

    CERN Document Server

    Vanneschi, Leonardo; Collard, Philippe; Tomassini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Negative Slope Coefficient is an indicator of problem hardness that has been introduced in 2004 and that has returned promising results on a large set of problems. It is based on the concept of fitness cloud and works by partitioning the cloud into a number of bins representing as many different regions of the fitness landscape. The measure is calculated by joining the bins centroids by segments and summing all their negative slopes. In this paper, for the first time, we point out a potential problem of the Negative Slope Coefficient: we study its value for different instances of the well known NK-landscapes and we show how this indicator is dramatically influenced by the minimum number of points contained into a bin. Successively, we formally justify this behavior of the Negative Slope Coefficient and we discuss pros and cons of this measure.

  16. Evaluation of Slope Assessment System in Predicting Landslides along Roads Underlain by Granitic Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujang B.K. Huat

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A slope assessment is to estimate the probability of occurrence and likely severity of landslides in a given area. This study evaluates two existing Slope Assessment Systems (SAS for predicting landslide at the micro level of assessment developed by the Public Works Department of Malaysia, namely the Slope Information Management System (SIMS and the Slope Management and Risk Tracking System (SMART. From the results of this study, it appears that none of the existing SAS is satisfactory for predicting landslide in granitic formation, for various reasons such as the use of hazard score developed from another country and use of data-base derived from different rock formation. A new SAS was developed using nine-parameters equation that was based on the stepwise discriminant analysis. The new SAS appears to show a good capability in predicting landslides in granitic formations.

  17. Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007" expedition, June 4 through July 6, 2007. Additional...

  18. Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006" expedition, May 7 through June 2, 2006. Additional...

  19. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India coastal current on the continental slope.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amol, P; Shankar, D.; Fernando, V.; Mukherjee, A; Aparna, S.G.; Fernandes, R.; Michael, G.S.; Khalap, S.T; Satelkar, N.P; Agarvadekar, Y.; Gaonkar, M.G.; Tari, A.P; Kankonkar, A.; Vernekar, S.

    We present current data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) moored on the continental slope off the west coast of India. The data were collected at four locations (roughly at Kanyakumari, Kollam, Goa, and Mumbai) extending from ~7...

  20. Slope 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rota Island, Mariana Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  1. Slope 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Guam Island, Mariana Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  2. Some considerations on the seismic stability of large slopes surrounding the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a series of the research on the seismic stabilities of a large scale slope surrounding the Nuclear Power Plant, the numerical simulation and analytical stability calculation are conducted in order to clarify the applicability of static stability evaluation method (conventional circular arc slip method, static non-linear F.E. analysis) and dynamic one (2-dimensional dynamic F.E. analysis). The discussions on these slope stability methods are done and the followings are clarified, i) The results of numerical simulation by dynamic F.E. analysis concerning the response property and the failure mode are qualitatively corresponded with the behaviour of dynamic failure test. ii) From the results of static and dynamic stability analysis, it is concluded that the conventional circular arc slip method gives the severest evaluation for slope stability. iii) It is proposed that the seismic coefficient for static slope stability analysis should be used the value of the equivalent instant acceleration. (author)

  3. Slope grid (5 m) derived from gridded bathymetry of US Territory of Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry from four sources: Multibeam bathymetry collected by Coral Reef Ecosystem Division aboard NOAA R/V AHI, and...

  4. Characterizing slope morphology using multifractal technique: a study from the western continental margin of India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Menezes, A.A.A.; Haris, K.; Gokul, G.S.; Fernandes, W.A.; Kavitha, G.

    Here, we present the slope configuration of the submarine gullies, ridges and the adjacent slump zone off Goa, along the western continental margin of India utilizing multibeam bathymetric and single-channel seismic data. The fluid flow migration...

  5. Morphological features of Co-rich manganese deposits and their relation to seabed slopes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.

