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Students' Information Literacy Needs: Competencies for Teacher-Librarians in the 21st Century.  

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Highlights the major professional and personal competencies necessary for teacher-librarians that were developed by the Association for Teacher-Librarianship in Canada (ATLC) and the Canadian School Library Association (CSLA). Topics include the role of the teacher-librarian, impact on school culture and student achievement, collaboration with…

Teacher Librarian, 1998

1998-01-01

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??????????????????????? The Elementary Teacher Librarian Collaborating with Teachers Designing Integrated Information Literacy Instruction  

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Full Text Available ???????????????????????????????????,?????????????????????,?????????????????????????????????,???????????????????????????????,????????????????????????????????,?????????????????????????????????:(?)?????????????????????,????????????????????????????;(?)??????????????????????????????????????????????,?????????;(?)?????????????????????????????;(?)??????????????????????,???????; (?)??????????????????????,????????????,????????????????????,????????The purpose of this research was to solve the problems occurring when elemen- tary teacher librarians and teachers collaboratively design integrated infor- mation literacy instruction. The collaborative action research was used as a framework in this study. The researchers, a teacher librarian, and three teach- ers worked together to implement four action plans, which lasted for one and a half years. During the research process, the methods of collecting data in- cluded observation, interviews, document collection, and survey. The research results showed the following possible strategies for improving the collaboration between the teacher librarians and teachers: 1. In the stage of collaborative initiation, the teacher librarian and teachers should actively invite each other, or join school research projects to start designing the integrated curriculum; 2. In the stage of collaborative planning, they should start to plan the detailed in- structional contents for the coming semester during summer or winter breaks, and the instructional schedule should be flexible; 3. In the stage of collabora- tive implementation, they should co-teach and allocate dedicated time for dis- cussion and reflection; 4. In the stage of collaborative evaluation, they should develop both of evaluation methods and rubrics, and assess students together; 5. In the stage of collaborative reflection, the teacher librarian should invite teachers to examine the curriculum comprehensively when it is finished, and in an ideal situation, they can collect all the documents into a portfolio for a ref- erence in the future.

Lin Ching Chen; Chia-Hui Lee

2009-01-01

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Relationship academic librarian - student: student’s knowledge of academic librarians’ work  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An academic library is supposed to provide quality services to the students, faculty employees and others. The students, who constitute the majority of the users, often seem to lack the skills and knowledge necessary to navigate and locate items within the library during this crucial period of life between education and employment.University librarians play a key role in explaining all the services of an academic library.A library is used by students mostly as a place to study, wait for their classes to start or search for the necessary literature. A question arose: how well do the students know the duties of academic librarians and how to encourage them to learn more about their work and find out what these information technology experts can offer? Students of the University of Ljubljana have been interviewed to determine that. 98 students of the average age of 23 years were interviewed in December 2008 and January 2009. The results showed their poor knowledge of academic libraries as most of the students do not know how many people are employed there and what their skills and everyday duties are. They do believe, however, that the professors encourage them to visit the library, but sadly do not perceive the librarians as qualified assistants of the faculty and only seldom credit them for their part in achieving their scholastic performance. We can therefore conclude that academic librarians are not key persons to the students during the time of attending the university. The academic library should try harder to emphasize its prominence and role in tertiary education as a key factor in information literacy - an important part of lifelong learning.

Mira Vidic; Primož Južni?

2010-01-01

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Becoming Teacher-Librarian 2.0  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available If you’ve visited a school library recently, you’ll know that it’s a very social place. Theonly straight rows you will see in this classroom are in the stacks. Collaboration is thefocus of teaching and learning strategies in the school library program. Teacherlibrarianscollaborate with classroom teachers to plan, teach and assess research units.The instructional approach in the library is constructivist, with students creating theirown understanding, most often through collaborative activities, and the conversationcontinues with the school library providing fundamental support for independent readingand engagement in reading. There is no program in the school that is better suited toexploiting the possibilities of social software.

Anita Brooks Kirkland

2007-01-01

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Internet Censorship Issues for Teacher-Librarians.  

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Describes and critiques emerging issues about Internet access in schools and school libraries. Discusses software products for filtering and rating expressive content on the Internet, reader-response-theory implications for filtering and rating Internet content, ambiguities, and the role of school librarians and acceptable-use policies. (AEF)

Schrader, Alvin

1999-01-01

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Evaluation of the Teacher-Librarian: A Discussion Guide.  

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Discusses evaluation of the teacher-librarian and describes nine areas of competence deemed necessary by the Canadian School Library Association (CSLA): (1) administration; (2) selection of learning resources; (3) acquisition, organization, and circulation of resources; (4) guidance; (5) design and production of resources; (6) information…

Haycock, Ken

1991-01-01

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The Effect of Professional Development on Teacher and Librarian Collaboration: Preliminary Findings Using a Revised Instrument, TLC-III  

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This study describes preliminary results of a study with elementary school teachers and librarians. Professional-development intervention workshops were conducted to improve teacher and school librarian collaboration to integrate library and subject content. A revised 24-item teacher and school librarian collaboration instrument (TLC-III) was used…

Montiel-Overall, Patricia; Hernandez, Anthony C. R.

2012-01-01

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Academic Librarians Have Concerns about Their Role as Teachers. A Review of: Walter, Scott. “Librarians as Teachers: A Qualitative Inquiry into Professional Identity.” College and Research Libraries 69.1 (2008): 51-71.  

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Full Text Available Objective – This study explores how academic librarians are introduced to teaching, the degree to which they think of themselves as teachers, the ways in which being a teacher has become a significant feature of their professional identity, and the factors that may influence academic librarians to adopt a “teacher identity.” Design – A literature review extended by qualitative semi-structured interviews.Setting – The research took place at an American university with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching designation of “Doctoral/Research — Extensive.”Subjects – Six academic librarians.Methods – The main feature of the article is an extensive literature review around the themes of LIS, teaching, and qualitative research methodologies. The literature review is supplemented by qualitative research consisting of semi-structured interviews of between 45 and 90 minutes each, which were conducted during spring2004 with six librarians (five women and one man), whose length of professional service ranged from 2 to 32 years. All of the participants worked at the same institution. The data collected were reviewed throughout the process using field memos and a research log. The data were analyzed using a coding process where discrete ideas that emerged from the data were used to identify a small number of themes. The initial conclusions in the study were validated through member checking during the writing phase. “Member checking involves sharing draft study findings with the participants, to inquire whether their viewpoints were faithfully interpreted, whether there are gross errors of fact, and whether the account makes sense to participants with different perspectives”(Centre for Health Evidence).Main Results – Five themes around teaching and teacher identity as they pertain to academic librarians emerged from thedata. The first theme was the centrality of teaching. Each participant sought out a position where the teaching role was valued.The role of teacher spilled over into the other roles of the librarian, i.e., reference service, collection development, etc. Thenext theme was the importance of collegial and administrative support, which is critical to the ability to focus on work as a teacher. The stress of multiple demands emerged as a theme, as time dedicated to teaching was often at the expense of something else. Another theme was the problems with professional education around teaching. Instruction course offerings in library schools were reported to be meagre, and some were badly planned and executed. The fifth theme involved stereotypes and misperceptions. Studies have shown that the academic library profession has been poorly understood by students and faculty. Study participants believed that many of their campus colleagues were either unaware of what they did, or were misinformed by popular culture stereotypes of librarians.Conclusions – The small sample size precluded the making of any definite conclusions based on the study results. Other limitations of the study include the relatively short amount of time spent in the interview process and the narrow range of librarians chosen to participate. The author notes that a subject pool more representative of academic librarians’ full range of opinions regarding the importance of teaching as a professional responsibility would have resulted in more complex themes emerging. While the author is aware of the study’s limitations, he feels there is value in the qualitative research design, in giving voice to individual librarians, and in the provision of insight into some of the research questions found in the literature of learning to teach and of teacher identity. Given the limitations, Walter makes three conclusions about his findings. He points out the lack of a formal introduction to teaching in many library programs which has been explored by other studies and concludes that his study “suggests that continuing lack of attention to this issue results in a difficult introduction into the profession for

Virginia Wilson

2008-01-01

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A Tale of Two Libraries: School and Public Librarians Working Together  

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The role that a public librarian can play in teaching on-line research classes is put forth. The manner in which school and public librarians can work together to help teachers and students deal with information overload is discussed.

Scordato, Julie

2004-01-01

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The librarian's role in an enrichment program for high school students interested in the health professions.  

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Librarians from the University of South Alabama Biomedical Library partnered to participate in a program that targets minority students interested in health care with instruction in information literacy. Librarians participate in the summer enrichment programs designed to encourage minority students to enter health care professions by enhancing their preparation. The curriculum developed by the Biomedical Library librarians is focused on developing information searching skills. Students indicated that the library segment helped them in their library research efforts and helped them make more effective use of available resources. Librarians involved report a sense of self-satisfaction as the program allows them to contribute to promoting greater diversity in health care professions. Participating in the summer enrichment program has been beneficial to the students and librarians. PMID:23394421

Rossini, Beverly; Burnham, Judy; Wright, Andrea

2013-01-01

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The librarian's role in an enrichment program for high school students interested in the health professions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Librarians from the University of South Alabama Biomedical Library partnered to participate in a program that targets minority students interested in health care with instruction in information literacy. Librarians participate in the summer enrichment programs designed to encourage minority students to enter health care professions by enhancing their preparation. The curriculum developed by the Biomedical Library librarians is focused on developing information searching skills. Students indicated that the library segment helped them in their library research efforts and helped them make more effective use of available resources. Librarians involved report a sense of self-satisfaction as the program allows them to contribute to promoting greater diversity in health care professions. Participating in the summer enrichment program has been beneficial to the students and librarians.

Rossini B; Burnham J; Wright A

2013-01-01

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Information Literacy and Transfer in Schools: Implications for Teacher Librarians  

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This study focuses on the use of the New South Wales (NSW) Department of Education and Training information literacy model in a primary school as the basis for the possible establishment of a culture of transfer of information literacy skills. The study used constructivist grounded analysis to interpret data gathered from teachers and principals.…

Herring, James E.; Bush, Stephanie J.

2011-01-01

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Partnering with Librarians to Meet NCATE Standards in Teacher Education  

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|As colleges of education prepare to meet NCATE standards they will find technically savvy allies and willing partners at their campus libraries. The information literacy and technology targets in the standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) parallel the information literacy standards developed by the…

Birch, Tobeylynn; Greenfield, Louise; Janke, Karen; Schaeffer, Deborah; Woods, Ada

2008-01-01

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Librarian-Teacher Partnerships for Inquiry Learning: Measures of Effectiveness for a Practice-Based Model of Professional Development  

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Full Text Available Objective – This study analyzed the effects of a practice-based model of professional development on the teaching and collaborative practices of 9 teams of librarians and teachers, who created and implemented units of inquiry-focused study with K-12 students during a yearlong course. The authors describe how the collection and analysis of evidence guided the development team in the formative and summative evaluations of the outcomes of the professional development, as well as the long-term results of participation in this initiative.Methods – The authors used an interpretive, participative approach. The first author was the external reviewer for the project; the second author headed the development team and served as a participant-observer. Triangulated data were collected from participants in the form of learning logs, discussion board postings, interviews, questionnaires, and learning portfolios consisting of unit and lesson plans and student work samples with critiques. Data were also collected from the professional development designers in the form of meeting notes, responses to participants, interviews, and course documents. For two years following the end of the formal course, the authors also conducted follow-up email correspondence with all teams and site visits with six teams to determine sustained or expanded implementation of inquiry-focused, collaborative curriculum development. Results – The practice-based approach to professional development required continual modification of the course design and timely, individualized mentoring and feedback, based on analysis and co-reflection by the developers on the evidence gathered through participant logs, reports, and school site visits. Modeling the inquiry process in their own course development work and making this process transparent to the participating community were essential to improvement. Course participants reported beneficial results in both immediate and long-term changes in practice. The summative evaluation identified significant changes in practice in three areas: (1) the design of inquiry-focused learning, (2) the roles of the teacher and librarian in collaborative development of instruction, and (3) the impact on student performance. Two years after the yearlong professional development course, most participants indicated that they continued to incorporate inquiry-based approaches, and over half of the participants were involving other colleagues at their schools in inquiry-focused practices. Six of the librarians assumed major curricular roles in their respective schools. Conclusion – The practice-based model of professional development appears to be effective and sustainable. It has been tested and modified by other development teams in the last two years. More extensive use of the model in other contexts with further testing and refinement by other developers is needed to ensure that the model is robust and widely applicable.

Joyce Yukawa; Violet H. Harada

2009-01-01

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Students as Technology Experts: A "Bottom-Up" Approach to Teacher Technology Development.  

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The intent of this "bottom-up" project was to create a community of learners to facilitate the implementation of computer technologies in the elementary school curriculum. The participants were 6 graduate students and their professor, 10 teachers (grades 1-5), their students, and the librarian in a Professional Development School. Each week on…

Hruskocy, Carole; Ertmer, Peggy A.; Johnson, Tristan; Cennamo, Katherine S.

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Improving Social Work Students' Information Literacy Skills: A Faculty and Librarian Collaboration  

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|The authors present a case study examining a university library initiative intended to increase students' information literacy through effective collaboration with teaching faculty--specifically, the collaboration between an academic librarian and a social work professor. The professor participated in the information literacy initiative and…

Johnson, O. J.; Whitfield, J. S.; Grohe, B.

2011-01-01

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Nursing Faculty Collaborate with Embedded Librarians to Serve Online Graduate Students in a Consortium Setting  

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Nursing and library faculty face many information literacy challenges when graduate nursing programs migrate to online course delivery. The authors describe a collaborative model for providing cost-effective online library services to new graduate students in a three-university consortium. The embedded librarian service links a health sciences…

Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Meeker, Bonnie Juve'

2010-01-01

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Becoming-Teachers: Desiring Students  

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This article proposes a reading of the lives of teachers through a Deleuzian-Guattarian materialistic approach. By asking the question "what kind of life do teachers live?" this article reminds us that teachers sometimes welcome the imposed policies, procedures and programmes, the consequences of which remove them from students. This desire is…

Mercieca, Duncan

2012-01-01

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Students in Nova Scotia Schools Without Teacher-Librarians are not Achieving Department of Education Expectations for Information Literacy Skills. A review of: Gunn, Holly, and Gary Hepburn. “Seeking Information for School Purposes on the Internet.” Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology 29.1 (Winter 2003): 67?88. 24 May 2007  

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Full Text Available Objective – This study investigated whether the expectations for Internet searching strategies outlined in provincial curriculumg oals are being met in Nova Scotia Schools. Twelfth-grade students in representative schools were surveyed as to their Internet information seeking strategies and their perceptions of the effectiveness of those strategies. The results are presented as six themes based on the survey questions.Design – Survey questionnaire consisting of yes/no, multiple-choice, Likert style, and open?ended responses.Setting – Twelfth?grade students from four high schools in one district in Nova Scotia. Total participants: 198.Subjects – Questionnaires were analyzed from 243 general practitioners, practice nurses, and practice managers in four Nottingham primary care trusts as well as practices in the Rotherham Health Authority area.Methods – Four research questions guided this study: 1. What strategies and techniques do students use that are helpful for information?seeking on the Internet? 2. What knowledge do students have of the different World Wide Web search engines? 3. How do students perceive their ability to locate information for school purposes on the Internet? 4. How do students learn how to seek information on the Internet for school related assignments? The survey was developed through a literature review of previous research. Each survey item reflected a theme and one of the four research questions. The survey was field tested in a pilot study with two twelfth?grade students, and two twelfth grade English classes.The sample was assembled by asking principals at the four schools to identify two classes in each of their schools that represented mixed academic abilities. Three schools chose English classes, and one school chose math classes participate in the study. All students had agreed to be a part of the study and only students present in class on the day the questionnaire was given were represented. No effort was made to include students who were absent. Results were tabulated as percentages of responses, and presented in tables related to the themes of the four research questions.Main results – Throughout the study, students reported very few strategies for effective Internet searching. They cited friends and family members rather than teachers as their main sources for support, and reported self?taught trial and error as the most common method of learning search strategies. Despite their lack of effectiveness, most students considered themselves “good” or “very good” at finding the information they need for school purposes. Most of the students used very few of the strategies associated with effective searching that have been stated in prior research studies.• Research Question One: Use of Strategies and Techniques for Information?Seeking on the Internet Only 15% of students used Boolean operators regularly. Over 70% of students did not know how to eliminate commercial sites, use particular features, limit searches to recently updatedp ages or limit searches to the title section of a Web page.• Research Question Two: Knowledge of World Wide Web Search Engines. Google was the overwhelming choice, with 66.7% percent of students reporting that they used it regularly. Other search engines were used from 0 to 22%.• Research Question Three: Students’ Perception of Their Information?Seeking Ability on the Internet 81.3 % of students reported their abilities as good or very good. Only 5% felt their abilities were poor.• Research Question Four: How Students Learn What They Know About Information?Seeking on the Internet 72.7% reported self?teaching strategies. 39.8% relied on friends or classmates, 36.8 % relied on teachers. 2.5% reported librarians as a source Of the students who reported self?teaching,53% used trial and error, 6.6% used help screens and 4% searched for assistance. 80.8% of students who reported teachers as a source for learning information strategie swere taught in computer?related classes, rather than in content ar

Gayle Bogel

2007-01-01

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Teacher Perceptions and Teacher-Student Interaction in Integrated Classrooms.  

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Teacher ratings of students' potential achievement, classroom behavior, personal characteristics, and teacher-student dyadic interaction measures were obtained to examine the nature of teacher perceptions and interaction with Black and White, male and female students in integrated classrooms. Results show teachers perceived Black and White…

Cornbleth, Catherine; Korth, Willard

1980-01-01

 
 
 
 
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Evaluation of five full-text drug databases by pharmacy students, faculty, and librarians: do the groups agree?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to assess the usefulness of five full-text drug databases as evaluated by medical librarians, pharmacy faculty, and pharmacy students at an academic health center. Study findings and recommendations are offered as guidance to librarians responsible for purchasing decisions. METHODS: Four pharmacy students, four pharmacy faculty members, and four medical librarians answered ten drug information questions using the databases AHFS Drug Information (STAT!Ref); DRUGDEX (Micromedex); eFacts (Drug Facts and Comparisons); Lexi-Drugs Online (Lexi-Comp); and the PDR Electronic Library (Micromedex). Participants noted whether each database contained answers to the questions and evaluated each database on ease of navigation, screen readability, overall satisfaction, and product recommendation. RESULTS: While each study group found that DRUGDEX provided the most direct answers to the ten questions, faculty members gave Lexi-Drugs the highest overall rating. Students favored eFacts. The faculty and students found the PDR least useful. Librarians ranked DRUGDEX the highest and AHFS the lowest. The comments of pharmacy faculty and students show that these groups preferred concise, easy-to-use sources; librarians focused on the comprehensiveness, layout, and supporting references of the databases. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the importance of consulting with primary clientele before purchasing databases. Although there are many online drug databases to consider, present findings offer strong support for eFacts, Lexi-Drugs, and DRUGDEX.

Kupferberg N; Jones Hartel L

2004-01-01

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Relations of Student Perceptions of Teacher Oral Feedback with Teacher Expectancies and Student Self-Concept  

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In this article, the authors investigated the relations of students' perceptions of teachers' oral feedback with teacher expectancies and student self-concept. A sample of 1,598 Taiwanese children in Grades 3 to 6 completed measures of student perceptions of teacher oral feedback and school self-concept. Homeroom teachers identified students for…

Chen, Yi-Hsin; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Chang, George H.

2011-01-01

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The International Teacher: Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Preferred Teacher-Student Interpersonal Behaviour in Two United World Colleges  

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|This study investigated students' and teachers' views of preferred teaching in terms of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship. Interpersonal teacher behaviour was studied by means of the Model for Interpersonal Teacher Behaviour. Data was gathered from 176 students and 39 teachers from two United World Colleges, one in Norway and one in…

van Oord, Lodewijk; den Brok, Perry

2004-01-01

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Teachers’ Expectancy and Students’ Attitude towards Science  

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Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of teachers’ expectancy and students’ attitude towards science (ATS). The participants were 130 teachers and 300 students from secondary schools in Indonesia. The results indicated teachers’ expectancy significantly affected students’ ATS. Different kind of expectancy led teachers to have different classroom behavior. Teachers expect students from the science streams to have significantly higher potential to improve their academic achievements compared to the students from non-science stream. The results also showed that there is a significant correlation between teachers’ expectancy and students’ perception of teachers’ behavior. Furthermore, because students from science stream perceived that their teachers are supportive, they believe that the teachers expected them to score higher in science. In turn, this belief led them to possess higher ATS compared to the non-science stream students, which perceived that their teachers are focusing more on controlling their behavior. It could be concluded that teachers’ expectancy affected students’ ATS, moderated by the students’ perception of teachers’ behavior.

Prihadi Kususanto; Chin Sook Fui; Lim Hooi Lan

2012-01-01

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Teachers and Bullying Developing a Deeper Understanding of Teachers' Perceptions of Teacher-to-Student Bullying  

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Students report that teachers bully them, but a review of the literature indicates that little attention has been given to teacher-to-student bullying. This study used a mixed-methods approach to investigate elementary teachers' perceptions of seriousness and their intent to intervene in teacher bullying incidents. Results indicated that teachers

Zerillo, Christine

2010-01-01

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Student Teacher Input and Teacher Work Sample as Part of a Teacher Education Unit Accountability System.  

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This paper presents findings of surveys completed by student teachers on their ability to prepare a teacher work sample, discussing potential program improvements arising from survey responses related to planning, assessment, and student learning, which are components of a teacher work sample, also sharing student teachers' perceptions of their…

Keese, Nancy; Brown, Tammie

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Working Together: Librarian and Student Collaboration for Active Learning in a Library Eclassroom  

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Full Text Available Active learning strategies based on several learning theories were incorporated during instruction sessions for second year Biological Sciences students. The instructional strategies described in this paper are based primarily on sociocultural and collaborative learning theory, with the goal being to expand the relatively small body of literature currently available that discusses the application of these learning theories to library instruction. The learning strategies employed successfully involved students in the learning process ensuring that the experiences were appropriate and effective. The researchers found that, as a result of these strategies (e.g. teaching moments based on the emerging needs of students) students’ interest in learning information literacy was increased and students interacted with information given to them as well as with their peers. Collaboration between the Librarians, Co-op Student and Senior Lab Instructor helped to enhance the learning experience for students and also revealed new aspects of the active learning experiences. The primary learning objective, which was to increase the students’ information skills in the Biological Sciences, was realized. The advantages of active learning were realized by both instructors and students. Advantages for students attained during these sessions include having their diverse learning styles addressed; increased interaction with and retention of information; increased responsibility for their own learning; the opportunity to value not only the instructors, but also themselves and their peers as sources of authority and knowledge; improved problem solving abilities; increased interest and opportunities for critical thinking, as a result of the actively exchanging information in a group. The primary advantage enjoyed by the instructors was the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to reduce the preparation required to create effective library instruction sessions. Opportunities for further research were also discovered, including the degree to which “social loafing” plays a role in collaborative, active learning.

Marcie Lynne Jacklin; Heather Pfaff

2010-01-01

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The Actions of Teacher-Librarians Minimize or Reinforce Barriers to Adolescent Information Seeking. A Review of: Meyers, Eric M., Lisa P. Nathan, and Matthew L. Saxton. “Barriers to Information Seeking in School Libraries: Conflicts in Perceptions and Practice.” Information Research 12:2 (2007): paper 295.  

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Full Text Available Objective – To study high school teacher-librarians and whether their actions and reactions are aligned with their perception of the role they play in creating an information seeking and learning environment.Design – Triangulation qualitative research undertaken over a 16 month period (Fall 2005 – 2007).Setting – Six high school libraries in the Puget Sound region of the state of Washington, United States.Subjects – Six teacher-librarians, each with a minimum of ten years experience and classroom teachers and students. This sample represented the range of school sizes, the rural, urban, and suburban mix, and the range of significant socioeconomic conditions (qualification for subsidized lunch and English as an additional language) in the region.Methods – Four interviews of one to two hours were held with each teacher-librarian during school hours. Initial interviews were recorded by hand and a set question protocol was used (and included in the appendix). Questions were asked about their professional background and training; their job duties, day to day activities and priorities; their perceptions as to how others (e.g., peers and administrators) support the library; the goals of their library’s services; how students use the library; and their critical assessment of their role. Subsequent interviews were undertaken within two days of a classroom visit to the library and also followed a set protocol of questions (Appendix D). The second set of interviews was audio recorded and transcribed. Two classroom teachers from each school were interviewed for 30 minutes and audio recorded using a set interview protocol (Appendix C) within two days of class participation in library instruction. Library observations ranging from two to three hours each occurred during a minimum of seven randomized times at each library. These observation sessions typically included class instructional sessions of thirty to ninety minutes. The observation protocols are described in an appendix to the study. Consistent note-taking, varying of observation times and days of week, use of triangulated methods, comparison of emergent themes with other studies, audio-taping interviews, inter-coder checks, analyzing data for observer effect, and a number of other approaches ensured validity. Kuhlthau’s theory of intermediation and Zone of Intervention was used as a theoretical framework to categorize the teacher-librarians’ perceptions of their roles and their observed activities. Harris and Dewdney’s principles of information seeking behaviour were used as an analytic framework to study the difference between the teacher-librarians’ perceptions of their roles and their observed practices. These five roles are organizer of information; expert in locating material; identifier and instructor of general sources; advisor of search strategy; and mediator in the process of constructing meaning (Kuhlthau).Main Results – The findings were framed in the six principles of information seeking (Harris & Dewdney) and were presented through use of narrative captured in both the observations and interviews.Principle 1: Information needs arise from the help-seeker’s situation.The high school students in the library to complete assignments about which the teacher-librarians were not apprised; therefore the teacher-librarians were unable to assist the students in meeting information needs.Principle 2: The decision to seek help or not seek help is affected by many factors.Principle 3: People tend to seek information that is most accessible.Issues of control were the greatest barrier to students’ successful information seeking behaviour. In the environments observed, the greatest balance of power was within the control of the teachers, including when and if the students would have access to the library, and whether the teacher-librarian would be informed of the assignment. Within the library facility, the teacher-librarians demonstrated a high need for control and power over the students’ activities and behaviour, and the studen

Julie McKenna

2009-01-01

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The Maxed out Librarian: How I Learned to Keep Smiling and Remain Effective as a Solo Librarian  

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Not so long ago the library at the high school in the author's semirural community was perking along every day with the help of one energetic and dedicated library clerk, a few student staffers, and the author, the professional school librarian. About 700 students, and 50 teachers and paraprofessionals access the library on a regular basis. They…

Busch, Anne

2011-01-01

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Longitudinal Effects of Teacher and Student Perceptions of Teacher-Student Relationship Qualities on Academic Adjustment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The shared and unique effects of teacher and student reports of teacher student relationship quality (TSRQ) in second and third grade on academic self views, behavioral engagement, and achievement the following year were investigated in a sample of 714 academically at-risk students. Teacher and student reports of teacher-student support and conflict showed low correspondence. As a block, teacher and student reports of TSRQ predicted all outcomes, above prior performance on that outcome and background variables. Student reports uniquely predicted school belonging, perceived academic competence, and math achievement. Teacher reports uniquely predicted behavioral engagement and child perceived academic competence. Teacher and student reports of the teacher-student relationship assess largely different constructs that predict different outcomes. Implications of findings for practice and research are discussed.

Hughes JN

2011-09-01

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Learning about Teacher and Student Freedom  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher preparation begins with students who explore challenging topics and issues under the guidance of knowledgeable and skillful teachers. This preparation continues, as pre-service candidates examine theories and research data that support and promote teacher freedom to deal with issues of significance on which there is a range of…

Daly, James

2010-01-01

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Hong Kong Student Teachers' Personal Construction of Teacher Efficacy.  

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This study employed the repertory grid technique to investigate how a sample of 27 student teachers in Hong Kong developed a personal sense of teaching efficacy. The analysis indicated that third-year students' perceptions were more homogeneous than were those of first-year students. The results also indicated that teaching efficacy was viewed in…

Yeung, Ka Wah; Watkins, David

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Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do student teachers receive in their practicum? 2) What are the student teachers’ and mentors’ views of feedback on the practicum? 3) What type of practicum feedback is more effective, oral or written? This study also aims to offer practical ideas that would empower both student teachers and supervisors in improving the practice of giving and receiving feedback in practicum. The data was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The statistical approach that is adopted in the questionnaire depends on frequency and percentage. The item of high frequency and percentage reflects the most significant, required answers for the three study questions. The findings indicated that student teachers and their mentors perceived their feedback practices on practicum positively; however the student teachers believed that both types of feedback are important to them but they are in favour of written feedback more than oral one. The study offered some pedagogical implications and recommendations with regard to feedback on practicum.

Holi Ibrahim Holi Ali; Hamed Ahmed Al-Adawi

2013-01-01

34

Factors influencing trust of teachers among students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In Indonesia, Ki Hajar Dewantoro is one of the most respected scholars in education philosophy. He stated the importance of trust earned by teachers in guiding students in their learning activities. The teacher, as the leader in the class, needs to develop mutual trust between students and teachers. Trust to teachers is strongly required by students as a foundation in developing and expanding their relationship and also social network. It is also the fundamental element in their desire to pursue higher education, for it is only through a sense of trust that student will embrace an empowering sense of freedom and pursuit the knowledge. The exercise of this freedom requires a risk on behalf of students based on the trust of their teachers and the learning experience that they provide. If students trust their teachers, they will be more able to focus on the task at hand and to work and learn more effectively. A total number of 291 senior high school students in Yogyakarta (males=147, females=144) completed an open-ended questionnaire developed for this study that asks how much they trust their teachers and the reason why they trust their teachers. The data was analyzed using indigenous psychological approach of analyzing the content of open-ended responses, categorization of the responses and cross-tabulating with demographic/background information. Results indicated that 63% of participants stated that they trusted their teachers. The main reason for trusting their teachers are as follows: they are perceived as being similar to their parents, teachers’ ability in transferring knowledge, the relationship with teacher, and their abilities of guiding students. The study concluded that trust of senior high school students was established because of views that teachers are parents that have competence in delivering knowledge and are formally established as teachers. Therefore a teacher’s behavior that similarly represents a parent’s behavior at home will produce a child’s trust and this will become the foundation for the students to learn better.

Kurnianingsih, Sri; Yuniarti, Kwartarini Wahyu; Kim, Uichol

2012-01-01

35

Identifying the Types of Student and Teacher Behaviours Associated with Teacher Stress  

Science.gov (United States)

|The objectives of this study were to identify the student behaviours associated with teacher stress and determine the types of teacher behaviours that may elicit these stressful student behaviours. Student teachers (n = 186) and their supervising teachers (n = 77) completed a stressful student behaviour questionnaire, a teacher behaviour…

Geving, Allison M.

2007-01-01

36

WEIGHTING OF STUDENTS’ PREFERENCES OF TEACHER’S COMPETENCIES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe the proposed methodology of identification of the students’ weights or preferences of teacher’s managerial competencies at the Faculty of Economics, Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague (CULS). The goal of this article is not to evaluate the teacher’s scientific ability but describe the evaluation of the teacher’s managerial competencies weights from students’ point of view. For setting of weights there are many different methods that varied in the proportion of including the subjective and objective judgement. Commonly diffused method is the Analytic Hierarchy or Network Process by prof. Saaty (AHP or ANP). Because it is not possible to see or to evaluate teacher’s competencies in complexity, we proposed the questionnaires for pairwise comparisons of various teacher’s managerial characteristics and competencies. These answers are then analysed using the AHP method. The AHP is a method deriving global weights from partial weights received as result of pairwise comparisons.

BROŽOVÁ, Helena

2011-01-01

37

The Use of the European Portfolio for Student Teachers of Languages (EPOSTL) to Foster Teacher Autonomy: English Language Teaching (ELT) Student Teachers' and Teacher Trainers' Views  

Science.gov (United States)

It was the aim of this pilot study to investigate ELT student teachers' and teacher trainers' views on the use of the EPOSTL in pre-service language teacher education of a Turkish state university. Upon the implementation of the EPOSTL as a reflection tool for the second semester of 2010, 25 student teachers and 4 teacher trainers were interviewed…

Cakir, Abdulvahit; Balcikanli, Cem

2012-01-01

38

On systems of relations “gifted studentteacher” and "teacher – gifted student" in secondary school  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We consider socio-psychological aspects of specific relationships in the systems “teacher – gifted student” and “gifted studentteacher”. We consistently argue the need to consider actual socio-psychological requirements to the personality and the role of “special teacher for the gifted” with a targeted selection and training of teachers for developing work with gifted students in secondary schools. We reveal the peculiarities of relationship and mutual importance of teacher and gifted student, depending on the age characteristics of the latter. The fundamentally important position, stated in the article, is the idea based on the basic concept of personalization, that creativity and personal teachers’ “creativeness” is not only his individual psychological trait, but also an effective channel of transferring individual-specific approaches of that particular teacher to the problems of life in general, and to the problematic areas of interest of his gifted students in particular.

N.V. Meshkova

2013-01-01

39

Preservice Secondary Mathematics Teachers’ Knowledge of Students  

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Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the nature of preservice secondary mathematics teachers’ knowledge of students as emerged from a study investigating the development of their pedagogical content knowledge in a methods course and its associated field experience. Six preservice teachers participated in the study and the data were collected in the forms of observations, interviews and written documents. Knowledge of students is defined as teachers’ knowledge of what mathematical concepts are difficult for students to grasp, which concepts students typically have misconceptions about, possible sources of students’ errors, and how to eliminate those difficulties and misconceptions. The findings revealed that preservice teachers had difficulty in both identifying the source of students’ misconceptions, and errors and generating effective ways different than telling the rules or procedures to eliminate such misconceptions. Furthermore, preservice teachers’ knowledge of students was intertwined with their knowledge of subject matter and knowledge of pedagogy. They neither had strong conceptual knowledge of mathematics nor rich repertoire of teaching strategies. Therefore, they frequently failed to recognize what conceptual knowledge the students were lacking and inclined to address students’ errors by telling how to carry out the procedure or apply the rule to solve the given problem correctly.

Hülya K?l?ç

2011-01-01

40

EFL Teachers' Factors and Students' Affect  

Science.gov (United States)

Individual learners' affective factors are very important for foreign language learning. In China foreign language learning mainly happens in the classroom. Foreign language teachers are the organizers and carriers of language classes, and thus they inevitably influence the students' affection. This study explores how EFL teachers influence…

Qin, Lei

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
41

Superfund for Students and Teachers Glossary  

Science.gov (United States)

Transpiration:  A part of the hydrologic cycle in which water vapor passes out of living organisms through a membrane or pores.   From Superfund for Students and Teachers Glossary  -  Search all glossaries for terms containing "transpiration"

2013-09-16

42

Gazing strategies in teacher-student dialog  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper studies multimodal communication between a teacher and a learner. Our long term goal is to specify the behavior of an animated pedagogical agent in a tutoring system. Our methodological approach is based on video corpora annotation. Dyadic interactions between teachers and learners were recorded. We worked with the Pepite tutoring system that assesses the level in algebra of students aged 15-16. We defined an annotation schema applied to a part of the videos. Statistical analysis of the annotations allows for capturing different strategies in the way the teacher uses gaze depending on students’ level and on pedagogical acts

Mohamedade Farouk; Jean-Hugues Réty; Élisabeth Delozanne; Brigitte Grugeon; Nelly Bensimon; Jean-Claude Martin

2007-01-01

43

Science Lab Safety Regulations--Teachers, Teacher Aides, Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

This publication summarizes safety regulations and guidelines for the science classroom laboratory. Contained are directions to the science department head; responsibilities for safety; responsibilities of the science teacher; storage safety regulations; safe techniques; instructions for science students; and special instructions for chemistry…

Vancouver Board of School Trustees (British Columbia).

44

Teachers' Expectations of Teacher-Student Interaction: Complementary and Distinctive Expectancy Patterns  

Science.gov (United States)

|In this study it is investigated what student responses teachers expect in particular teacher behaviour vignettes, and whether experience and gender produce differences in expectations. Teacher behaviour vignettes were presented to teachers (N = 46), who described the student responses they anticipated. Anticipated student responses were then…

de Jong, R. J.; van Tartwijk, J.; Verloop, N.; Veldman, I.; Wubbels, T.

2012-01-01

45

Enriching students' learning experience: furthering opportunities for faculty-librarian collaboration  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In addressing the challenges in the curriculum re-structure moving from a three-year to a four-year undergraduate curriculum from 2012 at the University of Hong Kong, coupled with the move to outcomes-based approaches within a learning commons environment, further opportunities arise for librarian-f...

Chan, GRYC

46

Student-Teacher Linkage Verification: Model Process and Recommendations  

Science.gov (United States)

As momentum grows for tracking the role of individual educators in student performance, school districts across the country are implementing projects that involve linking teachers to their students. Programs that link teachers to student outcomes require a verification process for student-teacher linkages. Linkage verification improves accuracy by…

Watson, Jeffery; Graham, Matthew; Thorn, Christopher A.

2012-01-01

47

Librarian as Professor of Social Media Literacy  

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Full Text Available Many high school teachers are prohibited from interacting with students in social media sites despite the fact that the majority of teenagers actively use them. The first opportunity most students have to interact with instructors in an online environment is in higher education. University and college librarians can take the lead in providing social media literacy instruction by developing courses and workshops using the Information Literacy Competency Standards developed by ACRL. This article discusses the development and instruction of a freshmen orientation course at Oregon State University titled Social Media: A Life Lived Online.

Laurie M. Bridges

2012-01-01

48

Comparison between Student’s and Teacher’s Points of View about Clinical Education Environment  

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Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Students learning in clinical education environment is the major part of the curriculums. This study was done with the purpose of comparing the students’ and teachers’ points of view about the status of clinical education environment in Paramedical Sciences and Nursing & Midwifery Schools of Qom University of Medical Sciences in 2012.Methods: This analytical-descriptive study was done on 154 students of Nursing and Midwifery, Operating Room, Anesthesia in fifth semester and above who were serving their apprenticeship and 18 teachers. Data collection was performed using a questionnaire consisted of 22 questions in four major domains (learning opportunity, support for learning, the environment’s facilities, and student-teacher communication.Results: There was a significant difference between students’ and teachers’ points of view in the domains of teacher-student communication, learning opportunity, support for learning, and overall point of view. Also, teachers had more favorable point of view (p<0.05), But no significant difference was observed in the domain of hospital environment facilities (p=0.999).Conclusion: According to the results of this study, knowing the students’ and teachers’ points of view as well as similarities and differences of these viewpoints could be effective in planning for the improvement of clinical education environment.

