WorldWideScience
1

Solar Heating System with Building-Integrated Heat Storage.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Traditional solar heating systems cover between 5 and 10% of the heat demand fordomestic hot water and comfort heating. By applying storage capacity this share can beincreased much. The Danish producer of solar heating systems, Aidt-Miljø, markets such a system including storage of dry sand heated by PP-pipe heat exchanger. Heat demand is reduced due to direct solar heating, and due to storage. Heat demand is reduced due to direct solar heating, due to storage and due to lower heat losses through the ground. In theory, by running the system flow backwards through the sand storage, active heating can be achieved.The objective of the report is to present results from measured system evaluation andcalculations and to give guidelines for the design of such solar heating systems with building integrated sand storage. The report is aimed to non-technicians. In another report R-006 the main results from the investigation on the measured system is presented.

Heller, Alfred

1996-01-01

2

Building a mass storage system for physics applications  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The IEEE Mass Storage Reference Model and forthcoming standards based on it provide a standardized architecture to facilitate designing and building mass storage systems, and standard interfaces so that hardware and software from different vendors can interoperate in providing mass storage capabilities. A key concept of this architecture is the separation of control and data flows. This separation allows a smaller machine to provide control functions, while the data can flow directly between high-performance channels. Another key concept is the layering of the file system and the storage functions. This layering allows the designers of the mass storage system to focus on storage functions, which can support a variety of file systems, such as the Network File System, the Andrew File System, and others. The mass storage system provides location-independent file naming, essential if files are to be migrated to different storage devices without requiring changes in application programs. Physics data analysis applications are particularly challenging for mass storage systems because they stream vast amounts of data through analysis applications. Special mechanisms are required, to handle the high data rates and to avoid upsetting the caching mechanisms commonly used for smaller, repetitive-use files. High data rates are facilitated by direct channel connections, where, for example, a dual-ported drive will be positioned by the mass storage controller on one channel, then the data will flow on a second channel directly into the user machine, or directly to a high capacity network, greatly reducing the I/O capacity required in the mass storage control computer. Intelligent storage allocation can be used to bypass the cache devices entirely when large files are being moved

3

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research project performed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site

4

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research projectperformed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-04-07

5

Optimal control of building storage systems using both ice storage and thermal mass – Part I: Simulation environment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? A simulation environment is described to account for both passive and active thermal energy storage (TES) systems. ? Laboratory testing results have been used to validate the predictions from the simulation environment. ? Optimal control strategies for TES systems have been developed as part of the simulation environment. - Abstract: This paper presents a simulation environment that can evaluate the benefits of using simultaneously building thermal capacitance and ice storage system to reduce total operating costs including energy and demand charges while maintaining adequate occupant comfort conditions within commercial buildings. The building thermal storage is controlled through pre-cooling strategies by setting space indoor air temperatures. The ice storage system is controlled by charging the ice tank and operating the chiller during low electrical charge periods and melting the ice during on-peak periods. Optimal controls for both building thermal storage and ice storage are developed to minimize energy charges, demand charges, or combined energy and demand charges. The results obtained from the simulation environment are validated using laboratory testing for an optimal controller.

6

Energy system investment model incorporating heat pumps with thermal storage in buildings and buffer tanks  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Individual compression heat pumps constitute a potentially valuable resource in supporting wind power integration due to their economic competitiveness and possibilities for flexible operation. When analysing the system benefits of flexible heat pump operation, effects on investments should be taken into account. In this study, we present a model that facilitates analysing individual heat pumps and complementing heat storages in integration with the energy system, while optimising both investments and operation. The model incorporates thermal building dynamics and covers various heat storage options: passive heat storage in the building structure via radiator heating, active heat storage in concrete floors via floor heating, and use of thermal storage tanks for space heating and hot water. It is shown that the model is well qualified for analysing possibilities and system benefits of operating heat pumps flexibly. This includes prioritising heat pump operation for hours with low marginal electricity production costs, and peak load shaving resulting in a reduced need for peak and reserve capacity investments. - Highlights: • Model optimising heat pumps and heat storages in integration with the energy system. • Optimisation of both energy system investments and operation. • Heat storage in building structure and thermal storage tanks included. • Model well qualified for analysing system benefits of flexible heat pump operation. • Covers peak load shaving and operation prioritised for low electricity prices

7

Optimal controls of building storage systems using both ice storage and thermal mass – Part II: Parametric analysis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? A detailed analysis is presented to assess the performance of thermal energy storage (TES) systems. ? Utility rates have been found to be significant in assessing the operation of TES systems. ? Optimal control strategies for TES systems can save up to 40% of total energy cost of office buildings. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of a series of parametric analysis to investigate the factors that affect the effectiveness of using simultaneously building thermal capacitance and ice storage system to reduce total operating costs (including energy and demand costs) while maintaining adequate occupant comfort conditions in buildings. The analysis is based on a validated model-based simulation environment and includes several parameters including the optimization cost function, base chiller size, and ice storage tank capacity, and weather conditions. It found that the combined use of building thermal mass and active thermal energy storage system can save up to 40% of the total energy costs when integrated optimal control are considered to operate commercial buildings.

8

Energy system investment model incorporating heat pumps with thermal storage in buildings and buffer tanks  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Individual compression heat pumps constitute a potentially valuable resource in supporting wind power integration due to their economic competitiveness and possibilities for flexible operation. When analysing the system benefits of flexible heat pump operation, effects on investments should be taken into account. In this study, we present a model that facilitates analysing individual heat pumps and complementing heat storages in integration with the energy system, while optimising both investments and operation. The model incorporates thermal building dynamics and covers various heat storage options: passive heat storage in the building structure via radiator heating, active heat storage in concrete floors via floor heating, and use of thermal storage tanks for space heating and hot water. It is shown that the model is well qualified for analysing possibilities and system benefits of operating heat pumps flexibly. This includes prioritising heat pump operation for hours with low marginal electricity production costs, and peak load shaving resulting in a reduced need for peak and reserve capacity investments.

Hedegaard, Karsten; Balyk, Olexandr

2013-01-01

9

Heat of fusion storage systems for combined solar systems in low energy buildings  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Solar heating systems for combined domestic hot water and space heating has a large potential especially in low energy houses where it is possible to take full advantage of low temperature heating systems. If a building integrated heating system is used – e.g. floor heating - the supply temperature (and the the return temperature) would only be a few degrees above room temperature due to the very low heating demand and the large heat transfer surface area. One of the objectives in a newly started IEA Task 32 project is to investigate and develop improved thermal storages for combined solar systems through further improvement of water based storages and in parallel to investigate the potential of using storage designs with phase change materials, PCM. The advantage of phase change materials is that large amounts of energy can be stored without temperature increase when the material is going from solid to liquid form (Fig. 1). Keeping the temperature as low as possible is an efficient way to reduce the heat loss from the storage. Furthermore, the PCM storage might be smaller than the equivalent water storage as more energy can be stored per volume. If the PCM further has the possibility of a stable super cooling, i.e. the material is able to cool down below its freezing point (Tfusion) and still be liquid, the possibility exist for a storage with a very low heat loss. When energy is needed from the storage the solidification is activated and the temperature rises almost instantly to the melting point. The work within the IEA Task 32 project focuses on the phase change material Sodium Acetate with xanthan rubber. This material melts at 58 °C, which means that low temperature heating systems could make full use of such a storage system. Energy to a large extent can be withdrawn even when the storage is in its super cooled phase without activation of the phase change. This paper presents an initial simulation model of a PCM storage for implementation in TRNSYS 15 [1] as well as the first test results achieved with the model.

Schultz, JØrgen Munthe; Furbo, Simon

2004-01-01

10

Performance evaluation of solar-assisted air-conditioning system with chilled water storage (CIESOL building)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? We present a new solar-assisted air-conditioning system’s operation sequence. ? This mode considers the chilled water tanks action with variable-speed pump. ? It permits to save about 20% and 30% of energy and water consumption, respectively. ? It allows storing the excess cooling capacity of the absorption chiller. ? It prevents the sudden start/stop (on/off cycles) of the absorption chiller. - Abstract: This study presents the performance of solar-assisted air-conditioning system with two chilled water storage tanks installed in the Solar Energy Research Center building. The system consists mainly of solar collectors’ array, a hot-water driven absorption chiller, a cooling tower, two hot storage tanks, an auxiliary heater as well as two chilled storage tanks. The chilled water storage tank circuit was further investigated in order to find the optimum solar system’s operation sequence while providing the best energy performance. Firstly, we carried out a study about the dynamics of building’s cooling load and the necessity of the integration of chilled water storage tanks to solar system. Subsequently, the new system’s operation mode was proposed to reduce the energy consumption. The results demonstrate that we can save about 20% of the total energy consumption and about 30% of water consumption applying the new operation sequence, which takes into account the chilled water tanks action. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the integrarated that the integration of chilled water storage tanks allows to reduce the sudden absorption chiller on/off cycles, thereby improving the efficiency of the solar-assisted system.

11

Energy efficient hybrid nanocomposite-based cool thermal storage air conditioning system for sustainable buildings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The quest towards energy conservative building design is increasingly popular in recent years, which has triggered greater interests in developing energy efficient systems for space cooling in buildings. In this work, energy efficient silver–titania HiTES (hybrid nanocomposites-based cool thermal energy storage) system combined with building A/C (air conditioning) system was experimentally investigated for summer and winter design conditions. HiNPCM (hybrid nanocomposite particles embedded PCM) used as the heat storage material has exhibited 7.3–58.4% of improved thermal conductivity than at its purest state. The complete freezing time for HiNPCM was reduced by 15% which was attributed to its improved thermophysical characteristics. Experimental results suggest that the effective energy redistribution capability of HiTES system has contributed for reduction in the chiller nominal cooling capacity by 46.3% and 39.6% respectively, under part load and on-peak load operating conditions. The HiTES A/C system achieved 27.3% and 32.5% of on-peak energy savings potential in summer and winter respectively compared to the conventional A/C system. For the same operating conditions, this system yield 8.3%, 12.2% and 7.2% and 10.2% of per day average and yearly energy conservation respectively. This system can be applied for year-round space conditioning application without sacrificing energy efficiency in buildings. - Highlights: • Energy storage is acquired by HiTES (hybrid nanocomposites-thermal storage) system. • Thermal conductivity of HiNPCM (hybrid nanocomposites-PCM) was improved by 58.4%. • Freezing time of HiNPCM was reduced by 15% that enabled improved energy efficiency. • Chiller nominal capacity was reduced by 46.3% and 39.6% in on-peak and part load respectively. • HiTES A/C system achieved appreciable energy savings in the range of 8.3–12.2%

12

System Configuration Management Implementation Procedure for the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document provides configuration management for the Distributed Control System (DCS), the Gaseous Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS-100) System, the Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), the Canister Receiving Crane (CRC) CRN-001 PLC, and both North and South vestibule door interlock system PLCs at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This procedure identifies and defines software configuration items in the CSB control and monitoring systems, and defines configuration control throughout the system life cycle. Components of this control include: configuration status accounting; physical protection and control; and verification of the completeness and correctness of these items.

GARRISON, R.C.

2000-11-28

13

Modeling and optimization of energy generation and storage systems for thermal conditioning of buildings targeting conceptual building design  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The thermal conditioning systems are responsible for almost half of the energy consump-tion by commercial buildings. In many European countries and in the USA, buildings account for around 40% of primary energy consumption and it is therefore vital to explore further ways to reduce the HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system energy consumption. This thesis investigates the relationship between the energy genera-tion and storage systems for thermal conditioning of buildings (shorter: primary HVAC systems) and the conceptual building design. Certain building design decisions irreversibly influence a building's energy performance and, conversely, many generation and storage components impose restrictions on building design and, by their nature, cannot be introduced at a later design stage. The objective is, firstly, to develop a method to quantify this influence, in terms of primary HVAC system dimensions, its cost, emissions and energy consumption and, secondly, to enable the use of the developed method by architects during the conceptual design. In order to account for the non-stationary effects of the intermittent renewable energy sources (RES), thermal storage and for the component part load efficiencies, a time domain system simulation is required. An abstract system simulation method is proposed based on seven pre-configured primary HVAC system models, including components such as boil-ers, chillers and cooling towers, thermal storage, solar thermal collectors, and photovoltaic modules. A control strategy is developed for each of the models and their annual quasi-stationary simulation is performed. The performance profiles obtained are then used to calculate the energy consumption, carbon emissions and costs. The annuity method has been employed to calculate the cost. Optimization is used to automatically size the HVAC systems, based on their simulation performance. Its purpose is to identify the system component dimensions that provide minimal costs, emissions or consumption, while maintaining the quality of the supply and, where specified, achieving the targeted annual solar ratio. Two optimization algorithms, the global bounded Nelder Mead and the Exhaustive search are implemented. Simulation and optimization performance has been evaluated using building and weather data for four cities situated in four different climates. Finally a tool, entitled PROBA, has been proposed by adding a user interface to the mod-els. The major characteristic of the interface is its suitability for non-expert users. This is achieved by, firstly, reducing amount of input data by implementing preset values and, secondly, providing information support. Making this tool available to the architects repre-sents an effective way to consider the primary HVAC during the preliminary design, with-out causing additional cost. Although such a tool can never replace an HVAC engineer, its use can heighten the awareness of architects regarding the significance of building energy consumption and inspire further education in this field.

Grahovac, Milica

2012-11-29

14

Thermoeconomic analysis of a building energy system integrated with energy storage options  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: • Combined sensible, latent and thermochemical thermal energy storage systems. • Thermoeconomic analysis of TES system. • Dead state temperature effects on thermoeconomics. - Abstract: This study deals with exergetic and thermoeconomic analyses of thermal energy storage (TES) systems, such as latent, sensible and thermochemical options coupled with different units for building heating applications under varying reference (dead-state) temperatures of 8 °C, 9 °C and 10 °C, respectively. It is found that the variation reference temperature affects the thermoeconomic parameters. The exergetic cost of the system becomes higher at the higher reference conditions, as directly proportional to the varying dead state conditions. It also becomes minimum at 8 °C reference temperature as 196.96 $/h while it is maximum at 10 °C dead-state temperature with 357.60 $/h. Furthermore, the maximum capital cost of the equipment is determined for the thermochemical TES as 4.612 $/h. So, the better optimization of this equipment may be considered

15

Thermodynamic analyses and assessments of various thermal energy storage systems for buildings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? Proposing a novel latent (PCM), thermochemical and sensible (aquifer) TES combination for building heating. ? Performing comprehensive environmental, energy, exergy and sustainability analyses. ? Investigating the effect of varying dead state temperatures on the TESs. - Abstract: In this study, energetic, exergetic, environmental and sustainability analyses and their assessments are carried out for latent, thermochemical and sensible thermal energy storage (TES) systems for phase change material (PCM) supported building applications under varying environment (surrounding) temperatures. The present system consists of a floor heating system, System-I, System-II and System-III. The floor heating system stays at the building floor supported with a floor heating unit and pump. The System-I includes a latent TES system and a fan. The latent TES system is comprised of a PCM supported building envelope, in which from outside to inside; glass, transparent insulation material, PCM, air channel and insulation material are placed, respectively. Furthermore, System-II mainly has a solar-thermochemical TES while there are an aquifer TES and a heat pump in System-III. Among the TESs, the hot and cold wells of the aquifer TES have maximum exergetic efficiency values of 88.782% and 69.607% at 8 °C dead state temperature, respectively. According to the energy efficiency aspects of TESs, the discharging processes of the latent TES and the hot well of the aquifer TESand the hot well of the aquifer TES possess the minimum and maximum values of 5.782% and 94.118% at 8 °C dead state temperature, respectively. Also, the fan used with the latent TES is the most environmentally-benign system component among the devices. Furthermore, the most sustainable TES is found for the aquifer TES while the worst sustainable system is the latent TES.

16

Airborne Effluent Monitoring System Certification for New Canister Storage Building Ventilation Exhaust Stack  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted three of the six tests needed to verify that the effluent monitoring system for the new Canister Storage Building ventilation exhaust stack meets applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the location for the air-sampling probe and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering the location for the air-sampling probe ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample-transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in this report. The tests reported here cover the contaminant tracer uniformity and particle delivery performance criteria. These criteria were successfully met. The other three tests were conducted by the start-up staff of Duke Engineering and Services Hanford Inc. (DESH) and reported elsewhere. The Canister Storage Building is located in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The new air-exhaust system was built under the W379 Project. The air sampling system features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and a filter holder to collect the sample.

Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

1999-04-01

17

System Configuration Management Implementation Procedure for the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document implements the procedure for providing configuration control for the monitoring and control systems associated with the operation of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). It identifies and defines the configuration items in the monitoring and control systems, provides configuration control of these items throughout the system life cycle, provides configuration status accounting, physical protection and control, and verifies the completeness and correctness of the items. It is written to comply with HNF-SD-SNF-CM-001, Spent Nuclear Fuel Configuration Management Plan (Forehand 1998), HNF-PRO-309, Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements, HNF-PRO-2778, IRM Application Software System Life Cycle Standards, and applicable sections of administrative procedure AP-CM-6-037-00, SNF Project Process Automation Software and Equipment Configuration Management.

GARRISON, R.C.

2000-09-22

18

System Configuration Management Implementation Procedure for the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document implements the procedure for providing configuration control for the monitoring and control systems associated with the operation of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). It identifies and defines the configuration items in the monitoring and control systems, provides configuration control of these items throughout the system life cycle, provides configuration status accounting, physical protection and control, and verifies the completeness and correctness of the items. It is written to comply with HNF-SD-SNF-CM-001, Spent Nuclear Fuel Configuration Management Plan (Forehand 1998), HNF-PRO-309, Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements, HNF-PRO-2778, IRM Application Software System Life Cycle Standards, and applicable sections of administrative procedure AP-CM-6-037-00, SNF Project Process Automation Software and Equipment Configuration Management

19

Modeling and simulation to determine the potential energy savings by implementing cold thermal energy storage system in office buildings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: • Simulating the CTES system behavior based on Malaysian climate. • Almost 65% of power is used for cooling for cooling the office buildings, every day. • The baseline shows an acceptable match with real data from the fieldwork. • Overall, the energy used for full load storage is much than the conventional system. • The load levelling storage strategy has 3.7% lower energy demand. - Abstract: In Malaysia, air conditioning (AC) systems are considered as the major energy consumers in office buildings with almost 57% share. During the past decade, cold thermal energy storage (CTES) systems have been widely used for their significant economic benefits. However, there were always doubts about their energy saving possibilities. The main objective of the present work is to develop a computer model to determine the potential energy savings of implementing CTES systems in Malaysia. A case study building has been selected to determine the energy consumption pattern of an office building. In the first step the building baseline model was developed and validated with the recorded data from the fieldwork. Once the simulation results reach an acceptable accuracy, different CTES system configuration was added to the model to predict their energy consumption pattern. It was found that the overall energy used by the full load storage strategy is considerably more than the conventional system. However, by applying the load leveling storage strategy, and considering its benefits to reduce the air handling unit size and reducing the pumping power, the overall energy usage was almost 4% lower than the non-storage system. Although utilizing CTES systems cannot reduce the total energy consumption considerably, but it has several outstanding benefits such as cost saving, bringing balance in the grid system, reducing the overall fuel consumption in the power plants and consequently reducing to total carbon footprint

20

Advanced storage concepts for solar thermal systems in low energy buildings. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The aim of Task 32 is to develop new and advanced heat storage systems which are economic and technical suitable as long-term heat storage systems for solar heating plants with a high degree of coverage. The project is international and Denmark's participation has focused on Subtask A, C, and D. In Subtask A Denmark has contributed to a status report about heat storage systems. In Subtask C Denmark has focused on liquid thermal storage tanks based on NaCH{sub 3}COO?3H{sub 2}O with a melting point of 58 deg. C. Theoretical and experimental tests have been conducted in order to establish optimum conditions for storage design. In Subtask D theoretical and experimental tests of optimum designs for advanced water tanks for solar heating plants for combined space heating and domestic hot water have been conducted. (BA)

Furbo, S.; Andersen, Elsa; Schultz, Joergen M.

2006-04-07

21

Investigation on Solar Heating System with Building-Integrated Heat Storage.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Traditional solar heating systems cover between 5 and 10% of the heat demand fordomestic hot water and comfort heating. By applying storage capacity this share can beincreased much. The Danish producer of solar heating systems, Aidt-Miljø, markets such a system including storage of dry sand heated by PP-pipe heat exchanger. Heat demand is reduced due to direct solar heating and due to storage. The storage affects the heat demand passively due to higher temperatures. Hence heat loss is reduced and passive heating is optioned. In theory, by running the system flow backwards, active heating can be achieved.The objective of the report is to present results from measured system evaluation andcalculations in detail. In another report R-007 the main results and recommendations aresummed up for non-technicians. The results of the project are among others: The system is rather simple. Much work can be self-made to keep the price down. The system is working, but heat exchange from plastic piping to sand is rather poor. The dimensioning of the volume is rather difficult based on common knowledge. Passive heating, hence reduction of heat demand, due to the storage and especially due to the oversized solar collector area of the system, was achieved. Active heating from the sand storage was not observed. The pay-back time for the system can be estimated to be similar to solar heated domestic hot water systems in general. A number of minor improvements on the system could be pointed out.

Heller, Alfred

1996-01-01

22

Spent nuclear fuel storage building  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Outer earthquake proof walls of a building are formed in the running direction of a bridge travelling type crane. Inner earthquake proof walls are disposed in the direction perpendicular to the running direction of the crane. An area for constructing an air ventilation tower is formed in the running direction of the crane at the central portion of the building. The area surrounded by the area for constructing air ventilation tower and the earthquake proof inner walls is defined as a cask storage area. Such cask storage areas are disposed symmetrically on both sides of the air ventilation tower. The crane is disposed on the roof of the building, stands on rails which are laid on the outer walls of the building and runs over the air ventilation tower. Since the crane is disposed on the roof of the building, the inner earthquake proof walls of the building can be constructed in the inside of the building, and a high earthquake proofness can be provided to the building itself. (I.N.)

23

High performance concrete applied to storage system buildings at low temperatures  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english According to some estimates, world's population growth is expected about 50% over the next 50 years. Thus, one of the greatest challenges faced by Engineering is to find effective options to food storage and conservation. Some researchers have investigated how to design durable buildings for storing [...] and conserving food. Nowadays, developing concrete with mechanical resistance for room temperatures is a parameter that can be achieved easily. On the other hand, associating it to low temperature of approximately 35 °C negative requires less empiricism, being necessary a suitable dosage method and a careful selection of the material constituents. This ongoing study involves these parameters. The presented concrete was analyzed through non-destructive tests that examines the material properties periodically and verifies its physical integrity. Concrete with and without incorporated air were studied. The results demonstrated that both are resistant to freezing.

Sandra Maria de, Lima; Luiz Vicente, Vareda; Jefferson Benedicto Libardi, Liborio.

2008-06-01

24

Numerical study of thin layer ring on improving the ice formation of building thermal storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Ice thermal storage systems have been widely used in HVAC and R systems for improving energy efficiency and reducing energy costs around the world. In this paper, a numerical model is developed to simulate the ice formation in a typical ice thermal storage system. The first study is to investigate the effect of a cooled cylinder placed in a rectangular space filled with water on the ice formation process. The validated numerical model can predict temperature distribution associated with liquid fraction during the process. Based on the result obtained from the first study, further research is focused on the novel structure of thin layer ring. The computational solutions can demonstrate that the thin layer ring structure can successfully increase an ice generated area and shorten the ice formation period in a typical ice thermal storage system. Finally, a parametric study was carried out to investigate the effect of material, thickness, and arrangement of thin layer ring. It predicted that the heat transfer performance of the thin layer ring is dependent on its material, thickness, and arrangement. Ice formation with novel thin layer ring can be improved by increasing the thermal conductivity of a material. A copper ring has the best performance among aluminum, stainless steel, magnesium alloy. The results show that the ice formation rate can be increased by increasing the thickness of the ring from 0.25 mm to 1 mm, while slowed by increasing from 1 mm to 2 mm and has the best performance with 3 mm ring in this study. Finally, the staggered arrangement of ring shows the best results of the ice formation compared to one parallel and two parallel cases. - Highlights: •A thin layer ring structure is studied systematically to enhance ice formation. •Increasing thermal conductivity of thin layer ring can increase ice formation rate. •Ice formation rate is also dependent on the thickness of thin layer ring. •Increasing thin layer ring area can increase ice formation rate

25

Dynamic Heat Storage and Cooling Capacity of a Concrete Deck with PCM and Thermally Activated Building System  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper presents a heat storage and cooling concept that utilizes a phase change material (PCM) and a thermally activated building system (TABS) implemented in a hollow core concrete deck. Numerical calculations of the dynamic heat storage capacity of the hollow core concrete deck element with and without microencapsulated PCM are presented. The new concrete deck with microencapsulated PCM is the standard deck on which an additional layer of the PCM concrete was added and, at the same time, the latent heat storage was introduced to the construction. The challenge of numerically simulating the performance of the new deck with PCM concrete is the thermal properties of such a new material, as the PCM concrete is yet to be well defined. The results presented in the paper include models in which the PCM concrete material properties, such as thermal conductivity, and specific heat capacity were first calculated theoretically and subsequently the models were updated with the experimentally determined thermal properties of the PCM concrete. Then, the heat storage of the decks with theoretically and experimentally determined thermal properties were compared with each other. Finally, the results presented in the article highlight the potential of using TABS and PCM in a prefabricated concrete deck element.

Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per

2012-01-01

26

The Role of Energy Storage in Commercial Building  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Motivation and Background of Study This project was motivated by the need to understand the full value of energy storage (thermal and electric energy storage) in commercial buildings, the opportunity of benefits for building operations and the potential interactions between a building and a smart grid infrastructure. On-site or local energy storage systems are not new to the commercial building sector; they have been in place in US buildings for decades. Most building-scale storage technologies are based on thermal or electrochemical storage mechanisms. Energy storage technologies are not designed to conserve energy, and losses associated with energy conversion are inevitable. Instead, storage provides flexibility to manage load in a building or to balance load and generation in the power grid. From the building owner's perspective, storage enables load shifting to optimize energy costs while maintaining comfort. From a grid operations perspective, building storage at scale could provide additional flexibility to grid operators in managing the generation variability from intermittent renewable energy resources (wind and solar). To characterize the set of benefits, technical opportunities and challenges, and potential economic values of storage in a commercial building from both the building operation's and the grid operation's view-points is the key point of this project. The research effort was initiated in early 2010 involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify these opportunities from a commercial buildings perspective. This report summarizes the early discussions, literature reviews, stakeholder engagements, and initial results of analyses related to the overall role of energy storage in commercial buildings. Beyond the summary of roughly eight months of effort by the laboratories, the report attempts to substantiate the importance of active DOE/BTP R&D activities in this space.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bandyopadhyay, Gopal K.; Finley, C.; Koritarov, V. S.; Molburg, J. C.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Fuli; Brackney, L.; Florita, A. R.