    The morphological features associated with Co-rich manganese deposits, the size variations of nodules, and the occurrence of different substrates have been analyzed, to evaluate the influence of various seabed slope angles on the distribution...

  6. How Fast Do Trees Grow? Using Tables and Graphs to Explore Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joram, Elana; Oleson, Vicki

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a lesson unit in which students constructed tables and graphs to represent the growth of different trees. Students then compared the graphs to develop an understanding of slope.

  7. Heavy metals in ordinary chernozems on slopes of different gradients and aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovik, D. V.; Dubovik, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of slope aspect and gradient on the contents and distribution of heavy metals (Mn, Cu, Zn, Co, Ni, Pb, and Cd) in the profiles of ordinary chernozem (Haplic Chernozems) was studied in Kursk oblast. Slope aspect was found to be a significant factor controlling the distribution of most of the bulk, mobile, and acid-soluble compounds of heavy metals, whereas the position on the slope (slope gradient) did not exert a significant influence on the distribution of elements. Bulk compounds of Co, Ni, Pb, and Cd showed the eluvial type of distribution in the soil profiles along with accumulation in the lower horizons. Distribution patterns of the mobile Cu, Co, Ni, Pb, and Cd were similar to those of the bulk ones. The latter phenomenon may be attributed to the high content of carbonates, an increased content of clay, and some alkalization of the soil solution in the lower horizons.

  8. Pre-IceBridge ATM L2 Icessn Elevation, Slope, and Roughness

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration The NASA Pre-IceBridge ATM Level-2 Icessn Elevation, Slope, and Roughness (BLATM2) data set contains resampled and smoothed elevation measurements of Arctic and...

  9. Probability and sensitivity analysis of the slope stability of naulong dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slope stability analysis was carried out for an earthfill dam having a sloping core. From the analysis, it was concluded that the pseudostatic case is critical for this dam. A probability and sensitivity analysis was carried out for some of the cases to assess probability of failure. The materials in the zoned embankment were assigned some variation for the probability analysis which showed that some slip surfaces had a probability of failure which is much greater than an acceptable limit. From the sensitivity analysis it was concluded that the variation in friction angle of the shell material affects the factor of safety more than any other material parameter and variation tried. To get a probability of failure within selected limits the probability analysis was carried out on revised downstream slopes to see the difference in probability of failure after the slopes are flattened from 1.75H:1V to 2H:1V and 2.25H:1V. (author)

  10. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  11. Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model Monthly Climate Data for the Continental United States.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset was created using the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) climate mapping system, developed by Dr. Christopher Daly,...

  12. Design and implementation of adaptive slope compensation in current mode DC-DC converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the compensation for the inherent instability in a current mode converter, the adaptive slope compensation, giving attention to the problems of the traditional compensation on compensation accuracy, loading capability and turning jitter, is presented. Based on the analysis of current loop, by detecting the input and output voltage, converting the adaptive slope compensation current, the compensation of the current loop is optimized successfully. It can not only improve the compensation accuracy but also eliminate the over compensation, the turning jitter and the poor loading capability in the reported slope compensation. A power supply chip with adaptive slope compensation has been fabricated in a 0.35 ?m CMOS process. The measurement results show that the chip starts up and operates steadily with the constant current limit under conditions of 5 V input voltage, from 10% to 100% duty cycle. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  13. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce Slope is derived from gridded (1 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard the Survey Vessel Swamp Fox. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in...

  14. NACP Woody Vegetation Characteristics of 1,039 Sites across the North Slope, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides the results of (1) field measurements of woody vegetation (shrubs) at 26 diverse sites across the North Slope of Alaska during 2010 and 2011,...

  15. North Slope Moose Surveys Within and Adjacent to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Fall 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior Aerial moose surveys were conducted on the north slope from the Sagavanirktok River to the Canning River during 1719 October 1988. Two aircraft based from Galbraith...