Seyed Ahmad Bathaei; Mohammad Koohbor; Reza Heidarifar; Maryam Mirizadeh; Neda Khorasani Niasar

2013-01-01

49

Diesel Technology: Engines. [Teacher and Student Editions.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Competency-based teacher and student materials on diesel engines are provided for a diesel technology curriculum. Seventeen units of instruction cover the following topics: introduction to engine principles and procedures; engine systems and components; fuel systems; engine diagnosis and maintenance. The materials are based on the…

Barbieri, Dave; Miller, Roger; Kellum, Mary

50

Improving Student Teachers' Attitudes to Mathematics  

Science.gov (United States)

The research results presented in this paper were part of an action research performed with the aims of improving primary school student teachers (STs)' understanding of, and attitudes to, mathematics. The teaching strategies used to help STs' improve their understanding and attitudes were similar to the ones suggested for their future use in…

Amato, Solange Amorim

2004-01-01

51

Teacher in Residence: Bringing Science to Students  

CERN Multimedia

CERN welcomes its first Teacher in Residence, Terrence Baine of the University of Oslo. Baine, who originally hails from Canada, will be concurrently completing his PhD in Physics Education during his time at CERN. Like CERN’s High School Teacher Programme (HST), of which Baine is an alumnus, the Teacher in Residence position is designed to help educators spread the science of CERN in a form that is accessible to students and can encourage them to pursue physics throughout their education.   Terrence Baine, first 'teacher in residence' at CERN Baine explains, “It’s very important to have a teacher present who can be that middle person between the young peoplecoming here, whom we are trying to enlighten, and the physicists who work at CERN. The Teacher in Residence can act as an on-site educational consultant.” As Teacher in Residence, Baine’s primary project will be to develop teaching modules, or a series of lesson plans, that can help high schoo...

Daisy Yuhas

52

Training graduate students to be teachers  

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Full Text Available Pedagogic education of graduate students, when and where it exists, is restricted to theoretical courses or to the participation of the students as teachers' assistants. This model is essentially reproductive and offers few opportunities for any significant curriculum innovation. To open an opportunity for novelty we have introduced a new approach in "Biochemistry Teaching", a course included in the Biochemistry Graduate Program of the Biochemistry Department (Universidade Estadual de Campinas and Universidade de São Paulo). The content of the course consists of a) choosing the theme, b) selecting and organizing the topics, c) preparing written material, d) establishing the methodological strategies, e) planning the evaluation tools and, finally, f) as teachers, conducting the course as an optional summer course for undergraduate students. During the first semester the graduate students establish general and specific educational objectives, select and organize contents, decide on the instructional strategies and plan evaluation tools. The contents are explored using a wide range of strategies, which include computer-aided instruction, laboratory classes, small group teaching, a few lectures and round table discussions. The graduate students also organize printed class notes to be used by the undergraduate students. Finally, as a group, they teach the summer course. In the three versions already developed, the themes chosen were Biochemistry of Exercise (UNICAMP), Biochemistry of Nutrition (UNICAMP) and Molecular Biology of Plants (USP). In all cases the number of registrations greatly exceeded the number of places and a selection had to be made. The evaluation of the experience by both graduate and undergraduate students was very positive. Graduate students considered this experience to be unique and recommended it to their schoolmates; the undergraduate students benefited from a more flexible curriculum (more options) and gave very high scores to both the courses and the teachers.

D.V. de-Macedo; E. de-Paula; B.B. Torres

1999-01-01

53

Training graduate students to be teachers  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english Pedagogic education of graduate students, when and where it exists, is restricted to theoretical courses or to the participation of the students as teachers' assistants. This model is essentially reproductive and offers few opportunities for any significant curriculum innovation. To open an opportunity for novelty we have introduced a new approach in "Biochemistry Teaching", a course included in the Biochemistry Graduate Program of the Biochemistry Department (Universidad (more) e Estadual de Campinas and Universidade de São Paulo). The content of the course consists of a) choosing the theme, b) selecting and organizing the topics, c) preparing written material, d) establishing the methodological strategies, e) planning the evaluation tools and, finally, f) as teachers, conducting the course as an optional summer course for undergraduate students. During the first semester the graduate students establish general and specific educational objectives, select and organize contents, decide on the instructional strategies and plan evaluation tools. The contents are explored using a wide range of strategies, which include computer-aided instruction, laboratory classes, small group teaching, a few lectures and round table discussions. The graduate students also organize printed class notes to be used by the undergraduate students. Finally, as a group, they teach the summer course. In the three versions already developed, the themes chosen were Biochemistry of Exercise (UNICAMP), Biochemistry of Nutrition (UNICAMP) and Molecular Biology of Plants (USP). In all cases the number of registrations greatly exceeded the number of places and a selection had to be made. The evaluation of the experience by both graduate and undergraduate students was very positive. Graduate students considered this experience to be unique and recommended it to their schoolmates; the undergraduate students benefited from a more flexible curriculum (more options) and gave very high scores to both the courses and the teachers.

de-Macedo, D.V.; de-Paula, E.; Torres, B.B.

1999-12-01

54

Dynamics of the Relationship between Student Teachers and Master Teachers within the Co-Teaching Model  

Science.gov (United States)

Student teaching is a critical step in the process of becoming a teacher. Since its development over the past few decades, student teaching has become a requirement to attain a teaching credential in all fifty of the United States. Unfortunately, the relationship between student teachers and master teachers is frequently wrought with tension. This…

Grothe, Katherine

2013-01-01

55

LIFE-LONG LEARNING AND TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CAN STUDENTS TEACH THEIR TEACHERS?  

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Full Text Available The paper is centered upon the student as a source of learning for the language teacher and the biunivocal, teacher-student, student-teacher knowledge and experience transfer, in the context of life-long learning and the development of motivational strategies related to military foreign language education.

Luiza KRAFT

2011-01-01

56

Disconnections between Teacher Expectations and Student Confidence in Bioethics  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines how student practice of scientific argumentation using socioscientific bioethics issues affects both teacher expectations of students' general performance and student confidence in their own work. When teachers use bioethical issues in the classroom students can gain not only biology content knowledge but also important…

Hanegan, Nikki L.; Price, Laura; Peterson, Jeremy

2008-01-01

57

Nonliterate Adult ESL Students. An Introduction for Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fourteen teachers from four California school districts developed this practical guide for teachers faced with a growing number of adult nonliterate students in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) programs. The guide is organized as follows: student goals and objectives, student characteristics, student identification, classroom activities,…

California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Adult, Alternative, and Continuation Education Div.

58

Supporting Teachers in Identifying Students' Learning Styles in Learning Management Systems: An Automatic Student Modelling Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

In learning management systems (LMSs), teachers have more difficulties to notice and know how individual students behave and learn in a course, compared to face-to-face education. Enabling teachers to know their students' learning styles and making students aware of their own learning styles increases teachers' and students' understanding about…

Graf, Sabine; Kinshuk; Liu, Tzu-Chien

2009-01-01

59

How and Why Do Student Teachers Use ICT?  

Science.gov (United States)

|This paper examines how and why student teachers made use of information and communication technology (ICT) during a 1-year initial teacher education programme from 2008 to 2009. This is a mixed methods study involving a survey (N = 340) of the entire cohort and a series of semi-structured interviews with a sample of student teachers within the…

Hammond, M.; Reynolds, L.; Ingram, J.

2011-01-01

60

Teaching practice: a make or break phase for student teachers  

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Full Text Available Teaching practice is an integral component of teacher training. It grants student teachers experience in the actual teaching and learning environment. We explore the experiences of student teachers in the Vaal University of Technology Post­graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) during their 10 weeks' teaching practice in the Vaal area. In this article we aim to establish the ways in which these experiences influence the student teachers' perception of the teaching profession. Semi-structured interviews with all student teachers were used to collect the data while content analysis was used to identify themes and analyse the data. We established that, despite the positive experiences during teaching practice, student teachers experienced challenges which affected their percep­tion of the teaching profession. Based on the findings of this study, measures are suggested on how to improve teaching practice in order to have a positive influence on the student teachers' perception of, and attitude towards, the tea­ching profession.

Edith Kiggundu; Samuel Nayimuli

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

The effect of teacher’s positive personal resource of features of students’ emotional states  

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Full Text Available We reveal the psychological mechanisms of impact of the formation level of the teacher’s positive values on the academic performance of students, one of the key components of which are the emotional states of students. We describe a study aimed to test the hypothesis that the positive values and standing behind them “strong” character traits of the teacher determine the emotional states specific of his students during the lesson. The study involved 241 teachers of school subjects and 498 pupils of VI, VIII, X, XI grades of several schools in Krivoy Rog. The study demonstrated that a high level of expression of teacher’s positive values, reflected in his professional qualities, provide the appearance of positive emotional states of students. We also revealed patterns of influence of teacher’s positive personal resource on the intensity of the emotional states experienced by students during lessons.

R.A. Trulyaev

2013-01-01

62

Listening for Learning in the Talk: An Ethnographic Story of the School Librarian as Broker in Collaborative Planning with Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Collaboration is widely promoted in school librarianship and education, yet little is known about the talk it entails. This intrinsic case study of eight planning meetings employed a discourse analysis and socio-cultural perspective to examine the school librarian's role as a broker for learning in the discourse of collaborative planning with…

Kimmel, Sue Crownfield

2010-01-01

63

Teacher Attitudes toward Dyslexia: Effects on Teacher Expectations and the Academic Achievement of Students with Dyslexia  

Science.gov (United States)

|The present study examined teacher attitudes toward dyslexia and the effects of these attitudes on teacher expectations and the academic achievement of students with dyslexia compared to students without learning disabilities. The attitudes of 30 regular education teachers toward dyslexia were determined using both an implicit measure and an…

Hornstra, Lisette; Denessen, Eddie; Bakker, Joep; van den Bergh, Linda; Voeten, Marinus

2010-01-01

64

Assessing Teaching Skills Linked to Student Achievement in Candidate Teachers during the Teacher Hiring Process  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this project study was to assist school principals in hiring quality teachers by examining existing hiring processes and research-based criteria on teacher practices that influence student achievement. The superintendent in one school district identified a problem of low student achievement and high teacher turnover. The theoretical…

Fortner, Dale

2011-01-01

65

Student Teachers' Professional Identity Formation: Between Being Born as a Teacher and Becoming One  

Science.gov (United States)

|This article focuses on student teachers' professional identity formation inspired by the tension between two layman points of view namely: being born as a teacher (i.e. based on demographics and personality traits) and becoming a teacher (i.e. based on experience). Besides demographics, personality traits and experience, the teacher preparation…

Schepens, Annemie; Aelterman, Antonia; Vlerick, Peter

2009-01-01

66

Examination of Different Learning Levels of Students' and Student Science Teachers' Concepts About Gravity  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine different grade levels of students’ and student science teachers’ conceptions about gravity related to different problematical situations.

Mehmet KÜÇÜK

2005-01-01

67

Coaching Students in Research Skills: A Difficult Task for Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Describes a study that examined the problems Dutch secondary students encountered when conducting research projects and difficulties teachers faced when coaching students in research skills. Results indicated that problem finding was an underdeveloped skill in education. Although teachers score d much better than students on a test of research…

van der Schee, Joop; Rijborz, Daphne

2003-01-01

68

Teachers' Perceptions of and Interaction with Students in Multicultural Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examination of the relationships between achievement ratings and interaction variables suggest that teachers interpret the same student behavior in different ways depending upon the student's race. With increased understanding of the student characteristics and behaviors influencing the formation of differential teacher perceptions, it would be…

Cornbleth, Catherine; Korth, Willard

69

Teaching Students How to Research the Past: Historians and Librarians in the Digital Age  

Science.gov (United States)

|In this article, the author examines some issues linked to the impact of new technologies on teaching. In a 2003 survey, respondents stressed that the priority was to understand "how new media are changing student learning." There are by now numerous studies that attempt to assess how students conduct research and learn in the digital age, but…

Daniel, Dominique

2012-01-01

70

Bayesian Inference and Student Evaluations of Teachers and Courses.  

Science.gov (United States)

In comparing student ratings of teaching performance, instructor evaluations at the beginning of the course are needed. Without such prior information, student assessment of teachers at the end of the course may not be valid. (Author/RM)

Wetzstein, Michael E.; And Others

1984-01-01

71

Teachers’ emotional expression in interaction with students of different ages  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Emotions are an integral part of “classroom life” and are experienced in teacher-student interactions quite often (Hosotani & Imai-Matsumura, 2011). The present study focuses on teachers’ emotions in classrooms. Its purpose is to establish which emotions are expressed by teachers in their interactio...

Prosen, Simona; Smrtnik Vitulic, Helena; Poljsak Skraban, Olga

72

A Technology Supported Induction Network for Rural Student Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Student teaching is a challenging period for preservice teachers as they make the transition from preparation to practice. Support from mentor teachers and university personnel can make this time easier, helping preservice teachers successfully integrate educational theory into their practice. Because of logistical, financial, and personnel…

Fry, Sara Winstead

2006-01-01

73

Job Satisfaction and Teacher-Student Relationships across the Teaching Career: Four Case Studies  

Science.gov (United States)

We studied the development of teacher-student relationships and teachers' job satisfaction throughout the careers of four veteran teachers who retained high job satisfaction. Teacher data gathered with the narrative-biographical method were compared with students' perceptions of the teacher-student relationships, using the Questionnaire on Teacher

Veldman, Ietje; van Tartwijk, Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Wubbels, Theo

2013-01-01

74

Mathematical Thinking: Teachers Perceptions and Students Performance  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper was investigated the teachers rating of the six different aspects of mathematical thinking developed by the researcher: Searching for patterns , Induction, Deduction, symbolism, Logical thinking and Mathematical proof in relation to level of importance, level of difficulty, and time spent in teaching each aspect. This paper was also aimed to examine any possible consistencies and inconsistencies between teacher opinions about the level of importance of mathematical thinking aspects to mathematics achievement, level of difficulty and test data collected. Also, it was examined if the students were familiar with solving specific problems (such as rice problem) logical ways like searching for patterns rather than more traditional approaches and if they also applying the fourth step in problem solving according to Polya, (1990) (i.e., looking back (a checking the answer)). Key words: Mathematical thinking; Teacher perceptions; Students performanceRésumé Ce document a étudié la notation des six aspects différents de la pensée mathématique des enseignants développé par le chercheur: la recherche de modèles, à induction, déduction, le symbolisme, la pensée logique et mathématique la preuve par rapport au niveau d'importance, le niveau de difficulté et le temps passé dans l'enseignement de chaque aspect. Ce document visait également à examiner toute consistances et des incohérences éventuelles entre les opinions des enseignants sur le niveau d'importance des aspects la pensée mathématique à la réussite en mathématiques, niveau de difficulté et les données recueillies lors des essais. En outre, il a été examiné si les élèves ont été familiarisés avec la résolution de problèmes spécifiques (tels que les problèmes du riz) façons logiques, tels que la recherche de modèles plutôt que des approches plus traditionnelles, et si ils ont également l'application de la quatrième étape dans la résolution de problèmes en fonction de Polya, (1990) (à savoir, en regardant en arrière (une vérification de la réponse)).Mots clés: Pensée mathématique; Les perceptions des enseignants et le rendement des étudiants

Mamoon. M. Mubark

2011-01-01

75

Student Perceptions of Secondary Science Teachers’ Practices Following Curricular Change  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Inquiry-based teaching has emerged as a highly valued strategy in science education. In Portugal, the science curriculum has been redesigned in order to promote such teaching. This implies substantial change in teacher practice. It is therefore important to understand students’ perceptions of teacher practice. In this study, we describe student perception of teacher practices and look for associations between the perceptions and student motivation. Three low-achieving, secondary-level science classes were studied. Motivation was measured by two scales (Intrinsic and Extrinsic); Perceptions were measured in four dimensions. Significant associations (p < .05) were observed between intrinsic motivation and (a) Perception of the use of Laboratory Work; (b) Perception of Science-Technology-Society and (c) Perceived Student Autonomy. No association was noted between intrinsic motivation and the Perception of Teacher as Facilitator. Results are generally consistent with previous literature. Teacher professional development lags behind curricular change. Teachers require new conceptions of assessment.

Carolina CARVALHO; Sofia FREIRE; Joseph CONBOY; Mónica BAPTISTA; Ana FREIRE; Mário AZEVEDO; Teresa OLIVEIRA

2011-01-01

76

TEACHERS’ AND STUDENTS’ VIEWS ABOUT THE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS’ DEMOCRATIC CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT BEHAVIORS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to determine the teachers’ and students’ views about to what extend high school teachers display democratic attitudes and behaviors while managing classroom. This study also aims at investigating both teachers’ views according to gender, professional experiences, and subject variables and students’ views according to gender and grade variables. To this end “Democratic Classroom Management Scale” was administered on the participating teachers and students. The teacher of this descriptive study comprises of a total number of 916 teachers and a total number of 22.023 students from state high schools in Malatya city center during 2005-2006 semester. The sample of the study is 227 teachers and 953 students selected from 8 state high schools. Research results revealed that teachers’ and students’ views differed significantly. While teachers state that they behave in a democratic manner, students think the opposite. Also it was found that students’ views differed significantly according to gender and grade variables.

Gülcan YALÇIN- DURMU?; Hasan DEM?RTA?

2009-01-01

77

Student Teachers' Research Skills as Experienced in Their Educational Training.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Investigated Dutch student teachers' practice, experience, and problems with their required educational research project. Researchers followed four student teachers and created a description of the four cases in terms of the operational, experienced, and attained curriculum. From these descriptions, they formulated improvements for the training…

Brinkman, F. G.; Van Rens, E. M. M.

1999-01-01

78

The Intercultural Sensitivity of Student Teachers in Three Cities  

Science.gov (United States)

This study represents an initial attempt to determine and compare the levels of the intercultural sensitivity of three samples of student teachers in Hong Kong, Shanghai and Singapore using the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI). A total of 317 student teachers participated in the study. Across the three samples, the majority of…

Yuen, Celeste Y. M.; Grossman, David L.

2009-01-01

79

Motivation for Math in Rural Schools: Student and Teacher Perspectives  

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Rural schools, students, teachers, administrators, families and community leaders face unique challenges from those of their urban and suburban counterparts. This paper investigates motivation in rural secondary schools, with a particular focus on mathematics, from teacher and student perspectives. It integrates recent research on math learning…

Hardre, Patricia L.

2011-01-01

80

Using Blended Learning in Developing Student Teachers Teaching Skills  

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The research aims to determine the effectiveness of using blended learning Approach in developing student teachers teaching skills, and defining teaching skills that confront students of teachers college at King Saud University need it. The research uses the Quasi- Experimental approach, with four experimental groups (Mathematics (21)--Science…

Isman, Aytekin; Abanmy, Fahad AbdulAziz; Hussein, Hisham Barakat; Al Saadany, Mohammed Abdelrahman

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Motivation for Math in Rural Schools: Student and Teacher Perspectives  

Science.gov (United States)

|Rural schools, students, teachers, administrators, families and community leaders face unique challenges from those of their urban and suburban counterparts. This paper investigates motivation in rural secondary schools, with a particular focus on mathematics, from teacher and student perspectives. It integrates recent research on math learning…

Hardre, Patricia L.

2011-01-01

82

SLJ's Book Buying Survey: When It Comes to Purchasing Supplemental Books, Librarians' Clout Extends Far beyond the Media Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Media specialists and teachers spend an estimated $1.4 billion annually on nonfiction titles. And even though most librarians, like Shirley Morand of New Richmond High School in Ohio, expect budget cuts this academic year, they still plan to dish out a sizable chunk of money on books that support students' textbooks, according to School Library…

Whelan, Debra Lau

2004-01-01

83

The Teacher I Wish to Be: Exploring the Influence of Life Histories on Student Teacher Idealised Identities  

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This paper examines the influence of life histories and apprenticeship of observation on the formation of student teachers' idealised identities. The life histories of 15 student teachers are decoded. Through eliciting from the student teachers the teacher they wish to be, the paper focuses on the interplay between the personal histories and ideal…

Furlong, Catherine

2013-01-01

84

An exploratory study of the effects of teacher attractiveness on undergraduates' perceptions of teacher-student sexual involvement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study explored whether the attractiveness of a teacher affected perceptions of teacher sexual misconduct. Respondents (120 female and 108 male undergraduates) read scenarios depicting teacher sexual misconduct varied by gender dyad (male teacher-female student and female teacher-male student) and two levels of attractiveness (very attractive or ordinary looking). The attractiveness of the teacher had little impact on respondents' perceptions. Significant interactions emerged on most variables between respondent gender and gender dyad. Specifically, male respondents tended to view the female teacher-male student dyad as less negative than the male teacher-female student dyad. Female respondents generally did not make a distinction based on the gender dyad.

Fromuth ME; Kelly DB; Wilson AK; Finch LV; Scruggs L

2013-01-01

85

Collaborating with Librarians to Develop Lower Division Political Science Students' Information Literacy Competencies  

Science.gov (United States)

Studies suggest that course-integrated information literacy instruction is an effective way to enhance the quality of student research. However, many political science professors are unfamiliar with the growing information literacy movement in higher education today, with strategies for integrating information literacy into their courses and…

Stevens, Christy R.; Campbell, Patricia J.

2008-01-01

86

Communication Breakdown: Librarian and Student Approaches to Virtual Reference Differ. A review of: Walter, Virginia A. and Cindy Mediavilla. “Teens Are from Neptune, Librarians Are from Pluto: An Analysis of Online Reference Transactions.” Library Trends 54.2 (2005): 209-227.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective – To evaluate the effectiveness of an online reference and referral service for students (primarily those in middle school and high school) seeking homework help. Design – Analysis of 114 transcripts of reference transactions. Setting – A centralized homework reference and tutor referral service provided on behalf of the California State Library by the Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. Subjects – Virtual reference librarians at a large urban library system and middle and high school students in California. Methods – One hundred fourteen virtual reference transactions recorded between October 12 and November 8, 2003 were evaluated against the Reference and User Services Association’s (RUSA) “Guidelines for Behavioral Performance of Reference and Information Service Providers.” Secondly, the transcripts were subjected to discourse analysis. Main results Performance of virtual reference librarians vis?àvis RUSA guidelines In the majority of cases, there was some evidence that librarians communicated clearly (110 out of 114 transactions). In 78 cases, it appeared that a librarian was available quickly, and in 92 of the transactions a friendly greeting was given. What was striking, however, was that in a clear majority of cases, some of the classic reference interview strategies were not employed. In 100 or more cases each, the following strategies were not observed: repeating or paraphrasing the question; helping to interpret the question; verifying mutual understanding; asking if the question has been answered; asking if the student needs more information. Furthermore, in 75 cases librarians did not probe for further information to clarify the question, while in 87 cases they did not check that information had been clearly understood. Possibly related to these findings, the researchers felt that the transcripts revealed “a conviction that homework questions are not the proper content for reference transactions” (222). In addition, librarians were found to be frequently too quick to refer students to a tutor, when a query might have been better answered as a reference question. Findings of discourse analysis In general, the virtual reference librarians used impersonal, formal language to “reinforce the professional’s superior position vis?à?vis the help?seeker” (217). There were repeated attempts by the students to interject a lighter or warmer tone (using humour, emoticons, informal language, introducing a personal note, etc.). These attempts were rarely reciprocated, with librarians continuing to use impersonal language, including stock messages such as: “we are experiencing a very busy time right now,” (217); or, “I am going to send you a page which will give you some help with your homework. After we disconnect this session, click on this link and follow the instructions to be connected with a tutor. Please do not click on any links on this page until after we have disconnected” (217). In several cases librarians were preoccupied with defining their roles—for example, specifying that they could give reference help but not advice. In all, the distancing mechanisms used by librarians, combined with occasional inaccurate referrals and technical problems with the software, were seen to create an enormous potential forfrustration on the part of the student. Conclusions – The most important implication of the study was that librarians and students were worlds (or planets) apart in their approach to the reference interaction. While “teens attempted to create meaningby recreating the chat discourse environment in which they were most at home”, librarians “tried to create meaning in a parallel discourse environment that duplicated as much as possible the standard impersonal protocols of a face?to?face reference counter” (223). One suggested way to alleviate the disconnect between librarians and students was to involve students in the planning of the services. For now, however, the authors conclude that “teens are from Neptune, libra

Stephanie Hall

2006-01-01

87

The Effects of Andragogical Teacher Training on Adult Students' Attendance and Evaluation of Their Teachers.  

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The study tested two hypotheses (1) student attendance will be better in classes taught by andragogically trained teachers and (2) students will evalute such teachers more positively. The experimental group received nine hours of andragogy training. Results indicate that the treatment had a significant, positive effect on attendance, but no effect…

Beder, Hal; Carrea, Natalino

1988-01-01

88

Students discussing their mathematical ideas: the role of the teacher  

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This article adds to current research on enhancing student discourse in mathematics teaching specifically in secondary schools but with equal relevance to elementary schools. Three mathematics teachers in secondary education were confronted with the question of how to encourage students to discuss their work with each other in the daily practice of their mathematical lessons. In response to this question the teachers devised three different approaches to encourage student discourse. One of the teachers chose to experiment with another setting to perform mathematical tasks that involved students working together on a group test. The second teacher experimented with a new kind of help when students were working on their maths tasks and asked for assistance. The third created a new setting in which the teacher (temporarily) did not provide mathematical hints and the students had to solve their own problems. The three teachers were very motivated, but they all had difficulties in not giving explanations themselves when supporting their students in their collaborative mathematical learning. They found that temporarily diminishing their product help stimulated discussion between students. It also became clear that the process of teacher reflection and follow-up discussions with the researcher/observers promoted changes of practice.

Pijls, Monique; Dekker, Rijkje

2011-12-01

89

Teacher consultation: impact on teachers' effectiveness and students' cognitive competence and achievement.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers from six ethnically diverse inner-city schools participated in weekly mental health consultation for more than two years. Using a quasi-experimental design, a longitudinal sample of 91 teachers and 209 students was assessed periodically through multiple standardized measures. Results indicate that a low-cost, indirect intervention had a direct impact on teachers' sense of professional competence and was linked to positive changes in students' sense of cognitive competence and their academic achievement. PMID:9250339

Goldman, R K; Botkin, M J; Tokunaga, H; Kuklinski, M

1997-07-01

90

Teacher consultation: impact on teachers' effectiveness and students' cognitive competence and achievement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Teachers from six ethnically diverse inner-city schools participated in weekly mental health consultation for more than two years. Using a quasi-experimental design, a longitudinal sample of 91 teachers and 209 students was assessed periodically through multiple standardized measures. Results indicate that a low-cost, indirect intervention had a direct impact on teachers' sense of professional competence and was linked to positive changes in students' sense of cognitive competence and their academic achievement.

Goldman RK; Botkin MJ; Tokunaga H; Kuklinski M

1997-07-01

91

What inspires South African student teachers for their future profession?  

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Full Text Available The need for an inspired professional teacher corps to haul South African school education out of its current low level of quality was the driving force behind this project. Its aim was to determine what counted as sources of inspiration for student teachers and hence for future teachers. Based on a conceptual-theoretical study, a questionnaire that could probe student teachers' sources of inspiration was completed by a sample of student teachers (n = 1,683). A factor analysis of their responses revealed the following as their sources of inspiration, from most to least important: (extended) family, religion, the teacher education institution, teaching practice, friends, and personal life. A comparison with similar research elsewhere revealed that, in this sample of respondents, considerations, such as education being the only accessible profession or being forced to enter the teaching profession because of economic circumstances, did not figure at all.

Charl Wolhuter; Hannes van der Walt; Ferdinand Potgieter; Louisa Meyer; Thapelo Mamiala

2012-01-01

92

Helping students make meaning of authentic investigations: findings from a student-teacher-scientist partnership.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As student-teacher-scientist partnerships become more widespread, there is a need for research to understand the roles assumed by scientists and teachers as they interact with students in general and in inquiry learning environments in particular. Although teacher roles during inquiry learning have been studied, there is a paucity of research about the roles that scientists assume in their interactions with students. Socio-cultural perspectives on learning emphasize social interaction as a means for students to make meaning of scientific ideas. Thus, this naturalistic study of classroom discourse aims to explore the ways scientists and teachers help high school students make meaning during authentic inquiry investigations. Conversational analysis is conducted of video recordings of discussions between students and teachers and students and scientists from two instances of a student-teacher-scientist partnership program. A social semiotic analytic framework is used to interpret the actions of scientists and teachers. The results indicate a range of common and distinct roles for scientists and teachers with respect to the conceptual, social, pedagogical, and epistemological aspects of meaning making. While scientists provided conceptual and epistemological support related to their scientific expertise, such as explaining scientific phenomena or aspects of the nature of science, teachers played a critical role in ensuring students' access to this knowledge. The results have implications for managing the division of labor between scientists and teachers in partnership programs.

Peker D; Dolan E

2012-03-01

93

Algebra I Teachers’ Perceptions of Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities  

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Full Text Available Although numerous studies have focused on teachers’ perceptions of inclusion, there is a scarcity of subject-specific research on their perceptions of a specific disability. In this study, 63 Algebra I teachers in 27 school districts in Alabama were surveyed to uncover their perceptions of teaching students with learning disabilities (LD) and factors that might affect these perceptions. The results indicated that Algebra I teachers do not have an overall favorable perception of teaching students with LD in inclusive classrooms. Collaboration with a special education teacher and the number of students with LD in the general education classroom were found to significantly contribute to Algebra I teachers’ perceptions of teaching students with LD.

Angela Lusk; Tony Thompson; C. J. Daane

2008-01-01

94

Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships in Indonesia: Profiles and Importance to Student Motivation  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was designed to investigate the distribution of interpersonal profiles based on students' and teachers' perceptions and to examine the associations between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviour and learning motivation in Indonesia. Participants were 1900 secondary school students (grades 7 to 9) across 66 (Mathematics…

Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; den Brok, Perry; Bosker, Roel

2011-01-01

95

Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships in Indonesia: Profiles and Importance to Student Motivation  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study was designed to investigate the distribution of interpersonal profiles based on students' and teachers' perceptions and to examine the associations between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviour and learning motivation in Indonesia. Participants were 1900 secondary school students (grades 7 to 9) across 66…

Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; den Brok, Perry; Bosker, Roel

2011-01-01

96

Job Satisfaction and Teacher-Student Relationships across the Teaching Career: Four Case Studies  

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|We studied the development of teacher-student relationships and teachers' job satisfaction throughout the careers of four veteran teachers who retained high job satisfaction. Teacher data gathered with the narrative-biographical method were compared with students' perceptions of the teacher-student relationships, using the Questionnaire on…

Veldman, Ietje; van Tartwijk, Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Wubbels, Theo

2013-01-01

97

Biology student teachers’ ideas about purpose of laboratory work  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate biology student teachers’ ideas about the purpose of laboratory work in teaching biology. Data has been collected from 82 participating students using an open-ended questionnaire and analyzed using content analysis techniques. The results show that almost all of the student teachers considered laboratory work an integral part of teaching biology. However, participating students focused on the verification of theoretical knowledge and laboratory techniques as the main purpose of laboratory work. Furthermore, most of the participating students ignored the purposes relating to scientific process skills and the nature of science. These results are compared with related literature and recommendations are provided.

Musa DIKMENLI

2009-01-01

98

[Evaluation of students and teachers concerning the "Vital Signs" software].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article had for objective to get students' and teacher's opinions about "Vital Signals" software. The investigation was developed in the Nursing Department of the Federal University of Ceará. The sample population was a total of 6 students and 3 teachers, who were submitted to an interview after using the software. The interviews generated 10 categories, which were separated in two themes: Features which stimulated the use of the "Vital Signals" software; and software educationally correct. The results showed that the teachers valued the correction of the content, while the students focused more on the dynamics of the program.

Lopes MV; de Araujo TL

2004-12-01

99

Teacher competences required for developing reflection skills of nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: This paper is a report of a study in senior secondary vocational education designed to develop a framework for teacher competences to support nursing students in developing their reflection skills. BACKGROUND: For healthcare-related professions such as nursing, there is a growing attention for developing reflection skills. Little is known about teacher competences required to support the development of reflection skills in nursing students. Developing a framework of teacher competences can contribute to filling up this gap. These competences are described in 91 indicators distributed over six task domains. METHODS: A Delphi study was conducted in the first half year of 2008 to get consensus on a framework of teacher competences required for creating the learning environment needed for developing reflection skills in nursing students. Experts judged teacher competences on a seven-point Likert-type scale. FINDINGS: In the first round, mean scores on the teacher competences were already high. Minor revisions were needed. In the second round, mean scores increased, whereas standard deviations decreased in round 2 compared with round 1. These changes were statistically significant. Coaching was seen as most important task domain. CONCLUSION: Consensus has been reached on teacher competences to be used in nursing education to develop students' reflection skills. The framework of competences may be a source for curriculum development concerning reflection skills and for teacher training programmes to coach nursing students' reflections.

Dekker-Groen AM; van der Schaaf MF; Stokking KM

2011-07-01

100

Schema Theory and Categorization of Student and Teacher Metaphors  

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Full Text Available This study explored whether the metaphors written by 504 Iranian learners of English and 140 English teachers behaved like semantic features of the schemata they likened themselves to.  The 239 student and 249 teacher metaphors elicited from the participants were submitted to four raters who assigned them to 13 conceptual categories established by Saban, Kocbeker, and Saban (2007). The statistical analysis of data showed that the categories behave as collective knowledge because there is no significant difference in the frequency of student metaphors written by both students and teachers who view students as passive recipients of knowledge, developing organisms and absolute compliants. Students and teachers, however, differ significantly as regards teacher categories. While the highest percentage of students metaphorised their teachers as facilitators/scaffolders, the teachers assigned a counselor’s role to themselves, indicating that metaphors are sensitive to social positions. Since the categories are pretty stable over age, proficiency level, years and fields of study as well as experience, they reflect the ever-evolving nature of schema in the variety of metaphors with which the categories are depicted and thus reflect the reality of language learning and teaching in Iran.

Ebrahim Khodadady; Mostafa Morady Moghaddam; Hoda Kanan Azar

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

The differential effect of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship on student outcomes for students with different ethnic backgrounds.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The differential effectiveness of schools and teachers receives a growing interest, but few studies focused on the relevance of student ethnicity for this effectiveness and only a small number of these studies investigated teaching in terms of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship. Furthermore, the methodology employed often restricted researchers to investigating direct effects between variables across large samples of students. AIMS: This study uses causal modelling to investigate associations between student background characteristics, students' perceptions of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship, and student outcomes, across and within several population subgroups in Dutch secondary multi-ethnic classes. METHODS AND SAMPLE: Multi-group structural equation modelling was used to investigate causal paths between variables in four ethnic groups: Dutch (N=387), Turkish first- and second-generation immigrant students (N=267), Moroccan first and second generation (N=364), and Surinamese second-generation students (N=101). RESULTS: Different structural paths were necessary to explain associations between variables in the different (sub) groups. Different amounts of variance in student attitudes could be explained by these variables. CONCLUSIONS: The teacher-student interpersonal relationship is more important for students with a non-Dutch background than for students with a Dutch background. Results suggest that the teacher-student relationship is more important for second generation than for first-generation immigrant students. Multi-group causal model analyses can provide a better, more differentiated picture of the associations between student background variables, teacher behaviour, and student outcomes than do more traditional types of analyses.

den Brok P; van Tartwijk J; Wubbels T; Veldman I

2010-06-01

102

Do Liberal Teachers Produce Violent and Xenophobic Students? An Empirical Study of German Ninth Graders and Their Teachers.  

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Surveyed teachers and their students from East and West Berlin, examining whether liberal teachers were producing violent, right-wing youth, primarily due to permissive teaching style. Results found that liberal and permissive teachers did not produce such students. Teachers who emphasized a universalistic, pluralistic political value conviction,…

Bovier, Elke; Boehnke, Klaus

1999-01-01

103

Quality of Student Paper Sources Improves after Individual Consultation with Librarians. A Review of: Reinsfelder, T. L. (2012). Citation analysis as a tool to measure the impact of individual research consultations. College & Research Libraries, 73(3), 263-277.  

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Full Text Available Objective – To determine whether the quality of sources used for a research paper will improve after a student receives one-on-one instruction with a librarian. To test citation analysis and a rating scale as means for measuring effectiveness of one-on-one consultations.Design – Citation analysis.Setting – Academic library of a large American university.Subjects – Papers from 10 courses were evaluated. In total, 76 students were asked to meet with librarians. Of these, 61 actually participated. Another 36 students from the control group were not asked to meet with a librarian (although 1 partook in a consultation).Methods – Librarians invited faculty to participate in a new service to help improve quality of student research papers. Eligible courses included those with a required research paper component where papers could be evaluated at different times in the project. Faculty instructed students in the class to meet with the librarian after a first draft of a paper was written. Students from seven courses were asked to meet with a librarian. Courses included English Composition (2), Geography (1), Child Development (1), Occupational Therapy (1), Marketing (1) and Women Writers (1). Three courses acted as control groups (all English Composition). After meeting with students to make recommendations, librarians used a rating scale (measuring relevancy, authority, appropriate dates and scope) to review the quality of sources in both drafts and final papers.Main Results – One-on-one consultations with a librarian resulted in sources being of a higher quality in the final paper. With the exception of authority, the differences between draft and final paper were statistically significant in all measures (overall quality, relevance, dates and scope). Those in the control group showed no improvement in quality of sources between draft and final paper.Conclusion – Quality of sources in final paper improves after one-on-one consultations with librarians. The use of a rating scale is helpful in objectively measuring quality of sources, although there is potential for subjective interpretation.

Laura Newton Miller

2013-01-01

104

Teacher-Oriented Address Terms in Students' Reproach Turns  

Science.gov (United States)

|This article demonstrates, using conversation analysis, how students use address terms when reproaching the teacher. The data consist of videotaped lessons of Finnish as a second language in secondary school. The analyses show, first of all, that teacher-oriented address terms can be used separately as reproaches, in which case they are marked…

Lehtimaja, Inkeri

2011-01-01

105

Diesel Technology: Introduction. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Second Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This complete teacher edition of a diesel technology course consists of introductory pages, teacher pages, and the student edition. The introductory pages provide these tools: training and competency profile; National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation Crosswalk; instructional/task analysis; basic skills icons and classifications; basic…

Joerschke, John D.; Eichhorn, Lane

106

Mainstreaming Students with Disabilities: Teacher Perspectives in India.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study surveyed general education teachers in four private elementary/secondary schools in New Delhi, India, concerning their attitudes toward mainstreaming students with mild to severe disabilities and factors that teachers considered essential for successful mainstreaming. The 98-item survey elicited 32 responses. Results are discussed in…

Dev, Poonam C.; Belfiore, Phillip J.

