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Sample records for talus slopes

  1. Reflection of climate changes in the structure and morphodynamics of talus slopes (the Tatra Mountains, Poland)

    Gądek, Bogdan; Grabiec, Mariusz; Kędzia, Stanisław; Rączkowska, Zofia

    2016-06-01

    Talus slopes beside glaciers are among the best objects to research on climate change. In the Tatra Mountains, the highest mountains of central Europe, no glaciers remain, only glacierets and permafrost. For that reasona complex investigation of talus slopes was conducted there in the years 2009-2010. This paper presents the results of GPR and lichenometric measurements of the talus slopes in six glacial cirques located in the High and Western Tatras. The thickness and internal structure of talus slopes were identified along with the variability and conditions of their development. Maximum thickness of the talus slopes ranges from 20 to 35 m, reaching higher values in the High Tatras. The diversity of the thickness of the talus slopes within the Tatras is mostly explained by differences in the relief conditioned by lithology. The diverse altitudinal locations of the talus slopes, and the exposure and inclinations are not reflected in the size and thickness. The thickness of the studied slopes depends primarily on the activity of the processes supplying rock material and on the size and shape of the sediment supply area. The results of the lichenometric testing together with the analysis of the long-term precipitation data imply a several hundred-year-long deterioration of the climate during the Little Ice Age, which is reflected in the increased activity of morphogenetic processes on the talus slopes across the whole massif of the Tatras. In the last 200 years, the talus slopes of the Tatras were most active in three periods: at the end of the Little Ice Age, in the 1930s and 1940s, and in the early 1970s.

  2. New insights into the ground thermal regime of talus slopes with permafrost below the timberline

    Schwindt, Daniel; Kneisel, Christof

    2013-04-01

    In the central Alps permafrost can be expected above 2400 m a.s.l., at altitudes where mean annual air temperatures are below -1° C. However, isolated permafrost occurrences are present in north-exposed talus slopes, far below the timberline, where mean annual air temperatures are positive. Driving factors are assumed to be a low income of solar radiation, a thick organic layer with high insulation capacities as well as the thermally induced chimney effect (Wakonigg, 1996). Investigated are three talus slopes with permafrost in the Swiss Alps that differ with regard to elevation level, talus material, humus characteristics and vegetation composition as well as the mean annual air temperatures. Aim is to achieve a deeper understanding of the factors determining the site-specific thermal regime, as well as the spatially limited and temporally highly variable permafrost occurrences in vegetated talus slopes. Focus is not solely on the question of why permafrost exists at these sites, but also why permafrost does not exist in the immediate surroundings. To detect the temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity of the permafrost occurrences, electrical resistivity tomography monitoring, seismic refraction tomography monitoring, and quasi-3D ERT were applied. To determine the ground thermal regime, air-, ground surface-, and humus temperatures, as well as temperatures within vents of the chimneys were recorded. Furthermore, humus characteristics (thickness, -temperature and -moisture) were mapped in permafrost-affected slope areas and in the immediate surroundings. To test the correlation between solar radiation, permafrost distribution, and humus/vegetation composition, digital elevation models were used to calculate the income of solar radiation. The areal extent of the permafrost bodies coincide precisely with slope sections where the organic layer is thickest, a consistent moss cover is present, and where temperatures at the transition between humus layer and

  3. Snow cover and ground surface temperature on a talus slope affected by mass movements. Veleta cirque, Sierra Nevada, Spain

    Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; Salvador-Franch, F.

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses the thermal ground behaviour on an alpine talus slope located at the foot of the north wall of the glacial cirque on the Pico del Veleta (3398 m, 37°03'21''N, 3°21'57''W, MAAT: -0,4°C) in Sierra Nevada, SE Spain. There are frequent mass movements on this talus slope, particularly in its central section, caused by the abundant presence of fine-grained sediment and by the water from snowmelt and/or ice degradation in the ground or permafrost (Gómez et al., 2003). To determine the snowmelt pattern and ocurrence of permafrost, a continuous ground surface temperature was kept by installing 6 mini-loggers (HOBO Pendant) along the descending profile of the central talus, which is 170 m long with altitudes ranging from 3180 m at the higher end to 3085 m at the lower end. A thermal borehole was also installed at a depth of 2 m at the base of the slope on an active rock glacier. The results obtained for the period October 2008 - September 2009 show that, in contrast to alpine talus slopes (Luetschg et. al., 2004; Lambiel and Pieracci, 2008), the upper part of the slope is characterized by mean annual ground surface temperatures (MAGST) lower than at the base of the talus, possibly due to the effect of the shadow of the cirque wall. The MAGST oscillate between 0.592°C at the station near the slope apex (S2) and 1.836°C at the station near the base (S5). In winter-spring, when the talus slope is covered with snow, the GST are stabilized at all stations between mid-October and early November. The minimum GST, which express the BTS conditions, oscillate between 0.232 and 0.01°C, depending on the month, with lowest values recorded during the month of April. Only one station (S3, mid-slope) recorded negative values (max. value : - 0.549°C in December and - 0.211 in April ). In summer, the snow disappears fairly quickly between mid- and late July on the intermediate stretch of the talus slope (S3, S4, S6), where the majority of the flows detected occur

  4. Paediatric talus fracture.

    Byrne, Ann-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric talus fractures are rare injuries resulting from axial loading of the talus against the anterior tibia with the foot in dorsiflexion. Skeletally immature bone is less brittle, with higher elastic resistance than adult bone, thus the paediatric talus can sustain higher forces before fractures occur. However, displaced paediatric talus fractures and those associated with high-energy trauma have been associated with complications including avascular necrosis, arthrosis, delayed union, neurapraxia and the need for revision surgery. The authors present the rare case of a talar neck fracture in a skeletally immature young girl, initially missed on radiological review. However, clinical suspicion on the part of the emergency physician, repeat examination and further radiographic imaging revealed this rare paediatric injury.

  5. Symmetry analysis of talus bone

    Islam, K.; Dobbe, A.; Komeili, A.; Duke, K; EL-RICH,M; Dhillon, S.; Adeeb, S.; Jomha, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The main object of this study was to use a geometric morphometric approach to quantify the left-right symmetry of talus bones. Methods Analysis was carried out using CT scan images of 11 pairs of intact tali. Two important geometric parameters, volume and surface area, were quantified for left and right talus bones. The geometric shape variations between the right and left talus bones were also measured using deviation analysis. Furthermore, location of asymmetry in the geometric sh...

  6. [Talus necrosis and its treatment].

    Trauth, J; Bläsius, K

    1988-08-01

    Aetiopathogenesis of the necrosis of the talus has not yet been definitely clarified, and neither has that of the other aseptic necroses. We were able to study the aetiopathogenesis, course of the disease and therapy in 20 of our own patients by follow-up; two of these developed necrosis of the talus in both feet. We definitely excluded patients suffering from osteochondrosis dissecans. Even though fracture of the talus is on the whole relatively rare, it remains the most frequent cause of necrosis of the talus. We also found talonecrosis after surgical correction of clubfoot, after Sudeck's disease (Sudeck-Leriche syndrome, Sudeck's atrophy or dystrophy), suppurative arthritis of the ankle joint, subtalar luxation and haematogenic osteomyelitis. Only few patients required surgery. In most cases a special boot constructed for arthrodesis patients proved sufficient. Each patient developed arthrodesis to a different degree. Depending upon the complaints and stiffening of the ankle joint or of the talo-calcanonavicular joint, the capacity of the patients to be gainfully employed was reduced by an amount between 20 and 30 per cent. PMID:2905578

  7. Epidemiological study on talus fractures

    Marcos Hideyo Sakaki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To analyze the characteristics of patients with talus fractures and the injuries that they present.Methods:Retrospective analysis on patients hospitalized in the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital das Clínicas, School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, between 2006 and 2011, with talus fractures. Patient profile parameters, risk factors, fracture characteristics, treatment data and acute complications were analyzed.Results:Analysis on 23 cases showed that men were more affected than women, with a ratio of 4.8:1. The most frequent trauma mechanism was traffic accidents, followed by falls from a height. The most frequent type of fracture was at the neck of the talus, with 17 cases. Among the 23 cases, seven had peritalar dislocation at the time of presentation, four had exposed fractures and 11 presented other associated fractures. The mean length of time between the trauma and the definitive treatment was six days, while the mean length of hospital stay was 11 days. Three patients presented acute postoperative complications.Conclusion:Talus fractures occurred most commonly in the region of the talar neck and most frequently in young males who suffered high-energy trauma. In almost half of the cases, there were other associated fractures. The length of hospital stay was 11 days.

  8. Analysis of the slope stability of the Afsin - Elbistan lignite open cast mine (Turkey); Analyse de la stabilite des talus de la mine de lignite d`Afsin - Elbistan (Turquie)

    Kilic, A.M.

    1996-09-27

    The aim of this work was to analyse the slope stability of the Afsin - Elbistan lignite open cast mine (Turkey) taking into account the geological, geotechnical, hydrogeological and seismic factors. The analyses showed the importance to the stability of the following parameters: lithology, bedding structure, hydrogeology, geometrical configuration of the walls and the seismicity. Stability calculations enabled the comparison of several approaches (static and pseudo - static) and calculation methods (Bishop, Carter and Sarma). Finally, this study enabled the proposition of several solutions to achieve wall stability, which need further economic to find the optimal solution. (author) 48 refs.

  9. Multidisciplinary investigations on coupled rockwall-talus-systems (Turtmann valley, Swiss Alps)

    Messenzehl, Karoline; Draebing, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Talus slopes covering the base of steep, unstable rockwalls are characteristic periglacial landforms and major sediment storages in mountain systems. In the Turtmann valley (Swiss Alps), rockfall deposits account for 1/8 of the debris volume stored in the hanging valleys. To evaluate the spatio-temporal efficiency of rockfalls for long-term talus evolution, geophysical measurements on rockwalls and talus slopes are increasingly applied during the last decades. However, the correct interpretation of the geophysical data is still a difficult task due to the landforms' specific material properties. Moreover, no comprehensive geophysical study exists investigating the coupled rockwall-talus-system. Here, we studied two rockwalls and corresponding talus slopes in a tributary of the Turtmann valley. The active rockfall source areas dominate on rockwalls, for which a high permafrost probability was modelled (Nyenhuis et al. 2005). Rockwalls were selected based on their contrasting lithology, activity degree and valley location. By combining geophysical, geotechnical and geomorphological methods, we investigated (i) the rockwalls' mechanical characteristics as well as (ii) the material properties of the talus slopes in order to (iii) gain a further process understanding of the coupled rockwall-talus system. (i) At the rockwalls, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Seismic Refraction Tomography (SRT) were applied along 40-50m transects with an electrode/geophone spacing of 1-1.25m. In addition, detailed geotechnical surveys of the rock mass and its discontinuity properties were performed. The combined results reveal that high resistivity (>10'000kΩm) and high p-wave velocities (>3'000m/s) correlate with dried bedrock consisting of amphibolites with large joint spacing (52cm) and long persistences (> 220cm). In contrast, the small joint spacing (17cm) and short persistences (permafrost. (ii) At the rockwalls' corresponding talus slopes, ERT and SRT were performed

  10. Congenital Vertical Talus: Etiology and Management.

    Miller, Mark; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a rare foot deformity. If left untreated, it causes significant disability, including pain and functional limitations. Although the etiology of vertical talus is likely heterogeneous, recent evidence strongly supports a genetic cause linking it to genes expressed during early limb development. Traditional management for vertical talus involves extensive surgeries that are associated with significant short- and long-term complications. A minimally invasive approach that relies on serial manipulation and casting to achieve most of the correction has been shown to produce excellent short-term results with regard to clinical and radiographic correction in both isolated and nonisolated cases of vertical talus. Although long-term studies are needed, achieving correction without extensive surgery may lead to more flexible and functional feet, much as Ponseti method has done for clubfeet. PMID:26337950

  11. Talus avulsion fractures: are they accurately diagnosed?

    Robinson, Karen P; Davies, Mark B

    2015-10-01

    Dorsal talus avulsion fractures occurring along the supination line of the foot can cause pain and discomfort. Examination of the foot and ankle using the Ottawa ankle rules does not include examination of the talus, an injury here is easily missed causing concern to the patient. This is a retrospective study carried out in a major trauma centre to look at the assessment and diagnosis of all patients with a dorsal talus and navicular avulsion fractures over a one year period. Nineteen patients with an isolated dorsal talus avulsion fracture and five patients with an isolated dorsal navicular fracture were included. The correct diagnosis was made in 12 of patients with isolated dorsal talus avulsion fractures, 7 patients were given an incorrect diagnosis after misreading of the radiograph. Four patients with a dorsal navicular avulsion fracture were given the correct diagnosis. If not correctly diagnosed on presentation patients can be overly concerned that a 'fracture was missed' which can lead to confusion and anxiety. Therefore these injuries need to be recognised early, promptly diagnosed, treated symptomatically and reassurance given. We recommend the routine palpation of the talus in addition to the examination set out in the Ottawa Ankle Rules and the close inspection of plain radiographs to adequately diagnose an injury in this area. PMID:26190632

  12. A Case Report: Ipsilateral Closed Talus Dislocation and Navicular Fracture

    Tolga Atay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of the subtalar joint dislocations are rare. Three joint axes associated with that (which, tibiotalar, subtalar and talonavicular talus bone dislocation totally high-energy trauma or sports competitions outcome occurs, and this trauma as a result of complications of neurovascular injury, the talus capsular structure damage, skin necrosis and ligament damage may occur. Result of late term complications are avascular necrosis and degenerative arthritis. Talus fractures often are associated with one of the malleolus fracture or dislocation of the talus. Isolated talus dislocations without malleolus and talus fractures are usually occurs in open wounds. In this case, closed talus dislocation and ipsilateral navicular bone of foot fracture are observed as a result of the high energy trauma without malleolar fractures or fracture of the talus. Closed Talus dislocations are rare in the literature and has very less informations.

  13. [Open total dislocation of the talus].

    Grabski, R S; Sosiński, R

    1992-01-01

    A case of 35 years old patient with open, total, fixed dislocation of the talus reduced with heel traction is presented. The Sudeck syndrome subsided after one year. Weight bearing was not allowed for 7 months. An examination after 2.5 years revealed minor osteoarthritis, full range of movement in the foot but limited walking capability. PMID:7555299

  14. Lopsakalt rahvuslik mood Pulga talus / Tanel Veenre

    Veenre, Tanel, 1977-

    2009-01-01

    Eesti Moekunstnike Ühenduse näitus "Lillemotiiv moevormil" Eesti Vabaõhumuuseumi Pulga talus. Osalevad Anne Metsis, Anneliis Vabul, Diana Denissova, Monika Kisand, Juta Piirlaid, Anu Hint ja moekunsti õppejõud Yumiko Okazaki Jaapanist. Eksponeeritud rõivamudelid on kaunistatud rahvuslikest tikanditest inspireeritud stiliseeritud kujunditega

  15. Tibiotalar arthrodesis for injuries of the talus

    Singh Jaswant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fracture-dislocation of the talus is one of the most severe injuries of the ankle. Opinion varies widely as to the proper treatment of this injury. Since Blair′s original description of the tibiotalar fusion in 1943, there is little mention in the literature of his method. The present study reports the results of tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair′s technique. Materials and Methods: Eleven cases of modified Blair ′ s tibiotalar arthrodesis were retrospectively studied. The average age was 32.4 years (range, 26-51 years. Six patients had posttraumatic avascular necrosis; five had neglected fracture-dislocation of the talus. Results: The mean followup is 8 years (range 3-12 years. Tibiotalar fusion was achieved in all the ankles at an average of 20.5 weeks (range 16-28 weeks. Nine cases having 15°-20° tibiopedal motion had excellent results and two ankles having 10°-15° of tibiopedal motion had good result. Conclusion: We achieved good long term results with tibiotalar arthrodesis with modification in Blair technique. The principal modification in the present study is retention of the talar body while performing arthrodesis with anterior sliding graft. The retention of the talar body provides intraoperative stability and in the long term, the retained talar body shares the load transmitted to the anterior and middle subtalar joints thus resulting in improved hind foot function and gait.

  16. Ephemeral skin-flows on talus affected by permafrost degradation (Corral del Veleta, Spain)

    Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Gómez, A.

    2009-04-01

    (gelifraction) and hillslope dynamics (rockfall activity) which affect the headwall (Gómez et al., 2003) and is formed mainly by various talus cones which are irregular in shape and stepped as the accumulated debris covers the remains of the stepped structural shelves which were not destroyed by the glacial erosion. Although the talus debris is basically made up of blocks, it is important to point out the abundant presence of fine material, produced by the weathering of the micaschist. (Castillo and Fedeli, 2002; Gómez et al., 2003). Field work carried out over the last ten years (1998-2008) has allowed observation of the triggering and formation in some years of various skin flows in different sectors of the talus, especially in the late summer of 2002 when four skin flows occurred. Within this timeframe monitoring and analysis of this kind of skin flow has been carried out. On the one hand, the description of the morphology, morphometry and sedimentology of each flow has been completed with the production of detailed geomorphological mapping and from sedimentological analysis. The geomorphological mapping has, in turn, allowed the observation of the geomorphological evolution of the flows from the time they occurred. On the other hand, a study has been made of the variables or factors which seem a priori to control the triggering of the skin flow landslips: the snow melt and the presence of permafrost in the detrital talus. The former has been monitored through photographic control of the snow cover at the end of the summer season, so that for each date analyzed a map was obtained of the snow cover, superimposing in turn the location of the skin flows at that date. A GIS processing of the different snow covers has also allowed a map to be produced with the areas of maximum summer snow cover, which was compared with the sites of the skin flow landslips. The existence of permafrost and its presence in the detrital slope has been detected through the monitoring of the ground

  17. Mixed approach (numerical modeling / equilibrium analysis) for slope stability analysis: development and application to the dams and open pit mining; Une approche mixte (numerique/equilibre limite) pour le calcul de stabilite des ouvrages en terre: developpement et application aux barrages et talus miniers

    Kourdey, A.

    2002-09-15

    The determination of the sliding surface of slope (dam, slope natural..) is one of the important and complicated problems in geotechnics. The Analyze of stability by the methods of Limit Equilibrium like the method of slices are the most used methods. They are able to determine a safety factor for a geometrically defined failure surface. These methods well adapted to the homogeneous mediums, have been developed a lot but they do not integrate the basic relations of mechanics (stress-strain). The numerical methods are better adapted to mediums having more complexity (effect of water, seismicity, fracturing,..). But, they are seldom used to determine a sliding surface and a safety factor. Each family offers appreciable advantages in the analysis of slope stability. For that purpose, we have developed a method that combines the advantages of the numerical methods as well as those of Limit Equilibrium allowing obtaining a slip surface determined by the calculated constraints. This slip surface may be imposed or better optimized, thus providing a minimal safety factor. Methods of operation research are used to obtain this surface. They are search methods by level, dynamic research.. or both at the same time. We integrated these developments in an existing computer code based on the method of Finite Differences known as FLAC. The stresses are determined for a linear behavior and for nonlinear. Interfaces and graphic tools are also produced to facilitate the analysis of stability. The validity of this approach was carried out for a standard case of slope, we analyzed and compared the results with the methods of Limit Equilibrium. The parametric study shows that this approach takes account of different parameters, which influences stability. We also kept a particular place for the application on real cases presenting slopes of different nature (dams, mining slops,...). (author)

  18. Congenital vertical talus: Treatment by reverse ponseti technique

    Bhaskar Atul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The surgery for idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT can lead to stiffness, wound complications and under or over correction. There are sporadic literature on costing with mixed results. We describe our early experience of reverse ponseti technique. Materials and methods: Four cases (four feet of idiopathic congenital vertical talus (CVT which presented one month after birth were treated by serial manipulation and casting, tendoachilles tenotomy and percutaneous pinning of talonavicular joint. An average of 5.2 (range - four to six plaster cast applications were required to correct the forefoot deformity. Once the talus and navicular were aligned based on the radiographic talus-first metatarsal axis, percutaneous fixation of the talo-navicular joint with a Kirschner wire, and percutaneous tendoachilles tenotomy under anesthesia was performed following which a cast was applied with the foot in slight dorsiflexion. Results: The mean follow-up period for the four cases was 8.5 months (6-12 months. At the end of the treatment all feet were supple and plantigrade but still using ankle foot orthosis (AFO. The mean talocalcaneal angle was 70 degrees before treatment and this reduced to 31 degrees after casting. The mean talar axis first metatasal base angle (TAMBA angle was 60° before casting and this improved to 10.5°. Conclusion: Although our follow-up period is small, we would recommend early casting for idiopathic CVT along the same lines as the Ponseti technique for clubfoot except that the forces applied are in reverse direction. This early casting method can prevent extensive surgery in the future, however, a close vigil is required to detect any early relapse.

  19. Retrograde osteochondral grafting for osteochondral lesion of the talus: a new technique eliminating malleolar osteotomy

    Kilicoglu, Onder; Taser, Omer

    2004-01-01

    Osteochondral grafting is one of the most effective treatment options for osteochondral lesions of the talus. However, the necessity for a medial malleolar osteotomy is the major drawback of the technique. This report presents a case treated with retrograde osteochondral grafting that eliminated the need for a medial malleolar osteotomy. An osteochondral lesion of the medial talus was detected in a 49-year-old woman. Under arthroscopic guidance, the talus was entered from the sinus tarsi regi...

  20. Can paleorefugia of cold-adapted species in talus slopes resist global warming?

    Růžička, Vlastimil; Zacharda, M.; Šmilauer, P.; Kučera, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2015), s. 403-412. ISSN 1239-6095 Grant ostatní: GA JU(CZ) 04-142/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : global warming Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.481, year: 2014 http://www.borenv.net/BER/pdfs/ber20/ber20-403.pdf

  1. Slope filtrations

    André, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Many slope filtrations occur in algebraic geometry, asymptotic analysis, ramification theory, p-adic theories, geometry of numbers... These functorial filtrations, which are indexed by rational (or sometimes real) numbers, have a lot of common properties. We propose a unified abstract treatment of slope filtrations, and survey how new ties between different domains have been woven by dint of deep correspondences between different concrete slope filtrations.

  2. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  3. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    Okamoto, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshimori; Nishi, Genzaburo; Tago, Kyoji; Tsuchiya, Daiji; Chiba, Takehiro; Okumura, Hisashi [Aichiken Koseiren Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Ikeda, Takeshi; Wada, Ikuo

    2000-02-01

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  4. HYBRID ANKLE PROSTHESIS IN A CASE OF POST-TRAUMATIC AVASCULAR NECROSIS OF THE TALUS

    de Sousa, Ricardo Jorge Gomes; Pinto, Ricardo Pedro Ferreira Rodrigues; de Oliveira Massada, Marta Maria Teixeira; Pereira, Manuel Alexandre Negrais Pinho Gonçalves; Geada, José Muras; Costa, Isabel Maria Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Talus fractures often lead to late post-traumatic arthrosis. In such cases, the use of latest generation, cementless prostheses has been hindered by the presence of avascular necrosis. We report the case of a 65-year-old patient who presented four years after a talus neck fracture. He had painful ankle arthrosis (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 19) and avascular necrosis, with collapse of the entire talar dome. Given the extent of the necrosis, it was decided to cement the talus prosthetic compone...

  5. Reconstruction of focal cartilage defects in the talus with miniarthrotomy and collagen matrix

    Walther, M.; Altenberger, S; Kriegelstein, S; Volkering, C; Röser, A.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical principal and objective Treatment of focal cartilage defects (traumatic or osteochondrosis dissecans) of the talus using a collagen matrix. The goal is to stabilize the superclot formed after microfracturing to accommodate cartilage repair. The procedure can be carried out via miniarthrotomy, without medial malleolus osteotomy. Indications International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade III and IV focal cartilage defects of the talus > 1.5 cm2. Contraindications Generalized osteo...

  6. Parrotfish erosion underpins reef growth, sand talus development and island building in the Maldives

    Morgan, Kyle M.; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-07-01

    Parrotfish play a key functional role on coral reefs as external bioerosion agents and produce large quantities of carbonate sediment as a by-product of grazing on reef surfaces. Parrotfish are therefore an important potential source of sediment for island construction and maintenance within atoll reef environments, particularly under future scenarios of sea level rise and island morphological change. Here, we present the first field-based estimates of excavating parrotfish erosion (Chlorurus sordidus and Chlorurus strongylocephalus) within the Indian Ocean and quantify the contribution of parrotfish to the carbonate and sediment budgets of an atoll interior reef platform in the Maldives. We note that parrotfish erosion rates are high (6.3 kg m- 2 y- 1), generating large amounts of new coral-based sediment (2.6 kg m- 2 y- 1) that has a comparable grain size distribution to island deposits. Mean erosion rates by individual C. strongylocephalus (405 kg individual y- 1) were higher than C. sordidus (55 kg individual y- 1), but their contribution to erosion per unit area of reef was less due to a lower relative biomass (C. strongylocephalus: 1.3 kg m- 2 y- 1; C. sordidus: 5.0 kg m- 2 y- 1). Parrotfish also facilitate sediment export from reefs (0.7 kg m- 2 y- 1), which contributes extensively to the development of the sand talus on the fore-reef slope and to the evolution of the wider atoll basin. Our results provide strong evidence that parrotfish erosion (and sediment generation) underpins island morphology on Maldivian reefs and highlight the importance of larger parrotfish as producers of island-grade sediment. Ecological processes must therefore be considered within future coastal management strategies for enhancing island stability.

  7. Congenital vertical talus in four generations of the same family

    This paper presents four generations of a family with radiographically demonstrated congenital vertical talus (CVT) in whom a HOXD10 gene mutation was identified. Some members of the family with this mutation exhibited cavo-varus foot deformity consistent with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)-like disorder. Physical examination was performed on nearly all of the affected and unaffected family members. DNA was extracted from blood obtained from 14 subjects who showed radiographic and clinical features of CVT (two of whom also had CMT), from two subjects with features of CMT but not CVT, and from 20 related family members who were clinically normal. Radiographs show the appearance of uncorrected CVT in infancy, in childhood, and in adulthood. DNA analysis revealed a mutation in a HOXD10gene located on chromosome 2 in all of the affected but none of the unaffected family members. There is an autosomal-dominant-inherited mutation with complete penetrance which is found in all members of a pedigree with CVT, some of whom exhibit a CMT-like foot disorder. Radiologic findings vary depending on the severity of involvement, treatment provided and age of the patient. (orig.)

  8. Impact of land-use change on soil degradation by establishment of terraces with subtropical orchards in sloping areas (Granada, SE Spain)

    In the coast of Granada, an intensive irrigated agriculture based on subtropical crops has been established. These trees have been planted in highly sloped areas, by the construction of terraces. In this fragile Mediterranean agroecosystem, the removal of native spontaneous vegetation cover and substitution by orchards, increase the susceptibility to soil degradation and eventually brings up the destruction of these structures by rainfall events. To study this net change, we monitored the soil loss and runoff over a two-year period in the taluses of terraces with a mature mango (Mangifera indica L.) orchard. The studied treatments were bare soil (BS) and spontaneous vegetation (NSV), each twice replicated. The erosion plots were 4 m x 4 m in area and were located in the taluses of orchard in the taluses of orchard terraces (65 degree centigrade slope). The average annual soil loss by erosion for BS and NSV was 2.5 and 0.3 Mg ha-1 yr-1, and for runoff 34.1 and 6.8 mm yr-1, respectively. Therefore, soil erosion and runoff from BS plot were 8- and 5-times higher than in NSV, showing the importance of plant covers in the taluses of terraces in reducing this impact. Thus, the removal of plant cover from the taluses under these conditions, represent a high risk of slump and collapse, causing serious environmental and economic problems for farmers of subtropical crops. (Author) 11 refs.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture

    Duo Wai-Chi Wong; Wenxin Niu; Yan Wang; Ming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The sim...