2010-09-30

27

Thermal-energy storage for process-heat building applications  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An assessment is made of energy storage for agricultural and industrial process heat applications and for space heating and cooling and water heating for residential and commercial buildings. The purpose is to identify these storage technologies that have the greatest potential to enhance the commercialization of the most promising solar thermal technologies. In the agricultural and industrial process heat application, the three solar thermal systems investigated are parabolic troughs, parabolic dishes, and central receivers, and the storage systems are mixed-tank, thermocline, two-tank, and phase change. For buildings, phase-change storage in active solar heating and cooling systems were studied in detail for two cities.

Kriz, T.; Christensen, C.; Gaul, H.; Leach, J.; Rabl, A.; Sillman, S.; Swet, C.J.; Ullman, J.

1983-06-01

28

SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) PROJECT CANISTER STORAGE BUILDING (CSB) MULTI CANISTER OVERPACK (MCO) SAMPLING SYSTEM VALIDATION (OCRWM)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Approximately 400 Multi-canister overpacks (MCO) containing spent nuclear fuel are to be interim stored at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Several MCOs (monitored MCOs) are designated to be gas sampled periodically at the CSB sampling/weld station (Bader 2002a). The monitoring program includes pressure, temperature and gas composition measurements of monitored MCOs during their first two years of interim storage at the CSB. The MCO sample cart (CART-001) is used at the sampling/weld station to measure the monitored MCO gas temperature and pressure, obtain gas samples for laboratory analysis and refill the monitored MCO with high purity helium as needed. The sample cart and support equipment were functionally and operationally tested and validated before sampling of the first monitored MCO (H-036). This report documents the results of validation testing using training MCO (TR-003) at the CSB. Another report (Bader 2002b) documents the sample results from gas sampling of the first monitored MCO (H-036). Validation testing of the MCO gas sampling system showed the equipment and procedure as originally constituted will satisfactorily sample the first monitored MCO. Subsequent system and procedural improvements will provide increased flexibility and reliability for future MCO gas sampling. The physical operation of the sampling equipment during testing provided evidence that theoretical correlation factors for extrapolating MCO gas composition from sample results are unnecessarily conservative. Empirically derived correlation factors showed adequate conservatism and support use of the sample system for ongoing monitored MCO sampling.

BLACK, D.M.; KLEM, M.J.

2003-11-17

29

SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) PROJECT CANISTER STORAGE BUILDING (CSB) MULTI CANISTER OVERPACK (MCO) SAMPLING SYSTEM VALIDATION (OCRWM)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Approximately 400 Multi-canister overpacks (MCO) containing spent nuclear fuel are to be interim stored at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Several MCOs (monitored MCOs) are designated to be gas sampled periodically at the CSB sampling/weld station (Bader 2002a). The monitoring program includes pressure, temperature and gas composition measurements of monitored MCOs during their first two years of interim storage at the CSB. The MCO sample cart (CART-001) is used at the sampling/weld station to measure the monitored MCO gas temperature and pressure, obtain gas samples for laboratory analysis and refill the monitored MCO with high purity helium as needed. The sample cart and support equipment were functionally and operationally tested and validated before sampling of the first monitored MCO (H-036). This report documents the results of validation testing using training MCO (TR-003) at the CSB. Another report (Bader 2002b) documents the sample results from gas sampling of the first monitored MCO (H-036). Validation testing of the MCO gas sampling system showed the equipment and procedure as originally constituted will satisfactorily sample the first monitored MCO. Subsequent system and procedural improvements will provide increased flexibility and reliability for future MCO gas sampling. The physical operation of the sampling equipment during testing provided evidence that theoretical correlation factors for extrapolating MCO gas composition from sample results are O gas composition from sample results are unnecessarily conservative. Empirically derived correlation factors showed adequate conservatism and support use of the sample system for ongoing monitored MCO sampling

30

Effect of thermal energy storage in energy consumption required for air conditioning system in office building under the African Mediterranean climate  

OpenAIRE

In the African Mediterranean countries, cooling demand constitutes a large proportion of total electrical demand for office buildings during peak hours. The thermal energy storage systems can be an alternative method to be utilized to reduce and time shift the electrical load of air conditioning from on-peak to off-peak hours. In this study, the Hourly Analysis Program has been used to estimate the cooling load profile for an office building based in Tripol...

Abdulgalil Mohamed M.; Kosi Franc F.; Musbah Mohamed H.; Komatina Mirko S.

2014-01-01

31

Canister storage building natural phenomena design loads  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document presents natural phenomena hazard (NPH) loads for use in the design and construction of the Canister Storage Building (CSB), which will be located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site

32

Effect of thermal energy storage in energy consumption required for air conditioning system in office building under the African Mediterranean climate  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the African Mediterranean countries, cooling demand constitutes a large proportion of total electrical demand for office buildings during peak hours. The thermal energy storage systems can be an alternative method to be utilized to reduce and time shift the electrical load of air conditioning from on-peak to off-peak hours. In this study, the Hourly Analysis Program has been used to estimate the cooling load profile for an office building based in Tripoli weather data conditions. Preliminary study was performed in order to define the most suitable operating strategies of ice thermal storage, including partial (load leveling and demand limiting, full storage and conventional A/C system. Then, the mathematical model of heat transfer for external ice storage would be based on the operating strategy which achieves the lowest energy consumption. Results indicate that the largest rate of energy consumption occurs when the conventional system is applied to the building, while the lowest rate of energy consumption is obtained when the partial storage (demand limiting 60% is applied. Analysis of results shows that the new layer of ice formed on the surface of the existing ice lead to an increase of thermal resistance of heat transfer, which in return decreased cooling capacity.

Abdulgalil Mohamed M.

2014-01-01

33

Mass storage management system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The author describes the application that the author developed during the time the author worked for Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, which creates an integrated storage environment. The application is built as a layer on top of the current storage manager (OSM), hiding details from the end user and manages access to all storage elements. A simple set of commands allows users to manipulate and move data between all storage elements of the system as well as to storage devices on remote machines

34

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis Report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis to support the final CSB Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis process identified hazardous conditions and material-at-risk, determined causes for potential accidents, identified preventive and mitigative features, and qualitatively estimated the frequencies and consequences of specific occurrences. The hazard analysis was performed by a team of cognizant CSB operations and design personnel, safety analysts familiar with the CSB, and technical experts in specialty areas. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process. Attachment A provides two lists of hazard analysis team members and describes the background and experience of each. The first list is a complete list of the hazard analysis team members that have been involved over the two-year long process. The second list is a subset of the first list and consists of those hazard analysis team members that reviewed and agreed to the final hazard analysis documentation. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process involving formal facilitated group sessions and independent hazard and accident analysis work. The hazard analysis process led to the selection of candidate accidents for further quantitative analysis. New information relative to the hazards, discovered during the accident analysis, was incorporated into the hazard analysis data in order to compile a complete profile of facility hazards. Through this process, the results of the hazard and accident analyses led directly to the identification of safety structures, systems, and components, technical safety requirements, and other controls required to protect the public, workers, and environment.

POWERS, T.B.

2000-03-16

35

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis Report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis to support the final CSB Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis process identified hazardous conditions and material-at-risk, determined causes for potential accidents, identified preventive and mitigative features, and qualitatively estimated the frequencies and consequences of specific occurrences. The hazard analysis was performed by a team of cognizant CSB operations and design personnel, safety analysts familiar with the CSB, and technical experts in specialty areas. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process. Attachment A provides two lists of hazard analysis team members and describes the background and experience of each. The first list is a complete list of the hazard analysis team members that have been involved over the two-year long process. The second list is a subset of the first list and consists of those hazard analysis team members that reviewed and agreed to the final hazard analysis documentation. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process involving formal facilitated group sessions and independent hazard and accident analysis work. The hazard analysis process led to the selection of candidate accidents for further quantitative analysis. New information relative to the hazards, discovered during the accident analysis, was incorporated into the hazard analysis data in order to compile a complete profile of facility hazards. Through this process, the results of the hazard and accident analyses led directly to the identification of safety structures, systems, and components, technical safety requirements, and other controls required to protect the public, workers, and environment

36

Dry storage developments in France build on CASCAD experience  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The CASCAD dry store, located at CEA's research centre at Cadarache, stores spent fuel from the EL4 heavy water reactor and the Osiris research reactor. The design was based on the following criteria: Storage period. Interim storage is provided for 50 years. Containment. The fuel is contained by a multiple barrier system consisting of: the fuel canister (primary barrier); the sealed stainless steel storage well; and the storage building which includes a ventilation system to provide dynamic containment during handling operations. The fuel is loaded into canisters at the reactor site to avoid contamination in the storage building. The integrity of the primary barrier is periodically monitored by sampling of air from the storage well. Cooling. The storage wells are cooled by a natural convection system that maintains the temperature of the fuel below its stated limit and the temperature of the concrete below 80oC. Criticality. Criticality incidents are prevented by static design measures such as maintaining a minimum pitch between storage wells and providing sufficient storage well diameter. Radiation protection. Radiation shielding limits the maximum equivalent dose rate for operating personnel to less than 25?Sv/h at the handling cell floor and the wall adjoining the control room, and to less than 7.5?Sv/h at the outside walls of the storage building. Cannister design. The canister must resist corrosion caused by condensation as well as pressure due to randensation as well as pressure due to radiolytic gases. The canister must also withstand a drop of up to 10m without losing its integrity. The design has now been adapted to accommodate light reactor fuels and is known as CASCAD+. (Author)

37

Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

38

Fuel storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Storage technologies are characterized for solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels. Emphasis is placed on storage methods applicable to Integrated Community Energy Systems based on coal. Items discussed here include standard practice, materials and energy losses, environmental effects, operating requirements, maintenance and reliability, and cost considerations. All storage systems were found to be well-developed and to represent mature technologies; an exception may exist for low-Btu gas storage, which could have materials incompatability.

Donakowski, T.D.; Tison, R.R.

1979-08-01

39

Canister storage building trade study. Final report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study was performed to evaluate the impact of several technical issues related to the usage of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) to safely stage and store N-Reactor spent fuel currently located at K-Basin 100KW and 100KE. Each technical issue formed the basis for an individual trade study used to develop the ROM cost and schedule estimates. The study used concept 2D from the Fluor prepared ''Staging and Storage Facility (SSF) Feasibility Report'' as the basis for development of the individual trade studies

40

2401-W Waste storage building closure plan  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This plan describes the performance standards met and closure activities conducted to achieve clean closure of the 2401-W Waste Storage Building (2401-W) (Figure I). In August 1998, after the last waste container was removed from 2401-W, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) notified Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in writing that the 2401-W would no longer receive waste and would be closed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit (98-EAP-475). Pursuant to this notification, closure activities were conducted, as described in this plan, in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and completed on February 9, 1999. Ecology witnessed the closure activities. Consistent with clean closure, no postclosure activities will be necessary. Because 2401-W is a portion of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), these closure activities become the basis for removing this building from the CWC TSD unit boundary. The 2401-W is a pre-engineered steel building with a sealed concrete floor and a 15.2-centimeter concrete curb around the perimeter of the floor. This building operated from April 1988 until August 1998 storing non-liquid containerized mixed waste. All waste storage occurred indoors. No potential existed for 2401-W operations to have impacted soil. A review of operating records and interviews with cognizant operations personnel indicated that no waste spills occurred in this building (Appendix A). After all waste containers were removed, a radiation survey of the 2401-W floor for radiological release of the building was performed December 17, 1998, which identified no radiological contamination (Appendix B).

LUKE, S.M.

1999-07-15

41

Efficient storage management for distributed storage system  

Science.gov (United States)

As storage systems grow larger and more complex, the traditional block-based file systems cannot satisfy the large workload. More recent distributed file systems have adopted architectures based on object-based storage. This paper presents a framework of efficient storage management for distributed storage system. In object storage side, low-level storage tasks and data distribution must be managed and in metadata server side, we will manage how to scale the metadata. Due to the high space efficiency and fast query response, bloom filters have been widely utilized in recent storage systems. So, we will also utilize bloom-filter based approach to manage metadata by taking the advantages of bloom-filter and the semantic-based scheme will also be used to narrow the managed workload. In this paper, we will neglect the data distribution of object-based storage side.

Phyu, Myat Pwint; Thein, Ni Lar

2011-12-01

42

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

43

Second aquifer storage under discussion. The power supply system of the German Bundestag building in Berlin; Zweiter Aquifer-Speicher im Gespraech. Zur Energieversorgung der Gebaeude des Deutschen Bundestages in Berlin  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The contribution outlines the current status of the building construction projects for the German Bundestag in Berlin. The following subjects are discussed: Energetic quality of the building, energy supply concept, integrated energy supply system, electric CHP systems, cogeneration (vegetable oil), aquifer storage (heat storage, cold storage), solar energy (photovoltaic energy conversion, thermal solar energy use), economic and ecological aspects. (HW) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Beitrag gibt einen Ueberblick ueber den aktuellen Stand des Bauvorhabens des Deutschen Bundestages in Berlin. In diesem Zusammenhang wird auf folgende Themen eingegangen: Energetische Gebaeudequalitaet, Energieversorgungskonzept, Energieverbund, stromgefuehrte BHKWs, Kraft-Waerme-Kopplung (Pflanzenoel), Aquiferspeicher (Waermespeicher, Kaeltespeicher), Sonnenergienutzung (Photovoltaik, thermische Solarenergienutzung), Wirtschaftlichkeit und Oekologie. (HW)

Luetzke, B. [Bundesbaugesellschaft Berlin mbH (Germany). Abt. fuer Energieversorgunug und Haustechnik

1996-12-01

44

Alternative design concept for the second Glass Waste Storage Building  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document presents an alternative design concept for storing canisters filled with vitrified waste produced at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The existing Glass Waste Storage Building (GWSB1) has the capacity to store 2,262 canisters and is projected to be completely filled by the year 2000. Current plans for glass waste storage are based on constructing a second Glass Waste Storage Building (GWSB2) once the existing Glass Waste Storage Building (GWSB1) is filled to capacity. The GWSB2 project (Project S-2045) is to provide additional storage capacity for 2,262 canisters. This project was initiated with the issue of a basic data report on March 6, 1989. In response to the basic data report Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) prepared a draft conceptual design report (CDR) for the GWSB2 project in April 1991. In May 1991 WSRC Systems Engineering issued a revised Functional Design Criteria (FDC), the Rev. I document has not yet been approved by DOE. This document proposes an alternative design for the conceptual design (CDR) completed in April 1991. In June 1992 Project Management Department authorized Systems Engineering to further develop the proposed alternative design. The proposed facility will have a storage capacity for 2,268 canisters and will meet DWPF interim storage requirements for a five-year period. This document contains: a description of the proposed facility; a cost estimate of the proposed design; a cost comparison between the proposed facility and the design outlined in the FDC/CDR; and an overall assessment of the alternative design as compared with the reference FDC/CDR design

45

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', and meets the intent of HNF-PRO-704, ''Hazard and Accident Analysis Process''. This hazard analysis implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports''.

POWERS, T.B.

1999-05-11

46

Assessment of energy storage technologies and systems. Phase I. Electric storage heating, storage air conditioning, and storage hot water heaters  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The study analyzes the commercial feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) in buildings; TES applications examined include storage electric (resistance) heating, storage air conditioning, and storage hot water heating. A system model, SIMSTOR, is employed to simulate TES-related effects upon daily and annual utility load profiles and to compare utility fuel and capital cost savings with TES-system costs. Case-study analyses of TES applications for a representative set of utility service areas indicate that several already- and near-commercial TES systems are cost-effective. Alternative strategies to commercialize these systems are examined and the preferred strategies are identified.

Asbury, J.; Giese, R.; Nelson, S.; Akridge, L.; Graf, P.; Heitner, K.

1976-08-01

47

The Effects of Different Storage Buildings on Wheat Quality  

OpenAIRE

The aim of storage is to preserve properties of products and their freshness. If suitable storage conditions are not supplied consistency product variety, quality and quantity losses increase. Decreasing this losses is possible with providing suitable storage condition and storage management. In this study, wheat storage buildings in the Thrace region were examined. Influences of storage condition on product losses were investigated. The study was conducted in one of the Soil Products Offices...

Soner Ergin, A.; Can Burak Sisman

2011-01-01

48

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01

49

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01

50

Building a Parallel Cloud Storage System using OpenStack’s Swift Object Store and Transformative Parallel I/O  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Our project consists of bleeding-edge research into replacing the traditional storage archives with a parallel, cloud-based storage solution. It used OpenStack's Swift Object Store cloud software. It's Benchmarked Swift for write speed and scalability. Our project is unique because Swift is typically used for reads and we are mostly concerned with write speeds. Cloud Storage is a viable archive solution because: (1) Container management for larger parallel archives might ease the migration workload; (2) Many tools that are written for cloud storage could be utilized for local archive; and (3) Current large cloud storage practices in industry could be utilized to manage a scalable archive solution.

Burns, Andrew J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lora, Kaleb D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shorter, Martel L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30

51

Energy performance standards for new buildings: impact on the use of customer storage  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This technical memo reviews the proposed Energy Performance Standards for new buildings and assesses their impact upon the commercial feasibility of off-peak energy storage in building heating and cooling applications. The technical data and assumptions uderlying the standards are examined with regard to their accuracy and relevance to off-peak energy storage. An estimate of the economic and scarce-fuel savings forgone under the Standards is also presented. It is recommended that temporary exceptions or exemptions for buildings with off-peak energy storage systems be granted until the Standards are modified to account for the economic and scarce-fuel benefits of off-peak energy storage.

Asbury, J.; Giese, R.; Mueller, R.; Rabl, V.

1980-02-25

52

Matching analysis for on-site building energy systems involving energy conversion, storage and hybrid grid connections  

OpenAIRE

Under the background that all new buildings in EU should be nearly zero-energy buildings (nZEB) from the year of 2021, the energy and building industries are progressing towards the direction of decreased local building energy demand and enhanced on-site renewable energy production. This, on one hand, leads to the continuously decreased annual primary energy consumption/equivalent CO2 emission, whereas on the other hand it brings in the matching problem between the on-site generation and loca...

Cao, Sunliang

2014-01-01

53

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In 1998, a major change in the technical strategy for managing Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO) while stored within the Canister Storage Building (CSB) occurred. The technical strategy is documented in Baseline Change Request (BCR) No. SNF-98-006, Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing) (FDH 1998). This BCR deleted the hot conditioning process initially adopted for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) as documented in WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (WHC 199.5). In summary, MCOs containing Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from K Basins would be placed in interim storage following processing through the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility. With this change, the needs for the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) and inerting/pressure retaining capabilities of the CSB storage tubes and the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) were eliminated. Mechanical seals will be used on the MCOs prior to transport to the CSB. Covers will be welded on the MCOs for the final seal at the CSB. Approval of BCR No. SNF-98-006, imposed the need to review and update the CSB functions and requirements baseline documented herein including changing the document title to ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements.'' This revision aligns the functions and requirements baseline with the CSB Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing). This document represents the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Subproject technical baseline. It establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the CSB Subproject. The document is organized in eight sections. Sections 1.0 Introduction and 2.0 Overview provide brief introductions to the document and the CSB Subproject. Sections 3.0 Functions, 4.0 Requirements, 5.0 Architecture, and 6.0 Interfaces provide the data described by their titles. Section 7.0 Glossary lists the acronyms and defines the terms used in this document. Section 8.0 References lists the references used for this document

54

Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

KOPELIC, S.D.

1999-02-25

55

Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

56

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

57

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

58

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-03-23

59

Energy storage connection system  

Science.gov (United States)

A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

2012-07-03

60

ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this paper you will find an overview of systems and energy storage techniques and a comparison of the important characteristics of them. Delocalized electricity production and the introduction of variable, fluctuating sources (renewable energy: solar, wind turbines, etc. increase the difficulty of stabilizing the power network, mainly due to a supply-demand imbalance. It is therefore convenient to generate the energy, transmit it, convert it, and then store it if need be. More than ever then, the storage of electrical energy has become a necessity.

ELENA RADUCAN

2011-02-01

61

Energy conservation in honey storage building using Trombe wall  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper investigates energy conservation, mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions and economics of retrofitting for a honey storage building with Trombe wall for winter heating application. The passive heating potential of Trombe wall for a honey storage building was estimated using TRNSYS building simulation software. This honey storage building is located at Gwalior (latitude: 26 14'N) in India. During winter months, the room air temperature of building falls below the required temperature range of 18-27 C which is suitable for honey storage. So, the room air temperature range is maintained in the building using a 2.3 kW capacity electrical oil filled radiator (or room air heater) which accounts for the major energy consumption of the building on an annual basis. On account of which there are significant CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere from the honey storage building. Hence, this case study was conducted to recommend the passive heating concept to the stakeholders of the building so as to conserve the energy requirement for room air heating. The investigation showed that the room air temperature can be easily maintained in the range suitable for honey storage using a vented Trombe wall. The experimental work was carried out for the existing building on a typical clear day of harsh winter month of January to validate the results of TRNSYS model of the present building. The statistical error analysis showed a good agreement between model and experimental results. This investigation concludes that there is potential of energy conservation up to 3312 kWh/year and associated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions ({proportional_to}33 tonne/year) using a Trombe wall. Also, the retrofitting of building is economically viable as the simple payback period is only about 7 months. (author)

Chel, Arvind [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Block-V, Hauzkhas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Energy Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Nayak, J.K. [Energy Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Kaushik, Geetanjali [Centre for Rural Development and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2008-07-01

62

ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS  

OpenAIRE

In this paper you will find an overview of systems and energy storage techniques and a comparison of the important characteristics of them. Delocalized electricity production and the introduction of variable, fluctuating sources (renewable energy: solar, wind turbines, etc.) increase the difficulty of stabilizing the power network, mainly due to a supply-demand imbalance. It is therefore convenient to generate the energy, transmit it, convert it, and then store it if need be. More than ever t...

ELENA RADUCAN; LUMINITA MORARU

2011-01-01

63

Energy Storage System  

Science.gov (United States)

SatCon Technology Corporation developed the drive train for use in the Chrysler Corporation's Patriot Mark II, which includes the Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) system. In Chrysler's experimental hybrid- electric car, the hybrid drive train uses an advanced turboalternator that generates electricity by burning a fuel; a powerful, compact electric motor; and a FES that eliminates the need for conventional batteries. The FES system incorporates technology SatCon developed in more than 30 projects with seven NASA centers, mostly for FES systems for spacecraft attitude control and momentum recovery. SatCon will continue to develop the technology with Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

1996-01-01

64

STANDALONE “GREEN” COMMUNITY-CENTER BUILDINGS: HYDROGEN GENERATION/STORAGE/DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR WHEN PRIMARY ENERGY STORAGE IS AT CAPACITY  

Science.gov (United States)

Overall, the implementation of a computer-controlled hydrogen generation system and subsequent conversion of small engine equipment for hydrogen use has been surprisingly straightforward from an engineering and technology standpoint. More testing is required to get a better gr...

65

PC-Cluster based Storage System Architecture for Cloud Storage  

OpenAIRE

Design and architecture of cloud storage system plays a vital role in cloud computing infrastructure in order to improve the storage capacity as well as cost effectiveness. Usually cloud storage system provides users to efficient storage space with elasticity feature. One of the challenges of cloud storage system is difficult to balance the providing huge elastic capacity of storage and investment of expensive cost for it. In order to solve this issue in the cloud storage in...

Yee, Tin Tin; Naing, Thinn Thu

2011-01-01

66

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

CROWE, R.D.

1999-09-09

67

Spent nuclear fuel canister storage building conceptual design report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Conceptual Design Report provides the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project, Canister Storage Building, and as amended by letter (correspondence number 9555700, M.E. Witherspoon to E.B. Sellers, ``Technical Baseline and Updated Cost Estimate for the Canister Storage Building``, dated October 24, 1995), includes the project cost baseline and Criteria to be used as the basis for starting detailed design in fiscal year 1995.

Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-01-01

68

Computer controlled target storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Hygroscopic or readily oxidizing targets need an appropriate and secure storage system. This is a description of a computer controlled target storage facility at ANL. The facility provides protection against vacuum failures and disruption of utilities

69

RCRA closure of the Building 3001 Storage Canal  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The 3001 Storage Canal is located under portions of Buildings 3001 and 3019 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and has a capacity of approximately 62,000 gallons of water. The term canal has historically been used to identify this structure, however, the canal is an in-ground reinforced concrete structure satisfying the regulatory definition of a tank. From 1943 through 1963, the canal in Building 3001 was designed to be an integral part of the system for handling irradiated fuel from the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor. Because one of the main initial purposes of the reactor was to produce plutonium for the chemical processing pilot plant in Building 3019, the canal was designed to be the connecting link between the reactor and the pilot plant. During the war years, natural uranium slugs were irradiated in the reactor and then pushed out of the graphite matrix into the system of diversion plates and chutes which directed the fuel into the deep pit of the canal. After shutdown of the reactor, the canal was no longer needed for its designed purpose. Since 1964, the canal has only been used to store radioisotopes and irradiated samples under a water pool for radiation protection. This report describes closure alternatives

70

Passive hygrothermal control of a museum storage building  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

For optimal conservation of the stored objects, museum storage buildings require a very stable interior climate, with only minimal and slow variations in temperature and relative humidity. Often extensive HVAC is installed to provide such stable indoor conditions, which results in a great amout of C02 emission. The purpose for this paper is to show that it is possible to reach the goal of using renewable energy for museum storage buildings by rethinking the strategy for the dehumidification design and in this way contribute to a C02 neutral environment. The solution is to construct a very airtight building and use concentrated dehumidification.