107

Teachers and Students Write a Curriculum on Water Pollution  

Science.gov (United States)

|Describes production of a water pollution curriculum guide by co-operative effort of teachers, students, and the Federal Water Quality Administration, and provides overview of guide's contents. (AL)|

Schlesinger, William H.

1971-01-01

108

Using Distance Technology to Sustain Teacher Education for Student Teachers in Isolated Areas: The Technology Supported Induction Network  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative study evaluated the Technology Supported Induction Network's (TSIN) effect on 15 elementary education student teachers in isolated rural schools. The student teachers were 50-300 miles away from their university; thus, it was difficult for faculty to provide support and supervision. The TSIN provided student teachers with…

Fry, Sara Winstead; Bryant, Carol

2007-01-01

109

How Can Teachers Develop Students' Motivation -- and Success?  

Science.gov (United States)

This interview with Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Columbia University, answers questions about types of motivation, with emphasis on performance (extrinsic) motivation vs. mastery (intrinsic) motivation. Questions address topics such as what teachers can do to help develop students who will work to overcome challenges rather than be overwhelmed by them, the challenge of the "gifted" label, and if self-esteem something that teachers can or should "give" to students. The site is easy reading, yet provides many useful insights.

Hopkins, Gary; World, Education

110

Listening Ability of Physical Education Teacher Department and Classroom Teacher Department Students on Interpersonal Communication  

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Full Text Available In the educational process “listening” is taking an important role like interpersonal communication. So, it is possible to increase the activity of teacher in communication between teacher and student by gaining and strengthening the “listening ability”. In the point of this view, the purpose of this study was to find out interpersonalcommunication ability level of classroom and physical education teacher department students and make some suggestions.For this purpose, 150 classroom teacher and 150 physical education teacher department students voluntarily join the study. A questionnaire, validity and reliability tests were done, applied the samples. Researchers were applied percentage, frequency, mean and t-test for statistical analysis by using SPSS statistical program.In the result; listening ability of both classroom teacher department and physical education teacher department students was “medium level”. There was no significant difference between gender and different department students on “listening ability” and finally it was an important foundation to think about that students(except two of them) did not have “the best listening ability”.

O?uzhan YONCALIK; Zafer Ç?MEN

2006-01-01

111

Haunting Native Speakerism? Students’ Perceptions toward Native Speaking English Teachers  

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Full Text Available This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese university students perceive their native-speaking English teachers (NESTs). Mutual expectations between the NESTs and students are also investigated. Collected data include questionnaires from 107 students and interviews with three NESTs and 19 students who have filled out the questionnaire. The result shows that students expect more encouragement and interaction with the NESTs, and more relaxed activities with less assignment and test. A third of the students expect NEST with a standard accent, while a quarter do not care about accent at all. The NESTs reveal their dissatisfaction toward the students’ passiveness and irresponsiveness. While students expect their NESTs to be interactive, they themselves seem to give the NESTs an impression of an unwillingness to participate. The discussion centers on this dilemma and offer some suggestions for English teachers.  

kun huei Wu; I Chung Ke

2009-01-01

112

More Research Needed on Librarian Teaching Anxiety. A Review of: Davis, Kaetrena D. “The Academic Librarian as Instructor: A Study of Teacher Anxiety.” College & Undergraduate Libraries 14.2 (2007):77?101.  

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Full Text Available Objective – To identify the types of librarian teaching anxiety and the coping mechanisms that often accompany it and to compare those findings with those described by Showalter in “Teaching Literature”; also, to examine whether perceptions of librarians from both inside and outside the profession influence teaching anxiety.Design – A 35?item online questionnaire created using Zoomerang; a link to the questionnaire was distributed through the Information Literacy Instruction Listserv (ILI?L).Subjects – Subscribers to ILI?L. There were approximately 3,700 subscribers to ILI?L at the time of the study. This electronic mailing list is sponsored by the Instruction Section of the Association of College and Research Libraries and is moderated.Methods – As previously mentioned, a link to the questionnaire was distributed via the ILI?L. Requests for participation were sent to the list three times during the six weeks the survey was open for responses. The questionnaire consisted primarily of multiple choice questions, several with the option to enter a free text “Other” response, as well as four Likert?type questions. After the survey closed, the collected data was analyzed using SPSS. The article did not indicate when the survey was completed.Main Results – 687 responses were collected. Of those, 657 were completed. Surveys were assessed for accuracy, during which 305 responses were eliminated, resulting in 382 “viable” responses (84). Accuracy assessments consisted of throwing out surveys in which respondents answered questions inappropriately, however, an explanation of what constituted an inappropriate response is not included. Nearly three quarters of respondents (74%) indicated they enjoyed teaching. This trend did not appear to be related to the number of years of experience as a librarian. The majority of respondents (58%) had never taught full semester or quarter courses, whereas “virtually all” (86) had taught one?shot instructional sessions. Sixty?three percent of respondents noted being nervous prior to teaching. Although 40% of respondents noted having no physical symptoms of anxiety, of those who did, the main symptoms included sweating and upset stomach. Sixty?five percent of respondents noted experiencing mental or emotional symptoms, mainly identified as worries about being sufficiently prepared and answering tough questions (40%) and fear of public speaking (27%). These mental and emotional symptoms were noted to occur often in the case of 29% of respondents, and at least some of the time in 41% of respondents. Nearly three quarters of the respondents reported using personal strategies for dealing with teaching anxiety, including over?preparation, joining groups where they were able to practice public speaking, and prayer. Most (84%) did not have routines or rituals that they followed prior to teaching.Some additional findings were presented regarding librarians’ perceptions of themselves as well as perceptions of librarians by other faculty. Eighty?four percent of respondents agreed or somewhat agreed that there are many differences in the roles and duties of librarians and paraprofessionals, while 78% agreed or somewhat agreed that faculty do not understand the librarian’s teaching role. Thirty?five percent noted defending teaching roles to other librarians.Conclusion – The role of librarians in academic institutions continues to evolve and include more teaching. As an increasing number of librarians regularly teach and move to teaching semester?long credit courses, the subject of teaching anxiety will continue to grow in importance. This small study draws attention to the need for more research in this area.

Stephanie J. Schulte

2009-01-01

113

Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Second Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Teacher and student editions and a student workbook for fundamentals of welding comprise the first of six in a series of competency-based instructional materials for welding programs. Introductory pages in the teacher edition are training and competency profile, instructional/task analysis, basic skills icons and classifications, basic skills…

Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike; New, Larry

114

Reflecting on Field Studies in Teacher Education: Experiences of Student Teachers in Sweden  

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The aim of this article is to describe how field studies can be useful in teacher education. While participating in a specialty area called "Play, learning and development," student teachers collected data about their own and young children's experience and perception of the outdoor environment. They observed, carried out interviews from a…

Niklasson, Laila; Sandberg, Anette

2012-01-01

115

Differentiating Psychology Students' Perceptions of Teachers Using the Teacher Behavior Checklist  

Science.gov (United States)

Keeley, Smith, and Buskist (2006) investigated the psychometric properties of the Teacher Behavior Checklist (TBC), but did not provide evidence that the measure could differentiate among teachers. This study required students at 2 schools to rate their best professor, worst professor, and most recent professor on the TBC. We found highly similar…

Keeley, Jared; Furr, R. Michael; Buskist, William

2010-01-01

116

Ethnic incongruence and the student-teacher relationship: the perspective of ethnic majority teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Among 36 ethnic-Dutch school teachers in the Netherlands, the present study examined the role of ethnic incongruence in perceived student-teacher relationship quality. Teachers rated their relationships with 59 Turkish-Dutch, 62 Moroccan-Dutch, and 109 ethnic-Dutch students attending grades 4 through 6 (M(age)=10.81 years, SD=1.05). On average, relationships were less favorable for the Moroccan-Dutch students only. However, the effects of ethnic incongruence were most pronounced among students with strong perceived inattention/hyperactivity and among teachers endorsing lower levels of multiculturalism (the view that different cultures deserve equal treatment). Results support the notion that ethnically incongruent relationships may be perceived as less favorable than ethnically congruent ones due to cultural misunderstandings and intergroup bias. Practical implications are discussed.

Thijs J; Westhof S; Koomen H

2012-04-01

117

The Influence of Student Characteristics and Interpersonal Teacher Behaviour in the Classroom on Student's Wellbeing  

Science.gov (United States)

|Student wellbeing can be considered a major output indicator of quality of education. A positive classroom climate can contribute to a higher sense of wellbeing. Interpersonal relationships between teachers and students are an important aspect of the classroom climate. This study investigated how student wellbeing was predicted by student

Van Petegem, Karen; Aelterman, Antonia; Van Keer, Hilde; Rosseel, Yves

2008-01-01

118

Teachers' Estimates of Their Students' Motivation and Engagement: Being in Synch with Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Being aware of, monitoring and responding constructively to students' signals of motivation and to students' signals of engagement represent two important teaching skills. We hypothesised, however, that teachers would better estimate their students' engagement than they would estimate their students' motivation. To test this hypothesis, Korean…

Lee, Woogul; Reeve, Johnmarshall

2012-01-01

119

Student and Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors and the Influence of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors on Student Motivation to Learn Science  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Assessment on Educational Progress signals that American students are not being adequately prepared to compete globally in an ever changing scientific society. As a result, legislation mandated that all students be assessed and show proficiency in scientific literacy beginning in Grade 4 with the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002 also known as No Child Left Behind. Research indicates a disturbing decline in the number of U.S. students pursuing more rigorous science courses in high school, majoring in scientific areas in college, and choosing future careers in science. With a need to improve science instruction and enhance science literacy for all students, this study focuses on immediate communication behaviors of the classroom teacher as a deciding factor in the opinions of high school students towards science. The purpose of this study was to reveal high school science student perceptions of teacher communication patterns, both verbal and nonverbal, and how they influence their motivation to learn science. The researcher utilized a nonexperimental, quantitative research design to guide this study. Teacher and student data were collected using the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ). The Student Motivation to Learn Instrument (SMLI) across gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status survey was used to evaluate student motivation in science. Participants were encouraged to be honest in reporting and sharing information concerning teacher communication behaviors. The data revealed that teacher immediacy behaviors, both verbal and nonverbal, were perceived differently in terms of student gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. The results showed that teachers who display positive communication behaviors and use challenging questioning followed with positive responses create pathways to potentially powerful relationships. These relationships between teachers and students can lead to increased student motivation and academic achievement in the science classroom.

Littlejohn, Vania

120

Validation of Assessment for Learning Questionnaires for teachers and students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Assessment can be a powerful force in promoting student learning. Still, few measures exist to gauge Assessment for Learning (AFL) in the classroom. Literature on AFL suggests that it encompasses both a monitor to track student progress as well as a scaffold to show or help students recognize in what areas they need to improve. AIMS: Based on a review of recent attempts to measure the AFL, we constructed Assessment for Learning Questionnaires for Teachers (TAFL-Q) and for students (SAFL-Q) for evaluating perceptions regarding AFL practices in classrooms using matching items. SAMPLE: The total sample included 1,422 students (49% girls, 51% boys) and 237 teachers (43% females, 57% males) in lower vocational secondary education. METHODS: The 28-item questionnaires were examined by means of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using EQS on one random half of the sample. The CFA was cross-validated on the second half. Measurement invariance tests were conducted to compare the students and teacher versions of the questionnaires. RESULTS: CFA revealed a stable second-order two-factor structure that was cross-validated: perceived monitoring, and perceived scaffolding subsumed under a common factor: AFL. Tests for measurement invariance showed that the parallel constructs were measured similarly for both students and teachers. CONCLUSION: The TAFL-Q and SAFL-Q capture the construct AFL in two subscales: Monitoring and Scaffolding, and allows for comparisons between teacher and student perceptions. The instruments can be useful tools for teachers and students alike to identify and scrutinize assessment practices in classroom.

Pat-El RJ; Tillema H; Segers M; Vedder P

2013-03-01

 
 
 
 
121

Teachers' Attitudes toward Students with Disabilities in Haiti  

Science.gov (United States)

After conducting a thorough review of the state of inclusion of students with disabilities in Haiti, the authors present a study that investigates the attitudes of urban and rural teachers in Haiti toward inclusion. Participants were administered the Opinions Relative to Integration (ORI) of Students with Disabilities instrument. Reliability of…

Dupoux, Errol; Hammond, Helen; Ingalls, Lawrence; Wolman, Clara

2006-01-01

122

Emerging Solutions to Improve Student-Teacher Linkage  

Science.gov (United States)

Nationwide, states and districts are implementing programs that involve linking teachers with student data. These initiatives range from educator evaluation systems that consider student growth to data-driven professional development decisions and large-scale program evaluations. Establishing accurate links is crucial in any initiative that links…

Graham, Matthew; Watson, Jeffery; Thorn, Christopher A.

2012-01-01

123

Hong Kong Student Teachers' Personal Construction of Teaching Efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Investigates how a sample of 27 student teachers in Hong Kong developed a personal sense of teaching efficacy by employing the repertory grid technique. Finds that third-year student perceptions were more homogenous and experiences of teaching practice, electives, pupils, and supervisors affected the development of efficacy. (CMK)

Yeung, Ka Wah; Watkins, David

2000-01-01

124

The Role of Teacher Relationships in the Lives of Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Students spend a great deal of time at school, and the classroom is the source of many of their interpersonal relationships and activities. Although children's social adjustment to school was initially examined primarily through relationships with classroom peers, research increasingly has highlighted the significance of student-teacher

Fredriksen, Katia; Rhodes, Jean

2004-01-01

125

Student-Teacher Collaboration: A Skateboard Project that Really Rocks!  

Science.gov (United States)

As a teacher, the author gets his biggest charge from seeing students' eyes light up when he asks them a question related to a topic on which they are the experts and he is the novice. Skateboarding provides a prime example. Since most of his students have a personal interest and involvement in skateboarding, he introduced a skateboard project to…

Moore, Tim

2005-01-01

126

Teacher Tweets Improve Achievement for Eighth Grade Science Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the Digital Age teachers have fallen far behind the technical skills of their "digital native" students. The implementation of technology as a tool for classroom communication is foreign for most teachers, but highly preferred by students. While teenagers are using Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks to communicate, teachers continue to respond through face-to-face conversations, telephone calls, and email messaging. Twitter, a platform for short message service text, is an online social network site that allows users to send and receive messages using 140 characters or less called Tweets. To analyze the relationship of the teacher's use of Twitter with student academic achievement, a correlation study conducted by Bess collected data from two matched samples of eighth grade science students: one utilizing Twitter and one not utilizing Twitter to reinforce classroom instruction. Two tests matching the science standards were given to both samples of students. The results of the tests were used as primary data. The findings suggested a positive correlation between the use of Twitter and student performance on the standardized tests. Implications for this study indicate that young teenagers may prefer Twitter as a mode of communication with their teacher, resulting in higher academic achievement in a middle school science class.

Carol Van Vooren; Corey Bess

2013-01-01

127

Effect of Teacher’s Qualification on the Performance of Senior Secondary School Physics Students: Implication on Technology in Nigeria  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study examined the effect of teacher’s qualification on the performance of Senior Secondary School students in Physics. The purpose was to determine whether the status of the teacher has any impact on the performance of the students in Physics. The survey type of descriptive research design was adopted. The sample for the study consisted of 100 Senior Secondary Schools Physics students in Ekiti State and the teachers that prepared and presented the students in each school for 2009/2010 West African School Certificate Examination. The year’s result summary for each school was collated with the bio-data of their respective Physics teachers. Four hypotheses were postulated and tested at 0.05 significance level. The data collated were analysed using inferential statistics. The results revealed that students taught by teachers with higher qualifications performed better than those taught by teachers with lower qualifications. It was also showed that students performed better in physics when taught by professional teachers. The result also showed that teacher’s gender has no effect on their ability to impact knowledge on the students, much as he/she is a skilled teacher in that field of study. However, the experience of the teacher is significant at impacting the students’ academic performance in Physics. Based on the findings, it was recommended that experienced teachers with professional qualifications in higher level should teach Physics at the certificate class.

Owolabi, Olabode Thomas; Adedayo, Julius Olugbenga

2012-01-01

128

A Case Study of Teacher’s Questioning and Students’ Critical Thinking in College EFL Reading Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present case study mainly focused on the effects of a teacher’s questions on the development of students’ critical thinking. The purpose was to investigate whether teacher’s questions could facilitate students’ critical thinking which required students to manipulate knowledge instead of direct recalling. Classroom observation and interview were employed in the study. A teacher’s questioning behavior was observed and 17 students were interviewed. The results showed the teacher asked more lower-cognitive questions (79.2%) than higher ones (20.8%). Based on the theory of the cognitive domain, results revealed that excessive use of lower-cognitive questions could not facilitate the development of students’ critical thinking. Additionally, the misuse of higher-cognitive questions by the teacher was also identified.

Ping Shen; Butsakorn Yodkhumlue

2012-01-01

129

Integrating Information Literacy into Teacher Education: A Successful Grant Project  

Science.gov (United States)

Information literacy has gained importance over the last few decades, not only among librarians, but also with higher education faculty. Information literacy instruction is important for all college-level students. However, it is essential for teacher education students who must not only be information literate themselves, but also be able to…

Earp, Vanessa

2009-01-01

130

Educational Beliefs of Higher Education Teachers and Students: Implications for Teacher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper begins by acknowledging the established and powerful link between educational beliefs and the teaching and learning practices of teaches and students. Based on this belief-practice connection, the paper documents the findings of a study that investigated the beliefs of a group of higher education teachers and students, most of whom were…

Northcote, Maria

2009-01-01

131

Deepening the Exchange of Student Teaching Experiences: Implications for the Pedagogy of Teacher Education of Recent Insights into Teacher Behaviour  

Science.gov (United States)

|How can teacher education seminars be arranged in such a way that theory is integrated with student teachers' practical experiences? In order to study this key question, we first present a theoretical framework on the sources of teacher behaviour, and discuss its implications for practices within teacher education. Next, we describe our…

Tigchelaar, A.; Korthagen, F.

2004-01-01

132

Librarian teachers on the move: are video tutorials an effective alternative tool for library information literacy instruction?: a case study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The Ghent Biomedical Library research group has performed research over the last year on teaching information literacy in the Biomedical curriculum. The impact of a differentiated teaching methodology was studied in a framework of blended learning, with the first year university students acquiring i...

De Sutter, Daisy

133

Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.  

Science.gov (United States)

This packet, containing a teacher's edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, introduces students to high deposition welding and processes for "shielding" a weld. In addition to general information, the teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages, as well as unit information that corresponds to the materials in the…

Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

134

Comparison of Center and Non-Center Placed Student Teachers in Their Opinions of the Student Teaching Experience.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study was designed to determine if there were significant differences in the opinions of two groups of student teachers regarding their teaching experience. One group completed student teaching in a teacher/teaching center, the other completed student teaching outside of a teacher/teaching center. Their opinions were measured with twelve…

Mitchell, Leonard L.

135

A unit on deterministic chaos for student teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

A unit aiming to introduce pre-service teachers of primary education to the limited predictability of deterministic chaotic systems is presented. The unit is based on a commercial chaotic pendulum system connected with a data acquisition interface. The capabilities and difficulties in understanding the notion of limited predictability of 18 pre-service teachers have been investigated, using a teaching experiment design. Our results show that students could be guided to significant insight into the limited predictability of deterministic chaotic systems.

Stavrou, D.; Assimopoulos, S.; Skordoulis, C.

2013-05-01

136

Does Student-Teacher Thinking Style Match/Mismatch Matter in Students' Achievement?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study concerns the contingent nature of the relationships of student-teacher style match (or mismatch) to students' academic achievement. Participants were 135 (59 male and 76 female) students (average age of 21.5 years) from three academic disciplines (mathematics, physics, and public administration) who responded to the Thinking Styles…

Zhang, Li-fang

2006-01-01

137

Utilization of feedback from student evaluation of teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Students who had completed a part of the medical course rated their teachers on a multiple choice-type questionnaire. Each teacher was provided with data from his own rating, and also the mean rating for all teachers, on each item. Six of these teachers were re-rated after a year by the next group of students who followed the same course. Positive change, often significant, was observed in the majority of instances. Such change was not, however, confined to behaviours previously hypothesized to be easily amenable to improvement on feedback. There was evidence of a tendency to unidirectional change within each teacher across most behaviours, some showing predominantly positive and others predominantly negative change at the second evaluation. These results are discussed in relation to the need for counselling following such evaluations. The second evaluation lent itself to determining the possibile existence of a 'halo effect' arising from students of one ethnic group evaluating teachers of the same ethnic group. Such an effect was found to be absent. The reliability of the measurements was tested in serveral ways.

Bandaranayake RC

1978-07-01

138

Mathematics Student Teachers’ Misconceptions on the Limit and Continuity Concepts  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Content knowledge is one of the important components of teacher training and has attracted particular interest of many mathematics educators. One of the most important variables which can be used to determinate teachers’ content knowledge of any topic is their misconceptions related to this topic. The aim of this study is to investigate student teachers’ misconceptions related to the limit and continuity concept. To gather data, we administered a questionnaire which composed of open and closed-ended questions to 37 teacher candidates studying in Secondary School Mathematics Education. Obtained data were analysed by using qualitative and quantitative analysis methods. The results show that the student teachers have some misconceptions concerning the limit and continuity concept e.g. if a function has limit at a point, it should be defined and continuous at that point, if the graph of a function is not in one piece, it is not continuous. At the same time, some student teachers have difficulties in distinguishing the notion of ambiguity from that of indefiniteness.

Sava? Ba?türk; Gülden DÖNMEZ

2011-01-01

139

Teacher behaviour: a determinant of student self esteem.  

Science.gov (United States)

This small scale piece of research was undertaken to establish whether there existed a relationship between teacher behaviour and the reported self esteem inventories of four students. Using a low inference category system for rating teacher behaviour the researcher's behaviour was observed and categorised by an independent rater. The students were asked to complete Coopersmith's (1967) modified self-esteem inventory both before and after each teaching session. Following the first teaching session, the remaining two, in terms of teacher behaviour, were experimentally manipulated. A repeated measures design was utilised, in order to reduce confounding variables in subjects. Results have been analysed using the 'T' test to calculate statistical significance between 'Pre' and 'Post' inventory scores of students. The paper clearly shows the need for the researcher to remain sensitive to experimental design when undertaking small scale research. PMID:2755445

Gates, R J

1989-06-01

140

Teacher behaviour: a determinant of student self esteem.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This small scale piece of research was undertaken to establish whether there existed a relationship between teacher behaviour and the reported self esteem inventories of four students. Using a low inference category system for rating teacher behaviour the researcher's behaviour was observed and categorised by an independent rater. The students were asked to complete Coopersmith's (1967) modified self-esteem inventory both before and after each teaching session. Following the first teaching session, the remaining two, in terms of teacher behaviour, were experimentally manipulated. A repeated measures design was utilised, in order to reduce confounding variables in subjects. Results have been analysed using the 'T' test to calculate statistical significance between 'Pre' and 'Post' inventory scores of students. The paper clearly shows the need for the researcher to remain sensitive to experimental design when undertaking small scale research.

Gates RJ

1989-06-01

 
 
 
 
141

Students’ Attitudes towards Teachers’ using Activities in EFL class  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated the students’ attitudes towards activities used in an EFL classroom in one Thai university. The research participants include the students of first year (bachelor students of medical and engineering faculties) who had studied public speaking subject as their minor in second semester. The data was collected through class observations and semi structured interviews. In classroom observations, EFL learners’ perceptions and satisfactions on their teacher using class activities were recorded in the field-notes and questions related to EFL learners’ attitudes in target language learning based on certain factors that include better teaching strategies, classroom activities and social environment that can help reduce or change negative attitudes were asked through interview. This study found promising results on the students’ attitudes towards teacher using activities. More than half of the participants regarded teacher’s using activities that determined their success in language learning. However, less than half of the participants showed dissatisfying factor that related to the EFL teacher using humor on their cultures as the part of his teaching. This research paves a way for future research by indicating issues and questions for researchers to address.

Channa Mansoor Ahmed; Yossiri Yossatorn; Varavejbhisis Yossiri

2012-01-01

142

The role of veterinary medical librarians in teaching information literacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This qualitative study seeks to determine the nature of the instruction librarians provide to veterinary medical students at all 28 United States veterinary colleges. A secondary goal of the study was to determine in what ways and to what extent librarians participated in other instructional activities at their colleges. Over half of the librarians formally taught in one or more courses, predominantly in the first two years of the veterinary curriculum. One presentation per course was most common. Over half of the librarians interviewed stated that evidence-based veterinary medicine was taught at their colleges, and about half of these librarians collaborated with veterinary faculty in this instruction. Many librarians participated in orientation for first-year veterinary students. The librarians also taught instructional sessions for residents, interns, faculty, graduate students, and practicing veterinarians. This study found that librarians teach information literacy skills both formally and informally, but, in general, instruction by librarians was not well integrated into the curriculum. This study advances several recommendations to help veterinary students develop information literacy skills. These include: encourage veterinary faculty and administrators to collaborate more closely with librarians, incorporate a broader array of information literacy skills into assignments, and add a literature evaluation course to the curriculum.

Dinkelman AL; Viera AR; Bickett-Weddle DA

2011-01-01

143

The role of veterinary medical librarians in teaching information literacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative study seeks to determine the nature of the instruction librarians provide to veterinary medical students at all 28 United States veterinary colleges. A secondary goal of the study was to determine in what ways and to what extent librarians participated in other instructional activities at their colleges. Over half of the librarians formally taught in one or more courses, predominantly in the first two years of the veterinary curriculum. One presentation per course was most common. Over half of the librarians interviewed stated that evidence-based veterinary medicine was taught at their colleges, and about half of these librarians collaborated with veterinary faculty in this instruction. Many librarians participated in orientation for first-year veterinary students. The librarians also taught instructional sessions for residents, interns, faculty, graduate students, and practicing veterinarians. This study found that librarians teach information literacy skills both formally and informally, but, in general, instruction by librarians was not well integrated into the curriculum. This study advances several recommendations to help veterinary students develop information literacy skills. These include: encourage veterinary faculty and administrators to collaborate more closely with librarians, incorporate a broader array of information literacy skills into assignments, and add a literature evaluation course to the curriculum. PMID:22023922

Dinkelman, Andrea L; Viera, Ann R; Bickett-Weddle, Danelle A

2011-01-01

144

Function of memory in librarians  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article deals with different types of memory (semantic, episodic and schematic)used in a reference process by a librarian. Three types of memory are described in the same way as librarians organize information during a reference interview. Some examples are added.The second part of the article describes problems of information process encountered by students of 3rd an 4th year of librarianship during a week of their work in the library.Methodology and its characteristics, the results and their interpretation are presented.Answers of the students of 4th year indicated equal proportions of semantic and semantic-schematic type while the students of 3rd year demonstrated 72 % of semantic and 28 % of semantic-schematic type.

Simona Senica

1999-01-01

145

Steve Marsden's Chemistry Resources for students and teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Steve Marsden, a teacher in Studio City, California, provides a variety of helpful supplemental chemistry materials for high school chemistry students and teachers. At the Elements link, users can find a periodic table that provides images and descriptions of elements categorized into families. Within the Lecture link, visitors can find assistance in a variety of topics including chemical reactions, stoichiometry, chemical kinetics, and chemical equilibrium. Users will find an extensive number of links to other educational websites within the materials. Although a few visuals are copyrighted and only available to the author's students, all users will be able to obtain an extensive amount of valuable tutorials.

Marsden, Steve

146

Student teachers' approaches to student's mistakes in the case of the absolute value concept  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available After the studies of Piaget and Bachelard, student’s mistakes were considered essential for learning and a messenger of knowledge being constructed. The purpose of this study was to define the approaches of student teachers regarding student’s mistakes and analyze those approaches in the light of learning theories (such as behaviorism, constructivism). The sample group consisted of 28 student-teachers from Secondary Mathematics Education department at the Ataturk Education Faculty of Marmara University. Data were collected through a questionnaire consisted of likert-type, open-ended and close-ended questions. In open-ended questions, student teachers were invited to interpret student’s mistakes on the concept of absolute value acquired from related literature. Data were analyzed and interpreted by the means of quantitative and qualitative approaches. One of the most considerable results of the study was that student teachers’ conceptions regarding the mistakes of the students reflected the approaches of classical and behaviorist views about learning.

Sava? Ba?türk

2009-01-01

147

Showing Automatically Generated Students' Conceptual Models to Students and Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

|A student conceptual model can be defined as a set of interconnected concepts associated with an estimation value that indicates how well these concepts are used by the students. It can model just one student or a group of students, and can be represented as a concept map, conceptual diagram or one of several other knowledge representation…

Perez-Marin, Diana; Pascual-Nieto, Ismael

2010-01-01

148

Matching music teacher’s self conception with students’ perception on teaching effectiveness in an unfavourable secondary classroom context  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper aims at identifying and recording good music teaching practices that promote social inclusion, and at developing effective teaching strategies that incorporate student perspectives into the pedagogies. A music teacher in Hong Kong was selected for this study, and two different classes of Form 2 (ages 12-13) were observed. The teaching process was videotaped and reviewed. Afterwards the teacher and a group of students were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview to solicit their ideas towards good practice of music teaching. Findings reveal that the good practices observed were attributed to four factors: 1) teacher’s personality, 2) teacher’s pedagogy, 3) teacher’s musical competence, and 4) teacher’s philosophy of teaching.

Bo Wah Leung; Paulina Wong

2005-01-01

149

The Violence Perception of Teachers and Students at Primary Schools  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In parallel with the increasing number of acts of violence in recent years, it is seen that the effect of violence in schools is becoming growingly worrisome. The violence the students are exposed to affect them not only in their academic life but also throughout their life and may make irrecoverable traumas. With this study, it is endeavoured to identify how the acts of violence in the primary schools are perceived and conceptualized through the teachers and students’ opinions. In this study designed in line with the qualitative research approach, “the content analysis” has been conducted. Within this context, the open-ended question, “Violence is like ……… because ……..” has been asked to the participants. In order to identify the teachers and students’ perceptions on violence, the random sample has been used and the opinions of 222 teachers from the schools in the city centre and districts of Elaz?? and 425 students attending at the 6th, 7th and 8th grade at these school have been taken. According to the themes created following the analysis of metaphors, it is seen that the students have created the most metaphors under “destroying” theme and the least metaphors under “penalty” theme. Again, according to the themes, it is seen that the teachers have considered violence under “natural disaster” theme the most and under “warning” theme the least.

Gönül ?ENER; Mukadder BOYDAK ÖZAN

2013-01-01

150

The Impact of Teachers' Aggressive Management Techniques on Students' Attitudes to Schoolwork  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous studies have shown that teachers' aggressive classroom management impacts negatively on students. The authors compared student reaction to teachers' use of aggressive management techniques in Australia, China, and Israel. Reactions included distraction negativity toward teachers and perceptions that teachers' responses were unjustified,…

Romi, Shlomo; Lewis, Ramon; Roache, Joel; Riley, Philip

2011-01-01

151

The Effects of Group Creativity Training on Teachers' Empathy and Interactions with Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effects of group creativity training upon teachers' empathy and interactions with students as perceived by students and teachers. A group of 26 secondary teachers were divided into an experimental and a control group and were administered the McConnell revised Teacher Behavior Description Questionnaire (TBDQ) and the…

McConnell, David M.; LeCapitaine, John E.

152

Modification of Attitudes of Regular Education Preservice Teachers toward Visually Impaired Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

The study compared the effectiveness of two intervention strategies on the attitudes of 53 regular education preservice teachers toward visually impaired students. The importance of personal contact with visually impaired students in attitude interventions for preservice teachers is stressed. (Author)

Skrtic, Thomas M.; And Others

1982-01-01

153

From Teacher Burnout to Student Burnout  

Science.gov (United States)

|Originally, Burnout was a common work related phenomena resulting of severe stress. Burnout is considered to be a long-term stress reaction that particularly occurs among professionals who work with people in some capacity--like teachers, nurses, or social workers. Although various definitions of burnout exist, it is most commonly described as a…

PP, Noushad

2008-01-01

154

Science student teachers’ attitudes towards reflective practice: differences in subjects and grades  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available teacher’s ability to reflect on their practice is an important element of teaching sciences. Developing the ability to bereflective in those studying to become science teachers is a core element of any successful teacher education programme. Thisstudy investigated science student teachers’ attitudes about reflective practice. A total of 206 science student-teachers (68biology, 49 physics, 56 chemistry and 33 primary science student-teachers) in their initial teacher education course at DicleUniversity, Turkey, were surveyed using questionnaires. The data were analysed by using correlations (Pearson), t-test and oneway ANOVA with SPSS 13.0. The findings suggest that science student-teachers’ attitudes toward reflective practice change inrelation to their subjects and years of study. The study did not find any difference in science student-teachers’ attitudes towardreflective practice in relation to gender.

Rifat Efe

2009-01-01

155

[Teacher-student communication across the Tizadora pedagogical problem  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Report of experience in the use of a social-cultural approach during the development of a work done by graduate students of Ribeiräo Preto School of Nursing-USP. As a form of reference for the didactic strategy, it was used the scheme of arch proposed by Charles Maguerez and presented by BORDENAVE, in an attempt to systematize the communication teacher-student talking about "Aspects related to the Undergraduate Teaching Problems".

Rozendo CA; Martins EA; Collet N

1995-01-01

156

Year 7 Students, Information Literacy, and Transfer: A Grounded Theory  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the views of year 7 students, teacher librarians, and teachers in three state secondary schools in rural New South Wales, Australia, on information literacy and transfer. The aims of the study included the development of a grounded theory in relation to information literacy and transfer in these schools. The study's perspective…

Herring, James E.

2011-01-01

157

Google in the Research and Teaching of Instruction Librarians  

Science.gov (United States)

This exploratory study assesses the differences and similarities between how instruction librarians in Western Canada use Google and how they instruct students to use it. Survey results indicate that these librarians do use Google but can be influenced by faculty to present Google negatively to students. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)

Sorensen, Charlene; Dahl, Candice

2008-01-01

158

Values--A Study of Teacher and Student Perceptions in Four Countries  

Science.gov (United States)

The study aimed to assess and compare the values prevalent among the students and teachers of Universities in Bangladesh, Japan, USA and Germany. The sample consisted of 480 students and 236 teachers. The sample included 120 undergraduate students from Japan; 120 undergraduate students from Bangladesh; 120 undergraduate students from USA, and 120…

Mahmud, Shamsul H.; Warchal, Judith R.; Masuchi, Ayumi; Ahmed, Rafiq; Schoelmerich, Axel

2009-01-01

159

Time and project management strategies for librarians  

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As budgets for libraries continue to shrink, the key challenge facing the 21st century librarian is finding how to do more with less. This book features more than thirty essays that provide valuable tips for the professional who must cope with increasing demands upon their resources. Librarians will get tips on how to identify the most important tasks for the library; eliminate non-essential functions and processes; increase reliance on volunteers, interns, and students; optimize daily routines; and more.

Smallwood, Carol; Fraser, Lisa

2013-01-01

160

Control Type Identification in Student-Teacher Interaction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The goal of this research is identifying the type of control for student-teacher interaction in the classroom, using a preliminary investigation based on a role-play. This research is used as a start phase in the building of a mathematical model for the student module in a future computer-assisted virtual Affective Tutoring System (ATS). An ATS is a software environment that can understand student emotions, behaviour, skills and needs, and adapt its teaching strategy for an optimal guidance of training. The control of the interaction is considered at any time on the side which is launching the questions. This controlling side is either the teacher or the student, whoever asks the other side questions about the lesson. Our research has a start point in the “Control-Value Theory” of psycho-pedagogy and aims to build statistical models of the control based on statistical regression – for guidance of the student based on pre-lesson and post-lesson tests and for guidance of the student based on teacher actions (using techniques of conversation control). For all these kinds of control, this paper aims to propose a mathematical model based on hidden Markov models (HMM) having, as a statistical base, volunteer role-play scenarios of classroom activities.

Hora?iu Moga; Florin Sandu; Aurel Cornel Stanca; Octavian Mihai Machidon

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Teacher Training and Student Achievement in Less Developed Counties. World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 310.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Part 1 of this paper reviews major research findings on the relationship of teacher characteristics to student achievement. Of the 16 teacher variables analyzed, those identified as important to student performance are teacher certification, ability and achievement, experience, inservice training, expectations for students, and methods. Policy…

Husen, Torsten; Saha, Lawrence J.; Noonan, Richard

162

Student Teachers' Perceptions about the Impact of Internet Usage on Their Learning and Jobs  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated student teachers' perceptions about the impact of internet usage on their learning and future jobs. The sample consisted of 448 student teachers from the Early Childhood and Primary Education Departments at the National University of Athens, in Greece. Student teachers' perceptions regarding the impact of internet usage on…

Gialamas, Vasilis; Nikolopoulou, Kleopatra; Koutromanos, George

2013-01-01

163

Praise and Feedback in the Primary Classroom: Teachers' and Students' Perspectives  

Science.gov (United States)

This small scale qualitative study investigated teachers' and students' perceptions of praise and feedback in the classroom using structured interviews and classroom observation. A case study approach was used whereby students and teachers from one school participated. Some 56 students and five teachers were interviewed individually or in small…

Burnett, Paul C.; Mandel, Valerie

2010-01-01

164

Assistive Technology Competencies of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments: A Comparison of Perceptions  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study surveyed teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas on their perceptions of a set of assistive technology competencies developed for teachers of students with visual impairments by Smith and colleagues (2009). Differences in opinion between practicing teachers of students with visual impairments and Smith's group of…

Zhou, Li; Smith, Derrick W.; Parker, Amy T.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

2011-01-01

165

Enhancing Quality of Student Teachers' Practices through Reflective Journal Writing during School Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

|This paper explores the role of journal writing in enhancing student teachers' learning during school practice. It analyses data from 22 student teachers' journals and 23 questionnaires. The study focuses on the areas that student teachers reflected on most, the nature of their reflection and the extent to which previous experiences informed…

Ezati, Betty Akullu; Ocheng, Mary K.; Ssentamu, Proscovia N.; Sikoyo, Leah N.