  10. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus: appearance at MR imaging and clinical significance

    The case of a 59-year-old man with chronic lateral ankle pain following an inversion injury is presented. MR imaging performed to evaluate for soft tissue injury revealed an unsuspected fracture of the lateral process of the talus. The patient underwent surgical exploration of the fracture with debridement of adjacent loose bodies and is currently undergoing aggressive physical rehabilitation. (orig.)

  11. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus: computed tomographic scan diagnosis.

    Noble, J; Royle, S G

    1992-01-01

    Fracture of the lateral process of the talus is rare but can be mistaken for a simple ankle sprain. A case with normal conventional radiographs is presented to draw attention to this diagnosis in the resistant ankle sprain, and to highlight some of the problems that may be encountered with treatment.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture.

    Duo Wai-Chi Wong

    Full Text Available Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis.A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The simulated impact velocities were from 2.0 to 7.0 m/s with 1.0 m/s interval.At 5.0 m/s impact velocity, the maximum von Mises stress of the trabecular calcaneus and talus were 3.21MPa and 2.41MPa respectively, while that of the Tresca stress were 3.46MPa and 2.55MPa. About 94% and 84% of the trabecular calcaneus and talus exceeded the shear yielding stress, while 21.7% and 18.3% yielded the compressive stress. The peak stresses were distributed around the talocalcaneal articulation and the calcaneal tuberosity inferiorly, which corresponded to the common fracture sites.The prediction in this study showed that axial compressive impact at 5.0 m/s could produce considerable yielding of trabecular bone in both calcaneus and talus, dominantly by shear and compounded with compression that predispose the rearfoot in the risk of fracture. This study suggested the injury pattern and fracture mode of high energy trauma that provides insights in injury prevention and fracture management.

  13. ElevationSlope_SLOPE2M

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Bennington County 2012 2.0m and related SLOPE datasets. Created using ArcGIS "SLOPE" command to produce...

  14. Arthroscopic treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus: analysis of outcome predictors

    GUO Qin-wei; HU Yue-lin; JIAO Chen; YU Chang-long; AO Ying-fang

    2010-01-01

    Background Compared with traditional arthrotomy procedures, arthroscopic treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus has some advantages. However, there has been considerable debate about the outcome predictors for this surgical technique. This study aimed to investigate the outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus, and analyze its outcome predictors.Methods Clinical data of 48 patients with osteochondral lesions of the talus who underwent ankle arthroscopy were studied. Arthroscopic debridement was performed on all patients, and microfracture was also performed in 36 cases. Scores on a subjective satisfaction questionnaire, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and the American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot scores were obtained before and after surgery.Results Five patients lost to follow up. The other forty-three patients, 8 of whom were athletes, were followed up for an average of 23.9 months. The average AOFAS post-operative score was 90.16±9.96, compared with 70.81±6.96 before surgery (t=9.353, P <0.001). The VAS pain score after the operation (2.51±9.45) was significantly lower than that before the operation (6.95±1.40) (t=8.647, P<0.001). Of the 43 patients, 35 (81.4%) had good or excellent results. There was no significant difference in outcome between the medial and lateral groups (z=0.205, P=0.838), while a better outcome was found with lesions smaller than 10 mm than those with larger lesions (z=2.199, P=0.028). Age, sex, athletic profession and location of the lesion did not significantly correlate with outcomes.Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment is effective and safe for osteochondral lesions of the talus. A strong correlation was found between the size of the lesion and successful outcome.

  15. A Review of Arthroscopic Bone Marrow Stimulation Techniques of the Talus

    Murawski, Christopher D.; Foo, Li Foong; Kennedy, John G

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries following acute and chronic ankle sprains. Numerous surgical treatment strategies have been employed for treating these lesions; arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation is recognized as the first-line technique to provide fibrocartilage infill of the defect site. While the short- and medium-term outcomes of this technique are good, the long-term outcomes are not yet known. An increasing number of studies, however, show a cause for concern in...

  16. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus: appearance at MR imaging and clinical significance

    Sanders, T.G.; Morrison, W.B. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall United States Air Force Medical Center, Lackland AFB, TX (United States); Ptaszek, A.J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Foot and Ankle Service, Wilford Hall United States Air Force Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas (United States)

    1999-04-01

    The case of a 59-year-old man with chronic lateral ankle pain following an inversion injury is presented. MR imaging performed to evaluate for soft tissue injury revealed an unsuspected fracture of the lateral process of the talus. The patient underwent surgical exploration of the fracture with debridement of adjacent loose bodies and is currently undergoing aggressive physical rehabilitation. (orig.) With 3 figs., 21 refs.

  17. Neglected lateral process of talus fracture presenting as a loose body in tarsal canal

    Kamal Bali; Sharad Prabhakar; Nitesh Gahlot; Mandeep S Dhillon

    2011-01-01

    Lateral process fractures of talus are rare injuries with a potential to cause significant morbidity if rnisdiagnosed.The appropriate management of these fractures is still controversial and only a few reports are available on this subject.We presented a case of a 37-year-old male with neglected fracture on the lateral process of talus which was misdiagnosed at the time of injury.The patient presented to 7 months after misdiagnosis with a chronic ankle pain.Our case is unique in the sense that it is a rare case of neglected fracture on the lateral process of talus which presented as a loose body in sinus tarsi.However,a surgery with an excision of the loose body presented a satisfactory outcome along with 2 years' follow-up.To our knowledge,it ought to be the first case reported in the English literature.Through this case report,we highlight the importance of high index of suspicion for such rare bony injuries while evaluating trauma to the lateral side of ankle and discuss the principles of management of these fractures.

  18. Assessment of talus deformity by three-dimensional MRI in congenital clubfoot

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphological deformity of talus in congenital clubfoot by three-dimensional MRI. Material and method: Subjects were five patients (two male, three female, mean age 5 months) with unilateral congenital clubfoot. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed of both feet using 1.5 T magnet. Based on the resulting magnetic resonance imaging volume data, a three-dimensional surface bone model was reconstructed by the Marching Cubes method. The long axis of the reconstructed model was determined, and in relation to the standard planes including this axis, the degree of talar head and neck deviation, and the relative positioning of the talus and navicular in the talonavicular joint were compared between normal foot and clubfoot. Result: The talar head and neck angle in relation to the talus exhibited significant medial deviation in the clubfoot, but the degree of plantar deviation of the talar head and neck did not show significance. The navicular was located more medially in clubfoot than in normal foot. The volume of the total talar and of the ossific nucleus for the clubfoot was smaller than that for the normal foot. Conclusion: The assessment technique presented herein was shown to be useful in ascertaining the various pathological characteristics associated with clubfoot

  19. Assessment of talus deformity by three-dimensional MRI in congenital clubfoot

    Itohara, T. E-mail: tomonobu@ort.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sugamoto, K.; Shimizu, N.; Ohno, I.; Tanaka, H.; Nakajima, Y.; Sato, Y.; Yoshikawa, H

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphological deformity of talus in congenital clubfoot by three-dimensional MRI. Material and method: Subjects were five patients (two male, three female, mean age 5 months) with unilateral congenital clubfoot. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed of both feet using 1.5 T magnet. Based on the resulting magnetic resonance imaging volume data, a three-dimensional surface bone model was reconstructed by the Marching Cubes method. The long axis of the reconstructed model was determined, and in relation to the standard planes including this axis, the degree of talar head and neck deviation, and the relative positioning of the talus and navicular in the talonavicular joint were compared between normal foot and clubfoot. Result: The talar head and neck angle in relation to the talus exhibited significant medial deviation in the clubfoot, but the degree of plantar deviation of the talar head and neck did not show significance. The navicular was located more medially in clubfoot than in normal foot. The volume of the total talar and of the ossific nucleus for the clubfoot was smaller than that for the normal foot. Conclusion: The assessment technique presented herein was shown to be useful in ascertaining the various pathological characteristics associated with clubfoot.

  20. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus: a report of two cases.

    Lunebourg, Alexandre; Zermatten, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Fracture of the lateral process of the talus is a rare lesion commonly described in snowboarding injuries. Nevertheless, several conditions can lead to this injury, which is often misdiagnosed as a severe ankle sprain because of the difficulty in detecting it on standard radiographic views. Computed tomography is very helpful for the assessment of this injury. The type of treatment will depend on the size and degree of the displacement of the fracture. This injury can also lead to subtalar joint osteoarthritis. We report 2 cases of fracture of the lateral process of the talus. In the first case, a young male sustained a combined inversion and dorsiflexion strain of his right foot when he fell from a ladder. In the second case, a woman broke the lateral process of her right talus by the same mechanism when she was sledding. In the 2 situations, we opted for an open reduction and internal fixation using 2.4-mm cannulated screws. Both patients were allowed walking with partial weightbearing with a walker boot (VACOped(®)) for 6 weeks. At 1 year, both showed a consolidated fracture and had regained their preinjury level of activity. PMID:24618244

  1. A comparative study of the trabecular bony architecture of the talus in humans, non-human primates, and Australopithecus.

    DeSilva, Jeremy M; Devlin, Maureen J

    2012-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that talar trabecular microarchitecture reflects the loading patterns in the primate ankle joint, to determine whether talar trabecular morphology might be useful for inferring locomotor behavior in fossil hominins. Trabecular microarchitecture was quantified in the anteromedial, anterolateral, posteromedial, and posterolateral quadrants of the talar body in humans and non-human primates using micro-computed tomography. Trabecular bone parameters, including bone volume fraction, trabecular number and thickness, and degree of anisotropy differed between primates, but not in a manner entirely consistent with hypotheses derived from locomotor kinematics. Humans have highly organized trabecular struts across the entirety of the talus, consistent with the compressive loads incurred during bipedal walking. Chimpanzees possess a high bone volume fraction, consisting of plate-like trabecular struts. Orangutan tali are filled with a high number of thin, connected trabeculae, particularly in the anterior portion of the talus. Gorillas and baboons have strikingly similar internal architecture of the talus. Intraspecific analyses revealed no regional differences in trabecular architecture unique to bipedal humans. Of the 22 statistically significant regional differences in the human talus, all can also be found in other primates. Trabecular thickness, number, spacing, and connectivity density had the same regional relationship in the talus of humans, chimpanzees, gorillas, and baboons, suggesting a deeply conserved architecture in the primate talus. Australopithecus tali are human-like in most respects, differing most notably in having more oriented struts in the posteromedial quadrant of the body compared with the posterolateral quadrant. Though this result could mean that australopiths loaded their ankles in a unique manner during bipedal gait, the regional variation in degree of anisotropy was similar in humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas

  2. Lichenometry and Cosmogenic Surface Exposure Dating of Possible Fossil Talus Deposits, Devil's Lake State Park, Wisconsin

    Knochenhauer, K. J.; Weber, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Lichenometry and cosmogenic surface exposure dating have been highly successful in deciphering landform evolution in tectonically active regions, but have not been widely applied in mid-continent settings. We propose to test the idea that many of the talus deposits in Devil's Lake State Park (DLSP) are ancient, fossil, periglacial deposits that have been frozen in space and time not moving since ~18,000 years ago. Our results may provide valuable information that could be applied to other settings and may also offer information on the effects of 2nd order climatic events such as the Little Ice Age of the 16th-19th centuries, and also help determine the relation between the last glacial maximum about 18ky ago and its related timing to major mass sediment movements. Our preliminary data was collected methodologically offering tight, unimodal peaks of lichen diameters/ages for Aspicilia cinerea and Dimelaena oreina most consistent with the idea that the deposits have not moved since the last ice age. A growth curve for Dimelaena oreina was established through the use of a neighboring cemetery giving a local growth rate of 67.13mm/100yr with R=68. Size-distribution results for DLSP peaked at only 65.2mm. This suggests that current talus block lichen cover is not a record of the first generation. We will pair our lichenometric results with the future use of 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating to determine the ages of the 3 major talus deposits themselves (as opposed to lichen initialization ages) which should allow us to test our initial hypothesis, enhance our lichenometry data set, and begin to develop a more robust sampling strategy for further work. Deciphering the landform evolution of this area would offer insight to past landslides and mass debris flows.

  3. Recurrent parosteal osteosarcoma of the talus in a 2-year-old child

    Parosteal osteosarcoma is an uncommon, low-grade malignant bone tumor and is found in an older age group than conventional osteosarcoma. We present a talar parosteal osteosarcoma that recurred twice in a 2-year-old child. To our knowledge, this is the youngest patient reported with a parosteal osteosarcoma. The talus is an unusual site for parosteal osteosarcoma. Inadequate resection due to a diagnosis of juxtacortical chondroma resulted in recurrence of the tumor. The age of the patient, the thick cartilaginous cap, and well-differentiated trabecular bone all contributed to the critical erroneous diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica (Trevor Syndrome of Talus in a 21-Year Old Woman; Case Report

    Amir R Sdeghifar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica is a rare nonhereditary epiphyseal disease that mimics synovial chondromatosis and osteochondroma of the joints. The disease mainly involves long bones of the lower extremities and tarsal bones. Herein we report 21-year old woman who presented with pain and limited range of ankle motion, who underwent surgical excision of talus exostosis after preoperative imaging and careful planning. after that she was discharged and her problem improved and she have no problem in three year follow up .pathologic examination of specimen confirm the diagnosis.

  5. Groundwater flow and storage within an alpine meadow-talus complex

    A. F. McClymont

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The different types of geological deposits and rock formations found in alpine watersheds play key roles in regulating the rate and timing of runoff to mountain rivers. Talus and alpine meadows are dominant features in these areas, but scant data exist for their capacity to store and transmit groundwater. To gain further understanding of these processes, we have undertaken a combined geophysical and hydrological study of a small (2100 m2 alpine meadow and surrounding talus within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. Several intersecting ground-penetrating radar (GPR and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles and a seismic refraction profile were acquired to map the thickness of the talus and to image the topography of the bedrock basin that underlies the meadow. From analysis of the GPR and seismic profiles, we estimate that the talus deposits are relatively thin (<6 m. Combined interpretations from the GPR and ERT data show that the fine-grained sediment comprising the meadow basin has a total volume of ca. 3300 m3 and has a maximum thickness of ca. 4 m. Annual snow surveys and stream gauging reveal that the total input volume of snowmelt and rainfall to the meadow basin is several times larger than its groundwater storage capacity, giving rise to low total-dissolved species concentrations (14–21 mg/L within the meadow groundwater. Observations from four piezometers established on the meadow show that the water table fluctuates rapidly in response to spring snowmelt and precipitation events but otherwise maintains a relatively stable depth of 0.3–0.4 m below the meadow surface during summer months. A slug test performed on one of the piezometers indicated that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the shallow meadow sediments is 2.5×10−7 m/s. We suggest that a bedrock saddle imaged underneath the southern end of the meadow forms a natural constriction to subsurface flow out of the

  6. Groundwater flow and storage within an alpine meadow-talus complex

    A. F. McClymont

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The different types of geological deposits and rock formations found in alpine watersheds play key roles in regulating the rate and timing of runoff to mountain rivers. Talus and alpine meadows are dominant features in these areas, but scant data exist for their capacity to store and transmit groundwater. To gain further understanding of these processes, we have undertaken a combined geophysical and hydrological study of a small (2100 m2 alpine meadow and surrounding talus within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. Several intersecting ground-penetrating radar (GPR and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles and a seismic refraction profile were acquired to map the thickness of the talus and to image the topography of the bedrock basin that lies under the meadow. From analysis of the GPR and seismic profiles, we estimate that the talus deposits are relatively thin (<6 m. Combined interpretations from the GPR and ERT data show that the fine-grained sediment, that the meadow basin is comprised of, has a total volume of ca. 3300 m3 and has a maximum thickness of ca. 4 m. Annual snow surveys and stream gauging reveal that the total input volume of snowmelt and rainfall to the meadow basin is several times larger than its groundwater storage capacity, giving rise to low total-dissolved species concentrations (14–21 mg/L within the meadow groundwater. Observations from four piezometers established on the meadow show that the water table fluctuates rapidly in response to spring snowmelt and precipitation events but otherwise maintains a relatively stable depth of 0.3–0.4 m below the meadow surface during summer months. A slug test performed on one of the piezometers indicated that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the shallow meadow sediments is 2.5×10−7 m/s. We suggest that a bedrock saddle imaged underneath the southern end of the meadow forms a natural constriction to subsurface

  7. Possible application of CT morphometry of the calcaneus and talus in forensic anthropological identification.

    Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Mustafa, Asmaa Mohammed Hishmat; Sogawa, Nozomi; Kanou, Tetsuya; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) data provide information for volumetric and radiographic density analysis. The present study investigated the application of virtual CT volumetry of the tarsal bones to estimation of the sex, stature, and body weight using postmortem CT (PMCT) data of forensic autopsy cases. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the bilateral foot bones of intact Japanese subjects after adolescence (age ≥ 15 years, n = 179, 100 males and 79 females) were reconstructed on an automated CT image analyzer system. Measured parameters were mass volume, mean CT value (HU), and total CT value of the talus and calcaneus. Mean CT values of these bones showed age-dependent decreases in elderly subjects over 60 years of age for both sexes, with significant sex-related differences especially in the elderly. The mass volumes and total CT values of the talus and calcaneus showed significant sex-related differences, and also moderate correlations with body height and weight for bilateral bones in all cases (r = 0.58-0.78, p forensic identification; however, greater variations should be considered in body weight estimations of females. PMID:26362306

  8. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Secondary to an Unreported Ossicle of the Talus: A Case Report.

    Sweed, Tamer Ahmed; Ali, Seyed Asghar; Choudhary, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is a compression neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel. In about 80% of patients, a specific cause can be identified for TTS. We present a case of TTS secondary to an ossicle in close relation to the talus that, to our knowledge, has not previously been reported. A 26-year-old male presented with left ankle and foot pain that increased with activity and playing football. He had a tingling sensation and paresthesia in the sole and medial border of the foot along the distribution of the medial and lateral plantar nerves. Clinically, he had hard swelling at the floor of the tarsal tunnel, and Tinel's sign was positive. Computed tomography showed an accessory ossicle articulating with the posteromedial aspect of the talus, separating the flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tendons, with tenosynovitis of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tendons. Surgical release of the tarsal tunnel and excision of the ossicle were performed. Postoperatively, the patient showed dramatic improvement and had no complications or recurrence of symptoms after 8 months of follow-up. More interestingly, to the best of our knowledge, this ossicle has not been previously reported to cause TTS. PMID:25441278

  9. Orthopaedic surgeon’s nightmare: iatrogenic fractures of talus and medial malleolus following tibial nailing

    Meena Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Intramedullary interlocking nailing is the gold standard for treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The growing use of intramedullary nailing has resulted in an increased number of tibial nailing in daily clinical practice. Despite adequate surgeon experience, tibial nailing is not without complications if proper techniques are not followed. A case of iatrogenic talar neck and medial malleolus frac-tures during intramedullary nailing of tibia in a 24-year-old male is reported. It is believed to be caused by forceful hammering of insertion zig with foot dorsiflexed. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported in the literature. It is possible to reduce the risk of this complica-tion by adoption of preventive measures. Key words: Tibial fracture; Talus; Fracture fixation, intramedullary

  10. RADIOGRAPHIC ABNORMALITIES OF THE TALUS IN PATIENTS WITH CLUBFOOT AFTER SURGICAL RELEASE USING THE MCKAY TECHNIQUE

    Pinto, José Antonio; Hernandes, Andréa Canizares; Buchaim, Thais Paula; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Chertman, Carla; Yamane, Patrícia Corey; da Rocha Corrêa Fernandes, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze morphological abnormalities of the talus in patients with clubfoot after surgical treatment using the McKay technique. Method: Lateral standing-position radiographs of the feet of 14 patients with unilateral clubfoot who underwent treatment by means of the doubleincision McKay technique were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients were operated by the same surgeon, with an average of 6.53 years between surgery and the radiograph. We compared the radiographic characteristics of the talus between the operated and the contralateral foot. We assessed the presence of deformity of the talar dome and head (sphericity evaluation); the talar length and height; the percentage and degree of navicular subluxation; abnormalities of the Gissane angle; and the trabecular bone pattern. Results: Abnormalities of the talar head occurred in 92.8% of the patients; of the talar dome in 92.8%; and of the trabecular pattern in 100%. The talar length ratio between the operated and the contralateral foot ranged from 0.61 to 0.88 (mean 0.79; SD = 0.09), while the height ratio ranged from 0.57 to 0.98 (mean 0.82; SD = 0.12). The Gissane angle was greater in all of the operated feet, and all of them also showed navicular subluxation, at a rate ranging from 6.43 to 59.75% (mean 26.34%; SD = 16.66%). Conclusion: Talar abnormalities occurred in 100% of the feet treated using the McKay technique. It was shown that establishing radiographic parameters to describe and quantify these deformities was feasible, through simple and easy-to-perform techniques. PMID:27047821

  11. Elastic slopes and diffraction

    It is well known that elastic hadronic slopes grow with energy and appear sizeably larger when measured very close to t=0 than at intermediate t-values. This has been confirmed by the recent anti-p p measurements at the CERN SPS-Collider. By comparing the data with a formula derived recently which gives the slope as a function of the four momentum transfer squared t and of the average multiplicity we argue that all the basic properties of hadronic slopes may be attributed to the role of multiparticle unitarity, i.e. to diffraction

  12. Closed subtalar dislocation with non-displaced fractures of talus and navicular: a case report and review of the literature

    Fotiadis, Elias; Lyrtzis, Christos; Svarnas, Theodoros; Koimtzis, Miltos; Akritopoulou, Kiriaki; Chalidis, Byron

    2009-01-01

    Closed subtalar dislocations associated with talus and navicular fractures are rare injuries. We report on a case of a 43-year-old builder man with medial subtalar dislocation that was further complicated by minimally displaced talar and navicular fractures. Successful closed reduction under general anesthesia was followed by non-weight bearing and ankle immobilization with a below-knee cast for 6 ;weeks. At 3 years post-injury, the subtalar joint was stable, the foot and ankle mobility was i...

  13. Snowboard, wakeboard, dashboard? Isolated fracture of the lateral process of the talus in a high-speed road traffic accident.

    Ng, Evangeline Shimei

    2013-01-01

    We present a 23-year-old man who sustained an isolated fracture of the lateral process of the talus (LPT) in a head-on vehicle collision at a combined speed of 200 km\\/h. The driver of the other vehicle sustained fatal injuries at the scene. The LPT was openly reduced and fixed with successful outcome at 3 months. This case is unusual in the method of injury, in particular in relation to the isolated relatively minor injury sustained.

  14. A platyrrhine talus from the early Miocene of Peru (Amazonian Madre de Dios Sub-Andean Zone).

    Marivaux, Laurent; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Tejada, Julia; Billet, Guillaume; Louterbach, Mélanie; Vink, Jochem; Bailleul, Julien; Roddaz, Martin; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier

    2012-11-01

    The earliest platyrrhines have been documented from the late Oligocene of Bolivia (Salla) and from the early and early middle Miocene of middle and high latitudes (central Chile and Argentinean Patagonia). Recent paleontological field expeditions in Peruvian Amazonia (Atalaya, Cusco; Upper Madre de Dios Basin) have led to the discovery of a new early Miocene locality termed MD-61 ('Pinturan' biochronological unit, ~18.75-16.5 Ma [millions of years ago]). Associated with the typical Pinturan dinomyid rodent Scleromys quadrangulatus, we found a well-preserved right talus of a small-bodied anthropoid primate (MUSM-2024). This new platyrrhine postcranial element displays a combination of talar features primarily found among the Cebidae, and more especially in the Cebinae. Its size approximates that of the talus of some living large marmosets or small tamarins (Cebidae, Callitrichinae). MUSM-2024 would thus document a tiny Saimiri-like cebine, with the body size of a large marmoset. Functionally, the features and proportions of MUSM-2024 indicate that this small primate was arboreal and primarily quadrupedal, agile, with frequent horizontal leaping and vertical clinging in its locomotor repertoire. This small talus is the first platyrrhine fossil to be found from Peru and the earliest primate fossil from northern South America. This new early Miocene taxon could be a stem cebid, thereby providing new evidence on the existence of some long-lived clades of modern platyrrhines. PMID:22974538

  15. Imaging of fractures of the lateral process of the talus, a frequently missed diagnosis

    Bonvin, Florent; Montet, Xavier; Copercini, Michele; Martinoli, Carlo; Bianchi, Stefano E-mail: stefano.bianchi@hcuge.ch

    2003-07-01

    Although if fractures of the lateral process of the talus (LPT) have been considered rare the widespread diffusion in snowboard practice has resulted in a dramatic increase in their frequency. If unrecognized they can result in secondary osteoarthritis of the ankle and/or talo-calcaneal joints and chronic pain and stiffness. Due to the complex anatomy of the region, these fractures are difficult to detect by standard radiographs. A high degree of suspicion is then necessary to diagnose them. Once suspected on the basis of physical examination and/or non concluding radiographs, computed tomography (CT) is the best modality to confirm the diagnosis and accurately appreciate the number of the fragments and their position which have therapeutic consequences (medical vs. surgical treatment). A better knowledge of these lesions seems necessary to the general radiologist to allow an early diagnosis in order to avoid chronic sequel. The purpose of this article is to report three additional cases of LPT fractures and discuss their pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

  16. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: a feasibility study

    Kerimaa, Pekka; Ojala, Risto; Markkanen, Paula; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oulu (Finland); Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Korhonen, Jussi [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Oulu (Finland); Hyvoenen, Pekka [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Oulu (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI guidance for percutaneous retrograde drilling in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (OCDT). Four patients, one juvenile and three adults, with one OCDT lesion each and persisting ankle pain after conservative treatment, were treated with MRI-guided retrograde drilling. All lesions were stable and located in the middle or posterior medial third of the talar dome. Pain relief and the ability to return to normal activities were assessed during clinical follow-up. MRI and plain film radiographs were used for imaging follow-up. Technical success was 100 % with no complications and with no damage to the overlying cartilage. All patients experienced some clinical benefit, although only one had complete resolution of pain and one had a relapse leading to surgical treatment. Changes in the pathological imaging findings were mostly very slight during the follow-up period. MRI guidance seems accurate, safe and technically feasible for retrograde drilling of OCDT. Larger series are needed to reliably assess its clinical value. (orig.)

  17. The emergency and delay management in total talus extrusion:Case report and review of literature after 24 months of follow up

    Luigi Piscitelli; Michele Bisaccia; Luigi Meccariello; Gabriele Falzarano; Antonio Medici; Daniele Maiettini; Alberto Rebonato; Giuseppe Rinonapoli; Auro Caraffa

    2016-01-01

    Total talus extrusion is a rare and severe injury. It is burdened by many complications as avascular necrosis and osteomyelitis even if a proper debridement of extruded talus is performed. Few case reports or case series were published, and because of the rarity of this event, there are no guidelines for treatment. We report the first case on an octoge-narian man providing a long-term follow-up performing contrast enhanced magnetic resonances. The authors report the case of an octogenarian man who fell from an olive tree reporting a total talus extrusion associated with the fracture of the medial malleolus. After an accurate debridement and washing of the wound, the talus was anatomically repositioned and the fracture was treated with an external fixator. The wound healed with difficulty after 12 months and the patient developed a chronic osteomyelitis of the talar dome and avascular necrosis of talar head. We followed the patient for 24 months per-forming contrast enhanced magnetic resonances and evaluating the development of the avascular necrosis. Even if we encountered these complications, the treatment allowed the patient to walk without pain, using a talus type shoe and one crutch. Although the literature suggests that an anatomic replacement of talus allows avoiding main compli-cations, we deem that the patient's age is an important biological feature to consider in the prognostic stratification. Moreover, primary talectomy and tibio-calcaneal fusion should be reserved as a salvage procedure. Talus replacement allows an overall good outcome for the patients, retaining height, and allowing a good quality of life.