  16. Halocline water modification and along slope advection at the Laptev Sea continental margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bauch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A general pattern in water mass distribution and potential shelf-basin exchanges is revealed at the Laptev Sea continental slope based on hydrochemical and stable oxygen isotope data from summers 20052009. Despite considerable interannual variations, a frontal system can be inferred between shelf, continental slope and central Eurasian Basin waters in the upper 100 m of the water column along the continental slope. Net sea-ice melt is consistently found at the continental slope; however the sea-ice meltwater signal is independent from the local retreat of the ice cover and appears to be advected from upwind locations. In addition to the along-slope frontal system at the continental shelf break a strong gradient is identified on the Laptev Sea shelf between 122 and 126 E with an eastward increase of riverine and sea-ice related brine water contents. These waters cross the shelf break at ~ 140 E and feed the Low Salinity Halocline Water (LSHW, salinity S < 33 in the upper 50 m of the water column. Extremely high silicate concentrations in Laptev Sea bottom waters may lead to speculation on a link to the local silicate maximum found within the salinity range of ~ 33 to 34.5, typical for the Lower Halocline Water (LHW at the continental slope. But brine signatures and nutrient ratios from the central Laptev Sea differ from those at the continental slope. Thus a significant contribution of Laptev Sea bottom waters to the LHW at the continental slope can be excluded. The silicate maximum within the LHW at the continental slope may be formed locally or at the outer Laptev Sea shelf. Similar to the advection of the sea-ice melt signal along the Laptev Sea continental slope the nutrient signal at 5070 m water depth within the LHW might also be fed by advection parallel to the slope. Thus, our analyses suggest that advective processes from upwind locations play a significant role in the halocline formation in the northern Laptev Sea.

  17. Radioactivity of bottom deposits in continental slope of West Africa (sector of the Guinea Republic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bottom deposits of the Guinea part of the continental slope are characterized by rather high natural radioactivity from 2 to 6 kBq/kg of uranium equivalent. At the upper stage of the slope it's basic part is due to the autigenous component of sediments. In the lower band of this stage a migration of mobile uranium forms from uranium-enriched original neogenic clays to the Pleistocene deposits is probable

  18. Brief communication "Importance of slope-induced error correction in volume change estimates from radar altimetry"

    OpenAIRE

    Hurkmans, R.T.W.L.; Bamber, J. L.; Griggs, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    In deriving elevation change rates (dH/dt) from radar altimetry, the slope-induced error is usually assumed to cancel out in repeat measurements. These measurements, however, represent a location that can be significantly further upslope than assumed, causing an underestimate of the basin-integrated volume change. In a case-study for the fast-flowing part of Jakobshavn Isbræ, we show that a relatively straightforward correction for slope-induced error increases elevation cha...

  19. Submesoscale circulation in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Deep phenomena and dispersion over the continental slope

    OpenAIRE

    Bracco, Annalisa; Joshi, Keshav; Luo, Hao; McWilliams, Jim C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the mesoscale and submesoscale circulations along the continental slope in the northern Gulf of Mexico at depths greater than 1000 m. The investigation is performed using a regional model run at two horizontal grid resolutions, 5 km and 1.6 km, over a three year period from January 2010 to December 2012. Ageostrophic submesoscale eddies, and vorticity filaments populate the continental slope, and they are stronger and more abundant in the simulation at higher resolution, a...

  20. AN ANOTHER WAY FOR OPEN PIT MINE DESIGN OPTIMIZATION – FLOATING SLOPES METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Galić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Authors of the work presents main principles of a new method of design the ultimate pit which is primarily applicable for bedded formations, but also can be acceptable for other types of deposits. On the basis of main criteria of optimum design (profitability and slope stability, the authors have tested theirs procedure and proposed a new method for optimum design of open pit mines, for which the most suitable name would be the Floating Slopes Method.