2010-01-01

166

Teacher quality: a comparison of National Board-certified and non-Board-certified teachers of deaf students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

THE STUDY was designed to identify specific components of teacher excellence, focusing initially on the characteristics of the small number of teachers of the deaf who are certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), then comparing those with the characteristics of other teachers identified as master teachers by university faculty in teacher preparation in deafness. Classroom observation, written lesson plans, teacher questionnaires on beliefs, and content analysis of interactive electronic focus groups were used to compare the two groups of teachers. Results indicated similarities between Board-certified and non-Board-certified master teachers in regard to teacher behaviors and commitment to well-founded pedagogical principles. Differences were found in classroom priorities and in the greater level of interconnectivity expressed by Board-certified teachers as the result of becoming Board certified. Recommendations are made for preparing teachers of deaf students.

Scheetz NA; Martin DS

2006-01-01

167

Mining Data to Find Adept Teachers in Dealing with Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Higher education faculty staffs lack behind any prior training program of teaching. Mostly staffs teach students in his/her ways. They are unaware of the qualities of a teacher which they must possess as how to tackle the problems arising in teaching, what key points must be remembered while teaching etc. This may cause a teacher to be unsuccessful in classroom. So the problem is the amount of knowledge a staff has of a teaching process. Educationist finds few qualities of a good teacher. But their method is qualitative. In this paper a quantitative approach i.e. data mining is used to measure the quality of a teacher and suggest them what qualities they have.

Umesh Kumar Pandey; Saurabh Pal

2012-01-01

168

Performance Standards for Teachers supporting Nursing Students’ Reflection Skills Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available How can nursing teachers improve students’ reflection skills? In the study performance standards for teachers were developed and validated. A ten-step procedure was followed to ensure procedural and internal validity. National competences and specific content standards for supporting nursing reflection skills development formed the foundation of a preliminary rubric framework which was piloted. Forty participants from six nursing institutes judged the developed rubric framework of eight competences covering thirty rubric attributes. They also discussed the prerequisite minimum performance level and judgmental models. These judgments and discussions resulted in consensus on the rubric framework, a cut-off score, and a conjunctive judgmental model that is convenient for assessing nursing teachers’ competences. The rubrics can be used in a teacher training program. Also institutes of nursing education can employ the rubrics as a tool for preparing and formatively assessing reflection skills.

Agaath Dekker- Groen

2012-01-01

169

Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students  

Science.gov (United States)

The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly…

Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

2010-01-01

170

Drinking Water Activities for Students, Teachers, and Parents.  

Science.gov (United States)

This guide provides teachers with materials, information, and classroom activities to enhance any drinking water curriculum. Students can use the activity sheets to further lessons and stimulate thought. Parents can use the guide to develop science projects that will provoke thought, encourage research, and provide a scientific approach to…

Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

171

ICT Student Teachers' Judgments and Justifications about Ethical Issues  

Science.gov (United States)

|In this study, Turkish ICT student teachers' judgments and justifications in four scenarios involving ICT-related ethical problems were investigated. Scenarios were designed based on Mason's (1986) four ethical issues: privacy, accuracy, property and accessibility. The study was carried out in the fall of 2010. We used the critical incidents…

Alakurt, Turgay; Bardakci, Salih; Keser, Hafize

2012-01-01

172

Does the Missouri Teacher Career Ladder Program Raise Student Achievement?  

Science.gov (United States)

Although Missouri has had a Career Ladder program for teachers since 1987, very little research has been carried out to measure the program's effects and what has been studied has not been comprehensive. This paper examines the program's effect on student achievement across the state, using longitudinal data on district math and reading scores for…

Booker, Kevin; Glazerman, Steven

2009-01-01

173

Claiming Our Own Space: Polyphony in Teacher-Student Dialogue  

Science.gov (United States)

|In this article, we reappraise the model of Discourse Analysis developed by Sinclair and Coulthard (1975) to analyse classroom talk. We analyse an extract of teacher-student dialogue using this model, then re-analyse the same extract drawing on conventions and concepts developed within the framework of Conversation Analysis. We argue that this…

Skidmore, David; Murakami, Kyoko

2012-01-01

174

Teacher Shocks and Student Learning: Evidence from Zambia  

Science.gov (United States)

A large literature examines the link between shocks to households and the educational attainment of children. We use new panel data to estimate the impact of shocks to teachers on student learning in Mathematics and English. Using absenteeism in the 30 days preceding the survey as a measure of these shocks, we find no impact for the full sample,…

Das, Jishnu; Dercon, Stefan; Habyarimana, James; Krishnan, Pramila

2007-01-01

175

Lessons of Love: Psychoanalysis and Teacher-Student Love  

Science.gov (United States)

|What is the relation of love and pedagogy? Two recent phenomena have called into question whether love has any place within pedagogy at all: teacher-student sexual scandal and the standardization movement. As love walks the thin line between inspiration and sex, and as standardization has assumed love to be synonymous with bias, it has become…

Cho, Daniel

2005-01-01

176

Diesel Technology: Workplace Skills. Teacher Edition and Student Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This publication consists of instructional materials to provide secondary and postsecondary students with skills useful in pursuing a career in the diesel industry. Introductory materials in the teacher edition include information on use of the publication, competency profile, instructional/task analysis, related academic and workplace skills…

Kellum, Mary

177

Diesel Technology: Brakes. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This document contains teacher and student materials for a course on brakes in the diesel technology curriculum. The course consists of 12 units organized in three sections. The three units of the introductory section cover: (1) brakes; (2) wheel bearings and seals; and (3) antilock brake systems. The second section, Hydraulic Brakes, contains…

Hilley, Robert; Scarberry, Terry; Kellum, Mary

178

WiseNews database for upper primary students and teachers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Electronic databases are widely used by students and teachers at secondary and tertiary level to gather information for academic purposes. Few studies have investigated their use in primary education, especially in the Asian context. A pilot study conducted a year ago has shown that WiseNews, an ele...

Chu, SKW; Mak, MYK; Wong, PTY

179

Student and Teacher De-Motivation in SLA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With a brief introduction of the definitions of de-motivation, this article reviews present research on student de-motivation, analyzes the teacher motivation from the macro-contexts and micro-contexts, and puts forward suggestions in getting rid of de-motivation.

Hui Yan

2009-01-01

180

Mathematics Student Teachers' Views on Tutor Feedback during Teaching Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

A group of students studying to become mathematics teachers were asked to comment on the tutor feedback they received during teaching practice (TP) and to offer suggestions aimed at improving this feedback. Analysis of the written data--which was collected through emails--suggests the need for: (i) all TP tutors to provide good quality feedback;…

Buhagiar, Michael A.

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

World-Wide Tricksters (Rainbow Teachers, Rainbow Students).  

Science.gov (United States)

Explains how teachers can help their students to explore trickster tales by reading those tales written down, gathering those passed on by word of mouth, writing some of their own, and considering what these tales tell their readers about the real world. Provides suggestions for a coordinated group discussion of trickster tales. (TB)

Brooks, Charlotte K.

1995-01-01

182

Students' Cognitive Style and Their Ratings of Their Teacher's Effectiveness.  

Science.gov (United States)

The cognitive style of 107 college juniors taking an education class at the University of Nebraska was measured using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the Inquiry Mode Questionnaire, and the Conflict Mode Questionnaire. The subjects' evaluation of teacher's competency was measured by the Teaching Analysis of Students questionnaire. Generally,…

Kagan, Dona M.; Tixier y Vigil, Yvonne

1987-01-01

183

An Examination of the Sex Bias of Student Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

In an effort to determine the extent of sex bias and sex-role stereotyping in the attitudes and awareness of student teachers, a 50-item questionnaire was developed and tested. Five general areas of sex bias were investigated: (l) career and the world of work; (2) family and home management; (3) education; (4) sports and health; and (5)…

Alden, Elaine; And Others.

184

Intellectual Property: What Do Teachers and Students Know?  

Science.gov (United States)

As society changes from an industrial to a knowledge era increasing importance and value is being placed on intellectual property rights. Technology teachers need to have pedagogical content knowledge of intellectual property if they are to incorporate it into their learning programmes to enable students to consider how to respect others'…

Starkey, Louise; Corbett, Susan; Bondy, Ann; Davidson, Susan

2010-01-01

185

Teacher-Astronaut out to Lift Academic Sights of Students  

Science.gov (United States)

The space shuttle Endeavour, slated to begin an 11-day mission August 7, will carry an educational payload that includes two "growth chambers" loaded with basil and lettuce seeds, and a list of activities to be led by teacher-turned-astronaut Barbara R. Morgan. The activities targeted to K-12 students are add-ons to the shuttle crew's primary…

Trotter, Andrew

2007-01-01

186

Lessons of Love: Psychoanalysis and Teacher-Student Love  

Science.gov (United States)

What is the relation of love and pedagogy? Two recent phenomena have called into question whether love has any place within pedagogy at all: teacher-student sexual scandal and the standardization movement. As love walks the thin line between inspiration and sex, and as standardization has assumed love to be synonymous with bias, it has become more…

Cho, Daniel

2005-01-01

187

Assistive Technology Competencies for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments  

Science.gov (United States)

|Using the expert opinion of more than 30 professionals, this Delphi study set out to develop a set of assistive technology competencies for teachers of students with visual impairments. The result of the study was the development of a highly reliable and valid set of 111 assistive technology competencies. (Contains 2 tables.)|

Smith, Derrick W.; Kelley, Pat; Maushak, Nancy J.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lan, William Y.

2009-01-01

188

What Affects Teacher Ratings of Student Behaviors? The Potential Influence of Teachers' Perceptions of the School Environment and Experiences.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Teachers serve as the natural raters of students within the school and classroom contexts. Yet teachers' ratings of their students may vary based on these contextual factors. The current study explored the extent to which teacher perceptions of the school environment predict their longitudinal ratings of student behaviors. Data for this study come from 702 teachers in 42 elementary schools. Teachers self-reported their perceptions of the school context at a single time point, and provided ratings of their students' behavior via the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaption-Checklist (TOCA-C) across three school years. Latent profile analysis identified three latent classes of teachers based on their ratings of school organizational health, burnout, and efficacy. A regression framework demonstrated an association between the baseline profiles in relation to TOCA-C ratings of student behavior across 3 years. Teachers with more favorable perceptions of the environment had lower initial ratings of concentration problems, disruptive behavior, and internalizing symptoms, and higher ratings of prosocial behaviors and family involvement. They also showed slower growth in their ratings of emotion dysregulation and greater increases of their ratings of family involvement over time. This work is particularly important for determining the extent to which teacher ratings may be biased by teacher and contextual factors, and may have implications for the identification of teachers who may rate students poorly over time.

Pas ET; Bradshaw CP

2013-08-01

189

Who chooses to become a teacher and why? : differences between Danish and Finnish first year primary school teacher students.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

We analyze in this article to what extent beginning teacher education students at the primary school level differ with respect to previous educational pathways, socio-demographic characteristics, academic self-concepts and occupational motivations. In order to overcome methodological problems of most previous empirical studies on teacher recruitment we draw on data from a recent comparative study on teacher recruitment based on two different samples: In both Denmark and Finland we surveyed a representative group of first year teacher education students as well as last year upper-secondary pupils. The nature of the data collected enables us to characterize teacher education students in contrast to a baseline reference group eligible to apply for teacher education and to compare these differences across countries (difference-in-differences estimation). This analytical strategy allows us to overcome problems of most previous studies that use samples of teacher-education students only in order to characterize teacher education students and to estimate differences between beginning teacher students across countries more reliably. Our results clearly show that Finish and Danish beginning teacher education students for the primary school level differ markedly with respect to previous academic pathways, academic self-concepts as well as occupational motivations.

Reimer, David; Dorf, Hans

2011-01-01

190

APPROACH ON THE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION IN THE TRAINING OF READER-LIBRARIAN BETWEEN THE LIBRARIANSHIP STUDENTS OF UFPA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Discusses the relationship between the New Technologies of Information and Communication (NTIC) and reading treated in an interdisciplinary perspective in the context of undergraduate librarianship in the UFPA. The study aims to examine how these tools are appropriated and used by graduate students to focus on access to scholarly texts for the reading and writing of these students who are undergoing training. Conducting methodological article was first performed on stage with the literature of authors such as foundations Castells (1999), Freire (2005) without giving up the contributions of other thinkers on the subject addressed in the research and the second leg by qualitative exploratory study quantitative and a questionnaire with closed questions, open, hybrid and later with analysis and data collection done with the students of the School of Library Science at UFPA class of 2008 in morning and night shifts made in two months. As a result, research shows that over half of the undergraduates interviewed consider that the practice of reading coupled with the use of the NCITthrought their answers, as relevant to obtaining a satisfactory degree of proficiency in academic and subsequently enter the job market with more qualification. Ends the reading and understanding that the ICTs are an essential component in the training of librarians, particularly in a context of production and reproduction of information / texts in digital environments, pointing to the con struction of new reading habits based on computer use.

Erik Andre Pires

2011-01-01

191

The Relationship between Student Teachers' Citizenship Skills and Critical  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of the research is to investigate the relationship between student teachers’ citizenship skills and their critical thinking skills. The New Turkish Primary Curriculum aims at educating pupils with pre-requisite skills and knowledge that are necessary for operating efficiently in a knowledge based society. There is a strong emphasis on improving generic skills of students. The skills of critical thinking, reflective thinking, inquiry and working in groups are thought to be necessary skills for effective teaching and learning. When it comes to citizenship education those skills, especially critical thinking skills, become even more important.There has been a shift in policy with the curriculum both in terms of its structure and its philosophy from ‘creating good citizens’ to ‘empowerment’. The teachers will be the agents for the proposed shift to occur in schools and in pupils’ hearts and minds. That is why it is important that teachers themselves should be equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge. In order to predict whether those aims will be realized or not, it is important to know whether teachers have those knowledge and skills. Thus, the question of whether there is relationship with citizenship qualifications and critical thinking skills will be investigated through student teachers.This study employs a survey research method. In order to collect data two different research tools are used. The data on student teachers’ citizenship skills were gathered through a ‘Citizenship Qualifications Scale’ developed by Yucel, Acun, Demirhan and Goz. The scale has to parts. First part contains questions on demographic information about teachers and teachers’ professional practice. Second part of the scale includes question/statements to determine teachers’ level of knowledge on citizenship themes, level of their behaviors and level of their importance attribution on the same themes. Those themes are categorized as ‘Active Citizenship’, ‘Enviromental Issues’, ‘Economy and Consumer Rights’, ‘Global Issues’, ‘Democracy: Equality and Respect’ and ‘Society and Individual’. In order to obtain information on their level of knowledge, behaviors and importance attribution on those 6 categories, 94 items were formulated. Likert type scale was used ranging from 1 to 5. The total reliability of the scale was ,89 Crombach’s Alpha.

?smail Acun; Metin Demir; Nur Leman Göz

2010-01-01

192

Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Second Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This packet of instructional materials for a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and plasma arc cutting course is comprised of a teacher edition, student edition, and student workbook. The teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages. Introductory pages include training and competency profile, state duty/task crosswalk,…

Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

193

High School Students’ Perceptions of and Attitudes towards Teacher Power in the Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study examines Greek High School students’ perceptions of and attitudes towards their teachers’ power, from findings produced during a questionnaire-based study conducted in the period 2010-2011, with the participation of 1076 students attending 68 schools across Greece. Greek students provided information on how their teachers exert didactic and legitimate power in the classroom and on how students themselves react whenever their teachers abuse power. Data elaboration, statistical and factor analysis showed that, according to students, teachers exert didactic power mainly by exhibiting profound knowledge and applying effective teaching and assessment methods, while they exert legitimate power through implementing rules, inflicting punishment and controlling students’ behaviour. The study also showed that students react passively to power abuse due to fear of possible consequences, aggressively when a teacher’s power is regarded as excessively unfair, or positively when relations of trust and acceptance have been established between the teacher and the student.

Konstanina Koutrouba; Eleni Baxevanou; Athanasios Koutroumpas

2012-01-01

194

Seeing Eye to Eye: Predicting Teacher-Student Agreement on Classroom Social Networks.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examines the association between classroom characteristics and teacher-student agreement in perceptions of students' classroom peer networks. Social network, peer nomination, and observational data were collected from a sample of second through fourth grade teachers (N=33) and students (N=669) in 33 classrooms across five high poverty urban schools. Results demonstrate that variation in teacher-student agreement on the structure of students' peer networks can be explained, in part, by developmental factors and classroom characteristics. Developmental increases in network density partially mediated the positive relationship between grade level and teacher-student agreement. Larger class sizes and higher levels of normative aggressive behavior resulted in lower levels of teacher-student agreement. Teachers' levels of classroom organization had mixed influences, with behavior management negatively predicting agreement, and productivity positively predicting agreement. These results underscore the importance of the classroom context in shaping teacher and student perceptions of peer networks.

Neal JW; Cappella E; Wagner C; Atkins MS

2011-05-01

195

Oxyacetylene Welding and Oxyfuel Cutting. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This Oklahoma curriculum guide, which includes a teacher edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, provides three units for a course on oxyacetylene welding, oxyfuel cutting, and cutting done with alternative fuels such as MAPP, propane, and natural gas. The three units are: "Oxyacetylene Welding"; "Oxyfuel Cutting"; and "Oxyacetylene…

Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

196

Introducing Literature to an EFL Classroom: Teacher’s Presentations and Students’ Perceptions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study documents a teacher-researcher’s presentations of 24 literary works to a class of 28 Taiwanese EFL senior high school students during a fourteen-week experiment, and reports on those students’ perceptions of the texts introduced and their attitudes towards literature in general. In preparing literary texts, the teacher explored the notion of computer assisted literature teaching (CALT), capitalizing on the Internet resources to prepare plot summaries of novels and plays. Some supplementary media materials were also used in the literature presentations. Results of participants’ responses to a 50-item questionnaire showed that most of the students like the presented novels most, followed by plays, short stories, and then poems. Furthermore, about half of the students like to read literary works and also like to be introduced to literature. Specifically, students like to read contemporary literature rather than classic literature, and such works as movie novels, realistic fiction, fantasies, and mysteries are their favorites. In the end, the author argues that there is low literature threshold, if any, for teachers to cross before they can introduce literature to their EFL students.

Fan-ping Tseng

2010-01-01

197

Teacher to Teacher: What Texts Effectively Raise Issues Related to 9/11 for Secondary Students?  

Science.gov (United States)

|This article deals with texts that effectively raise issues related to 9/11 for secondary students, as discussed by several teachers. Kevin J. Collins from St. Thomas Aquinas High School says, "Elephant," Gus Van Sant's exploration of a Columbine-like tragedy, underscores the current generation's attempt to define the meaning of events in…

English Journal, 2006

2006-01-01

198

The Relationship of Verbal Interaction Patterns and Teacher-Student Rapport of Selected ESCP Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reported is an investigation of the instructional styles of 23 earth science teachers who used the Earth Science Curriculum Project (ESCP) materials and text with eighth- or ninth-grade students. Flanders' interaction analysis system was used as a basis for the observations. The differences in teaching procedures were identified by using the…

Roth, Robert August

199

"A Language Teacher is Like...": Examining Malaysian Students' Perceptions of Language Teachers through Metaphor Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines metaphors about language teachers created by a group of 23 Malaysian university students. The aims of the study are (1) to determine whether metaphors produced by language learners in the Asian educational context can fit into the four philosophical perspectives on education outlined by Oxford et al. (1998), and (2) to…

Nikitina, Larisa; Furuoka, Fumitaka

2008-01-01

200

Teacher Behaviour and Student Outcomes: Suggestions for Research on Teacher Training and Professional Development  

Science.gov (United States)

|The study reported here examines whether teaching skills included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness can be grouped into types of teacher behaviour and whether these types are related with different student outcome measures. The data stem from a study which was conducted in order to test the validity of the dynamic model. Results…

Kyriakides, L.; Creemers, B. P. M.; Antoniou, P.

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Teacher Behaviour and Student Outcomes: Suggestions for Research on Teacher Training and Professional Development  

Science.gov (United States)

The study reported here examines whether teaching skills included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness can be grouped into types of teacher behaviour and whether these types are related with different student outcome measures. The data stem from a study which was conducted in order to test the validity of the dynamic model. Results…

Kyriakides, L.; Creemers, B. P. M.; Antoniou, P.

2009-01-01

202

Crossing the Border from Science Student to Science Teacher: Preservice Teachers' Views and Experiences Learning to Teach Inquiry  

Science.gov (United States)

Preservice science teachers face numerous challenges in understanding and teaching science as inquiry. Over the course of their teacher education program, they are expected to move from veteran science students with little experience learning their discipline through inquiry instruction to beginning science teachers adept at implementing inquiry…

Kang, Emily J. S.; Bianchini, Julie A.; Kelly, Gregory J.

2013-01-01

203

Evaluating Student-Teacher Linkage Data in Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) Sites: Acquisition, Verification, and System Development. The Harvesting Project  

Science.gov (United States)

The U.S. Department of Education Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) seeks to transform education compensation systems so that principal and teacher performance (measured through classroom productivity measures) connects to compensation. Classroom-level productivity measures require robust student-teacher linkage data. Organizations such as the…

Watson, Jeffery; Witham, Peter; St. Louis, Timothy

2010-01-01

204

Teachers’ Nonverbal Behavior and Its Impact on Student Achievement  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The observational study was conducted to see the impact of teachers’ nonverbal behavior on academic achievement of learners. This also investigated the relationship of nonverbal communication of teachers working in different educational institutions. Main objectives of study were to measure nonverbal behavior of teachers’ both male and female working in English medium Federal Government Cantt Garrison schools, Army Public schools and Private schools and to find out the relationship between teachers’ nonverbal behavior and academic achievement of students. 90 science teachers were randomly chosen through cluster sampling technique. An observation form with seven-point rating scale (semantic differential) based on Galloways’ categories of nonverbal communication was developed. The rating scale complemented verbal dimension of Flanders’ interaction categories through nonverbal dimension. Design of research was descriptive cum observational. The statistical techniques of frequency distribution, mean, standard deviation, and ANNOVA and t-test were used for analysis. The results were generalized to the population by means of appropriate inferential statistics. It was found that the nonverbal behavior of the teachers was found to be consistent with their verbal behavior. 

Noureen Asghar Chaudhry; Manzoor Arif

2012-01-01

205

Understanding Chinese Teachers’ Professional Identity and Beliefs about the Teacher-Student Relationship in a Danish Context  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper presents a qualitative study on immigrant Chinese teachers’ professional identity and beliefs about the teacher-student relationship in a Danish teaching context. From a sociocultural perspective of understanding professional identity, the empirical analysis of this paper mainly drew upon ethnographic interviews with a group of Chinese language teachers’ in Denmark concerning their life experiences, perceptions and beliefs. This study suggests that cultural differences and contextual factors are influential in shaping both teachers’ perceptions of professional identity and the ways in which they perceive and handle relationships with students, and being a teacher in a cross-cultural context involves professional identity transformation. This study also suggests that these teachers are experiencing a shift in their ideas of what constitutes an appropriate teacher-student relationship, and they are developing diverse coping strategies in order to acclimate to the change in their situated teaching context.

Wang, Li; Du, Xiangyun

2013-01-01

206

The Influence of the Teacher’s Sex on High School Students’ Engagement and Achievement in Science.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore relationships between teachers’ sex and a range of variables relating to adolescent students’ perceptions of their classroom engagement, quality of teaching and responses to their teacher, and their own achievements in science. A cross-sectional survey of 798 Norwegian students showed the potential influence of the sex of the teacher on engagement, motivation, volition, and learning outcomes which was estimated after they had known their teachers for six months. The conclusion is that there are interesting interactions between the sex of students and the sex of science teachers in high school along some dimensions. The statistical significant findings support the sex-stereotypic notion, while there are also tendencies supporting the sex-opposite notion. However, in most instances significant interactions between teacher sex and student sex are not established. The conclusion is more nuanced than in earlier studies. Study shortcomings and implications for the practice of future research are discussed.

Eyvind Elstad; Are Turmo

2009-01-01

207

The Fission Vision: Teacher and Student Editions  

Science.gov (United States)

Although they may have heard the term many times, students often have difficulty conceptualizing the process of nuclear fission. The kinesthetic simulation, as wellas the two suggested applets, are worthwhile activities for clarifying the process of nuclearfission. This free selection includes the Table of Contents, A Note from Joy Hakim, Resources for Integration and Implementation, the corresponding National Science Education Standards, and the Index.

Texley, Juliana

2008-11-01

208

How student teachers understand African philosophy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The question ‘What constitutes African philosophy?’ was first raised with the publication of Placide Tempels’s seminal work Bantu philosophy in 1959. Tempels’s book inevitably elicited considerable critical response from African philosophers, which culminated in a wide range of publications such as Wiredu’s (1980) Philosophy and an African culture, Hountondji’s (1983) African philosophy: Myth and reality, Oruka’s (1990) Sage philosophy: Indigenous thinkers and modern debate on African philosophy, Shutte’s (1993) Philosophy for Africa, Masolo’s (1994) African philosophy in search of identity and Gyekye’s (1995) An essay of African philosophical thought: The Akan conceptual scheme. It has been over 60 years since the publication of Temples’s book and there continues to be serious debate about African philosophy. This article sought to contribute to the debate on the various conceptions of African philosophy, but with a focus on the challenges of teaching African philosophy to Philosophy of Education students at an open distance learning institution in South Africa. This article discussed the tendency amongst undergraduate Philosophy of Education students to conflate and reduce African philosophy to African cultures and traditions, and to the notion of ubuntu, and sought to understand the reasons for students’ inclination to treat African philosophy in this way. It examined students’ background knowledge of African philosophy, their critical thinking skills and whether their official study materials are selected and packaged in a manner that, in fact, adds to the challenges they face. Finally, the article explored the ways in which Philosophy of Education lecturers can adapt their pedagogy to provide students with a better understanding of African philosophy.

Matsephe M. Letseka; Elza Venter

2012-01-01

209

Teachers' Multicultural Awareness and the Ethnic Identity of Minority Students: An Individual Case Study of a Hani Student  

Science.gov (United States)

This study considers the role of teachers' multicultural awareness in promoting minority students' ethnic identity by considering the situation in one particular middle school. A case study of a Hani student is presented to show how teachers' multicultural awareness affects ethnic identity and the academic achievement of minority students. This…

Qunhui, Ou; Na, Du

2012-01-01

210

An Investigation of Students’ Face Wants in Chinese English Teachers’ Classroom Feedback  

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Full Text Available In order to create a new teacher-student relationship and raise students’ politeness awareness and pragmatic competence in cross-cultural communication, this paper investigated and analyzed students’ face wants and English teachers’ awareness of students’ face want in their classroom feedback. The main data-gathering instruments are MP3-recording, non-participant observation, follow-up structured-interviews and closed- questionnaires. The results reveal that 60.6% of the teacher participants are frequently aware of their students’ face wants, and 27.2% of them are sometimes, while the other teachers seldom or never consider the students’ face want. Because of being influenced by the Chinese traditional culture in which teachers are superiors, not thoroughly understanding English Curriculum Standard which calls for human concern, and knowing a little about pragmatic theories, some Chinese English teachers ignore students’ face want. Suggestions on how to save students’ face want are put forward.

Wanli Zhao

2010-01-01

211

Learning to Teach: A Descriptive Study of Student Language Teachers in Taiwan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Studies have shown that many training programs are relatively ineffective in preparing prospective teachers for classroom teaching. Such findings suggest that teacher training programs might require improvement and that prospective teachers should be more thoroughly assessed during the training period. This study examined the learning process of a group of EFL teachers during their practicum at elementary schools. Our findings indicate that prior language learning experience and peer student teachers play a critical role in this period. Overall, the results suggested that student teachers would benefit from greater integration between field experiences, practicum, and lecture courses, which would enable the students to link teaching theory and practice more effectively.

En-Chong Liaw

2012-01-01

212

Student and Teacher Attendance: The Role of Shared Goods in Reducing Absenteeism  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

A theoretical model is advanced that demonstrates that, if teacher and student attendance generate a shared good, then teacher and student attendance will be mutually reinforcing. Using data from the Northwest Frontier Province of Pakistan, empirical evidence supporting that proposition is advanced. Controlling for the endogeneity of teacher and student attendance, the most powerful factor raising teacher attendance is the attendance of the children in the school, and the most important factor influencing child attendance is the presence of the teacher. The results suggest that one important avenue to be explored in developing policies to reduce teacher absenteeism is to focus on raising the attendance of children.

Banerjee, Ritwik; King, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

213

Questions Asked by Primary Student Teachers about Observations of a Science Demonstration  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher questioning has a central role in guiding pupils to learn to make scientific observations and inferences. We asked 110 primary student teachers to write down what kind of questions they would ask their pupils about a demonstration. Almost half of the student teachers posed questions that were either inappropriate or presupposed that the…

Ahtee, Maija; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari; Suomela, Liisa

2011-01-01

214

Facilitating Malaysian Student Teachers' Understanding of the Biology Syllabus through Concept Mapping  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the outcome of an exercise carried out with one hundred undergraduate student teachers (preservice teachers) enrolled in a Biology Teaching Methods course, a third year course in a four-year Teacher Education Programme. The students, working in groups of three to four, were assigned to construct a concept map showing their…

Ali, Maznah; Ismail, Zurida

2005-01-01

215

"Philia" and Pedagogy "Side by Side": The Perils and Promise of Teacher-Student Friendships  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper asks whether teachers and students can be friends with one another and yet maintain their integrity as teachers and students. It provides an account of friendship, drawing on Aristotle, Montaigne, and contemporary work by Elizabeth Telfer and Lawrence Blum, and addresses two key challenges: first, that teachers must be impartial and…

Shuffelton, Amy B.

2012-01-01

216

The Influence of Teachers' Preexisting Notions about Students on Scholastic Achievement  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper examines teachers' preexisting notion of the "weak" academic student, and the characteristics implicit in that stereotype. Extant literature demonstrates how the teacher's dichotomous conceptions of "strong" and "weak" academic students are predictive of scholastic success. The goal of this study was to demonstrate how teachers'…

Pirrone, Concetta

2012-01-01

217

Voices of Students, Parents, and Teachers in China's Secondary Education Reform  

Science.gov (United States)

|The goal of this study was to examine how and to what extent secondary teachers have implemented educational reforms in China that have had a direct impact on students, teachers, and parents. The survey concluded that teachers and parents liked the reform initiatives. Most teachers were able to make changes that supported the reforms even though…

Joong, Peter; Ying, Xiong; Lin, Li; Jian, Pan Chun

2006-01-01

218

Die beroepsingesteldheid van vierdejaaronderwys-studente/ The career orientation of final year teacher training students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Abstract in english The research was prompted by the assumption that the many problems in South African education (e.g. continuous curiculum changes, insufficient in-service training and support, classroom overcrowding, discipline problems,administrative paperwork, low teacher morale, high teacher attrition rate, low societal status of the teaching profession) must have an adverse effect on the career orientation of teacher training students. Our research was embedded in the theoretical fram (more) ework of eco-systemic theory (Bronfenbrenner 1990), through which we indicated how the teacher is surrounded and influenced by various societal systems in four levels of proximity: the micro, meso, exo and macro levels. From these systems we established the conceptual framework, in which we discussed negative forces on the teacher as these are eminent in societal expectations about the teacher, the professional identity of the teacher and the retention rate in the teaching profession. The discussion ofthese negative forces and their impact affirmed our initial assumption and led to our research question: To what extent are teaching training students positively inclined towards a career in teaching? This question implied attention to a) the career motivation, and b) the moral values of the modern South African teaching training student. The empirical study was conceptualised as a pilot project. We involved the full number of final year teaching training students at one of the largest education faculties in South Africa, namely at the University of Pretoria. The students (n = 403) were asked to complete a questionnaire which focused inter alia on respondents' exposure to daily news, reasonsfor choosing the education career path, attitudes towards the teaching profession and medium to long term prospects in the profession. Moral inclinations were also probed, e.g. with items on religion, discipline, language of instruction, multicultural teaching and being a role model. The questionnaire findings were verified in a focus group interview with five purposively selected respondents in the questionnaire survey. Our findings nullified our initial assumptions. Not only were the students strongly committed to their chosen career, notwithstanding the questionable societal status of the teaching profession and the formidable teaching challenges (of which they were apparently keenly aware), but they also conveyed a strong message about moral values and the teacher's role in modelling those in and beyond the school. Our findings are prospective and certainly need verification on a broader scale. We are also planning a follow-up study with the same respondents, once they have completed two years of full time teaching. The findings could serve as impetus for education management measures to ensure that aspiring teachers' level of commitment is sustainable. One of these measures could be an online advice and counselling service for beginner teachers.

Kamper, G.D.; Steyn, M.G.

2012-06-01

219

Streaming and Students’ Self-Esteem: A Qualitative Study on Teachers’ Correspondence Bias  

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Full Text Available This  study  was  aimed  to  investigate  the  effect  of  students’ streaming  practice  in  Malaysian  secondary  on  students’  self-esteem  through teachers’ expectancy.   17 teachers and 20 students from art and science streams of secondary schools  in  Penang,  Malaysia  were  participated  in  this  study.  Unstructured interviews  were  used  on  teachers  to  collect  the  qualitative  data  of  teachers’ expectancy.  The  participating  students  were  from  the  fourth  year  of  secondary school  in  Malaysian  school  system  (between  16-17  years  old,  10  from  science stream  and  10  from  arts  stream)  were  interviewed  in  order  to  collect  the qualitative data of teachers’ perceived behavior and self-esteem. Result  of  this  study  shown  that  teachers  expected  science  stream students to have good academic performance but expected arts stream students to  be  involved  in  disciplinary  problems.  Furthermore,  science  stream  students perceived  that  their  teachers  were  academically  supportive  but  arts  stream students  perceived  that  their  teachers  were  focusing  on  controlling  their behavior.  On  the  other  hand,  findings  of  this  study  also  revealed  that  science stream  students  possed  higher  level  of  self-esteem than  arts  stream  students. Accordingly,  it  was  indicated  that  teachers’  perceived  behavior  and  teachers’ expectancy  are  correlated  to  one  another,  and  teachers’  perceived  behavior predicts students’ self-esteem. It was discovered that teachers expected science stream students to be eager to improve their academic performance, and students from arts stream class  were likely to be involved in disciplinary problems. Students  were found to  be  aware  of  their  teachers’  expectancy,  and  their  perception  of  teachers’ expectancy  affected  their  self-esteem.  While  self-esteem  was  referred  to  a discrepancy  between  a  student’s  ideal-self  and  actual-self,  it  was  discovered that  both  groups  of  students  pictured  their  ideal-self  differently  to  each  other. Science  stream  students  pictured  their  ideal-selves  as  a  character  with  overall success, while arts stream students pictured their ideal-selves as a socially well-functioned  character.  Nevertheless,  arts  stream  students  found  to  have  lower self-esteem.  It  was  concluded  that  streaming  affected  the  students’  self-esteem through teachers’ expectancy and perceived behavior.Keywords:   Streaming,  students’  self-esteem,  teachers’  expectancy,  science stream, arts stream, supportive, controlling.

Prihadi Kususanto Chin Sook Fui

2013-01-01

220

Undergraduate Teacher Education students’ thoughts on immigration and immigrants  

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Full Text Available Many immigrant children have become part of our educational system in the last few years. This research paper aims to examine the beliefs and representations that the third-year students of Teacher Education have towards immigration and immigrants. We have used life narratives as the research tool. This method has a solid tradition in the area of qualitative research. Our close examination of texts throws interesting results and research topics.

Amelia Barquín; Nerea Alzola; Monika Madinabeitia; Ane Urizar

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Effective ways of teaching students applied art by future teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Organization of training in teaching students of art and crafts of future teachers through improvement of the forms, methods and programs for the active development of thought processes and skills by students, their application in practice and in the organization of the development of students of folk arts and crafts creation creativity through creative research students, in the course of development of art and crafts ability to set goals for working with different types of applied art, the ability to receive and use information, the ability to use modern technology to determine the quality of the work, make plans, prepare materials, organize and carry out technological problems determine the policies, monitor, analyze, and give real self-esteem.

Zhunissova N. A.

2013-01-01

222

Parents' perception, students' and teachers' attitude towards school sex education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Sex education is described as education about human sexual anatomy, sexual reproduction, sexual intercourse, reproductive health, emotional relations, reproductive rights and responsibilities, abstinence, contraception, family planning, body image, sexual orientation, sexual pleasure, values, decision making, communication, dating, relationships, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and how to avoid them, and birth control methods. This study was conducted to explore perception of parents about school sex education and assess the attitude of teachers and students towards school sex education. METHODS: A cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative study was conducted on randomly selected 386 students, total census of 94 teachers and 10 parents in Merawi Town from March 13-27, 2011. Data were collected using self-administered structured questionnaire and in-depth interview guideline. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed using total score to determine the effect of the independent variables on the outcome variable and thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. RESULTS: All study participants have favourable attitude towards the importance of school sex education. They also agreed that the content of school sex education should include abstinence-only and abstinence-plus based on mental maturity of the students. That means at early age (Primary school) the content of school sex education should be abstinence-only and at later age (secondary school) the content of school sex education should be added abstinence-plus. The students and the teachers said that the minimum and maximum introduction time for school sex education is 5 year and 25 year with mean of 10.97(SD±4.3) and 12.36(SD±3.7) respectively. Teacher teaching experiences and field of studies have supportive idea about the starting of school sex education. Watching romantic movies, reading romantic materials and listening romantic radio programs appear to have a contribution on the predictor of students' attitude towards the starting time of school sex education. CONCLUSION: All study participants have a need to start sex education at school. All study participants said that at early age (Primary school) the content of school sex education is abstinence-only and at later age (secondary school) is added abstinence-plus. School Sex education should be under considers the need of students, teachers and parents.