  18. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus%距骨软骨损伤的治疗

    张波; 曲家富

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are rare.The factors leading to them include trauma,chronic fatigue,family history,and idiopathic necrosis.The patients present with ankle pain,swelling,bruise,limited mobility and limp at an early stage while joint stiffness and walking and moving pain at a late stage.Normal check is likely to overlook them,resulting in delayed diagnosis and treatment.If an osteochondral lesion of the talus is suspected with negative X-ray manifestations,further radionuclide bone scan or MRI is indicated for definite diagnosis.As there is no blood supply to the talar cartilage which is relatively too small,it is difficult to treat osteochondral lesions of the talus.Early mild lesions can be treated by conservative therapy.If conservative treatment fails or the lesions deteriorate,surgery is required.This paper reviews the research progress in the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus.%距骨软骨损伤是一种比较少见的损伤,导致其损伤的因素包括创伤或慢性劳损、家族史、特发性坏死等.患者早期表现为踝关节疼痛、肿胀、瘀斑、活动受限和跛行;晚期表现为关节僵硬、行走和活动时疼痛等.普通检查很容易因为漏诊而延误治疗;若X线阴性而高度怀疑距骨软骨损伤时,可进一步作核素骨扫描或MRI以明确诊断.由于距骨软骨缺乏血供和相对过少的关节软骨,距骨软骨损伤难以治疗.早期轻度的损伤可选择保守治疗,保守治疗无效或病变严重,需要手术治疗.本文主要就距骨软骨损伤治疗方面的研究进展作一综述.

  19. Arctic Submarine Slope Stability

    Winkelmann, D.; Geissler, W.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine landsliding represents aside submarine earthquakes major natural hazard to coastal and sea-floor infrastructure as well as to coastal communities due to their ability to generate large-scale tsunamis with their socio-economic consequences. The investigation of submarine landslides, their conditions and trigger mechanisms, recurrence rates and potential impact remains an important task for the evaluation of risks in coastal management and offshore industrial activities. In the light of a changing globe with warming oceans and rising sea-level accompanied by increasing human population along coasts and enhanced near- and offshore activities, slope stability issues gain more importance than ever before. The Arctic exhibits the most rapid and drastic changes and is predicted to change even faster. Aside rising air temperatures, enhanced inflow of less cooled Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean reduces sea-ice cover and warms the surroundings. Slope stability is challenged considering large areas of permafrost and hydrates. The Hinlopen/Yermak Megaslide (HYM) north of Svalbard is the first and so far only reported large-scale submarine landslide in the Arctic Ocean. The HYM exhibits the highest headwalls that have been found on siliciclastic margins. With more than 10.000 square kilometer areal extent and app. 2.400 cubic kilometer of involved sedimentary material, it is one of the largest exposed submarine slides worldwide. Geometry and age put this slide in a special position in discussing submarine slope stability on glaciated continental margins. The HYM occurred 30 ka ago, when the global sea-level dropped by app. 50 m within less than one millennium due to rapid onset of global glaciation. It probably caused a tsunami with circum-Arctic impact and wave heights exceeding 130 meters. The HYM affected the slope stability field in its neighbourhood by removal of support. Post-megaslide slope instability as expressed in creeping and smaller-scaled slides are

  20. ElevationSlope_SLOPE3p2M

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): ( and related SLOPE datasets. Created using ArcGIS "SLOPE" command to produce change in elevation over...

  1. ElevationSlope_SLOPE1p6M2010

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and related SLOPE datasets. Created using ArcGIS "SLOPE" command to produce...

  2. Functional anatomy of the calcaneum and talus in Cercopithecinae (Mammalia, Primates, Cercopithecidae

    Pina, M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the species of the order Primates exist a huge variety of forms and habitats. This heterogeneity has encouraged the evolution and development of a great number of locomotor adaptations to different environments. Thus, nowadays there are both arboreal and terrestrial groups within the order. The subfamily Cercopithecinae present taxa with both kinds of locomotor behaviours, although the most of them are adapted to a ground life-style. This group probably has an arboreal ancestor and its radiation is relatively recent. Consequently, species belonged to this group present mixed features or sometimes not too much derived ones. Likewise, it is important the fact that the evolutionary history and phylogeny of the group could influence in some characteristics. Both the calcaneum and the talus are two of the largest bones of the foot and are good for inferring the kind of locomotion. For this reason, it has been used these two tarsal bones to study the morphology of eight species of cercopithecines and then deduce functional implications of the kind of locomotion.

    Dentro del orden Primates existe una gran variedad de especies distribuidas a lo largo de hábitats muy diversos. Dicha heterogeneidad ha fomentado la evolución y desarrollo de un gran número de adaptaciones locomotoras a los diferentes ambientes en los que habitan. Así, existen en la actualidad tanto grupos arborícolas como terrestres. La subfamilia Cercopithecinae agrupa una serie de taxones que representan ambos comportamientos locomotores, aunque la mayoría de las especies están adaptadas a una vida en el suelo. Se supone que este grupo desciende de un ancestro arborícola y que su radiación es relativamente reciente. En consecuencia, las especies de este grupo presentan características mixtas o poco derivadas en algunas ocasiones. Asimismo, es importante tener en cuenta la influencia que la herencia filogenética puede tener sobre alguno de estos rasgos. El calc

  3. Comments on the slope function

    Kim, Minkyoo

    2016-01-01

    The exact slope function was first proposed in $SL(2)$ sector and generalized to $SU(2)$ sector later. In this note, we consider the slope function in $SU(1|1)$ sector of ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM. We derive the quantity through the method invented by N. Gromov and discuss about its validity. Further, we give comments on the slope function in deformed SYM.

  4. ElevationSlope_SLOPE1p6M

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m; Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m; Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related SLOPE...

  5. The use of fibrin matrix-mixed gel-type autologous chondrocyte implantation in the treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus

    Lee, Kyung Tai; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Lee, Young Koo; Park, Young Uk; Kim, Yong Hoon; Cho, Hun ki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the clinical results and second-look arthroscopy after fibrin matrix-mixed gel-type autologous chondrocyte implantation to treat osteochondral lesions of the talus. Methods Chondrocytes were harvested from the cuboid surface of the calcaneus in 38 patients and cultured, and gel-type autologous chondrocyte implantation was performed with or without medial malleolar osteotomy. Preoperative American orthopedic foot and ankle society ankle-hind foot scores, visual anal...

  6. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi2 (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives

  7. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  8. Three-Dimensional Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocytes Implantation for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus: Midterm Results

    B. Magnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We evaluate the midterm results of thirty patients who underwent autologous chondrocytes implantation for talus osteochondral lesions treatment. Materials and Methods. From 2002 to 2009, 30 ankles with a mean lesion size of 2,36 cm2 were treated. We evaluated patients using American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery and Coughlin score, Van Dijk scale, recovering time, and Musculoskeletal Outcomes Data Evaluation and Management System. Results. The mean AOFAS score varied from 36.9 to 83.9 at follow-up. Average of Van Dijk scale was 141.1. Coughlin score was excellent/good in 24 patients. MOCART score varied from 6.3 to 3.8. Discussion. This matrix is easy to handle conformable to the lesion and apply by arthroscopy. No correlation between MRI imaging and clinical results is found. Conclusions. Our results, compared with those reported in literature with other surgical procedures, show no superiority evidence for our technique compared to the others regarding the size of the lesions.

  9. Human talus bones from the Middle Pleistocene site of Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain).

    Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Lorenzo, Carlos; Gracia, Ana; Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2013-07-01

    Here we present and describe comparatively 25 talus bones from the Middle Pleistocene site of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain). These tali belong to 14 individuals (11 adult and three immature). Although variation among Middle and Late Pleistocene tali tends to be subtle, this study has identified unique morphological characteristics of the SH tali. They are vertically shorter than those of Late Pleistocene Homo sapiens, and show a shorter head and a broader lateral malleolar facet than all of the samples. Moreover, a few shared characters with Neanderthals are consistent with the hypothesis that the SH population and Neanderthals are sister groups. These shared characters are a broad lateral malleolar facet, a trochlear height intermediate between modern humans and Late Pleistocene H. sapiens, and a short middle calcaneal facet. It has been possible to propose sex assignment for the SH tali based on their size. Stature estimates based on these fossils give a mean stature of 174.4 cm for males and 161.9 cm for females, similar to that obtained based on the long bones from this same site. PMID:23706407

  10. Slope stability hazard management systems

    2007-01-01

    Weather-related geo-hazards are a major concern for both natural slopes and man-made slopes and embankments.Government agencies and private companies are increasingly required to ensure that there is adequate protection of sloping surfaces in order that interaction with the climate does not produce instability. Superior theoretical formulations and computer tools are now available to address engineering design issues related to the near ground surface soil-atmospheric interactions. An example is given in this paper that illustrates the consequences of not paying adequate attention to the hazards of slope stability prior to the construction of a highway in South America. On the other hand, examples are given from Hong Kong and Mainland China where significant benefits are derived from putting in place a hazard slope stability management system. Some results from a hazard management slope stability study related to the railway system in Canada are also reported. The study took advantage of recent research on unsaturated soil behaviour and applied this information to real-time modelling of climatic conditions. The quantification of the water balance at the ground surface, and subsequent infiltration, is used as the primary tool for hazard level assessment. The suggested hazard model can be applied at either specific high risk locations or in a more general, broad-based manner over large areas. A more thorough understanding of unsaturated soil behaviour as it applies to near ground surface soils,along with the numerical computational power of the computer has made it possible for new approaches to be used in slope hazard management engineering.

  11. ElevationSlope_SLOPE0p7M

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Windham County 2015 0.7m; Eastern VT 2014 0.7m; Rutland/GI Counties 2013 0.7m and related SLOPE datasets....

  12. Geologic context of recurring slope lineae in Melas and Coprates Chasmata, Mars

    Chojnacki, Matthew; McEwen, Alfred; Dundas, Colin M.; Ojha, Lujendra; Urso, Anna; Sutton, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    One of the major Mars discoveries of recent years is the existence of recurring slope lineae (RSL), which suggests that liquid water occurs on or near the surface of Mars today. These dark and narrow features emerge from steep, rocky exposures and incrementally grow, fade, and reform on a seasonal basis and are detected in images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. RSL are known to occur at scattered midlatitude and equatorial sites with little spatial connection to one another. One major exception is the steep, low-albedo slopes of Melas and Coprates Chasmata, in Valles Marineris where RSL are detected among diverse geologic surfaces (e.g., bedrock and talus) and landforms (e.g., inselbergs and landslides). New images show topographic changes including sediment deposition on active RSL slopes. Midwall locations in Coprates and Melas appear to have more areally extensively abundant RSL and related fans as compared with other RSL sites found on Mars. Water budget estimates for regional RSL are on the order of 105 to 106 m3 of fluid, for depths of 10 to 100mm, and suggest that a significant amount of near-surface watermight be present. Many RSL are concentrated near local topographic highs, such as ridge crests or peaks, which is challenging to explain via groundwater or ice without a recharge mechanism. Collectively, results provide additional support for the notion that significant amounts of near-surface water can be found on Mars today and suggest that a widespread mechanism, possibly related to the atmosphere, is recharging RSL sources.

  13. Exploring Slope with Stairs & Steps

    Smith, Toni M.; Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan; Peixoto, Nathalia; Suh, Jennifer M.; Bagshaw, Graham; Collins, Laurena K.

    2013-01-01

    As much as ever before, mathematics teachers are searching for ways to connect mathematics to real-life scenarios within STEM contexts. As students develop skill in proportional reasoning, they examine graphical representations of linear functions, learn to associate "slope" with "steepness" and rate of change, and develop…

  14. Slope Estimation from ICESat/GLAS

    Craig Mahoney; Natascha Kljun; Sietse O. Los; Laura Chasmer; Jorg M. Hacker; Christopher Hopkinson; North, Peter R.J.; Jacqueline A. B. Rosette; Eva van Gorsel

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel technique to infer ground slope angle from waveform LiDAR, known as the independent slope method (ISM). The technique is applied to large footprint waveforms (\\(\\sim\\) mean diameter) from the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) to produce a slope dataset of near-global coverage at \\(0.5^{\\circ} \\times 0.5^{\\circ}\\) resolution. ISM slope estimates are compared against high resolution airborne LiDAR slope measurements for ...

  15. Is rock slope instability in high-mountain systems driven by topo-climatic, paraglacial or rock mechanical factors? - A question of scale!

    Messenzehl, Karoline; Dikau, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Due to the emergent and (often non-linear) complex nature of mountain systems the key small-scale system properties responsible for rock slope instability contrast to those being dominant at larger spatial scales. This geomorphic system behaviour has major epistemological consequences for the study of rockfalls and associated form-process-relationships. As each scale requires its own scientific explanation, we cannot simply upscale bedrock-scale findings and, in turn, we cannot downscale the valley-scale knowledge to smaller phenomena. Here, we present a multi-scale study from the Turtmann Valley (Swiss Alps), that addresses rock slope properties at three different geomorphic levels: (i) regional valley scale, (ii) the hillslope scale and (iii) the bedrock scale. Using this hierarchical approach, we aim to understand the key properties of high-mountain systems responsible for rockfall initiation with respect to the resulting form-process-relationship at each scale. (i) At the valley scale (110 km2) rock slope instability was evaluated using a GIS-based modelling approach. Topo-climatic parameters, i.e. the permafrost distribution and the time since deglaciation after LGM were found to be the key variables causative for the regional-scale bedrock erosion and the storage of 62.3 - 65.3 x 106 m3 rockfall sediments in the hanging valleys (Messenzehl et al. 2015). (ii) At the hillslope scale (0.03 km2) geotechnical scanline surveys of 16 rock slopes and one-year rock temperature data of 25 ibuttons reveal that the local rockfall activity and the resulting deposition of individual talus slope landforms is mainly controlled by the specific rock mass strength with respect to the slope aspect, than being a paraglacial reaction. Permafrost might be only of secondary importance for the present-day rock mechanical state as geophysical surveys disprove the existence of frozen bedrock below 2600 m asl. (Messenzehl & Draebing 2015). (iii) At the bedrock scale (0.01 mm - 10 m) the

  16. THE EQUIVALENT SLOPE - A NEW METHOD FOR CALCULATING SOIL LOSS FROM IRREGULAR SLOPES

    Xiaoguang ZHAO; Hui SHI; Ming'an SHAO

    2004-01-01

    The slopes in field conditions are always irregular, but the supposed uniform slopes are used in most erosion models. Some studies used several uniform slopes to approximate an irregular slope for estimating soil erosion. This approximation is both time-consuming and weak in physical insights. In this paper, the concept of equivalent slope is presented based on that runoff potential on uniform slope is equal to that of irregular slope, and the equivalent uniform slope is used to estimate soil erosion instead of the irregular slopes. The estimated results of slope-length factors for convex and concave slopes are consistent with those from the method of Foster and Wischmeier.The experiments in the southern part of the Loess Plateau in China confirmed the applicability of the present method. The method is simple and has, to some extent, clear physical meanings, and is applicable for estimating soil erosion from irregular slopes.

  17. In-Place Randomized Slope Selection

    Blunck, Henrik; Vahrenhold, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Slope selection, i.e. selecting the slope with rank k among all 􀀀n 2lines induced by a collection P of points, results in a widely used robust estimator for linefitting. In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform slope selection in expected O(n·log2 n) time using only c...

  18. Mycorrhizal aspects in slope stabilisation

    Graf, Frank

    2016-04-01

    In order to re-colonise and stabilise slopes affected by superficial soil failure with plants essential requirements have to be met: the plants must grow the plants must survive sustainably plant succession must start and continuously develop These requirements, however, are anything but easy given, particularly under the often hostile environmental conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. Mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, are said to improve the plants' ability to overcome periods governed by strongly (growth) limiting factors. Subsequently, results of investigations are presented of mycorrhizal effects on different plant and soil functions related to eco-engineering in general and soil and slope stabilisation in particular. Generally, inoculation yielded higher biomass of the host plants above as well as below ground. Furthermore, the survival rate was higher for mycorrhized compared to non-mycorrhized plants, particularly under extreme environmental conditions. However, the scale of the mycorrhizal impact may be species specific of both the plant host as well as the fungal partner(s) and often becomes evident only after a certain time lag. Depending on the plant-fungus combination the root length per soil volume was found to be between 0 and 2.5 times higher for inoculated compared to non-inoculated specimens. On an alpine graded ski slope the survival of inoculated compared to non-treated Salix herbacea cuttings was significant after one vegetation period only for one of the three added mycorrhizal fungus species. However, after three years all of the inoculated plantlets performed significantly better than the non-inoculated controls. The analysis of the potential for producing and stabilising soil aggregates of five different ectomycorrhizal fungi showed high variation and, for the species Inocybe lacera, no significant difference compared to untreated soil. Furthermore, inoculation of Salix

  19. Treatment of ankle fracture and biomechanics of talus%踝部骨折治疗效果与距骨生物力学的关系

    梁庆威; 范广宇; 吕刚

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The anatomical structure of ankle joint is not complicated, but its biomechanics is very important. The talus has participated in consisting of three joints and played very important role in supporting the functions of ankle. Therefore, it is very important to stabilize the position of talus in order to restore the anatomical structure of ankle.OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between treatment of ankle fracture and the biomechanics of the talus.DESIGN: A non-randomized case controlled study was conducted.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: There were 95 patients with fracture of ankle joints during January 1985 to October 2000 from the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. Three specimens of amputating legs due to malignant tumor were collected.INTERVENTIONS: The biomechanics of talus in ankle fracture was observed by amputated leg specimens and the clinical manifestation and Xray examinations were analyzed in the 95 fracture patients after treatment.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Forces acting on different fracture types,relationship between therapeutic effects and biomechanics of talus.RESULTS: Sixty-five cases were followed up. There were 41 cases with very good therapeutic effects, 12 cases with good effects, 7 cases with fair effects and 5 cases with poor effects. Biomechanics results: the neck was compressed 0.48 cm when both ankles were broken. The lateral malleolar facet got more pressure than medial malleolar facet when vertical pressure acted in external facet fracture. When fracture happened in the lower 1/3 of fibula, the pressure acted on lateral malleolar facet was less than that on medial malleolar facet when in inversion position.CONCLUSION: It should pay more attention to the anatomical relations of talus in ankle cavity and the gap of lower tibiofibular joint no matter external fixation or internal fixation of manual reposition to ankle fracture was used. It is a very important treatment standard to restore the biomechanical

  20. The Influence of Shales on Slope Instability

    Stead, Doug

    2016-02-01

    Shales play a major role in the stability of slopes, both natural and engineered. This paper attempts to provide a review of the state-of-the-art in shale slope stability. The complexities of shale terminology and classification are first reviewed followed by a brief discussion of the important physical and mechanical properties of relevance to shale slope stability. The varied mechanisms of shale slope stability are outlined and their importance highlighted by reference to international shale slope failures. Stability analysis and modelling of anisotropic rock slope masses are briefly discussed and the potential role of brittle rock fracture and damage highlighted. A short review of shale slopes in open pits is presented.

  1. Enucleación medial de astrágalo abierta: Evolución a medio plazo Medial dislocation of the talus: Medium term evolution

    S. García Mata

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de 57 años con enucleación abierta medial del astrágalo izquierdo, con fractura suprasindesmal de peroné, por traumatismo indirecto. Se realizó lavado, limpieza del astrágalo y partes blandas, Friedrich, reducción, fijación con agujas de kirschner, sutura del ligamento deltoideo y osteosíntesis del peroné. No hubo infección superficial ni profunda postoperatoria. Permaneció seis semanas de inmovilización y tres meses en descarga. Dos años después no había signos radiológicos de necrosis avascular. En gammagrafía ósea realizada a los 18 meses de la lesión se observaba necrosis avascular parcial astragalina. Tres años después de la lesión realizaba vida normal, sin dolor en reposo pero sí a la marcha y movilidad con limitación de la dorsiflexión (-20º. Cinco años y medio después de la lesión presentaba hundimiento de cúpula astragalina por la necrosis avascular con sintomatología dolorosa a la marcha y diástasis tibio-peronea distal, que requirió realizar artrodesis tibio-astragalina.Fifty-seven year old patient with open medial dislocation of the left talus, with suprasyndesmotic fracture of the fibula, due to indirect traumatism. The following were carried out: washing, cleaning the talus and the soft parts, Friedrich, reduction, fixing with Kirschner needles, suture of the deltoid ligament, and osteosynthesis of the fibula. There were neither surface nor deep post-operational infections. The patient underwent six weeks of immobilisation and spent three months on discharge. Two years later there were no radiological signs of avascular necrosis. In the osseous gammagraphy carried out 18 months after the lesion, partial avascular necrosis of the talus was observed. Three years after the lesion, the patient was able to carry out a normal life, without pain in repose but with pain whilst moving, and mobility with limitation of dorsoinflection (-20º. Five and a half years after the lesion, the patient

  2. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage of the ankle joint: Results after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC)-aided reconstruction of osteochondral lesions of the talus

    Aim: To assess cartilage quality using delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus using autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC). Materials and methods: A three-dimensional (3D) spoiled gradient-echo (SGE) sequence at 3 T was used to obtain quantitative T1 relaxation times before and after Gd-DTPA2 (Magnevist, 0.2 mM/kg bod weight) administration to assess 23 cases of AMIC-aided repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus. Delta relaxation rates (ΔR1) for reference cartilage (RC) and repair tissue (RT), and the relative delta relaxation rate (rΔR1) were calculated. The morphological appearance of the cartilage RT was graded on sagittal dual-echo steady-state (DESS) views according to the “magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue” (MOCART) protocol. The study was approved by the institutional review board and written consent from each patient was obtained. Results: The AMIC cases had a mean T1 relaxation time of 1.194 s (SD 0.207 s) in RC and 1.470 s (SD 0.384 s) in RT before contrast medium administration. The contrast-enhanced T1 relaxation time decreased to 0.480 s (SD 0.114 s) in RC and 0.411 s (SD 0.096 s) in RT. There was a significant difference (p > 0.05) between the ΔR1 in RC (1.372 × 10−3/s, range 0.526–3.201 × 10−3/s, SD 0.666 × 10−3/s) and RT (1.856 × 10−3/s, range 0.93–3.336 × 10−3/s, SD 0.609 × 10−3/s). The mean rΔR1 was 1.49, SD 0.45). The mean MOCART score at follow-up was 62.6 points (range 30–95, SD 15.3). Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that repair cartilage resulting from AMIC-aided repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus has a significantly lower glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content than normal hyaline cartilage, but can be regarded as having hyaline-like properties

  3. Preliminary results of short term continuous monitoring of an unstable permafrost affected rock slope using a portable, real aperture radar interferometer (GPRI).

    Kos, Andrew; Amann, Florian; Strozzi, Tazio; Button, Edward; Rothard, Gerd

    2010-05-01

    A portable real aperture radar interferometer was used to continuously monitor a large unstable rock slope located in the Glarner Alps of Switzerland over a 26 hour period. With an elevation ranging between 2500 and 2800 m.a.s.l., and a north facing aspect, the slope is influenced by permafrost processes. Radar images revealed a larger than previously known area of instability, characterized by several discrete zones of movement. Maximum average displacements were on the order of approx. 0.5mm per hour. The unstable area was delineated by structural features, one of which included open (ice-filled) fractures. A strong radar signature for toppling was observed after 6 hours corresponding to a large rock column leaning approximately 10 degrees towards the radar's line of sight at the top of slope, however, further interpretation of failure mechanisms from the observed displacement field is complicated without additional data due to the heterogeneous nature of the rock mass characteristics and distribution of discrete talus deposits.

  4. Precision of SPECT/CT allows the diagnosis of a hidden Brodie's abscess of the talus in a patient with sickle cell disease

    Brodie's abscess is a rare subacute osteomyelitis that can be found in sickle cell disease along with other bone complications. A 21-year-old female with sickle cell disease was presenting frequently to the medical casualty department for painful vasoocclusive crises and for persistent ankle pain and swelling. Hybrid imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) incidentally revealed Brodie's abscess in the talus bone of the ankle, causing persisting long-standing pain. SPECT-CT is a modern technology used to scan bone to detect both anatomical and functional abnormalities with high specificity. Brodie's abscess is a rare bone inflammation that could be a hidden cause of pain and infection in sickle cell disease. Although rare, this lesion requires more attention in patients with sickle cell disease because their immunocompromised status renders them prone to this infection

  5. Precision of SPECT/CT allows the diagnosis of a hidden Brodie's abscess of the talus in a patient with sickle cell disease

    Al jafar, Hassan [Dept. of Hematology, Amiri Hospital, Kuwait (Kuwait); Al Shemmeri, Eman [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Farwaniya Hospital, Al-Farwania (Kuwait); Al Shemmeri, Jehan; Al Enizi, Saud [Faculty of Medicine, Nuclear Medicine Dept, Kuwait University, Kuwait (Kuwait); Aytglu, Leena [Molecular Imaging Center, Jaber Al-Ahmad Center, Kuwait (Kuwait); Afzai, Uzma [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Farwaniya Hospital, Al-Farwania (Kuwait)

    2015-06-15

    Brodie's abscess is a rare subacute osteomyelitis that can be found in sickle cell disease along with other bone complications. A 21-year-old female with sickle cell disease was presenting frequently to the medical casualty department for painful vasoocclusive crises and for persistent ankle pain and swelling. Hybrid imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) incidentally revealed Brodie's abscess in the talus bone of the ankle, causing persisting long-standing pain. SPECT-CT is a modern technology used to scan bone to detect both anatomical and functional abnormalities with high specificity. Brodie's abscess is a rare bone inflammation that could be a hidden cause of pain and infection in sickle cell disease. Although rare, this lesion requires more attention in patients with sickle cell disease because their immunocompromised status renders them prone to this infection.

  6. Dip-slope and Dip-slope Failures in Taiwan - a Review

    Lee, C.

    2011-12-01

    Taiwan is famous for dip-slope and dip-slope slides. Dip-slopes exist at many places in the fold-and-thrust belt of Taiwan. Under active cutting of stream channels and man-made excavations, a dip-slope may become unstable and susceptible for mass sliding. Daylight of a bedding parallel clay seam is the most dangerous type for dip-slope sliding. Buckling or shear-off features may also happen at toe of a long dip-slope. Besides, a dip-slope is also dangerous for shallow debris slides, if the slope angle is between 25 to 45 degrees and the debris (colluvium or slope wash) is thick (>1m). These unstable slopes may slide during a triggering event, earthquake or typhoon storm; or even slide without a triggering event, like the 2010 Tapu case. Initial buckling feature had been found in the dip-slope of the Feitsui arch dam abutment after detailed explorations. Shear-off feature have also been found in dip-slope located in right bank of the Nahua reservoir after field investigation and drilling. The Chiufengerhshan slide may also be shear-off type. On the other hand, the Tapu, the Tsaoling slides and others are of direct slide type. The Neihoo Bishan slide is a shallow debris slide on dip-slope. All these cases demonstrate the four different types of dip-slope slide. The hazard of a dip-slope should be investigated to cover these possible types of failure. The existence of bedding parallel clay seams is critical for the stability of a dip-slope, either for direct slide or buckling or shear-off type of failure, and is a hot point during investigation. Because, the stability of a dip-slope is changing with time, therefore, detailed explorations to including weathering and erosion rates are also very necessary to ensure the long-term stability of a dip-slope.