Christensen, JØrgen Erik; Janssen, Hans

2011-01-01

71

Economic feasibility of thermal energy storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper investigates the economic feasibility of both building an ice thermal storage and structure a time of rate tariff for the unique air conditioning (A/C) plant of the Grand Holy Mosque of Makkah, Saudi Arabia. The features of the building are unique where the air-conditioned 39,300 m{sup 2} zone is open to the atmosphere and the worshippers fully occupy the building five times a day, in addition hundreds of thousands of worshippers attend the blessed weekend's prayer at noontime, which escalates the peak electricity load. For economic analysis, the objective function is the daily electricity bill that includes the operation cost and the capital investment of the ice storage system. The operation cost is function of the energy imported for operating the plant in which the tariff structure, number of operating hours and the ambient temperature are parameters. The capital recovery factor is calculated for 10% interest rate and payback period of 10 years. Full and partial load storage scenarios are considered. The results showed that with the current fixed electricity rate (0.07 $/kWh), there is no gain in introducing ice storage systems for both storage schemes. Combining energy storage and an incentive time structured rate showed reasonable daily bill savings. For base tariff of 0.07 $/kWh during daytime operation and 0.016 $/kWh for off-peak period, savings were achieved for full load storage scenario. Different tariff structure is discussed and the break-even nighttime rate was determined (varies between 0.008 and 0.03 $/kWh). Partial load storage scenario showed to be unattractive where the savings for the base structured tariff was insignificant. (author)

Habeebullah, B.A. [Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

2007-07-01

72

Terrestrial Energy Storage SPS Systems  

Science.gov (United States)

Terrestrial energy storage systems for the SSP system were evaluated that could maintain the 1.2 GW power level during periods of brief outages from the solar powered satellite (SPS). Short-term outages of ten minutes and long-term outages up to four hours have been identified as "typical" cases where the ground-based energy storage system would be required to supply power to the grid. These brief interruptions in transmission could result from performing maintenance on the solar power satellite or from safety considerations necessitating the power beam be turned off. For example, one situation would be to allow for the safe passage of airplanes through the space occupied by the beam. Under these conditions, the energy storage system needs to be capable of storing 200 MW-hrs and 4.8 GW-hrs, respectively. The types of energy storage systems to be considered include compressed air energy storage, inertial energy storage, electrochemical energy storage, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and pumped hydro energy storage. For each of these technologies, the state-of-the-art in terms of energy and power densities were identified as well as the potential for scaling to the size systems required by the SSP system. Other issues addressed included the performance, life expectancy, cost, and necessary infrastructure and site locations for the various storage technologies.

Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

1998-01-01

73

Wind turbine storage systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Electric power is often produced in locations far from the point of utilization which creates a challenge in stabilizing power grids, particularly since electricity cannot be stored. The production of decentralized electricity by renewable energy sources offers a greater security of supply while protecting the environment. Wind power holds the greatest promise in terms of environmental protection, competitiveness and possible applications. It is known that wind energy production is not always in phase with power needs because of the uncertainty of wind. For that reason, energy storage is the key for the widespread integration of wind energy into the power grids. This paper proposed various energy storage methods that can be used in combination with decentralized wind energy production where an imbalance exists between electricity production and consumption. Energy storage can play an essential role in bringing value to wind energy, particularly if electricity is to be delivered during peak hours. Various types of energy storage are already in use or are being developed. This paper identified the main characteristics of various electricity storage techniques and their applications. They include stationary or embarked storage for long or short term applications. A comparison of characteristics made it possible to determine which types of electricity storage are best suited for wind energy. These include gravity energy; thermal energy; compressed air energy; coupled stornergy; compressed air energy; coupled storage with natural gas; coupled storage with liquefied gas; hydrogen storage for fuel cells; chemical energy storage; storage in REDOX batteries; storage by superconductive inductance; storage in supercondensers; and, storage as kinetic energy. 21 refs., 21 figs

74

Monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility surge storage systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility includes surge storage for canistered commercial spent fuels and associated wastes. This storage is provided by air-cooled vaults and passive-cooled concrete storage casks. This paper, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, discusses the design and analysis for these storage systems

75

Energy management systems in buildings  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An investigation is made of the range of possibilities available from three types of systems (automatic control devices, building envelope, and the occupants) in buildings. The following subjects are discussed: general (buildings, design and personnel); new buildings (envelope, designers, energy and load calculations, plant design, general design parameters); existing buildings (conservation measures, general energy management, air conditioned buildings, industrial buildings); man and motivation (general, energy management and documentation, maintenance, motivation); automatic energy management systems (thermostatic controls, optimized plant start up, air conditioned and industrial buildings, building automatic systems). (MCW)

Lush, D.M.

1979-07-01

76

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

Science.gov (United States)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12

77

PCM thermal storage in buildings: A state of art  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A comprehensive review of various possible methods for heating and cooling in buildings are discussed in this paper. The thermal performance of various types of systems like PCM trombe wall, PCM wallboards, PCM shutters, PCM building blocks, air-based heating systems, floor heating, ceiling boards, etc., is presented in this paper. All systems have good potential for heating and cooling in building through phase change materials and also very beneficial to reduce the energy demand of the buildings. (author)

Tyagi, Vineet Veer; Buddhi, D. [Thermal Energy Storage Laboratory, School of Energy and Environmental Studies, Faculty of Engineering Science, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452017 (India)

2007-08-15

78

Building Web Reputation Systems  

CERN Document Server

What do Amazon's product reviews, eBay's feedback score system, Slashdot's Karma System, and Xbox Live's Achievements have in common? They're all examples of successful reputation systems that enable consumer websites to manage and present user contributions most effectively. This book shows you how to design and develop reputation systems for your own sites or web applications, written by experts who have designed web communities for Yahoo! and other prominent sites. Building Web Reputation Systems helps you ask the hard questions about these underlying mechanisms, and why they're critical

Farmer, Randy

2010-01-01

79

Optimization of Korean crop storage insulation systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

With the increasing concerns with the quality and the safety of foods, several standards and guidelines have been developed to improve the design, construction and operation of storage warehouses. Several cool storage buildings have been constructed in Korea during the last decade. However, there are no specific standards or guidelines for energy use reduction in refrigerated structures. The main objective of this study is to determine the impact of various insulation systems on the total cooling load of the cool storage structures with particular consideration given to the product thermal mass to find optimal insulation thicknesses for each envelope component for various climatic locations in Korea. An energy analysis model was developed using the DOE-2.1E program. To determine the optimal configuration for the storage building insulation system, life cycle cost analysis was conducted. The selection of optimal insulation configuration for each climatic location is based on various criteria including cost and energy minimization. The results presented in this paper provide easy to use design guidelines to select the optimal insulation thickness for crop storage facilities in Korea. (Author)

Jongho Yoon [Taejon National Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Architectural Engineering, Taejon (Korea); Euyjoon Lee [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Passive Solar Research Team, Taejon (Korea); Krarti, Moncef [Colorado Univ., CEAE Dept., Boulder, CO (United States)

2003-05-01

80

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model includes a realistic plant model. The savings associated with passive building thermal storage inventory proved to be small be-cause the test facility is not an ideal candidate for the investigated control technology. Moreover, the facility's central plant revealed the idiosyncratic behavior that the chiller operation in the ice-making mode was more energy efficient than in the chilled-water mode. Field experimentation (Phase III) is now required in a suitable commercial building with sufficient thermal mass, an active TES system, and a climate conducive to passive storage utilization over a longer testing period to support the laboratory findings presented in this topical report.

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2003-12-17

81

Data Storage Control System Design  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper presents a methodology for evaluating and improving the effectiveness of storage management during the development of automated control systems. The description of the storage management system in terms of queuing theory is proposed. The model of the system and the criteria for efficient processing of requests to read and write data are provided. The authors also propose the partitioning of stored data and the use of several software solutions to improve the system performance.

Yury Yurievich Shumilov

2014-12-01

82

Advances in information storage systems  

CERN Document Server

The series Advances in Information Storage Systems covers a wide range of interdisciplinary technical areas, related to magnetic or optical storage systems. The following nonexhaustive list is indicative of the scope of the topics: Friction, Adhesion, Wear and Lubrications, Coatings, Solid Mechanics, Air Flow, Contamination, Instrumentation, Dynamics, Shock and Vibration, Controls, Head and Suspension Design, Actuators, Spindle and Actuator Motors and Bearings, Structure of Thin Films, Corrosion, Long-Term Reliability, Materials and Processing, Manufacturing and Automation, Economics.This volu

Bhushan, Bharat

1995-01-01

83

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A model-based predictive control (MPC) is designed for optimal thermal energy storage in building cooling systems. We focus on buildings equipped with a water tank used for actively storing cold water produced by a series of chillers. Typically the chillers are operated at night to recharge the storage tank in order to meet the building demands on the following day. In this paper, we build on our previous work, improve the building load model, and present experimental results. The experiments show that MPC can achieve reduction in the central plant electricity cost and improvement of its efficiency.

Ma, Yudong; Borrelli, Francesco; Hencey, Brandon; Coffey, Brian; Bengea, Sorin; Haves, Philip

2010-06-29

84

Measurement of Moisture Storage Parameters of Building Materials  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The moisture storage parameters of three different building materials: calcium silicate, ceramic brick and autoclaved aerated concrete, are determined in the hygroscopic range and overhygroscopic range. Measured sorption isotherms and moisture retention curves are then combined into moisture storage functions using the Kelvin equation. A comparison of measured results with global characteristics of the pore space obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry shows a reasonable agreement; the median pore radii by volume are well within the interval given by the beginning and the end of the characteristic steep parts of the moisture retention curves.

M. Ji?i?ková

2003-01-01

85

The High Performance Storage System  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) was organized to develop, demonstrate and commercialize technology for the storage system that will be the future repositories for our national information assets. Within the NSL four Department of Energy laboratories and IBM Federal System Company have pooled their resources to develop an entirely new High Performance Storage System (HPSS). The HPSS project concentrates on scalable parallel storage system for highly parallel computers as well as traditional supercomputers and workstation clusters. Concentrating on meeting the high end of storage system and data management requirements, HPSS is designed using network-connected storage devices to transfer data at rates of 100 million bytes per second and beyond. The resulting products will be portable to many vendor`s platforms. The three year project is targeted to be complete in 1995. This paper provides an overview of the requirements, design issues, and architecture of HPSS, as well as a description of the distributed, multi-organization industry and national laboratory HPSS project.

Coyne, R.A.; Hulen, H. [IBM Federal Systems Co., Houston, TX (United States); Watson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01

86

Volatile liquid storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This patent describes a method of collecting and abating emission from a volatile liquid in an above ground storage tank. It comprises the liquid storage tank having a bottom, a vertical cylindrical circular wall having a lower edge portion joined to the bottom, and an external fixed roof, the tank having an internal floating roof floating on a volatile liquid stored in the tank, and air vent means in the tank in communication with a vapor space in the tank constituting at least the space above the floating roof when the floating roof floats on a predetermined maximum volume of volatile liquid in the tank; permitting ambient air; pumping emission laden air from the tank vapor space above the floating roof; and by means of the emissions abatement apparatus eliminating most of the emission from the emissions laden air with formation of a gaseous effluent and then discharging the resulting gaseous effluent to the atmosphere

87

D5.4 – Energy management system : Coordinating and dispatching of generation, consumption, and storage devices connected to the local microgrid or to the building network.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This report will focus on strategies for energy management as well at the building level and at the microgrid level. The designed energy management controller will manage energy flow such that generated power in the microgrid is mainly consumed by local consumers and the power trade between the microgrid and the grid is shrunk to minimum. Buildings’ role is to provide flexibility to the energy management controller so that this controller can use this flexibility to enhance the local use of the local produced energy and by that mean lower the energy bill for each house in the microgrid. The Optimization of building loads are based on electricity price signal and shedding, shifting or rescheduling the power consumption pattern. The main shiftable loads are the HVAC systems. This system will be the primary controllable load for the energy management controller but also curtailable load and non-controllable loads will be taken into account when designing the controller. The flexibility, with respect to the HVAC system, is based on the heat capacity of the house and a thermal tolerance that users give permission for. The wider the thermal tolerance is, the more flexibility will be provided to the energy management controller. Load management strategies will be devised such that thermal comfort and other user-predefined preferences will be satisfied.

Madsen, Per Printz; Andersen, Palle

2014-01-01

88

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, t

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30

89

Management of Data Replication for PC Cluster-based Cloud Storage System  

OpenAIRE

Storage systems are essential building blocks for cloud computing infrastructures. Although high performance storage servers are the ultimate solution for cloud storage, the implementation of inexpensive storage system remains an open issue. To address this problem, the efficient cloud storage system is implemented with inexpensive and commodity computer nodes that are organized into PC cluster based datacenter. Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) is an open source cloud b...

Myint, Julia; Naing, Thinn Thu

2011-01-01

90

Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organoti

Dr. Digby Macdonald

2010-08-09

91

Peak load shifting control using different cold thermal energy storage facilities in commercial buildings: A review  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: • Little study reviews the load shifting control using different facilities. • This study reviews load shifting control using building thermal mass. • This study reviews load shifting control using thermal energy storage systems. • This study reviews load shifting control using phase change material. • Efforts for developing more applicable load shifting control are addressed. - Abstract: For decades, load shifting control, one of most effective peak demand management methods, has attracted increasing attentions from both researchers and engineers. Different load shifting control strategies have been developed when diverse cold thermal energy storage facilities are used in commercial buildings. The facilities include building thermal mass (BTM), thermal energy storage system (TES) and phase change material (PCM). Little study has systematically reviewed these load shifting control strategies and therefore this study presents a comprehensive review of peak load shifting control strategies using these thermal energy storage facilities in commercial buildings. The research and applications of the load shifting control strategies are presented and discussed. The further efforts needed for developing more applicable load shifting control strategies using the facilities are also addressed

92

Monitored Retrievable Storage conceptual system study: transportable storage casks  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Conceptual designs of three Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) cask storage facilities have been prepared along with an estimate of life cycle costs for each. The designs are for two all spent fuel storage facilities and one high-level waste and transuranic waste facility with capacities of 15,000 equivalent metric tons of uranium (MTU) and 72,000 equivalent MTU. These designs were developed using criteria and assumptions provided by PNL. Each storage facility consists of a generic Receiving and Handling Facility (designed by Kaiser Engineers) with modifications for storage cask handling (and unloading damaged casks), on-site handling and transportation equipment (low-bed trailer and tractor, and mobile crane), a storage facility consisting of an array of concrete storage pads, and the support facilities and equipment (security, utilities, etc.) needed to maintain facility operations. The high-level waste and transuranic waste storage facility includes a prefabricated concrete storage building for the contact-handled transuranic waste received. Detailed cost estimates have been developed for these facilities which include costs for construction, operation and decommissioning for the 15,000 MTU capacity facility. Total costs and present worth costs in mid-1983 dollars for these facilities have been estimated. In addition, costs have been developed for the incremental expansion of these facilities to a 72,000 MTU storage capacity. 3 references, 17 figures, 4 tablesty. 3 references, 17 figures, 4 tables

93

Development of organic storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Organic Storage System is designed to absorb the massive data flow with low TCO. The system scales unlimitedly to store the data that keeps growing, and undergoes metabolic change to provide data longevity. Its high-data-mobility feature enables quick replication and migration for disaster recovery and self-healing. (author)

94

Analysis of ice cool thermal storage for a clinic building in Kuwait  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Kuwait, air conditioning (AC) systems consume 61% and 40% of the peak electrical load and total electrical energy, respectively. This is due to a very high ambient temperature for the long summer period extended from April to October and the low energy cost. This paper gives an overview of the electrical peak and energy consumption in Kuwait, and it has been found that the average increase in the annual peak electrical demand and energy consumption for the year 1998-2002 was 6.2% and 6.4%, respectively. One method of reducing the peak electrical demand of AC systems during the day period is by incorporating an ice cool thermal storage (ICTS) with the AC system. A clinic building has been selected to study the effects of using an ICTS with different operation strategies such as partial (load levelling), partial (demand limiting) and full storage operations on chiller and storage sizes, reduction of peak electrical demand and energy consumption of the chiller for selected charging and discharging hours. It has been found that the full storage operation has the largest chiller and storage capacities, energy consumption and peak electrical reduction. However, partial storage (load levelling) has the smallest chiller and storage capacities and peak electrical reduction. This paper also provides a detailed comparison of using ICTS operating strategies with AC and AC systems without ICTS

95

Application of Energy Storage in Power Systems  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this research is to determine the advantages of using energy storage systems. This study presents a model for energy storage in electric power systems. The model involves methods of reducing the operation cost of a power network and the calculation of capital cost of energy storage systems. Two test systems have been considered, the IEEE six-bus system and the IEEE 118-bus system, to analyze the impact of energy storage on power system economic operation. Properties of energy storage have been considered such as rated power investment cost and rated energy investment cost. Mixed integer programming has been used to formulate the model. A comparison between centralized energy storage system and distributed energy storage system have been proposed. The results show that distributed energy storage system has more impact on reducing total operation cost. Also, an analysis on optimal sizing of energy storage system with fixed investment cost is provided.

Alqunun, Khalid M.

96

Scope of dynamic thermal storage. A systems and feasibility study within the research program 'Smart energy-efficient buildings' at NTNU and SINTEF 2002-2006  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Dynamic thermal storage (DTS) allows heat (and cold) to be stored when available, for use when needed to control temperature in buildings to achieve this, the DTS must accommodate the dynamic nature of such control. Used in conjunction with heat pumps and with automatic planning and optimisation by computers (as is now generally available), this technology allows variation in outdoor temperature to serve as a genuine source of renewable energy. A major objective is for DTS to be economically and practically available in conjunction with existing buildings (that actually consumes the energy presently used in the building sector). The current report presents results from modelling and from evaluation of construction of dynamic thermal storage facilities. In order for these results to be meaningful, a fuller survey of the overall concept is included, presenting the broad technical background and principles of construction and operation of dynamic thermal storage facilities. For successful application, DTS requires efficient heat transfer, with temperature drops across heat exchangers of 2-3 deg. C. The present modelling indicates that in an Oslo climate, DTS will retrieve energy (i.e. replace current supply of electricity) at an investment per unit of energy of about NOK 8.-/kWh, which is two to three times that of renewable electric power from wind, and some four times that of fossil power generated from natural gas. The retrieved energy is, however, on end-user terms. It provides services valued at consumer prices (NOK 0.75-1.00/kWh at present in Norway), as compared with prices at new power plants of NOK 0.18-0.25/kWh. On a basis of return on investment to society (an investment of NOK 2.0-3.0 for each kWh paid for by the consumer), DTS technology as modelled for an Oslo climate appears as a potentially valuable alternative to other sources of renewable power. How practical it is depends on variation in outdoor temperature; in coastal climates it is less suitable, while in continental climates it will be better, compared to Oslo. The retrieved energy is as useful as (or actually better than) freshly generated energy. Buildings remain as comfortable, there are no losses in the supply and distribution system, and capacity is freed up in these. Supply is adapted to pattern of consumption, resulting in excellent load factors relative to base-load fossil-fuel based energy supplies. The solutions obtained are long-term, environmentally sound, and sustainable. In warm climates with appreciable night/day temperature differences, and where large amounts of electric power are now used for air conditioning, DTS-based systems may be commercially viable now (author) (ml)

Gether, Harald; Gether, Joergen; Stang, Jacob

2006-07-01

97

Hydrogen storage and generation system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

2010-08-24

98

Simulation of thermocline thermal energy storage system using C  

OpenAIRE

Solar thermal power generation is a modern technology, which has already shown feasible results in the production of electricity. Thermal energy storage (TES) is a crucial element in solar energy applications, which includes the increase of building thermal capacity, solar water heating systems for domestic use, and Concentrated Solar Thermal power plants for electricity generation. Economic, efficient and reliable thermal energy storage systems are a key need of solar thermal power plants, i...

Meseret Tesfay; Meyyappan Venkatesan

2013-01-01

99

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies

100

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15

101

Building an organic block storage service at CERN with Ceph  

Science.gov (United States)

Emerging storage requirements, such as the need for block storage for both OpenStack VMs and file services like AFS and NFS, have motivated the development of a generic backend storage service for CERN IT. The goals for such a service include (a) vendor neutrality, (b) horizontal scalability with commodity hardware, (c) fault tolerance at the disk, host, and network levels, and (d) support for geo-replication. Ceph is an attractive option due to its native block device layer RBD which is built upon its scalable, reliable, and performant object storage system, RADOS. It can be considered an "organic" storage solution because of its ability to balance and heal itself while living on an ever-changing set of heterogeneous disk servers. This work will present the outcome of a petabyte-scale test deployment of Ceph by CERN IT. We will first present the architecture and configuration of our cluster, including a summary of best practices learned from the community and discovered internally. Next the results of various functionality and performance tests will be shown: the cluster has been used as a backend block storage system for AFS and NFS servers as well as a large OpenStack cluster at CERN. Finally, we will discuss the next steps and future possibilities for Ceph at CERN.

van der Ster, Daniel; Wiebalck, Arne

2014-06-01

102

The CMU air-core passive hybrid heat storage system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper discusses environmental engineering and practical application of the concrete masonry unit (CMU) based air-core thermal storage system, principally applied in climate responsive (passive and hybrid solar) building design. CMU's with their large core spaces can provide ample heat-transfer surface areas near low-velocity air-flows conducted through stacked masonry units where the cores are aligned as ducts. CMU air-core heat storage is ideally suited to the low-cost application of thermal storage in the structural envelope of buildings. The physical principals of designing, analyzing and predicting performance of these systems are reviewed. Sample building performance assessments are provided along with heat transfer properties information on such CMU systems, derived from both field measurements and engineering calculations. Generic design diagrams are provided based on actual built projects.

Howard, B.D.

1999-07-01

103

Safety evaluation of the Mixed Waste Storage Building (Building 643-43E)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A safety evaluation has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Storage Building (MWSB) at the Savannah River Site. The results of this evaluation are compared with those contained in the Burial Ground Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The MWSB will function as an interim storage facility for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated mixed waste. It will meet all applicable standards set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the South Carolina Department of Health and Environment Control (SCDHEC), and Department of Energy (DOE) Orders

104

Power systems energy storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The capacitor bank for Nova was completed during the past year. At the beginning of 1984, the Nova capacitor bank was capable of supporting 8 of Nova's 10 arms. During the year, the Novette capacitor bank was moved to the Nova laser facility. In addition, the capacitor bank was expanded to accommodate the additional 31.5- and 46.0-cm amplifiers. The Nova power conditioning control system is divided into three major areas: pulsed-power, system-timing, and facility controls. The majority of all pulsed-power and system-timing controls were completed during the year and installed on Nova. Much of the facility monitoring hardware has been installed, and the software development has begun. The Nova oscillator controls front-end processor (FEP) was moved from the Nova MOR to the system interconnect room with other power conditioning FEPs. This allowed us to easily implement communications to the Nova VAXs through the multiport memory. This is a change from the planned Novanet connection. The decided to connect to the multiport to minimize software development and to meet time constraints

105

INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Hydrogen storage is recognized as a key technical hurdle that must be overcome for the realization of hydrogen powered vehicles. Metal hydrides and their doped variants have shown great promise as a storage material and significant advances have been made with this technology. In any practical storage system the rate of H2 uptake will be governed by all processes that affect the rate of mass transport through the bed and into the particles. These coupled processes include heat and mass transfer as well as chemical kinetics and equilibrium. However, with few exceptions, studies of metal hydrides have focused primarily on fundamental properties associated with hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics. A full understanding of the complex interplay of physical processes that occur during the charging and discharging of a practical storage system requires models that integrate the salient phenomena. For example, in the case of sodium alanate, the size of NaAlH4 crystals is on the order of 300nm and the size of polycrystalline particles may be approximately 10 times larger ({approx}3,000nm). For the bed volume to be as small as possible, it is necessary to densely pack the hydride particles. Even so, in packed beds composed of NaAlH{sub 4} particles alone, it has been observed that the void fraction is still approximately 50-60%. Because of the large void fraction and particle to particle thermal contact resistance, the thermal conductivity of the hydride is very low, on the order of 0.2 W/m-{sup o}C, Gross, Majzoub, Thomas and Sandrock [2002]. The chemical reaction for hydrogen loading is exothermic. Based on the data in Gross [2003], on the order of 10{sup 8}J of heat of is released for the uptake of 5 kg of H{sub 2}2 and complete conversion of NaH to NaAlH{sub 4}. Since the hydride reaction transitions from hydrogen loading to discharge at elevated temperatures, it is essential to control the temperature of the bed. However, the low thermal conductivity of the hydride makes it difficult to remove the heat of reaction, especially in the relatively short target refueling times, see Attachment 3. This document describes a detailed numerical model for general metal hydride beds that couples reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer, for both hydriding and dehydriding of the bed. The detailed model is part of a comprehensive methodology for the design, evaluation and modification of hydrogen storage systems. In Hardy [2007], scoping models for reaction kinetics, bed geometry and heat removal parameters are discussed. The scoping models are used to perform a quick assessment of storage systems and identify those which have the potential to meet DOE performance targets. The operational characteristics of successful candidate systems are then evaluated with the more detailed models discussed in this document. The detailed analysis for hydrogen storage systems is modeled in either 2 or 3-dimensions, via the general purpose finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics{reg_sign}. The two-dimensional model serves to provide rapid evaluation of bed configurations and physical processes, while the three-dimensional model, which requires a much longer run time, is used to investigate detailed effects that do not readily lend themselves to two-dimensional representations. The model is general and can be adapted to any geometry or storage media. In this document, the model is applied to a modified cylindrical shell and tube geometry with radial fins perpendicular to the axis, see Figures 4.1-1 and 4.1-2. Sodium alanate, NaAlH{sub 4}, is used as the hydrogen storage medium. The model can be run on any DOS, LINUX or Unix based system.

Hardy, B

2007-11-16

106

Storage monitoring system - 1997  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Sandia National Laboratories has several ongoing projects in the area of nuclear materials management. These projects establish a core capability in monitoring stored nuclear materials. The overarching goal of these projects is to get the right sensor information to the right user to enhance the safety, security and to verify the legitimacy of use of stored nuclear materials. An effort has been initiated to merge these projects into a common system. This paper provides an overview of several of these projects and the integration activities between them

107

Multi personal computer storage system. The solution of PACS storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Objective: According to the characteristics of digital medicine and demand of digitized management in hospital, the authors establish a storage system which is cheap, highly expansible, and reliable. Methods: The multi personal computer storage system (MPCSS) was constructed by assembling the hardware and software. The image data were archived from major server to storage PC by using NEUSOFT-PACS archiving manage system and backup on storage PC. The authors simulated the situation that the data on storage PC was lost and restored the data. The authors also expanded the storage system to enlarge its capacity. Results: Average transfer rate from MPCSS was 27.7 Mbit/s(1 byte = 8 bit); average cost for this system was 74 RMB/G; six cases in the 187 repeated reading of 100 patients failed. MPCSS can store backup and restore the image data, and can expand the storage size. Conclusion: MPCSS is very cheap compared with other high capacity systems or devices. It is feasible and suitable for digital image storage

108

NASA Langley Research Center's distributed mass storage system  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a trend in institutions with high performance computing and data management requirements to explore mass storage systems with peripherals directly attached to a high speed network. The Distributed Mass Storage System (DMSS) Project at NASA LaRC is building such a system and expects to put it into production use by the end of 1993. This paper presents the design of the DMSS, some experiences in its development and use, and a performance analysis of its capabilities. The special features of this system are: (1) workstation class file servers running UniTree software; (2) third party I/O; (3) HIPPI network; (4) HIPPI/IPI3 disk array systems; (5) Storage Technology Corporation (STK) ACS 4400 automatic cartridge system; (6) CRAY Research Incorporated (CRI) CRAY Y-MP and CRAY-2 clients; (7) file server redundancy provision; and (8) a transition mechanism from the existent mass storage system to the DMSS.