Fentahun N; Assefa T; Alemseged F; Ambaw F

2012-07-01

223

Students Learn about Documentation throughout Their Teacher Education Program  

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Full Text Available Study groups and learning circles can offer a systematic way for early childhood teachers to interact about their work and create a culture of professional development. This paper describes how faculty systematically followed a collaborative co-inquiry process in order to improve a new early childhood interdisciplinary teacher preparation program. The team met on a regular basis throughout one academic year, with the stated objective of infusing observation/documentation knowledge and skills in a coherent and systematic way throughout the students’ program of studies. The group created a template of the cycle of inquiry, which could apply to all courses, and analyzed the documentation process along a series of skill dimensions: (1) level that students are expected to achieve (awareness, application, refinement/integration); (2) focus of the students’ observations (who, what, where, when, how); (3) width of the lens of observation (e.g., focused narrowly on one dimension of behavior or widely on a whole classroom environment); (4) intended audience of the completed documentation (e.g., children, parents, professional colleagues); and (5) finished product of documentation (e.g., project panel, memory book, slide presentation). The co-inquiry process allowed the faculty to improve the ways that the program helps students move from an awareness level toward a practitioner level in using observation and documentation. The students’ reflections and finished work suggest how they learned to promote children’s learning, partner with parents, and come to think of themselves as “professionals” in their field.

Carolyn Pope Edwards; Susan Churchill; Mary Gabriel; Ruth Heaton; Julie Jones-Branch; Christine Marvin; Michelle Rupiper

2007-01-01

224

Student-teacher relationship quality and academic adjustment in upper elementary school: the role of student personality.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study tested a theoretical model considering students' personality traits as predictors of student-teacher relationship quality (closeness, conflict, and dependency), the effects of student-teacher relationship quality on students' math and reading achievement, and the mediating role of students' motivational beliefs on the association between student-teacher relationship quality and achievement in upper elementary school. Surveys and tests were conducted among a nationally representative Dutch sample of 8545 sixth-grade students and their teachers in 395 schools. Structural equation models were used to test direct and indirect effects. Support was found for a model that identified conscientiousness and agreeableness as predictors of close, nonconflictual relationships, and neuroticism as a predictor of dependent and conflictual relationships. Extraversion was associated with higher levels of closeness and conflict, and autonomy was only associated with lower levels of dependency. Students' motivational beliefs mediated the effects of dependency and student-reported closeness on reading and math achievement.

Zee M; Koomen HM; Van der Veen I

2013-08-01

225

Student-teacher relationship quality and academic adjustment in upper elementary school: the role of student personality.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study tested a theoretical model considering students' personality traits as predictors of student-teacher relationship quality (closeness, conflict, and dependency), the effects of student-teacher relationship quality on students' math and reading achievement, and the mediating role of students' motivational beliefs on the association between student-teacher relationship quality and achievement in upper elementary school. Surveys and tests were conducted among a nationally representative Dutch sample of 8545 sixth-grade students and their teachers in 395 schools. Structural equation models were used to test direct and indirect effects. Support was found for a model that identified conscientiousness and agreeableness as predictors of close, nonconflictual relationships, and neuroticism as a predictor of dependent and conflictual relationships. Extraversion was associated with higher levels of closeness and conflict, and autonomy was only associated with lower levels of dependency. Students' motivational beliefs mediated the effects of dependency and student-reported closeness on reading and math achievement. PMID:23870445

Zee, Marjolein; Koomen, Helma M Y; Van der Veen, Ineke

2013-05-29

226

Generating Knowledge and Avoiding Plagiarism: Smart Information Use by High School Students  

Science.gov (United States)

The article reports phase 2 of a two-year study, dubbed the Smart Information Use project, the focus of which was appropriate seeking and use of information by students at various stages of their high school education, along with the avoidance of plagiarism. In four Australian high schools, teacher librarians and classroom teachers developed and…

Williamson, Kirsty; McGregor, Joy

2011-01-01

227

Formal education and the quality of librarian's work  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper deals with the relations between formal education of librarians within the Department of Library Science on the Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana, and the quality of work of librarians. The university must give to the students more then only specialized knowledge needed on their working places in libraries. The profile of a librarian is rapidly changing and the information technology has brought to librarians new contents of work. But the »book« will not be superseded by the computer, but book and computer will coexist in the third millenium library. The curriculum on the Department of Library Science will have to take into account these developments. But for the high quality of librarian's work more is required then formal education: the personal drive to achieve more than average in his or her everyday work is the quality that will make a good librarian.

Martin Žnidarši?

1999-01-01

228

The Role of Librarians in Academic Success  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Librarians address all levels of information needs for the university: its acquisition, its production, its storage, and instruction for its safe and gainful use. Most of today's college students have a high degree of computer literacy but are weak in their abilities to determine the quality of the information that is so readily available. Students need to be taught to find, evaluate, and use information in an academically-oriented manner in order to solve complex problems. Good library skills are integral to academic success. In conjunction with research and teaching faculty, librarians create a framework for knowledge acquisition in the evolving university education.

Claudia J. Dold

2013-01-01

229

Solo Librarians Working Collaboratively  

Science.gov (United States)

The Elko County School District in Nevada has elementary school librarians that are "solo" librarians. Over the last several years they have worked to collaborate on meeting monthly--even though the district covers 17,100 square miles--and on providing professional development face to face and online. Sharing and collaboration help them to problem…

Nickel, Robbie

2011-01-01

230

Teacher-student relationship climate and school outcomes: implications for educational policy initiatives.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In recent discussions regarding concerns about the academic achievement of US students, educational policy makers have suggested the implementation of certain teacher policies. To address the limited empirical research on the putative educational impact of such policies, this study used multilevel structural equation models to investigate the longitudinal associations between teacher evaluation and reward policies, and student mathematics achievement and dropout with a national sample of students (n = 7,779) attending one of 431 public high schools. The student sample included an equal number of boys and girls averaging 16 years of age, and included a White (53%) majority. This study examined whether associations between teacher policies and student achievement were mediated by the teacher-student relationship climate. Results of this study were threefold. First, teacher evaluation policies that allowed students to evaluate their teachers were associated with more positive student reports of the classroom teaching climate. Second, schools with teacher reward policies that included assigning higher performing teachers with higher performing students had a negative association with student perceptions of the teaching climate. Lastly, schools with better student perceptions of the teaching climate were associated with lower student dropout rates by students' senior year. These findings are discussed in light of their educational policy implications.

Barile JP; Donohue DK; Anthony ER; Baker AM; Weaver SR; Henrich CC

2012-03-01

231

Teacher-student relationship climate and school outcomes: implications for educational policy initiatives.  

Science.gov (United States)

In recent discussions regarding concerns about the academic achievement of US students, educational policy makers have suggested the implementation of certain teacher policies. To address the limited empirical research on the putative educational impact of such policies, this study used multilevel structural equation models to investigate the longitudinal associations between teacher evaluation and reward policies, and student mathematics achievement and dropout with a national sample of students (n = 7,779) attending one of 431 public high schools. The student sample included an equal number of boys and girls averaging 16 years of age, and included a White (53%) majority. This study examined whether associations between teacher policies and student achievement were mediated by the teacher-student relationship climate. Results of this study were threefold. First, teacher evaluation policies that allowed students to evaluate their teachers were associated with more positive student reports of the classroom teaching climate. Second, schools with teacher reward policies that included assigning higher performing teachers with higher performing students had a negative association with student perceptions of the teaching climate. Lastly, schools with better student perceptions of the teaching climate were associated with lower student dropout rates by students' senior year. These findings are discussed in light of their educational policy implications. PMID:21404108

Barile, John P; Donohue, Dana K; Anthony, Elizabeth R; Baker, Andrew M; Weaver, Scott R; Henrich, Christopher C

2011-03-15

232

Science Teacher Quality and Effectiveness: Gweru Urban Junior Secondary School Students’ Points of View  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions among junior secondary science students from Gweru Urban secondary schools in Zimbabwe towards science teachers' teaching quality and effectiveness. This qualitative study approached and interviewed Form 2 students from 10 different schools in Gweru urban. The results show that three key dimensions of science teacher quality and effectiveness emerged: teacher's scientific knowledge, teacher’s pedagogical skills and teacher's social competence. Findings suggest that the teachers can promote and enhance teaching effectiveness by applying a positive student approach, understanding students’ learning difficulties, acknowledging the individual student, being someone the students can trust, being able to organise and teach in interesting and flexible ways, using good teaching methods, their ability to plan and structure the content and the use of practical investigative science in the classroom. Student perspectives, however, retain a humanistic vision of teaching and learning. Students want teachers who care and respect them, who help them learn and make learning interesting and fun. This study adds value by unveiling the key antecedents and predictors of students perceptions thus confirm previous findings that teacher quality is an important educational issue. It is apparent from this study that quality teachers must embrace the vision of caring for students and their learning.The results of the research indicated that students highly value teachers who are both passionate about the subject taught and passionate about their students. Secondary school science students prefer teachers who teach science in a way that is both interesting and relevant to the student.

Mandina Shadreck; Mambanda Isaac

2012-01-01

233

Astronomy Librarian - Quo Vadis?  

Science.gov (United States)

"You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of some of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of Open Access, to name but a few topics.

Lagerstrom, Jill; Grothkopf, Uta

234

Astronomy Librarians - Quo Vadis?  

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"You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of open access, to name but a few topics.

Lagerstrom, Jill

2011-01-01

235

The effects of teacher mathematics knowledge and pedagogy on student achievement in rural Guatemala  

Science.gov (United States)

Why are some teachers more effective than others? The importance of understanding the interplay between teacher preparation, pedagogy and student achievement has motivated a new line of research focusing on teacher knowledge. This study analyses the effects of teacher mathematics knowledge on student achievement using longitudinal data from rural Guatemalan primary schools. After presenting a conceptual framework for linking the work of the teacher with student learning in mathematics together with an overview of the different forms of teacher knowledge, the paper introduces the Guatemalan context and the analytical framework including the sample, data and methods. Overall, the results provide some empirical support for a widely held, if infrequently tested, belief in mathematics education: effective teachers have different kinds of mathematical knowledge. The results also suggest specific mechanisms by which effective teachers can make substantial impacts on student learning, even in extremely poor contexts.

Marshall, Jeffery H.; Sorto, M. Alejandra

2012-04-01

236

New activities and changing roles of health sciences librarians: a systematic review, 1990-2012  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: The paper identifies and documents new health sciences librarian activities and roles during the period from 1990–2012. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, Library and Information Abstracts, Library Literature, Scopus, and Web of Science. To find new roles that might not yet have been described in the literature, job announcements published in the Medical Library Association email discussion list archives from 2008–2012 were searched. For inclusion, an article needed to contain a substantive description of a new role and/or activity performed by librarians and be in the field of medical or health sciences librarianship. Papers that did not describe an actual (rather than proposed) librarian role were excluded. Results: New roles identified through the literature search were: embedded librarians (such as clinical informationist, bioinformationist, public health informationist, disaster information specialist); systematic review librarian; emerging technologies librarian; continuing medical education librarian; grants development librarian; and data management librarian. New roles identified through job announcements were digital librarian, metadata librarian, scholarly communication librarian, and translational research librarian. New twists to old roles were also identified: clinical medical librarian, instruction librarian, outreach librarian, and consumer health librarian. Conclusions: While the main purposes of health sciences librarianship remain the same, the new roles represent major new activities so that, for many librarians, daily on-the-job work is completely different. Implications: This list of new activities should inform students contemplating medical librarianship careers, guide formal and continuing education programs, and encourage other librarians to consider these new services.

Cooper, I. Diane; Crum, Janet A

2013-01-01

237

New activities and changing roles of health sciences librarians: a systematic review, 1990-2012.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The paper identifies and documents new health sciences librarian activities and roles during the period from 1990-2012. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, Library and Information Abstracts, Library Literature, Scopus, and Web of Science. To find new roles that might not yet have been described in the literature, job announcements published in the Medical Library Association email discussion list archives from 2008-2012 were searched. For inclusion, an article needed to contain a substantive description of a new role and/or activity performed by librarians and be in the field of medical or health sciences librarianship. Papers that did not describe an actual (rather than proposed) librarian role were excluded. RESULTS: NEW ROLES IDENTIFIED THROUGH THE LITERATURE SEARCH WERE: embedded librarians (such as clinical informationist, bioinformationist, public health informationist, disaster information specialist); systematic review librarian; emerging technologies librarian; continuing medical education librarian; grants development librarian; and data management librarian. New roles identified through job announcements were digital librarian, metadata librarian, scholarly communication librarian, and translational research librarian. New twists to old roles were also identified: clinical medical librarian, instruction librarian, outreach librarian, and consumer health librarian. CONCLUSIONS: While the main purposes of health sciences librarianship remain the same, the new roles represent major new activities so that, for many librarians, daily on-the-job work is completely different. IMPLICATIONS: This list of new activities should inform students contemplating medical librarianship careers, guide formal and continuing education programs, and encourage other librarians to consider these new services.

Cooper ID; Crum JA

2013-10-01

238

Developing medical students as teachers: An anatomy-based student-as-teacher program with emphasis on core teaching competencies.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Teaching is an increasingly recognized responsibility of the resident physician. Residents, however, often assume teaching responsibilities without adequate preparation. Consequently, many medical schools have implemented student-as-teacher (SAT) programs that provide near-peer teaching opportunities to senior medical students. Near-peer teaching is widely regarded as an effective teaching modality; however, whether near-peer teaching experiences in medical school prepare students for the teaching demands of residency is less understood. We explored whether the anatomy-based SAT program through the Human Structure didactic block at Mayo Medical School addressed the core teaching competencies of a medical educator and prepared its participants for further teaching roles in their medical careers. A web-based survey was sent to all teaching assistants in the anatomy-based SAT program over the past five years (2007-2011). Survey questions were constructed based on previously published competencies in seven teaching domains - course development, course organization, teaching execution, student coaching, student assessment, teacher evaluation, and scholarship. Results of the survey indicate that participants in the anatomy-based SAT program achieved core competencies of a medical educator and felt prepared for the teaching demands of residency. Anat Sci Educ. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

Jay Erie A; Starkman SJ; Pawlina W; Lachman N

2013-03-01

239

A STUDY OF STUDENT TEACHERS PARTICIPATION IN QUALITY MANAGEMENT RELATED TO STUDENT SUPPORT AND PROGRESS.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Present study has been conducted to study the student teacher's participation in related is related to teaching, learning and evaluation of planning ,organization, communication ,co-ordination and evaluation process. The sample consisted 960 and selected randomly. In order to collect the data self made Questionnaire was used. Mean, S.D. and't' value are calculated to get result on basis of collected data. The analysis shows that student teacher's participation in Quality management in relation to Granted and No granted for planning, organization, communication, co-ordination and evaluation seemed to be an average level.According to NAAC institution all higher education's quality maintain by seven criteria's. Student support and progress is also one important criteria. Researcher compare old and new colleges of b.ed related to Student support and progress

NITINKUMAR DADASAHEB MALI

2013-01-01

240

Are Boys Better Off with Male and Girls with Female Teachers? A Multilevel Investigation of Measurement Invariance and Gender Match in Teacher-Student Relationship Quality  

Science.gov (United States)

Although research consistently points to poorer teacher-student relationships for boys than girls, there are no studies that take into account the effects of teacher gender and control for possible measurement non-invariance across student and teacher gender. This study addressed both issues. The sample included 649 primary school teachers (182…

Spilt, Jantine L.; Koomen, Helma M. Y.; Jak, Suzanne

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Preservice music teachers' predictions, perceptions, and assessment of students with special needs: the need for training in student assessment.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the current study was to examine preservice teachers' predictions and perceptions of students with special needs' levels of mastery of specific music education concepts and actual grades achieved by these students using alternative assessments and testing accommodations within two subpopulations: students with emotional and/or behavior disorders (EDBD) and students with acute cognitive delays (ACD). The preservice teachers predicted students within the EDBD class would achieve a significantly higher level of mastery of the music concepts than students within the ACD classroom. After the field experience, however, the preservice teachers' perceptions of all students' levels of mastery increased from prediction scores overall. Additionally, preservice teachers were able to execute testing accommodations and implement successful alternative assessments which gave empirical data on the students' levels of mastery of the music education concepts within the curriculum. Implications for music therapists, as consultants in special education, are discussed. PMID:17419665

VanWeelden, Kimberly; Whipple, Jennifer

2007-01-01

242

Preservice music teachers' predictions, perceptions, and assessment of students with special needs: the need for training in student assessment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of the current study was to examine preservice teachers' predictions and perceptions of students with special needs' levels of mastery of specific music education concepts and actual grades achieved by these students using alternative assessments and testing accommodations within two subpopulations: students with emotional and/or behavior disorders (EDBD) and students with acute cognitive delays (ACD). The preservice teachers predicted students within the EDBD class would achieve a significantly higher level of mastery of the music concepts than students within the ACD classroom. After the field experience, however, the preservice teachers' perceptions of all students' levels of mastery increased from prediction scores overall. Additionally, preservice teachers were able to execute testing accommodations and implement successful alternative assessments which gave empirical data on the students' levels of mastery of the music education concepts within the curriculum. Implications for music therapists, as consultants in special education, are discussed.

VanWeelden K; Whipple J

2007-01-01

243

Enhancing learning approaches: practical tips for students and teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: In an integrated curriculum such as problem-based learning (PBL), students need to develop a number of learning skills and competencies. These cannot be achieved through memorization of factual knowledge but rather through the development of a wide range of cognitive and noncognitive skills that enhance deep learning. AIM: The aim of this article is to provide students and teachers with learning approaches and learning strategies that enhance deep learning. METHOds: We reviewed current literature in this area, explored current theories of learning, and used our experience with medical students in a number of universities to develop these tips. RESULTS: Incorporating the methods described, we have developed 12 tips and organized them under three themes. These tips are (1) learn how to ask good questions, (2) use analogy, (3) construct mechanisms and concept maps, (4) join a peer-tutoring group, (5) develop critical thinking skills, (6) use self-reflection, (7) use appropriate range of learning resources, (8) ask for feedback, (9) apply knowledge learnt to new problems, (10) practice learning by using simulation, (11) learn by doing and service learning, and (12) learn from patients. CONCLUSIONS: Practicing each of these approaches by students and teachers and applying them in day-to-day learning/teaching activities are recommended for optimum performance.

Azer SA; Guerrero AP; Walsh A

2013-06-01

244

Teacher-Student Interaction and Learning in On-Line Theological Education. Part III: Methodological Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

Many theological educators ask how on-line classes can provide students with the kind of personal teacher-student interaction that is needed in a healthy and holistic approach to preparation for ministry. A quantitative study was undertaken for the purposes of examining the relationships between three major types of teacher-student interaction…

Heinemann, Mark H.

2006-01-01

245

Teacher-Student Interaction and Learning in Online Theological Education. Part Four: Findings and Conclusions  

Science.gov (United States)

Many theological educators ask how online classes can provide students with the kind of personal teacher-student interaction that is needed in a healthy and holistic approach to preparation for ministry. A quantitative study was undertaken for the purposes of examining the relationships between three major types of teacher-student interaction…

Heinemann, Mark H.

2007-01-01

246

Teacher-Student Interaction and Learning in Online Theological Education. Part II: Additional Theoretical Frameworks  

Science.gov (United States)

Many theological educators ask how on-line classes can provide students with the kind of personal teacher-student interaction that is needed in a healthy and holistic approach to preparation for ministry. A quantitative study was undertaken for the purpose of examining the relationships between three major types of teacher-student interaction…

Heinemann, Mark H.

2005-01-01

247

An Empirical Study of Communication between Teachers and Students in Colleges and Universities  

Science.gov (United States)

As an empirical study based on multiple linear regression analysis of the investigation data, this paper studies the communication between teachers and students in universities. It reveals that the interaction between university teachers and students promotes the personal development of college students. For some reason, however, a rather low…

Tingyong, Zhou; Zuoyu, Zhou

2006-01-01

248

Toward Global Horizons: Student Stories from an International Teacher Education Project.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes an international teacher education project, the Regina-Yaounde Inter-University Project, as one approach to the development of global consciousness in student teachers. The stories of two of the student participants (from Cameroon and Canada) in the student exchange component illustrate the impact of the experience on their professional…

Friesen, David; And Others

1995-01-01

249

The Effect of Reflective Writing on Identity Maintenance in Student Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

The hypothesis tested in this study was that introspective writing will increase self-awareness and confidence in student teachers. Of particular interest was how such an exercise would change the student's perception of self, students, and the cooperating teacher with whom they were working. The test group was required to periodically write short…

Benham, B. J.

250

Clinical teachers' perceptions of medical students' English language proficiency.  

Science.gov (United States)

Medical educators from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Adelaide, South Australia, have expressed reservations about the adequacy of some undergraduate medical students' English language proficiency for satisfactory academic and clinical performance. This study explores the occurrence and nature of the comments made in writing by clinical teachers about the English language proficiency of 568 students over a period of 4 years. The frequency and nature of the comments made by clinicians have important implications for the planning and implementation of pedagogical strategies to support non-English-speaking background medical students experiencing difficulties with their course due to language. Although the University of Adelaide has introduced initiatives in response to some of the problems that have been identified, it is recommended that any teaching interventions require careful evaluation through a longitudinal research design to ensure that their aims are being achieved. PMID:9743794

Chur-Hansen, A; Vernon-Roberts, J

1998-07-01

251

Clinical teachers' perceptions of medical students' English language proficiency.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Medical educators from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Adelaide, South Australia, have expressed reservations about the adequacy of some undergraduate medical students' English language proficiency for satisfactory academic and clinical performance. This study explores the occurrence and nature of the comments made in writing by clinical teachers about the English language proficiency of 568 students over a period of 4 years. The frequency and nature of the comments made by clinicians have important implications for the planning and implementation of pedagogical strategies to support non-English-speaking background medical students experiencing difficulties with their course due to language. Although the University of Adelaide has introduced initiatives in response to some of the problems that have been identified, it is recommended that any teaching interventions require careful evaluation through a longitudinal research design to ensure that their aims are being achieved.

Chur-Hansen A; Vernon-Roberts J

1998-07-01

252

Teacher-Student Interactions in a Ubiquitous Computing Environment: Learning within Dyads & Triads of Interaction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This investigation was designed to examine the features of teacher-student interactions in a ubiquitous computing environment. The study focused on the learning context created by the teacher when interacting with students as they used technology to support their learning. Data obtained from quantitative and qualitative analyses of the teacher-student discourse were examined. Interpretation reflected the context of existing research documenting specific teacher linguistic and communicative behaviors that tend to facilitate students’ use of problem solving and higher order thinking skills. A primary finding of this investigation is the suggestion that when technology is part of the classroom interaction context, the teacher-student dyad may expand to a “triad”, comprised of teacher-student-technology.

Karen Bobkoff Katz; Annette Kratcoski

2005-01-01

253

Lecture Demonstrations on Earthquakes for K-12 Teachers and Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Lecture Demonstrations on Earthquakes for K-12 Teachers and Students Since 1975, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, (CERI), at The University of Memphis, has strived to satisfy its information transfer directives through diverse education and outreach efforts, providing technical and non-technical earthquake information to the general public, K-16 teachers and students, professional organizations, and state and federal organizations via all forms of written and electronic communication. Through these education and outreach efforts, CERI tries to increase earthquake hazard awareness to help limit future losses. In the past three years, education programs have reached over 20,000 K-16 students and teachers through in-service training workshops for teachers and earthquake/earth science lecture demonstrations for students. The presentations include an hour-long lecture demonstration featuring graphics and an informal question and answer format. Graphics used include seismic hazard maps, damage photos, plate tectonic maps, layers of the Earth, and more, all adapted for the audience. Throughout this presentation, manipulatives such as a Slinky, Silly Putty, a foam Earth with depth and temperature features, and Popsicle sticks are used to demonstrate seismic waves, the elasticity of the Earth, the Earth's layers and their features, and the brittleness of the crust. Toward the end, a demonstration featuring a portable shake table with a dollhouse mounted on it is used to illustrate earthquake-shaking effects. This presentation is also taken to schools when they are unable to visit CERI. Following this presentation, groups are then taken to the Public Earthquake Resource Center at CERI, a space featuring nine displays, seven of which are interactive. The interactive displays include a shake table and building blocks, a trench with paleoliquefaction features, computers with web access to seismology sites, a liquefaction model, an oscilloscope and attached geophone, a touch-screen monitor, and various manipulatives. CERI is also developing suitcase kits and activities for teachers to borrow and use in their classrooms. The suitcase kits include activities based on state learning standards, such as layers of the Earth and plate tectonics. Items included in the suitcase modules include a shake table and dollhouse, an oscilloscope and geophone, a resonance model, a Slinky, Silly putty, Popsicle sticks, and other items. Almost all of the activities feature a lecture demonstration component. These projects would not be possible without leveraged funding from the Mid-America Earthquake Center (MAEC) and the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, with additional funding from the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP).

Dry, M. D.; Patterson, G. L.

2005-12-01

254

Propositions of nuclear issue education for teachers and students  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Besides renewable energy forms, the nuclear energy seems to be of the greatest importance now. Recently the nuclear technology has developed almost in all domains of human activity. Unfortunately, common knowledge about physical processes involved in the nuclear energetics and furthermore, about the specific, nuclear radiation effects on the living tissues, is still very poor among the secondary and university students. We can find proofs for this statement in everyday situations and in literature. Thus, we should take every opportunity to speak about the complex nuclear problems, and that much more of the school time should be spend on teaching radioactivity phenomenon. We should acquaint students both with benefits and risks of the nuclear energy applications. Knowledge is certainly the cheapest way to prevent any nuclear danger. Taking this into account we designed the proposition of projects aimed at increase of nuclear issue knowledge and awareness among teachers and students: Project RADONET; Computer aided investigations of radioactivity with the use of GM detector; Competition 'Radioactive World'; Distance lecture on 'Radioactivity Around Us'. The main objective of project RADONET (RADON + NET) was concentrated on answering the question: Radon in our homes - is the risk acceptable? It was based on the concentration of radon investigations in indoor air, ground and drinking water and in the vicinity of TV and computer screens, made by the science teachers from Torun. In our opinion, the knowledge about radon and its health risk should be implemented to the interdisciplinary science education as early as possible. Thus, inspiring by English and Hungarian researchers we propose the method of environmental education related to the radon issue. In collaboration with 35 science teachers from different regions of Poland educational research project RADONET for students was performed. The concentration of radon was measured by the use of passive method (TASTRAK detectors). For communication of researchers, teachers and students as well for discussion of the obtained results e-mail, WWW pages, etc. were used. As the result we created the preliminary map of radon concentration in Poland made by students and we got the evidence that the increasing number of teacher and pupils wish to take a part in this kind of educational investigations. Since the phenomenon of radioactivity was discovered by Henry Becquerel, Marie Curie- Sklodowska and Pierre Curie we know, that the 'ionizing radiation' is around us. It can be the stream of particles of the distinct kind - alpha, beta, protons, ions, neutrons and stream of high energy - X or gamma rays. But, naturally some problems arise: where does this radiation come from, how long does it live, is it dangerous to the human body, can we measure its amount and behaviour? In this paper we report our attempt to answer mainly the last question. For this purpose we designed and constructed computer controlled Geiger-Mueller counter with the dedicated software to measure ionising radiation intensity. The menu of the software contains the following options: characteristic of detector, intensity of the ionising radiation and its dependence on distance and type of absorbing material as well as statistical distribution of ionising radiation [8]. Last year, tribute to the 100th anniversary of Maria Curie-Sklodowska Nobel Prize, we organised the competition for educational projects under the general title Radioactive World. The competition was addressed to Polish teachers and their pupils. The Award Committee received 44 projects from upper and lower secondary schools. Knowledge and methodical level of all projects was very high. Most of them engaged not only the science subjects teachers but also specialists of literature, history and art. The committee awarded 15 projects which were the most original and their results were presented to the wide local community by press, radio and TV. The results of the best projects: original lessons plans, posters, WWW pages, computer animations were

2004-01-01

255

Some Student Teachers’ Conceptions of Creativity in Secondary School English  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article explores a group of trainee teachers’ conceptions of Creativity in Secondary School English. Data was collected by means of questionnaires and interviews. Whilst there are many promising notions of creativity, the results also reveal some evidence of narrow conceptions, inconsistent thinking and some misconceptions.  This suggests that there may be significant implications for teacher trainers in universities and schools if we are to equip our students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to teach, support and facilitate creativity in their new careers. Romantic notions of original and innate genius, and a progressive emphasis on boundless, directionless play are two possible sources of misconceived ideas for training teachers of English. Creativity can be supported and developed within pedagogical frameworks and settings. This article, therefore, offers a consideration of  how Sternberg’s 21 suggested strategies for “Developing creativity as a decision” might be adapted and implemented in the Secondary English classroom. Practical teaching methods and competencies are presented which could be developed and incorporated into graduate trainee teacher programmes.

Beth Howell

2008-01-01

256

Itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing: practices and preparation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Increasing numbers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing are receiving their education in general education settings with special education support from an itinerant teacher. However, previous research indicates that the majority of teacher preparation programs do not provide training on the itinerant teaching model or set up field experiences for preservice teachers as an itinerant teacher. The purpose of this study was to survey a national sample of itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing to learn about their practices, preparation, perceptions, and the students they serve. Results, recommendations, and suggestions for future research are provided.

Luckner JL; Ayantoye C

2013-01-01

257

Itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing: practices and preparation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Increasing numbers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing are receiving their education in general education settings with special education support from an itinerant teacher. However, previous research indicates that the majority of teacher preparation programs do not provide training on the itinerant teaching model or set up field experiences for preservice teachers as an itinerant teacher. The purpose of this study was to survey a national sample of itinerant teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing to learn about their practices, preparation, perceptions, and the students they serve. Results, recommendations, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:23515459

Luckner, John L; Ayantoye, Catherine

2013-03-20

258

Relations between Teachers’ Goal Orientations, Their Instructional Practices and Students’ Motivation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Relations between teachers’ goal orientations, their instructional practices as expressed in perceived classroom goal structures and students’ goal orientations were analyzed, focusing also on potential moderators. Results of a questionnaire study with 46 Mathematics teachers and their 930 students supported the assumption that teachers’ goal orientations affect their instructional practices and students’ goal orientations. These effects were, in part, moderated by teacher beliefs (implicit theories, self-efficacy beliefs). Overall, the results provided strong support for the notion that the mechanisms underlying these effects are based on the functionality of certain instructional practices for the attainment of teachers’ goals.

Markus Dresel; Michaela S. Fasching; Gabriele Steuer; Sebastian Nitsche; Oliver Dickhäuser

2013-01-01

259

Our Librarian Bodies. Our Librarian Selves.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Librarians are great at taking care of their patrons. We will conduct searches for our patrons and provide them with the resources they need, we contribute to the public good and offer ongoing educational opportunities, and we provide community space in the name of discourse and community building. We also testify in and lobby Congress [...

Emily Ford

2008-01-01

260

Students’ Perceptions of their Teachers’ Teaching of Mathematics: The Case of Ghana  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine students’ perceptions of their teachers’ teaching practices and how it impact on their learning experiences. The sample of the study involved 358 students from 12 Junior High Schools (12-14years) who were randomly selected to complete a semi-structured questionnaire. The study revealed that students’ perceptions of their teachers’ teaching varies as the results established that both teacher-centred and student-centred teaching approaches were used by mathematics teachers. The study also established that teachers’ actions and inactions impact positively or negatively on students learning experiences as majority of the respondents reported that their learning experiences are to a larger extent controlled by that teacher. Majority of the respondents indicated that their teachers normally tell them which questions to solve and which methods to use. Although the study was limited only to 12 schools, the findings provide a conceptual framework for further research into how students’ views could be used by both teachers and educational authorities in improving the teaching and learning of mathematics as students’ are in a better position to provide useful information regarding their teachers teaching and how it impacts on their learning. Among others, it is recommended that students’ ratings or evaluation of their teaachers’ teaching should be considered in evaluating teachers’ teaching and effectiveness.© 2012 IOJES. All rights reserved

Ernest Ampadu

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Teacher Gender and Student Performance in Mathematics. Evidence from Catalonia (Spain)  

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Full Text Available This paper analyses the impact of teacher gender towards students’ test results in a blinded Math test administered to students in Catalonia (Spain). The data for this analysis are drawn from a sample of secondary school students who participated in an international blind-test known as the “Mathematical Kangaroo” in 2008. The estimation considers a two-stage procedure since participation on the test leads to the presence of sample selection. Results show a correlation between female teacher gender and student results. Moreover, students with female teachers have a higher probability of participating in the “Kangaroo” test (in this case, the effect being more marked among male students).

Josep-Oriol Escardíbul; Toni Mora

2013-01-01

262

ATTITUDES AND VIEWS OF TEACHERS TOWARDS STUDENTS’ SEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN TANZANIA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study assessed attitudes and views of thirty secondary school teachers and three heads of schools towards students’ sexual relationships in three secondary schools. Teachers filled in a questionnaire, which tapped their views and reaction towardsstudents’ sexual relationships; knowledge of sex education; and how they assisted students on sexual related matters. The heads of schools and twelve teachers were interviewed. The results of this assessment revealed a range of teachers’ attitudes and views towards students’ sexual relationships. Many teachers favoured the provisionof sex education; yet, most of them were either not conversant with sex education or did not want to educate or assist students in sexual related matters. Some teachers punished students involved in sexual relationships; this indicated negative attitudes towards students’ sexual relationships. Some teachers helped students on sexual matters, which indicated positive attitude towards students’ sexual relationships. This paper recommends for alternative ways to improve students’ wellbeing through provision of effective sex education to students, strengthening help and support systems in schools, and establishment of sex education programmes for teachers and students.

Budeba Petro Mlyakado

2013-01-01

263

A Qualitative Case Study of Teacher-Student Micropolitical Interaction: The Strategies, Goals, and Consequences of Student Resistance.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This report examines part of a qualitative study on the micropolitical classroom strategies, goals, and consequences that occur among the students and a teacher in an elementary classroom. The paper focuses on the students' micropolitical strategies and goals, and the resulting consequences on their classroom teacher. Micropolitics describes the…

Spaulding, Angela McNabb

264

Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Carbon Arc Cutting--Air. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Third Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This document contains the teacher and student texts and student workbook for a secondary-level course in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and carbon arc cutting that consists of units on the following topics: SMAW safety; SMAW equipment, applications, and techniques; hardfacing; and carbon arc cutting--air. The teacher edition includes the…

Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

265

Student and teacher perceptions of school climate: a multilevel exploration of patterns of discrepancy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: School climate has been linked with improved academic achievement and reduced discipline problems, and thus is often a target of school improvement initiatives. However, few studies have examined the extent to which student and teacher perceptions vary as a function of individual, classroom, and school characteristics, or the level of congruence between teachers' and their students' perceptions of school climate. METHODS: Using data from 1881 fifth-grade students and their 90 homeroom teachers, we examined parallel models of students' and teachers' perceptions of overall school climate and academic emphasis. Two additional models were fit that assessed the congruence between teacher and student perceptions of school climate and academic emphasis. RESULTS: Multilevel analyses indicated that classroom-level factors were more closely associated with teachers' perceptions of climate, whereas school-level factors were more closely associated with the students' perceptions. Further analyses indicated an inverse association between student and teacher ratings of academic emphasis, and no association between student and teacher ratings of overall climate. CONCLUSIONS: Teacher ratings were more sensitive to classroom-level factors, such as poor classroom management and proportion of students with disruptive behaviors, whereas student ratings were more influenced by school-level factors such as student mobility, student-teacher relationship, and principal turnover. The discrepancy in ratings of academic emphasis suggests that while all of the respondents may have shared objectively similar experiences, their perceptions of those experiences varied significantly. These results emphasize the importance of assessing both student and teacher perceptions in future research on school climate.

Mitchell MM; Bradshaw CP; Leaf PJ

2010-06-01

266

Internet Library For Librarians  

Science.gov (United States)

The Internet Library For Librarians is a portal designed with librarians in mind. Common reference materials, librarianship, and accessories organize the site hierarchically. Under each of these levels exist more levels that further narrow down the visitor�s specific focus. Furthermore, the portal forms a community that offers features such as 'add or recommend a site' to further expand the portal's collection. This site is a valuable resource for those who are just entering the field or seasoned professional librarians.

Sha, Vianne T.

2007-02-11

267

Turkish Science Student Teachers' Conceptions on the States of Matter  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aims to determine science students teachers’ conceptions on the concepts related to ‘the matter and the states of the matter’. 112 Turkish science student teachers participated at this research. A questionnaire consisting of thirteen open-ended items was designed to collect the data. The questionnaire aimed to reveal the students’ views concerning; the features of ‘solid, liquid and gas’ states and their application in everyday life, the state of matter at room temperature and in normal conditions, the particulate structure of matter, unique properties of each particle of matter, the relationship between the force of attraction between these particles and room temperature. The results were analyzed mainly qualitatively, but also quantitatively. As an outcome of the analysis, fourteen misconceptions were determined. These misconceptions can be categorized as ‘mentioning of the state of matter without specifying the temperature and the pressure’, ‘not comprehending that liquids evaporate at any temperature’, ‘not understanding the features of the particulate structures of solid, liquid and gas substances (volume and the number of the particles)’.

Abdullah Aydin; Yasemin Godek Altuk

2013-01-01

268

Reaching teachers: The first step in teaching students  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A 1984 American Association of the Academy of Sciences study of more than 150 successful science in-service programs developed a list of their characteristics, which included: Strong academic component in mathematics, science, and communications, focused on enrichment rather than remediation; academic subjects taught by teachers who are highly competent in the subject matter and believe that students can learn the materials; heavy emphasis on the applications of science and mathematics and careers in these fields; integrative approach to teaching that incorporates all subject areas, hands-on opportunities, and computers; multiyear involvement with students; recruitment of participants from all relevant target populations; opportunities for in-school and out-of-school learning experiences; parental involvement and development of base of community support; specific attention to removing educational inequalities related to race and gender; involvement of professionals and staff who look like the target population; development of peer support systems (involvement of a critical mass of any kind of student); evaluation, long-term follow-up, and careful data collection; and, ``mainstreaming`` -- integration of program elements supportive of women and minorities into the institutional support programs. I shall illustrate these points with ongoing teacher-support programs in progress in the Chicago area.

Berry, G.

1991-12-31

269

Reaching teachers: The first step in teaching students  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A 1984 American Association of the Academy of Sciences study of more than 150 successful science in-service programs developed a list of their characteristics, which included: Strong academic component in mathematics, science, and communications, focused on enrichment rather than remediation; academic subjects taught by teachers who are highly competent in the subject matter and believe that students can learn the materials; heavy emphasis on the applications of science and mathematics and careers in these fields; integrative approach to teaching that incorporates all subject areas, hands-on opportunities, and computers; multiyear involvement with students; recruitment of participants from all relevant target populations; opportunities for in-school and out-of-school learning experiences; parental involvement and development of base of community support; specific attention to removing educational inequalities related to race and gender; involvement of professionals and staff who look like the target population; development of peer support systems (involvement of a critical mass of any kind of student); evaluation, long-term follow-up, and careful data collection; and, mainstreaming'' -- integration of program elements supportive of women and minorities into the institutional support programs. I shall illustrate these points with ongoing teacher-support programs in progress in the Chicago area.