  7. Mathematical Model of the Identical Slope Surface

    2002-01-01

    The formation of the identical slope surface and the method of construction are discussed. Onthe basement of building the parameter equation of variable-radius circle family envelope, the frequentlyused parameter equation of the identical slope surface of the top of taper moving along column helix,horizental arc and line is built. The equation can be used to construct the identical slope surface's con-tours, gradient lines and three dimensional figures correctly.

  8. INFLUENCES OF SLOPE GRADIENT ON SOIL EROSION

    刘青泉; 陈力; 李家春

    2001-01-01

    The main factors influencing soil erosion include the net rain excess, the water depth, the velocity, the shear stress of overland flows , and the erosion-resisting capacity of soil. The laws of these factors varying with the slope gradient were investigated by using the kinematic wave theory. Furthermore, the critical slope gradient of erosion was driven. The analysis shows that the critical slope gradient of soil erosion is dependent on grain size , soil bulk density , surface roughness, runoff length, net rain excess, and the friction coefficient of soil, etc. The critical slope gradient has been estimated theoretically with its range between 41. 5 °~ 50°.

  9. Slope Estimation from ICESat/GLAS

    Craig Mahoney

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel technique to infer ground slope angle from waveform LiDAR, known as the independent slope method (ISM. The technique is applied to large footprint waveforms (\\(\\sim\\ mean diameter from the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS to produce a slope dataset of near-global coverage at \\(0.5^{\\circ} \\times 0.5^{\\circ}\\ resolution. ISM slope estimates are compared against high resolution airborne LiDAR slope measurements for nine sites across three continents. ISM slope estimates compare better with the aircraft data (R\\(^{2}=0.87\\ and RMSE\\(=5.16^{\\circ}\\ than the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model (SRTM DEM inferred slopes (R\\(^{2}=0.71\\ and RMSE\\(=8.69^{\\circ}\\ ISM slope estimates are concurrent with GLAS waveforms and can be used to correct biophysical parameters, such as tree height and biomass. They can also be fused with other DEMs, such as SRTM, to improve slope estimates.

  10. Slope of the Slope Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope of slope was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell by applying the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst 'Slope' Tool to a previously created slope...

  11. Internal waves and temperature fronts on slopes

    S. A. Thorpe

    Full Text Available Time series measurements from an array of temperature miniloggers in a line at constant depth along the sloping boundary of a lake are used to describe the `internal surf zone' where internal waves interact with the sloping boundary. More small positive temperature time derivatives are recorded than negative, but there are more large negative values than positive, giving the overall distribution of temperature time derivatives a small negative skewness. This is consistent with the internal wave dynamics; fronts form during the up-slope phase of the motion, bringing cold water up the slope, and the return flow may become unstable, leading to small advecting billows and weak warm fronts. The data are analysed to detect `events', periods in which the temperature derivatives exceed a set threshold. The speed and distance travelled by `events' are described. The motion along the slope may be a consequence of (a instabilities advected by the flow (b internal waves propagating along-slope or (c internal waves approaching the slope from oblique directions. The propagation of several of the observed 'events' can only be explained by (c, evidence that the internal surf zone has some, but possibly not all, the characteristics of the conventional 'surface wave' surf zone, with waves steepening as they approach the slope at oblique angles.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (benthic boundary layers; limnology, Oceanography: physical (internal and inertial waves

  12. Stability Analysing of Unsaturated Soil Slope

    张士林; 邵龙潭

    2003-01-01

    The stability of unsaturated soil slope has been the hot point recently. Especially, the seeping rainfall makes losing stability of unsaturated soil slope, and causes enormous loss to the producation and safety of other people. The seeping rainfall makes volumetric water content of unsaturated soil slope changing, and the volumetric water content has directly relationship with matric suction. And matric suction also has directly relationship with the stability of unsaturated soil slope. So the change of matric suction influence the stability changing, that is, safety coefficient has decided relationship with volumetric water content. The profile of dangerous volumetric water content curves of unsaturated soil slope has been obtained. If a volumetric water content curve of some unsaturated soil slope belongs to one of these dongerous curves, the unsaturated soil slope could be in danger. So this is called DVWCCP(dangerous volumetric water content curves profile). By monitoring the volumetric water content curves can obtain the stability information of some soil slope to serve producing and safety.

  13. Lattice calculus of the morphological slope transform

    Heijmans, H.J.A.M.; Maragos, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the morphological slope transform in the complete lattice framework. It discusses in detail the interrelationships between the slope transform at one hand and the (Young-Fenchel) conjugate and Legendre transform, two well-known concepts from convex analysis, at the oth

  14. Rock slopes and reservoirs - lessons learned

    Lessons learned about slope stability in the course of four decades of monitoring, and in some cases stabilizing, slopes along British Columbia's hydroelectric reservoirs are discussed. The lessons are illustrated by short case histories of some of the more important slopes such as Little Chief Slide, Dutchman's Ridge, Downie Slide, Checkerboard Creek and Wahleach. Information derived from the monitoring and other investigations are compared with early interpretations of geology and slope performance. The comparison serves as an indicator of progress in slope stability determination and as a measure of the value of accumulated experience in terms of the potential consequences to safety and cost savings over the long life-span of hydroelectric projects.14 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs

  15. Slope-scale dynamic states of rockfalls

    Agliardi, F.; Crosta, G. B.

    2009-04-01

    Rockfalls are common earth surface phenomena characterised by complex dynamics at the slope scale, depending on local block kinematics and slope geometry. We investigated the nature of this slope-scale dynamics by parametric 3D numerical modelling of rockfalls over synthetic slopes with different inclination, roughness and spatial resolution. Simulations were performed through an original code specifically designed for rockfall modeling, incorporating kinematic and hybrid algorithms with different damping functions available to model local energy loss by impact and pure rolling. Modelling results in terms of average velocity profiles suggest that three dynamic regimes (i.e. decelerating, steady-state and accelerating), previously recognized in the literature through laboratory experiments on granular flows, can set up at the slope scale depending on slope average inclination and roughness. Sharp changes in rock fall kinematics, including motion type and lateral dispersion of trajectories, are associated to the transition among different regimes. Associated threshold conditions, portrayed in "phase diagrams" as slope-roughness critical lines, were analysed depending on block size, impact/rebound angles, velocity and energy, and model spatial resolution. Motion in regime B (i.e. steady state) is governed by a slope-scale "viscous friction" with average velocity linearly related to the sine of slope inclination. This suggest an analogy between rockfall motion in regime B and newtonian flow, whereas in regime C (i.e. accelerating) an analogy with a dilatant flow was observed. Thus, although local behavior of single falling blocks is well described by rigid body dynamics, the slope scale dynamics of rockfalls seem to statistically approach that of granular media. Possible outcomes of these findings include a discussion of the transition from rockfall to granular flow, the evaluation of the reliability of predictive models, and the implementation of criteria for a

  16. Factors affecting seismic response of submarine slopes

    G. Biscontin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of submerged slopes on the continental shelf to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and 'local' tsunami hazards worldwide. The geological profile of these slopes typically includes normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated soft cohesive soils with layer thickness ranging from a few meters to hundreds of meters. The factor of safety obtained from pseudo-static analyses is not always a useful measure for evaluating the slope response, since values less than one do not necessarily imply slope failure with large movements of the soil mass. This paper addresses the relative importance of different factors affecting the response of submerged slopes during seismic loading. The analyses use a dynamic finite element code which includes a constitutive law describing the anisotropic stress-strain-strength behavior of normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated clays. The model also incorporates anisotropic hardening to describe the effect of different shear strain and stress histories as well as bounding surface principles to provide realistic descriptions of the accumulation of the plastic strains and excess pore pressure during successive loading cycles. The paper presents results from parametric site response analyses on slope geometry and layering, soil material parameters, and input ground motion characteristics. The predicted maximum shear strains, permanent deformations, displacement time histories and maximum excess pore pressure development provide insight of slope performance during a seismic event.

  17. Reinforcement of sloping banks in open cast mines: analysis of stability and dimensions from block models. Final report; Renforcement des talus de mines a ciel ouvert: analyse de stabilite et dimensionnement par models de blocs. Rapport final

    Paquette, Y. [INERIS, Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Resoblok software is a powerful computing tool which allows simulation of fracturing in rock formations from actual or statistically defined data. Combined with a method of analysis of the stability of isolated blocks, it becomes a means of predicting risks of instability and enables the calculation of a suitable bolt-propping system to remedy the problem. In general the choice of a bolt-propping plan is made by analysing various possible alternatives. The criterion used is the minimisation of the numbers and size of unstable blocks, but economic considerations and complementary technical solutions (grillage and concreting) are also taken into account. The relatively simple calculation method used speeds up the analysis of stability, and permits the study of various method of bolting for various types of fracturing geometries. Application to actual situations should be carried out progressively, comparing the model results with observations and measurements in situ, as well as continuously improving knowledge of the fracturing, the mechanical characteristics and the hypotheses of the calculation.

  18. ElevationOther_SLOPE10M

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Used ElevationDEM_DEM10M and the Arc/Info SLOPE command with the "PERCENT_RISE" and ".3048" Z_unit options to create this data layer. Input source dataset is...

  19. North Slope, Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for diving birds, gulls and terns, seabirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl for the North Slope of Alaska....

  20. North Slope, Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for waterfowl, seabirds, gulls and terns for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set...

  1. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type....

  2. North Slope, Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for benthic marine habitats for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  3. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  4. The sloping land conversion program in China

    Liu, Zhen; Lan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Through addressing the motivations behind rural households’ livelihood diversification, this paper examines the effect of the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) on livelihood diversification using a longitudinal household survey data set spanning the overall implementation of the SLCP. Our...

  5. Quadratic integer programming and the slope conjecture

    Garoufalidis, Stavros; van der Veen, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The Slope Conjecture relates a quantum knot invariant, (the degree of the colored Jones polynomial of a knot) with a classical one (boundary slopes of incompressible surfaces in the knot complement). The degree of the colored Jones polynomial can be computed by a suitable (almost tight) state sum and the solution of a corresponding quadratic integer programming problem. We illustrate this principle for a 2-parameter family of 2-fusion knots. Combined with the results of Dunfield and the first...

  6. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    Einstein, H.H.; Sousa, R.L.; Karam, K.; Manzella, Irène; Kveldsvik, V.

    2010-01-01

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical and mechanical models for which recent developments are presented. This leads with appropriate consideration of uncertainties to risk determination and to the description of tools for risk management through active and passive countermeasures, including warning systems. ...

  7. Numerical Computation of Homogeneous Slope Stability

    Shuangshuang Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To simplify the computational process of homogeneous slope stability, improve computational accuracy, and find multiple potential slip surfaces of a complex geometric slope, this study utilized the limit equilibrium method to derive expression equations of overall and partial factors of safety. This study transformed the solution of the minimum factor of safety (FOS to solving of a constrained nonlinear programming problem and applied an exhaustive method (EM and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO to this problem. In simple slope examples, the computational results using an EM and PSO were close to those obtained using other methods. Compared to the EM, the PSO had a small computation error and a significantly shorter computation time. As a result, the PSO could precisely calculate the slope FOS with high efficiency. The example of the multistage slope analysis indicated that this slope had two potential slip surfaces. The factors of safety were 1.1182 and 1.1560, respectively. The differences between these and the minimum FOS (1.0759 were small, but the positions of the slip surfaces were completely different than the critical slip surface (CSS.

  8. Seasonal slope surface deformation measured with TLS

    Fan, L.; Smethurst, J.; Powrie, W.; Sellaiya, A.

    2014-03-01

    In temperate European climates, soil water removal due to vegetation transpiration peaks in summer and soil rewetting from higher levels of precipitation occurs in winter. In clays of high plasticity, the seasonal cycles of drying and wetting cause the soil to experience a volumetric change, resulting in seasonal shrinking and swelling. For a clay slope exhibiting volume change, such behaviour can lead to excessive deformation and could contribute to strain-softening and progressive slope failure. This can in turn cause traffic disruption and loss of life if roads and railways are founded on or surrounded by such slopes. This paper discusses the driving forces of seasonal surface movement, in particular the role of vegetation, and presents the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to measure the surface movement of a lightly vegetated London Clay slope near Newbury, UK. Two TLS scans were carried out in early and late summer respectively, representing relative wet and dry conditions of the slope. Continuous field measurements of soil water content in upper layers of the slope were obtained from TDR ThetaProbes already installed at the site. The water content data are used to support the results obtained from TLS by indicating the likely volumetric change in the soil due to loss of water.

  9. Electrokinetic Geotextile Stabilization Of Embankment Slopes

    Mumtaz M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The choice of repair of slope depends on site conditions and cost. This includes reducing the slope, installing horizontal drains, soil nailing and providing stability by structural methods. All these methods have their limitations and some are very costly. Another alternative is the electrokinetic stabilization of slopes. EKG reinforcement or soil nails not only provide reinforcement, but also increase the shear strength of the soil in which they are placed as well as improving soil-reinforcement bond. The development of EKG materials offers slope stabilisation of embankments and cuttings in fine grained soils, which will significantly increase the factor of safety , address pore pressure changes and also avoids importing earthwork materials or aggregates. By inserting a grid of anodes and a cathode into the ground and applying an electrical potential difference across the slope drives water away, via the cathodes and creates physical changes in the embankment, promoting consolidation of the slope materials. Anodes and cathodes were connected to a DC power circuit and electrified for a calculated period based on water content, strength and electrode spacing. The conductive geotextile used was coir geotextile and it was woven with steel filament in weft direction only. The steel filament made the geotextile conductive. The geotextile used was natural geotextile and it is required after the end of construction of embankment only, till the completion of dissipation of pore pressure.

  10. Value of magnetic resonance imaging in the mid-term follow-up of osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle and talus

    Purpose: Definition of the prognostic value of clinical and morphological findings in the mid-term follow-up of OCD of the femoral condyle and talus. Demonstration of the consolidation of OCD on MRI depending on different therapies. Materials and Methods: 76 patients were examined before and at an average of 30 months after conservative or surgical therapy using T1 and T2 weighted SE and 3D-FISP sequences and contrast enhanced studies. Six clinical (age, gender, site, duration and severity of symptoms, therapy) and six morphological (size, signal intensity, fragmentation, contrast enhancement, condition of cartilage, staging) data were registered on first MRI and correlated with the degree of consolidation of OCD (partial and complete remission, no change and progression) on control MRI. Results: Patients under 17 years showed partial or complete remissions in 73%, those of 17 years or older in 33%. Conservatively treated patients had a higher remission rate (54%) than those treated with different surgical techniques (drilling 50%, refixation 43%, abrasio 38%). Small OCDs had a higher remission rate than large lesions (63% vs. 33%). OCDs covered with intact cartilage healed better than lesions with chondral defects (61% vs. 26%). Contrast enhancing fragments had a better prognosis than non-enhancing lesions (100% vs. 40%). Conclusions: Prognosis of OCD can be better estimated when size of OCD, condition of cartilage and enhancement of contrast agent is graduated with MRI and patient age is registered. The consequences for therapy planning are great. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of Slope Instability and Risk Analysis of Road Cut Slopes in Lashotor Pass, Iran

    Mohammad Hossein Taherynia; Mojtaba Mohammadi; Rasoul Ajalloeian

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of the stability of natural and artificial rock slopes is an important topic in the rock mechanics sciences. One of the most widely used methods for this purpose is the classification of the slope rock mass. In the recent decades, several rock slope classification systems are presented by many researchers. Each one of these rock mass classification systems uses different parameters and rating systems. These differences are due to the diversity of affecting parameters and the degree...

  12. Steady state phreatic surfaces in sloping aquifers

    Loáiciga, Hugo A.

    2005-08-01

    Steady state groundwater flow driven by constant recharge in an unconfined aquifer overlying sloping bedrock is shown to be represented, using the Dupuit approximation, by an ordinary differential equation of the Abel type y(x) . y'(x) + a . y(x) + x = 0, whose analytical solution is derived in this work. This article first investigates the case of zero saturated thickness at the upstream boundary, a flow system reminiscent of perched groundwater created by percolation of precipitation or irrigation in a sloping aquifer fully draining at its downstream boundary. A variant of this flow system occurs when the phreatic surface mounds and produces groundwater discharge toward the upstream boundary. This variant is a generalization of the classical groundwater flow problem involving two lakes connected by an aquifer, the latter being on sloping terrain in this instance. Analytical solutions for the phreatic surface's steady state geometry are derived for the case of monotonically declining hydraulic head as well as for the case of a mounded phreatic surface. These solutions are of practical interest in drainage studies, slope stability, and runoff formation investigations. It is shown that the flow factor a = -$\\sqrt{{\\rm K}/{\\rm N} tan β (where K, N, and tan β are the hydraulic conductivity, vertical recharge, and aquifer slope, respectively) has a commanding role on the phreatic surface's solutions. Two computational examples illustrate the implementation of this article's results.

  13. Decision Guide for Roof Slope Selection

    Sharp, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings.

  14. The logarithmic slope in diffractive DIS

    The logarithmic slope of diffractive structure function is a potential observable to separate the hard and soft contributions in diffraction, allowing to disentangle the QCD dynamics at small-x region. In this paper we extend our previous analyzes and calculate the diffractive logarithmic slope for three current approaches in the literature: (i) the Bartels-Wusthoff model, based on perturbative QCD, (ii) the CKMT model, based on Regge theory and (iii) the Golec-Biernat-Wusthoff model which assumes that the saturation phenomena is present in the HERA kinematic region. We analyze the transition region of small to large momentum transfer and verify that future experimental results on the diffractive logarithmic slope could discriminate between these approaches

  15. The Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    Liu, Zhen

    By overcoming the barriers that limit access to financial liquidity and human resource, the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) can promote rural livelihood diversification. This paper examines this effect using a household survey data set spanning the 1999 implementation of the Sloping land...... conversion program. Our results show that SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention on rural livelihood diversification. In addition, the findings demonstrate that there exist heterogeneous effects of SLCP implementation on livelihood diversification across different rural income groups. The lower...

  16. 距骨骨软骨损伤的诊断及关节镜治疗%Diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus

    郭秦炜; 胡跃林; 焦晨; 敖英芳; 于长隆

    2008-01-01

    目的 总结、分析距骨骨软骨损伤的症状、体征、影像学特点、关节镜下治疗方法及手术效果.方法 2000年至2005年共收治34例距骨骨软骨损伤患者,对其临床资料包括症状、体征、X线片、MRI表现、关节镜手术方法等进行回顾性分析,术后随访根据主观和客观评分判断疗效.术前美国足踝外科后足评分平均(71±8)分,术前主观疼痛程度评分(7.5±1.3)分.结果 34例患者MRI均有骨软骨损伤征象,其中21例通过X线片检查发现距骨骨软骨损伤.距骨骨软骨损伤的主要症状为负重疼痛以及运动后加重,MRI诊断准确率较X线片高(χ2=16.07,P<0.001).31例患者获得随访,平均随访时间为28个月.术后美国足踝外科后足评分(91±9)分,显著高于术前(t=9.147,P<0.001);术后主观疼痛程度评分(2.4±2.3)分,显著低于术前(t=10.853,P<0.001);临床疗效优良率为87.1%.结论 MRI检查能够提高诊断的正确率,关节镜微创手术治疗距骨骨软骨损伤效果良好.%Objective To summarize and analyze the diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment of osteochondral lesion of talus(OLT).Methods From 2000 to 2005 the data of 34 patients of OLT of the talus were retrospectively studied,including the symptom,physical examination,image,arthroscopic treatment.All patients took X-ray and MRI examination before the arthroscopic surgery.Arthroscopic debridement was performed for all patients,in addition to drilling in 5 cases,and microfracture in 18 cases.Before operation,ankle-hindfoot score of American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society(AOFAS)was 71±8,and the score of pain(visual analogue scale,VAS)Was 7.5±1.3.Results Weight-bearing pain of the ankle joint aggravated after exercise was the predominant complaint of OLT.X-ray examination was negative in 13 cases,and all lesions were detected by MRI,which was signifcantly better than X-ray(χ2=16.07,P<0.001).Thirty-one patients were followed up for an average of 28

  17. 30 CFR 77.1911 - Ventilation of slopes and shafts.

    2010-07-01

    ... COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking § 77.1911 Ventilation of slopes and shafts. (a) All slopes and shafts shall be ventilated by mechanical ventilation equipment during development. Such equipment shall... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation of slopes and shafts....

  18. MIBSA: Multi Interacting Blocks for Slope Analysis

    Dattola, Giuseppe; Crosta, Giovanni; Castellanza, Riccardo; di Prisco, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    As it is well known, the slope instabilities have very important consequences in terms of human lives and activities. So predicting the evolution in time and space of slope mass movements becomes fundamental. This is even more relevant when we consider that the triggering mechanisms are a rising ground water level and the occurrence of earthquakes. Therefore, seasonal rainfall has a direct influence on the triggering of large rock and earthslide with a composite failure surface and causing differential behaviors within the sliding mass. In this contribution, a model describing the slope mass by means of an array of blocks that move on a prefixed failure surface, is defined. A shear band located at the base of each block, whose behavior is modelled via a viscous plastic model based on the Perzyna's approach, controls the slip velocity of the block. The motion of the blocks is obtained by solving the second balance equation in which the normal and tangential interaction forces are obtained by a specific interaction model. The model has been implemented in an original code and it is used to perform a parametric analysis that describes the effects of block interactions under a transient ground water oscillation. The numerical results confirm that the normal and tangential interactions between blocks can inhibit or induce the slope movements. The model is tested against some real case studies. This model is under development to add the dynamic effects generated by earthquake shaking.

  19. A Novel Way To Practice Slope.

    Kennedy, Jane B.

    1997-01-01

    Presents examples of using a tic-tac-toe format to practice finding the slope and identifying parallel and perpendicular lines from various equation formats. Reports the successful use of this format as a review in both precalculus and calculus classes before students work with applications of analytic geometry. (JRH)

  20. Slope stability and erosion control: Ecotechnological solutions

    J.E. Norris; A. Stokes; S.B. Mickovski; E. Cammeraat; R. van Beek; B.C. Nicoll; A. Achim

    2008-01-01

    This book is designed to assist the civil and geotechnical engineer, geomorphologist, forester, landscape architect or ecologist in choosing ecotechnological solutions for slopes that are prone to a variety of mass movements e.g. shallow failure or erosion. Within this book, the 'engineer' is used i

  1. Passive solar meets North slope rockies

    Duffield, J.

    1980-01-01

    The origin and construction of a passive solar home near Missoula, Montana is described. The site is a relatively cold and wet north slope huckleberry/larch habitat. The key element of the design is integration of a wood furnace/fireplace/oven into a massive Trombe wall. The design has emerged from an on-going interaction of the builder, site, and materials.

  2. Ranking Slope Stability in Frozen Terrain

    Stothoff, S.; Dinwiddie, C. L.; Walter, G. R.; Necsoiu, M.

    2011-12-01

    Motivated by the need to assess the risk of permafrost thaw to infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, and pipelines, a landscape-scale approach was developed to rank the risk of slope failures and thermokarst development in areas of seasonally frozen soils underlain by permafrost. The approach has two parts: (i) identifying locations where permafrost thaw is likely to occur under future climates, and (ii) identifying areas where thaw would have consequences with respect to a disturbance. The developed screening tool uses (i) land classification maps developed from remotely sensed data and (ii) a thermohydrologic hazard risk assessment to identify areas susceptible to slope instability under current and future climate states. The screening tool combines a numerical ground thawing and freezing dynamics model for calculating the thickness of the active layer and depth of permafrost with a simple slope stability model that is based upon the Level I Stability Analysis (LISA) approach of Harrell et al. (1992). Instead of using the numerical models directly within probabilistic sampling, a response function for the factor of safety in slope stability is developed from numerical simulations that systematically vary input parameters across their range of applicability. The response function is used within Monte Carlo sampling for each grid cell in a landscape model, with a probability distribution for each input parameter assigned to each grid cell based on (i) classes defined for each grid cell; (ii) a digital elevation model; (iii) empirical, mathematical, and numerical interpretive models; and (iv) probabilistic descriptions of the parameters in the interpretive models. For example, the root cohesion distribution is defined by vegetation class, with vegetation spread across the landscape using Landsat-derived vegetation classification maps. The probability of slope failure is the fraction of parameter realizations that result in a factor of safety less than 1. Ranking

  3. Analysis of Rainfall Infiltration Law in Unsaturated Soil Slope

    Gui-rong Zhang; Ya-jun Qian; Zhang-chun Wang; Bo Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In the study of unsaturated soil slope stability under rainfall infiltration, it is worth continuing to explore how much rainfall infiltrates into the slope in a rain process, and the amount of rainfall infiltrating into slope is the important factor influencing the stability. Therefore, rainfall infiltration capacity is an important issue of unsaturated seepage analysis for slope. On the basis of previous studies, rainfall infiltration law of unsaturated soil slope is analyzed. Considering t...

  4. 距骨缺血坏死的MRI表现(附12例报告)%MRI features of avascular necrosis of talus:a report of 12 cases

    马晓文; 李海燕

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价MRI检查对距骨缺血坏死早期诊断及治疗方法选择的价值.方法 对已确诊的12例距骨缺血坏死的MRI表现进行回顾性分析.结果 本组12例均行MRI检查.4例距骨早期坏死,病灶呈不规则条带状异常信号,T1WI呈低信号,T2WI呈高信号,均伴有周围骨髓水肿;8例典型距骨坏死,即地图样表现,T2WI病灶中间呈高信号,周边环绕低信号的硬化带.结论 MRI对于距骨早期缺血坏死的诊断具有重要价值,并且可以准确评价其坏死程度,为临床治疗方案的选择提供客观依据.%Objective To explore the applied value of MRI in diagnosis and clinical administration for avascular necrosis of talus. Methods MRI findings were reviewed in 12 patients with complaint of avascular necrosis of talus at a 0. 35T MR machine. Results All cases underwent MRI scan. The early necrosis of talus in 4 cases were showed,the lesions appeared as irregular linear abnormal signals accompanied by surrounding bone marrow edema, the lesions were hypointense on T1 WI and hyperintense on T2WI. The typical MRI signs showed map-like changes in 8 cases, the lesions were hyperintense in the center and hypointense in the periphery on T2 WI. Conclusion MRI is of important value for early diagnosis of avascular necrosis of talus,and can accurately evaluate the necrosis degree of the lesions,which may provide informations for clinical administration.

  5. Automatic delineation of geomorphological slope units

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Marchesini, Ivan; Fiorucci, Federica; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Reichenbach, Paola; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Slope units are portions of land surface, defined by the general requirement of maximizing homogeneity within a single unit and heterogeneity between different units, but whose formal characterization and practical delineation has been done in different ways. This is often justified by the statement that the slope unit partitioning of a territory can be used to describe a variety of landforms and processes, and for the assessment of natural hazards. As a result, they need to be tailored according to the specific model in use. This may result in an ambiguous definition of such objects, while an objective definition is highly desirable, which would also allow their reproducibility. We have developed a publicly accessible Web Processing Service (WPS) with the aim of incrementally achieve a satisfactory definition of slope unit. The service allows any user to connect to a CNR-IRPI (Perugia) server, upload his own Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and optional additional data, specify parameters constraining the size and aspect of slope units, and quickly obtain the result in a layer in vector format. The calculation is performed using a parallel algorithm, resulting in a processing time short enough to allow the user to tune the input parameters, repeating the process for a sufficient number of times in order to obtain a satisfactory result. We use quantitative criteria to define and draw the slope units, depending on the input parameters. The algorithm starts from a hydrologically consistent partition of the study area into half-basins with a large number of contributing DEM cells. Each of the half-basins is then checked against a few requirements: maximum area required by the user and maximum standard deviation of the aspect on two orthogonal directions. Those specific half-basin that do not meet the requirements are partitioned further, requiring a lower number of contributing cells. The process is iterated until no half-basin exceeds the user-specified thresholds. Our

  6. CCN-supersaturation spectra slopes (k)

    Jiusto, J. E.; Lala, G. G.