Pao, Juliet Z.; Humes, D. Creig

1993-01-01

109

APS storage ring vacuum system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

110

APS storage ring vacuum system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

1990-01-01

111

Analysis and sizing of thermal energy storage in combined heating, cooling and power plants for buildings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? Novel method to estimate the contribution of thermal energy storage in CHCP plants. ? Simple and accurate analysis of contributions of thermal storage. ? Application to the assessment and optimal sizing of thermal storage in CHCP plants. ? Thermal storage increases efficiency, coverage and economic benefit. ? Thermal storage allows increasing efficient operation of the plant. - Abstract: Thermal energy storage (TES) can lead to significant energy savings and economic benefits in combined heating, cooling and power plants (CHCPs) for buildings in the tertiary sector. However, their complex interactions with the rest of the CHCP system make their adequate sizing difficult without using extensive and detailed simulations. The authors have developed a new method to evaluate the thermal contribution of TES based on simple procedures. Comparisons with detailed simulations for a range of situations confirm the ability of this method to predict the effect of TES on CHCP systems with good approximation, as well as to find the optimal size in a relatively simple manner and with few required data. The case studies show a strong dependence of the TES contribution on the demands profile and the operation strategy. However, adequately sized TES are proven to bring relevant energy savings as well as economic profit to CHCP plants. In this paper, sizing procedures are provided to find the optimal volume both in terms of thermodynamic efficiency and of economic

112

Parametric Study on the Dynamic Heat Storage Capacity of Building Elements  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In modern, extensively glazed office buildings, due to high solar and internal loads and increased comfort expectations, air conditioning systems are often used even in moderate and cold climates. Particularly in this case, passive cooling by night-time ventilation seems to offer considerable potential. However, because heat gains and night ventilation periods do not coincide in time, a sufficient amount of thermal mass is needed in the building to store the heat. Assuming a 24 h-period harmonic oscillation of the indoor air temperature within a range of thermal comfort, the analytical solution of onedimensional heat conduction in a slab with convective boundary condition was applied to quantify the dynamic heat storage capacity of a particular building element. The impact of different parameters, such as slab thickness, material properties and the heat transfer coefficient was investigated, as well as their interrelation. The potential of increasing thermal mass by using phase change materials (PCM) was estimated assuming increased thermal capacity. The results show a significant impact of the heat transfer coefficient on heat storage capacity, especially for thick, thermally heavy elements. The storage capacity of a 100 mm thick concrete slab was found to increase with increasing heat transfer coefficients as high as 30 W/m2K. In contrast the heat storage capacity of a thin gypsum plaster board was found to be constant when the heat transfer coefficient exceeded 3 W/m2K. Additionally, the optimal thickness of an element depended greatly on the heat transfer coefficient. For thin, light elements a significant increase in heat capacity due to the use of PCMs was found to be possible. The present study shows the impact and interrelation of geometrical and physical parameters which appreciably influence the heat storage capacity of building elements.

Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, H.

2007-01-01

113

Advanced storage concepts for solar and low energy buildings, IEA-SHC Task 32. Slutrapport  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report reports on the results of the activities carried through in connection with the Danish part of the IEA SHC Task 32 project: Advanced Storage Concepts for Solar and Low Energy Buildings. The Danish involvement has focused on Subtask C: Storage Concepts Based on Phase Change Materials and Subtask D: Storage Concepts Based on Advanced Water Tanks and Special Devices. The report describes activities concerning heat-of-fusion storage and advanced water storage. (BA)

Schultz, J.M.; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, S.

2008-01-15

114

An energy self-sufficient public building using integrated renewable sources and hydrogen storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The control of the use of fossil fuels, major cause of greenhouse gas emissions and climate changes, in present days represents one of Governments' main challenges; particularly, a significant energy consumption is observed in buildings and might be significantly reduced through sustainable design, increased energy efficiency and use of renewable sources. At the moment, the widespread use of renewable energy in buildings is limited by its intrinsic discontinuity: consequently integration of plants with energy storage systems could represent an efficient solution to the problem. Within this frame, hydrogen has shown to be particularly fit in order to be used as an energetic carrier. In this aim, in the paper an energetic, economic and environmental analysis of two different configurations of a self-sufficient system for energy production from renewable sources in buildings is presented. In particular, in the first configuration energy production is carried out by means of photovoltaic systems, whereas in the second one a combination of photovoltaic panels and wind generators is used. In both configurations, hydrogen is used as an energy carrier, in order to store energy, and fuel cells guarantee its energetic reconversion. The analysis carried out shows that, although dimensioned as a stand-alone configuration, the system can today be realized only taking advantage from the incentivizing fares applied to grid-connected systems, that are likely to be suspended in the next future. In such case, it represents an interesting investment, with capital returns in about 15 years. As concerns economic sustainability, in fact, the analysis shows that the cost of the energy unit stored in hydrogen volumes, due to the not very high efficiency of the process, presently results greater than that of directly used one. Moreover, also the starting fund of the system proves to be very high, showing an additional cost with respect to systems lacking of energy storage equal to about 50%. From the above, it can be deduced that, in the aim to obtain a quick, effective penetration of hydrogen into the market, it is at the moment indispensable to enact incentivizing policies, attributing to hydrogen production fares able to cover the additional costs due to its production, storage and reconversion. - Highlights: ? We present a self-sufficient system for renewable energy production in buildings. ? PV and eolic plants are integrated with electrolyzer, storage system and fuel cells. ? We analyze two configurations of the system: only PV panels or with wind generators. ? We compare wind generators with PV panels in relation to Italian Government fares. ? We carry out the energetic, economic and environmental analysis of the systems

115

Advances in information storage systems  

CERN Document Server

Advances in Information Storage Systems (AISS) series was initiated by ASME Press. New York with a first issue published in April 1991. ASME Press published a total of five volumes in 1991-93. In 1994, World Scientific Publishing Co. Private Limited took over the highly respected series and published volume number 6 in 1995. This volume number 7 is the second volume published by the World Scientific Publishing. The aim of the series remains to report the latest results from around the world in all the electromechanical, materials science, design, and manufacturing problems of information stora

Bhushan, Bharat

1996-01-01

116

Characterization of the 309 building fuel transfer pit and storage basin  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document identifies radiological, chemical and physical conditions inside the Fuel Transfer Pit and Fuel Storage Basins. These spaces are located inside the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor structure (309 Building.) The fuel handling and storage feature of the PRTR were primarily located in these spaces. The conditions were assessed as part of overall 309 Building transition

117

ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade  

CERN Document Server

The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nigh...

Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Simmons, B; Undrus, A

2013-01-01

118

Proton Storage Ring control system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

When designing a control system for a new facility, one is faced with a bewildering array of electronic devices to use in the solution. There is, of course, no single correct solution because the constraints are Laboratory- and project-dependent. The major constraint applicable to the hardware choice for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) control system was the limited manpower available for the design, development, and documentation of custom hardware. As a result, wherever possible, commercial components have been used that are based on recognized standards. The array of choice on the hardware side contrasts markedly with the absence of suitable commercial software products, and it is unfortunate that here there seems to be little prospect of change. The analysis of the overall system that follows will lead to a suitable hardware choice and a description of the software's structure. This paper is an overview, but more information is available

119

Advances in information storage systems, v.8  

CERN Document Server

This volume covers friction-induced vibration, the influence of actuator-bearing grease composition, wear measurements for proximity recording heads, characteristics of a suspension assembly, design and analysis of the HDD Servo System, reluctance torque reduction, etc. It is organized into three parts: Mechanics and Tribology for Data Storage Systems; Dynamics and Controls for Data Storage Systems; and Electric Motors for Data Storage Systems.

Bhushan, Bharat

1998-01-01

120

Energy Production System Management - Renewable energy power supply integration with Building Automation System  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Intelligent buildings, historically and technologically, refers to the integration of four distinctive systems: Building Automation Systems (BAS), Telecommunication Systems, Office Automation Systems and Computer Building Management Systems. The increasing sophisticated BAS has become the 'heart and soul' of modern intelligent buildings. Integrating energy supply and demand elements - often known as Demand-Side Management (DSM) - has became an important energy efficiency policy concept. Nowadays, European countries have diversified their power supplies, reducing the dependence on OPEC, and developing a broader mix of energy sources maximizing the use of renewable energy domestic sources. In this way it makes sense to include a fifth system into the intelligent building group: Energy Production System Management (EPSM). This paper presents a Building Automation System where the Demand-Side Management is fully integrated with the building's Energy Production System, which incorporates a complete set of renewable energy production and storage systems.

121

DOE's storage, transportation, and systems integration activities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The current status of the following U.S. DOE programs are discussed: monitored retrievable storage activities, transportation activities, and systems integration. Also described are storage research, development, and demonstration activities with respect to dry storage modules and prototypical rod consolidation development

122

Demand-side management in office buildings in Kuwait through an ice-storage assisted HVAC system with model predictive control  

OpenAIRE

Examining methods for controlling the electricity demand in Kuwait was the main objective and motivation of this researchp roject. The extensiveu se of air-conditioning for indoor cooling in office and large commercial buildings in Kuwait and the Gulf States represents a major part of the power and electricity consumption in such countries. The rising electricity generation cost and growing rates of consumption continuously demand the construction new power plants. Devising and...

Al-hadban, Yehya

2005-01-01

123

Criticality safety studies of Building 3019 Cell 4 and in-line storage wells  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

New fissile material load limits for storage facilities located in Building 3019 are derived in a manner consistent with currently applicable Martin Marietta Energy Systems requirements. The limits for 233U loading are 2.00, 1.80, 1.45, and 0.19 kg/ft for hydrogen-to-233U atoms ratios of 3, 5, 10, and unrestricted, respectively. Limits were also found for 235U and 239Pu systems. The KENO-Va Monte Carlo Program and Hansen-Roach cross sections were used to derive these limits

124

ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade  

Science.gov (United States)

The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nightly build results, and provides new tools for offline release shifters. We will also outline our long-term plans for distributed nightly releases builds and testing.

Dimitrov, G.; Obreshkov, E.; Simmons, B.; Undrus, A.; Atlas Collaboration

2014-06-01

125

An application of conventional building technology in the storage of low level solid reactor wastes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Ontario Hydro has been engaged in the interim storage of low and medium level solid reactor wastes since 1967. Over the past 14 years, engineered inground concrete trenches have provided safe, retrievable storage capacity for the bulk of the waste arising from Ontario Hydro's nuclear generation program. In addition to concrete trenches, inground concrete cylinders (tile holes) and above ground concrete vaults (Quadricells) have been designed and constructed to store disposable ion-exchange columns, spent filters and bulk ion-exchange resins. In 1978, Ontario Hydro initiated a conceptual design study on the future storage of solid reactor wastes. The objective of the study was to develop a bulk storage concept which would reduce both reactor waste storage costs and storage site land consumption. The study, completed in 1979, recommended a conventional pre-stressed, pre-fabricated, concrete storage building concept as Ontario Hydro's future bulk reactor waste storage facility. This new, low level storage building (LLSB) will be placed in service by September 1982, reducing bulk storage costs by a factor of three while reducing land consumption by a factor of 10 over present Ontario Hydro trench storage facilities. The storage building complements the capabilities of the other Ontario Hydro storage facility designs

126

Hybrid Energy Storage System With A Special Battery Charger For Wind Power System  

OpenAIRE

Generation systems including wind turbine generators, photovoltaic panels and storage batteries are used to build hybrid stand-alone generation systems that are reliable, economic and efficient. Battery energy storage is the current and typical means of smoothing wind or solar power generation fluctuations and improving the power quality. A new battery charger which is a buck-type power converter specially for the wind power system is developed. The converter provides pulsating charging curre...

Dipu Varghese; George, Stany E.

2014-01-01

127

Autonomic Management in a Distributed Storage System  

OpenAIRE

This thesis investigates the application of autonomic management to a distributed storage system. Effects on performance and resource consumption were measured in experiments, which were carried out in a local area test-bed. The experiments were conducted with components of one specific distributed storage system, but seek to be applicable to a wide range of such systems, in particular those exposed to varying conditions. The perceived characteristics of distributed storage ...

Tauber, Markus

2010-01-01

128

Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-10-18

129

Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS)

130

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. Because this sub-project is still in the construction/start-up phase, all verification activities have not yet been performed (e.g., canister cover cap and welding fixture system verification, MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment verification, and As-built verification.). The verification activities identified in this report that still are to be performed will be added to the start-up punchlist and tracked to closure

131

Energy storage and wind energy conversion systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The demand imposed by the variability of wind power input have pushed the technical performance and cost requirements for energy storage to the forefront. In principle, wind turbine generators can be integrated with almost any kind of energy storage technology. However, the most appropriate energy storage system depends on the system size and the type of energy being delivered. Because most commercial wind turbines are designed to deliver electrical power, the vast majority of systems that do incorporate energy storage use batteries. Large systems using batteries have not been shown to be viable. Up to now, most efforts and success in reliably and economically integrating storage with wind turbine generators have been concerned with relatively small power plants, less than about 1 kW. Very small wind/storage systems, where the wind turbine is dedicated to charging conventional lead-acid batteries, currently dominate the market for wind power/energy storage hybrid power systems. These systems are well developed and proven. So-called 'village scale' hybrid power generating systems using energy storage (about 5 kW to 100 kW capacity) are now the subject of considerable product development and commercialization. The key technical problem for off-grid or stand-alone wind power systems of this size that must deliver well-regulated (i.e. high quality) AC power may well be to implement the most reliable and cost effective short term and highly responsive energy storage systemnd highly responsive energy storage systems (on the scale of 1 second to 10 minutes). Such storage schemes must respond effectively to the wind power fluctuations and the load demand fluctuations to maintain network stability. Pumped hydro and underground compressed air storage will probably find some applications in larger scale wind power plants where they can work with the wind power plant to deliver baseload power to the grid, however the number of applications for these systems is limited. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 45 refs

132

Building Better Buildings: Sustainable Building Activities in California Higher Education Systems.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article outlines the activities and recommendations of California's sustainable building task force, discusses sustainable building activities in California's higher education systems, and highlights key issues that California is grappling with in its implementation of sustainable building practices. (EV)

Sowell, Arnold; Eichel, Amanda; Alevantis, Leon; Lovegreen, Maureen

2003-01-01

133

Analysis for Eccentric Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Drops at the Canister Storage Building  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Canister Storage Building (CSB) is the interim storage facility for the K-Basin SNF at the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The SNF is packaged in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs). The MCOs are placed inside transport casks, then delivered to the service station inside the CSB. At the service station, the MCO handling machine (MHM) moves the MCO from the cask to a storage tube or one of two sample/weld stations. There are 220 standard storage tubes and six overpack storage tubes in a below grade reinforced concrete vault. Each storage tube can hold two MCOs

134

Building scars for integrable systems  

OpenAIRE

It is shown, by means of a simple specific example, that for integrable systems it is possible to build up approximate eigenfunctions, called {\\it asymptotic eigenfunctions}, which are concentrated as much as one wants to a classical trajectory and have a lifetime as long as one wants. These states are directly related to the presence of shell structures in the quantal spectrum of the system. It is argued that the result can be extended to classically chaotic system, at leas...

Baldo, M.; Raciti, F.

1995-01-01

135

DESIGN VERIFICATION REPORT SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) PROJECT CANISTER STORAGE BUILDING (CSB)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. The original version of this document was prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNs prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNF Project. Revision 1 documented verification actions that were pending at the time the initial report was prepared. Revision 3 of this document incorporates MCO Cover Cap Assembly welding verification activities. Verification activities for the installed and operational SSCs have been completed

136

Operating Experiences with an Advanced Fabric Energy Storage System  

OpenAIRE

Despite their proven track record in the cold climate countries of northern Europe, there are no reports in the research literature of experiences using advanced fabric energy storage (FES) systems in countries where cooling rather than heating is the main priority. This paper reports some of the experiences with the first known advanced FES system in Australia made over the first full calendar year of operation. It is located in a three-storey building on a university campus in Victoria and ...

Fuller, R. J.

2012-01-01

137

Network Coding for Distributed Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

Distributed storage systems provide reliable access to data through redundancy spread over individually unreliable nodes. Application scenarios include data centers, peer-to-peer storage systems, and storage in wireless networks. Storing data using an erasure code, in fragments spread across nodes, requires less redundancy than simple replication for the same level of reliability. However, since fragments must be periodically replaced as nodes fail, a key question is how to ...

Dimakis, Alexandros G.; Godfrey, P. Brighten; Wainwright, Martin J.; Ramchandran, Kannan

2007-01-01

138

Management issues for high performance storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

Louis, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01

139

Hydrogen storage and delivery system development  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-09-01

140

Space-Time Storage Codes for Wireless Distributed Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

Distributed storage systems (DSSs) have gained a lot of interest recently, thanks to their robustness and scalability compared to single-device storage. Majority of the related research has exclusively concerned the network layer. At the same time, the number of users of, e.g., peer-to-peer (p2p) and device-to-device (d2d) networks as well as proximity based services is growing rapidly, and the mobility of users is considered more and more important. This motivates, in contr...

Hollanti, Camilla; Karpuk, David; Barreal, Amaro; Lu, Hsiao-feng Francis

2014-01-01

141

Lunox storage and transfer system  

Science.gov (United States)

This semester, efforts were concentrated on the design of the Lunox transfer line from the storage area to the launch site. Emphasis was placed on flow and heat transfer problems and their remedies by reducing the effect of radiation by selecting materials for storage tanks, transfer lines and insulation. The design for the storage tank was based on a medium sized Lunox production facility of 6,000 metric tons per year and the frequency of transportation of Lunox from lunar launch site to lower lunar orbit of four launches per month. The design included the selection of materials for cryogenic storage, insulation and radiation shielding. Lunox was pumped to the storage area near the launch site through a piping network designed for maximum mass flow rate with a minimum boil off. The entire network incorporated specially designed radiation shields made of material which was lightweight and low in secondary radiation.

1987-01-01

142

Integrated collector and storage systems for mild climates  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The primary types of solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems that can effectively meet hot water needs include flat plate thermosiphonic units (FPTU) and integrated collector storage (ICS) systems. The advantage of efficient heat preservation in thermosyphon systems has resulted in their widespread application. Although ICS systems are less expensive, they are not widely used as solar water heaters because of higher thermal losses in the storage tank during the night. Because a majority of residential and industrial building hot water requirements are around 50 degrees Celsius, an ICS solar water heater could provide a bulk source that blends collection and storage into one unit. In most commercial ICS systems, cylindrical type storage tanks are needed to resist the pressure of water mains. This paper discussed the design of an ICS solar thermal system with eight cylindrical horizontally layed water storage tanks. Outdoor tests of the experimental model were conducted in a mild climate of north of Iran. The paper presented and discussed the experimental results for this model with particular reference to water temperature profiles, mean daily efficiency, water temperature stratification and thermal losses during the night. The experimental results showed acceptable thermal performance of the model of the ICS system. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

Fouladi, F.; Taherian, H.; Gorji, M. [Babol Noshirvani Univ. of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2009-06-15

143

Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

1999-09-01

144

Seasonal energy storage - PV-hydrogen systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

PV systems are widely used in remote areas e.g. in telecommunication systems. Typically lead acid batteries are used as energy storage. In northern locations seasonal storage is needed, which however is too expensive and difficult to realise with batteries. Therefore, a PV- battery system with a diesel backup is sometimes used. The disadvantages of this kind of system for very remote applications are the need of maintenance and the need to supply the fuel. To overcome these problems, it has been suggested to use hydrogen technologies to make a closed loop autonomous energy storage system

Leppaenen, J. [Neste Oy/NAPS (Finland)

1998-10-01

145

Cooperative Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

When there are multiple node failures in a distributed storage system, regenerating the failed storage nodes individually in a one-by-one manner is suboptimal as far as repair-bandwidth minimization is concerned. If data exchange among the newcomers is enabled, we can get a better tradeoff between repair bandwidth and the storage per node. An explicit and optimal construction of cooperative regenerating code is illustrated.

Shum, Kenneth W.

2011-01-01

146

Designing and building bunkers for storage of stowing materials  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The paper evaluates hoppers for storage of stowing materials in coal mines of the Prokop'evskugol' association. Hoppers for stowing materials used until 1975 were built like a short mine shaft. A cylindrical section was from 16 to 25 m high and had a diameter from 8 to 12 m. The conic shaped bottom had walls inclined at an angle of 45 degrees. Due to a high proportion of clays in stowing materials hopper jamming often disrupted operation of mine stowing systems. The modified hopper design developed jointly by the IGD im. A.A. Skochinski Institute and the KuzNIUI Institute is evaluated. Design improvements are aimed at preventing hopper jamming and preventing deformation of the hopper bottom by rocks falling from a large height during feeding of stowing material to a hopper. The modified hoppers are characterized by an improved outlet system and steel walls of the conic shaped bottom section. Section walls are inclined at an angle of 70 degrees. Number of outlets ranges from 2 to 8 depending on hopper capacity which ranges from 500 to 2000 m/SUP/3. Stowing material is fed to the hoppers from trucks or railroad cars with a capacity to 100 t. Material leaving a hopper is hauled by conveyor systems. The modified hoppers are characterized by reliable operation and low failure rate.

Zolotarev, G.M.; Poturilov, A.M.; Kattsin, A.G.

1983-03-01

147

A review on energy conservation in building applications with thermal storage by latent heat using phase change materials  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Energy storage in the walls, ceiling and floor of buildings may be enhanced by encapsulating suitable phase change materials (PCMs) within these surfaces to capture solar energy directly and increase human comfort by decreasing the frequency of internal air temperature swings and maintaining the temperature closer to the desired temperature for a longer period of time. This paper summarizes the investigation and analysis of thermal energy storage systems incorporating PCMs for use in building applications. Researches on thermal storage in which the PCM is encapsulated in concrete, gypsum wallboard, ceiling and floor have been ongoing for some time and are discussed. The problems associated with the application of PCMs with regard to the selection of materials and the methods used to contain them are also discussed

148

Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL

2012-01-01

149

Dry storage systems with free convection air cooling  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Several design principles to remove heat from the spent fuel by free air convection are illustrated and described. The key safety considerations were felt to be: loss of coolant is impossible as the passive system uses air as a coolant; overheating is precluded because as the temperatures of the containers rises the coolant flow rate increases; mass of the storage building provides a large heat sink and therefore a rapid temperature rise is impossible; and lack of any active external support requirements makes the cooling process less likely to equipment or operator failures. An example of this type of storage already exists. The German HTGR is operated with spherical graphite fuel elements which are stored in canister and in storage cells. The concept is a double cooling system with free convection inside the cells and heat exchange via two side walls of the cell to the ambient air in the cooling ducts. Technical description of the TN 1300 cask is also presented

150

The CASCAD system: An SGN spent fuel dry storage facility  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper will present SGN's dry vault spent storage system. This concept is based on the CASCAD facility, designed and built by SGN for the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) at Cadarache, France. Cascade has been in operation since 1990 since which time SGN has customized its storage system. Because of its extensive experience in both spent fuel assembly and dry storage of high level waste, SGN is able to design solutions fully customized to fit customers' storage requirements using proven technology. Its modular approach allows for staggered investment over a period of several years for maximum flexibility. The Cascad system meets site-specific constraints and safety requirements and is able to receive a wide range of fuels and shipping casks. Since spent fuel assemblies are stored in passive cooled pits, the system is entirely passive and therefore inherently safe. Moreover, the Cascad system allows total retrievability of spent fuel after a 50-year storage period even if the reactor building no longer exists

151

Redox flow cell energy storage systems  

Science.gov (United States)

The redox flow cell energy storage system being developed by NASA for use in remote power systems and distributed storage installations for electric utilities is presented. The system under consideration is an electrochemical storage device which utilizes the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples (acidified chloride solutions of chromium and iron) as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. Redox equipment has allowed the incorporation of state of charge readout, stack voltage control and system capacity maintenance (rebalance) devices to regulate cells in a stack jointly. A 200 W, 12 V system with a capacity of about 400 Wh has been constructed, and a 2 kW, 10kWh system is planned.

Thaller, L. H.

1979-01-01

152

GOSSIP: Gossip Over Storage Systems Is Practical  

OpenAIRE

Gossip-based mechanisms are touted for their simplicity, limited resource usage, robustness to failures, and tunable system behavior. These qualities make gossiping an ideal mechanism for storage systems that are responsible for maintaining and updating data in a mist of failures and limited resources (e.g., intermittent network connectivity, limited bandwidth, constrained communication range, or limited battery power). We focus on persistent storage systems that, unlike mere caches, are resp...

Weatherspoon, Hakim; Miranda, Hugo; Iwanicki, Konrad; Ghodsi, Ali; Busnel, Yann

2007-01-01

153

Informed about possible building-up of electric power plant. The Ipel Pumped Storage Power Plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In the locality of the Ipel Pumped Storage Power Plant (Ipel PSPP) in beginning of the October 2005 the presentation about prospectus of building-up of this hydroelectric power plant was held. In this paper the energetic development in the Slovak Republic and necessity as well as profitability of building-up of the Ipel PSPP are discussed. (author)

154

Minimization of Storage Cost in Distributed Storage Systems with Repair Consideration  

OpenAIRE

In a distributed storage system, the storage costs of different storage nodes, in general, can be different. How to store a file in a given set of storage nodes so as to minimize the total storage cost is investigated. By analyzing the min-cut constraints of the information flow graph, the feasible region of the storage capacities of the nodes can be determined. The storage cost minimization can then be reduced to a linear programming problem, which can be readily solved. Mo...