Berry, G.

1991-01-01

270

Researching the Induction of Intending Elementary Science Teachers in Multicultural Settings: The Science Student Teaching Component  

Science.gov (United States)

This is one component of an in-depth, longitudinal case study investigating the deliberate attempt to infuse a science multicultural perspective throughout an elementary teacher education program at a major research university. Intending teachers' perspectives of being inducted into a profession overtly signifying its commitment to multicultural awareness and action were documented during their methods experience, their student teaching experience, and during the first few years of their teaching practice. The focus in this paper is the student teaching component for 40 prospective science teachers. Data sources were individual semi-structured audiotaped interviews. Data were analyzed through standard qualitative techniques to generate insights for science teacher educators. Implications for science teacher education focus on the assertions that intending teachers bring multiple perspectives to their teaching and that these perspectives face a commitment test during the student teaching experience. In addition, intending teachers discovered during student teaching that the schools in which they were placed did not really value science teaching.

Mcginnis, Randy J.; Davis, Rachel T.

2008-09-12

271

Teacher and Student Perceptions about Technology Use in an Elementary School in Ankara  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the present study, the perceptions of two important stakeholder groups (teachers andstudents) were examined at the same time to have an insight about the current state of technology usein an elementary school in Ankara. The participants of this study included 35 elementary school teachers and 81 students, and the data were collected through two different questionnaires for teachers and students. The results of the study indicated that both teachers and students have positive perceptions about the value of technologies in educational settings. Teachers’ most frequently used technologies were computer and internet and they used these technologies mostly for class preparation activities. A majority of teachers have low competency levels for computer use and the most important barrier to their technology use was their lack of technology related knowledge and skills. Looking from both teachers’ and students’ perspectives, the results of this study would provide valuable insights about how to improve technology integration process in educational settings.

Feride Karaca

2011-01-01

272

Elementary School Students’ Reading Environments from Teachers’, Parents’, and Students’ Perspectives  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this research was to describe reading environments of elementary school students when taken account of students’, parents’, and classroom teachers’ views. This research also gave some recommendations on what elementary school students’ reading environments should be in the light of literature. For this aim, the data was collected from classroom teachers, parents, and students studying in fourth-grade and fifth-grade by semi-structured questionnaire forms. The descriptive analysis was carried out to analyze the data obtained from the participants. The results of this research revealed that teachers and parents could not become models to support students’ readings. Instead, they orally directed children about their readings. This research also showed that the activities for reading done at homes and at schools do not improve children’s positive motivation toward reading. In addition, the children stated that they would love to get involved in reading activities since these enjoyable activities can increase their interests in reading.© 2012 IOJES. All rights reserved

Seyit Ate?; Çetin Çetinkaya; Kas?m Y?ld?r?m

2012-01-01

273

Study on Influencing Factors Relationship between Teacher and Student in View of Students of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background and Objective: Scientific and personal characteristics of teachers are important factors in StudentTeacher relationship. In this study the objective to determine the Factors that influence the relationship between teachers and students regarding the opinion of the students of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences. Subjects and Methods: This study is descriptive-analytic. The population of the research Includes all students of Ahvaz University of medical sciences. The data was gathered by questionnaire. The criteria for assessment of questions were Likert scale. Results: In this study, The effect of personal, ethical and professional characters of teachers was assessed as high by 63.8 percent of students and very high by 23.4 percent.. In between Of all these characters, “ethic” and “h umility” and also, “heartiness” of teachers have been the most effects regarding the students’ views. The effect of professional and scientific factors was assessed as inefctive by 18.8 percent, as low by 1.8, high by 48.7, and very high by 30.7 percent of the students. The effect of physical environment was considered as ineffective by 42.4 percent, very low by 4.7, low by 13.8, high by 25.3 and very high by 13.8 percent of the students.. Conclusion: This study and other researches show that of different factors, ethical and personal characters of teacher are more effective in student- teacher Relationship.

Amin Torabi; Mansour Zahiri

2012-01-01

274

Study on Influencing Factors Relationship between Teacher and Student in View of Students of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background and Objective: Scientific and personal characteristics of teachers are important factors in Student-Teacher relationship. In this study the objective to determine the Factors that influence the relationship between teachers and students regarding the opinion of the students of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences.Subjects and Methods: This study is descriptive-analytic. The population of the researchIncludes all students of Ahvaz University of medical sciences. The data was gathered by questionnaire. The criteria for assessment of questions were Likert scale. Results: In this study, The effect of personal, ethical and professional characters of teachers was assessed as high by 63.8 percent of students and very high by 23.4 percent.. In between Of all these characters, “ethic” and “h umility” and also, “heartiness” of teachers have been the most effects regarding the students’ views. The effect of professional and scientific factors was assessed as inefctive by 18.8 percent, as low by 1.8, high by 48.7, and very high by 30.7 percent of the students. The effect of physical environment was considered as ineffective by 42.4 percent, very low by 4.7, low by 13.8, high by 25.3 and very high by 13.8 percent of the students.. Conclusion: This study and other researches show that of different factors, ethical and personal characters of teacher are more effective in student- teacher Relationship.

Amin Torabi; Mansour Zahiri

2012-01-01

275

A Meta-Analytical Review of Teacher Credibility and Its Associations with Teacher Behaviors and Student Outcomes  

Science.gov (United States)

This meta-analysis reviews the findings of 51 studies (N = 14,378) examining the associations among teacher credibility, teacher behaviors, and student outcomes. When all three dimensions of credibility are considered collectively (i.e., competence, trustworthiness, and caring), the cumulative evidence indicates a moderate, meaningful relationship…

Finn, Amber N.; Schrodt, Paul; Witt, Paul L.; Elledge, Nikki; Jernberg, Kodiane A.; Larson, Lara M.

2009-01-01

276

Student Teachers’ Perceptions of Success: A Tale of Two Universities  

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Full Text Available This article is primarily focused on a recent group (tale 2) experiencing a seriesof embedded and interactive field based experiences (field learning); thediscussion is benchmarked to a previous study (tale 1) of student teachershaving had a more traditional semester practicum as part of their field-basedexperience. It is within this context that the authors’ show support for rarelynoted findings (knowledge) supporting the efficacy of university campus programs:novice teachers linking their success in field-based teaching to theiruniversity campus program (campus learning). We contend this is importantevidence supporting the link between theory and practice that has the potentialto better inform educational management decisions.

Kirk Anderson; Mark Hirschkorn

2012-01-01

277

Bridging discourses in the ESL classroom students, teachers and researchers  

CERN Multimedia

Bridging Discourses in the ESL Classroom examines the interactions between learners and teachers in the language classroom. It aims to identify patterns of discourse which enable second language development but also support the learning of curriculum knowledge. These patterns are 'bridging discourses' in that they combine the everyday language used by the student, with the specialised language of the academic register. This book puts forward an innovative new theory of classroom discourse analysis, influenced by the work of Halliday and Vygotsky. It is recommended for academics and postgraduat

Gibbons, Pauline

2006-01-01

278

TO LEARN FROM TEACHERS AT SCHOOL, IDEAL TEACHER OR E-LEARNING APPLICATIONS FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF GIFTED STUDENTS  

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Full Text Available The present study, aimed at revealing the views of elementary school gifted students about the roles and behaviors of their teachers in class as well as about the in-class roles and behaviors that they expect from an ideal teacher with respect to different variables. Another question in the study was directed to determine students’ views about learning academic subjects via e-learning applications instead of at teachers. The participants of the study were 46 gifted students identified with the diagnosis system of “Education program for the gifted” executed in the Department of Gifted Education at the Education Faculty of Anadolu University. The research data were collected via a five-point Likert-type scale developed and tested by the researcher for its validity and reliability. For the analysis of the research data, paired sample t-test, one of descriptive parametrical statistical techniques, was applied. The findings obtained in the study revealed that according to gifted students, the in-class behaviors demonstrated by the course teachers were mostly those related to their roles of guidance for students. The behaviors of the course teachers within the scope of this role were followed by those related to providing information and maintaining the discipline, respectively. The behaviors least demonstrated by the teachers were those related to the role of supporting the students and those related to being a model for them. According to the students, an ideal teacher should at most demonstrate behaviors in class regarding the role of guiding the students and those regarding the role of providing information. According to the gifted students, the roles and behaviors of their teachers in class are quite different from the behaviors expected from an ideal teacher. Students do not regard e-learning applications as an alternative to learning from teachers. Rather, they prefer learning from their teachers to technology-aided learning environments. According to students, compared to structure academic learning, technology is a better environment to make good use of their time, to satisfy their curiosity about certain subjects, to establish communication with others and to play games.

Bahadir ERISTI,

2012-01-01

279

An Investigation of Factors Impacting on Mainstream Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Students with Learning Difficulties  

Science.gov (United States)

|The relationship between teacher experience, further professional development training, and beliefs and attributions about teaching students with additional learning support needs was studied in a sample of 199 mainstream general class primary school teachers. Using multiple regression, it was found that none of the teacher experience or…

Woolfson, Lisa Marks; Brady, Katy

2009-01-01

280

Perception about radiation by students and teachers. Necessity of bringing-up of ''radiation literacy''  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Perception about radiation and nuclear-related matters by students and teachers were studies, and it has proved that the degree of acquisition of the knowledge about radiation by teachers is in general very poor. It is keenly felt that some fundamental policy for improving the present situation should be established for the goal of elevations the ''radiation literacy'' of the teachers. (author)

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Student Teachers' Transcending the Limits of Their Past: Repertory Grid Framing Narratives for Learning To Teach.  

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This paper explains the use in teacher preparation of a psychoanalytical tool called the repertory grid, examining how the grid has been successfully integrated into physical education teacher preparation courses. Within the process reported here, student teachers engaged in semi-autobiographical reflection on the roots of their personal beliefs…

Hopper, T. F.

282

Study of Teachers' Motivation To Motivate Students by the Theory of Planned Behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

This research goes with a new tendency in the field of educational psychology--the study not only of students' motivation but also of teachers' motivation. However, the studies of teacher motivation had been only to acknowledge the factors to motivate teachers, without the analysis of motivation as a process that contains several cognitive…

Jesus, Saul Neves de; Abreu, Manuel Viegas

283

Exploring the Educational Beliefs of Primary Education Student Teachers in the Chinese Context  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher educational beliefs may be largely shaped by culturally shared learning experiences and social values. The main purpose of this study is to explore educational beliefs of Chinese student teachers. An adapted version of the Teacher Beliefs Scale (TBS)--developed in a Western context (Woolley et al. in "Educational and Psychological…

Sang, Guoyuan; Valcke, Martin; Tondeur, Jo; Zhu, Chang; van Braak, Johan

2012-01-01

284

Social Marketing and the School Library: An Effective Path to Collaboration? A Review of: Immroth, Barbara and W. Bernard Lukenbill. “Teacher-School Library Media Specialist Collaboration through Social Marketing Strategies: An Information Behavior Study.” School Library Media Research 10 (2007). 22 April 2008 .  

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Full Text Available Objective – The study attempted to apply the strategies of social marketing theory to collaboration between school librarians andteachers. Design – Based on the 1972 theory of social marketing by Zaltman, Kotler and Kaufman, a cohort of students in a graduate-level practicum established a collaborative unit with selected teachers within their school. In addition, two focus groups were conducted in alternate schools to gauge the overall attitudes of teachers toward collaboration with school librarians.Subjects – Students (student librarians) in a graduate-level certification class for Texas school librarians, and both teachers and librarians in host schools/districts for the graduate students’ practicum experiences Methods – Researchers used qualitative approaches, both case study and focus groups, to gather data about the collaborative interactions between teachers and school librarians. The interactions were designed using the social marketing AIDA model (Attention, Interest, Desire, and Action). Social marketing, based on models of commercial marketing, assumes that social goodwill is a motivator for establishing interactions between groups – or selling a service that is for the greater good. Students in a graduate-level practicum were instructed to develop a strategy based on the AIDA model to elicit and carry out a collaborative unit with teachers in their host schools. They were given specific guidelines by the principal investigators that included:• Instructions for designing announcements, leaflets, and conferences as marketing strategies • Instructional unit designs for subject content and information literacy skills• Incentive payments of $200 to be used for library resources as anincentive to collaborate.• The steps to engaging in the collaborative process • Procedural guidelines for taking field notes, unobtrusive observations and informal evidence.Summative evaluation was based on a reflective journaling exercise by both student librarian and teacher. Measurements and recordings were analysed using accepted case study methods.Main Results – Social Marketing Model The researchers evaluated the study in each of the four aspects of the Social Marketing Model.Attention (A) – Gaining Attention and Convincing. Efforts to gain attention through student choices of flyers to teachers were not successful. E-mail announcements were more effective, but it appeared that direct librarian-teacher contact was the most effective. The monetary incentive also did not appear to have an effect on response rate. Host librarians did make suggestions regarding the appropriateness of when and how to distribute the flyers in some cases. Researchers concluded that perhaps such a straightforward advertising approach did not fit in the established relationships, and may be a better choice for new librarians who are establishing their presence in schools.Interest (I) - Promoting Interest in Services and/or Products - Researchers noted that initial strategies did not promote interest in the field study project. Teachers cited time and test–related curriculum restraints, and viewed the project as an “extra” responsibility. The researchers note the need to establish the value of the collaborative instruction to long-term goals for both teachers and librarians. The focus groups showed more interest in collaboration, and an awareness of the value of librarians’ collaboration in promoting effective teaching and improving student achievement.Desire (D) and Action (A) – Recognizing Values and Taking Action. Field test responses did not reflect desire on the part of teachers to collaborate with student librarians. Only two teachers responded directly to the advertisement. The offer of monetary incentive ($200 in library supplies) also did not appear to increase motivation of teachers to participate. Results after the field test showed that overall, teachers gained an appreciation of the value of collaboration with school librarians, and indicated they would be open to future projects. Action

Gayle Bogel

2008-01-01

285

Copyright for librarians the essential handbook  

CERN Document Server

"Copyright for Librarians" (CFL) is an online open curriculum on copyright law that was developed jointly with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Re-designed as a brand new textbook, "Copyright for Librarians: the essential handbook" can be used as a stand-alone resource or as an adjunct to the online version which contains additional links and references for students who wish to pursue any topic in greater depth. Delve into copyright theory or explore enforcement. With a new index and a handy Glossary, the Handbook is essential reading for librarians who want to hone their skills in 2013, and for anyone learning about or teaching copyright law in the information field.

Berkman Center for Internet and Society

2012-01-01

286

The Analyze of Teachers’ Responsibility Beliefs for Student Academic Successes and Failures (The Sample of Turkish Biology Teachers)  

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Full Text Available This study was prepared to analyze biology teachers’ responsibility beliefs for student academic successes and failures in terms of different variables. The data were collected with Teachers’ Responsibility for Student Achievement Scale, Teachers’ Sense of Self-efficacy Scale, The Scale of Attitudes toward Teaching Profession and open-ended interview questionnaire. For the data analysis, descriptive statistics, one-way variance analysis (ANOVA), independent groups t-test and Pearson Correlation Coefficient were used. On the other hand, the data collected through open-ended interviews were subject to content analysis. While teachers’ responsibility beliefs is not significant in terms gender, teachers’ sense of self-efficacy and teachers’ attitudes toward teaching profession, there is significant results in terms of length of service and student numbers in their classrooms. There are average, positive and significant relations between teachers’ responsibility beliefs for student success and years experience, size of classrooms, perception of self-efficacy in teaching profession and attitudes toward teaching profession.© 2013 IOJES. All rights reserved

Hakan Kurt

2013-01-01

287

The reverse double standard in perceptions of student-teacher sexual relationships: the role of gender, initiation, and power.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The present study tested the prediction that male teachers are judged more harshly than female teachers for engaging in heterosexual intercourse with a student. One-hundred and eighty-seven adults (116 women, 71 men) evaluated a hypothetical newspaper article describing an alleged student-teacher relationship as part of a 2 (Gender Dyad: Male Teacher/Female Student or Female Teacher/Male Student) x 2 (Initiator: Student or Teacher) between-subjects design. As expected, a reverse sexual double standard was revealed, in which participants judged situations involving male teachers more harshly than they judged situations involving female teachers, but only when the sexual contact was teacher-initiated. Participants also believed that male students received more social benefits from the sexual contact than did female students.

Howell JL; Egan PM; Giuliano TA; Ackley BD

2011-03-01

288

Deconstructing Teacher-Centeredness and Student-Centeredness Dichotomy: A Case Study of a Shanghai Mathematics Lesson  

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Full Text Available Teacher-dominated classrooms with some student-centered elements are a perplexing phenomenon of Chinese mathematics classrooms. In-depth exploration of this phenomenon is helpful for understanding the features of mathematics teaching in China. This paper demonstrates how the teacher can encourage students to actively generate knowledge under the teacher’s control from a perspective of variation and further deconstruct the legitimacy of teacher-centeredness and student-centeredness dichotomy.

Rongjin Huang; Frederick K. S. Leung

2005-01-01

289

Relations between Student Teachers' Learning Patterns and Their Concrete Learning Activities  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aims to unravel the relationships between student teachers' learning patterns and how they actually learn in practice as measured during multiple concrete learning experiences. In previous research aptitude and event measures often pointed in different directions. 90 student teachers' learning patterns were measured with an aptitude…

Endedijk, Maaike D.; Vermunt, Jan D.

2013-01-01

290

Choosing Teaching as a Career: Perspectives of Male and Female Malaysian Student Teachers in Training  

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This paper is motivated by concern about the decline in the numbers of males entering the teaching profession in Malaysia. It seeks to explore first year student teachers' views of teaching as a career choice and to determine the factors that influenced their decision to enter the teaching profession. A total of 425 student teachers completed a…

Azman, Norzaini

2013-01-01

291

Teacher-Artist Partnership in Teaching Cantonese Opera in Hong Kong Schools: Student Transformation  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aims to examine how and why students transform in terms of learning motivation in learning the Cantonese opera with a teacher-artist partnership approach in Hong Kong schools. An artist and seven teachers from four schools collaborated to teach the genre for eight weeks. Students' learning motivation changes in Cantonese opera was…

Leung, Bo Wah; Leung, Eddie C. K.

2010-01-01

292

Influencing Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Mathematics for Numeracy to Students with Mathematics Learning Difficulties  

Science.gov (United States)

|This paper reports on the beliefs of a group of K-8 mathematics teachers about appropriate goals and methods of mathematics teaching for students with mathematics learning difficulties and for students generally. The teachers were involved in a brief professional learning program that aimed to provide them with effective strategies for…

Beswick, Kim

2008-01-01

293

Who Assigns the Most ICT Activities? Examining the Relationship between Teacher and Student Usage  

Science.gov (United States)

|The expansion of information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure in schools is expected to promote learning. To what extent teachers are utilizing the new ICT tools to engage students in learning activities remains a question. This study reports what kind of activities teachers are likely to assign students, and what type of…

Hsu, Shihkuan

2011-01-01

294

Teacher Expectations and Students from Low Socioeconomic Background: A Perspective from Costa Rica  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explores teachers' academic expectations of students from low socioeconomic status (SES) in Costa Rica for the purpose of cross-cultural comparison. A group of 17 teachers from two different elementary schools located in a small town in Costa Rica were questioned about their expectations of low SES students enrolled in their classes.…

Regalla, Michele

2013-01-01

295

Perceptions of Iowa Secondary School Agricultural Education Teachers and Students Regarding Sustainable Agriculture.  

Science.gov (United States)

Responses from 41 of 60 Iowa secondary agriculture teachers and 464 11th- and 12th-grade students indicated both teachers and students had high perceptions of sustainable agriculture and its impact on the environment. Both groups felt the need to learn more about it. (SK)

Williams, David L.; Wise, Kenneth L.

1997-01-01

296

The Evaluation of the Student Teachers' Attitudes toward Internet and Democracy  

Science.gov (United States)

The aims of this study are to find out (1) how student teachers' attitudes toward Internet affect their attitudes toward democracy, (2) how student teachers' attitudes toward democracy are in terms of their purpose of using Internet and (3) benefits provided by the Internet. The research is carried out in Ziya Gokalp Education Faculty at Dicle…

Oral, Behcet

2008-01-01

297

Teacher Assistance Teams: Supporting At-Risk Students in Rural Areas. A Three Year Plan.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher Assistance Teams (TAT) can support the collaboration and empowerment of teachers, address student and schoolwide problems, provide preventive intervention for at-risk students, and identify appropriate referrals to special education. This paper describes the implementation of TAT throughout the state of Arkansas over a 3-year period.…

Chalfant, James C.; And Others

298

An Investigation into the Understanding of Earth Sciences among Students Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

|In this article, the students teachers' opinions, including rock formation and improper terms related to or different from these ideas, all of which are considered or must be considered in geology classes, have been analyzed. Alternative conception is used to inform our understanding of students teachers' ideas and describe any conceptual…

Dal, Burckin

2009-01-01

299

Chinese Students' Perceptions of Native English-Speaking Teachers in EFL Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

The article reports the views of 20 Chinese English as a foreign Language (EFL) students on the strengths and weaknesses of native English-speaking (NES) teachers in EFL teaching. Responding to an open-ended questionnaire and in-depth interviews, EFL students named the following as NES teachers' strengths: native language authenticity, cultural…

Rao, Zhenhui

2010-01-01

300

Hispanic Students' Perception of White Teachers' Mastery Goal Orientation Influences Sense of School Belonging  

Science.gov (United States)

This study postulated a structural model to investigate the degree of influence that White middle-level teachers who employ mastery goal orientation and academic pressure may have on Hispanic students' sense of school belongingness. Participants were 434 5th and 6th grade students and 21 teachers. Initial proposed model estimates fit the data…

Stevens, Tara; Hamman, Doug; Olivarez, Arturo, Jr.

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Learning Trajectories of Primary Student Teachers; a Cross-Cultural Comparison  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Life history methodology was used to compare the life and educational trajectories of six primary student teachers in England with their counterparts at a Malawian Teacher Training College. A semi structured interview schedule was used to elicit the students? childhood memories including experiences...

Paul Gardner; Chris Rix

302

Development and Validation of the Teacher--Student Relationship Inventory Using Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

Development and validation of the 14-item Teacher-Student Relationship Inventory (TSRI) is described. The TSRI is a self-report measure assessing teacher perceptions of the quality of their relationship with students from Grade 4 through junior high school. In Study 1, findings from exploratory factor analysis provided evidence for a 3-factor…

Ang, Rebecca P.

2005-01-01

303

Teacher Interpersonal Behaviour and Secondary Students' Cognitive, Affective and Moral Outcomes in Hong Kong  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study validated the Chinese version of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) in the Hong Kong context as well as examined the relationship between students' perceptions of interpersonal teacher behaviour and their cognitive, affective and moral learning outcomes. Data were collected with the QTI and four other measures of student

Sivan, Atara; Chan, Dennis W. K.

2013-01-01

304

Affordances of Computers in Teacher-Student Interactions: The Case of Interactive Physics  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses a study designed to understand 11th-grade students' learning during conversations with their teacher over and about a computer-based Newtonian microworld, Interactive Physics. Illustrates that students' learning was not local but persistent, in that they used appropriate canonical science talk without teacher support. (36 references)

Roth, Wolff-Michael

2006-10-09

305

Examining Response to a One-to-One Computer Initiative: Student and Teacher Voices  

Science.gov (United States)

|The impact of a one-to-one computing initiative at a Midwestern urban middle school was examined through phenomenological research techniques focusing on the voices of eighth grade students and their teachers. Analysis of transcripts from pre and post-implementation interviews of 47 students and eight teachers yielded patterns of responses to…

Storz, Mark G.; Hoffman, Amy R.

2013-01-01

306

Attitudes toward Communication Skills among Students'-Teachers' in Jordanian Public Universities  

Science.gov (United States)

|The present study was carried out to determine the positive and negative attitudes among 289 students of class teachers and childhood teachers' disciplines using the communication skills attitude scale (CSAS) in Jordanian public universities. GPA, year level of students were recorded. Overall results of study revealed that the mean of positive…

Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.

2010-01-01

307

Classroom Discourse and Teacher Talk Influences on English Language Learner Students' Mathematics Experiences  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the features of the classroom discourse in eight Algebra I classes from two urban high schools with diverse student populations. In particular, by using the discursive analysis perspective, the type of communication between teachers and students was examined. The study investigated to what extent teachers' patterns of discourse…

Petkova, Mariana M.

2009-01-01

308

Laboring to Connect: The Challenges of Student-Teacher Intersubjectivity at an Urban Charter High School  

Science.gov (United States)

In this dissertation, I examine the mediating role of emotion during lived interactions between students and teachers at an urban charter high school. While the importance of student-teacher connectivity for positive school engagement has been well documented, research that attempts to describe the mechanism of that link is scarce. This…

Soto, Christopher S.

2011-01-01

309

Student Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs about Using the Target Language in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Although the language teaching profession has long emphasized the use of the target language in the classroom, student teachers face various challenges in their efforts to conduct class in their target language. This case study focused on 10 student teachers with respect to (1) their initial attitudes and beliefs about using the target language,…

Bateman, Blair E.

2008-01-01

310

Impact of Academic Stress on Student-Teacher Classroom Communication and Relationships.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this research paper, a descriptive research paper, is to provide the necessary data to show a need for a more intensive study of the impact of academic stress on student-teacher classroom communication and relationships. Participants (n=104) were students 18 years of age who have graduated from high school, parents, teachers, and…

Blackwell, Eddie L.

311

"I Secretly Relished that Delicious Feeling of Excitement": A Rhizoanalysis of Teacher-Student Attraction  

Science.gov (United States)

In the author's pilot study of teacher-student sexual dynamics in five preservice teachers high school classrooms, one piece of data stood out from among the rest of the interview transcripts, field notes, and email correspondence--not as an aberrant outlier; the content, feeling attracted to a student, echoed across the data set. Rather, this one…

Johnson, Tara Star

2004-01-01

312

Boundary Dilemmas in Teacher-Student Relationships: Struggling with "the Line"  

Science.gov (United States)

The teacher-student relationship is viewed as integral to successful teaching and learning but, outside of a few exceptions, ethical boundary issues in this relationship have not been explored. The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' perspectives of their relationships with their students as well as how they described and negotiated…

Aultman, Lori Price; Williams-Johnson, Meca R.; Schutz, Paul A.

2009-01-01

313

Middle School Teachers' Expectations of Organizational Behaviors of Students with Learning Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the specific classroom organizational behaviors that middle school inclusive teachers report as expectations for students with learning disabilities. Practicing middle school science and social studies teachers (n = 12) responded to a survey about organization behaviors of students with learning…

McMullen, Rebecca C.; Shippen, Margaret E.; Dangel, Harry L.

2007-01-01

314

Violence in public schools and health promotion: reports and dialogues with students and teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To analyze perceptions about the interaction between health and environment, from the reports and conversations with teenagers and teachers from two public schools in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on violence and health promotion. Methods: Descriptive and qualitative study, conducted from February to June 2009, involving 153 students of two public schools in Rio de Janeiro and 17 teachers. Data collection among students was carried out by means of participant observation with notes in a field diary, a semi-structured questionnaire and focus groups. Among teachers, participant observation with notes in a field diary and study groupwere adopted. A thematic analysis was performed, seeking to establish units of meaning. Results: The reports of the students presented discussions on three forms of violence: urban, school and sexual violence within the family. About urban violence, the students highlighted the issue of lack of public safety, especially in their entertainment area. School violence has been characterized as: a) violence in school (physical and psychological violenceamong students, bullying and against school property); b) violence of the school (through derogatory comments of teachers on students); c) violence against the school (devaluation of the teacher and the outcomes of school violence on teacher’s health). Students alsocommented on sexual violence within the family, the teenager as a victim or the perpetrator towards a family member. Conclusions: Violence coping strategies should be established as a health promotion measure for students, teachers and families.

Kátia Ovídia José de Souza

2012-01-01

315

Assessing In-Service Teachers' Instructional Beliefs about Student-Centered Education: A Turkish Perspective  

Science.gov (United States)

The main purpose of this research is to examine in-service teachers' instructional beliefs about student-centered education. The inventory was designed to measure teachers' student-centered educational beliefs based on four components of the educational curriculum comprising of educational objectives, content, teaching strategies and instructional…

Isikoglu, Nesrin; Basturk, Ramazan; Karaca, Feyyaz

2009-01-01

316

Revisiting Teaching Archetypes: Identifying Dominant Shaping Influences on Student Teacher's Identities  

Science.gov (United States)

The primary aim of this article is to identify and interrogate the lay theories of contemporary student teachers and to indicate and illustrate the manner in which these "theories" manifest both continuity and change when contrasted with teaching archetypes and previously articulated lay theories of student teachers in the setting. It is in five…

Sugrue, Ciaran

2004-01-01

317

Special Education Teachers' Use of Assistive Technology with Students Who Have Severe Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

|Teachers' integration of computer-based assistive technology has been linked to positive educational outcomes for students with disabilities. This study was conducted to identify factors that are predictive of integrating assistive technology into teaching practices among general and special education teachers of students with severe…

Connor, Cynthia; Snell, Martha; Gansneder, Bruce; Dexter, Sara

2010-01-01

318

Assistive Technology Competencies for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments: A National Study  

Science.gov (United States)

|Introduction: For practicing teachers of students with visual impairments, assistive technology has assumed an important role in the education of their students' assessment and learning of content. Little research has addressed this area; therefore, the purpose of the study presented here was to identify the teachers' self-reported possession of…

Zhou, Li; Ajuwon, Paul M.; Smith, Derrick W.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Parker, Amy T.; Okungu, Phoebe

2012-01-01

319

Beyond the Right Answer: Exploring How Preservice Elementary Teachers Evaluate Student-Generated Algortihms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Tasks regularly completed by elementary teachers reveal the mathematical nature of their work. However, preservice teachers demonstrate a lack of depth of mathematical thought. This study investigated the criteria preservice teachers intuitively used to evaluate algorithms. The intent was to use that knowledge as a foundation for modeling mathematical habits of mind for similar tasks. Journal writings and notes from in-class discussions were collected over three semesters of an introductory course for future teachers. Data were analyzed to discover dominant criteria used by preservice teachers to evaluate student algorithms. Four criteria, namely efficiency, generalizability, mathematical validity, and permissibility, were routinely used by preservice teachers.

TRACIE McLEMORE SALINAS

2009-01-01

320

Information Literacy Skills: Teacher and Student Viewpoints. A review of: Herring, James E. “A Critical Investigation of Students’ and Teachers’ View of the Use of Information Literacy Skills in School Assignments.” School Library Media Research 9 (2006). 14 May 2007 .  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective – To examine student and teacher views of information literacy skills in school assignments in order to determine: 1) To what extent did students value the use of a research model booklet (PLUS)? 2) How confident were the students about doing a good assignment and did the PLUS booklet affect their confidence? 3)What benefits and limitations did students identify from individual brainstorming and concept mapping in relation to learning more about their topic and producing a good assignment? 4) To what extent did students see value in doing preliminary reading to revise their initial keywords and concept maps? 5) What reading and note?taking strategies did students adopt when using print and electronic resources? 6) To what extent (and why) did students prefer to use electronic rather than print resources? 7) What are the implications for teachers and school library media specialists (SLMS)?Design – Qualitative, action research; collaborative inquiry.Setting – Ripon Grammar School, Yorkshire, United Kingdom (high school/coeducational).Subjects – Fifty?two students in the second year of high school (year 8) enrolled in a science class studying sound technology; the school library media specialist (SLMS); science teachers.Methods – Students in this study had previously been taught a variety of information skills and had been introduced to a research model called PLUS (Purpose, Location, Use, Self?Evaluation). Students were given a PLUS model booklet, were required to select a topic in the area of sound technology, and were expected to do brainstorming and concept mapping and to produce a 600?word essay. After the assignment was completed, three methods of data collection were employed to determine students’ and teachers’ views: 1) post?assignment questionnaire 2) group interviews with students and teachers 3)semi?structured interview with the school librarian.Main results – Responses indicated that students were “mostly” satisfied with the use of the PLUS model, although there were 18 students who did not respond to questions regarding the use of the booklet. It was also clear from the questionnaire that the majority of the students did not feel confident in their abilities to produce a satisfactory assignment prior to beginning the research; however, 48% of the students indicated that the PLUS booklet made them more confident. A comparable number of students said the booklet had no effect on their confidence and one student said it made them less confident. Students responded very positively about the use of individual brainstorming and concept mapping as a way to organize and focus on their topic. (There was a split between those who felt a written concept map was useful and those who felt a mental concept map was just as helpful.) The majority of students felt that group brainstorming was helpful, while a few indicated the behavior of other students during group brainstorming was a hindrance. Questions about preliminary reading were not open?ended but were multiple choice. There was no response to indicate whether the preliminary reading was helpful or not, but rather how it was helpful. Most students indicated it had helped to identify the right keywords for further research and it helped them in finding the right resources. Students were questioned on the format of their note?taking. Sixty?five per cent preferred to hand write their notes in a notebook; fifteen per cent preferred to take notes electronically in some type of word processing program; twelve per cent preferred to cut and paste into a word processor; and eight per cent preferred “other methods.” Note?taking styles ranged from bulleted lists to spider diagrams, to using headings with categorized notes. When asked to indicate the percentage of information derived from Web sites versus information from books and journals, responses showed that over 65.5 % of the information came from web sites while only 35.5 % came from print material. When asked why, students responded that Websites we

Julie Stephens

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Teacher organizational citizenship behaviours and job efficacy: Implications for student quality of school life.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The present study investigated the impact of teachers' organizational citizenship behaviours (OCBs) on student quality of school life (SQSL) via the indirect effect of job efficacy. A measure of teacher OCBs was developed, tapping one dimension of individual-focused OCB (OCBI - student-directed behaviour) and two dimensions of organization-focused OCB (OCBO - civic virtue and professional development). In line with previous research suggesting that OCBs may enhance job efficacy, as well as studies demonstrating the positive effects of teacher efficacy on student outcomes, we expected an indirect relationship between teachers OCBs and SQSL via teachers' job efficacy. Hypotheses were tested in a multi-level design in which 170 teachers and their students (N=3,057) completed questionnaires. A significant proportion of variance in SQSL was attributable to classroom factors. Analyses revealed that the civic virtue and professional development behaviours of teachers were positively related to their job efficacy. The job efficacy of teachers also had a positive impact on all five indicators of SQSL. In regards to professional development, job efficacy acted as an indirect variable in the prediction of four student outcomes (i.e., general satisfaction, student-teacher relations, achievement, and opportunity) and fully mediated the direct negative effect on psychological distress.

Jimmieson NL; Hannam RL; Yeo GB

2010-08-01

322

The Influence of Affective Teacher-Student Relationships on Students' School Engagement and Achievement: A Meta-Analytic Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

A meta-analytic approach was used to investigate the associations between affective qualities of teacher-student relationships (TSRs) and students' school engagement and achievement. Results were based on 99 studies, including students from preschool to high school. Separate analyses were conducted for positive relationships and engagement (k = 61…

Roorda, Debora L.; Koomen, Helma M. Y.; Spilt, Jantine L.; Oort, Frans J.

2011-01-01

323

Primary and Secondary Teachers’ Knowledge, Interpretation, and Approaches to Students Errors about Ratio and Proportion Topics  

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Full Text Available This study investigated elementary and secondary teachers’ understanding and pedagogical strategies applied to students making errors in finding a missing length in similar rectangles. It was revealed that secondary teachers had better understanding of ratio and proportion in similar rectangles than elementary teachers. While all secondary teachers solved the similar rectangles problems correctly, a large portion of elementary teacher struggled with the problem. In explaining their solution strategies, and even though similar strategies appeared both from elementary teachers and secondary teachers, a majority of secondary teachers pointed out the underlying idea of similarity, whereas less than half of the elementary teachers explained their reasoning for using ratios and proportion. This article is derived from the research project registered under number 20110343 (Ruiz, 2011), and developed in Escuela Superior de Cómputo del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN) (School of Computer Sciences of the National Poly-technical Institute of Mexico)

Elena Fabiola Ruiz Ledesma

2011-01-01

324

Student science teachers’ ideas about endangered bird species: Hermit ibis, chukar partridge  

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Full Text Available In this study, student science teachers’ ideas and views of endangered bird species and their protection are analysed. 173 student science teachers studying at Selcuk University in the department of science education, participated in the study. Data analysis provides evidence that the majority of students thought that human intervention is required to protect endangered birds. Student teachers gave their opinions relating to hunting prohibitions, preventing pollution and protecting the environment and appropriate environmental possibilities for reproduction of bird species. Literature on the subject has been scanned, results have been discussed, and some recommendations relating to protection of endangered bird species have been made.

Osman CARDAK; Musa DIKMENLI

2009-01-01

325

Student teachers' views: what is an interesting life sciences curriculum?  

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Full Text Available In South Africa, the Grade 12 'classes of 2008 and 2009' were the first to write examinations under the revised Life Sciences (Biology) curriculum which focuses on outcomes-based education (OBE). This paper presents an exploration of what students (as learners) considered to be difficult and interesting in Grades 10-12 Life Sciences curricula in the Further Education and Training (FET) phase. A sample of 125 first year, pre-service Life Sciences and Natural Sciences teachers from a university responded to a questionnaire in regard to their experiences with the newly implemented FET Life Sciences curricula. The responses to the questions were analysed qualitatively and/or quantitatively. Friedman tests were used to compare the mean rankings of the four different content knowledge areas within each curriculum, and to make cross-curricular comparisons of the mean rankings of the same content knowledge area for all three curricula. All four content areas of Grade 12 were considered as being more interesting than the other two grades. In terms of difficulty, the students found the Grade 10 curriculum themes the most difficult, followed by the Grade 12 and the Grade 11 curricula. Most of the students found the themes under the content area Diversity, change and continuity (Grades 10-12) more difficult to learn than the other three content areas. It is recommended that more emphasis needs to be placed on what learners are interested in, and on having this incorporated into Life Sciences curricula.