    1981-11-01

    Theoretically the slope k of a CCN-supesaturation spectrum should equal two thirds of the slope of the total (soluble) aerosol size distribution. Workshop results tended to verify this relation. The k values are markedly different depending on whether one is measuring ambient CCN concentrations at supersaturations S above or below approximately 0.1-0.2%. The larger k values for S approximately 0.1% is consistent with the greater decrease in large particle concentration with increasing size. It is concluded that over the S range of 0.02% to 2%, two power fits (and k values) may sometimes suffice for a reasonable approximation of the CCN distribution. At other times, and with laboratory generated aeosols, such an approach is inadequate and requires refinement.

  7. Pipeline modeling and assessment in unstable slopes

    Caceres, Carlos Nieves [Oleoducto Central S.A., Bogota, Cundinamarca (Colombia); Ordonez, Mauricio Pereira [SOLSIN S.A.S, Bogota, Cundinamarca (Colombia)

    2010-07-01

    The OCENSA pipeline system is vulnerable to geotechnical problems such as faults, landslides or creeping slopes, which are well-known in the Andes Mountains and tropical countries like Colombia. This paper proposes a methodology to evaluate the pipe behaviour during the soil displacements of slow landslides. Three different cases of analysis are examined, according to site characteristics. The process starts with a simplified analytical model and develops into 3D finite element numerical simulations applied to the on-site geometry of soil and pipe. Case 1 should be used when the unstable site is subject to landslides impacting significant lengths of pipeline, pipeline is straight, and landslide is simple from the geotechnical perspective. Case 2 should be used when pipeline is straight and landslide is complex (creeping slopes and non-conventional stabilization solutions). Case 3 should be used if the pipeline presents vertical or horizontal bends.

  8. Wildlife response on the Alaska North Slope

    Recognizing the need for a comprehensive plan to deal with potentially oiled wildlife on the Alaskan North Slope, a multifaceted wildlife protection strategy was developed and implemented during 1991. The strategy incorporated all aspects of wildlife response including protection of critical habitat, hazing, capture and stabilization, long term rehabilitation, and release. The primary wildlife response strategy emphasizes controlling of the release and spreading of spilled oil at the source to prevent or reduce contamination of potentially affected species and/or their habitat. A secondary response strategy concentrates on keeping potentially affected wildlife away from an oiled area through the use of deterrent techniques. Tertiary response involves the capture and treatment of oiled wildlife. Implementation of the strategy included the development of specialized training, the procurement of equipment, and the construction of a bird stabilization center. The result of this initiative is a comprehensive wildlife response capability on the Alaskan North Slope. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  9. An Extended Mild-Slope Equation

    PAN Junning; HONG Guangwen; ZUO Qihua

    2000-01-01

    On the assumption that the vortex and the vertical velocity component of the current are small, a mild-slope equation for wave propagation on non-uniform flows is deduced from the basic hydrodynamic equations, with the terms of ( h h)2 and /2h h included in the equation. The terms of bottom friction, wind energy input and wave nonlinearity are also introduced into the equation. The wind energy input functions for wind waves and swells are separately considered by adopting Wen′s (1989) empirical formula for wind waves and Snyder′s observation results for swells. Thus, an extended mild-slope equation is obtained, in which the effects of refraction, diffraction, reflection, current, bottom friction, wind energy input and wave nonlinearity are considered synthetically.

  10. Back analysis of reinforced soil slopes

    Procházka, P.; Trčková, Jiřina

    Southampton : WIT Press, 2012 - (Mammoli, A.; Brebbia, C.), s. 423-432 ISBN 978-1-84564-602-8. ISSN 1743-3533. [Computational methods and experiments in material characterisation /3./. Material Characterisation 2007. Bologna (IT), 13.06.2007-15.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2119402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : back analysis * numerical and experimental modelling * slopes Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  11. Viscous liquid flow on Martian dune slopes

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    The observed temporary dark streaks on some dune slopes on Mars may be due to thin sheets of water (or some other liquid) trickling downhill. This note corrects conceptual errors in a previous paper (M\\"{o}hlmann and Kereszturi 2010, Icarus 207, 654-658) which affect the velocity profile of such flows, and produce over-estimates of their depths and mass fluxes by factors of almost two.

  12. Assessment of slope stability endangered by groundwater

    Procházka, P.; Trčková, Jiřina

    Southampton : WIT Press, 2006 - (Brebbia, C.; Conti, M.; Tiezzi, E.), s. 709-718 ISBN 978-1-84564-048-4. [Ravage of Planet. Baryloche (AR), 12.12.2006-14.12.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2119402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : physical and numerical modelling * slope stability * groundwater Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  13. Stability of nuclear crater slopes in rock

    The United States Army Engineer Nuclear Cratering Group was established in 1962 to participate with the Atomic Energy Commission in a joint research and development program to develop nuclear engineering and construction technology. A major part of this research effort has been devoted to studies of the engineering properties of craters. The program to date has included field investigations of crater properties in various media over a broad range of chemical and nuclear explosive yields, studies of man-made and natural slopes, and studies directed toward the development of analytical and empirical methods of crater stability analysis. From this background, a general understanding has been developed of the effects of a cratering explosion on the surrounding medium and of physical nature of the various crater zones which are produced. The stability of nuclear crater slopes has been a subject of prime interest in the feasibility study being conducted for an Atlantic-Pacific sea-level canal. Based on experimental evidence assembled to date, nuclear crater slopes in dry dock and dry alluvium have an initially stable configuration. There have been five nuclear craters produced to date with yields of 0.4 kt or more on which observations are based and the initial configurations of these craters have remained stable for over seven years. The medium, yield, crater dimensions, and date of event for these craters are summarized. It is interesting to note that the Sedan Crater has been subjected to strong seismic motions from nearby detonations without adverse effects

  14. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project

  15. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    Carson, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Koerner, R.M. [Geosynthetic Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bonaparte, R. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  16. Monitoring method for the aging slope by geophysical explorations

    Tatsuru, YAMAMOTO; Harushige, KUSUMI; 楠見, 晴重 (編); Tsuyoshi, YAMAMOTO; Makoto, NAKAMURA

    2009-01-01

    This research is monitoring the ground condition inside the aging slope. The purpose of this research is to consider the value of a monitoring method with the ground evaluating system to estimate the soundness in the aging slope. In Japan, at the high economic growth period after the 1960’s, a great number of slopes were formed to construct many roads and most slope protection methods were to cover with shotcrete on the slope. Now, those slopes are aging. Therefore, there is a possibility tha...

  17. Slope stability monitoring from microseismic field using polarization methodology

    Yu. I. Kolesnikov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of seismoacoustic emission (SAE associated with fracturing in zones of shear stress concentration shows that SAE signals are polarized along the stress direction. The proposed polarization methodology for monitoring of slope stability makes use of three-component recording of the microseismic field on a slope in order to pick the signals of slope processes by filtering and polarization analysis. Slope activity is indicated by rather strong roughly horizontal polarization of the respective portion of the field in the direction of slope dip. The methodology was tested in microseismic observations on a landslide slope in the Northern Tien-Shan (Kyrgyzstan.

  18. Chemical differences in atmospheric, talus and stream water from a small rainforest low-mountain experimental catchment, Sikhote-Alin' Mountains, Pacific Russia

    Boldeskul, Anna; Shamov, Vladimir; Kozhevnikova, Nadezhda; Gartsman, Boris; Bugaets, Andrey; Lupakov, Sergey; Matveyeva, Lubov; Lutsenko, Tatyana

    2013-04-01

    Some results of detailed hydrological and hydrochemical observations on the experimental low-mountain basin "Elovyi", Pacific Russia in 2011-2012, are presented. The studied catchment area is 82 ha, and its elevation ranges from 620 to 960 m a.s.l. The basin is shaped by a narrow deeply-incised valley, and entirely covered by typical coniferous-deciduous forest. The regional temperate and humid climate is attributed to monsoon activity. Brown mountain-forest soils (top and sides of the valley); mountain-taiga illuvial-humus soils (sides of the valley); soddy-alluvial soils (bottom of valley) are the main soil types there. The underlying effusive rocks (mostly liparite porphyres, porphyrites, dacites, syenites and its tuffs) are rather acid. All the dataset obtained was studied to reveal the most applicable chemical indices for distinguishing of water sources. Preliminarily, the seven genetic categories of water as 1) cyclonic rain, 2) intermittent rain, 3) throughfall, 4) talus flow, 5) low-water streamflow (specific discharge is less 2.5 l/s per sq. km), 6) low flood streamflow (specific discharge is more 2.5 and less 16 l/s per sq. km), and 7) medium flood streamflow (specific discharge is more 16 and less 100 l/s per sq. km) were sampled and analyzed for chemical compounds. The talus water was taken from tensiolysimeters. According to the sequence of the water types given above, the following is the series of mean values of several compounds: TDS (ppm) = 2.4, 5.7, 9.4, 28.2, 22.6, 24.2, 22.7; pH = 4.8, 4.4, 5.2, 6.4, 5.9, 5.8, 5.7; K (ppm) = 0.09, 1.27, 3.47, 1.35, 1.42, 1.63, 1.49; Na (ppm) = 0.04, 0.21, 0.39, 2.30, 1.60, 1.91, 1.64; Ca (ppm) = 0.36, 1.11, 1.00, 4.11, 2.97, 3.40, 2.98; Mg (ppm) = 0.02, 0.16, 0.32, 0.74, 0.54, 0.57, 0.59; Hydrocarbonate (ppm) = 0.33, 0.16, 2.61, 10.3, 3.07, 3.84, 3.10; Sulfate (ppm) = 0.94, 4.25, 1.49, 8.00, 9.75, 10.20, 8.24; Chloride (ppm) = 0.19, 0.85, 0.46, 1.47, 0.75, 0.97, 0.88; Nitrate (ppm) = 0.70, 2.74, 0.52, 1.39, 2

  19. Mechanical interaction between roots and soil mass in slope vegetation

    2010-01-01

    The most basic function of slope vegetation is to strengthen rock and soil mass through plant roots which increase the shear strength of the slope markedly and thereby increase the stability of the slope. However, the calculation of the reinforcement ability of slope vegetation still remains at the stage of judging by experience, because it is rather difficult due to the intricacy and volatility of the force condition of plant roots in rock and soil medium. Although some scholars have tried to study the interaction between plant roots and soil mass, the systemic analysis of the mechanical reinforcement mechanism and the contribution of plant roots to strengthening the rock and soil mass on the surface of the slope is untapped. In this paper, by analyzing the mechanism of slope vegetation and the corresponding reinforcement effect, the effects that slope vegetation generates on the shear strength of slope soil mass are studied, thereby a theoretical basis for plant protection designing is provided.

  20. Propagation of internal waves up continental slope and shelf

    DAI Dejun; WANG Wei; QIAO Fangli; YUAN Yeli; XIANG Wenxi

    2008-01-01

    In a two-dimensional and linear framework, a transformation was developed to derive eigensolutions of internal waves over a subcriticai hyperbolic slope and to approximate the continental slope and shelf. The transformation converts a hyperbolic slope in physical space into a fiat bottom in transform space while the governing equations of internal waves remain hyperbolic. The eigensolutions are further used to study the evolution of linear internal waves as it propagates to subcritical continental slope and shelf. The stream function, velocity, and vertical shear of velocity induced by internal wave at the hyperbolic slope are analytically expressed by superposition of the obtained eigensolutions. The velocity and velocity shear increase as the internal wave propagates to a hyperbolic slope. They become very large especially when the slope of internal wave rays approaches the topographic slope, which is consistent with the previous studies.

  1. THE ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK OF FORECASTING OPEN MINING SLOPE STABILITY

    魏春启; 白润才

    2000-01-01

    The artificial neural network model which forecasts Open Mining Slope stability is established by neural network theory and method. The nonlinear reflection relation between stability target of open mining slope and its influence factor is described. The method of forecasting Open Mining Slope stability is brought forward.

  2. Slope equalities for genus 5 surface fibrations

    Tenni, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    K. Konno proved a slope equality for fibred surfaces with fibres of odd genus and general fibre of maximal gonality. More precisely he found a relation between the invariants of the fibration and certain weights of special fibres (called the Horikawa numbers). We give an alternative and more geometric proof in the case of a genus 5 fibration, under generality assumptions. In our setting we are able to prove that the fibre with positive Horikawa numbers are precisely the trigonal ones, we compute their weights explicitly and thus we exhibit explicit examples of regular surfaces with assigned invariants and Horikawa numbers.

  3. Slope stability of moraines, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Klimes, J.; Novotny, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides originating from inner slopes of moraine dams are often capable of producing glacial lakes outburst floods (GLOFs). Therefore assessing stability conditions of the moraines is important for predicting this potentially damaging phenomenon. Characteristics of the basic mechanical properties of the material and geophysical investigations were applied to collect necessary information for slope stability assessment of the Palcacocha Lake moraine dam, Peru. The lake is situated in the Cordillera Blanca Mts. at the altitude of about 4,500m asl and produced catastrophic GLOF in 1941. Another minor flood originated in 2003 due to landslide impact into the lake. Detailed investigations of this landslide site included geomorphological mapping, geophysical investigations and characterization of basic mechanical properties of the forming material. Geomorphological mapping identified dormant landslide with scarp up to 2m high which developed on the edge of the inner moraine slope. It is conditioned by set of parallel extension trenches which also affected the origin of 2003 landslide. Within its scarp area, significant water bearing layer was noticed around 10 m bellow the moraine surface. Three profiles were investigated using electric resistivity tomography performed on 4poing light instrument with 24 electrodes and with spacing ranging from 1 to 4m. Results helped to verify geometry of the main shear plane of the mapped landslide as well as the spacing and depth of extension trenches. Significant heterogeneity in the moraine resistivity characteristics was found. The high resistivity regions are explained by rock block accumulation whereas the low resistivity may represent wet layers within the moraine body. Grain size distribution of 33 disturbed soil samples originating from moraine material within the Cordillera Blanca Mts., Peru were determined and classified according to the UCSC classification system. The samples were taken from moraine dams and slopes

  4. Outerplanar graph drawings with few slopes

    Knauer, Kolja; Walczak, Bartosz

    2012-01-01

    We consider straight-line outerplanar drawings of outerplanar graphs in which the segments representing edges are parallel to a small number of directions. We prove that Delta-1 directions suffice for every outerplanar graph with maximum degree Delta>=4. This improves the previous bound of O(Delta^5), which was shown for planar partial 3-trees, a superclass of outerplanar graphs. The bound is tight: for every Delta>=4 there is an outerplanar graph of maximum degree Delta which requires at least Delta-1 distinct edge slopes for an outerplanar straight-line drawing.

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Slope for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope of Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  6. Slope evolution of GRB correlations and cosmology

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Piedipalumbo, Ester; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Gamma -ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts $z>9.4$ can be used as possible probes to test cosmological models. Here we show how changes of the slope of the {\\it luminosity $L^*_X$ -break time $T^*_a$} correlation in GRB afterglows, hereafter the LT correlation, affect the determination of the cosmological parameters. With a simulated data set of 101 GRBs with a central value of the correlation slope that differs on the intrinsic one by a $5\\sigma$ factor, we find an overstimated value of the matter density parameter, $\\Omega_M$, compared to the value obtained with SNe Ia, while the Hubble constant, $H_0$, best fit value is still compatible in 1$\\sigma$ compared to other probes. We show that this compatibility of $H_0$ is due to the large intrinsic scatter associated with the simulated sample. Instead, if we consider a subsample of high luminous GRBs ($HighL$), we find that both the evaluation of $H_0$ and $\\Omega_M$ are not more compatible in 1$\\sigma$ and $\\Omega_M$ is underestimated by the $13\\%$. Ho...

  7. Foam drainage on a sloping weir.

    Grassia, P; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2002-08-01

    Foam drainage is considered in a froth flotation tank with a sloping weir. The drainage is shown to be gravity dominated in most of the foam, except for thin boundary layers at the base of the froth, and along the sloping weir. The mathematical reason for the boundary layers is that capillary suction is a much weaker effect than gravity, but cannot be ignored altogether, because it represents a singular perturbation. The relative weakness of capillary suction with respect to gravity is represented by a key dimensionless parameter, denoted K, which satisfies Kbulk of the flotation tank. The liquid volume fraction in the jet is likewise O(K(-2/3)) larger than that in the bulk. Across the jet, the foam exhibits a known profile of liquid fraction vs. distance from the weir: this is known as the equilibrium profile. The foam requires a distance equivalent to O(K(4/3)) weir lengths to dry out significantly from the wetness value on the weir, but a larger O(K) distance to fall back to a wetness comparable with that in the bulk of the froth. PMID:15015124

  8. Assessment of highway slope failure using neural networks

    Tsung-lin LEE; Hung-ming LIN; Yuh-pin LU

    2009-01-01

    An artificial intelligence technique of back-propagation neural networks is used to assess the slope failure. On-site slope failure data from the South Cross-Island Highway in southern Taiwan are used to test the performance of the neural network model. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of artificial neural networks in the evaluation of slope failure potential based on five major factors, such as the slope gradient angle, the slope height, the cumulative precipitation, daily rainfall and strength of materials.

  9. Multi Rotor Uav at Different Altitudes for Slope Mapping Studies

    Tahar, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Most of consultation work only involves a small area, especially for slope mapping studies. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of slope mapping results from different altitudes at semi-undulated area and undulated area. Multi-rotor UAV is used as an instrument for data acquisition for this study. The images of slope were captured from five different altitudes in the same study area. All images were processed using photogrammetric software to produce digital elevation models and digital orthophoto. In this study, slope map from all different altitudes were identified and recorded for analysis purposes. It was found that the accuracy of slope is increase when altitude is increase. In conclusion, the condition of slope such as semi-undulated and undulated area did have an influence on the slope accuracy.

  10. Overland flow resistances on varying slope gradients and partitioning on grassed slopes under simulated rainfall

    Pan, Chengzhong; Ma, Lan; Wainwright, John; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-04-01

    It is still unclear how slope steepness (S) and revegetation affect resistance (f) to overland flow. A series of experiments on runoff hydraulics was conducted on granular surfaces (bare soil and sandpaper) and grassed surfaces, including grass plots (GP), GP with litter (GL), and GP without leaves (GS) under simulated rainfall and inflow (30erosion on hillslopes impacted by vegetation restoration.

  11. Linear chirped slope profile for spatial calibration in slope measuring deflectometry.

    Siewert, F; Zeschke, T; Arnold, T; Paetzelt, H; Yashchuk, V V

    2016-05-01

    Slope measuring deflectometry is commonly used by the X-ray optics community to measure the long-spatial-wavelength surface figure error of optical components dedicated to guide and focus X-rays under grazing incidence condition at synchrotron and free electron laser beamlines. The best performing instruments of this kind are capable of absolute accuracy on the level of 30-50 nrad. However, the exact bandwidth of the measurements, determined at the higher spatial frequencies by the instrument's spatial resolution, or more generally by the instrument's modulation transfer function (MTF) is hard to determine. An MTF calibration method based on application of a test surface with a one-dimensional (1D) chirped height profile of constant amplitude was suggested in the past. In this work, we propose a new approach to designing the test surfaces with a 2D-chirped topography, specially optimized for MTF characterization of slope measuring instruments. The design of the developed MTF test samples based on the proposed linear chirped slope profiles (LCSPs) is free of the major drawback of the 1D chirped height profiles, where in the slope domain, the amplitude strongly increases with the local spatial frequency of the profile. We provide the details of fabrication of the LCSP samples. The results of first application of the developed test samples to measure the spatial resolution of the BESSY-NOM at different experimental arrangements are also presented and discussed. PMID:27250379

  12. On Front Slope Stability of Berm Breakwaters

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    reshaping of a large Norwegian breakwater exposed to the North Sea waves. As a motivation for applying the Van der Meer formula a discussion of design parameters related to berm breakwater stability formulae is given. Comparisons of front erosion predicted by the use of the Van der Meer formula with model......The short communication presents application of the conventional Van der Meer stability formula for low-crested breakwaters for the prediction of front slope erosion of statically stable berm breakwaters with relatively high berms. The method is verified (Burcharth, 2008) by comparison with the......, relative berm width, method of armour stone placement, and hydraulic parameters. The formulae should cover the structure range from statically stable berm breakwaters to conventional double layer armoured breakwaters....

  13. Seismic Stability of Reinforced Soil Slopes

    Tzavara, I.; Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Y.; Psarropoulos, P.N.

    Over recent decades increased research interest has been observed on the dynamic response and stability issues of earth walls and reinforced soil structures. The current study aims to provide an insight into the dynamic response of reinforced soil structures and the potential of the geosynthetics...... to prevent the development of slope instability taking advantage of their reinforcing effect. For this purpose, a onedimensional (SDOF) model, based on Newmark’s sliding block model as well as a two-dimensional (plane-strain) dynamic finite-element analyses are conducted in order to investigate the...... impact of the most significant parameters involved, such as the flexibility of the sliding system, the mechanical properties of the soil and of the geosynthetics material, the frequency content of the excitation and the interface shear strength....

  14. Methodologies for risk analysis in slope instability

    This paper is an approach to the different methodologies used in conducting landslide risk maps so that the reader can get a basic knowledge about how to proceed in its development. The landslide hazard maps are increasingly demanded by governments. This is because due to climate change, deforestation and the pressure exerted by the growth of urban centers, damage caused by natural phenomena is increasing each year, making this area of work a field of study with increasing importance. To explain the process of mapping a journey through each of the phases of which it is composed is made: from the study of the types of slope movements and the necessary management of geographic information systems (GIS) inventories and landslide susceptibility analysis, threat, vulnerability and risk. (Author)

  15. ASPECTS OF DRIP IRRIGATION ON SLOPES

    Oprea Radu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, water and its supply raise problems of strategic importance, of great complexity, being considered one of the keys to sustainable human development. Drip irrigation consists in the slow and controlled administration of water in the area of the root system of the plants for the purposes of fulfilling their physiological needs and is considered to be one of the variants of localized irrigation. Water is distributed in a uniform and slow manner, drop by drop, in a quantity and with a frequency that depend on the needs of the plant, thanks to the exact regulation of the water flow rate and pressure, as well as to the activation of the irrigation based on the information recorded by the tensiometer with regard to soil humidity. This method enables the exact dosage of the water quantity necessary in the various evolution stages of the plant, thus eliminating losses. By applying the irrigation with 5 liters of water per linear meter, at a 7 days interval, in the month of august, for a vine cultivated on a slope, in layers covered with black film and irrigated via dropping, soil humidity immediately after irrigation reaches its highest level, but within the limits of active humidity, on the line of the irrigation band. Three days later, the water content of the soil in the layer is relatively uniform, and, after this interval, it is higher in the points situated at the basis of the film. This technology of cultivation on slopes favors the accumulation, in the soil, of the water resulted from heavy rains and reduces soil losses as a result of erosion.

  16. Foam drainage on a sloping weir

    Grassia, P.; Neethling, S. J.; Cilliers, J. J.

    2002-08-01

    Foam drainage is considered in a froth flotation tank with a sloping weir. The drainage is shown to be gravity dominated in most of the foam, except for thin boundary layers at the base of the froth, and along the sloping weir. The mathematical reason for the boundary layers is that capillary suction is a much weaker effect than gravity, but cannot be ignored altogether, because it represents a singular perturbation. The relative weakness of capillary suction with respect to gravity is represented by a key dimensionless parameter, denoted K, which satisfies Kll 1. The volumetric flow at any point along the weir boundary layer is the accumulation of all liquid that has rained onto the weir above the point in question: typically, this flow is linear in distance measured downward from the weir lip. All liquid raining onto the weir is ultimately returned to the pulp phase as a high-speed jet. The jet velocity scales with the frac{2}{3} power of distance from the weir lip, and is O(K^{-2/3}) times larger than the typical velocity in the gravity-dominated flow in the bulk of the flotation tank. The liquid volume fraction in the jet is likewise O(K^{-2/3}) larger than that in the bulk. Across the jet, the foam exhibits a known profile of liquid fraction vs. distance from the weir: this is known as the equilibrium profile. The foam requires a distance equivalent to O(K^{4/3}) weir lengths to dry out significantly from the wetness value on the weir, but a larger O(K) distance to fall back to a wetness comparable with that in the bulk of the froth.

  17. Dendrogeomorphic approach to estimating slope retreat, Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    Hupp, Cliff R.; Carey, William P.

    1990-07-01

    A dendrogeomorphic study of slope retreat was conducted at the Maxey Flats nuclear-waste disposal site in northeastern Kentucky. Tree roots exposed by surface lowering were used as an indicator of ground surface at the time of germination. The amount of lowering was measured and divided by tree-ring-determined tree age. Surface lowering and slope degradation rates were estimated for three slopes below waste-burial trenches and compared with data obtained from sediment troughs and erosion frames at the site. Mean rates of slope retreat ranged from 1.92 to 3.16 mm/yr. Sediment-trough results are two to three orders of magnitude less than dendrogeomorphic and erosion-frame estimates of slope degradation, which suggests that piping and solution-weathering processes may be important in slope degradation. Slope aspect and declivity may be important factors affecting retreat of slopes with a uniform lithology. Dendrogeomorphic techniques provide results comparable to those in the literature and offer a rapid method for estimating slope retreat that integrates slope processes over many years.

  18. Dendrogeomorphic approach to estimating slope retreat, Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    A dendrogeomorphic study of slope retreat was conducted at the Maxey Flats nuclear-waste disposal site in northeastern Kentucky. Tree roots exposed by surface lowering were used as an indicator of ground surface at the time of germination. The amount of lowering was measured and divided by tree-ring-determined tree age. Surface lowering and slope degradation rates were estimated for three slopes below waste-burial trenches and compared with data obtained from sediment troughs and erosion frames at the site. Mean rates of slope retreat ranged from 1.92 to 3.16 mm/yr. Sediment-trough results are two to three orders of magnitude less than dendrogeomorphic and erosion-frame estimates of slope degradation, which suggests that piping and solution-weathering processes may be important in slope degradation. Slope aspect and declivity may be important factors affecting retreat of slopes with a uniform lithology. Dendrogeomorphic techniques provide results comparable to those in the literature and offer a rapid method for estimating slope retreat that integrates slope processes over many years

  19. Three-dimensional analysis of slopes reinforced with piles

    高玉峰; 叶茂; 张飞

    2015-01-01

    Based on the upper bound of limit analysis, the plane-strain analysis of the slopes reinforced with a row of piles to the 3D case was extended. A 3D rotational failure mechanism was adopted to yield the upper bound of the factor of safety. Parametric studies were carried out to explore the end effects of the slope failures and the effects of the pile location and diameter on the safety of the reinforced slopes. The results demonstrate that the end effects nearly have no effects on the most suitable location of the installed piles but have significant influence on the safety of the slopes. For a slope constrained to a narrow width, the slope becomes more stable owing to the contribution of the end effects. When the slope is reinforced with a row of piles in small space between piles, the effects of group piles are significant for evaluating the safety of slopes. The presented method is more appropriate for assessing the stability of slopes reinforced with piles and can be also utilized in the design of plies stabilizing the unstable slopes.