Yu, Quan; Shum, Kenneth W.; Sung, Chi Wan

2011-01-01

155

Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system  

Science.gov (United States)

A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

1988-01-01

156

Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Fabrication  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a newly developed fuel cell vehicle hydride storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. An experimental test facility, the Hydride Bed Testing Laboratory (HBTL) has been designed and fabricated. The development of this facility and its use in storage system development will be reviewed. These two capabilities (analytical and experimental) form the basis of an integrated approach to storage system design and development. The initial focus of these activities has been on hydride utilization for vehicular applications.

Handrock, J.L.; Malinowski, M.E.; Wally, K. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-10-01

157

Energy storage for power systems  

CERN Document Server

The supply of energy from primary sources is not constant and rarely matches the pattern of demand from consumers. Electricity is also difficult to store in significant quantities. Therefore, secondary storage of energy is essential to increase generation capacity efficiency and to allow more substantial use of renewable energy sources that only provide energy intermittently. Lack of effective storage has often been cited as a major hurdle to substantial introduction of renewable energy sources into the electricity supply network.This 2nd edition, without changing the existing structure of the

Ter-Gazarian, Andrei

2011-01-01

158

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. The original version of this document was prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNF Project. The purpose of this revision is to document completion of verification actions that were pending at the time the initial report was prepared. Verification activities for the installed and operational SSCs have been completed. Verification of future additions to the CSB related to the canister cover cap and welding fixture system and MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment will be completed as appropriate for those components. The open items related to verification of those requirements are noted in section 3.1.5 and will be tracked as part of the CSB Facility action tracking system

159

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. The original version of this document was prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNs prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNF Project. Revision 1 documented verification actions that were pending at the time the initial report was prepared. Verification activities for the installed and operational SSCs have been completed. Verification of future additions to the CSB related to the canister cover cap and welding fixture system and MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment will be completed as appropriate for those components. The open items related to verification of those requirements are noted in section 3.1.5 and will be tracked as part of the CSB Facility action tracking system

160

Energy storage system for a pulsed DEMO  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Several designs have been proposed for the DEMO fusion reactor. Some of them are working in a non-steady state mode. Since a power plant should be able to deliver to the grid a constant power, this challenge must be solved. Energy storage is required at a level of 250 MWhe with the capability of delivering a power of 1 GWe. A review of different technologies for energy storage is made. Thermal energy storage (TES), fuel cells and other hydrogen storage, compressed air storage, water pumping, batteries, flywheels and supercapacitors are the most promising solutions to energy storage. Each one is briefly described in the paper, showing its basis, features, advantages and disadvantages for this application. The conclusion of the review is that, based on existing technology, thermal energy storage using molten salts and a system based on hydrogen storage are the most promising candidates to meet the requirements of a pulsed DEMO. These systems are investigated in more detail together with an economic assessment of each

161

Status of electrical energy storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents an overview of the status of electrical storage systems in the light of the growing use of renewable energy sources and distributed generation (DG) in meeting emission targets and in the interest of the UK electricity supply industry. Examples of storage technologies, their applications and current status are examined along with technical issues and possible activities by UK industries. Details are given of development opportunities in the fields of flow cells, advanced batteries - lithium batteries, high temperature batteries, flywheels, and capacitors. Power conversion systems and system integration, the all-electric ship project, and compressed air energy storage are discussed. Opportunities for development and deployment, small scale systems, demonstration programmes, and research and development issues are considered. An outline of the US Department of Energy Storage programme is given in the Annex to the report.

NONE

2004-07-01

162

Radiation Monitoring System For Technical Storage Complex  

CERN Document Server

In the report the characteristics of ALARM radiation monitoring systems and feature of their use at the Technical Storage Complex of F.V. Lukin State Research Institute of Physical Problems are presented.

Alexeev, A G; Kirayakova, N V; Kosiaynenko, E V; Liashenko, O A; Lukanin, V S; Pikalov, V A; Spinko, N V

2004-01-01

163

Water-storage-tube systems. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Passive solar collection/storage/distribution systems were surveyed, designed, fabricated, and mechanically and thermally tested. The types studied were clear and opaque fiberglass tubes, metal tubes with plastic liners, and thermosyphoning tubes. (MHR)

Hemker, P.

1981-12-24

164

Energy storage in future power systems  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Most sources of renewable power are characterised by uncontrollable and chaotic variations in power output. We here look at how energy storage may benefit renewable power generation by making it available in periods with little or no intermittent generation and thereby prevent additional conventional generation form being used. In addition to this, one of the strongest concerns in relation to renewable power is the instability in the electric power system that it may introduce as a result of large and relatively fast power fluctuations. An additional benefit of energy storage is therefore its ability to counteract fluctuations in renewable power generation and thereby allow for longer reaction times for any controllable generation units. Capture and storage of excess renewable power in order to fully exploit the natural recourses is likely to become relevant for high penetration levels of renewable energy. Meanwhile, the insurance of power system stability through reduction of power gradients is of major importance even at lower penetration levels and some form of energy storage therefore seems unavoidable. A variety of technologies are available for storage of energy in the power system. When identifying the most relevant storage solutions it is necessary to include considerations on many relevant parameters which should be evaluated against the potential drawbacks and benefits of adding storage. Here, the most relevant technologies in relation to power systems with high penetration of renewable sources are identified and considerations with regard to cost, sizing and operation scheme are made.

Rasmussen, Claus Nygaard; Østergaard, Jacob

2011-01-01

165

Optimization of energy storage in power systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

For more than a century, electric transmission and distribution systems have been developed assuming that electric energy was almost impossible to store. Technical progress, new environmental requirements and electrical industry reforms now lead us to believe that storage in the future will be one of the main challenges in the development of power systems. Storage would have potential applications to deal with current technical constraints such as the system load, peak-load value, faults in parts of the system, control issues, etc. and economic ones such as upgrades deferral, renewable energy deployment, etc. In this study, energy storage is considered in two strategic locations in the French power system: HT/MT substations and wind farms. Possible applications and economic flags are formulated and appropriate optimization methods (genetic algorithms, Pareto) are used to maximize the project net present value. This optimization results in defining optimal capacities and control strategies for the energy storage system, taken from a set of storage technologies suitable for this problem, and in assessing the technical-economic impact of energy storage as a solution in power systems. (author)

166

Thermo Active Building Systems Using Building Mass To Heat and Cool  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Using the thermal storage capacity of the concrete slabs between each floor in multistory buildings to heat or cool is a trend that began in the early 1990s in Switzerland.1,2 Pipes carrying water for heating and cooling are embedded in the center of the concrete slab. In central Europe (Germany, Austria, Netherlands, etc.), this type of system has been installed in a significant number of new office buildings since the late 1990s. The trend is spreading to other parts of the world (the rest of Europe, North America and Asia).

Olesen, Bjarne W.

2012-01-01

167

Simulation of thermocline thermal energy storage system using C  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Solar thermal power generation is a modern technology, which has already shown feasible results in the production of electricity. Thermal energy storage (TES is a crucial element in solar energy applications, which includes the increase of building thermal capacity, solar water heating systems for domestic use, and Concentrated Solar Thermal power plants for electricity generation. Economic, efficient and reliable thermal energy storage systems are a key need of solar thermal power plants, in order to smooth out the insolation changes during intermittent cloudy weather condition or during night period, to allow the operation. To address this goal, based on the parabolic trough power plants, sensible heat storage system with operation temperature between 300°C – 390°C can be used. The goal of this research is to design TES which can produce 1MWe. In this work simulation is performed to analyze the Liquid medium STES using C. In this case different liquid medium TESs is investigated and out of all mixed-media single-tank thermocline TES is selected and designed based on the Schumann equation. In particular, this equation is numerically solved, in order to determine energy storage, at different locations and time inside the storage tank. Finally, due to their feasibility, low cost of manufacturing and maintenance are designed and sized to the minimum possible volume.

Meseret Tesfay

2013-06-01

168

40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.  

Science.gov (United States)

...storage tank or underground storage tank system. (a) Operating an UST or UST system prior to foreclosure. A holder, prior to...for the daily operation of the UST or UST system. (b) Operating an UST or UST system after...

2010-07-01

169

Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document (MRS-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and technical requirements for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility subelement and the On-Site Transfer and Storage (OSTS) subelement. The MRS facility subelement provides for temporary storage, at a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operated site, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in an NRC-approved Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) storage mode, or other NRC-approved storage modes. The OSTS subelement provides for transfer and storage, at Purchaser sites, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in MPCs. Both the MRS facility subelement and the OSTS subelement are in support of the CRWMS. The purpose of the MRS-SRD is to define the top-level requirements for the development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. The document also presents an overall description of the MRS facility and the OSTS, their functions (derived by extending the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) Store Waste Document), their segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the top-level interface requirements of the MRS facility and the OSTS are included. As such, the MRS-SRD provides the technical baseline for the MRS Safety Analysis Report (SAR) design and the OSTS Safety Analysis Report design

170

Test report : Princeton power systems prototype energy storage system.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Princeton Power Systems has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lithium ion phosphate batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Princeton Power Systems Prototype Energy Storage System.

Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

2013-08-01

171

Combined solar collector and storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The article discusses reasons why fossil-fuelled water heating systems are included in new houses but solar systems are not. The technology and market potential for evacuated tube systems and integral collector storage systems (ICSS) are explained. The challenge for the designers of ICSSWH has been how to reduce heat loss without compromising solar energy collection. A new concept for enhanced energy storage is described in detail and input/output data are given for two versions of ICSSWH units. A table compares the costs of ICSSWH in houses compared with other (i.e. fossil fuel) water heating systems.

Norton, B.; Smyth, M.; Eames, P.; Lo, S.N.G. [University of Ulster, Newtownabbey (United Kingdom). Centre for Sustainable Technologies

2000-07-01

172

Weather monitoring system for intelligent building control  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Using modern building management systems, heating of private and office buildings can be optimized for lower energy consumption. These days heating systems are controlled by the input of the outdoor temperature of air measured at the north side of the building. However, the thermal loss of a building is determined by more parameters. Our weather system consists of a solar radiometer, a rain detector (only qualitative), a hygrometer, a thermometer and a wind gauge. All meteorological data are monitored automatically and made available to the building management system over a digital interface like CAN, EIB, LON or TCP/IP. (orig.)

Wennmacher, C.; Mikuta, R.; Burte, E.P. [Otto-von-Guericke-Univ. Magdeburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikro- und Sensorsysteme

2001-07-01

173

ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit

174

ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

CERN Document Server

The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

Lewis, M E

2000-01-01

175

RTDS modelling of battery energy storage system  

OpenAIRE

This thesis describes the development of a simplified model of a battery energy storage. The battery energy storage is part of the ABB energy storage system DynaPeaQ®. The model has been built to be run in RTDS, a real time digital simulator. Batteries can be represented by equivalent electric circuits, built up of e.g voltage sources and resistances. The magnitude of the components in an equivalent circuit varies with a number of parameters, e.g. state of charge of the battery and current f...

Rydberg, Lova

2011-01-01

176

Electricity demand and storage dispatch modeling for buildings and implications for the smartgrid  

Science.gov (United States)

As an enabler for demand response (DR), electricity storage in buildings has the potential to lower costs and carbon footprint of grid electricity while simultaneously mitigating grid strain and increasing its flexibility to integrate renewables (central or distributed). We present a stochastic model to simulate minute-by-minute electricity demand of buildings and analyze the resulting electricity costs under actual, currently available DR-enabling tariffs in New York State, namely a peak/offpeak tariff charging by consumed energy (monthly total kWh) and a time of use tariff charging by power demand (monthly peak kW). We then introduce a variety of electrical storage options (from flow batteries to flywheels) and determine how DR via temporary storage may increase the overall net present value (NPV) for consumers (comparing the reduced cost of electricity to capital and maintenance costs of the storage). We find that, under the total-energy tariff, only medium-term storage options such as batteries offer positive NPV, and only at the low end of storage costs (optimistic scenario). Under the peak-demand tariff, however, even short-term storage such as flywheels and superconducting magnetic energy offer positive NPV. Therefore, these offer significant economic incentive to enable DR without affecting the consumption habits of buildings' residents. We discuss implications for smartgrid communication and our future work on real-time price tariffs.

Zheng, Menglian; Meinrenken, Christoph

2013-04-01

177

Force balanced magnetic energy storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A novel scheme of constructing coils suited for inductive storage system is described. By means of a force-compensating method, the reinforcement structure can be made considerably smaller than that needed for conventional coils. The economics of this system is shown to be capable of achieving savings of upwards of 40% when compared to a conventional system

178

Injection Control System of HLS Storage Ring  

CERN Document Server

The injection control system of Hefei Light Source (HLS) storage ring is a subsystem of the upgraded HLS control system, which is based upon EPICS. Three programmable logic controllers (PLCs) are used as device controllers, which control one septum modulator and four kicker modulators of HLS storage ring. An Industrial PC is used as Input/Output Controller (IOC) and it connects the PLCs with serial communication (RS232 mode) over fibre. A PC with Linux is used as operator interface (OPI), operator application are running on it. The control system was completed in July 2000. The commissioning shows that the control system is reliable and easy operational.

Liu, G; Li, W; Li Chuan; Li, K; Shang, L; Liu, Gongfa; Li, Jingyi; Li, Weimin; Li, Chuan; Li, Kaihong; Shang, Lei

2001-01-01

179

Autonomic Management in a Distributed Storage System  

CERN Document Server

This thesis investigates the application of autonomic management to a distributed storage system. Effects on performance and resource consumption were measured in experiments, which were carried out in a local area test-bed. The experiments were conducted with components of one specific distributed storage system, but seek to be applicable to a wide range of such systems, in particular those exposed to varying conditions. The perceived characteristics of distributed storage systems depend on their configuration parameters and on various dynamic conditions. For a given set of conditions, one specific configuration may be better than another with respect to measures such as resource consumption and performance. Here, configuration parameter values were set dynamically and the results compared with a static configuration. It was hypothesised that under non-changing conditions this would allow the system to converge on a configuration that was more suitable than any that could be set a priori. Furthermore, the sy...

Tauber, Markus

2010-01-01

180

Electronics applied to buildings lighting systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Progress in the introduction of electronics into building lighting systems has allowed the use of more architecturally interesting lighting components to enhance overall building architecture, the creation of more pleasant and safer working environments, and the adoption of intelligent building energy management systems to reduce energy consumption. ENEL (Italian National Electricity Board), through extensive energy conservation studies on building lighting systems, has now begun a campaign of information dissemination to educate consumers on how to efficiently manage building lighting and to make effective use of innovative electronic lighting equipment.

Bellato, G.

1990-08-01

181

Technology for national asset storage systems  

Science.gov (United States)

An industry-led collaborative project, called the National Storage Laboratory, was organized to investigate technology for storage systems that will be the future repositories for our national information assets. Industry participants are IBM Federal Systems Company, Ampex Recording Systems Corporation, General Atomics DISCOS Division, IBM ADSTAR, Maximum Strategy Corporation, Network Systems Corporation, and Zitel Corporation. Industry members of the collaborative project are funding their own participation. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through its National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) will participate in the project as the operational site and the provider of applications. The expected result is an evaluation of a high performance storage architecture assembled from commercially available hardware and software, with some software enhancements to meet the project's goals. It is anticipated that the integrated testbed system will represent a significant advance in the technology for distributed storage systems capable of handling gigabyte class files at gigabit-per-second data rates. The National Storage Laboratory was officially launched on 27 May 1992.

Coyne, Robert A.; Hulen, Harry; Watson, Richard

1993-01-01

182

Latent heat thermal energy storage tanks for space heating of buildings: Comparison between calculations and experiments  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Latent heat thermal energy storage tanks, where carbon fiber brushes are inserted to improve the heat transfer rates in the phase change materials, are installed in an air conditioning system of a building as a space heating resource. The measured outlet fluid temperatures are compared with the numerical ones predicted by a previously developed three dimensional heat transfer model. The preliminary numerical results had unallowable prediction errors, which probably resulted from poor contact between the brushes and the heat transfer tubes due to an installation problem of the brushes. However, the numerical results predicted by a corrected model agree well with the experimental ones under various operating conditions. The effect of the brushes on the thermal outputs of the tanks is then investigated using the corrected model. The result shows that the brushes contribute to saving space and reducing the cost of the tanks

183

Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04

184

Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

185

The ALICE online data storage system  

CERN Document Server

The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) Data Acquisition (DAQ) system has the unprecedented requirement to ensure a very high volume, sustained data stream between the ALICE Detector and the Permanent Data Storage (PDS) system which is used as main data repository for Event processing and Offline Computing. The key component to accomplish this task is the Transient Data Storage System (TDS), a set of data storage elements with its associated hardware and software components, which supports raw data collection, its conversion into a format suitable for subsequent high-level analysis, the storage of the result using highly parallelized architectures, its access via a cluster file system capable of creating high-speed partitions via its affinity feature, and its transfer to the final destination via dedicated data links. We describe the methods and the components used to validate, test, implement, operate, and monitor the ALICE Online Data Storage system and the way it has been used in the early days of comm...

Divia, R; Makhlyueva, I; Vande Vyvre, P; Altini, V; Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Chibante Barroso, V; Costa, F; Roukoutakis, F; Schossmaier, K; Soos, S; von Haller, B; 10.1088/1742-6596/219/5/052002

2010-01-01

186

Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

Handrock, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-10-01

187

New kinds of energy-storing building composite PCMs for thermal energy storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Graphical abstract: In this work, 10 new kinds of BCPCMs were prepared by blending of liquid xylitol pentalaurate (XPL) and xylitol pentamyristate (XPM) esters into gypsum, cement, diatomite, perlite and vermiculite. DSC results showed that the melting temperatures and energy storage capacities of the prepared BCPCMs are in range of about 40–55 °C and 31–126 J/g, respectively. TG investigations and thermal cycling test showed that the BCPCMs had good thermal endurance and thermal reliability. It can be also concluded that among the prepared 10 kinds materials, especially the BCPCMs including perlite, vermiculite, diatomite were found to better candidates for thermal energy storage applications in buildings due to the fact that they have relatively high heat storage ability. Highlights: ? New kinds BCPCMs were prepared by blending of liquid XPL and XPM esters with some building materials. ? The BCPCMs had suitable melting temperatures and energy storage capacities. ? Especially, the BCPCMs including perlite, vermiculite, diatomite were found to better candidates for thermal energy storage. - Abstract: Energy storing-composite phase change materials (PCMs) are significant means of thermal energy storage in buildings. Although several building composite PCMs (BCPCMs) have been developed in recent years, the additional investigations are still required to enrich the diversity of BCPCMs for solar heating and energy conservation applications in buildings. For this purpose, the present work is focused the preparation, characterization and determination of 10 new kinds of BCPCMs. The BCPCMs were prepared by blending of liquid xylitol pentalaurate (XPL) and xylitol pentamyristate (XPM) esters with gypsum, cement, diatomite, perlite and vermiculite as supporting matrices. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) analysis showed that the ester compounds were adsorbed uniformly into the building materials due to capillary forces. The highest adsorption ratio of XPL ester into gypsum, cement, perlite, diatomite, and vermiculite were found to be 20, 19, 71, 52 and 40 wt.%, respectively while it was found to be 22, 25, 66, 50 and 41 wt.% for XPM ester, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicated that the melting temperatures and latent heat energy storage capacities of the prepared BCPCMs are in range of about 40–55 °C and 31–126 J/g, respectively. Thermogravimetric (TG) investigations showed that the BCPCMs had good thermal endurance even above their phase change temperatures. The BCPCMs exhibited almost same chemical and phase change characteristics after 1000 thermal cycling test. It can be also concluded that especially the BCPCMs perlite, vermiculite, diatomite content were found to better candidates for thermal energy storage applications in buildings due to the fact that they have relatively higher heat storage capacity

188

Toward Web Enhanced Building Automation Systems  

OpenAIRE

The emerging concept of Smart Building relies on an intensive use of sensors and actuators and therefore appears, at first glance, to be a domain of predilection for the IoT. However, technology providers of building automation systems have been functioning, for a long time, with dedicated networks, communication protocols and APIs. Eventually, a mix of different technologies can even be present in a given building. IoT principles are now appearing in buildings as a way to simplify and standa...

Bovet, Ge?ro?me; Ridi, Antonio; Hennebert, Jean

2014-01-01

189

Design and operational experience of dry cask storage systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper (Power Point presentation) describes cask storage design features and available dry cask storage technology, cask types used for dry storage, design characteristics of CASTOR casks, the German licensing basis for cask storage systems, shielding requirements, thermal layout, mechanical design, criticality safety and containment, licensing procedure, operational experience of dry cask storage in Germany and worldwide

190

Dry storage system for spent nuclear fuel DSS  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The DSS is a Dry Storage System manufactured by INVAP for spent nuclear fuel. Spent fuel removed from the reactor of nuclear plants is usually stored in water pools where water acts as radiological shielding and as coolant. Pool water and pool building air require regular monitoring and maintenance. The DSS offers a more economical and safe alternative to store spent fuel which has had partial decay of its activity in the plant storage pool. The DSS alternative uses above ground concrete silos. With the DSS system spent fuel is loaded in steel baskets before fuel is removed from the storage pool of the power plant. Each basket holds several fuel bundles. Each basket is taken from the pool and dried in a shielded transfer cell. The basket loaded with dry fuel is then covered and seal welded. Each basket is transported inside a shielded container to its storage place in the concrete silo. The silo is a steel cylinder with capacity to store several baskets and surrounded by a thick reinforced concrete shielding. Baskets are housed inside the steel cylinder on top of each other. The silos are closed with a plug made of steel-lined reinforced concrete. When a silo is full the steel lining of the plug is seal welded to the steel cylinder. The system has been designed for a minimum of 50 years

191

QoS optimization in object storage system  

Science.gov (United States)

With the growing scale of storage system, the traditional storage strategies can not match the requirements of storage system. The attribute controlled object storage has brought about new revolution. Moreover, storage system must handle an increasing variety of data storage needs. QoSS (Quality of Storage Service) has therefore become an important issue. Based on a review of the current development in the object storage and QoS, a QoSS management framework and some optimization strategies are proposed. We implement QoSS efficiently involved with the optimizations in object-based storage systems in accordance with the proposed framework. An attribute-managed storage system with guaranteed QoSS based on extension of OSD and iSCSI protocols is developed. We mainly extend the T10 OSD standard on the delay and bandwidth attributes. The test results show that the proposed strategy can achieve the optimization of the storage systems.

Xiao, Liang; Wu, Chentao; Wei, Qinqi

2009-08-01

192

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27

193

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

194

Thermo Active Building Systems – Using Building Mass To Heat and Cool  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Using the thermal storage capacity of the concrete slabs between each floor in multistory buildings to heat or cool is a trend that began in the early 1990s in Switzerland.1,2 Pipes carrying water for heating and cooling are embedded in the center of the concrete slab. In central Europe (Germany, Austria, Netherlands, etc.), this type of system has been installed in a significant number of new office buildings since the late 1990s. The trend is spreading to other parts of the world (the rest of Europe, North America and Asia). Thermo active building systems (TABS) are primarily used for cooling multistory buildings. By activating the building mass, there is a direct heating-cooling effect. Also, because of the thermal mass, the peak load will be reduced and some of the cooling load will be transferred beyond the time of occupancy. Because these systems for cooling operate at water temperatures close to room temperature, they increase the efficiency of heat pumps, ground heat exchangers and other systems using renewable energy sources.

Olesen, Bjarne W.

2014-01-01

195

Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

Alan C. Cooper

2012-05-02

196

Guidelines for improved performance of ice storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper describes simulation-based results of an investigation of a commercial cooling plant with an ice storage system. Various ice storage systems, chiller compressors, and building types were analyzed under four different control strategies. Optimal control as the strategy that minimizes the total operating cost (demand and energy charges) served as a benchmark to assess the relative performance of three conventional controls (chiller-priority, constant-proportion, and storage-priority control) and to determine aspects in need of improvement in order to apply these conventional controls better and to enhance the cost saving potential of ice storage systems. Independent of the non-cooling electrical load profile, it was found that good efficiency of the cooling plant in the icemaking mode and rate structures with strong load-shifting incentives are prerequisites for making cool storage successful. Chillers with poor performance at subfreezing evaporator temperatures require significant on- to off-peak differentials in the energy and demand rates to yield substantial savings. The relative performance benefit of optimal control over conventional controls increases when rate-based load-shifting incentives are weak. With cooling-related electrical loads being large compared to non-cooling loads, all conventional controls improve their performance when slowly recharging during off-peak periods to contain off-peak demand. On-peak demand reduction of storage-priority is near-optimal for many cases. Guidelines are presented to improve the load-shifting performance of chiller-priority and constant-proportion control.(author)

Henze, G.P. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States); Krarti, M.; Brandemuehl, M.J. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States)

2003-02-01

197

Guidelines for improved performance of ice storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper describes simulation-based results of an investigation of a commercial cooling plant with an ice storage system. Various ice storage systems, chiller compressors, and building types were analyzed under four different control strategies. Optimal control as the strategy that minimizes the total operating cost (demand and energy charges) served as a benchmark to assess the relative performance of three conventional controls (chiller-priority, constant-proportion, and storage-priority control) and to determine aspects in need of improvement in order to apply these conventional controls better and to enhance the cost saving potential of ice storage systems. Independent of the non-cooling electrical load profile, it was found that good efficiency of the cooling plant in the ice making mode and rate structures with strong load-shifting incentives are prerequisites for making cool storage successful. Chillers with poor performance at subfreezing evaporator temperatures require significant on- to off-peak differentials in the energy and demand rates to yield substantial savings. The relative performance benefit of optimal control over conventional controls increases when rate-based load-shifting incentives are weak. With cooling-related electrical loads being large compared to non-cooling loads, all conventional controls improve their performance when slowly recharging during off-peak periods to contain off-peak demand. On-peak demand reduction of storage-priority is near-optimal for many cases. Guidelines are presented to improve the load-shifting performance of chiller-priority and constant-proportion control. (author)

Henze, G.P. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States); Krarti, M.; Brandemuehl, M.J. [University of Colorado at Boulder, Campus, Boulder, CO (United States)

2002-07-01

198

A smart grid ready building energy management system based on a hierarchical model predictive control.  

OpenAIRE

Electrical system is under a hard constraint: production and consumption must be equal. The production has to integrate non-controllable energy resources and to consider variability of local productions. While buildings are one of the most important energy consumers, the emergence of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the building integrates them in smart-grid as important consumer-actor players. Indeed, they have at their disposal various storage capacities: thermal storage,...