  1. Down-slope cascading modulated by day/night variations of solar heating

    OpenAIRE

    Irina P. Chubarenko; Elena Esiukova; Natalia Stepanova; Boris Chubarenko; Henning Baudler

    2013-01-01

    Sloping sides of natural basins favour the formation of cross-shore temperature gradients (differential coastal heating/cooling), which cause significant littoral-pelagial water exchange. Autumnal denser water cascading along a sloping lake boundary, modulated by day/night variations of solar heating is considered numerically, in order to reveal the development of the cascading process in time, spatial structure of the exchange flows, and diurnal variations of volumetric flow-rate of littoral...

  2. Investigations on debris sheets for the analysis of slope instability conditions in the Machu Picchu area

    OpenAIRE

    Casagli N.; Fanti R.; Morelli S.; Nocentini M.; Vannocci P.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1997 the Machu Picchu area has been in the spotlight for its slope instability, when Carreno & Bonnard described the general geological and geomorphological condition, and the further studies of Sassa et alii (2001, 2002) contributed to define the interpretation of the structures, as the result of the existence of a main deep slow slide involving the archaeological area. However, the attention of these studies focused on the condition of the entire slope, with a lesser co...

  3. Large Submarine Landslides on Continental Slopes: Geohazards, Methane Release, and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Talling, Peter J.; Michael Clare; Morelia Urlaub; Ed Pope; Hunt, James E.; Sebastian Watt

    2014-01-01

    Submarine landslides on open continental slopes can be prodigious in scale. They are an important process for global sediment fluxes, and can generate very damaging tsunamis. Submarine landslides are far harder to monitor directly than terrestrial landslides, and much greater uncertainty surrounds their preconditioning factors and triggers. Submarine slope failure often occurs on remarkably low (< 2°) gradients that are almost always stable on land, indicating that particularly high excess po...

  4. Estimating velocity from noisy GPS data for investigating the temporal variability of slope movements

    OpenAIRE

    Wirz, Vanessa; Beutel, Jan; Gruber, Stephan; Gubler, Stefanie; Purves, Ross S

    2014-01-01

    Detecting and monitoring of moving and potentially hazardous slopes requires reliable estimations of velocities. Separating any movement signal from measurement noise is crucial for understanding the temporal variability of slope movements and detecting changes in the movement regime, which may be important indicators of the process. Thus, methods capable of estimating velocity and its changes reliably are required. In this paper we develop and test a method for deriving velocities based on n...

  5. How to Use COMSOL Multiphysics for coupled dual-permeability hydrological and slope stability modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, W; T. A. Bogaard; Bakker, M.

    2014-01-01

    Preferential flow paths, such as cracks, macropores, fissures, pipes etc. are common features of highly heterogeneous slopes. During intense rainstorms, preferential flow has a significant influence on subsurface flow and slope stability. Dual-permeability models are widely used to simulate preferential flow, but have not been incorporated into hydro-mechanical models. In this study, the COMSOL Multiphysics software was used to couple a dual-permeability model with a soil mechanics model for ...

  6. Non-deterministic analysis of slope stability based on numerical simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In geotechnical engineering, the uncertainties such as the variability and uncertainty inherent in the geotechnical properties have caught more and more attentions from researchers and engineers. They have found that a single “Factor of Safety” calculated by traditional deterministic analyses methods can not represent the slope stability exactly. Recently in order to provide a more rational mathematical framework to incorporate different types of uncertainties in the slope stability estimatio...

  7. Probabilistic model of slope mass movement susceptibility – a case study of Bovec municipality, Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Komac

    2005-01-01

    A probabilistic model of slope mass movement susceptibility for the Bovec municipality in north-western Slovenia was developed based on the expert geohazard map at scale 1: 25.000 and several other relevant influence factors. For analytical purposes 10816 modelswere developed, 3142 for landslide susceptibility and 7674 for rockfall susceptibility. In both cases geology / lithology and slope angle showed to be the most important influence factors. Regarding landslides, additional important fac...