  20. Model tests of geosynthetic reinforced slopes in a geotechnical centrifuge

    Geosynthetic-reinforced slopes and walls became very popular in recent years because of their financial, technical, and ecological advantages. Centrifuge modelling is a powerful tool for physical modelling of reinforced slopes and offers the advantage to observe the failure mechanisms of the slopes. In order to replicate the gravity induced stresses of a prototype structure in a geometrically 1/N reduced model, it is necessary to test the model in a gravitational field N times larger than that of the prototype structure. In this dissertation, geotextile-reinforced slope models were tested in a geotechnical centrifuge to identify the possible failure mechanisms. Slope models were tested by varying slope inclination, tensile strengths of the geotextiles, and overlapping lengths. Photographs of the geotextile reinforced slope models in flight were taken with a digital camera and the soil deformations of geotextile reinforced slopes were evaluated with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The experimental results showed that failure of the centrifuge models initiated at midheight of the slope, and occurred due to geotextile breakage instead of pullout. The location of the shear surface is independent of the tensile strength of the geotextile; it is dependent on the shear strength of the soil. It is logical to see that the required acceleration of the centrifuge at slope failure was decreased with increasing slope inclination. An important contribution to the stability of the slope models was provided by the overlapping of the geotextile layers. It has a secondary reinforcement effect when it was prolonged and passed through the shear surface. Moreover, the location of the shear surface observed with PIV analysis exactly matches the tears of the retrieved geotextiles measured carefully after the centrifuge testing. It is concluded that PIV is an efficient tool to instrument the slope failures in a geotechnical centrifuge.(author)

  1. Characterization of the collagen component of cartilage repair tissue of the talus with quantitative MRI: comparison of T2 relaxation time measurements with a diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state sequence (dwDESS)

    Kretzschmar, M.; Hainc, N.; Studler, U. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Bieri, O. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Miska, M. [University Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiewiorski, M.; Valderrabano, V. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the collagen component of repair tissue (RT) of the talus after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) using quantitative T2 and diffusion-weighted imaging. Mean T2 values and diffusion coefficients of AMIC-RT and normal cartilage of the talus of 25 patients with posttraumatic osteochondral lesions and AMIC repair were compared in a cross-sectional design using partially spoiled steady-state free precession (pSSFP) for T2 quantification, and diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state (dwDESS) for diffusion measurement. RT and cartilage were graded with modified Noyes and MOCART scores on morphological sequences. An association between follow-up interval and quantitative MRI measures was assessed using multivariate regression, after stratifying the cohort according to time interval between surgery and MRI. Mean T2 of the AMIC-RT and cartilage were 43.1 ms and 39.1 ms, respectively (p = 0.26). Mean diffusivity of the RT (1.76 μm{sup 2}/ms) was significantly higher compared to normal cartilage (1.46 μm{sup 2}/ms) (p = 0.0092). No correlation was found between morphological and quantitative parameters. RT diffusivity was lowest in the subgroup with follow-up >28 months (p = 0.027). Compared to T2-mapping, dwDESS demonstrated greater sensitivity in detecting differences in the collagen matrix between AMIC-RT and cartilage. Decreased diffusivity in patients with longer follow-up times may indicate an increased matrix organization of RT. (orig.)

  2. Slope Stability: Factor of Safety along the Seismically Active Continental Slope Offshore Sumatra

    Patton, J. R.; Goldfinger, C.; Djadjadihardja, Y.; None, U.

    2013-12-01

    Recent papers have documented the probability that turbidites deposited along and downslope of subduction zone accretionary prisms are likely the result of strong ground shaking from great earthquakes. Given the damaging nature of these earthquakes, along with the casualties from the associated tsunamis, the spatial and temporal patterns of these earthquakes can only be evaluated with paleoseismologic coring and seismic reflection methods. We evaluate slope stability for seafloor topography along the Sunda subduction offshore Sumatra, Indonesia. We use sediment material properties, from local (Sumatra) and analogous sites, to constrain our estimates of static slope stability Factor of Safety (FOS) analyses. We then use ground motion prediction equations (GMPE's) to estimate ground motion intensity (Arias Intensity, AI) and acceleration (Peak Ground Acceleration, PGA), as possibly generated by fault rupture, to constrain seismic loads for pseudostatic slope stability FOS analyses. The ground motions taper rapidly with distance from the fault plane, consistent with ground motion - fault distance relations measured during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki subduction zone earthquake. Our FOS analyses include a Morgenstern method of slices probabilistic analysis for 2-D profiles along with Critical Acceleration (Ac) and Newmark Displacement (Dn) analysis of multibeam bathymetry of the seafloor. In addition, we also use estimates of ground motion modeled with a 2004 Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ) earthquake fault slip model, to also compare with our static FOS analyses of seafloor topography. All slope and trench sites are statically stable (FOS < 1) and sensitive to ground motions generated by earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7. We conclude that for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 9, PGA of 0.4-0.6 to 1.4-2.5 g would be expected, respectively, from existing GMPE's. However, saturation of accelerations in the accretionary wedge may limit actual accelerations to less than 1

  3. Improvement parameters in dynamic compaction adjacent to the slopes

    Elham Ghanbari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic compaction is a cost-effective method commonly used for improvement of sandy soils. A number of researchers have investigated experimentally and numerically the improvement parameters of soils using dynamic compaction, such as crater depth, improvement depth, and radial improvement, however, these parameters are not studied for improvement adjacent to the slopes or trenches. In this research, four different slopes with different inclinations are modeled numerically using the finite element code ABAQUS, and impact loads of dynamic compaction are applied. The static factors of safety are kept similar for all trenches and determined numerically by application of gravity loads to the slope using strength reduction method (SRM. The analysis focuses on crater depth and improvement region which are compared to the state of flat ground. It can be observed that compacted area adjacent to the slopes is narrower and slightly away from the slope compared to the flat state. Moreover, crater depth increases with increase in slope inclination.

  4. Calculation method of solar radiation incident upon slopes considering topography

    When radiation in a basin is calculated, slope inclination, slope orientation and topography of surroundings have to be taken into account. The method of approximation to topography by triangles proposed by Miura et al. is employed to take slope characteristics and topography of surroundings into account. Authors prepared 360 directions' shades altitudes, i.e. every degree of angle, for each triangle in advance, and used these shades' altitudes to calculate both direct radiation on a slope diffuse radiation taking topography of surroundings into account. And authors show how to estimate hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation from hourly horizontal global radiation and synthesize hourly slope global radiation on slopes

  5. Numerical analysis of slope failure in granitic soil slopes : main types of instability and remediation measures

    Neves, Manuel João Niza das

    2015-01-01

    Slope stability is a worldwide problem which above all affects people’s safety. However, in tropical or temperate regions (such as the Mediterranean), a combination of their topographic, geologic and climate settings contributes to an increased landslide hazard. A full understanding of this topic, and what it entails, requires an accurate knowledge of its triggers and awareness to the different instability mechanisms that may occur. Furthermore, the instability phenomenon may present differen...

  6. Coherent sea-level fluctuations along the global continental slope

    Chris W. Hughes; Meredith, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Signals in sea-level or, more properly, sub-surface pressure (SSP; sea-level corrected for the inverse barometer effect) are expected to propagate rapidly along the continental slope due to the effect of sloping topography on wave modes, resulting in strongly correlated SSP over long-distances. Observations of such correlations around the Arctic and Antarctic are briefly reviewed, and then extended using satellite altimetry to the rest of the global continental slope. It is shown that such lo...

  7. Slope Stability Analysis Using Limit Equilibrium Method in Nonlinear Criterion

    Hang Lin; Wenwen Zhong; Wei Xiong; Wenyu Tang

    2014-01-01

    In slope stability analysis, the limit equilibrium method is usually used to calculate the safety factor of slope based on Mohr-Coulomb criterion. However, Mohr-Coulomb criterion is restricted to the description of rock mass. To overcome its shortcomings, this paper combined Hoek-Brown criterion and limit equilibrium method and proposed an equation for calculating the safety factor of slope with limit equilibrium method in Hoek-Brown criterion through equivalent cohesive strength and the fric...

  8. Geotechnical methods of reinforcement of slopes near railroads

    Vladimir D.Vereskun; Victor A.Yavna

    2015-01-01

    In order to generate well-based design decisions on reinforcement of landslide slopes and road embankment slopes, a system of combined geotechnical analysis of geological conditions is suggested which includes topographic and geo-physical survey, and laboratory studies of soils using infra-red spectroscopy methods. Calculations of slopes' deflected modes are carried out with taking into account elastic and elasto-plastic behavior of soil, and the presence of supporting man-made constructions. Results of the application of the system suggested may be used as criteria for the classification of landslide slopes along permanent ways according to the degree of danger when used for transportation.

  9. HeppleⅤ型距骨骨软骨损伤的手术治疗%Surgical treatment for Hepple typeⅤosteochondral lesion of the talus

    施忠民; 顾文奇; 许同龙; 邹剑; 薛剑锋; 梅国华

    2015-01-01

    Background:Most of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT) results from trauma of ankle fracture or ankle sprain. There are a lot of literatures on the classification and treatment of OLT, but there is no consensus of treatment or prognosis in Hep-ple typeⅤlesion, especially for lesion more than 1.5 mm2. Objective: To investigate surgical techniques and clinical outcomes of medial malleolar osteotomy and cancellous bone graft with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) gel covering for Hepple typeⅤOLT. Methods:From October 2013 to December 2014, 13 patients with Hepple typeⅤOLT underwent medial malleolar osteoto-my, cyst debridement and cancellous bone graft with PRP gel covering. There were 9 males and 4 females with a mean age of 38.2 years old (range, 19-61 years). The mean onset was 25 months (range, 11-49 months). Ankle X-ray examination and MRI were obtained at the final follow-up. The VAS score and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) an-kle-hindfoot score were recorded before surgery and at the final follow-up. Results:Twelve patients got the final follow-up with a mean duration of 15 months (range, 9-22 months). X-rays showed bone union at a mean time of 12 weeks (range, 10-14 weeks) after treatment. MRI showed good recovery of cartilage at OLT lesion, except for 2 cases of excessive hyperplasia without ankle function disability. The mean VAS and AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores improved significantly after surgery (P1.5 cm2的缺损的治疗和预后临床并不统一.目的:探讨经内踝截骨、松质骨植骨、富血小板血浆凝胶覆盖治疗HeppleⅤ型距骨骨软骨损伤的手术技巧及预后.方法:2013年10月至2014年11月,13例HeppleⅤ型内侧距骨骨软骨损伤行内踝截骨、囊腔病灶清理、松质骨打压植骨及富血小板血浆凝胶覆盖软骨缺损区域.男9例,女4例;年龄19~61岁,平均38.2岁.病程11~49个月,平均25个月.末次随访摄踝关节正侧位片,并同时行踝关节MRI检查,比较术

  10. Slope destabilization during the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    Gargani, Julien; Bache, François; Jouannic, Gwenael; Gorini, Christian

    2014-05-01

    During the Messinian Salinity Crisis, ~ 6 Myr ago, deep canyons were incised when a huge sea-level drawdown of ~ 1.5 km affected the Mediterranean Sea. Nearly contemporaneously, more than 2 km of evaporites accumulated in the basin. This event was the consequence of a complex interaction of tectonic movements and global sea-level variation associated with climatic evolution. This unusual event ended with the reflooding of the Mediterranean area. In this paper, using seismic line interpretation, we show that several landslides occurred in various parts of the Mediterranean Basin during this crisis. Three of these landslides are well preserved, and their dynamics were analyzed. Modeling of the slope stability demonstrates that these landslides may have been due to (i) the relief created by the deep erosion, and/or (ii) the reflooding, which triggered a pore pressure increase. The relatively small run-out distances of the three landslides suggest propagation in a submarine environment and triggering by sea-level rise.

  11. Design of Rock Slope Reinforcement: An Himalayan Case Study

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Latha, Gali Madhavi

    2016-06-01

    The stability analysis of the two abutment slopes of a railway bridge proposed at about 359 m above the ground level, crossing a river and connecting two hill faces in the Himalayas, India, is presented. The bridge is located in a zone of high seismic activity. The rock slopes are composed of a heavily jointed rock mass and the spacing, dip and dip direction of joint sets are varying at different locations. Geological mapping was carried out to characterize all discontinuities present along the slopes. Laboratory and field investigations were conducted to assess the geotechnical properties of the intact rock, rock mass and joint infill. Stability analyses of these rock slopes were carried out using numerical programmes. Loads from the foundations resting on the slopes and seismic accelerations estimated from site-specific ground response analysis were considered. The proposed slope profile with several berms between successive foundations was simulated in the numerical model. An equivalent continuum approach with Hoek and Brown failure criterion was initially used in a finite element model to assess the global stability of the slope abutments. In the second stage, finite element analysis of rock slopes with all joint sets with their orientations, spacing and properties explicitly incorporated into the numerical model was taken up using continuum with joints approach. It was observed that the continuum with joints approach was able to capture the local failures in some of the slope sections, which were verified using wedge failure analysis and stereographic projections. Based on the slope deformations and failure patterns observed from the numerical analyses, rock anchors were designed to achieve the target factors of safety against failure while keeping the deformations within the permissible limits. Detailed design of rock anchors and comparison of the stability of slopes with and without reinforcement are presented.

  12. Quasi-steady flow in sloping aquifers

    Akylas, Evangelos; Gravanis, Elias; Koussis, Antonis D.

    2015-11-01

    Mass conservation links the storage S and the outflow Q of an aquifer. A relation between them (an S-Q relation) provides then a model governing the evolution of these quantities. In this work we construct an analytical quasi-steady state model which exploits the properties of the exact S-Q relation associated with steady state solutions of the Boussinesq equation for the sloping aquifer (that is, the Henderson and Wooding [1964] solutions). The model is derived by matching the asymptotic forms of the exact S-Q relation which arise for small and large values of the Henderson and Wooding parameter λ. These asymptotic forms provide a novel rederivation of well-known semiempirical S-Q relations of the form Q∝ S and Q∝ S2, and they lead to soluble quasi-steady state models. The quadratic asymptotic relation turns out to hold for surprisingly low values of λ. This characteristic and its formal properties allow smooth matching with the linear relation at λ=π2/4=2.47. The obtained model holds over the entire parameter space. An important characteristic of the model, stemming from its derivation, is that it involves only the geometric and hydraulic quantities present in the exact Boussinesq equation. The model is tested by best fitting four data sets from experiments simulating aquifer drainage. The derived curves for the drained volume are in excellent agreement with the data. The estimated values for k and n are also in overall very good agreement with their reference values.

  13. Biogeochemistry of southern Australian continental slope sediments

    Sediment cores from the middle to lower slope of the southern continental margin of Australia between the Great Australian Bight and western Tasmania are compared in terms of marine and terrigenous input signals during the Holocene. The mass accumulation rates of carbonate, organic carbon, biogenic Ba. and Al are corrected for lateral sediment input (focusing), using the inventory of excess 230Th in the sediment normalised to its known production rate in the water column above each site. The biogenic signal is generally higher in the eastern part of the southern margin probably due to enhanced productivity associated with seasonal upwelling off southeastern South Australia and the proximity of the Subtropical Front, which passes just south of Tasmania. The input of Al, representing the terrigenous signal, is also higher in this region reflecting the close proximity of river runoff from the mountainous catchment of southeastern Australia. The distribution pattern of Mn and authigenic U, together with pore-water profiles of Mn++, indicate diagenetic reactions driven by the oxidation of buried organic carbon in an oxic to suboxic environment. Whereas Mn is reduced at depth and diffuses upwards to become immobilised in a Mn-rich surface layer. U is derived from seawater and diffuses downward into the sediment, driven by reduction and precipitation at a depth below the reduction zone of Mn. The estimated removal rate of U from seawater by this process is within the range of U removal measured in hemipelagic sediments from other areas, and supports the proposition that hemipelagic sediments are a major sink of U in the global ocean. Unlike Mn, the depth profile of sedimentary Fe appears to be little affected by diagenesis, suggesting that little of the total Fe inventory in the sediment is remobilised and redistributed as soluble Fe. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. RMS slope of exponentially correlated surface roughness for radar applications

    Dierking, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    In radar signature analysis, the root mean square (RMS) surface slope is utilized to assess the relative contribution of multiple scattering effects. For an exponentially correlated surface, an effective RMS slope can be determined by truncating the high frequency tail of the roughness spectrum...

  15. Conceptual model for reinforced grass on inner dike slopes

    ComCoast

    2005-01-01

    A desk study has been carried out in order to develop a conceptual model for the erosion of inner dike slopes with reinforced grass cover. Based on the results the following can be concluded: The presence of a geosynthetic in a grass slope can be taken into account in the EPM method by increasing th

  16. Assessing slope stability in unplanned settlements in developing countries.

    Anderson, Malcolm G; Holcombe, Liz; Renaud, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Unplanned housing in developing countries is often located on steep slopes. Frequently no building code is enforced for such housing and mains water is provided with no drainage provision. Both of these factors can be particularly significant in terms of landslide risk if, as is so often the case, such slopes lack any planned drainage provision. There is thus a need to develop a model that facilitates the assessment of slope stability in an holistic context, incorporating a wide range of factors (including surface cover, soil water topographic convergence, slope loading and point source water leakage) in order that appropriate advice can be given as to the general controls on slope stability in such circumstances. This paper outlines a model configured for this specific purpose and describes an application to a site in St. Lucia, West Indies, where there is active slope movement in an unplanned housing development on relatively steep topography. The model findings are in accord with the nature of the current failure at the site, provide guidance as to the significance of slope drainage and correspond to inferences drawn from an application of resistance envelope methods to the site. In being able to scenario test a uniquely wide range of combinations of factors, the model structure is shown to be highly valuable in assessing dominant slope stability process controls in such complex environments. PMID:17107745

  17. An experimental model for slopes subject to weathering

    Voulgari, C.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an experimental prototype model to study the influence of cracks on the morphologic evolution of natural cliffs subject to progressive retreat induced by weathering is presented. A set of small scale laboratory tests is designed to investigate weathering induced successive landslides. Weathering is applied to the slope model by wetting the slope crest through a rainfall simulator device. The moisture content and the suction of the soil during the tests are monitored by soil moisture sensors and tensiometers that are buried inside the slope model. High resolution cameras record the behaviour of the slope model and GeoPIV is used to analyse the frames and obtain the deformations of the slope model during the tests. After a short time of rainfall, vertical cracks appear in the slope model with significant vertical deformations developing. Experimental results indicate that there is a strong connection between moisture content - thus degree of weathering - and the occurrence of a landslide. A prediction model of slope failures can be introduced based on the observed moisture content response of the slope models.

  18. Identifying Colluvial Slopes by Airborne LiDAR Analysis

    Kasai, M.; Marutani, T.; Yoshida, H.

    2015-12-01

    Colluvial slopes are one of major sources of landslides. Identifying the locations of the slopes will help reduce the risk of disasters, by avoiding building infrastructure and properties nearby, or if they are already there, by applying appropriate counter measures before it suddenly moves. In this study, airborne LiDAR data was analyzed to find their geomorphic characteristics to use for extracting their locations. The study site was set in the suburb of Sapporo City, Hokkaido in Japan. The area is underlain by Andesite and Tuff and prone to landslides. Slope angle and surface roughness were calculated from 5 m resolution DEM. These filters were chosen because colluvial materials deposit at around the angle of repose and accumulation of loose materials was considered to form a peculiar surface texture differentiable from other slope types. Field survey conducted together suggested that colluvial slopes could be identified by the filters with a probability of 80 percent. Repeat LiDAR monitoring of the site by an unmanned helicopter indicated that those slopes detected as colluviums appeared to be moving at a slow rate. In comparison with a similar study from the crushed zone in Japan, the range of slope angle indicative of colluviums agreed with the Sapporo site, while the texture was rougher due to larger debris composing the slopes.

  19. SLOPE--a real-time ECG data compressor.

    Tai, S C

    1991-03-01

    An ECG sampled at a rate of 250 samples s-1 or more produces a large amount of redundant data that are difficult to store and transmit. In the paper, a real-time ECG data compressor, SLOPE, is presented. SLOPE considers some adjacent samples as a vector, and this vector is extended if the coming sample falls in a fan spanned by this vector and a threshold angle; otherwise, it is delimited as a linear segment. By this means SLOPE repeatedly delimits linear segments of different lengths and different slopes. The Huffman codes for the parameters to describe this linear segment are transmitted for that linear segment. SLOPEa, which is a slightly modified version of SLOPE, is used to compress ambulatory ECG data. All the operations used by SLOPE and SLOPEa are simple integer operations, both SLOPE and SLOPEa being real-time compressors. Experimental results show that an average of 192 bits per channel per second (bpcs) for each ECG signal is obtained by SLOPE and an average of 148 bpcs for each ECG signal is obtained by SLOPEa. PMID:1857123

  20. Culture of Sharing: North Slope Leaders Forge Trail into Future

    Patkotak, Elise Sereni

    2010-01-01

    To create a strong local economy, the community needs a workforce. In Native communities, the workforce should be grounded in the local culture and values. On the North Slope of Alaska, this has long been a goal of leaders. To achieve this goal, North Slope leaders came together February 2010 in Barrow, Alaska, for the "Tumitchiat" Leadership…

  1. The World Is Not Flat: Can People Reorient Using Slope?

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of spatial representation generally focus on flat environments and visual input. However, the world is not flat, and slopes are part of most natural environments. In a series of 4 experiments, we examined whether humans can use a slope as a source of allocentric, directional information for reorientation. A target was hidden in a corner of…

  2. Wave overtopping resistance of grassed dike slopes in Vietnam

    Trung, L.H.; Van der Meer, J.W.; Luong, N.Q.; Verhagen, H.J.; Schiereck, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    The resistance of various grassed slopes against wave overtopping has been appraised by means of the Wave Overtopping Simulator in situ for a couple of years in Viet Nam. Destructive test results show that a dike slope covered with grass could suffer a certain overtopping discharge not smaller than

  3. Wave energy saturation on a natural beach of variable slope.

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Holman, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Time series of flow were measured across the inner surf zone during a storm. These data were used to quantify the dependence of wave height (transformed from measured flow) and velocity on local slope and depth. Local depth increased with local slope and was independent of deepwater wave steepness.-from Authors

  4. Slope Morphology of Twin Peaks, Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    Hobbs, Steven; Paine, Colin; Clarke, Jon; Caprarelli, Graziella

    2010-05-01

    Development of slope form over time has long been a concern of geomorphologists, although recently this concern has been moved to slope processes rather than form. There are two basic approaches. The first is theoretical, involving modeling of different types and rates of processes, and calculation of results in terms of slope evolution over time. Comparisons with real-life slopes can follow this approach [1], [2]. The second, inductive, approach involves field measurements to test ideas about slope evolution starting from the assumption that observed slopes represent different stages of an essentially similar evolution [3]. Space is substituted for time, and a number of slopes, assumed to be of increasing age, are measured and placed in an evolutionary sequence (e.g. [4], [5], [6]). [5] showed that slope angles are modally distributed, with the modal angles controlled by the materials (regolith) of which the slopes are formed, and by the processes operating on them. Data can be obtained directly from field work or from digital elevation models (DEM) derived from remote sensing investigations [7]. DEMs are particularly useful to study inaccessible planets, such as Mars, where on site observations are restricted to only a few landing sites. Here we present a study of slopes on the Twin Peaks, two small hills located 780 m north and 910 m south of the Mars Pathfinder landing site at the mouth of the Ares and Tiu flood channels. The presence of streamlined hills, jumbled surfaces and conglomerates suggested the region was modified by massive flooding 1.8 - 3.5 billion years ago [8], [9]. The streamlined forms and terraces of the Twin Peaks were taken to indicate catastrophic flood conditions that were believed to be prevalent in the area [8]. It was also suggested that the northernmost peak was topped by floodwater, causing its flatter appearance. Other researchers postulated alternative geomorphological origins for the features observed at the Pathfinder landing site

  5. Simulating the seismic behaviour of soil slopes and embankments

    Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Yiannis; Psarropoulos, Prodromos

    2010-01-01

    parametric dynamic numerical analyses taking into account not only the main parameters dominating the seismic slope stability, but also the inherent assumptions of the applied approaches that affect the obtained results. The investigation conclude to a realistic procedure for seismic slope stability...

  6. Long Wave Reflection and Transmission over A Sloping Step

    Hsien-Kuo CHANG; Jin-Cheng LIOU

    2004-01-01

    This investigation examines long wave reflection and transmission induced by a sloping step. Bellman and Kalaba's(1959) invariant imbedding is introduced to find wave reflection. An alternative method matching both the surface elevation and its surface slope of each region at the junction is applied to the determination of wave reflection and transmission.The proposed methods are compared with the accurate numerical results of Porter and Porter (2000) and those of Mei(1983) for a vertical step. The wave reflection obtained for a mildly sloping step differs significantly from the result of Mei. The wave reflection is found to fluctuate owing to wave trapping for the mild sloping step. The height and the face slope of the step are important for determining wave reflection and transmission coefficients.

  7. Wave run-up on permeable fixed reveted slopes

    I.G. Kantardgi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of surface wave movement and water filtration in saturated-unsaturated porous medium has been developed. The model can be used to define the parameters of the wave run-up on the slope protected with a permeable fixed layer. The model is applied to determine positions of the free wave surface at the different times, including such parameters as the height of wave run-up and wave run-down on the slope. In addition, both flow velocity field in the upper protected layer and moisture distribution in the soil body of the slope were defined. The model is verified with the results of the published large-scale tests that have been conducted at Technical University Braunschweig in the wave flume with the slopes protected according to Elastocoast technology. The numerical model can be applied to calculate the run-up of extreme waves on protected engineering and beach slopes in natural conditions.

  8. DOWNWARD SLOPING DEMAND CURVES FOR STOCK AND LEVERAGE

    Liem Pei Fun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to investigate the effect of downward sloping demand curves for stock on firms' financing decisions. For the same size of equity issuance, firms with steeper slope of demand curves for their stocks experience a larger price drop in their share price compare to their counterparts. As a consequence, firms with a steeper slope of demand curves are less likely to issue equity and hence they have higher leverage ratios. This research finds that the steeper the slope of demand curve for firm's stock, the higher the actual leverage of the firm. Furthermore, firms with a steeper slope of demand curves have higher target leverage ratios, signifying that these firms prefer debt to equity financing in order to avoid the adverse price impact of equity issuance on their share price.

  9. Effects of rainfall infiltration on deep slope failure

    2009-01-01

    With the finite element method and the limit equilibrium method, a numerical model has been established for examining the effects of rainfall infiltration on the stability of slopes. This model is able to availably reflect the variations in pore pressure field in slopes, dead weight of soil, and the softening of soil strength caused by rainfall infiltration. As a case study, an actual landslide located at the Nongji Jixiao in Chongqing is studied to analyze the effects of rainfall infiltration on the seepage field and the slope stability. The simulated results show that a deep slope failure is prone to occur when rainfall infiltration will lead to a remarkable variation in the seepage field, in particular, for large range pore water pressure increase in slopes.

  10. Effects of rainfall infiltration on deep slope failure

    SUN JianPing; LIU QingQuan; LI JiaChun; AN Yi

    2009-01-01

    With the finite element method and the limit equilibrium method, a numerical model has been estab-lished for examining the effects of rainfall infiltration on the stability of slopes. This model is able to availably reflect the variations in pore pressure field in slopes, dead weight of soil, and the softening of soil strength caused by rainfall infiltration. As a case study, an actual landslide located at the Nongji Jixiao in Chongqing is studied to analyze the effects of rainfall infiltration on the seepage field and the slope stability. The simulated results show that a deep slope failure is prone to occur when rainfall infiltration will lead to a remarkable variation in the seepage field, in particular, for large range pore water pressure increase in slopes.