Lefort, Antoine

2014-01-01

199

A smart grid ready building energy managment system based on model predictive control  

OpenAIRE

Electrical system is under a hard constraint: production and consumption must be equal. The production has to integrate non-controllable energy resources and to consider variability of local productions. While buildings are one of the most important energy consumers, the emergence of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the building integrates them in smart-grid as important consumer-actor players. Indeed, they have at their disposal various storage capacities: thermal storage,...

Lefort, Antoine

2014-01-01

200

Electric power storage and energy storage system. ; Pumped storage power generation, heat storage and batteries. Denryoku chozoter dot chiku ene system. ; Yosui hatsuden, chikunetsu, denchi to idea hofu  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper describes a technology on electric power storage and energy storage which aims at storing different types of energy converted from electricity and utilizing them as electric energy. As an electric power storage technology, the pumped storage power generation system is put to practical use. In the electric power storage system, electric power is first stored as physical or chemical energy and then converted into electric energy, while electric power is stored as electromagnetic energy in the superconducting coil system. As to the compressed air energy storage, caverns of halite or coal mine are used as storage tanks for compressed air. In consideration of making an effective use of electric power, the heat storage system is put to practical use in the field of air-conditioning. In this system, cold water sotred in the heat storage tank during the night is utilized for cooling during the day. The development of the advanced battery electric energy storage, which aims at storing a large capacity of electric power, is now under way. The 1,000kW system tests are scheduled on NaS battery which is expected as the most compact stacked one and ZnBr battery which is easy to operate and maintain. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Mori, S. (The Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan))

1990-08-30

201

Generalized storage-reliability-yield relationships for rainwater harvesting systems  

Science.gov (United States)

Sizing storage for rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems is often a difficult design consideration, as the system must be designed specifically for the local rainfall pattern. We introduce a generally applicable method for estimating the required storage by using regional regression equations to account for climatic differences in the behavior of RWH systems across the entire continental United States. A series of simulations for 231 locations with continuous daily precipitation records enable the development of storage-reliability-yield (SRY) relations at four useful reliabilities, 0.8, 0.9, 0.95, and 0.98. Multivariate, log-linear regression results in storage equations that include demand, collection area and local precipitation statistics. The continental regression equations demonstrated excellent goodness-of-fit (R2 0.96-0.99) using only two precipitation parameters, and fits improved when three geographic regions with more homogeneous rainfall characteristics were considered. The SRY models can be used to obtain a preliminary estimate of how large to build a storage tank almost anywhere in the United States based on desired yield and reliability, collection area, and local rainfall statistics. Our methodology could be extended to other regions of world, and the equations presented herein could be used to investigate how RWH systems would respond to changes in climatic variability. The resulting model may also prove useful in regional planning studies to evaluate the net benefits which result from the broad use of RWH to meet water supply requirements. We outline numerous other possible extensions to our work, which when taken together, illustrate the value of our initial generalized SRY model for RWH systems.

Hanson, L. S.; Vogel, R. M.

2014-07-01

202

Review of flywheel energy storage system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As a clean energy storage method with high energy density, flywheel energy storage (FES) rekindles wide range interests among researchers. Since the rapid development of material science and power electronics, great progress has been made in FES technology. Material used to fabricate the flywheel rotor has switched from stone, stainless-steel to the latest composite material. With the introduction of magnetic bearing and high-efficient motor/generator, FES becomes a powerful competitor to chemical battery and develops wider application fields. This paper describes the latest developments and design considerations of FES technology. Rotor, bearing suspension system, motor/generator are the key parts of a FES system. And main factors like total energy losses, safety, cost control are discussed. Finally, application area of FES technology is presented including energy storage and attitude control in satellite, high-power uninterrupted power supply (UPS), electric vehicle (EV), power quality problem. (orig.)

Zhou Long; Qi Zhiping [Inst. of Electrical Engineering, CAS, Qian yan Dept., BJ (China)

2008-07-01

203

Atomic storage  

CERN Multimedia

IBM is supplying CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, with its Storage Tank file system virtualization software, 20 terabytes of storage capacity, and services under a three-year deal to build computer systems that will support the Large Hadron Collider accelerator (1 paragraph).

Ricadela, A

2003-01-01

204

Mass storage system by using broadcast technology  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

There are many similarities between data recording systems for high energy physics and broadcast systems; the data flow is almost one-way, requires real-time recording; requires large-scale automated libraries for 24-hours operation, etc. In addition to these functional similarities, the required data-transfer and data-recording speeds are also close to those for near future experiments. For these reasons, we have collaborated with SONY Broadcast Company to study the usability of broadcast devices for our data storage system. Our new data storage system consists of high-speed data recorders and tape-robots which are originally based on the digital video-tape recorder and the tape-robot for broadcast systems. We are also studying the possibility to use these technologies for the online data-recording system for B-physics experiment at KEK. (author)

205

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Waste Handling Building Electrical System performs the function of receiving, distributing, transforming, monitoring, and controlling AC and DC power to all waste handling building electrical loads. The system distributes normal electrical power to support all loads that are within the Waste Handling Building (WHB). The system also generates and distributes emergency power to support designated emergency loads within the WHB within specified time limits. The system provides the capability to transfer between normal and emergency power. The system provides emergency power via independent and physically separated distribution feeds from the normal supply. The designated emergency electrical equipment will be designed to operate during and after design basis events (DBEs). The system also provides lighting, grounding, and lightning protection for the Waste Handling Building. The system is located in the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of a diesel generator, power distribution cables, transformers, switch gear, motor controllers, power panel boards, lighting panel boards, lighting equipment, lightning protection equipment, control cabling, and grounding system. Emergency power is generated with a diesel generator located in a QL-2 structure and connected to the QL-2 bus. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System distributes and controls primary power to acceptable industry standards, and with a dependability compatible with waste handling building reliability objectives for non-safety electrical loads. It also generates and distributes emergency power to the designated emergency loads. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System receives power from the Site Electrical Power System. The primary material handling power interfaces include the Carrier/Cask Handling System, Canister Transfer System, Assembly Transfer System, Waste Package Remediation System, and Disposal Container Handling Systems. The system interfaces with the MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System for supervisory monitoring and control signals. The system interfaces with all facility support loads such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, office, fire protection, monitoring and control, safeguards and security, and communications subsystems.

S.C. Khamamkar

2000-06-23

206

Evaluation of existing Hanford buildings for the storage of solid wastes  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Existing storage space at the Hanford Site for solid low-level mixed waste (LLMW) will be filled up by 1997. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has initiated the project funding cycle for additional storage space to assure that new facilities are available when needed. In the course of considering the funding request, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked WHC to identify and review any existing Hanford Site facilities that could be modified and used as an alternative to constructing the proposed W-112 Project. This report documents the results of that review. In summary, no buildings exist at the Hanford Site that can be utilized for storage of solid LLMW on a cost-effective basis when compared to new construction. The nearest approach to an economically sensible conversion would involve upgrade of 100,000 ft{sup 2} of space in the 2101-M Building in the 200 East Area. Here, modified storage space is estimated to cost about $106 per ft{sup 2} while new construction will cost about $50 per ft{sup 2}. Construction costs for the waste storage portion of the W-112 Project are comparable with W-016 Project actual costs, with escalation considered. Details of the cost evaluation for this building and for other selected candidate facilities are presented in this report. All comparisons presented address the potential decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) cost avoidances realized by using existing facilities.

Carlson, M.C.; Hodgson, R.D.; Sabin, J.C.

1993-05-01

207

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The purpose of these calculations is to develop the material balances for documentation of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram (PFD) and future reference. The attached mass balances were prepared to support revision two of the PFD for the CSB. The calculations refer to diagram H-2-825869.

KLEM, M.J.

2000-05-11

208

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The purpose of these calculations is to develop the material balances for documentation of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram (PFD) and future reference. The attached mass balances were prepared to support revision two of the PFD for the CSB. The calculations refer to diagram H-2-825869

209

Management information systems - storage security  

OpenAIRE

This bachelor work is a research based document. It elaborates briefly on management information systems, their establishment and implementation. It later focuses on their security measures using the support of IS/IT.

El Hallag, Ahmed Yousef

2008-01-01

210

Mass Storage Performance Information System  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this task is to develop a data warehouse to enable system administrators and their managers to gather information by querying the data logs of the MDSDS. Currently detailed logs capture the activity of the MDSDS internal to the different systems. The elements to be included in the data warehouse are requirements analysis, data cleansing, database design, database population, hardware/software acquisition, data transformation, query and report generation, and data mining.

Scheuermann, Peter

2000-01-01

211

Heat of Fusion Storage with High Solar Fraction for Solar Low Energy Buildings  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper presents the theoretical investigation on a concept for a seasonal thermal storage based on the phase change material sodium acetate trihydrate with active use of supercooling as a measure to achieve a partly heat loss free thermal storage. The effect of supercooling allows a melted part of the storage to cool down below the melting point without solidification preserving the heat of fusion energy. If the supercooled storage reaches the surrounding temperature no heat loss will take place until the supercooled salt is activated. The investigation shows that this concept makes it possible to achieve 100% coverage of space heating and domestic hot water in a low energy house in a Danish climate with a solar heating system with 36 m² flat plate solar collector and approximately 10 m³ storage with sodium acetate. A traditional water storage solution aiming at 100% coverage will require a storage volume several times larger.

Schultz, JØrgen Munthe; Furbo, Simon

2006-01-01

212

Flywheel energy storage for electromechanical actuation systems  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors describe a flywheel energy storage system designed specifically to provide load-leveling for a thrust vector control (TVC) system using electromechanical actuators (EMAs). One of the major advantages of an EMA system over a hydraulic system is the significant reduction in total energy consumed during the launch profile. Realization of this energy reduction will, however, require localized energy storage capable of delivering the peak power required by the EMAs. A combined flywheel-motor/generator unit which interfaces directly to the 20-kHz power bus represents an ideal candidate for this load leveling. The overall objective is the definition of a flywheel energy storage system for this application. The authors discuss progress on four technical objectives: (1) definition of the specifications for the flywheel-motor/generator system, including system-level trade-off analysis; (2) design of the flywheel rotor; (3) design of the motor/generator; and (4) determination of the configuration for the power management system.

Hockney, Richard L.; Goldie, James H.; Kirtley, James L.

213

Monitored Retrievable Storage conceptual system study: concrete storage casks  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report presents design concepts and cost estimates for the Monitored Retrievable Storage facility which uses concrete silos for storage. Two separate scenarios are considered: the first is the storage of spent fuel assemblies and the second is the storage of wastes generated during the reprocessing of spent fuel and does not consider spent fuel storage. Two storage options for each scenario were evaluated. One is for maximum throughput of fuel or waste at 1800 MTU/y and a facility storage capacity of 15,000 MTU. The other option is for a maximum throughput of fuel or waste at 3000 MTU/y and a facility storage capacity of 72,000 MTU. The construction and operating costs, as well as the life-cycle costs for both scenarios and both the 1800 and 3000 MTU/y throughput rates are summarized. Drawings defining the facility and equipment that are unique to the silo storage concept are included. 26 figures, 34 tables

214

Multi-purpose canister storage of spent nuclear fuel in modular vault system. Technology development  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The original Modular Vault Dry Storage (MVDS) technology was developed in the early 1980s leading on from the experience gained with the magnox fuel dry storage facilities at the Wylfa power station in Wales (UK). The Wylfa dry fuel stores were commissioned in 1969 and the MVDS can, therefore, rightly claim to be the only dry fuel storage technology that has an operational and technological background of over thirty years. The MVDS system was originally designed to store individual fuel assemblies within a Storage Canister. This system ensures minimum fuel storage temperatures and provides maximum flexibility for future off-site transportation. Individual fuel assemblies can be removed from their storage locations and placed into a transportation cask for either road or rail off-site shipment. However, this requires each fuel assembly to be re-handled and transferred into the transportation cask. A vault storage system based on the proven MVDS technology using a large Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC), is now being developed to provide a cost-effective interim spent fuel storage system. Integrating the MVDS technology with a MPC and adapting the cooling, shielding and handling systems, allows the new vault storage system to provide high storage efficiency in compact storage buildings suitable for a large spent fuel interim storage facility. It has been possible to reconfigure the vault storage array from individual fuel assembly storage canisters to large diameter canisterorage canisters to large diameter canisters, and to re-configure the handling equipment to transfer large canisters. By modifying the design of the MVDS to accept large, multiple fuel assembly, multi-purpose canisters, it has been possible to maintain the technical and operational benefits of the original MVDS design, with the additional benefits of multi-purpose canisters. (author)

215

Changing Dashboard build system to Bamboo  

CERN Document Server

The aim of this project is to change Cosmic custom build system to an Automated build system used Bamboo CI System services. The goal is when a developer performs some changes on the source code, the system builds installation packages for different architectures and runs tests automatically on the software modules as soon as possible. The Bamboo build system polls the git repository which is a commonly used source code repository by the developers of the IT department. Bamboo CI System is a widely used system by the department. Thus the project uses widely accepted tools by the department which makes the Cosmic project even more standardized. Project also aims to create packages for every versions of Cosmic modules for different architectures (SLC5/SLC6) which can be accessed by different package repositories on AFS file system. The created package repositories can be used for automated deploy environment such as puppet.

Varga, Robert

2013-01-01

216

Storage monitoring systems for the year 2000  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In September 1993, President Clinton stated the US would ensure that its fissile material meet the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability. Frequent human inspection of the material could be used to ensure these standards. However, it may be more effective and less expensive to replace these manual inspections with virtual inspections via remote monitoring technologies. To prepare for this future, Sandia National Laboratories has developed several monitoring systems, including the Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) and Project Straight-Line. The purpose of this paper is to describe a Sandia effort that merges remote monitoring technologies into a comprehensive storage monitoring system that will meet the near-term as well as the long-term requirements for these types of systems. Topics discussed include: motivations for storage monitoring systems to include remote monitoring; an overview of the needs and challenges of providing a storage monitoring system for the year 2000; an overview of how the MIMS and Straight-Line can be enhanced so that together they create an integrated and synergistic information system by the end of 1997; and suggested milestones for 1998 and 1999 to assure steady progress in preparing for the needs of 2000

217

Energy Efficiency through Thermal Energy Storage - Evaluation of the Possibilities for the Swedish Building Stock, Phase 1  

OpenAIRE

As a first step in assessing the potential of thermal energy storage in Swedish buildings, the current situation of the Swedish building stock and different storage methods are discussed in this paper. Overall, many buildings are from the 1960’s or earlier having a relatively high energy demand, creating opportunities for large energy savings. The major means of heating are electricity for detached houses and district heating for multi dwelling houses and premises. Cooling needs are relativ...

Heier, Johan; Bales, Chris; Martin, Viktoria

2010-01-01

218

Planning horizon for a predictive optimal controller for thermal energy storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper presents the results of a detailed simulation analysis to determine the planning horizon for a predictive optimal controller for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The objective of the simulation analysis is to determine the sensitivity of the performance of a TES optimal controller and the planning horizon length to different design parameters, including: chiller capacity, cooling plant model, storage system capacity, and load profile. The analysis is performed using two commercial buildings: a 20-floor office building in Wisconsin, and a hotel in California.

Krarti, M.; Henze, G.P.; Bell, D.

1999-07-01

219

Comparison of cask and dry well storage concepts for a stand-alone monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Metal storage casks are compared with surface dry wells for storage of spent fuel or solidified high-level wastes. Conceptual designs of monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facilities are described and evaluated for both storage concepts. The MRS/IS facilities include systems and storage facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste. The impact of TRU waste on the MRS/IS facility is evaluated. Comparisons of the storage concepts were made for three cases for which different reprocessing and disposal schedules were assumed, thus affecting the size and handling rate of the MRS/IS facility. In all cases, dry wells were more economical than metal storage casks. 6 references, 51 figures, 51 tables

220

Transport system for AR and AFR spent fuel storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The purpose of the study is to develop concepts of transport system of spent fuel of which results are necessary to propose an optimum storage method in Japan. Conceptual designs of the transport system from reactor to reprocessing plant were made for cask storage method, vault storage method and pool storage method in cases of AR and AFR storage conditions. In addition, costs for the transport system were estimated. As the results, economy of transport systems of those methods are good in the following orders vault storage approximately equal to pool storage > cask storage. However, the above results are for the case that costs for casks are included in the transport cost. Unless otherwise, economy of the transport system of the cask storage is the best. (author)

221

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

2011-05-01

222

CNAAA spent fuel complementary storage building (UFC) construction and licensing: an overview of current status  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The reprocessing of nuclear fuel assemblies could be a valuable solution in order to make available additional energy resources and also to decrease the volume of discarded materials. After the burning of nuclear fuel assemblies to produce electrical energy, these components have to be stored in the spent fuel pools of each unit, for at least 10 years, in order to decrease their residual heat. Even after this initial 10 year-period, these spent fuel assemblies still have a great amount of energy, which can be reused. Nowadays, the spent fuel materials can be reprocessed in order to produce electrical energy, or be stored to provide, in the future, an opportunity to decide how these materials will be treated. At the present moment, Brazil does not plan to reprocess these spent fuels assemblies, as performed by some other countries. Thus, Brazil intends to build a spent fuel long term intermediate storage facility to allow the chance to make a decision in the future, taking into account the available technology at that time. Considering the three CNAAA units (Angra 1, 2 and 3 of Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto, the Brazilian nuclear power plant, located at Angra dos Reis county, Rio de Janeiro state) have a life time estimated in 60 years, and the intrinsical spent fuel pools storage capacity of these units, a Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Building - UFC has to be foreseen in order to increase the storage capacity of CNAAA. Therefore, the Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Building shall be in operation in 2018, capable to receive the first spent fuel assemblies from Angra 2 and, in the next year, from Angra 1. The same procedure will be applied for the spent fuel assemblies of Angra 3, currently in construction. The Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Building will be constructed and operated by Eletrobras Eletronuclear - the CNAAA owner - and will be located at the same site of the plant. Conceptually, the UFC will be built as a wet storage modality, representing a similar solution used in all the three CNAAA units to store the spent fuel assemblies. Taking into account the above described aspects, this paper aims to compare the licensing requirements included in the safety analysis report prepared for external spent fuel wet storage facilities in USA (NRC Regulatory Guide) and Switzerland (ENSI - Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate), considering that the standard formats applied by CNEN - the Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Authority - are based on USNRC recommendations and Eletrobras Eletronuclear plans, as a preliminary idea, to take the Goesgen NPP - KKG (Switzerland) spent fuel facility as a reference one for of the UFC. (author)

223

CNAAA spent fuel complementary storage building (UFC) construction and licensing: an overview of current status  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The reprocessing of nuclear fuel assemblies could be a valuable solution in order to make available additional energy resources and also to decrease the volume of discarded materials. After the burning of nuclear fuel assemblies to produce electrical energy, these components have to be stored in the spent fuel pools of each unit, for at least 10 years, in order to decrease their residual heat. Even after this initial 10 year-period, these spent fuel assemblies still have a great amount of energy, which can be reused. Nowadays, the spent fuel materials can be reprocessed in order to produce electrical energy, or be stored to provide, in the future, an opportunity to decide how these materials will be treated. At the present moment, Brazil does not plan to reprocess these spent fuels assemblies, as performed by some other countries. Thus, Brazil intends to build a spent fuel long term intermediate storage facility to allow the chance to make a decision in the future, taking into account the available technology at that time. Considering the three CNAAA units (Angra 1, 2 and 3 of Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto, the Brazilian nuclear power plant, located at Angra dos Reis county, Rio de Janeiro state) have a life time estimated in 60 years, and the intrinsical spent fuel pools storage capacity of these units, a Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Building - UFC has to be foreseen in order to increase the storage capacity of CNAAA. Therefore, the Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Building shall be in operation in 2018, capable to receive the first spent fuel assemblies from Angra 2 and, in the next year, from Angra 1. The same procedure will be applied for the spent fuel assemblies of Angra 3, currently in construction. The Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Building will be constructed and operated by Eletrobras Eletronuclear - the CNAAA owner - and will be located at the same site of the plant. Conceptually, the UFC will be built as a wet storage modality, representing a similar solution used in all the three CNAAA units to store the spent fuel assemblies. Taking into account the above described aspects, this paper aims to compare the licensing requirements included in the safety analysis report prepared for external spent fuel wet storage facilities in USA (NRC Regulatory Guide) and Switzerland (ENSI - Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate), considering that the standard formats applied by CNEN - the Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Authority - are based on USNRC recommendations and Eletrobras Eletronuclear plans, as a preliminary idea, to take the Goesgen NPP - KKG (Switzerland) spent fuel facility as a reference one for of the UFC. (author)

Lima Neto, Bertino do Carmo; Pacifi, Cicero Durval, E-mail: bertino@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: cicero@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Eletronuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2013-07-01

224

Hydrogen storage systems from waste Mg alloys  

Science.gov (United States)

The production cost of materials for hydrogen storage is one of the major issues to be addressed in order to consider them suitable for large scale applications. In the last decades several authors reported on the hydrogen sorption properties of Mg and Mg-based systems. In this work magnesium industrial wastes of AZ91 alloy and Mg-10 wt.% Gd alloy are used for the production of hydrogen storage materials. The hydrogen sorption properties of the alloys were investigated by means of volumetric technique, in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) and calorimetric methods. The measured reversible hydrogen storage capacity for the alloys AZ91 and Mg-10 wt.% Gd are 4.2 and 5.8 wt.%, respectively. For the Mg-10 wt.% Gd alloy, the hydrogenated product was also successfully used as starting reactant for the synthesis of Mg(NH2)2 and as MgH2 substitute in the Reactive Hydride Composite (RHC) 2LiBH4 + MgH2. The results of this work demonstrate the concrete possibility to use Mg alloy wastes for hydrogen storage purposes.

Pistidda, C.; Bergemann, N.; Wurr, J.; Rzeszutek, A.; Møller, K. T.; Hansen, B. R. S.; Garroni, S.; Horstmann, C.; Milanese, C.; Girella, A.; Metz, O.; Taube, K.; Jensen, T. R.; Thomas, D.; Liermann, H. P.; Klassen, T.; Dornheim, M.

2014-12-01

225

Ultra Capacitor: Alternative Energy Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

Today, ultracapacitors are a viable component for production aim designs in the power electronics world. The need for highly reliable back-up and emergency power are creating significant markets for energy storage and power delivery. Electrical wind turbine pitch systems, uninterruptible power supplies and electronic products such as wireless communication devices and digital cameras are some of the many applications where ultracapacitors have been designed in....

Ashish Kumar, Kriti Singh

2013-01-01

226

Benchmarking Eventually Consistent Distributed Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

Cloud storage services and NoSQL systems typically offer only "Eventual Consistency", a rather weak guarantee covering a broad range of potential data consistency behavior. The degree of actual (in-)consistency, however, is unknown. This work presents novel solutions for determining the degree of (in-)consistency via simulation and benchmarking, as well as the necessary means to resolve inconsistencies leveraging this information.

Bermbach, David

2014-01-01

227

Laser surveillance systems for fuel storage pools  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A Laser Surveillance System (LASSY) as a new safeguards device has been developed under the IAEA research contract No. 3458/RB at the Atominstitut Wien using earlier results by S. Fiarman. This system is designed to act as a sheet of light covering spent fuel assemblies in spent fuel storage pools. When movement of assemblies takes place, LASSY detects and locates the position of the movement in the pool and when interrogated, presents a list of pool positions and times of movement to the safeguards inspector. A complete prototype system was developed and built. Full scale tests showed the principal working capabilities of a LASSY underwater

228

Failure Analysis of Storage Data Magnetic Systems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper shows the conclusions about the corrosion mechanics in storage data magnetic systems (hard disk. It was done from the inspection of 198 units that were in service in nine different climatic regions characteristic for Mexico. The results allow to define trends about the failure forms and the factors that affect them. In turn, this study has analyzed the causes that led to mechanical failure and those due to deterioration by atmospheric corrosion. On the basis of the results obtained from the field sampling, demonstrates that the hard disk failure is fundamentally by mechanical effects. The deterioration by environmental effects were found in read-write heads, integrated circuits, printed circuit boards and in some of the electronic components of the controller card of the device, but not in magnetic storage surfaces. There fore, you can discard corrosion on the surface of the disk as the main kind of failure due to environmental deterioration. To avoid any inconvenience in the magnetic data storage system it is necessary to ensure sealing of the system.

Ortiz–Prado A.

2010-10-01

229

Improving Throughput in Cloud Storage System  

OpenAIRE

Because the cloud serves many workloads concurrently, its disk access pattern is highly random and heterogeneous. In addition, because various virtual machines access to files respectively, meta data utilization and small write requests are increased. In order to build a system for these patters, we should analyze the modern techniques used at cloud system. First, we show that a SATA controller hasenough processing capability to serve six disks without performance degradation. Motivated by th...

Chanho Choi; Shin-gyu Kim; Hyeonsang Eom; Yeom, Heon Y.

2012-01-01

230

Evaluation of battery/microturbine hybrid energy storage technologies at the University of Maryland :a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This study describes the technical and economic benefits derived from adding an energy storage component to an existing building cooling, heating, and power system that uses microturbine generation to augment utility-provided power. Three different types of battery energy storage were evaluated: flooded lead-acid, valve-regulated lead-acid, and zinc/bromine. Additionally, the economic advantages of hybrid generation/storage systems were evaluated for a representative range of utility tariffs. The analysis was done using the Distributed Energy Technology Simulator developed for the Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories by Energetics, Inc. The study was sponsored by the U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program through Sandia National Laboratories and was performed in coordination with the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Energy Engineering.

De Anda, Mindi Farber (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Fall, Ndeye K. (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC)

2005-03-01

231

Energy storage in electric power systems, what prospects?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The massive development of intermittent renewable energy sources is a disturbing factor for the stability of power grids. The time response of classical power balance stabilization systems, like hydraulic storage, compressed air storage and thermal storage systems, may be too slow in some situations. In this case fast response storage systems, like electrochemical systems, flywheels, super-capacitors or electromagnetic storage systems, can be the solution but their profitability depends on many technical and economical parameters. Tests of these systems with experimental facilities and demonstration projects are in progress in order to evaluate their technical and economical performances in real conditions of use. (J.S.)