  8. Rainfall Reliability Evaluation for Stability of Municipal Solid Waste Landfills on Slope

    OpenAIRE

    Fu-Kuo Huang; Grace S. Wang; Yueh-Lin Tsai

    2013-01-01

    A method to assess the reliability for the stability of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills on slope due to rainfall infiltration is proposed. Parameter studies are first done to explore the influence of factors on the stability of MSW. These factors include rainfall intensity, duration, pattern, and the engineering properties of MSW. Then 100 different combinations of parameters are generated and associated stability analyses of MSW on slope are performed assuming that each parameter is un...

  9. Mechanics of a tectonized soil slope: influence of boundary conditions and rainfall

    OpenAIRE

    Santaloia, F.; CNR-IRPI; Cotecchia, F.; Politecnico di Bari; Polemio, M.; CNR-IRPI, Bari

    2001-01-01

    The Vadoncello landslide was mobilized in December 1993 and is still active. It involves highly tectonized soils and is the reactivation of a landslide dragged by a larger landslide at the toe of the slope soon after the 1980 Irpinia (Southern Italy) earthquake. Investigations and monitoring of the Vadoncello landslide were carried out, between 1994 and 1996, within an EC funded research project. The slope has been found to be formed of chaotic successions of soil and rock strata which have b...

  10. Landslide susceptibility on selected slopes in Dzanani, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Diko, Makia L; Shallati C. Banyini; Monareng, Batobeleng F

    2014-01-01

    Inherent soil properties and anthropogenic activities on slope faces are considered potential recipes for landslide occurrence. The objectives of this study were to physically characterise unconsolidated soils and identify on-going anthropogenic activities on selected slopes in Dzanani in order to appraise their role as contributory factors in enhancing landslide susceptibility. Methods employed for this study comprised mapping, description of soil profile, identification of anthropogenic ac...

  11. New developments in ambient noise analysis to characterise the seismic response of landslide-prone slopes

    OpenAIRE

    V. Del Gaudio; J. Wasowski; S. Muscillo

    2013-01-01

    We report on new developments in the application of ambient noise analysis applied to investigate the dynamic response of landslide-prone slopes to seismic shaking, with special attention to the directional resonance phenomena recognised in previous studies. These phenomena can be relevant for seismic slope susceptibility, especially when maximum resonance orientation is close to potential sliding directions. Therefore, the implementation of an effective technique for site response directivit...

  12. A hydrological study concerning the southern slopes of Mt Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Røhr, Paul Christen

    2003-01-01

    The hydrological conditions on the southern slopes of Mt Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, are complex and not similar to very many other places. High annual precipitation with complex distribution patterns occurs on these slopes. Extensive water consumption and concentrated groundwater sources of unknown origin are found on the plains. The distribution and utilisation of the scarce water resources can easily be influenced by change in these and in other factors. A hydrological model is developed for th...

  13. Fluctuations of bed load solid discharge and grain size distribution on steep slopes

    OpenAIRE

    FREY, P.; Ronco, P; Recking, A.

    2003-01-01

    Flume experiments of bed load transport on steeps slopes have been studied using image analysis. In particular, the effects of grain size distribution on solid discharge have been investigated. Two sets of experiments were performed, respectively with slopes of 9 and 15%, using non-uniform materials. In each case, although input of water and sediments was stationary, fluctuations of solid discharge were observed, associated with unstable bed-forms. Moreover the higher solid discharges were a...

  14. Grade control structure influences on steep slope stream dynamics: bed level fluctuations and sediment transport variations

    OpenAIRE

    Piton, G.; Recking, A.

    2014-01-01

    Various kind of structures are used in torrent related hazards mitigation. For instance, transversal structures as check dams and ground sills are often used as grade control structures. They are generally thought to induce decreases in slopes and thus to limit bed load transport. Small scale flume experiments were undertaken to study the effects of these structures on the dynamic equilibrium of steep slope streams, i.e. bed level fluctuations and variations in bed load transport....