  11. Slope mass rating and kinematic analysis of slopes along the national highway-58 near Jonk, Rishikesh, India

    Tariq Siddique

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The road network in the Himalayan terrain, connecting remote areas either in the valleys or on the hill slopes, plays a pivotal role in socio-economic development of India. The planning, development and even maintenance of road and rail networks in such precarious terrains are always a challenging task because of complexities posed by topography, geological structures, varied lithology and neotectonics. Increasing population and construction of roads have led to destabilisation of slopes, thus leading to mass wasting and movement, further aggravation due to recent events of cloud bursts and unprecedented flash floods. Vulnerability analysis of slopes is an important component for the “Landslide Hazard Assessment” and “Slope Mass Characterisation” guide planners to predict and choose suitable ways for construction of roads and other engineering structures. The problem of landslides along the national highway-58 (NH-58 from Rishikesh to Devprayag is a common scene. The slopes along the NH-58 between Jonk and Rishikesh were investigated, which experienced very heavy traffic especially from March to August due to pilgrimage to Kedarnath shrine. On the basis of slope mass rating (SMR investigation, the area falls in stable class, and landslide susceptibility score (LSS values also indicate that the slopes under investigation fall in low to moderate vulnerability to landslide. More attentions should be paid to the slopes to achieve greater safe and economic benefits along the highway.

  12. The effects of plant density of Melastoma malabathricum on the erosion rate of slope soil at different slope orientations

    Aimee Halim n; Osman Normaniza

    2015-01-01

    abstract Malaysia's cut slopes, especially for road lines accommodation, are prone to erosions and landslides. These problems mainly occur due to lack of vegetation cover and strong erosive forces. In addition, the topography factors have also become a major factor affecting soil degradation. Thus, this study is aimed at determining the effects of planting density of a selected species, namely Melastoma malabathricum;one, two, and three seedlings per box, on the erosion rate at selected slopes of different orientation (morning and evening sun) at the Guthrie Corridor Expressway, Selangor. In six months of observation, treatment with three seedlings/box on the morning sun slope showed a lower erosion rate by 69.2%than those with the same treatment on the evening sun slope. In addition, the treatment of the three seedlings recorded at month six (final observation) had the highest reduction of soil saturation level (STL), by 23.6%. Furthermore, the physiological values of the species studied, grown on the morning sun slope, were higher in terms of stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate by 12.1%and15.8%(three seedlings/box), respectively. The overall results showed that plant density was inversely related to the STL and erosion rate on the slope. In conclusion, a planting density of three seedlings/box and morning sun orientation gave positive effects on the plant's physiological performance of the slope, reducing the STL, as well as alleviating the erosion rate of slope soils.

  13. Is there a distinct continental slope fauna in the Antarctic?

    Kaiser, Stefanie; Griffiths, Huw J.; Barnes, David K. A.; Brandão, Simone N.; Brandt, Angelika; O'Brien, Philip E.

    2011-02-01

    The Antarctic continental slope spans the depths from the shelf break (usually between 500 and 1000 m) to ˜3000 m, is very steep, overlain by 'warm' (2-2.5 °C) Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), and life there is poorly studied. This study investigates whether life on Antarctica's continental slope is essentially an extension of the shelf or the abyssal fauna, a transition zone between these or clearly distinct in its own right. Using data from several cruises to the Weddell Sea and Scotia Sea, including the ANDEEP (ANtarctic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity, colonisation history and recent community patterns) I-III, BIOPEARL (BIOdiversity, Phylogeny, Evolution and Adaptive Radiation of Life in Antarctica) 1 and EASIZ (Ecology of the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone) II cruises as well as current databases (SOMBASE, SCAR-MarBIN), four different taxa were selected (i.e. cheilostome bryozoans, isopod and ostracod crustaceans and echinoid echinoderms) and two areas, the Weddell Sea and the Scotia Sea, to examine faunal composition, richness and affinities. The answer has important ramifications to the link between physical oceanography and ecology, and the potential of the slope to act as a refuge and resupply zone to the shelf during glaciations. Benthic samples were collected using Agassiz trawl, epibenthic sledge and Rauschert sled. By bathymetric definition, these data suggest that despite eurybathy in some of the groups examined and apparent similarity of physical conditions in the Antarctic, the shelf, slope and abyssal faunas were clearly separated in the Weddell Sea. However, no such separation of faunas was apparent in the Scotia Sea (except in echinoids). Using a geomorphological definition of the slope, shelf-slope-abyss similarity only changed significantly in the bryozoans. Our results did not support the presence of a homogenous and unique Antarctic slope fauna despite a high number of species being restricted to the slope. However, it remains the case that there may be

  14. Soil erosion processes on sloping land using REE tracer

    Sheet erosion is the main performance in the slope soil erosion process at the primary stage of natural rainfall. For three times of rainfall during experiment, the ratios of sheet erosion to total erosion account for 71%, 48% and 49% respectively, which showed that the sloping erosion was still at the primary stage from sheet erosion to rill erosion. With the rainfall going, the rill erosion amount increase. It showed that soil erosion was changing from sheet erosion to rill erosion. The sources of sediment from different sections of the plot were analyzed, and the results indicated that whatever the sheet erosion changed, the ratio erosion of upper part of surface soil was always lower than 10%. Sheet erosion came mainly from the lower section of surface soil. With the ratios to the amount of total rill erosion changes, the rill erosion amount of each section regularly changes too. The general conclusion is that when the rainfall ends, relative erosion of different slope element to the foot of slope is: 1 meter away accounts for 16%, 2-4 meters away is 6% and 5-9 meters away is 3%. The ratio of rill erosion amount of these three slope element is 5:2:1, which shows the rill erosion amount are mainly from the slope element of 4 meters from the foot of slope. (authors)

  15. Anisotropy of Soil Hydraulic Properties Along Arable Slopes

    JING Yuan-Shu; ZHANG Bin; A.THIMM; H.ZEPP

    2008-01-01

    The spatial variations of the soil hydraulic properties were mainly considered in vertical direction.The objectives of this study were to measure water-retention curves,θ(ψ),and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions,K(ψ),of the soils sampled at different slope positions in three directions,namely,in vertical direction,along the slope and along the contour,and to determine the effects of sampling direction and slope position of two soil catenas.At the upper slope positions,the surface soils (0-10 cm) sampled in the vertical direction had a lower soil water content,θ,at a certain soil water potential (-1500 kPa <ψ<-10 kPa) and had the greatest unsaturated hydraulic conductivity,K,at ψ> -10kPa.At the lower slope positions,K at ψ>-10 kPa was smaller in the vertical direction than in the direction along the slope.The deep soils (100-110 cm) had similar soil hydraulic properties in all the three directions.The anisotropic variations of the hydraulic properties of the surface soils were ascribed to the effects of natural wetting and drying cycles on the structural heterogeneity.These results suggested that the anisotropy of soil hydraulic properties might be significant in influencing soil water movement along the slope and need to be considered in modeling.

  16. Pleistocene tectonic accretion of the continental slope off Washington

    Silver, E.A.

    1972-01-01

    Interpretation of reflection profiles across the Washington continental margin suggests deformation of Cascadia basin strata against the continental slope. Individual reflecting horizons can be traced across the slope-basin boundary. The sense of offset along faults on the continental slope is predominantly, but not entirely, west side up. Two faults of small displacement are seen to be west-dipping reverse faults. Magnetic anomalies on the Juan de Fuca plate can be traced 40-100 km eastward under the slope, and structural interpretation combined with calculated rates of subduction suggests that approximately 50 km of the outer continental slope may have been formed in Pleistocene time. Rocks of Pleistocene age dredge from a ridge exposing acoustic "basement" on the slope, plus the results of deep-sea drilling off northern Oregon, are consistent with this interpretation. The question of whether or not subduction is occurring at present is unresolved because significant strain has not affected the upper 200 m of section in the Cascadia basin. However, deformation of the outer part of the slope has been episodic and may reflect episodic yield, deposition rate, subduction rate, or some combination of these factors. ?? 1972.

  17. Finite element analysis of effect of ankle ligment injury on stability of talus%踝关节周围韧带损伤对距骨稳定性影响的有限元分析

    戴海飞; 余斌; 张凯瑞; 熊小龙; 陈志刚; 崔壮; 卢昌怀

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the biomechanical properties of the talus in different ankle ligament injury through finite element analysis and therefore to provide theoretical basis for the clinic treatment of ankle ligament injury. Methods CT scan data, three-dimensional anatomically detailed finite element models was used to simulate human ankle joint internal rotation, external rotation stress state of the finite element analysis. The contact pressure and Von Mises stress distribution of the talar articular surface were compared in different ankle ligament injury. Results The three-dimensional finite element model of bone, cartilage and ligaments of the normal human ankle was established. The biomechanical stability of the talus which influenced by the ankle ligament was different in the internal rotation and external rotation force. Conclusion The anterior tibio-talar ligament playes an important role in ankle stability under external rotation force while under internal rotation force, calca-neofibular ligament playes an important role.%目的 有限元法分析踝关节周围韧带损伤对距骨生物力学稳定性的影响,为临床踝关节周围韧带损伤的治疗提供理论依据.方法 基于正常男性的足踝部螺旋CT扫描数据,运用三维重建软件,建立足踝部三维几何模型,最后导人Abaqus 6.9软件中,模拟人体踝关节内旋、外旋的受力状况,分析踝关节周围韧带损伤后距骨各关节面的接触压力及Von Mises应力分布.结果 建立包括骨、软骨、韧带在内的正常人体足踝部三维有限元模型,踝关节周围韧带在踝关节内旋、外旋时对距骨的生物力学影响不同.结论 在外旋作用力下胫距后韧带对踝关节的稳定性具有重要作用,而在内旋作用力下跟腓韧带对踝关节的稳定性具有重要作用.

  18. Photogrammetry and altimetry: Part C: frequency distributions of lunar slopes

    Wu, Sherman S.C.; Moore, H.J.

    1972-01-01

    The metric and panoramic cameras aboard the Apollo 16 spacecraft provided photographs on which photogrammetric techniques may be used to obtain precise measurements of horizontal distances and elevations. These measurements of horizontal distances and elevations. These measurements may in turn be used to obtain slope-frequency distributions of lunar surfaces at various slope lengths and for various types of terrain and geologic map units (ref. 30-4). Bistatic radar and photoclinometric methods have also been used to obtain slope-frequency distributions of lunar surfaces. The problem arises as to how well these varied methods correlate with one another (ref. 30-5).

  19. Slope Deformation Prediction Based on Support Vector Machine

    Lei JIA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper principally studies the prediction of slope deformation based on Support Vector Machine (SVM. In the prediction process,explore how to reconstruct the phase space. The geological body’s displacement data obtained from chaotic time series are used as SVM’s training samples. Slope displacement caused by multivariable coupling is predicted by means of single variable. Results show that this model is of high fitting accuracy and generalization, and provides reference for deformation prediction in slope engineering.

  20. Stability analysis of slopes of expansive soils considering rainfall effect

    ZHU Fang-cai

    2007-01-01

    Typical failure types of slopes of expansive soils are divided to two kinds: slip in surface layer and slip in shallow layer. Based on total strength law of expansive soils, the relationship between its water content and shear strength inculding cohesion and friction angle, was studied in detail. Acoording to change of water content and depth effect during rainfall, distribution of shear strength in slopes of expansive soils was analyzed. Finally,with a slope of expansive soils in Nanning city of Guangxi Autonomous Region of China as a case, safety factor and slip surface was studied.

  1. A modified risk evaluation method of slope failure in a heavy rain. For application to slopes in widespread area

    A risk evaluation method of slope failure has developed to combine gas-liquid two phase flow analysis as a rainfall infiltration analysis and elastic-plastic finite element analysis as a slope stability analysis and has applied to a slope field. This method, however, had a difficulty to apply to many slopes since it needed many parameters to calculate the risk of the slope failure. The method was simplified to lessen input parameters which included an inclination and length of a slope, a depth of bedrock and a rainfall pattern assuming that hydraulic properties and mechanical properties were similar for the same geological unit. The method was also modified to represent a water collection structure, a surface runoff, an existence of a forest road and a water level variation of a downward river / pond which could affect infiltration phenomena. Results of the simplification and the modification made it possible to enhance a prediction precision of the method and create a hazard map of slopes in widespread area. (author)

  2. Adaptive slope compensation for high bandwidth digital current mode controller

    Taeed, Fazel; Nymand, Morten

    converter duty cycle. The adaptive slope compensation provides optimum controller operation in term of bandwidth over wide range of operating points. In this paper operation principle of the controller is discussed. The proposed controller is implemented in an FPGA to control a 100 W buck converter. The......An adaptive slope compensation method for digital current mode control of dc-dc converters is proposed in this paper. The compensation slope is used for stabilizing the inner current loop in peak current mode control. In this method, the compensation slope is adapted with the variations in...... experimental results of measured loop-gain at different operating points are presented to validate the theoretical performance of the controller....

  3. North Slope, Alaska ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for brown bears, caribou, and muskoxen for the North Slope, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set...

  4. Slope movements in Callejón de Huyalas, Peru

    Vilímek, V.; Zapata, M. L.; Stemberk, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 35, supplementum (2003), s. 39-51. ISSN 0300-5402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : slope movements * natural hazards * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  5. Goose banding, Koyukuk and north slope Alaska, 1978

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Goose drive trapping and banding was successfully conducted in the Galena and North Slope areas of Alaska in 1978. This was the fourth year of a five consecutive...

  6. CONCIDERING OF FUNDATION SLOPE TO DETERMINE THE ENGENEERING STRUCTURE HEIGHT

    Zubko, Z.

    2005-01-01

    The article considers some aspects of determining of engineering structure height. It proposes the technique for terrain slope consideration in the course of base adjustment under difficult conditions of geodetic surveying.

  7. The swans and geese of Alaska's arctic slope

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A mid-summer aerial search was made on the 23,000 square miles of waterfowl habitat on Alaska's Arctic slope. Observations included 159 whistling swan (Olor...

  8. North Slope, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for whales, seals, walruses, and polar bears for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector polygons in this data...

  9. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes (Future)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type....

  10. Mass movement hazard assessment model in the slope profile

    Colangelo, A. C.

    2003-04-01

    The central aim of this work is to assess the spatial behaviour of critical depths for slope stability and the behaviour of their correlated variables in the soil-regolith transition along slope profiles over granite, migmatite and mica-schist parent materials in an humid tropical environment. In this way, we had making measures of shear strength for residual soils and regolith materials with soil "Cohron Sheargraph" apparatus and evaluated the shear stress tension behaviour at soil-regolith boundary along slope profiles, in each referred lithology. In the limit equilibrium approach applied here we adapt the infinite slope model for slope analysis in whole slope profile by means of finite element solution like in Fellenius or Bishop methods. In our case, we assume that the potential rupture surface occurs at soil-regolith or soil-rock boundary in slope material. For each slice, the factor of safety was calculated considering the value of shear strength (cohesion and friction) of material, soil-regolith boundary depth, soil moisture level content, slope gradient, top of subsurface flow gradient, apparent soil bulk density. The correlations showed the relative weight of cohesion, internal friction angle, apparent bulk density of soil materials and slope gradient variables with respect to the evaluation of critical depth behaviour for different simulated soil moisture content levels at slope profile scale. Some important results refer to the central role of behaviour of soil bulk-density variable along slope profile during soil evolution and in present day, because the intense clay production, mainly Kaolinite and Gibbsite at B and C-horizons, in the humid tropical environment. A increase in soil clay content produce a fall of friction angle and bulk density of material, specially when some montmorillonite or illite clay are present. We have observed too at threshold conditions, that a slight change in soil bulk-density value may disturb drastically the equilibrium of

  11. Research on the Slope Protection Mechanism of Roots

    Juan Wan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the slope protection mechanism of roots. In ecological slope protection, plant roots can fix soil and protect slop through biological and mechanical action. However, previous studies on the slope protection mechanism are still not deep enough and inadequate. By taking four kinds of typical plant roots along Wu-Shen Expressway as the research object, through the indoor tensile test and root morphology observation analysis, the tensile strength and ultimate tension were studied and the influence to the stability of the slope was discussed in this study. The results show that the mean ultimate tension of roots is 7.19~29.96 N. The mean tension of shrub roots is 2~4 times greater than that of herb roots. The ultimate tension of the same plant roots increases with the diameter significantly. To the range of improvement, Shrub roots exceed herb ones. It also indicates that the mean tensile strength of roots are 24.48~74.25 MPa. Compared with the steel HRB235, the tensile strength of herb roots is as great as 1/5~1/3, while Shrub roots is about 1/10~1/5. The slope stability coefficient with plant growing is a positive correlation with roots tension and root number through the sliding surface and is a negative correlation with plants weight. In addition, the slope stability coefficient is related to plant density and root morphology. The test results demonstrate that the roots tension with acute angle or right angle to the landslide surface and the roots shear stiffness with obtuse angle can improve the performance of slope’s anti-slide. Four kinds of plants can improve the stability coefficient of shallow soil. As for the slope protection effect, herbage is superior to shrub. In general, grass-shrub mixed community is the ideal system for slope protection.

  12. Factors affecting the molybdenum line slope by reactive ion etching

    Factors affecting the slope of the reactive ion etched molybdenum line have been studied with a simulation method and with experiments. Plasma chemistry and process parameters of the CF4/O2 mixture for the molybdenum etch have been examined. The theoretical calculation matches experimental results. Surface topography and composition of the etched molybdenum have been analyzed. A highly sloped molybdenum profile can be obtained by using the RIE method with a large process window

  13. Slope Stability Evaluations by Limit Equilibrium and Finite Element Methods

    Aryal, Krishna Prasad

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with slope stability evolutions carried out by commonly used limit equilibrium (LE) and finite element (FE) methods. The study utilizes two LE based software (SLOPE/W and SLIDE) and one FE based software (PLAXIS). The principal difference between these two analyses approaches is that the LE methods are based on the static of equilibrium whereas FE methods utilise the stress‐strain relationship or constitutive law. To fulfil one of the aims of the study, the LE based methods...

  14. Novel Measurement Technique of the Tibial Slope on Conventional MRI

    Hudek, Robert; Schmutz, Silvia; Regenfelder, Felix; Fuchs, Bruno; Koch, Peter P.

    2009-01-01

    The posterior inclination of the tibial plateau, which is referred to as posterior tibial slope, is determined routinely on lateral radiographs. However, radiographically, it is not always possible to reliably recognize the lateral plateau, making a separate assessment of the medial and lateral plateaus difficult. We propose a technique to measure the plateaus separately by defining a tibial longitudinal axis on a conventional MRI. The medial plateau posterior tibial slope obtained from radio...

  15. Slope Stability Evaluations by Limit Equilibrium and Finite Element Methods

    Aryal, Krishna Prasad

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with slope stability evolutions carried out by commonly used limit equilibrium (LE) and finite element (FE) methods. The study utilizes two LE based software (SLOPE/W and SLIDE) and one FE based software (PLAXIS). The principal difference between these two analyses approaches is that the LE methods are based on the static of equilibrium whereas FE methods utilise the stress‐strain relationship or constitutive law. To fulfil one of the aims of the study, the LE based method...

  16. Assessment of overgrazing on degradation of sloping soil

    Bondi, Giulia; Peruzzi, Eleonora; Macci, Cristina; Doni, Serena; Masciandaro, Grazia; Pistoia, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Overgrazing, particularly on slopes, can cause significant alterations in soil quality, determining a greater vulnerability to soil erosion. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of horse overgrazing on sloping (20%) soil properties. Chemical and biochemical parameters have been determined in order to evaluate soil quality. A significant decrease in nutrients was observed after one year. The trend of enzyme activities highlighted a reduction of metabolic processes. However, after o...

  17. Exploring Benthic Biodiversity Patterns and Hotspots on European Margin Slopes

    Roberto Danovaro; Miquel Canals; Serge Heussner; Nikolaos Lampadariou; Ann Vanreusel

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that continental slope ecosystems represent one of the major repositories of benthic marine biodiversity. The enhanced levels of biodiversity along slopes are hypothesized to be a source of biodiversity for continental shelves and deeper basins. Continental margins are increasingly altered by human activities, but the consequences of these anthropogenic impacts on benthic biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are almost completely unknown. Thus, there is an urgen...

  18. Exploring benthic biodiversity patterns and hotspots on European margin slopes

    Danovaro, R.; M. Canals; Gambi, C.; S. Heussner; Lampadariou, N.; Vanreusel, A.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that continental slope ecosystems represent one of the major repositories of benthic marine biodiversity. The enhanced levels of biodiversity along slopes are hypothesized to be a source of biodiversity for continental shelves and deeper basins. Continental margins are increasingly altered by human activities, but the consequences of these anthropogenic impacts on benthic biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are almost completely unknown. Thus, there is an urgen...

  19. A new vision of carbonate slopes: the Little Bahama Bank

    Mulder, Thierry; Gillet, Hervé; Hanquiez, Vincent; Reijmer, John J.; Tournadour, Elsa; Chabaud, Ludivine; Principaud, Mélanie; Schnyder, Jara; Borgomano, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Recent data collected in November 2014 (RV Walton Smith) on the upper slope of the Little Bahama Bank (LBB) between 30 and 400 m water depth allowed to characterize the uppermost slope (Rankey et al., 2012) over a surface of 170 km2. The new data set includes multibeam bathymetry and acoustic imagery, 3.5 kHz very-high resolution (VHR) seismic reflection lines, 21 gravity cores and 11 Van Veen grabs. The upper slope of the LBB does not show a steep submarine cliff as known from western Great Bahama Bank. The carbonate bank progressively deepens towards the basin through a slighty inclined plateau. The slope value is genus Halimeda. Sediments collected in the deeper part of the basin (water depth = 1080 m) on the distal lobe consist of massive fine to medium well-sorted aragonitic sand. This suggests that carbonate slope systems are able to sort sediment despite the relative short slope distance. Sorting could either be due to flow spilling above the terraces identified in the canyon heads (Mulder et al., 2012) or could result from bottom currents. In this area, flow velocity profiles in the water column show the presence of two superposed water masses with a pycnocline at about 600-700 m water depth. Mulder, T., Ducassou, E., Gillet, H., Hanquiez, V., Tournadour, E., Combes, J., Eberli, G.P, Kindler, P., Gonthier, E., Conesa, G., Robin, C., Sianipar, R., Reijmer, J.J.G., and François A. Canyon morphology on a modern carbonate slope of the Bahamas: Evidence of regional tectonic tilting. Geology, 40(9), 771-774. Rankey, E.C, and Doolittle, D.F. (2012). Geomorphology of carbonate platform-marginal uppermost slopes: Insights from a Holocene analogue, Little Bahama Bank, Bahamas. Sedimentology, 59, 2146-2171.

  20. Assessment of cropland area on sloping land in DPRK

    Following the famines of the mid 1990s, the government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) authorized cultivation on sloping land before deciding, in the years 2000, to limit this practice on slopes above 15 degrees in order to reduce erosion. There are still many cultivated fields on slopes and their total estimated area ranges from 300,000 ha to more than 2 million ha. This study aims at assessing cropland areas on slopes above 10 and 15 degrees by using high to very high resolution remote sensing satellite imagery. For this purpose, a grid of points was superimposed over the DPRK territory and stratified according to slope, as derived from two DEMs, the 30 m ASTER GDEM V2 and the 3 arc second (∼90 m) SRTM Dem V4. A sample of about 2100 points was drawn using an optimal allocation sampling plan, based on a preliminary assessment of the variance of the estimated cropland percentage per class of slope. These 2100 points were interpreted into cropland, no cropland and doubt using mostly Google Earth imagery acquired after 2004. For slopes above 10 degrees, the area cropped was estimated to be around 1,000,000 ha (5.6% CV) and 742,000 ha (8.1% CV) according to the ASTER and SRTM DEM respectively. Above 15 degrees, the estimated cropland area ranges from 360,000 ha (9.7% CV) with SRTM to 540,000 ha (6.6.% CV) with ASTER. To decide between these two estimations, a validation of the two DEMs should be carried out on a region with similar relief. Alternatively, a higher accuracy DEM such as the one to be derived from the TanDEM-X mission in 2014 should provide more accurate estimates of the cropland area on sloping land

  1. Problems of definitive slopes mining at Doly Nastup Tusimice

    The instability of slopes influents mining business in many aspects at open-cast mining. The temporary decrease of intended mined volumes due to land slips is common and sometimes there is necessary to change origin-mining plans. It has impact to economy and other essential costs for rehabilitation are required. In case of definitive slopes formation in contact to traffic and communication networks, watercourses and infrastructures of seats stability of slope security there is even more important. Monitoring of rock massive stability plays an important role. Everything which stability of slopes is concerned belongs to essential tasks for mining technicians at open-cast mining. The article explains what ways for definitive slope formation near mining boundary were selected at Severoceske doly j.s.c., Doly Nastup Tusimice mining site. The precautions refer to mining technology, preventive and reconstruction precautions for stabilization of slopes must to solve, are to described. Tasks, which mining engineers, surveyors, geologists and geotechnics have to solve are described. (authors)

  2. Alternative method for direct measurement of tibial slope

    Stijak Lazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The tibial slope is one of the most frequently cited anatomical causes of anterior cruciate ligament trauma. The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of direct measuring of the tibial slope of the knee without prior soft tissue dissection in cadavers. Methods. Measurement was performed on the two groups of samples: osteological and cadaveric. The osteological group consisted of 102 matured tibiae and measurement was performed: indirectly by sagittal photographing of the tibia, and directly by a set of parallel bars. The cadaveric group consisted of 50 cadaveric knees and measurement was performed directly by a set of parallel bars. The difference and correlation between indirect and the direct measurements were observed, which included also measuring of the difference and correlation of the tibial slope on the medial and lateral condyles. Results. A statistically significant difference between the direct and indirect method of measuring (p 0.05. However, the slope on the medial condyle, as well as indirect measurement showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01. Conclusion. By the use of a set of parallel bars it is possible to measure the tibial slope directly without removal of the soft tissue. The results of indirect, photographic measurement did not statistically differ from the results of direct measurement of the tibial slope.

  3. Slope Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using ArcGIS's Spatial Analyst 'Slope' Tool. Slope describes the maximum steepness of a...