232

Spent fuel consolidation in the 105KW Building fuel storage basin  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study is one element of a larger engineering study effort by WHC to examine the feasibility of irradiated fuel and sludge consolidation in the KW Basin in response to TPA Milestone (target date) M-34-00-T03. The study concludes that up to 11,500 fuel storage canisters could be accommodated in the KW Basin with modifications. These modifications would include provisions for multi-tiered canister storage involving the fabrication and installation of new storage racks and installation of additional decay heat removal systems for control of basin water temperature. The ability of existing systems to control radionuclide concentrations in the basin water is examined. The study discusses requirements for spent nuclear fuel inventory given the proposed multi-tiered storage arrangement, the impact of the consolidated mass on the KW Basin structure, and criticality issues associated with multi-tiered storage

233

Aquifer thermal energy storage at the Scarborough Government of Canada building  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A seasonal energy storage field trial facility will be associated with the Scarborough Town Centre Government of Canada Building scheduled for occupancy in 1985. This major centre of federal general purpose accomodation will be provided heating and cooling primarily by electrically driven centrifugal refrigeration machines operating on a heat pump cycle. A confined, artesian aquifer will be able to store winter chill, reject heat from the chillers, or excess solar energy. The aquifer may also serve as a constant temperature heat sink for the heat pumps if stored energy has been exhausted. Geotechnical Sampling, pumping tests, water quality testing and aquifer modeling have been accomplished. Project objectives are to assess the practicality of implementing cost effective aquifer energy storage within the constraints of modern building design and construction, and to evaluate the effectiveness of various operational strategies in maximizing the energy saving. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Morofsky, E.

1982-01-01

234

On Heterogeneous Regenerating Codes and Capacity of Distributed Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

Heterogeneous Distributed Storage Systems (DSS) are close to real world applications for data storage. Internet caching system and peer-to-peer storage clouds are the examples of such DSS. In this work, we calculate the capacity formula for such systems where each node store different number of packets and each having a different repair bandwidth (node can be repaired by contacting a specific set of nodes). The tradeoff curve between storage and repair bandwidth is studied f...

Benerjee, Krishna Gopal; Gupta, Manish Kumar

2014-01-01

235

Development of Automotive Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems  

Science.gov (United States)

Liquid hydrogen (LH2) takes up less storage volume than gas but requires cryogenic vessels. State-of-the-art applications for passenger vehicles consist of double-wall cylindrical tanks that hold a hydrogen storage mass of up to 10 kg. The preferred shell material of the tanks is stainless steel, since it is very resistant against hydrogen brittleness and shows negligible hydrogen permeation. Therefore, the weight of the whole tank system including valves and heat exchanger is more than 100 kg. The space between the inner and outer vessel is mainly used for thermal super-insulation purposes. Several layers of insulation foils and high vacuums of 10-3 Pa reduce the heat entry. The support structures, which keep the inner tank in position to the outer tank, are made of materials with low thermal conductivity, e.g. glass or carbon fiber reinforced plastics. The remaining heat in-leak leads to a boil-off rate of 1 to 3 percent per day. Active cooling systems to increase the stand-by time before evaporation losses occur are being studied. Currently, the production of several liquid hydrogen tanks that fulfill the draft of regulations of the European Integrated Hydrogen Project (EIHP) is being prepared. New concepts of lightweight liquid hydrogen storage tanks will be investigated.

Krainz, G.; Bartlok, G.; Bodner, P.; Casapicola, P.; Doeller, Ch.; Hofmeister, F.; Neubacher, E.; Zieger, A.

2004-06-01

236

Beam position monitor system for storage rings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Beam position monitors (BPM) for synchrotron light storage rings usually consist of beam pickup electrodes, coaxial relays and a narrowband receiver. While accurate, these systems are slow and of limited use in the commissioning of an accelerator. A beam position monitor is described which is intended to be a principal diagnostic during debug and routine running of a storage ring. It is capable of measuring the position of a single bunch on the first or nth orbit to an accuracy of a few percent. Stored beam position is more accurately measured with averaging techniques. Beam position changes can be studied in a bandwidth from DC to a few MHz. The beam monitor electronics consist of a separate amplification, detection, and sampling channel for each beam pickup electrode. Fast switches in each channel permit selection of the nth turn for measurement (single bunch mode). A calibration pulse is injected into each channel after beam measurement to permit gain offsets to be measured and removed from the final data. While initially more costly than the usual beam position monitor system, this sytem will pay for itself in reduced storage ring debug and trouble shooting time. 5 refs., 5 figs

237

Beam position monitor system for storage rings  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Beam position monitors (BPM) for synchrotron light storage rings usually consist of beam pickup electrodes, coaxial relays and a narrowband receiver. While accurate, these systems are slow and of limited use in the commissioning of an accelerator. A beam position monitor is described which is intended to be a principal diagnostic during debug and routine running of a storage ring. It is capable of measuring the position of a single bunch on the first or nth orbit to an accuracy of a few percent. Stored beam position is more accurately measured with averaging techniques. Beam position changes can be studied in a bandwidth from DC to a few MHz. The beam monitor electronics consist of a separate amplification, detection, and sampling channel for each beam pickup electrode. Fast switches in each channel permit selection of the nth turn for measurement (single bunch mode). A calibration pulse is injected into each channel after beam measurement to permit gain offsets to be measured and removed from the final data. While initially more costly than the usual beam position monitor system, this sytem will pay for itself in reduced storage ring debug and trouble shooting time. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Nakamura, M.; Hinkson, J.A.

1985-05-01

238

General considerations on thermal energy storage with closed adsorption systems  

OpenAIRE

Heat supply for buildings accounts for about 40% of primary energy consumption in Europe. The main obstacle to a sustainable energy supply for buildings is the time gap between energy availability (solar heat in summer) and heating demand in winter. Storage of thermal energy may allow to bridge this gap and to reach high solar coverage rates for the heating supply of buildings. Within a study of a reference house in three climatic regions, with three insulation standards, two collector types,...

Fu?ldner, G.; Henning, H. -m; Schossig, P.; Schmidt, F. P.

2011-01-01

239

Canister Storage Building (CSB) safety analysis report, phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The US Department of Energy established the K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel Project to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored under water in the Hanford Site's K Basins, which are located near the Columbia River. Recommendations for a series of aggressive projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to manage the safe removal of K Basins fuel were made in WHC-EP-0830, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Recommended Path Forward, and its subsequent update, WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Fuel. The integrated process strategy recommendations include the following steps: Fuel preparation activities at the K Basins, including removing the fuel elements from their K Basin canisters, separating fuel particulate from fuel elements and fuel fragments greater than 0.6 cm (0.25 in.) in any dimension, removing excess sludge from the fuel and fuel fragments by means of flushing, as necessary, and packaging the fuel into multicanister overpacks (MCOs); Removal of free water by draining and vacuum drying at a cold vacuum drying facility ES-122; Dry shipment of fuel from the Cold Vacuum Drying to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), a new facility in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site

240

Lithium batteries and other electrochemical storage systems  

CERN Document Server

Lithium batteries were introduced relatively recently in comparison to lead- or nickel-based batteries, which have been around for over 100 years. Nevertheless, in the space of 20 years, they have acquired a considerable market share - particularly for the supply of mobile devices. We are still a long way from exhausting the possibilities that they offer. Numerous projects will undoubtedly further improve their performances in the years to come. For large-scale storage systems, other types of batteries are also worthy of consideration: hot batteries and redox flow systems, for example.

Glaize, Christian

2013-01-01

241

Ultra Capacitor: Alternative Energy Storage Systems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Today, ultracapacitors are a viable component for production aim designs in the power electronics world. The need for highly reliable back-up and emergency power are creating significant markets for energy storage and power delivery. Electrical wind turbine pitch systems, uninterruptible power supplies and electronic products such as wireless communication devices and digital cameras are some of the many applications where ultracapacitors have been designed in. Ultracapacitors are components which have properties of a complexe capacitor system which is sensitive to voltage, temperature and frequency. The understanding of their behavior is primordial to characterize and operate them.

Ashish Kumar, Kriti Singh, Dr. Debmalya Bhattacharya

2013-12-01

242

Nuclear Hybrid energy Systems: Molten Salt Energy Storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Without growing concerns in reliable energy supply, the next generation in reliable power generation via hybrid energy systems is being developed. A hybrid energy system incorporates multiple energy input source sand multiple energy outputs. The vitality and efficiency of these combined systems resides in the energy storage application. Energy storage is necessary for grid stabilization because stored excess energy is used later to meet peak energy demands. With high thermal energy production the primary nuclear heat generation source, molten salt energy storage is an intriguing option because of its distinct thermal properties. This paper discusses the criteria for efficient energy storage and molten salt energy storage system options for hybrid systems. (Author)

243

Nuclear Hybrid energy Systems: Molten Salt Energy Storage  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Without growing concerns in reliable energy supply, the next generation in reliable power generation via hybrid energy systems is being developed. A hybrid energy system incorporates multiple energy input source sand multiple energy outputs. The vitality and efficiency of these combined systems resides in the energy storage application. Energy storage is necessary for grid stabilization because stored excess energy is used later to meet peak energy demands. With high thermal energy production the primary nuclear heat generation source, molten salt energy storage is an intriguing option because of its distinct thermal properties. This paper discusses the criteria for efficient energy storage and molten salt energy storage system options for hybrid systems. (Author)

Green, M.; Sabharwall, P.; Yoon, S. J.; Bragg-Sitton, S. B.; Stoot, C.

2014-07-01

244

Eutectic mixtures of capric acid and lauric acid applied in building wallboards for heat energy storage  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Capric acid (CA) and lauric acid (LA), as phase change materials (PCM), can be applied for energy storage in low temperature. The phase transition temperature and values of latent heat of eutectic mixtures of CA and LA are suitable for being incorporated with building materials to form phase change wallboards used for building energy storage. 120, 240 and 360 accelerated thermal cycle tests were conducted to study the changes in latent heat of fusion and melting temperature of phase change wallboards combined with the eutectic mixtures of CA and LA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tested the transition temperature and latent heat. The results showed that the melting temperature and latent heat of these phase change wallboards with eutectic mixtures have no obvious variations after repeated 360 thermal cycles, which proved that these phase change wallboards have good thermal stability for melting temperature and variations in latent heat of fusion for long time application. Therefore, they can be used for latent heat storage in the field of building energy conservation. (author)

Shilei, L.; Neng, Z. [School of Environment Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Guohui, F. [Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang (China)

2006-07-01

245

Eutectic mixtures of capric acid and lauric acid applied in building wallboards for heat energy storage  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Capric acid (CA) and lauric acid (LA), as phase change materials (PCM), can be applied for energy storage in low temperature. The phase transitions temperature and values of latent heat of eutectic mixtures of CA and LA are suitable for being incorporated with building materials to form phase change wallboards used for building energy storage. 120, 240 and 360 accelerated thermal cycle tests were conducted to study the changes in latent heat of fusion and melting temperature of phase change wallboards combined with the eutectic mixtures of CA and LA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tested the transition temperature and latent heat. The results showed that the melting temperature and latent heat of these phase change wallboards with eutectic mixtures have not obvious variations after repeated 360 thermal cycles, which proved that these phase change wallboards have good thermal stability for melting temperature and variations in latent heat of fusion for long time application. Therefore, they can be used for latent heat storage in the field of building energy conservation. (author)

Lv Shilei; Zhu Neng [Tianjin University (China). School of Environmental Science and Technology; Feng Guohui [Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang (China)

2006-06-15

246

Spent Nuclear Fuel [SNF] Project Canister Storage Building [CSB] Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] Volume 1 [Section 1-3  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating SNF presently stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins, which are located in the 100 K Area near the Columbia River. Recommendations for a series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to manage the safe removal and storage of K Basins fuel were made in WHC-EP-0830, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Recommended Path Forward, and its subsequent update, WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel. The integrated process strategy recommendations include the following steps: (1) Fuel preparation activities at the K Basins, including removing the fuel elements from their K Basins canisters; separating fuel particulate from fuel elements and fuel fragments greater than 0.25 in. in any dimension; removing excess sludge from the fuel fragments by means of flushing, as necessary; and packaging the fuel into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs); (2) Transportation of MCOs loaded with SNF from K Basins to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF); (3) Removal of free water by draining and vacuum drying at the CVDF in the 100 K Area; (4) Dry shipment of fuel from the CVDF to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), a new facility in the 200 East Area; and (5) Interim storage of the MCOs in the CSB until a suitable long-term repository is established. In addition, the CSB can alsoestablished. In addition, the CSB can also store Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies in a modified MCO container called the Shippingport spent fuel canister. The Interim Storage Area has been established adjacent to the CSB for storage of other non-defense SNF in above-ground dry cask storage containers

247

Pulsed rf systems for large storage rings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this note we consider the possibility that by using a pulsed rf system, perhaps a system which operates at a somewhat higher frequency, a substantial reduction can be made in the rf power requirement for the next generation of large storage rings. A large effort over a period of many years has been expended in the attempt to increase the shunt impedance of rf structures for cw systems. Without turning to superconductivity only modest gains in the shunt impedance remain to be made by further detailed adjustments in cell shape. On the other hand, very little effort has as yet gone into the optimization of structures for pulsed systems. The structure parameters to be quoted in this report do not therefore necessarily represent values close to those for an optimum design. It is expected that the system designs set out here can be improved upon with further experimental and theoretical work. 11 refs., 3 figs

248

Nuclear power reactors and hydrogen storage systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Among conclusions and results come by, a nuclear-electric-hydrogen integrated power system was suggested as a way to prevent the energy crisis. It was shown that the hydrogen power system using nuclear power as a leading energy resource would hold an advantage in the current international situation as well as for the long-term future. Results reported provide designers of integrated nuclear-electric-hydrogen systems with computation models and routines which will allow them to explore the optimal solution in coupling power reactors to hydrogen producing systems, taking into account the specific characters of hydrogen storage systems. The models were meant for average computers of a type easily available in developing countries. (author)

249

Ventilation system in the RA reactor building - design specifications  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Protective role of the ventilation system of nuclear facilities involve construction of ventilation barriers which prevent release of radioactive particulates or gases, elimination od radioactive particulates and gases from the air which is released from contaminated zones into the reactor environment. Ventilation barriers are created by dividing the building into a number of ventilation zones with different sub pressure compared to the atmospheric pressure. The RA reactor building is divided into four ventilation zones. First zone is the zone of highest risk. It includes reactor core with horizontal experimental channels, underground rooms of the primary coolant system (D2O), helium system, hot cells and the space above the the reactor core. Second zone is the reactor hall and the room for irradiated fuel storage. The third zone includes corridors in the basement, ground floor and first floor where the probability of contamination is small. The fourth zone includes the annex where the contamination risk is low. There is no have natural air circulation in the reactor building. Ventilators for air input and outlet maintain the sub pressure in the building (pressure lower than the atmospheric pressure). This prevents release of radioactivity into the atmosphere

250

Ice storage system controls for the reduction of operating cost and energy use  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Ice storage systems have the reputation of saving cost for operating building cooling plants by appropriately recognizing time-of-use incentives in the utility rate structure. However, many systems can consume more electrical energy than a conventional cooling plant without ice storage. This excess energy problem is illustrated in this paper by a simplified cooling plant model employed in a simulation environment that allows the assessment of the control performance of various conventional and optimal strategies. The optimal control strategy of minimizing operating cost only is introduced and subsequently is modified to allow the simultaneous consideration of operating cost and energy consumption. This proposed optimal control strategy could be valuable if ice storage systems are to stand on their own merits in a deregulated utility environment. Due to the lack of demand charges under real-time pricing, even small energy penalties and their associated excess energy cost may jeopardize the feasibility of the ice storage system.

Henze, G.P.; Krarti, M. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

1998-11-01

251

Vaccum system for storage ring in Taiwan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The construction of an electron storage ring with an energy accumulation capacity of 1.3GeV has been under way at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; SRRC) in Taiwan. The facility comprises a linear accelerator of 50MeV and a synchrotron of 1.3GeV. The storage ring, 120m in length, comprises TBA-type lattices and 18 deflecting magnets to deflect the beam by 20deg. The vacuum system for the 1.3GeV electron storage ring at SRRC was designed on the basis of calculations of the pressure distribution. An aluminum alloy was adopted as material for the vacuum chambers, allowing its design and production to be performed by a simple process. The chamber at the linear portion was produced by a special extrusion process while the chamber for the deflector was produced by EL processing and TIG welding. The surface properties were analyzed and the gas release rate was measured. Results have shown that the chambers can have fairly good vacuum characteristics. Pumping tests were also carried out using an ion pump and a getter pump. A vacuum of 10-10-10-11 Torr was achieved rapidly in each of the chamber. Shields are provided to minimize the RF inpedance at various parts of the ring. (N.K.)

252

Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with ``conventional`` HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1992-01-01

253

Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with conventional'' HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1992-01-01

254

Investigation of heat of fusion storage for solar low energy buildings  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper describes a theoretical investigation by means of TRNSYS simulations of a partly heat loss free phase change material (PCM) storage solution for solar heating systems. The partly heat loss free storage is obtained by controlled used of super cooling in a mixture of sodium acetate and xanthane rubber. The storage can cool down to surrounding temperature preserving the latent heat in form of the heat of fusion energy. The basis for the calculations is a super low energy house with a space heating demand of 2010 kWh/year and a domestic hot water demand of 2530 kWh/year. For storage volumes in the range of 500 – 3000 litres the heat loss free state is seldom reached and the effect of super cooling is limited. For larger volumes the heat loss free state may be reached. The benefit of using a PCM storage compared to a traditional water storage is limited with respect to energy savings for storage sizes up to 1 m3, but if the same amount of net utilised solar energy should be reached it would require a water storage that is 2 – 3 times larger.

Schultz, JØrgen Munthe; Furbo, Simon

2005-01-01

255

ASRS Handling System for Radioactive Waste Storage Purposes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Automated Storage Retrieval System (ASRS) is a computing controlled method for automatically depositing and retrieving waste from defined locations. The system is used to replace the existing process of storage and retrieval of radioactive waste at storage facility at block 33. The main objective of this project is to reduced the radiation exposure to the worker and potential forklift accident occur during storage and retrieval of the radioactive waste. By using the ASRS system, WasTeC/ Nuclear Malaysia can provide a safe storage of radioactive waste and the use of this system can eliminate the repeat handling and can improve productivity. (author)

256

Corrective action baseline report for underground storage tank 2331-U Building 9201-1  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The purpose of this report is to provide baseline geochemical and hydrogeologic data relative to corrective action for underground storage tank (UST) 2331-U at the Building 9201-1 Site. Progress in support of the Building 9201-1 Site has included monitoring well installation and baseline groundwater sampling and analysis. This document represents the baseline report for corrective action at the Building 9201-1 site and is organized into three sections. Section 1 presents introductory information relative to the site, including the regulatory initiative, site description, and progress to date. Section 2 includes the summary of additional monitoring well installation activities and the results of baseline groundwater sampling. Section 3 presents the baseline hydrogeology and planned zone of influence for groundwater remediation

257

Energy Savings by Treating Buildings as Systems  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews the opportunities for dramatically reducing energy use in buildings by treating buildings as systems, rather than focusing on device efficiencies. Systems-level considerations are relevant for the operation of heat pumps (where the temperatures at which heat or coldness are distributed are particularly important); the joint or separate provision of heating, cooling, and ventilation; the joint or separate removal of sensible heat and moisture; and in the operation of fluid systems having pumps. Passive heating, cooling, and ventilation, as well as daylighting (use of sunlight for lighting purposes) also require consideration of buildings as systems. In order to achieve the significant (50-75%) energy savings that are possible through a systems approach, the design process itself has to involve a high degree of integration between the architect and various engineering disciplines (structural, mechanical, electrical), and requires the systematic examination and adjustment of alternative designs using computer simulation models.

Harvey, L. D. Danny

2008-09-01

258

A hybrid energy efficient building ventilation system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The present paper presents a high performance cooling/heating ventilation system using a rotary heat exchanger (RHE), together with a reverse-cycle heat pump (RCHP) that can be integrated with various heat sources. Energy consumption in the building sector is largely dominated by the energy consumed in maintaining comfortable conditions indoors. For example in many developed countries the building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems consume up to 50% of the total energy consumed in buildings. Therefore energy efficient HVAC solutions in buildings are critical for realising CO2 targets at local and global level. There are many heating/cooling concepts that rely upon renewable energy sources and/or use natural low temperature heat sources in the winter and heat sinks in the summer. In the proposed system, waste energy from the exhaust air stream is used to precondition the outdoor air before it is supplied into the building. The hybrid system provides heating in the winter and cooling in the summer without any need for additional heating or cooling devices as required in conventional systems. Its performance is better than a typical reheat or air conditioning system in providing the same indoor air quality (IAQ) levels. It is shown that an energy saving up to 60% (heat energy) is achieved by using the proposed hybrid system in building ventilation applications. -- Highlights: • Hybrid ventilation system: the hybrid ventilation system uses a rotating regenerator and a reversible heat pump. • Heat recovery: heat recovery from exhaust air stream by rotary wheel type heat exchanger. • Reversible cycle heat pump (RCHP): additional heating or cooling of the supply air is provided by the RCHP. • Energy efficiency: energy savings of up to 60% using the proposed system are achievable

259

Simulation of Flywheel Energy Storage System Controls  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents the progress made in the controller design and operation of a flywheel energy storage system. The switching logic for the converter bridge circuit has been redefined to reduce line current harmonics, even at the highest operating speed of the permanent magnet motor-generator. An electromechanical machine model is utilized to simulate charge and discharge operation of the inertial energy in the flywheel. Controlling the magnitude of phase currents regulates the rate of charge and discharge. The resulting improvements are demonstrated by simulation.

Truong, Long V.; Wolff, Frederick J.; Dravid, Narayan

2001-01-01

260

ADVANCEMENT FOR INVOLUNTARY RECONFIGURATION FOR AMPLE RESPONSIBLE STORAGE SYSTEMS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nowadays we are more dependent on Internet services, which gives a significant functionality and store serious state. These services are often executed on a group of machines inhabit at several geographic locations such as a set of company data centers. Byzantine-fault-tolerant duplication gets better the accessibility and reliability of Internet services that build up significant state and defend it in spite of attacks or software errors. However, an inactive set of replica, or have restrictions in how they hold reconfigurations is assumed by the accessible Byzantine-fault-tolerant storage systems. During the system lifetime in long-lived and large-scale systems this can be problematic where system membership is likely to change. A large-scale Byzantine-fault-tolerant system is a complete solution for dynamically changing system membership which is presented here. A service that tracks system membership and periodically notifies other system nodes of membership changes is presented in this paper. To avoid human configuration errors the membership service runs mostly automatically and provides applications with a sequence of consistent views of the system membership is itself by Byzantine fault- tolerant and reconfigurable. By using it in a new dispersed hash table called dBQS that provides atomic semantics even across changes in imitation sets as the utility of this membership service is demonstrated. To handle changes in the replica set dBQS is interesting in its own right because its storage algorithms extend existing Byzantine quorum protocols, and because it differs from previous distributed hash tables (DHTs by providing Byzantine fault tolerance and offering strong semantics.

Velikanti Kiran Kumar

2013-08-01

261

Diagnosis System for Building Management Network  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this study the author used multi-criteria decision-making design to provide optimal structure of the developed and modified modern Building Management Systems (BMS. While modern BMS is used to provide effective and securable activity of enterprises solving complex tasks of their operability. However a lot of problems such as system structure flexibility in an ever changing market of the BMS and industrial network hardware can be solved by means of the hardware structure development automation. Problems of optimal hardware structure composition solving all the necessary building management task support providing reliable and effective system operation have to be solved.

Zafer Al-Makhadmee

2013-12-01

262

Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

1997-10-15

263

High-performance commercial building systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01

264

Specification requirements for inter-seasonal heat storage systems in a low energy residential house  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: • Quick evaluation of heating needs and maximal power of a low-energy residential house. • Detailed tools are provided for the design of a thermal energy storage system. • Heating needs are calculated for full seasonal storage or for shorter autonomies. • Design power is estimated as a function of the desired time coverage of the system. • Heating needs and deliverable power may be linked together for system optimization. - Abstract: This paper aims at providing sizing information concerning a thermal storage system in the case of a low energy consumption building (2 y). Numerical simulations for a reference individual building were run for 23 different cities in Europe. Results show a clear correlation between annual heat demand Qy and annual heating degree-day (HDD): Qy = f1(HDD). There is also a good correlation between power demand and HDD. But as heat coverage of the entire heating period may be too ambitious, the analysis goes further. It presents a correlation between heating demand Q and HDD as a function of the storage system autonomy t of the form Q=(1-exp((-t)/(?) ))×Qy with ? = f2(HDD). It also gives the absolute distribution of sorted power demand values as a function of HDD in the form of a power sizing chart. The purpose of this chart is to provide specifications for the sizing of a thermal storage system intended to partially cover energy needs and power demand of a low energy residential house

265

Final Hazard Classification and Auditable Safety Analysis for the 105-F Building Interim Safe Storage Project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The auditable safety analysis (ASA) documents the authorization basis for the partial decommissioning and facility modifications to place the 105-F Building into interim safe storage (ISS). Placement into the ISS is consistent with the preferred alternative identified in the Record of Decision (58 FR). Modifications will reduce the potential for release and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials, as well as lower surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) costs. This analysis includes the following: A description of the activities to be performed in the course of the 105-F Building ISS Project. An assessment of the inventory of radioactive and other hazardous materials within the 105-F Building. Identification of the hazards associated with the activities of the 105-F Building ISS Project. Identification of internally and externally initiated accident scenarios with the potential to produce significant local or offsite consequences during the 105-F Building ISS Project. Bounding evaluation of the consequences of the potentially significant accident scenarios. Hazard classification based on the bounding consequence evaluation. Associated safety function and controls, including commitments. Radiological and other employee safety and health considerations

266

Value and cost analyses for solar thermal-storage systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Value and cost data for thermal energy storage are presented for solar thermal central receiver systems for which thermal energy storage appears to be attractive. Both solar thermal electric power and industrial process heat applications are evaluated. The value of storage is based on the cost for fossil fuel and solar thermal collector systems in 1990. The costing uses a standard lifetime methodology with the storage capacity as a parameter. Both value and costs are functions of storage capacity. However, the value function depends on the application. Value/cost analyses for first-generation storage concepts for five central receiver systems (molten salt, water/steam, organic fluid, air, and liquid metal) established the reference against which new systems were compared. Some promising second-generation energy storage concepts have been identified, and some more advanced concepts have also been evaluated.

Luft, W.; Copeland, R.J.

1983-04-01

267

Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System  

CERN Document Server

The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Builds and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, test...

Undrus, A

2012-01-01

268

Thermally activated building systems in context of increasing building energy efficiency  

OpenAIRE

One of the possible ways to provide heating to the building is to use thermally activated building systems. This type of heating, besides providing significant increase in building energy efficiency, allows using low-temperature heating sources. In this paper, special attention is given to opaque part of the building façade with integrated thermally activated building systems. Due to fact that this type of system strongly depends on temperature of this con...