  15. Pile-Reinforcement Behavior of Cohesive Soil Slopes: Numerical Modeling and Centrifuge Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Liping Wang; Ga Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Centrifuge model tests were conducted on pile-reinforced and unreinforced cohesive soil slopes to investigate the fundamental behavior and reinforcement mechanism. A finite element analysis model was established and confirmed to be effective in capturing the primary behavior of pile-reinforced slopes by comparing its predictions with experimental results. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the stress-deformation response was obtained by combining the numerical and physical simulations. Th...

  16. Overtopping and Rear Slope Stability of Reshaping & Non-reshaping Berm Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, H. F.

    Overtopping and rear slope stability of reshaping and non-reshaping berm breakwaters have been studied in a wave flume. A total of 695 tests have been performed to cover the influence of crest freeboard, crest width, berm width, berm elevation, stone size and sea state. Formula for average...... overtopping discharge that includes these parameters has been derived. The measurements show good correlation between average overtopping discharge and rear slope damage....

  17. Backtracking Algorithm for Single-Axis Solar Trackers installed in a sloping field

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Nascimento; Daniel Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a backtracking algorithm that improves the energy production of a single-axis solar tracker by reducing the shadow caused by neighboring panels. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can operate in any field slope avoiding the necessity of correcting the field slope where the solar tracker is placed. This is an important feature once it will reduced the time and the manpower during the solar tracker setup. The results have shown that the algorithm presents a si...

  18. Slope processes and related risk appearance within the Icelandic Westfjords during the twentieth century

    OpenAIRE

    A. Decaulne

    2005-01-01

    In North-western Iceland, records of slope processes were increasing during the twentieth century. Few dramatic events during the last decades highlighted the danger due to slope dynamics, leaving local populations in a risk situation that was merely unknown before 1970. The recent snow-avalanche, debris-flow and rock-fall activity underlined that the most frequent processes are not these with the largest human impact. In fact, the most catastrophic events were the extreme ones, following dir...

  19. Slope processes and related risk appearance within the Icelandic Westfjords during the twentieth century

    OpenAIRE

    A. Decaulne

    2005-01-01

    In North-western Iceland, records of slope processes were increasing during the twentieth century. Few dramatic events during the last decades highlighted the danger due to slope dynamics, leaving local populations in a risk situation that was merely unknown before 1970. The recent snow-avalanche, debris-flow and rock-fall activity underlined that the most frequent processes are not these with the largest human impact. In fact, the most catastrophic events were the extreme o...

  20. A new package in MODFLOW to simulate unconfined groundwater flow in sloping aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanrong; Zhan, Hongbin; Tang, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    The nonhorizontal-model-layer (NHML) grid system is more accurate than the horizontal-model-layer grid system to describe groundwater flow in an unconfined sloping aquifer on the basis of MODFLOW-2000. However, the finite-difference scheme of NHML was based on the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumption that the streamlines were horizontal, which was acceptable for slope less than 0.10. In this study, we presented a new finite-difference scheme of NHML based on the Boussinesq assumption and developed a new package SLOPE which was incorporated into MODFLOW-2000 to become the MODFLOW-SP model. The accuracy of MODFLOW-SP was tested against solution of Mac Cormack (1969). The differences between the solutions of MODFLOW-2000 and MODFLOW-SP were nearly negligible when the slope was less than 0.27, and they were noticeable during the transient flow stage and vanished in steady state when the slope increased above 0.27. We established a model considering the vertical flow using COMSOL Multiphysics to test the robustness of constrains used in MODFLOW-SP. The results showed that streamlines quickly became parallel with the aquifer base except in the narrow regions near the boundaries when the initial flow was not parallel to the aquifer base. MODFLOW-SP can be used to predict the hydraulic head of an unconfined aquifer along the profile perpendicular to the aquifer base when the slope was smaller than 0.50. The errors associated with constrains used in MODFLOW-SP were small but noticeable when the slope increased to 0.75, and became significant for the slope of 1.0. PMID:24299562