  4. Soil properties in high-elevation ski slopes

    Filippa, Gianluca; Freppaz, Michele; Letey, Stéphanie; Corti, Giuseppe; Cocco, Stefania; Zanini, Ermanno

    2010-05-01

    The development of winter sports determines an increasing impact on the high altitude ecosystems, as a consequence of increased participation and an increasing demand of high quality standards for skiable areas. The construction of a ski slope is associated with a certain impact on soil, which varies as a function of the degree of human-induced disturbance to the native substrata. In this work, we provide a description of the characteristics of alpine tundra ski-slope soils and their nutrient status, contrasted with undisturbed areas. The study site is located in the Monterosaski Resort, Aosta Valley, NW Italy (45°51' N; 7°48' E). We chose 5 sites along an altitudinal gradient between 2700 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Per each site, one plot was established on the ski slope, while a control plot was chosen under comparable topographic conditions a few meters apart. Soils were described and samples were collected and analysed for main chemical-physical properties. In addition an evaluation of N forms, organic matter fractionation and microbial biomass was carried out. Soil depth ranged between 10 to more than 70 cm, both on the ski slope and in the undisturbed areas. A true organo-mineral (A) horizon was firstly identified at 2500 m a.s.l., while a weathering horizon (Bw) was detected at 2400 m a.s.l.. However, a Bw horizon thick enough to be recognised as diagnostic for shifting soil classification order from Entisols to Inceptisols (USDA-Soil Taxonomy) was detected only below 2400 m a.s.l.. Lithic Cryorthents were predominant in the upper part of the sequence (above 2500 m a.s.l.), both in the ski slope and the undisturbed areas; Typic Cryorthents were identified between 2500 and 2400 m a.s.l., while Inceptisols were predominant between 2400 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Chemical-physical properties will be discussed focusing on the main differences between ski slope and undisturbed soils, as determined by the ski slope construction. Pedogenetic processes at high altitude are

  5. Landslides induced by heavy rainfall in July 2012 in Northern Kyushu District, Japan and the influence of long term rainfall increase comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Aditian, Aril

    2013-04-01

    soil strength reduction by seismic shaking. The target areas are located in northern Kyushu district, western Japan where they often have severe landslide disasters. The geology in research areas consists of Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks (mainly schist, slate) and Quaternary volcanic sediment such as Aso volcano body. The vegetation consists of mainly Japanese cypress, cedar or bamboo. 3. Result and consideration Consequently, the long term rainfall increase in the region such as increment of approximately 20 mm/hr for rain intensity Ri in 36 years is confirmed statistically using Kendall's rank correlation, and it is found that its impact on slope stability is considerable and critical in other cases. In the sample landslide slopes, even the increase in rain of duration for only 10 years has impact to a certain extent on their stabilities in terms of Fs. The Fs calculated with rains in previous decade is higher than 1.0 that corresponds to stable state, whereas the Fs with present rains is lower than 1.0 such as 0.99 which means unstable state. Extremely heavy rainfall with this impact is generally cause extreme ground water pressure in the slope. It is also obvious that the extreme ground water content rendered even small landslides liquefied to be source of destructive debris flows. In this disaster, especially in the Aso volcanic region, tremendous number of debris flow occurred and even the talus cone slopes which are usually stable collapsed to flow down. However, the influence of the long term rainfall increase on the slopes (such as 1% decrease in Fs) is not relatively small compared with the destabilization of the slopes due to the reduction of soil strength by seismic shaking (8~9 % reduction in Fs after seismic shaking of even 490gal). 4. Conclusion In the disaster in July 2012, many landslides and debris flows originated from landslides induced by concentrated underground water supplied by the heavy rainfall occurred. The increase of rainfall due to climate

  6. Effect of subthreshold slope on the sensitivity of nanoribbon sensors

    Sun, K.; Zeimpekis, I.; Hu, C.; Ditshego, N. M. J.; Thomas, O.; de Planque, M. R. R.; Chong, H. M. H.; Morgan, H.; Ashburn, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate how the sensitivity of a nanowire or nanoribbon sensor is influenced by the subthreshold slope of the sensing transistor. Polysilicon nanoribbon sensors are fabricated with a wide range of subthreshold slopes and the sensitivity is characterized using pH measurements. It is shown that there is a strong relationship between the sensitivity and the device subthreshold slope. The sensitivity is characterized using the current sensitivity per pH, which is shown to increase from 1.2% ph‑1 to 33.6% ph‑1 as the subthreshold slope improves from 6.2 V dec‑1 to 0.23 V dec‑1 respectively. We propose a model that relates current sensitivity per pH to the subthreshold slope of the sensing transistor. The model shows that sensitivity is determined only on the subthreshold slope of the sensing transistor and the choice of gate insulator. The model fully explains the values of current sensitivity per pH for the broad range of subthreshold slopes obtained in our fabricated nanoribbon devices. It is also able to explain values of sensitivity reported in the literature, which range from 2.5% pH‑1 to 650% pH‑1 for a variety of nanoribbon and nanowire sensors. Furthermore, it shows that aggressive device scaling is not the key to high sensitivity. For the first time, a figure-of-merit is proposed to compare the performance of nanoscale field effect transistor sensors fabricated using different materials and technologies.

  7. Impacts of Habitat Slope on Plant from of Astracantha adscendens

    S.J. Khajeddin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Astracantha adscendens is an endemic species in Iran growing on alpine and above alpine timberline habitats on the Zagross Mountain Range. These habitats are characterized by steep slopes, heavy snowfalls and long ice formation periods. The present study was carried out in Chelgerd, Bakhtiari, and Fereidan, Isfahan. Slopes, elevation above sea-level, and magnetic north azimuth were measured. The canopy cover was also measured along four radii in upward, downward, left and right directions. Regression analysis was performed for the measured values of plant and environmental factors. The results revealed that the upward radius had a high negative correlation with slope changes while the downward radius showed no relationship with slope variations. The two left and right radii had a high and positive relationship with each other, both reducing in length as the slope steepness increased. Shrub volume decreases with increasing slope steepness. Plant shape was classified into seven groups using Sorenson similarity index and constructing the dendrogram. Snow pressure bends the stem toward the soil surface. Snow gliding pressure scratches stem and its base buds above the bent stem. Soil and debris move downward the slope as a result of snow gliding and rainfall runoff as well as wildlife and domestic animals. Snow gliding along with other natural factors have various effects on A. adscendens plant form which can be grouped under three categories: direct mechanical effect of snow, physiological effect of snow, and indirect effect of precipitation and wildlife. The environmental factors and plant physiological responses to them change the A. adscendens plant form from a funnel or ob-conical shape to a semi-funnel or semi ob-conical form.

  8. Simulation of a sloped solar chimney power plant in Lanzhou

    Research highlights: → A sloped solar chimney power plant in Lanzhou, China is investigated. → The configuration sizes are designed separately. → The system has high periodicity and stability but low efficiency. → The sloped solar chimney power system is of high value for Northwest China. -- Abstract: Solar chimney power system is one large-scale utilization style of solar energy, which has drawn high attentions worldwide. Though scholars all over the world have made many researches on the solar chimney power system, reports of sloped solar chimney power system are still few. A sloped solar chimney power plant, which is expected to provide electric power for remote villages in Northwest China, has been designed for Lanzhou City in this paper. The designed plant, in which the height and radius of the chimney are 252.2 m and 14 m respectively, the radius and angle of the solar collector are 607.2 m and 31o respectively, is designed to produce 5 MW electric power on a monthly average all year. The performances, such as the airflow temperature increase, pressure, the airflow speed, system efficiency and solar collector efficiency, of the built sloped solar chimney power plant are simulated and presented. Simulation results show that parameters of the sloped solar chimney power plant are symmetrical and stable; the power plant has better performances in spring and autumn days; the overall efficiency of the power plant is low. Considering the abundant solar radiation, environmental friendliness, easy management and low population density, the sloped solar chimney power system is of high value to Northwest China.

  9. Very rare Q-slope none overcome by electropolishing and baking

    We discovered the very rare Q-slope none overcome by electropolishing and baking at 120degC for 48 hours. The Q-slope is not related to 'Hydrogen disease'. The Q-slope is not improved by the wiping and steam so that we recognize that the Q-slope is not caused by some cohesion things of the cavity's surface. The rare Q-slope is categorized a low, medium and high rare Q-slope. In this paper, we report the Rare Q-slope and the categorized rare Q-slope. (author)

  10. Characterization of Unstable Rock Slopes Through Passive Seismic Measurements

    Kleinbrod, U.; Burjanek, J.; Fäh, D.

    2014-12-01

    Catastrophic rock slope failures have high social impact, causing significant damage to infrastructure and many casualties throughout the world each year. Both detection and characterization of rock instabilities are therefore of key importance. An analysis of ambient vibrations of unstable rock slopes might be a new alternative to the already existing methods, e.g. geotechnical displacement measurements. Systematic measurements have been performed recently in Switzerland to study the seismic response of potential rockslides concerning a broad class of slope failure mechanisms and material conditions. Small aperture seismic arrays were deployed at sites of interest for a short period of time (several hours) in order to record ambient vibrations. Each measurement setup included a reference station, which was installed on a stable part close to the instability. Recorded ground motion is highly directional in the unstable parts of the rock slope, and significantly amplified with respect to stable areas. These effects are strongest at certain frequencies, which were identified as eigenfrequencies of the unstable rock mass. In most cases the directions of maximum amplification are perpendicular to open cracks and in good agreement with the deformation directions obtained by geodetic measurements. Such unique signatures might improve our understanding of slope structure and stability. Thus we link observed vibration characteristics with available results of detailed geological characterization. This is supported by numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media with complex topography.For example, a potential relation between eigenfrequencies and unstable rock mass volume is investigated.

  11. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  12. The Stability of Unsaturated Soil Slope Affected by Rainfall Seeping

    Zhang Shilin; Wang Guochen; Shao Longtan

    2007-01-01

    Because rainfall seeping makes losing stability of unsaturated soil slope, and arouses great loss to production and human being safety, the stability of unsaturated soil slope has been researched by many scholars recently. This article mainly uses the model for the prediction of shear strength with respect to soil suction, developed by Vanapalli and Fredlund to formulate rainfall seeping how to affect the stability of unsaturated soil slope. Firstly, volumetric water content of unsaturated soil slope changes with rainfall duration, and effective saturation changes with its volumetric water content. Secondly, soil volume weight changes with its volumetric water content. Thirdly, matric suction also changes with its volumetric water content. According to these causes, this article researches how much they make the contribution to the minimum safety coefficient respectively. At last, these factors roundly considered, this article gets the rule of minimum safety coefficient of unsaturated soil slope with rainfall duration that is minimum safety coefficient gradually increasing firstly, then decreasing that is composed of two sectors, first is slowly decreasing, then is fast decreasing after some value.

  13. Retrieval of short ocean wave slope using polarimetric imaging

    We present a passive optical remote sensing technique for recovering shape information about a water surface, in the form of a two-dimensional slope map. The method, known as polarimetric slope sensing (PSS), uses the relationship between surface orientation and the change in polarization of reflected light to infer the instantaneous two-dimensional slope across the field-of-view of an imaging polarimeter. For unpolarized skylight, the polarization orientation and degree of linear polarization of the reflected skylight provide sufficient information to determine the local surface slope vectors. A controlled laboratory experiment was carried out in a wave tank with mechanically generated gravity waves. A second study was performed from a pier on the Hudson River, near Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. We demonstrated that the two-dimensional slope field of short gravity waves could be recovered accurately without interfering with the fluid dynamics of the air or water, and water surface features appear remarkably realistic. The combined field and laboratory results demonstrate that the polarimetric camera gives a robust characterization of the fine-scale surface wave features that are intrinsic to wind-driven air–sea interaction processes

  14. Robustness for slope stability modelling under deep uncertainty

    Almeida, Susana; Holcombe, Liz; Pianosi, Francesca; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Landslides can have large negative societal and economic impacts, such as loss of life and damage to infrastructure. However, the ability of slope stability assessment to guide management is limited by high levels of uncertainty in model predictions. Many of these uncertainties cannot be easily quantified, such as those linked to climate change and other future socio-economic conditions, restricting the usefulness of traditional decision analysis tools. Deep uncertainty can be managed more effectively by developing robust, but not necessarily optimal, policies that are expected to perform adequately under a wide range of future conditions. Robust strategies are particularly valuable when the consequences of taking a wrong decision are high as is often the case of when managing natural hazard risks such as landslides. In our work a physically based numerical model of hydrologically induced slope instability (the Combined Hydrology and Stability Model - CHASM) is applied together with robust decision making to evaluate the most important uncertainties (storm events, groundwater conditions, surface cover, slope geometry, material strata and geotechnical properties) affecting slope stability. Specifically, impacts of climate change on long-term slope stability are incorporated, accounting for the deep uncertainty in future climate projections. Our findings highlight the potential of robust decision making to aid decision support for landslide hazard reduction and risk management under conditions of deep uncertainty.

  15. On the role of topographic amplification in seismic slope instabilities

    Fardin Jafarzadeh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface wave generation due to body wave propagation near ground surface has been discussed in the literature. This phenomenon, typically occurring in topographic changing areas, along with its interaction with body waves (SV, decreases precision of formulas for evaluation of slope displacement. This significant fact caused the researchers not only to investigate the combined surface and SV waves motion pattern, but also to consider its effect on structures built on the slopes. In order to reveal the phenomenon, several finite element numerical studies have been performed by ABAQUS programme. Besides, two physical model slopes simulating the landslide occurrence have been constructed and tested by shaking table device. The results of induced and calculated accelerations obtained by two approaches have been compared and Rayleigh wave generation has been proved. Furthermore, the slope displacements have been calculated by various empirical methods and the results were compared with numerical ones. The results proved that in order to increase the precision of empirical formulas for displacement prediction, surface wave effect should be taken into account. Finally, a concept of “effective depth of surficial amplification” is introduced and its effect on dynamic slope stability is analysed.

  16. Linking Slope Sedimentation, Gradient, Morphology, and Active Faulting: An Integrated Example from the Palos Verdes Slope, Southern California Borderland

    Maier, K. L.; Brothers, D. S.; Paull, C. K.; McGann, M.; Caress, D. W.; Conrad, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor gradient variations associated with restraining and releasing bends along the active (1.6-1.9 mm/yr) right-lateral Palos Verdes Fault appear to control Holocene sediment thickness, depositional environment, and morphodynamic processes along a section of the continental slope offshore Los Angeles, California. Autonomous underwater mapping vehicle (AUV), remotely operated vehicle (ROV), and shipboard methods were used to acquire a dense grid of high-resolution chirp profiles (150 m line spacing; 11 cm vertical resolution), multibeam bathymetry (2 m grid), and targeted sediment core samples (<2 m length). Detailed interpretation of Holocene deposits in the chirp profiles combined with radiocarbon dating and laser particle-size analyses allow correlation of Holocene sediment thickness and seafloor gradient with sediment gravity flow deposits. Holocene down-slope flows appear to have been generated by mass wasting processes, primarily on the upper slope (~100-200 m water depth) where shipboard multibeam bathymetry reveals submarine landslide headwall scarps in a region that has been isolated from terrigenous sediment sources throughout the Holocene. Submarine landslides appear to have transformed into sandy and organic-rich turbidity currents that created up-slope migrating sediment waves, a low relief (<5 m) fault-bounded channel, and a series of depocenters. A down-slope gradient profile and a Holocene isopach down-slope profile show that the primary depocenter occurs within a small pull-apart basin associated with a decrease in seafloor gradient of ~1.5°. Holocene sediment-flow deposits vary in number, thickness, and character with subtle changes in seabed gradient (<0.5°) and depositional environment. These results help quantify morphodynamic sensitivity to seafloor gradients and have implications for down-slope flow dynamics, deep-water depositional architecture, Holocene sediment, nutrient, and contaminant transport, and turbidite paleoseismology along

  17. An anatomic study and clinical application of sustentaculum talus for displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures%载距突的解剖学研究及其在跟骨关节内移位骨折手术中的应用

    王志杰; 邹云雯; 钟世镇; 丁自海

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the anatomy and clinical application of sustentaculum talus for displaced intraarticular calcancal fractures. Methods The anterior tilt angles of the sustentaculum talus and the anterior part of posterior calcaneal facet, the maximal width of the middle calcaneum and the maximal and minimal thicknesses of the sustentaculum talus base were measured in 40 pieces of adult calcaneal spec-imens. The intraarticular structures of normal calcaneum were observed, including anatomical relations of the sustentaculum talus. The internal screw fixation of middle calcaneum was simulated to measure the positions and angles of screws. Follow-ups were conducted in 27 patients with displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures treated by ORIF through an extensile right-angled lateral incision. The accuracy of screw insertion and func-tional outcome were assessed. Results The anterior tilt angle of the sustentaculum talus is 50°±5°, the anterior tilt angle of anterior part of posterior calcaneal facet is 69°±5°, the width of the middle calcaneum is (41.75±1.76) mm, and the maximal and minimal thicknesses of sustentaculum tali base are (12.14±1.60) mm and (4.81±1.07) mm respectively. The compact structure of bone trabecula beneath the sus-tentaculum talus progresses to the inferior part of the posterior calcaneal facet. The sustentaculum talus is closely connected with the tendons and vessels running along medially. The best 3 positions for screw insertion measured on coronal plane from the posterior facet to the sustentaculum talus are as follows: the lowest position is 25°±5° upwards, the highest point is 3°±3° downwards and the middle position is 13°±3°. The excellent and good rate of functional outcome was 88.9%. Conclusions ORIF through an extensile right-angled lateral incision is effective for displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures. The sustentaculum talus is a good place for screw insertion. The length of screws can be determined by

  18. Development of a GIS-based failure investigation system for highway soil slopes

    Ramanathan, Raghav; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Tanyu, Burak F.

    2015-06-01

    A framework for preparation of an early warning system was developed for Maryland, using a GIS database and a collective overlay of maps that highlight highway slopes susceptible to soil slides or slope failures in advance through spatial and statistical analysis. Data for existing soil slope failures was collected from geotechnical reports and field visits. A total of 48 slope failures were recorded and analyzed. Six factors, including event precipitation, geological formation, land cover, slope history, slope angle, and elevation were considered to affect highway soil slope stability. The observed trends indicate that precipitation and poor surface or subsurface drainage conditions are principal factors causing slope failures. 96% of the failed slopes have an open drainage section. A majority of the failed slopes lie in regions with relatively high event precipitation ( P>200 mm). 90% of the existing failures are surficial erosion type failures, and only 1 out of the 42 slope failures is deep rotational type failure. More than half of the analyzed slope failures have occurred in regions having low density land cover. 46% of failures are on slopes with slope angles between 20° and 30°. Influx of more data relating to failed slopes should give rise to more trends, and thus the developed slope management system will aid the state highway engineers in prudential budget allocation and prioritizing different remediation projects based on the literature reviewed on the principles, concepts, techniques, and methodology for slope instability evaluation (Leshchinsky et al., 2015).

  19. Newton slopes for Artin-Schreier-Witt towers

    Davis, Christopher James; Wan, Daqing; Xiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We fix a monic polynomial f(x)∈Fq[x] over a finite field and consider the Artin-Schreier-Witt tower defined by f(x); this is a tower of curves ⋯→Cm→Cm−1→⋯→C0=A1, with total Galois group Zp. We study the Newton slopes of zeta functions of this tower of curves. This reduces to the study of the Newton...... slopes of L-functions associated to characters of the Galois group of this tower. We prove that, when the conductor of the character is large enough, the Newton slopes of the L-function form arithmetic progressions which are independent of the conductor of the character. As a corollary, we obtain a...

  20. Forest harvesting influence on slope erosion in Baikal Basin Mountains

    Onuchin, A. A.; Borisov, A. N.; Burenina, T. A.

    2009-04-01

    Post-logging recovery of forest water protection and erosion prevention functions can occur different ways on slopes and in big river catchments. While erosion decreases several times during only three to five years after logging on slopes, as compared to its immediate post-logging rate, water silt load in big rivers can remain high for decades after forest logging in their catchments. Among other factors, this can be attributable to erosion of timber transportation roads and skidding trails, which become extremely eroded 10-15 years following forest logging. One should not underestimate a probable sediment load increase resulting from post-logging channel runoff changes. Disregarding this increase leads to contradictory conclusions about post-logging recovery of forest water protecting capability. Investigating this issue requires to clearly determine the type of the forest site of interest (a certain slope, an elementary or a complex catchments) and to consider the experience gained so far in estimating erosion rate changes depending on changing forest areas of continents. Therefore, hierarchical river catchments ranking should be recognized effective and useful for forest hydrology. This approach will allow systematizing the existing information and facilitating the development of fruitful analysis of water protection and erosion prevention functions of forest in areas of different ranks. This study used an approach that enabled a single-model description of the rate of soil erosion previously estimated by different models for areas of various ranks, from a micro slope to elementary catchments. An elementary catchments is defined as the smallest drainage area characterized by uniform surface, ground, and vegetation structures and having a single well-pronounced channel, with hydro network being practically absent. Using runoff slope length as the argument and introducing a dummy variable that describes specific investigation methodologies ensured high generality

  1. Experimental Study of Wave Breaking on Gentle Slope

    2000-01-01

    -An experimental study of regular wave and irregular wave breaking is performed on a gentle slope of 1:200. In the experiment, asymmetry of wave profile is analyzed to determine its effect on wave breaker indices and to explain the difference between Goda and Nelson about the breaker indices of regular waves on very mild slopes. The study shows that the breaker index of irregular waves is under less influence of bottom slope i, relative water depth d/ L0 and the asymmetry of wave profile than that of regular waves. The breaker index of regular waves from Goda may be used in the case of irregular waves, while the coefficient A should be 0.15. The ratio of irregular wavelength to the length calculated by linear wave theory is 0.74. Analysis is also made on the waveheight damping coefficient of regular waves after breaking and on the breaking probability of large irregular waves.

  2. Sensitivity of atypical lateral fire spread to wind and slope

    Simpson, Colin. C.; Sharples, Jason J.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents new knowledge of the environmental sensitivity of a dynamic mode of atypical wildland fire spread on steep lee-facing slopes. This is achieved through a series of idealized numerical simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF-Fire coupled atmosphere-fire models. The sensitivity of the atypical lateral fire spread across lee slopes is tested for a varying background wind speed, wind direction relative to the terrain aspect, and lee slope steepness. The results indicate that the lateral spread characteristics are highly sensitive to each of these environmental conditions, and there is a broad agreement with the empirical thresholds calculated for lateral spread events observed in the 2003 Canberra bushfires. A theory to explain these environmental thresholds and their apparent interdependency is presented. The results are expected to have important implications for the management of wildland fires in rugged terrain.

  3. The Socioeconomic Assessment of Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    Liu, Zhen

    Abstract This thesis mainly focuses on the socioeconomic impact of the largest Ecological Recovery Program ― the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP), also called Grain for Green Program (GFG) in China. The central government initiated this program in 1999 and it was launched nationwide in 2002...... amount of household survey data, this study aims to improve our understanding of the treatment effect of the SLCP on farm households, which is split into three parts. The first paper ― The Sloping Land Conversion Program in China: Effects on Rural Households’ Livelihood Diversification, evaluates the...... effects of the implementation of the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) on livelihood diversification, which is thought to be the solution to poverty and environmental dilemmas. Our results show that SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention on rural livelihood diversification. In addition...

  4. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Takacs, Peter Z.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-09-16

    A collaboration, including all DOE synchrotron labs, industrial vendors of x-ray optics, and with active participation of the HBZ-BESSY-II optics group has been established to work together on a new slope measuring profiler -- the optical slope measuring system (OSMS). The slope measurement accuracy of the instrument is expected to be<50 nrad for the current and future metrology of x-ray optics for the next generation of light sources. The goals were to solidify a design that meets the needs of mirror specifications and also be affordable; and to create a common specification for fabrication of a multi-functional translation/scanning (MFTS) system for the OSMS. This was accomplished by two collaborative meetings at the ALS (March 26, 2010) and at the APS (May 6, 2010).

  5. Rock mass characterisation and stability analyses of excavated slopes

    Zangerl, Christian; Lechner, Heidrun

    2016-04-01

    Excavated slopes in fractured rock masses are frequently designed for open pit mining, quarries, buildings, highways, railway lines, and canals. These slopes can reach heights of several hundreds of metres and in cases concerning open pit mines slopes larger than 1000 m are not uncommon. Given that deep-seated slope failures can cause large damage or even loss of life, the slope design needs to incorporate sufficient stability. Thus, slope design methods based on comprehensive approaches need to be applied. Excavation changes slope angle, groundwater flow, and blasting increases the degree of rock mass fracturing as well as rock mass disturbance. As such, excavation leads to considerable stress changes in the slopes. Generally, slope design rely on the concept of factor of safety (FOS), often a requirement by international or national standards. A limitation of the factor of safety is that time dependent failure processes, stress-strain relationships, and the impact of rock mass strain and displacement are not considered. Usually, there is a difficulty to estimate the strength of the rock mass, which in turn is controlled by an interaction of intact rock and discontinuity strength. In addition, knowledge about in-situ stresses for the failure criterion is essential. Thus, the estimation of the state of stress of the slope and the strength parameters of the rock mass is still challenging. Given that, large-scale in-situ testing is difficult and costly, back-calculations of case studies in similar rock types or rock mass classification systems are usually the methods of choice. Concerning back-calculations, often a detailed and standardised documentation is missing, and a direct applicability to new projects is not always given. Concerning rock mass classification systems, it is difficult to consider rock mass anisotropy and thus the empirical estimation of the strength properties possesses high uncertainty. In the framework of this study an approach based on

  6. Detecting regular dynamics from time series using permutations slopes

    Eyebe Fouda, J. S. Armand; Koepf, Wolfram

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present the entropy related to the largest slope of the permutation as an efficient approach for distinguishing between regular and non-regular dynamics, as well as the similarities between this method and the three-state test (3ST) algorithm. We theoretically establish that for suitably chosen delay times, permutations generated in the case of regular dynamics present the same largest slope if their order is greater than the period of the underlying orbit. This investigation helps making a clear decision (even in a noisy environment) in the detection of regular dynamics with large periods for which PE gives an arbitrary nonzero complexity measure.

  7. Comparison between characteristics of mild slope equations and Boussinesq equations

    2005-01-01

    Boussinesq-type equations and mild-slope equations are compared in terms of their basic forms and characteristics. It is concluded that linear mild-slope equations on dispersion relation are better than non-linear Boussinesq equations. In addition, Berkhoff experiments are computed and compared by the two models, and agreement between model results and available experimental data is found to be quite reasonable, which demonstrates the two models' capacity to simulate wave transformation. However they can deal with different physical processes respectively, and they have their own characteristics.

  8. Wave Run-Up on Sloping Coastal Structures

    Rouck, J. De; Troch, P.; Ronde, J. De; Frigaard, Peter; Gent, M. R. A. van

    2001-01-01

    Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which are taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. The crest level design of these structures is mainly based on physical scale model results.......Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which are taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. The crest level design of these structures is mainly based on physical scale model results....

  9. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands—where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in April 2001—may shed...

  10. Radiographic and functional results of the Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck fractures via internal and lateral approaches%内、外侧双切口治疗HawkinsⅢ型距骨颈骨折

    张文海; 卢艳东; 王敬博; 张克刚; 郑玉晨; 姚辉; 李宝和; 王裕民

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical results and related key points of surgical treatment for Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck fractures.Methods From March 2005 to March 2010,26 patients with Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck fracture were treated and 21 of them were followed,including 13 males and 8 females,with an average age of 37.6 years.The fractures occurred on the left side in 11 patients and on the right side in 10patients.The mechanism of injury included high falling injury in 13 patients,traffic accident injury in 7 patients and rolling down injury in 1 patient.Five cases were closed fractures and 6 cases were open fractures.A bilateral approach,the medial and lateral approaches,was used to perform the operation with cannulated screw fixation in emergency.After external fixation in functional position for 6 weeks without loading,ankle joints were allowed to take exercise with hinge brace and to bear partially basing on plain radiograph 12-16weeks later.The weight-bearing should be adjusted with follow-up.Functional results were assessed according to AOFAS (American Orthupaedic Foot and Ankle Society,AOFAS)score.Results The average duration of follow-up was 36.6 months (range,6-60 months).All fractures gained union and the average union time was 4.5 months.The average AOFAS score was 78.6.There were 4 cases in excellent results,10 in good,5 in fair and 2 in poor.The overall excellent and good rate was 67.8%.Traumatic arthritis occurred in 13 cases and avascular necrosis in 5 cases.Conclusion The effect of surgical treatment for Hawkins Ⅲtalus neck fracture via a bilateral approach is satisfactory.%目的 探讨HawkinsⅢ型距骨颈骨折的手术注意事项及临床疗效.方法 2005年3月至2010年3月手术治疗HawkinsⅢ型距骨颈骨折26例,完整随访资料者21例,男13例,女8例;年龄18~50岁,平均37.6岁;左侧11例,右侧10例.坠落伤13例,车祸伤7例,滚落伤l例.闭合骨折15例,开放骨折6例.所有患者均急症采用内、外侧双切