Rian de Villiers

2011-01-01

326

Sports injuries in physical education teacher education students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Sports injuries could be highly detrimental to the career of a physical education teacher education (PETE) student. To enable the development of future sports injury prevention programs, sports injuries in 128 first-year academic bachelor PETE students were registered prospectively during one academic year. Common risk factors for sports injuries, taken from the literature, were also evaluated by means of logistic regression analysis. We found an incidence rate of 1.91 and an injury risk of 0.85, which is higher than generally found in a sports-active population. Most injuries involved the lower extremities, were acute, newly occurring injuries, and took place in non-contact situations. More than half of all injuries lead to an inactivity period of 1 week or more and over 80% of all injuries required medical attention. A major part of these injuries happened during the intracurricular sports classes. Few differences were seen between women and men. A history of injury was a significant risk factor (P?=?0.018) for the occurrence of injuries, and performance of cooling-down exercises was significantly related to a lower occurrence of ankle injuries (P?=?0.031). These data can inform future programs for the prevention of sports injuries in PETE students.

Goossens L; Verrelst R; Cardon G; De Clercq D

2013-02-01

327

Perceptions of Scientists: A Comparative Study of Fifth Graders and Fourth Year Student Teachers  

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Full Text Available This study compared the perception of scientists of fifth grade elementary school students’ (n=65) and senior student teachers (n=48). First, all participants answered a form with seven open-ended questions, and then they were given a blank piece of paper on which to draw a picture of a scientist. Both qualitative and quantitative procedures were utilized to analyze the data of the study. The results showed that student teachers’ perception of scientists were more stereotypical than those of the fifth grade students were. Even though today’s education programs are framed to encourage the idea of being scientists, scientific thinking and scientific society, student teachers’ perception of scientists were surprising given that they are likely to be classroom teachers in only a year’s time. The paper concludes with suggestions for science education, including an activity to put a positive image of scientists in students’ minds.

Ay?e O?uz-Ünver

2010-01-01

328

Final-year teacher training students' perceptions of THRASS  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english Our purpose was to see if THRASS (Teaching Handwriting, Reading and Spelling Skills) is a programme that should be taught to Foundation Phase (FP) and Intermediate/Senior Phases (ISP) pre-service teachers at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT). The term 'literacy' is defined as an evolving, developing and complex concept, not only because it describes a set of practices, but also because it is context-driven. The THRASS programme is fundamentally for teachi (more) ng phonics, and is described as being at the 'word' level teaching of literacy. We argue that word level teaching should be done in context and within texts. A mixed method research design was used in order to provide better understandings and answers to the research question: What are the BEd 4 students' perceptions of THRASS? A questionnaire and two focus group interviews were used to gather data. Qualitative data were analysed, using an inductive approach. The findings confirm that pre-service teachers going to teach in schools feel prepared to teach reading, but not spelling or creative writing.

Condy, Janet; Chigona, Agnes; Chetty, Rajendra; Thornhill, Christa

2010-01-01

329

Starfish Student and Teacher Resource: Fishing Methods Fact Sheet  

Science.gov (United States)

The New Zealand Ministry of Fisheries provides a fact sheet describing fishing methods used around the world and the modern technology used for fish-finding and electronic navigation. Simple diagrams illustrate each item. Related fact sheets accessed via live links discuss fisheries conservation, marine fisheries, human impacts on fisheries, general ocean life, and several topics especially relevant to New Zealand fisheries. Resources for use by teachers and students in classroom settings for which the fact sheets provide background information are live linked. Some of these activities, such as determining the age of a fish from its scales, could be applied in an informal education setting. All fact sheets are downloadable as Microsoft Word documents, and fish catch data are downloadable as Microsoft Excel spreadsheets.

330

The Effect of Teacher Beliefs on Student Competence in Mathematical Modeling – An Intervention Study  

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Full Text Available This paper presents an intervention study whose aim was to promote teacher beliefs about mathematics and learning mathematics and student competences in mathematical modeling. In the intervention, teachers received written curriculum materials about mathematical modeling. The concept underlying the materials was based on constructivist ideas and findings from mathematics education. Teacher beliefs about mathematics, learning and self-efficacy were expected to have a major impact on their classroom practices. We therefore assessed teacher beliefs about the usefulness of mathematics, learning (constructivist and socio-constructivist beliefs) and teacher self-efficacy when teaching modeling (teacher or class level variable). The student level variables assessed were modeling competence and other individual factors, such as basic mathematical skills and cognitive abilities. The effectiveness of the intervention was measured in a pre-post control group design using multilevel structural equation modeling. The results showed no direct effect of the intervention on student modeling competence. However, they did reveal that the intervention had a significant effect on teacher beliefs about learning (constructivist and socio-constructivist view) and an effect of these teacher beliefs about learning on student modeling competence. Further, the results showed that students’ gains in modeling competence is not only mediated by teacher beliefs, but also influenced by individual factors. Implications for teaching as well as limitations of the study are discussed.

Christoph Mischo; Katja Maaß

2013-01-01

331

Effects on students of teacher training in use of a drug education curriculum.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The study reported here examines the effects of differential teacher training in use of a drug education curriculum on students' knowledge levels, problem-solving and coping skills, attitudes towards planned decision making, behavioral intentions and tobacco and alcohol use. An experimental design was used to compare the effects of exposure to teachers who had either intensive staff development, in-service training or no training. The findings indicate a statistically significant difference between groups of students on the intention to drink alcohol. Students whose teachers had intensive staff development were less likely to intend to take a drink if offered than students whose teachers had in-service or no training. Possible reasons for a lack of significant results on other variables are the confounding influences of school, classroom and teacher effects.

Allison KR; Silverman G; Dignam C

1990-01-01

332

The importance of teacher interpersonal behaviour for student attitudes in Brunei primary science classes  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated relationships between students' perceptions of their teachers' interpersonal behaviour and their subject-related attitude in primary science classes in Brunei. Teacher student interpersonal behaviour was mapped with the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) and reported in terms of two independent dimensions called Influence (teacher dominance vs submission) and Proximity (teacher cooperation vs opposition). While prior research using the QTI mainly focused on secondary education, the present study was one of the first in Brunei and in primary education and one of few studies to use multilevel analysis. Data from 1305 students from 64 classes were used in this study. Results indicated strong and positive effects of Influence and Proximity on students' enjoyment of their science class and supported findings of earlier work with the QTI.

den Brok, Perry; Fisher, Darrell; Scott, Rowena

2005-07-01

333

A Study Of Personality Factors In Relation To Emotional Intelligence Of Student-teachers  

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Full Text Available Emotional intelligence seems to be everywhere. In recent years, it has emerged as a critical factor forsustaining high achievement, retention, and positive behaviour as well as improving life success. Emotionalintelligence (EI) and personality traits play a major role in maintaining work effectiveness and efficiency in anyorganization. The purpose of this study is to see the impact of emotional intelligence on personality traits of studentteacherswho aspire to become effective teachers. A total of 600 student-teachers of various colleges of educationaffiliated to University of Jammu, Jammu were selected as a sample randomly for the purpose of classification inlow and high emotional intelligent student-teachers. Finally 80 student-teachers (40 low and 40 high emotionallyintelligent) were selected randomly by using P40 and P60 percentiles. To test hypothesis t-test was used. Results ofthis study indicated significant differences between high and low emotional intelligent student teachers onpersonality factors.

Rakesh Bharti

2013-01-01

334

Preservice teachers' predictions, perceptions, and actual assessment of students with special needs in secondary general music.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of the current study was to examine preservice teachers' predictions and perceptions of students with special needs' level of mastery of specific music education concepts and actual grades achieved by these students using alternative assessments and testing accommodations within two subpopulations: students with emotional and/or behavior disorders, and students with acute cognitive delays. The preservice teachers predicted students within the EDBD class would achieve a significantly higher level of mastery of the music concepts than students within the ACD classroom. After the field experience, however, the preservice teachers perceptions of all students' level of mastery increased from predictions scores overall. Additionally, pre-service teachers were able to execute testing accommodations and implement successful alternative assessments which gave empirical data on the students' level of mastery of the music education concepts within the curriculum. Finally, there was no correlation between how the preservice teachers thought students would perform, how they thought the students performed, and how the students actually performed based on assessment data.

Vanweelden K; Whipple J

2005-01-01

335

Preservice teachers' predictions, perceptions, and actual assessment of students with special needs in secondary general music.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the current study was to examine preservice teachers' predictions and perceptions of students with special needs' level of mastery of specific music education concepts and actual grades achieved by these students using alternative assessments and testing accommodations within two subpopulations: students with emotional and/or behavior disorders, and students with acute cognitive delays. The preservice teachers predicted students within the EDBD class would achieve a significantly higher level of mastery of the music concepts than students within the ACD classroom. After the field experience, however, the preservice teachers perceptions of all students' level of mastery increased from predictions scores overall. Additionally, pre-service teachers were able to execute testing accommodations and implement successful alternative assessments which gave empirical data on the students' level of mastery of the music education concepts within the curriculum. Finally, there was no correlation between how the preservice teachers thought students would perform, how they thought the students performed, and how the students actually performed based on assessment data. PMID:16086605

Vanweelden, Kimberly; Whipple, Jennifer

2005-01-01

336

A Match or a Mismatch between Student and Teacher Learning Style Preferences  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the learning styles of the students enrolled in an American affiliated Lebanese university who are currently registered in intensive English courses and to investigate whether there is a match between students’ learning styles and teachers’ teaching styles. The participants in this study were 103 students and five ESL teachers. A modified version of the PLSPQ has been used as an assessment instrument to determine the learning styles of the students. The results showed that Lebanese students have a preference for multiple learning styles, auditory, kinesthetic, tactile and visual and that age, gender, discipline and time spent studying English are variables that affect the learning styles of the students. The findings showed that there was no match between the teaching and learning styles of the teachers and students. Implications are made for the classroom.

Ghada Sabeh; Rima Bahous; Nahla Nola Bacha; Mona Nabhani

2011-01-01

337

Teachers’ Use of Humor in Teaching and Students’ Rating of Their Effectiveness  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which teachers use humour in teaching in Migori district, Kenya, and students’ ratings of their teaching effectiveness. Purposive and random sampling procedures were used in the selection of the sample for the study.  Students and teachers in 6 secondary schools in Migori District participated in the study.  Data was collected using questionnaire.  Three hundred and eleven students (159 male and 152 female) responded to the questionnaire designed to be used by students, which surveyed the students’ opinion of their teachers.  Thirty-five teachers also responded to the questionnaire that was designed to survey the humour style that is common among them.  In this study, the data collected was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Inferential and descriptive statistics were used.  The level of significance used in the study was 0.05. The results indicate that the use of humour in teaching is generally good and that there is a significant, moderate relationship between the use of humour and students’ rating of teachers’ effectiveness.  The results also indicate that the most commonly used styles of humour among the students are the positive styles of humour (Affiliative humour and Self-enhancing humour).  In conclusion, teachers who use humor in teaching are generally rated effective in terms of motivation, creation of engaging lessons and anxiety reduction in students. The teachers are also rated effective in terms of stimulation of thought and interest in students and fostering of a positive teacher-student relationship.  Keywords:  Humour, teaching effectiveness, affiliative humour, self-enhancing humour,The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which teachers use humour in teaching in Migori district, Kenya, and students’ ratings of their teaching effectiveness. Purposive and random sampling procedures were used in the selection of the sample for the study. Students and teachers in 6 secondary schools in Migori District participated in the study. Data was collected using questionnaire. Three hundred and eleven students (159 male and 152 female) responded to the questionnaire designed to be used by students, which surveyed the students’ opinion of their teachers. Thirty-five teachers also responded to the questionnaire that was designed to survey the humour style that is common among them.In this study, the data collected was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Inferential and descriptive statistics were used. The level of significance used in the study was 0.05. The results indicate that the use of humour in teaching is generally good and that there is a significant, moderate relationship between the use of humour and students’ rating of teachers’ effectiveness. The results also indicate that the most commonly used styles of humour among the students are the positive styles of humour (Affiliative humour and Self-enhancing humour).In conclusion, teachers who use humor in teaching are generally rated effective in terms of motivation, creation of engaging lessons and anxiety reduction in students. The teachers are also rated effective in terms of stimulation of thought and interest in students and fostering of a positive teacher-student relationship.

Lazarus Ndiku Makewa; Elizabeth Role; Jane Ayiemba Genga

2011-01-01

338

Assisting Reluctant Teacher's College Students to Autonomously Appreciate a Novel to Read  

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Full Text Available Abstract This paper is a report of how to make reluctant teachers' col­lege students read in a prose course. These students were not interested in fiction and had never read interpretative fiction in English. The teacher sought to know why the students were reluctant to read, and how to make them read, and discovered that it was because of students' linguistic de­ficiency and their reluctance to read longer texts. The teacher also dis­covered that in spite of their reluctance they were interested in listening to the teachers' explanation about the cultural elements and the analysis of the short stories. Thus, provided with a guideline developed based on cultural and gender elements, students were motivated to autonomously read an assigned Pulitzer-winning novel.

Siusana Kweldju

2000-01-01

339

Comparison of Service Quality Gaps among Teachers and Students as Internal and External Customers  

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Full Text Available Using an internal marketing (IM) approach, this study aims to compare the quality gap of educational servicesamong students (service customers) and teachers (service providers) at the district 6 public high schools ofTehran, Iran. In a cross-sectional study, the survey questionnaire was completed by two distinct groups ofrespondents, 230 teachers and 384 students. Findings indicate that there is negative gap in each of the fivedimensions among both groups of teachers and students. Quality gaps from viewpoint of both groups werenegative. The largest mean quality gap from students and teachers viewpoint was in the responsiveness andtangibility dimensions, respectively. The largest and smallest differences between students and teachersviewpoint were in the responsiveness and tangibility dimensions. The findings show a need for implementationof IM.

Rahim Mosahab; Osman Mahamad; T. Ramayah

2010-01-01

340

Perceived motivational climate, sportsmanship, and students' attitudes toward physical education classes and teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine the relations among students' perceptions of motivational climate, sportsmanship attitudes, and attitudes toward content and teachers in physical education. 910 secondary school students ages 13 to 16 years (M=14.3, SD=1.1) completed Spanish translations of L'Echelle de Perception du Climat Motivational by Biddle, et al., the Multidimensional Sportspersonship Orientations Scale by Vallerand, et al., and the Student Attitudes toward Teacher and Program in Physical Education by Luke and Cope. Structural equation modeling showed that perceived mastery climate is a predictor of students' attitudes toward teacher and content and positive sportsmanship attitudes. In contrast, perceived performance climate was not a predictor or mainly predicted negatively the students' attitudes toward the physical education teacher, content, and sportsmanship attitudes. These findings are discussed with regard to the implications for physical educators. PMID:19425471

Gutiérrez, Melchor; Ruiz, Luis Miguel

2009-02-01

 
 
 
 
341

Perceived motivational climate, sportsmanship, and students' attitudes toward physical education classes and teachers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to examine the relations among students' perceptions of motivational climate, sportsmanship attitudes, and attitudes toward content and teachers in physical education. 910 secondary school students ages 13 to 16 years (M=14.3, SD=1.1) completed Spanish translations of L'Echelle de Perception du Climat Motivational by Biddle, et al., the Multidimensional Sportspersonship Orientations Scale by Vallerand, et al., and the Student Attitudes toward Teacher and Program in Physical Education by Luke and Cope. Structural equation modeling showed that perceived mastery climate is a predictor of students' attitudes toward teacher and content and positive sportsmanship attitudes. In contrast, perceived performance climate was not a predictor or mainly predicted negatively the students' attitudes toward the physical education teacher, content, and sportsmanship attitudes. These findings are discussed with regard to the implications for physical educators.

Gutiérrez M; Ruiz LM

2009-02-01

342

Going Beyond Test-Taking Strategies: Building Self-Regulated Students and Teachers  

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Full Text Available Since the inception of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standardized tests have been on the minds of students, parents, and educators, who are consistently concerned with how to increase test scores. In this article, the authors suggest that it is time to look beyond tests to enable willing, focused, and persistent - that is self-regulated - students and teachers. Self-regulated students and teachers take control of their learning, set goals, monitor progress, reflect on outcomes, are intrinsically motivated to learn, and demonstrate higher levels of achievement (Harter, 1996; Markman, 1979; Mason, Snyder, Sukhram, & Kedem, 2006; Perry, Nordby, & VandeKamp, 2003; Zimmerman, 2000, 2002). Supporting such self-regulation not only promotes more independent, competent, and motivated students and teachers, but is also likely to raise test scores (Paris & Paris, 2001). The authors suggest specific strategies for, and benefits of, the development of self-regulation in both students and teachers.

Stephanie G. Davis; Erika Swarts Gray

2007-01-01

343

Student learning teams: viewpoints of team members, teachers and an observer  

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Full Text Available This paper presents results from a research project focused on group learning as experienced by students enrolled in a new Integrated Engineering programme (IGEN). Data from student survey responses,ethnographic observations of class meetings, and faculty commentary were collected continuously over one semester.Supporting group function and minimising dysfunction emerged as challenges for teachers, thus one research focus was the variance in teamwork function that student teams exhibited. The extent to which functional team-based processes were implicitly and explicitly modelled by teachers and student teams was also assessed. Results demonstrated that students perceived value in team projects, especially when instructors provided adequate support and appropriate rolemodelling.

Cheryl Aman; Gary Poole; Scott Dunbar; Daan Maijer; Fariborz Taghipour; Pierre Berube

2007-01-01

344

Ranganathan : A Universal Librarian  

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Full Text Available In formulating Five Laws of Library Science Ranganathan has made a lasting and fundamental contribution to the philosophy of library patron service. His Colon Classification has provided a scheme for hierarchical design of faceted subject classification. For such valuable contribution to the profession he has been acclaimed as a universal librarian.

Abulfazale M. Fazle Kabir

2003-01-01

345

Reinventing the medical librarian.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The caliber of the librarian is a health sciences library's most important resource. This paper explores factors which have influenced who has, or who has not, entered the profession of medical librarianship, and discusses several attributes which the author considers critical for restructuring the profession to meet current and future needs.

Anderson RK

1989-10-01

346

Perspectives of Teachers and Students about Internal and External evaluation system at Postgraduate level  

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Full Text Available A research study was conducted to know the opinion of teachers and students about internal and external system of examination in Universities at postgraduate level. A structured questionnaire on three point Likert scale was developed and utilized for collection of data from 500 respondents selected through random sampling techniques in Gomal University Dera Ismail Khan Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The opinion of the teachers and students were known and investigated. The result of the study indicated that teachers are in favour of internal system of examination while students support the external system of examination at postgraduate level.

Mohammad Younis Khan; Asif Jamil; Umar Ali Khan; Uzma Kareem

2012-01-01

347

Suggesting a New Model of Assessment at Chinese Teacher Education Institutions: Perceptions of University Students  

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Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate the different aspects of assessments like fairness, feedback ability, compatibility with the goals, and satisfaction of the students about assessment system in teacher education institutions. The main object of the study was to suggest a model of assessment applicable in the teacher education institutions in China. The students were ignorant of curricular goals. The teachers were not providing proper feedback to the students. Overwhelming majority suggested integrating internal and external assessment system. The majority doubted the fairness and validity of the assessment. A model was suggested to align the goals, instruction, and assessment.

Syed Manzar-Abbas; Shafqat Hussain Khan; Wang Yang; Lu Lijie

2012-01-01

348

Teacher-student relationships and school adjustment: progress and remaining challenges.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This commentary highlights the ways in which the articles in this special issue contribute to the second generation of research on teacher-student relationships. Second generation research aims to increase our understanding of the development of these relationships, and the processes responsible for their effects, as well as to evaluate theoretically-informed interventions designed to enhance teacher-student interactions. Despite unanswered questions and challenges that confront this field of inquiry, the current state of knowledge is adequate to apply the knowledge gained to the task of increasing teachers' abilities to provide positive social and emotional learning environments, thereby improving students' learning and behavioral adjustment.

Hughes JN

2012-01-01

349

Social interactions between veterinary medical students and their teachers in an ambulatory clinic setting in Finland.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, the social interactions between students and their teachers in an ambulatory clinic setting were investigated using Bales's interaction process analysis framework. Observational data were collected during five small-group sessions. The observations were quantified, and the behaviors of students and teachers were compared statistically. This study demonstrated that the interaction between students and their teachers was for the most part equal and could be characterized as "positively task oriented." The study has implications for veterinary educators wishing to use social psychology frameworks to assess the quality of learning in small-group clinical setting. PMID:20576905

Koskinen, Heli I

2010-01-01

350

Teacher Perceptions of Middle School Students' Sense of Belonging in Southeast Texas  

Science.gov (United States)

An extensive review of the literature reveals support for the importance of sense of belonging in student achievement. There is also extensive evidence regarding variation of sense of belonging among minority groups and the important role of teachers in creating a sense of belonging for students. The purpose of this study is to examine students'…

Capps, Matthew A.

2004-01-01

351

Decreasing Tardiness in Elementary School Students Using Teacher-Written Praise Notes  

Science.gov (United States)

Principals and teachers consider student tardiness to be a serious problem. Some have argued that tardiness is a widespread problem with serious effects, particularly for younger students who must depend on their parents to get them to school on time. Students who are frequently tardy may miss important opening announcements or academic…

Caldarella, Paul; Christensen, Lynnette; Young, Kenneth Richard; Densley, Colleen

2011-01-01

352

Deafness, Teacher-of-the-Deaf Support and Self-Concept in Australian Deaf Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines whether self-concept scores of deaf students vary according to age at diagnosis of deafness, the degree of deafness and the number of visits students receive from a teacher of the deaf. Thirty-seven deaf students between the ages of 12 and 18 attending inclusive educational settings in Western Australia participated in the…

Remine, Maria D.; Care, Esther; Grbic, Melissa

2009-01-01

353

Online Postings of Teacher Education Candidates Completing Student Teaching: What Do They Talk about?  

Science.gov (United States)

This purpose of this investigation was to review the postings of candidates completing student teaching using an online discussion module. A total of 3624 on-line postings by 295 student teachers over eight semesters were examined. Postings were grouped into one of six categories (general information, teaching, students, placements, projects and…

Rettig, Michael A.

2013-01-01

354

Teaching Students with Disabilities: Perception of Preparedness among Preservice General Education Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Increasing numbers of students with disabilities are being included full time in general education classrooms. General education teachers are assuming greater responsibility for the academic progress of students with special needs. Prior to the EAHCA, the education of students with disabilities was the primary responsibility of the special…

Nutter, Mary Ellen

2011-01-01

355

Do teachers believe they are competent to promote healthy ICT use among their students?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Information and communication technologies (ICT), including computers, are becoming commonplace tools for learning by school children in Australia and around the world. Teachers are responsible for integrating ICT into the school learning environment; however, they may not recognize how and when ICT use may compromise their students' physical health. Children's exposure to physical harm through the unhealthy use of ICT may have liability implications for the education sector. OBJECTIVES: To determine (i) whether teachers consider it their responsibility to promote healthy ICT use among their students; (ii) teachers' self-perceived competence to do so; and (iii) what teachers perceive are the barriers and enablers to promoting healthy ICT use among their students. METHOD: An online survey was developed for the study. All Catholic Education school principals in Western Australia (n=157) were sent an email link to the survey for distribution to teachers at their respective schools. Over the three week survey period, 95 teachers completed the survey. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data and summarize participants' responses. RESULTS: Fifty-five percent of teachers agreed they were concerned about their students' physical health when using ICT. Only 19% of teachers reported they frequently or always provided their students with information on how to use computers in their class in a way, so as to promote physical health. Teachers identified barriers to promoting healthy computing use among students including; insufficient time (47%), non-adjustable furniture (46%), and insufficient knowledge (41%). Male teachers reported more confidence in their ability to promote healthy ICT use among students than female teachers. CONCLUSION: Just over half of the teachers in this study were concerned for the physical health of their students when using ICT in the classroom. Respondents identified barriers that limit their ability to promote healthy practices to their students. Designing and implementing school-based computer ergonomics education programmes may assist teachers fulfil their duty of care in regard to the physical health and well-being of their students.

Zlamanski R; Ciccarelli M

2012-01-01

356

High school students' perceptions of EFL teacher control orientations and their English academic achievement.  

Science.gov (United States)

BACKGROUND. Theories distinguish between student-initiated and teacher-initiated regulation of students' learning activities, or between strong, shared, or loose teacher control during the completion of learning tasks. Empirical validations for such distinctions are scarce, however. AIM. The present study aimed at (a) investigating students' perceptions of control behaviours exhibited by their English teachers; and (b) exploring the contribution of different types of teacher control behaviours to students' cognitive outcomes (English Achievement). SAMPLE. The sample comprised 732 English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students studying in three major fields of high school (Mathematics, Natural Science, and Humanities). The participants (16-17 years of age) were selected from third-grade classes of 27 EFL teachers working in 25 high schools of 6 main different geographical regions in the Isfahan province, Iran. METHOD. To obtain a comprehensive picture of different control types exhibited by Iranian EFL teachers, the control subscales of the two existing questionnaires, i.e., the Questionnaire on Instructional Behaviours (QIB), adapted by Den Brok et al. (2004) and the Questionnaire on Lesson Activities (QLA) used by Den Brok (2001) were merged to form the Questionnaire of Teacher Control (QTC). The development of this Persian instrument involved several steps: translation and back translation by the researchers, one expert translator, and two EFL teachers; piloting; and a final administration of the questionnaire to the student sample. With respect to the second aim of the study, data regarding students' performances on the Standardized National English Achievement Tests were gathered from local educational offices and schools. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Statistical analyses supported acceptable reliability and validity of the instrument. A main factor structure with three types of teacher control (strong/high, shared/mid, and loose/low) was found to underlie students' perceptions. The results of multi-level analyses indicated that a relatively large amount of variance was explained by the control variables and student variables, and teacher control had a statistically significant effect on student outcomes. Students' English achievement was lowest when they felt control was their teachers' prerogative, higher when they themselves exerted their own control (low teacher control), and highest under shared (mid) control behaviours. PMID:21770916

Kiany, Gholam Reza; Shayestefar, Parvaneh

2011-03-09

357

High school students' perceptions of EFL teacher control orientations and their English academic achievement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Background Theories distinguish between student-initiated and teacher-initiated regulation of students' learning activities, or between strong, shared, or loose teacher control during the completion of learning tasks. Empirical validations for such distinctions are scarce, however. Aim The present study aimed at (a) investigating students' perceptions of control behaviours exhibited by their English teachers; and (b) exploring the contribution of different types of teacher control behaviours to students' cognitive outcomes (English Achievement). Sample The sample comprised 732 English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students studying in three major fields of high school (Mathematics, Natural Science, and Humanities). The participants (16-17 years of age) were selected from third-grade classes of 27 EFL teachers working in 25 high schools of 6 main different geographical regions in the Isfahan province, Iran. Method To obtain a comprehensive picture of different control types exhibited by Iranian EFL teachers, the control subscales of the two existing questionnaires, i.e., the Questionnaire on Instructional Behaviours (QIB), adapted by Den Brok et al. (2004) and the Questionnaire on Lesson Activities (QLA) used by Den Brok (2001) were merged to form the Questionnaire of Teacher Control (QTC). The development of this Persian instrument involved several steps: translation and back translation by the researchers, one expert translator, and two EFL teachers; piloting; and a final administration of the questionnaire to the student sample. With respect to the second aim of the study, data regarding students' performances on the Standardized National English Achievement Tests were gathered from local educational offices and schools. Results and conclusion Statistical analyses supported acceptable reliability and validity of the instrument. A main factor structure with three types of teacher control (strong/high, shared/mid, and loose/low) was found to underlie students' perceptions. The results of multi-level analyses indicated that a relatively large amount of variance was explained by the control variables and student variables, and teacher control had a statistically significant effect on student outcomes. Students' English achievement was lowest when they felt control was their teachers' prerogative, higher when they themselves exerted their own control (low teacher control), and highest under shared (mid) control behaviours.

Kiany GR; Shayestefar P

2010-08-01

358

High school students' perceptions of EFL teacher control orientations and their English academic achievement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND. Theories distinguish between student-initiated and teacher-initiated regulation of students' learning activities, or between strong, shared, or loose teacher control during the completion of learning tasks. Empirical validations for such distinctions are scarce, however. AIM. The present study aimed at (a) investigating students' perceptions of control behaviours exhibited by their English teachers; and (b) exploring the contribution of different types of teacher control behaviours to students' cognitive outcomes (English Achievement). SAMPLE. The sample comprised 732 English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students studying in three major fields of high school (Mathematics, Natural Science, and Humanities). The participants (16-17 years of age) were selected from third-grade classes of 27 EFL teachers working in 25 high schools of 6 main different geographical regions in the Isfahan province, Iran. METHOD. To obtain a comprehensive picture of different control types exhibited by Iranian EFL teachers, the control subscales of the two existing questionnaires, i.e., the Questionnaire on Instructional Behaviours (QIB), adapted by Den Brok et al. (2004) and the Questionnaire on Lesson Activities (QLA) used by Den Brok (2001) were merged to form the Questionnaire of Teacher Control (QTC). The development of this Persian instrument involved several steps: translation and back translation by the researchers, one expert translator, and two EFL teachers; piloting; and a final administration of the questionnaire to the student sample. With respect to the second aim of the study, data regarding students' performances on the Standardized National English Achievement Tests were gathered from local educational offices and schools. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Statistical analyses supported acceptable reliability and validity of the instrument. A main factor structure with three types of teacher control (strong/high, shared/mid, and loose/low) was found to underlie students' perceptions. The results of multi-level analyses indicated that a relatively large amount of variance was explained by the control variables and student variables, and teacher control had a statistically significant effect on student outcomes. Students' English achievement was lowest when they felt control was their teachers' prerogative, higher when they themselves exerted their own control (low teacher control), and highest under shared (mid) control behaviours.

Kiany GR; Shayestefar P

2011-09-01

359

Examining Teachers’ Behavior Related to Students with Special Needs in Inclusive Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this study, teachers’ behaviors which are related to students with special needs in inclusive classrooms were investigated. Forty-five teachers who worked in three elementary schools in Ankara and had students with special needs participated in this study. Data were obtained using 15 items which are related to special needs students in Preventive Classroom Management Observation Form (PCMOF), developed by Sucuo?lu Akal?n and Sazak P?nar (2007). The maximum score which can be taken from this part of observation form was 15. The analysis of the research data revealed that average score of teachers obtained 15 items in PCMOF was 4,09 and scores of teachers did not differ significantly in terms of their gender, age, experience and departments they graduated. However scores of teachers changed significantly in terms of socio-economic level of parents of children who are attending to the schools.© 2012 IOJES. All rights reserved

Nevin Güner Y?ld?z; Elif Sazak P?nar

2012-01-01

360

Promoting Social Justice through Service-Learning in Urban Teacher Education: The Role of Student Voice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Although service-learning is becoming more common in teacher education programs (Anderson & Erickson 2003), few detailed case descriptions show how service-learning can help to promote a social justice orientation for prospective teachers. A comparative descriptive analysis of projects within two teacher preparation programs--one focused on training undergraduates and one focused on training graduate students--illustrates how service-learning, when undergirded by student voice work, prepares prospective educators to teach for social justice in urban classrooms. We identify commonalities in our two approaches to integrating service-learning and student voice into the teacher education curriculum, and we show how our distinctive efforts support prospective teachers in developing the relationships, reflections, and practices they need to become effective educators of urban youth.

Noah Borrero; Jerusha Conner; Alex Mejia

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
361

Four science teachers' perceptions and reflections about teaching science to middle school students: A case study  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative case study examined four middle school science teachers from Southern New Jersey perceptions and reflections about their selections of instructional strategies used to teach scientific concepts to seventh and eighth grade students. They reflected upon their pedagogy by reviewing videotaped lessons, reflective journaling, and participating in in-depth interviews. The findings in this study indicated that reflecting upon instruction contributes to the knowledge base of teaching, improves teachers' individual practices, and helps practitioners become deliberate about their instructional practices. Teacher should have opportunities to observe, investigate and practice using components they perceive as useful instructional strategies to teach scientific concepts to middle school students. When teachers engage in reflection, pedagogical strategies transform and teachers lean toward choosing instructional strategies that are less teacher-centered toward that of more student-centered. In conclusion, it is evident that engaging in student-centered dialogue, argumentation, and researched-based projects improved the way students learned. The participants found that constructivist, hands-on inquiry and reasoning, are skills that middle school students can readily engage in and students can develop skills that help them to think and act more like scientist.

Theadford, Brita A.

362

Teachers Assessment Practices and Students Perceptions of the Classroom Assessment Environment  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' assessment practices and students’ perceptions of the classroom assessment environment. A total of 1,636 students and 83 science teachers in the ninth grade participated in the study. Results from hierarchical linear modeling techniques showed that students’ perceptions of the assessment environment were shaped by student characteristics such as self-efficacy, class contextual features such as aggregate perceived assessment environment and self-efficacy levels of the class, and teacher’s teaching experience and assessment practices. These results point to a conclusion that each class has an assessment environment that originates from the teacher’s assessment practices, and that students develop their perceptions of the classroom assessment environment based in part on their group experiences. Therefore, researchers studying classroom environment may need to consider not only the individual student perception of the assessment environment, but also the aggregate perceptions of students in a class about their classroom assessment practices.

Hussain Alkharusi

2010-01-01

363

“Play…a waste of time”? Samoan and Tongan student teachers’ views of play  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article the author reports on a research study that explores the views of Samoan and Tongan student teachers perceptions of the term ‘play’. The research undertaken with the students draws attention to how the students’ perceptions of play have been influenced. As developing early childhood teachers, what they know and understand of play will influence the ways in which they provide play experiences for young children in their care. The participants were interviewed before and after undertaking a course about the value of play in the learning and teaching of young children. Significant changes were noted in the students’ understanding of the term play. The findings identified several critical factors: (a) the influence of parental attitudes towards play, (b) how student teachers initially viewed play, and (c) the student teachers perceptions as developing early childhood teachers of play. Using critical reflection in conjunction with developing their theoretical knowledge and understanding of play enabled the student teachers to better understand theories of play and become advocates of play for young children in an early childhood education setting.

Manutai Leaupepe

2010-01-01

364

Implications of Training Student Teachers of Preschooling through Micro-Teaching Activities for a Classroom with Mentally-Disabled Students  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a difference between the student teachers' opinions about in-class teaching skills before and after applying micro-teaching. This study was carried out with the participation of second-year students of the Child Development Program of a Vocational School in the full term of 2005-2006 academic…

Deniz, Sabahattin

2010-01-01

365

Educating student teachers to become high quality professionals - a Finnish case  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

For decades, the Finnish orientation toward teacher education has committed itself to the development of an inquiry oriented and research-based professional culture. The aims of teacher education are to train students to find and analyse problems they may expect to face in their future work. This st...

Niemi, Hannele

366

A Comparison of Student Outcomes in Various Earth Science Courses Taught by Seventeen Iowa Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of the type of earth science course (Earth Science Curriculum Project (ESCP) and non-ESCP), the directness or indirectness of teacher-pupil interaction in various teaching activities (I/D ratio), and the teacher's philosophical orientation (T/NT ratio) on various student outcomes such as understanding of science and scientists;…

Schirner, Silas Wesley

367

Competencies and Characteristics for Teaching Gifted Students: A Comparative Study of Beijing and Hong Kong Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines the competencies and characteristics of in-service teachers who teach gifted students. A total of 511 in-service teachers participated in the study, 334 of whom were from Beijing and 177 were from Hong Kong. The scale developed by D. W. Chan was used as the instrument to examine the competencies and characteristics of the…

Cheung, Hoi Yan; Hui, Sammy King Fai

2011-01-01

368

Primary and Secondary Teachers’ Knowledge, Interpretation, and Approaches to Students Errors about Ratio and Proportion Topics  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study investigated elementary and secondary teachers’ understanding and pedagogical strategies applied to students making errors in finding a missing length in similar rectangles. It was revealed that secondary teachers had better understanding of ratio and proportion in similar rectangles than...

Elena Fabiola Ruiz Ledesma

369

Evaluation of ICT Literacy Differences in Trainee Student Teachers from the View of Sexuality  

Science.gov (United States)

|Purpose: The aim of this paper is to evaluate ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality. Design/methodology/approach: In the research, sender differences in self-reported ICT experience and ICT literacy among first year graduate trainee teachers were investigated. The questionnaires were made available in two…

Rekabdarkolaei, Saeid Moradi; Amuei, Fattane

2008-01-01

370

Unpacking Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Conceptualizing and Measuring Teachers' Topic-Specific Knowledge of Students  

Science.gov (United States)

|There is widespread agreement that effective teachers have unique knowledge of students' mathematical ideas and thinking. However, few scholars have focused on conceptualizing this domain, and even fewer have focused on measuring this knowledge. In this article, we describe an effort to conceptualize and develop measures of teachers' combined…

Hill, Heather C.; Ball, Deborah Loewenberg; Schilling, Stephen G.

2008-01-01

371

Social Studies Student Teachers' Levels of Understanding Sociology Concepts within Social Studies Curriculum  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aims at investigating social studies student teachers' levels of understanding sociology concepts within social studies curriculum. Study group of the research consists of 266 teacher candidates attending the Department of Social Studies, Faculty of Education, Kastamonu University during 2012 to 2013 education year. A semi-structured…

Karatekin, Kadir

2013-01-01

372

Maslow's Need Hierarchy Related to Educational Attitudes and Self-Concepts of Elementary Student Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Work Motivation Inventory, Minnesota Teacher Attitude Inventory, and Adjective Self Description Instrument were administered to 128 University of Houston student teachers. Results indicated that educational attitudes and self-concept, operating jointly, significantly contributed to the variance in Maslow's scales of basic, safety, and…

Noad, Brian

1979-01-01

373

Primary School Teachers' Knowledge and Awareness of Dyslexia in Kuwaiti Students  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study investigated Kuwaiti primary school teachers' knowledge and awareness of early signs of dyslexia among Kuwaiti students. To achieve this purpose, a survey was developed to collect data randomly from more than 700 participants of primary language teachers across Kuwait's six educational districts. The results showed that the majority of…

Aladwani, Amel M.; Al Shaye, Shaye S.

2012-01-01

374

Kindergartners' Temperament, Classroom Engagement, and Student-Teacher Relationship: Moderation by Effortful Control  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine whether kindergartners' (N = 291; M age = 5 years) effortful control (EC), impulsivity, anger, or shyness predict their classroom participation, school liking, and student-teacher relationship. Parents and teachers reported on children's temperament. Children's EC and impulsivity were also assessed with…

Valiente, Carlos; Swanson, Jodi; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn

2012-01-01

375

What do Greek physical education teachers know about elementary student assessment?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate whether teachers’ knowledge of student assessment was influenced by their gender and if it was related to their teaching experience (years in education). One hundred and twenty six physical education teachers (n=126) who teach in different Greek public elementary schools, participated. Their teaching experience ranged from one to 24 years (?=10.45, SD=5.9). Participants’ knowledge of student assessment was assessed via a multiple choice questionnaire. Independent samples t-test and Spearman rank order correlation were conducted in order to explore the impact of gender on teachers’ knowledge and the relation between the latter and teaching experience, respectively. Descriptive statistics showed deficiencies in teachers’ knowledge. Results indicated that females presented higher knowledge scores than males, although marginally non-significant. Marginally non-significant was also the negative correlation between teaching experience and teachers’ knowledge. It seems that gender and teaching experience play a role on teachers’ knowledge of student assessment, as measured in the present research, in favor of the females and the teachers with less teaching experience. These findings could be taken into consideration for further research as well as for teacher training on student assessment.

VASSILIKI DERRI; ANDREAS AVGERINOS; KYRIAKI EMMANOUILIDOU; EFTHIMIS KIOUMOURTZOGLOU

2012-01-01

376

Inclusion for Students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Classroom Teachers Talk about Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors aimed to investigate the perceptions and experiences of regular education classroom teachers whose students included at least 1 child diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum (FAS) disorders. The authors collected data over a 3-year period in 3 school districts in the Pacific Northwest. Data included interviews with classroom teachers,…

Dybdahl, Claudia S.; Ryan, Susan

2009-01-01

377

The Development of Sloyd Teacher Students’ Self-Directed Learning Readiness  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This research is the first part of a longitudinal study of sloyd teacher students’ self-directed learning of craft & technology studies at the end of bachelor level throughout three decades in Finland. Sloyd education is the main subject in the sloyd teacher study program in University of Tur...

Mika Metsärinne; Kalle Virta

378

A Longitudinal Study on the Stability over Time of School and Teacher Effects on Student Outcomes  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews educational effectiveness theory, concentrating on the time stability of the teacher and school effect. The contribution of longitudinal studies investigating the long-term effect of schools and teachers to modelling educational effectiveness is discussed. Findings of a longitudinal study on the progress of students (N=1681) in…

Kyriakides, Leonidas; Creemers, Bert P. M.

2008-01-01

379

Support Teachers' Beliefs about the Academic Achievement of Students with Special Educational Needs  

Science.gov (United States)

Jos Castro Silva, lecturer in sciences of education, and Jos Morgado, assistant professor, both work at the Instituto Superior de Psicologica Aplicada in Lisboa, Portugal. In this article, they describe their study of support teachers beliefs about the academic achievement of school students with special educational needs. The support teachers who…

Silva, Jos Castro; Morgado, Jos

2004-01-01

380

Teachers' Views on the Impact of Classroom Management on Student Responsibility  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines teachers' views of their management styles, classified as either "coercive" or "relationship"-based, for 145 primary and 363 secondary school teachers in Victoria, Australia. It finds that management that combines punishment with aggressive and hostile behaviour can exacerbate misbehaviour and increase student distraction. In…

Roache, Joel; Lewis, Ramon

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

Using Teacher Praise and Opportunities to Respond to Promote Appropriate Student Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers' successful provision of levels of support to prevent and reduce problem classroom behaviors requires skillful application of research-based classroom and behavior management strategies. Among others, 2 teacher-centered strategies have been shown to decrease students' inappropriate behaviors and increase their appropriate behaviors: the…

Moore Partin, Tara C.; Robertson, Rachel E.; Maggin, Daniel M.; Oliver, Regina M.; Wehby, Joseph H.

2010-01-01

382

Teachers' Perspectives on Literacy Instruction for Students with Severe Disabilities Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' perspectives on the appropriate skills and settings for literacy instruction, the factors influencing their decisions about literacy instruction, and the barriers to literacy instruction in general education classrooms. A sample of special education teachers (n = 69) of students taking the…

Ruppar, Andrea L.; Dymond, Stacy K.; Gaffney, Janet S.

2011-01-01

383

Teacher Educational Beliefs and Sociometric Status of Special Educational Needs (SEN) Students in Inclusive Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify characteristics of teachers who were successful in social mainstreaming of students with special needs. In the exploratory stage, several successful teachers were interviewed about their pedagogical beliefs and mainstreaming practices. Themes and categories were extracted. In the major phase 24…

Ben-Yehuda, Simcha; Leyser, Yona; Last, Uriel

2010-01-01

384

A Comparative Analysis of Student-Teacher Interpersonal Similarity/Dissimilarity and Teaching Effectiveness  

Science.gov (United States)

Perceived student-teacher interpersonal similarity/dissimilarity (homophily/heterophily) was explored as a possible construct for deciphering the determinants of teaching effectiveness and for gauging teaching effectiveness. (MJB)

Anderson, W. Thomas, Jr.; And Others

1977-01-01

385

Pre-athletic training students perform better on written tests with teacher-centered instruction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There are many different methods of instruction used in the academic setting. Little experimental research exists examining which mode is more effective in educating students. The purpose of this study was to compare scores obtained on the written and the practical examinations of students on a single topic taught through either a teacher-centered format or a student-centered format. A 2 x 2 x 6 factorial design was used in this study. Independent variables were teaching style (teacher-centered instruction and student-centered instruction), order (first or second), and learning style (competitive, collaborative, participant, avoidant, dependent, and independent). The dependent variables were the scores obtained on a written and a practical examination of gait and crutch fitting. Forty pre-athletic training students in their first semester of their first year (16 males, 24 females) participated in this study. The Grasha-Reichmann Student Learning Style Scale was used to determine the learning styles of the subjects. The total subject pool was divided randomly into two groups, one taught by teacher-centered instruction and the other by student-centered instruction. Both groups took the same written and practical examinations, and scores were recorded. A 2 x 2 x 6 fixed model multivariate analysis of variance was performed. A difference was observed for teaching style (F2,21 = 5.35, p = 0.01), on the combination of written and practical exam scores. A difference also was observed on the written examination scores with the teacher-centered format producing better results (p < 0.05); but teacher-centered format scores did not differ from student-centered scores on the practical examination (p > 0.05). Teacher-centered instruction improves written test performance compared with student-centered instruction. When initially teaching a skill, direct teacher involvement may help students learn and perform better.

Livecchi NM; Merrick MA; Ingersoll CD; Stemmans CL

2004-01-01

386

How student teachers form their educational practice in relation to sustainable development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigates experienced student teachers’ perceptions of their professional training to encompass education for sustainable development, ESD. Data were collected by using questionnaires. The findings indicate that teachers’ implementation of ESD depends on both external and internal factors. Three major external factors have been found: colleagues, time and the curriculum. The internal factors were identified as transformative phases; especially a disorienting dilemma, self-examination, exploration of options for new actions, acquisition of knowledge and skills, and integration of new action in the teaching of ESD. Tensions between the individual teacher as a professional versus the teacher as a private personare explicitly mentioned as well as tensions with other teachers, principals and the community. These results may be important to teacher education as well as teachers’ professional development as they provide insights for implementation of changes in the educational system.

Ingela Bursjöö

2011-01-01

387

GREEK TEACHER’S PERCEPTIONS ABOUT “EFFICIENT” AND “NON-EFFICIENT” STUDENTS DEVELOPMENT OF AN ATTRIBUTION QUESTIONNAIRE FOR TEACHERS IN THE NORTH AEGEAN REGION  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This research is an attempt in investigating the attributions of teachers about cognitive, learning and psychological characteristics of “good” and “bad” students. A written questionnaire consisting of 35 items, which described potential student behaviour, was filled by 377 Primary, Secondary and University teachers from the North Aegean region. From the factor analysis we can observe five factors characterised “good” students: 1) Parent involvement and behaviour (11 items-16,5% of the variance), 2)Interpersonal adjustment (9 items-10,3% of the variance), 3) Intrapersonal adjustment (6 items-7,8% of the variance), 4) Independence (6 items-5,8% of the variance), 5) Classroom behaviour (3 items-4,6% of the variance). Furthermore we can observe five factors characterised “bad” students: 1) Parent involvement and school achievement (11 items-17,3% of the variance), 2)Learning behaviour (6 items-8,7% of the variance), 3) Negative behaviour (6 items-6,2% of the variance), 4) Team working (8 items-5,4% of the variance) and 5) Behaviour towards teacher (3 items-4,1% of the variance). Significant differences in teachers’ perceptions were found with the respect to teachers’ gender, age and years of service as well as regarding several questionnaire dimensions.

Panagiotis GIAVRIMIS; Efstratios PAPANIS

2009-01-01

388

Librarians and occupational therapy faculty: a collaboration for teaching evidence-based practice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Students in allied health educational programs learn evidence-based practice (EBP) skills, yet often do not consistently utilize these skills as practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP include time pressures and lack of skill. This descriptive study explains how librarians can teach information literacy skills and strengthen knowledge of EBP in graduate occupational therapy (OT) students. The goal of the study was to evaluate students' perception of the effectiveness of learning activities about EBP, and librarians' perception of the value of teaching in an OT curriculum. Sixty-three students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio read articles and learned didactic information from OT faculty and librarians about EBP. Students researched intervention questions and electronically sent searches to librarians for feedback. Students applied skills by researching an intervention of their choice. Evaluative data were collected from students in 2009 and 2010 and from librarians in 2009. Both groups rated the learning experiences highly. Students felt the learning experiences improved their effectiveness in carrying out EBP. Librarians valued the experience of teaching information literacy to OT students. These results support other studies showing librarians' effectiveness in developing EBP skills in students. Recommendations are given about using journal clubs and secondary literature to ensure the use of EBP at the workplace. PMID:22544409

Vogel, Kimberly A

2012-01-01

389

Strategic Pay Reform: A Student Outcomes-Based Evaluation of Denver's ProComp Teacher Pay Initiative  

Science.gov (United States)

Denver Public Schools utilizes one of the nation's highest profile alternative teacher compensation systems, and a key element of Denver's Professional Compensation System for Teachers (ProComp) is pay for performance. This study analyzes the student achievement implications of ProComp utilizing matched student- and teacher-level data from 2003 to…

Goldhaber, Dan; Walch, Joe

2012-01-01

390

Mentoring Student Teachers Into The Profession: Intentionally Creating a Culture of Inquiry in the Context of Media and Technology Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

What is the nature of onsite and online mentoring which enables student teachers to design inquiry-based, technology rich learning experiences? In this case study, faculty and expert teachers worked with fifteen student teachers during an elementary school practicum. An online intelligent design environment supported the development of a community…

Jacobsen, Michele; Friesen, Sharon; Clifford, Pat

2004-01-01

391

Orchestrating Productive Discussions of Student Responses: Helping Teachers Move Beyond "Showing and Telling"  

Science.gov (United States)

In this webinar, recorded in October 2011, Margaret Smith describes 5 practices which can help teachers make student-centered discussions more manageable and coherent by moderating the degree of improvisation required by the teachers. She provides a sample problem and student work to illustrate each step of her process. A pfd version of her slides are available to download (the recommended way to follow her talk, as there were technical problems with her slides during the webinar).

Smith, Margaret

2011-10-19

392

[Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. [Includes a copy of the Student Guide  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

1993-04-27

393

Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

AIM: The aim of this study is to compare student teachers and clinical associate professors regarding the quality of procedural skills teaching in terms of participants' technical skills, knowledge and satisfaction with the teaching. METHODS: This is an experimental, randomized, controlled study comparing the teaching of student teachers and associate professors regarding participants' learning outcome and satisfaction with the teaching. Two skills are chosen for the experiment, i.v.-access and bladder catheterization. Learning outcome is assessed by a pre- and post testing of the participants' knowledge and skills. Participants evaluate satisfaction with teaching on nine statements immediately after the teaching. RESULTS: In total 59 first year medical students are included as participants in the experiment. The students taught by student teachers perform just as well as the students taught by associate professors and in one skill--catheterization--they perform even better, mean post- minus pre-test scores 65.5 (SD 12.9) vs. 35.0 (SD 23.3), One-way ANOVA, p < 0.0001, effect size 1.62. Student teachers receive significantly more positive evaluations than associate professors on several statements. CONCLUSION: Trained student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep

Tolsgaard, Martin G; Gustafsson, Amandus

2007-01-01

394

Learning Trajectories of Primary Student Teachers; a Cross-Cultural Comparison  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Life history methodology was used to compare the life and educational trajectories of six primary student teachers in England with their counterparts at a Malawian Teacher Training College. A semi structured interview schedule was used to elicit the students? childhood memories including experiences of school, significant people in their lives, interactions with their teachers and influential factors in deciding to enter teaching. Students were also asked to expand their philosophy and purpose of education, to consider their immediate needs as newly qualified classroom practitioners and predict their career trajectory over a 20 year period. The cross-cultural analysis reveals causal biographical and socio-cultural factors combining to influence students? intentions to pursue teaching as a career. Teacher identity and notions of educational purpose revealed altruistic desires to teach, influenced by significant others in students? personal lives; educational narratives and the socio- political contexts of the respective societies. Choices made by the English students reflected the individualistic nature of British society whereas their Malawian counterparts were driven by a desire to improve children?s education as a means of improving their country. In all cases the English students saw themselves remaining in primary education, in comparison all the Malawi students saw this as a stepping stone to a higher status role. This reflects the perceived low status that primary teaching has in Malawi and suggests that to improve education in Malawi a major priority should be to raise the status of primary teachers.

Paul Gardner; Chris Rix

2012-01-01

395

If You Build Teachers, Will Students Come? The Role of Teachers in Broadening Computer Science Learning for Urban Youth  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the digital saturation of today's youth across demographic groups, students of color and females remain severely underrepresented in computer science. Reporting on a sequential mixed methods study, this article explores the ways that high school computer science teachers can act as change agents to broaden the participation in computing…

Goode, Joanna

2007-01-01

396

If You Build Teachers, Will Students Come? The Role of Teachers in Broadening Computer Science Learning for Urban Youth  

Science.gov (United States)

|Despite the digital saturation of today's youth across demographic groups, students of color and females remain severely underrepresented in computer science. Reporting on a sequential mixed methods study, this article explores the ways that high school computer science teachers can act as change agents to broaden the participation in computing…

Goode, Joanna

2007-01-01

397

Secondary School Teachers Don’t Have Time to Engage in the Most Important Aspects of Information Literacy Due to Curricular Pressures. A Review of: Williams, D. and C. Wavell. “Secondary School Teachers’ Conceptions of Student Information Literacy.” Journal of Librarianship and Information Science 39.4 (2007): 199-212.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective – To examine school teachers’ understanding of student information literacy and to look at the implications of the findings for developing information literacy in students.Design – Qualitative research design (group discussions; verbal and written reflections).Setting – Secondary schools in the United Kingdom.Subjects – Secondary school teachers with various subject specializations.Methods – The study initially involved 31 secondary school teachers; 24 from seven schools in Scotland and seven from two schools in England. Participant teachers were self-selecting. The study took a phenomenographic approach. Teachers’ perceptions of their students’ abilities and their experiences and perceptions of their role in developing these abilities were examined through data collection in three stages. During the first stage, group discussions established the teacher’s initial conceptions of information literacy. Participants also filled out an information task grid which, together with focus questions, ensured that discussions were kept in the realm of practice. During the second stage of data collection, teachers observed and reflected on their students’ use of information in classroom activities. This was accompanied by informal site visits during which 26 of the participants were introduced to information literacy frameworks and definitions in order to contextualize reflections and discussions. Field notes were used to record these informal meetings. Six participants provided written feedback on reflections. In the third and final stage, a summary of themes from the first two stages was sent to 23 of the participants prior to a second group discussion in order to try to stimulate further reflection. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed. The transcribed data were analyzed for the dimensions of variation of teachers’ conceptions of student information literacy and key elements associated with each category of description were determined.Main Results – The data revealed six main conceptions of student information literacy among the teachers: “finding information,” “linguistic understanding,” “makingmeaning,” “skills,” “critical awareness ofsources,” and “independent learning.” There was no particular hierarchy in their conceptualization, although independent learning seemed to be the ultimate goal. Teachers’ conceptions in the beginning ofthe study focused on the ability to find information, whereas after a period of reflection and further discussions, a broader and more complex understanding of information literacy appeared. Table 1 simplifies some of the data from the table in the article and shows conceptualizations as well as some of the contextual elements. Teachers felt that they had at least some control over the development of student ability to find information, develop skills, and critically appraise sources, even though these were not the highest learning priority outcomes. However, in the three areas of ability which the teachers regarded as of high learning priority (linguistic understanding, making meaning and independent learning), they felt that they had little control over the development of these abilities in the students.Conclusion – The teachers’ conceptions of student information literacy overlapped with the ideas in existing models and frameworks for information literacy. However, some areas of information literacy were not addressed by the teachers, i.e., ethical issues in the use of information. In the categories of description of high learning priority, the main reason for the low sense of control by the teachers seemed to be curricular pressures – “our content is prescribed and time allocated doing each of these things is prescribed so we have got limited room for maneuvering” (206). The teachers tended to regard information literacy as process and skills-orientated, with little connection to learning. The authors note that other research also suggests that school librarians also have difficulty relating inf

David Herron; Lotta Haglund

2009-01-01

398

Radiation Biology: A Handbook for Teachers and Students  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Knowledge of the radiobiology of normal tissues and tumours is a core prerequisite for the practice of radiation oncology. As such the study of radiobiology is mandatory for gaining qualification as a radiation oncologist in most countries. Teaching is done partly by qualified radiobiologists in some countries, and this is supplemented by teaching from knowledgeable radiation oncologists. In low and middle income (LMI) countries the teachers are often radiation oncologists and/or medical physicists. In Europe, a master's course on radiobiology is taught jointly by a consortium of five European Universities. This is aimed at young scientists from both Western and Eastern Europe, training in this discipline. Recently the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) initiated the launch of a radiobiology teaching course outside Europe (Beijing, 2007; Shanghai, 2009). Radiation protection activities are governed by many regulations and recommendations. These are based on knowledge gained from epidemiological studies of health effects from low as well as from high dose radiation exposures. Organizations like the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have put a lot of effort into reviewing and evaluating the biological basis to radiological protection practices. Personnel being trained as future radiation protection personnel should have a basic understanding of the biological and clinical basis to the exposure limitations that they are subject to and that they implement for industrial workers and the public at large. It is for these reasons that aspects of Radiobiology related to protection issues are included in this teaching syllabus. In LMI countries, many more teachers are needed in radiobiology, and the establishment of regional training centres or special regional training courses in radiobiology, are really the only options to solve the obvious deficit in knowledge of radiobiology in such countries. Radiobiology teaching courses organized or sponsored by the IAEA are oversubscribed, and the students themselves confirm the great need for this type of teaching. Requests have been received from a number of countries in all regions asking for the IAEA to help organize radiobiology teaching. More qualified professionals are also needed for this exercise. Already there are some initiatives e.g. an IAEA project produced in 2007 a distance-learning course in the Applied Sciences of Oncology (ASO) for Radiation Oncologists (also available on the IAEA-website since 2008) including 10 modules in radiobiology. This handbook for teachers and students was formulated based on the recommendations of a Consultants Meeting on International Syllabus for Radiobiology Teaching held 12-14 December 2005 in Vienna, Austria. Whilst this information is available in various books and other reports, it is summarized and collated here so that the whole document has a degree of completeness. This should be helpful in particular to those countries that do not have easy access to appropriate books and reports. Comments and suggestions on this syllabus as a teaching tool were sought from committees of the ESTRO and ASTRO (American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology). This handbook is written in two parts: (a) Teaching programme including a common basic radiobiology education and teaching programme for radiation oncologists, radiation therapy technologists, diagnostic radiologists, radiation biologists, medical physicists, radiation protection officers and other disciplines involved in radiation activities. This will take 1 week of teaching (30 hours), including a practical or tutorial session at the end of each day. This is followed by a further week of advanced teaching for radiation oncologists, and a further 3 days for radiation protection personnel. (b) Minimal Essential Syllabus for Radiobiology and two extra modules for radiation oncologists and radiation protection personnel, respectively. For each discipline, the basic module and an extra module would constitute the minimum essential syllabus

2010-01-01

399

Teacher Education Follow-Up Study, 2000: A Summary of First and Second Year Teachers, Graduate Students, and Their Employers with Respect to State and National Standards.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report represents the 12th follow-up study by the Teacher Education Assessment Committee at Central Missouri State University (CMSU), Warrensburg. This year's surveys were distributed to preservice, first-year, and second-year teachers in Missouri, graduate students, alternative certification teachers, and employers (principals) of the…

Zelazek, John R.; Williams, Wayne W.; McAdams, Charles; Palmer, Kyle

400

Developing a cognitive theory from student teachers' post-lesson reflective dialogues on secondary school mathematics  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english This article describes phases of post-lesson reflective dialogues that were enacted by secondary school mathematics student teachers with their peers. Five pairs of student teachers on 12 weeks of teaching practice provided data through lesson assessments, post-lesson reflectivedialogues, and end-of-teaching-practice reflective interviews. A cognitive theory of collaborative reflection with a peer that encapsulates phase characteristics of a post-lesson reflective dialogu (more) e is proposed. Dialogue at each of the phases of the theory may not easily change student teachers' conceptions of teaching, but could provide a platform and structure for reviewing, modifying, or even maintaining teaching cognitions. While the older and more familiar 'apprenticeship' models are based on an expert teacher coaching a novice student teacher instructional skills, this fresh 'social' model is based on novice student teachers and their peers coaching each other teaching skills. An important implication of this observation is that current discourse on strategies for improving the quality of student teaching may move towards a consideration for a fresh school attachment model.

Nyaumwe, Lovemore J; Mtetwa, David K

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
401

Developing a cognitive theory from student teachers' post-lesson reflective dialogues on secondary school mathematics  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article describes phases of post-lesson reflective dialogues that were enacted by secondary school mathematics student teachers with their peers. Five pairs of student teachers on 12 weeks of teaching practice provided data through lesson assessments, post-lesson reflectivedialogues, and end-of-teaching-practice reflective interviews. A cognitive theory of collaborative reflection with a peer that encapsulates phase characteristics of a post-lesson reflective dialogue is proposed. Dialogue at each of the phases of the theory may not easily change student teachers' conceptions of teaching, but could provide a platform and structure for reviewing, modifying, or even maintaining teaching cognitions. While the older and more familiar 'apprenticeship' models are based on an expert teacher coaching a novice student teacher instructional skills, this fresh 'social' model is based on novice student teachers and their peers coaching each other teaching skills. An important implication of this observation is that current discourse on strategies for improving the quality of student teaching may move towards a consideration for a fresh school attachment model.

Lovemore J Nyaumwe; David K Mtetwa

2011-01-01

402

Teacher and observer views on student-teacher relationships: convergence across kindergarten and relations with student engagement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Most studies regarding the role of teacher-child relationships for children's early school adjustment use only teacher ratings of relationship quality. The current study examines (a) the agreement between teacher and observer ratings, (b) whether similar patterns of relations with behavioral engagement are obtained across informants, and (c) which informant matters the most in the prediction of engagement. Teacher and observer ratings of teacher-child closeness, conflict, and dependency were gathered for a sample of 148 kindergartners and their teachers at three measurement occasions. Teacher and observer reports converged to a moderate degree but only when considering multiple occasions and ruling out occasion-specific variance. Although some relations with behavioral engagement were similar, only teacher ratings had unique, added value in this prediction.

Doumen S; Koomen HM; Buyse E; Wouters S; Verschueren K

2012-02-01

403

Experiences as an embedded librarian in online courses.  

Science.gov (United States)

Embedded librarianship gives librarians a prime opportunity to have a direct, positive impact in a clinical setting, classroom setting, or within a working group by providing integrated services that cater to the group's needs. Extending embedded librarian services beyond the various physical settings and into online classrooms is an exceptional way for librarians to engage online learners. This group of students is growing rapidly in numbers and could benefit greatly from having library services and resources incorporated into their classes. The author's services as an embedded librarian in fully online courses at a medium-sized university will be discussed, as will strategies, lessons learned, and opportunities for engaging in this realm. To develop a foundation of knowledge on embedded librarianship, an overview of this topic is provided. PMID:20391164

Konieczny, Alison

2010-01-01

404

Experiences as an embedded librarian in online courses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Embedded librarianship gives librarians a prime opportunity to have a direct, positive impact in a clinical setting, classroom setting, or within a working group by providing integrated services that cater to the group's needs. Extending embedded librarian services beyond the various physical settings and into online classrooms is an exceptional way for librarians to engage online learners. This group of students is growing rapidly in numbers and could benefit greatly from having library services and resources incorporated into their classes. The author's services as an embedded librarian in fully online courses at a medium-sized university will be discussed, as will strategies, lessons learned, and opportunities for engaging in this realm. To develop a foundation of knowledge on embedded librarianship, an overview of this topic is provided.

Konieczny A

2010-01-01

405

Literacy Learning in Networked Classrooms: Using the Internet with Middle-Level Students  

Science.gov (United States)

|Middle-level teachers, librarians, and media specialists can use this book to meet current English language arts and technology standards and to prepare students to be literate citizens in the 21st century. Additional teaching tools include timelines of classroom events, reproducible rubrics for assessing curriculum units, suggested Web…

McNabb, Mary L.; Thurber, Bonnie B.; Dibuz, Balazs; McDermott, Pamela A.; Lee, Carol Ann

2006-01-01

406

Primary four students’ development of reading ability through inquiry-based learning projects  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper is part of a bigger study that investigates a collaborative instructional approach involving three kinds of teachers (Information Technology, General Studies, and Chinese) and the school librarian in guiding primary 4 (P4) students through two phases of inquiry-based learning (IBL) projec...

Chu, SKW; Tse, SK; Loh, EKY; Chow, K; Fung, HF; Ng, HWR

407

The Translation of Teachers' Understanding of Gifted Students Into Instructional Strategies for Teaching Science  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined how instructional challenges presented by gifted students shaped teachers’ instructional strategies. This study is a qualitative research grounded in a social constructivist framework. The participants were three high school science teachers who were teaching identified gifted students in both heterogeneously- and homogeneously-grouped classrooms. Major data sources are classroom observations and interviews. Data analysis indicated that these science teachers developed content-specific teaching strategies based on their understanding of gifted students, including: (a) instructional differentiation, e.g., thematic units, (b) variety in instructional mode and/or students’ products, (c) student grouping strategies and peer tutoring, (d) individualized support, (e) strategies to manage challenging questions, (f) strategies to deal with the perfectionism, and (g) psychologically safe classroom environments.

Park, Soonhye; Steve Oliver, J.

2009-08-01

408

Revising our Curriculum/Empowering Students: Teachers‘ Preparation and Perceptions about Bilingual Writing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available While emphasis on writing instruction has been a main concern in teaching Spanish to bilingual students in the U. S., it is an area in which very few theoretical advances have been made; in Mexico’s case the situation is even more challenging. Therefore, based on classroom observations, and individual interviews with both teachers and students, and on the collection of class syllabi, this paper seeks to describe the current state of affairs regarding Spanish and English writing instruction for bilingual students in both countries. The main objectives are: 1) the analysis and comparison of the diverse teaching methodologies that high school teachers use to teach Spanish and English writing; 2) the analysis of the effects that the specific observed writing instruction has on students’ perceptions about their own writing in both languages; and 3) the analysis of the perceptions that teachers have about their students’ writing.

Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante

2011-01-01

409

Student Teaching Experience in Diverse Settings, White Racial Identity Development and Teacher Efficacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examined how diversity of field placement affected White student teachers’ White racial identity(WRI) development, and the relationship between WRI and teacher efficacy. There was no change in WRIdevelopment regardless of placement; however, as the percentage of students of color in the placement increased,two subscales (instructional strategies, classroom management) of the Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES)decreased. A negative correlation existed between WRI (Pseudo-Independence and Contact subscales of theWhite Racial Consciousness Development Scale-Revised) and subscales of the TSES. Results indicate thatteacher preparation programs critically examine Whiteness and WRI as a construct.

Diane S. Bloom; Terri Peters

2012-01-01

410

BELIEF CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT: TWO TALES OF NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKING STUDENT TEACHERS IN A TESOL PROGRAMME  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article explores the construction and development of two non-native English speaking student teachers’ beliefs throughout a one-year teaching English to speakers of other languages programme in a university in the United Kingdom. The research used a qualitative case methodology to illuminate individuals’understanding and perceptions. The study employed three data collection instruments: semi-structured interviews, observation of micro-teaching sessions and student teachers’ written reflections on their teaching. Data analysis focused on how beliefs developed within five dimensions of belief, namely, subject matter, learning, teaching, learners and the teacher. The study suggests that teacher education programmes shape and develop pre-service teachers’ beliefs. A major contribution of this study is to argue that the development of student teachers ’ beliefs mirrored identity shifts of NNS student teachers in the programme; a finding which has the potential to inform the future design of language teacher education programmes.

Li LI

2012-01-01

411

Teachers' Discoursal Strategies in Providing Positive Feedback to Student Responses: A Study of Four English Immersion Teachers in People's Republic of China  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper investigates the discoursal strategies of four teachers in providing feedback to student responses in English classrooms in Xi'an, People's Republic of China. The findings indicate that the teachers provide positive feedback for students English learning in various ways, including using the most common strategies such as accepting,…

Pei, Miao

2012-01-01

412

The Artist-Teacher in the Classroom and Changes in the Teacher-Student Relationship, with Reference to the Issue of Censorship  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines a case study of an A-Level student's work and how the inclusion and integration of my own practice as artist-teacher into the classroom has changed the teacher-student relationship, resulting in a more collaborative environment. It investigates how the mutual sharing of practice supports opportunities for pupils to discuss…

Stanhope, Clare

2011-01-01

413

Emotional intelligence (EQ) levels of the senior students in secondary education system in Turkey based on teacher’s perceptions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available As in all sciences, interpersonal interactions develop new approaches. One of them is emotional intelligence (EQ), “observing and understanding capacity own and other’s emotion, definition of different type of emotion; and knowledge that you learned using to know other’s emotion and understanding. The purpose of this study is to determine EQ competence acquisition levels of senior students in secondary education system according to teacher perceptions. A survey method was used as the main research approach. Participants were 262 teachers who were selected from seven secondary schools in Adapazari that were selected randomly. Research questions were tested with ANOVA that includes Observed Power and Partial Eta analysis and t-test that includes Cohen d analysis. Results revealed that students, who have higher academic achievements, have the highest level in EQ traits as well. Science and Anatolian Secondary Schools’ students have higher EQ levels as cognitive skills.

Osman Titrek

2009-01-01

414

Teachers’ and Students’ Views Toward The Activities of the Primary Science and Technology Curriculum  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study is to find out teachers’ and students’ views about preparation, application and evaluation of activities in which the Primary Science and Technology Curriculum began to be used since 2004-2005 education year. In the study, qualitative research design was used. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews conducted with 3 science and technology teachers who work at various primary schools in Trabzon and 9 primary school students. The gathered data were presented by classifying under categories. One of the most important result of the study is that activities are generally applied teacher-centered because of material shortage, lack of time and overcrowded classrooms. It is suggested as the first step for solution of problems that physical conditions in the schools are got better and the teachers are educated in In-Service Teacher Education Program systematically.

Nur Kurtulu?; Oylum Çavdar

2011-01-01

415

Model United Nations Projects: How High School Librarians Can Help.  

Science.gov (United States)

Notes that high school librarians should know what transpires at Model United Nations Assemblies and which books will help prepare students and educators for these experiences. Describes the conferences, student responsibilities, and awards. Provides a list of relevant university depository sources for United Nations records and reports. (AEF)

Grosek, Edward

1996-01-01

416

Power quality affects teacher wellbeing and student behavior in three Minnesota Schools  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Background: Poor power quality (dirty electricity) is ubiquitous especially in schools with fluorescent lights and computers. Previous studies have shown a relationship between power quality and student behavior/teacher health. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to determine the ability of power line filters to reduce dirty electricity in a school environment and to document changes in health and behavior among teachers and students. Method: We installed Graham Stetzer filters and dummy filters and measured power quality in three Minnesota Schools. Teachers completed a daily questionnaire regarding their health and the behavior of their students for an 8-week period. Teachers were unaware of which filters were installed at any one time (single blind study). Results: Dirty electricity was reduced by more than 90% in the three schools and during this period teacher health improved as did student behavior in the middle/elementary schools. Headaches, general weakness, dry eyes/mouth, facial flushing, asthma, skin irritations, overall mood including depression and anxiety improved significantly among staff. Of the 44 teachers who participated 64% were better, 30% were worse, and 6% did not change. Behavior of high school students did not improve but elementary/middle school students were more active in class; more responsive, more focused; had fewer health complaints; and had a better overall learning experience. Conclusions: Dirty electricity in schools may be adversely affecting wellbeing of teachers and behavior of their students, especially younger students in middle and elementary school. Power line filters improve power quality and may also protect those who are sensitive to this energy. Work on electric and magnetic field metrics with and without Stetzer filters urgently needs to be carried out to determine just what characteristics of the dirty electricity may be interacting with the people.

Havas, Magda [Environmental and Resource Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, ON, K9J 7B8 (Canada)], E-mail: mhavas@trentu.ca; Olstad, Angela [Melrose-Mindoro Elementary School, N181 State Road 108, Melrose WI, USA 54642 (United States)], E-mail: olstad@mel-min.k12.wi.us

2008-09-01

417

A Qualitative Case Study of EFL Students’ Affective Reactions to and Perceptions of Their Teachers’ Written Feedback  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present paper reports a qualitative case study of investigating EFL students’ affective reactions to and perceptions of their teachers’ written feedback. In addition, the study reported here also focuses on contextual factors that may influence students’ reactions to and perceptions of their teachers’ written feedback. Data were collected using multiple methods that included semi-structured interviews, think-aloud protocols, teachers’ written feedback, and students’ written essays. Results of data analysis revealed that EFL students showed some variations in their affective reactions to their teachers’ written feedback. The students perceived their teachers’ written feedback as useful and very important for the development of their writing skills. The students wanted their teachers to focus on all aspects of written texts when they provide written feedback. Contextual factors such as students’ past experience, teachers’ wording of written feedback, students’ acceptance of teachers’ authority, and teachers’ handwriting have their impact on EFL students’ affective reactions to and perceptions of their teachers’ written feedback

Omer Mahfoodh; Ambigapathy Pandian

2011-01-01

418

Moderating effects of teacher-student relationship in adolescent trajectories of emotional and behavioral adjustment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined relations between effortful control, parent-adolescent conflict, and teacher-student relationships and the concurrent and longitudinal impact of these factors on adolescent depression and misconduct. In particular, we examined whether the risks of low effortful control and parent-adolescent conflict could be buffered by positive teacher-student relationships characterized by warmth and trust. Data were collected on 1,400 urban youths (52% female, 51% Black, 44% White) who reported on their effortful control at age 13 years and on their depressive symptoms and misconduct from ages 13-18. Teacher-student relationship data were collected from teacher-report at age 13 and parent-adolescent conflict data from parent-report at age 13. As hypothesized, regardless of gender, both early poor effortful control and conflictive parent-adolescent relationship were general risks for adolescents' depression and misconduct. Positive teacher-student relationships protected adolescents against depression and misconduct throughout ages 13-18. In addition, positive teacher-student relationships moderated the negative influences of adolescents' early poor effortful control and conflictive parent-adolescent relationships on misconduct and helped such at-risk adolescents to attain less behaviorally delinquent developmental trajectories over time.

Wang MT; Brinkworth M; Eccles J

2013-04-01

419

Teacher-Student Interaction and Learning in On-Line Theological Education. Part I: Concepts and Concerns  

Science.gov (United States)

Many theological educators ask how on-line classes can provide students with the kind of personal teacher-student interaction that is needed in a healthy and holistic approach to preparation for ministry. A quantitative study was undertaken for the purpose of examining the relationships between three major types of teacher-student interaction…

Heinemann, Mark H.

2005-01-01

420

It Takes Two to Tango: In Dynamic Inquiry, the Self-Directed Student Acts in Association with the Facilitating Teacher  

Science.gov (United States)

The current research presents a qualitative view of a teacher-student association within the context of dynamic inquiry, as encouraged by a new biology curriculum, ''Biomind''. This curriculum enables open inquiry learning through teacher guidance. We characterized the various aspects of the student's functioning as a self-directed student during…

Zion, M.; Slezak, M.

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
421

The Role of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication between Students with Special Needs and Their Teachers in Middle School  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous research has demonstrated that a positive relationship between teacher and student improves student performance in school. However, less information is available regarding the verbal and nonverbal communications between the students with special needs and their teachers within this middle school subgroup. Personal attention and support…

Williams, Dottie S.

2009-01-01

422

Students' Self-Esteem and Their Perception of Teacher Behavior: A Study of Between-Class Ability Grouping  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: Between-class ability grouping practice in Malaysian Secondary Schools was studied in order to find the influence students' perception on their teachers' behavior on their self-esteem. Students' perception on teachers' behaviors were divided into two categories: controlling students' behavior to avoid disciplinary matters and…

Kususanto, Prihadi; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Jamil, Hazri

2010-01-01

423

Experienced Middle School Science Teachers' Assessment Literacy: Investigating Knowledge of Students' Conceptions in Genetics and Ways to Shape Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Using a framework of assessment literacy that included teachers' view of learning, knowledge of assessment tools, and knowledge of assessment interpretation and action taking, this study explored the assessment literacy of five experienced middle school teachers. Multiple sources of data were: teachers' predictions about students' ideas, students' written and verbal responses to assessment tasks, teacher background questionnaire, and a videotaped teacher focus group. We investigated middle school teachers' predictions, interpretations, and recommended actions for formative assessment in genetics. Results documented a variety of ways that teachers would elicit students' ideas in genetics, focusing on discussion strategies. Findings showed how well teachers predicted student conceptions compared to actual student conceptions. We also found that teachers mostly described general topics they would use to address students' alternative conceptions. Less often, they explained specific content they would use to challenge ideas or pedagogical strategies for conceptual change. Teachers also discussed barriers to addressing ideas. Teacher professional development should provide more support in helping teachers close the formative assessment cycle by addressing conceptions that are elicited with assessments.

Gottheiner, Daniel M.; Siegel, Marcelle A.