Stojanovi? Branislav V.; Janevski Jelena N.; Mitkovi? Petar B.; Stojanovi? Milica B.; Ignjatovi? Marko G.

2014-01-01

269

Seismic upgrading of the spent fuel storage building at Kozloduy NPP  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Spent Fuel Storage Building at Kozloduy NPP site has been analysed for new review level earthquake with 0.2 g peak ground acceleration (compared to the initial design basis earthquake with 0.1 g PGA). The preliminary seismic analysis of the existing building structure using the 5% site specific response spectrum showed the need of seismic structural upgrading. Two upgrading concepts were evaluated on the basis of several factors. The main factor considered was preventing the collapse of the hall structure and the travelling cranes on the fuel storage area during and after a SSE. A three dimensional finite element model was created for the investigation of the seismic response of the existing structure and for the design of the building upgrading. The modelling of the heavy travelling crane and its sub-crane structure was one of the key points. Different configurations of the new upgrading and strengthening structures were investigated. Some interesting conclusions have been drawn from the experience in analysing and upgrading of such a complex industrial structure, comprised of elements with substantial differences in material, rigidity, construction and general behaviour. (author)

270

Real-time supervision of building HVAC system performance  

OpenAIRE

This thesis presents techniques for improving building HVAC system performance in existing buildings generated using simulation-based tools and real data. Therefore, one of the aims has been to research the needs and possibilities to assess and improve building HVAC system performance. In addition, this thesis aims at an advanced utilization of building energy management system (BEMS) and the provision of useful information to building operators using simulation tools. Buildings are becoming ...

Djuric, Natasa

2008-01-01

271

An Overview on Energy Storage Options for Renewable Energy Systems  

OpenAIRE

Developing technology to store electrical energy so it can be available to meet demand whenever needed would represent a major breakthrough in electricity distribution. Helping to try and meet this goal, electricity storage devices can manage the amount of power required to supply customers at times when need is greatest, which is during peak load. This paper focuses on four storage technologies that can be used as storage for wind energy conversion system. For each storage te...

Mr. Ajay Sharma

2014-01-01

272

Transport of NUHOMS spent-fuel storage system canisters  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

As utilities face near-term spent-fuel storage needs, various methods of dry storage are being implemented to augment their present spent-fuel pool storage capacities. The decisions on the type of storage are based on utility-specific criteria as well as long-term storage economics. Since the US Department of Energy (DOE) will be responsible for transporting the spent fuel from the reactor sites to either a monitored retrievable storage facility or a geologic repository, compatibility between the utility's dry storage system and the DOE transportation system is also an important consideration in selecting a system. One storage system selected by utilities is the NUHOMS reg-sign spent-fuel storage system. In the NUHOMS reg-sign system, fuel is stored in canisters that are housed in a reinforced concrete storage module. The canisters hold either 24 pressurized water reactor or 52 boiling water reactor fuel assemblies. It is desirable to transfer these canisters in the future directly to the DOE transportation system to minimize the rehandling of the fuel and its associated risk. Certain technical interfaces must be addressed to successfully implement the direct transfer of NUHOMS reg-sign fuel canisters to the DOE waste system. These interfaces include dimensional compatibility, handling requirements, criticality criteria, shielding needs, and thermal performance

273

Switching system for capacitance energy storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The system is intended for a synchronous and programmed discharge of large capacitance energy storages. The RVU-43 vacuum dischargers are used as commutators, able of transmitting the current up to 200 kA by the voltage up 30 keV and commutated charge up to 120 Kl. Each discharger is located in a screening vessel with sockets for switching coaxial cables, connecting the discharger with condensers and loading. The ignition pulses for dischargers are generated through the high-voltage pulses multichannel generators. Individual channels in the generators are controlled through an optofibrous cable from the programmer unit. The programmer operates in combination with a computer and provides for generation in each channel of pulses delayed for the given time interval relative to the synchronization pulse, common for the whole system

274

Ultrasonic identity data storage and archival system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Ultrasonic seals are being used to determine if an underwater stored spent fuel container has been compromised and can be used to determine if a nuclear material container has been compromised. The Seal Pattern Reader (SPAR) is a microprocessor controlled instrument which interrogates an ultrasonic seal to obtain its identity. The SPAR can compare the present identity with a previous identity, which it obtains from a magnetic bubble cassette memory. A system has been developed which allows an IAEA inspector to transfer seal information obtained at a facility by the SPAR to an IAEA-based data storage and retrieval system, using the bubble cassette memory. Likewise, magnetic bubbles can be loaded at the IAEA with seal signature data needed at a facility for comparison purposes. The archived signatures can be retrieved from the data base for relevant statistical manipulation and for plotting

275

Closure system for a nuclear storage vessel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A description is given of a closure system for a nuclear storage or reactor vessel in which the closure is achieved by a plug revolving on a ball bearing ring, the displacements taking place in such a way that the plug rests sometimes on the ball bearing ring and sometimes on the vessel flange. The feature of this system is a set of rollers comprising one or more cams, in contact with the plug and the ball ring, interposed between these parts so that the rotation of these rollers, determined by the rotation of the ring, causes the plug to move away from or towards the ball ring, the shape of the cam (s) being determined so as to obtain the desired path and motion

276

Energy Storage System Scheduling in Wind-Diesel Microgrids  

Science.gov (United States)

This thesis proposes a knowledge based expert system tool that can be used as an online controller for the charging/discharging of an energy storage system in a wind-diesel microgrid. The wind-diesel microgrid is modelled, and a typical energy storage system is implemented to test the functionality of the controller using hourly-discrete power values. The results are compared against an offline optimization that was provided 24-hour lookahead wind values, as well as a controller that was implemented using artificial neural networks. The knowledge based expert system is then used to analyze the cost of energy, by means of a parametric analysis, consisting of varying the wind penetration, energy storage system power rating and energy rating to determine for which wind penetration values a storage system implementation would be technically and economically viable. Different storage technologies are tested in a one-year time frame to determine which would be best suited for this particular application. The energy storage systems are implemented as single-layer and dual-layer, in which the knowledge based expert system is modified for the latter analysis, in order to determine whether or not there are advantages to having a dual-layer storage system. Throughout these analyses, the flexibility of the knowledge based expert system controller to various energy storage systems and microgrid models is verified. It also demonstrates that, in a context of high base generation costs, energy storage can be a viable solution to managing wind power variations.

Ross, Michael

277

Monitoring Building Systems for Schedule Compliance  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) initiated a Core Business Hours program, it became a challenge to ensure that the hundreds of systems campus wide were operating within their programmed schedules. Therefore, a collaborative exchange between PNNL operations and PNNL researchers developing the Decision Support for Operations and Maintenance (DSOM) software package was initiated to create a tool to solve this problem. This new DSOM tool verifies systems are operating within scheduled operation times by polling Building Automation and Control Network (BACnet) identifiers of systems’ on/off or command statuses. The tool records the time spent in operation state (ON) and totalizes each system over a rolling 7-day period, highlighting systems that are running over the scheduled hours. This snapshot view allows building management to look quickly at the entire campus to ensure that systems are not operating beyond their scheduled hours.

Jensen, Andrew M.; Belew, Shan T.

2013-02-19

278

Exergy analysis of building energy systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In Germany, energy consumption for space heating represents about 25% of the total final energy consumption of the entire country. The concept of LowEx buildings, which have a low exergy demand, has been introduced; however, the associated pump devices have a high electrical energy consumption. The aim of this paper is to provide a novel approach for comparing the exergy efficiency of different buildings. A system was modeled and simulated using Modelica, and the exergy losses in heat generation, distribution and delivery were calculated for both a geothermal heat pump and a boiler system. Results showed that the heat pump system led to lower exergy losses for heat generation but higher exergy losses for heat distribution than the boiler system. This study provided a useful comparison of exergy performance of geothermal heat pump and boiler systems however the simulation model should be improved to fully describe both systems' behavior.

Badakhshani, Azadeh; Hoh, Alexander; Muller, Dirk [RWTH Aachen University, E.ON Energy Research Center (Germany)], email: abadakhshani@eonerc.rwth-aachen.de

2011-07-01

279

Building a Cooperative Communications System  

CERN Document Server

In this paper, we present the results from over-the-air experiments of a complete implementation of an amplify and forward cooperative communications system. Our custom OFDM-based physical layer uses a distributed version of the Alamouti block code, where the relay sends one branch of Alamouti encoded symbols. First we show analytically and experimentally that amplify and forward protocols are unaffected by carrier frequency offsets at the relay. This result allows us to use a conventional Alamouti receiver without change for the distributed relay system. Our full system implementation shows gains up to 5.5dB in peak power constrained networks. Thus, we can conclusively state that even the simplest form of relaying can lead to significant gains in practical implementations.

Murphy, Patrick; Aazhang, Behnaam

2007-01-01

280

Energetic and Exergy Efficiency of a Heat Storage Unit for Building Heating  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper deals with a numerical and experimental investigation of a daily solar storage system conceived and built in Laboratoire de Maitrise des Technologies de l Energie (LMTE, Borj Cedria). This system consists mainly of the storage unit connected to a solar collector unit. The storage unit consists of a wooden case with dimension of 5 m3 (5 m x 1m x 1m) filed with fin sand. Inside the wooden case was buried a network of a polypropylene capillary heat exchanger with an aperture area equal to 5 m2. The heat collection unit consisted of 5 m2 of south-facing solar collector mounted at a 37 degree tilt angle. In order to evaluate the system efficiency during the charging period (during the day) and discharging period (during the night) an energy and exergy analyses were applied. Outdoor experiments were also carried out under varied environmental conditions for several consecutive days. Results showed that during the charging period, the average daily rates of thermal energy and exergy stored in the heat storage unit were 400 and 2.6 W, respectively. It was found that the net energy and exergy efficiencies in the charging period were 32 pour cent and 22 pour cent, respectively. During the discharging period, the average daily rates of the thermal energy and exergy recovered from the heat storage unit were 2 kW and 2.5 kW, respectively. The recovered heat from the heat storage unit was used for the air-heating of a tested room (4 m x 3 m x 3 m). The results showed that 30 pour cent of the total heating requirement of the tested room was obtained from the heat storage system during the whole night in cold seasons

281

Green Roofs and Green Building Rating Systems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The environmental benefits for green building from the Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED and Ecology, Energy, Waste, and Health (EEWH rating systems have been extensively investigated; however, the effect of green roofs on the credit-earning mechanisms is relatively unexplored. This study is concerned with the environmental benefits of green roofs with respect to sustainability, stormwater control, energy savings, and water resources. We focused on the relationship between green coverage and the credits of the rating systems, evaluated the credits efficiency, and performed cost analysis. As an example, we used a university building in Keelung, Northern Taiwan. The findings suggest that with EEWH, the proposed green coverage is 50–75%, whereas with LEED, the proposed green coverage is 100%. These findings have implications for the application of green roofs in green building.

Liaw

2015-01-01

282

Energy storage systems program report for FY1996  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective energy storage systems as a resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage systems for stationary applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1996.

Butler, P.C.

1997-05-01

283

Design and building of a new experimental setup for testing hydrogen storage materials  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

For hydrogen to become the future energy carrier a suitable way of storing hydrogen is needed, especially if hydrogen is to be used in mobile applications such as cars. To test potential hydrogen storage materials with respect to capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics the Materials Research Department has a high pressure balance. However, the drawback of this equipment is, that in order to load samples, exposure towards air is inevitable. This has prompted the design and building of a new experimental setup with a detachable reactor allowing samples to be loaded under protective atmosphere. The purpose of this report is to serve as documentation of the new setup. (au)

Andreasen, Anders

2005-09-01

284

Canister storage building (CSB) safety analysis report phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Canister Storage Building (CSB) will be constructed in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The CSB will be used to stage and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) removed from the Hanford Site K Basins. The objective of this chapter is to describe the characteristics of the site on which the CSB will be located. This description will support the hazard analysis and accident analyses in Chapter 3.0. The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the CSB design criteria, the design's compliance with the applicable criteria, and the basis for authorization to proceed with construction of the CSB

285

As-Built Verification Plan Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building MCO Handling Machine  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This as-built verification plan outlines the methodology and responsibilities that will be implemented during the as-built field verification activity for the Canister Storage Building (CSB) MCO HANDLING MACHINE (MHM). This as-built verification plan covers THE ELECTRICAL PORTION of the CONSTRUCTION PERFORMED BY POWER CITY UNDER CONTRACT TO MOWAT. The as-built verifications will be performed in accordance Administrative Procedure AP 6-012-00, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project As-Built Verification Plan Development Process, revision I. The results of the verification walkdown will be documented in a verification walkdown completion package, approved by the Design Authority (DA), and maintained in the CSB project files

286

Building a Cooperative Communications System  

OpenAIRE

In this paper, we present the results from over-the-air experiments of a complete implementation of an amplify and forward cooperative communications system. Our custom OFDM-based physical layer uses a distributed version of the Alamouti block code, where the relay sends one branch of Alamouti encoded symbols. First we show analytically and experimentally that amplify and forward protocols are unaffected by carrier frequency offsets at the relay. This result allows us to use...

Murphy, Patrick; Sabharwal, Ashutosh; Aazhang, Behnaam

2007-01-01

287

Impact of energy storage in buildings on electricity demand side management  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Research highlights: ? Phase change material (PCM) application for space heating has been implemented and assessed for built environment. ? Real-Time Pricing (RTP) is assessed as tool to implement Demand Side Management programs effectively. ? Two buildings, with and without PCM, have been compared for space heating using RTP in functional electricity market. ? PCM found to offer peak load shifting, energy conservation, and reduction in price of electricity. -- Abstract: This paper assesses impact of using phase change materials (PCM) in buildings to leverage its thermal energy storage capability. The emphasis is from an electricity demand side perspective with case studies that incorporates wholesale electricity market data of New Zealand. The results presented in this paper show that for space heating application significant advantages could be obtained using PCM built structures. These positive impacts include peak load shifting, energy conservation and reduction in peak demand for network line companies and potential reduction in electricity consumption and savings for residential customers. This paper uses a testing facility that consists of two identically designed and shaped offices built at Tamaki Campus location of the University of Auckland, New Zealand. The walls and ceilings of one office are finished with ordinary gypsum boards while the interior of the other office is finished with PCM impregnated gypsum boards. Controlled heating facility is proControlled heating facility is provided in both the offices for maintaining temperature within the range of human comfort. This facility is equipped with advanced data acquisition equipment for data monitoring and archiving both locally within the offices and also remotely. Through actual observations and analysis this paper demonstrates two major impacts of DSM. First, the application of phase change material (PCM) in building environment enabling efficient thermal storage to achieve some reduction in the overall electrical energy consumption. Second, assessment of peak load shifting achieved for space heating in a PCM building during a typical winter period in New Zealand.

288

Biomass fuelled trigeneration system in selected buildings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? We model a commercial building scale biomass fuelled trigeneration plant. ? It is economically feasible to use willow chips, miscanthus and rice husk as the fuel to operate the trigeneration system. ? The efficiency of TG is much higher than that of PO, but is lower than that of the combined heat and power (CHP) configuration. ? The breakeven electricity selling price (BESP) of the TG system is better than that of the PO option with the CHP option producing the cheapest electricity. -- Abstract: Many buildings require simultaneous electricity, heating and cooling. Biomass is one of the renewable energy sources which is not intermittent, location-dependent or very difficult to store. If grown sustainably, biomass can be considered to be CO2 neutral. A trigeneration system consisting of an internal combustion (IC) engine integrated with biomass gasification may offer a combination for delivering heat, electricity and cooling cleanly and economically. The producer gas generated by the gasifier is used to provide electricity for building use via the IC engine. The waste heat is recovered from the engine cooling system and exhaust gases to supply hot water to space heating, excess heat is also used to drive an absorption cooling system. The proposed system is designed to meet the energy requirements for selected commercial buildings and district heating/cooling applications. This work focuses on the modeling and simulation of a commercial bg and simulation of a commercial building scale trigeneration plant fuelled by a biomass downdraft gasifier. In order to use both energy and financial resources most efficiently, technical and economic analyses were carried out, using the ECLIPSE process simulation package. The study also looks at the impact of different biomass feedstock (willow, rice husk and miscanthus) on the performance of a trigeneration plant.

289

ANL computer controlled target storage system: Status report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Design and operation of an isotopic target storage system is described. Due to the cost and effort associated with nuclear target production, it is necessary to protect them. The storage system described was designed to protect up to 90 hydroscopic and readily oxidizing targets under vacuum of 10-6 torr. The computer controller maintains system integrity during normal use and emergency situations

290

Superconductive energy storage for large systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A summary report of a three-year study of superconductive energy storage for large utility systems is presented. The preferred conceptual design choices include: large, thin-walled solenoids, 1.80K cooling, TiNb in aluminum composite conductors at 5 tesla, bedrock structural support for both axial and radial forces, and a three-phase Graetz (ac/dc) bridge converter interface to the power grid. Preliminary estimates show that capital costs are given by dollar/kW = 40 + 125 (P/1000)/sup -1/3/ (t/2)/sup 2/3/ where P is the average power in MW and t is the discharge (peaking) time in hours. A typical operating loss is 10 to 15 percent of the stored energy. The concept is technically feasible requiring only present day technology

291

Pulsed rf systems for large storage rings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The possibility is considered that by using a pulsed rf system a substantial reduction can be made in the rf power requirement for the next generation of large storage rings. For a ring with a sufficiently large circumference, the time between bunch passages, T/sub b/, can exceed the cavity filling time, T/sub f/. As the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/ increases, it is clear that at some point the average power requirement can be reduced by pulsing the rf to the cavities. In this mode of operation, the rf power is turned on a filling time or so before the arrival of a bunch and is switched off again at the time of bunch passage. There is no rf energy in the accelerating structure, and hence no power dissipation, for most of the period between bunches

292

Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

Pelka, W.

1980-07-01

293

Battery Energy Storage Technology for power systems-An overview  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The penetration of renewable sources (particularly wind power) in to the power system network has been increasing in the recent years. As a result of this, there have been serious concerns over reliable and satisfactory operation of the power systems. One of the solutions being proposed to improve the reliability and performance of these systems is to integrate energy storage devices into the power system network. Further, in the present deregulated markets these storage devices could also be used to increase the profit margins of wind farm owners and even provide arbitrage. This paper discusses the present status of battery energy storage technology and methods of assessing their economic viability and impact on power system operation. Further, a discussion on the role of battery storage systems of electric hybrid vehicles in power system storage technologies had been made. Finally, the paper suggests a likely future outlook for the battery technologies and the electric hybrid vehicles in the context of power system applications.

Chandrashekhara, Divya K; Østergaard, Jacob

2009-01-01

294

Battery energy storage technology for power systems - An overview  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The penetration of renewable sources (particularly wind power) in to the power system network has been increasing in the recent years. As a result of this, there have been serious concerns over reliable and satisfactory operation of the power systems. One of the solutions being proposed to improve the reliability and performance of these systems is to integrate energy storage devices into the power system network. Further, in the present deregulated markets these storage devices could also be used to increase the profit margins of wind farm owners and even provide arbitrage. This paper discusses the present status of battery energy storage technology and methods of assessing their economic viability and impact on power system operation. Further, a discussion on the role of battery storage systems of electric hybrid vehicles in power system storage technologies had been made. Finally, the paper suggests a likely future outlook for the battery technologies and the electric hybrid vehicles in the context of power system applications. (author)

295

Electrical Energy Storage for Renewable Energy Systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This program focused on development of the fundamental understanding necessary to significantly improve advanced battery and ultra-capacitor materials and systems to achieve significantly higher power and energy density on the one hand, and significantly lower cost on the other. This program spanned all the way from atomic-level theory, to new nanomaterials syntheses and characterization, to system modeling and bench-scale technology demonstration. Significant accomplishments are detailed in each section. Those particularly noteworthy include: • Transition metal silicate cathodes with 2x higher storage capacity than commercial cobalt oxide cathodes were demonstrated. • MnO? nanowires, which are a promising replacement for RuO?, were synthesized • PAN-based carbon nanofibers were prepared and characterized with an energy density 30-times higher than current ultracapacitors on the market and comparable to lead-acid batteries • An optimization-based control strategy for real-time power management of battery storage in wind farms was developed and demonstrated. • PVDF films were developed with breakdown strengths of > 600MVm?¹, a maximum energy density of approximately 15 Jcm?³, and an average dielectric constant of 9.8 (±1.2). Capacitors made from these films can support a 10-year lifetime operating at an electric field of 200 MV m?¹. This program not only delivered significant advancements in fundamental understanding and new materials and technology, it also showcased the power of the cross-functional, multi-disciplinary teams at UT Dallas and UT Tyler for such work. These teams are continuing this work with other sources of funding from both industry and government.

Helms, C. R.; Cho, K. J.; Ferraris, John; Balkus, Ken; Chabal, Yves; Gnade, Bruce; Rotea, Mario; Vasselli, John

2012-08-31

296

Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Molten Salt Energy Storage  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

With growing concerns in the production of reliable energy sources, the next generation in reliable power generation, hybrid energy systems, are being developed to stabilize these growing energy needs. The hybrid energy system incorporates multiple inputs and multiple outputs. The vitality and efficiency of these systems resides in the energy storage application. Energy storage is necessary for grid stabilizing and storing the overproduction of energy to meet peak demands of energy at the time of need. With high thermal energy production of the primary nuclear heat generation source, molten salt energy storage is an intriguing option because of its distinct properties. This paper will discuss the different energy storage options with the criteria for efficient energy storage set forth, and will primarily focus on different molten salt energy storage system options through a thermodynamic analysis

P. Sabharwall; M. Green; S.J. Yoon; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; C. Stoots

2014-07-01

297

Buildings Definition as Product-Service Systems  

OpenAIRE

Product-Service System is one way toward sustainable system development. One issue of PSS concerns the function allocation between the product part and the service part. In Architecture-Engineering-Construction,function assignment to either the building or the service offered is also a strong issue. The contracting owner (i.e. paying client) has to deal with this issue during the requirements definition. This paper proposes to tackle it through an adaptation and application of Gero's Function...

Mauger, Cyril; Dantan, Jean-yves

2013-01-01

298

Design Space Exploration for Building Automation Systems  

OpenAIRE

In the building automation domain, there are gaps among various tasks related to design engineering. As a result created system designs must be adapted to the given requirements on system functionality, which is related to increased costs and engineering effort than planned. For this reason standards are prepared to enable a coordination among these tasks by providing guidelines and unified artifacts for the design. Moreover, a huge variety of prefabricated devices offered from different manu...

O?zlu?k, Ali Cemal

2013-01-01

299

Numerical analysis of a medium scale latent energy storage unit for districtheating systems  

OpenAIRE

The present paper describes the application of computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) to the design and characterization of a medium scale energy storage unit for district heating systems. The shell-and-tube LHTES unit contains a technical grade paraffin (RT100) as phase change material (PCM) and uses water as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The system has been designed to transfer heat from the district to the building heating networks. After an initial description of the LHTES unit and a wide litera...

Colella, Francesco; Sciacovelli, Adriano; Verda, Vittorio

2012-01-01

300

Toxicity of systems for energy generation and storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This section contains summaries of research on assessment of health and environmental effects of electric storage systems, and the metabolism and toxicity of metal compounds associated with energy production and storage. The first project relates to the production and use of electric storage battery systems. The second project deals with the effects of pregnancy and lactation on the gastrointestinal absorption, tissue distribution, and toxic effects of metals (Cd). Also included in this study is work on the absorption of actinides (239Pu)

301

A Cloud Storage System with Information Confidentiality and Forwarding  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Cloud storage suggests that the storage of information on-line within the cloud,wherein a company's knowledge is keep in and accessible from multiple distributed and connected resources that comprise a cloud.Cloud storage will offer the advantages of larger accessibility and reliability; speedy deployment; robust protection for knowledge backup,archival and disaster recovery purposes; and lower overall storage prices as a results of not having to buy, manage and maintain overpriced hardware. However, cloud storage will have the potential for security and compliance issues.Third party’s cloud system doesn't offer knowledge confidentiality. Constructing centralized storage system for the cloud system makes hackers scarf knowledge simply. General cryptography schemes shield knowledge confidentiality. within the projected system a secure distributed storage system is developed by desegregation a threshold proxy re-encryption theme with a suburbanised erasure code. The distributed storage system not solely supports secure and strong knowledge storage and retrieval, however conjointly lets a user forward knowledge from one user to a different while not retrieving the info back. the most technical involvement is that the proxy re-encryption theme supports coding operations over encrypted messages still as forwarding operations over encoded and encrypted messages. the strategy totally integrates encrypting, encoding, and forwarding.

Dr. M.V.Siva Prasad

2014-06-01

302

Reliability-oriented energy storage sizing in wind power systems  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Energy storage can be used to suppress the power fluctuations in wind power systems, and thereby reduce the thermal excursion and improve the reliability. Since the cost of the energy storage in large power application is high, it is crucial to have a better understanding of the relationship between the size of the energy storage and the reliability benefit it can generate. Therefore, a reliability-oriented energy storage sizing approach is proposed for the wind power systems, where the power, energy, cost and the control strategy of the energy storage are all taken into account. With the proposed approach, the computational effort is reduced and the impact of the energy storage system on the reliability of the wind power converter can be quantified.

Qin, Zian; Liserre, Marco

2014-01-01

303

Real-time supervision of building HVAC system performance  

OpenAIRE

This thesis presents techniques for improving building HVAC system performance in existing buildings generated using simulation-based tools and real data. Therefore, one of the aims has been to research the needs and possibilities to assess and improve building HVAC system performance. In addition, this thesis aims at an advanced utilization of building energy management system (BEMS) and the provision of useful information to building operators using simulation tools.

&am...

Djuric, Natasa

2008-01-01

304

An Overview of Video Allocation Algorithms for Flash-based SSD Storage Systems  

CERN Document Server

Despite the fact that Solid State Disk (SSD) data storage media had offered a revolutionary property storages community, but the unavailability of a comprehensive allocation strategy in SSDs storage media, leads to consuming the available space, random writing processes, time-consuming reading processes, and system resources consumption. In order to overcome these challenges, an efficient allocation algorithm is a desirable option. In this paper, we had executed an intensive investigation on the SSD-based allocation algorithms that had been proposed by the knowledge community. An explanatory comparison had been made between these algorithms. We reviewed these algorithms in order to building advanced knowledge armature that would help in inventing new allocation algorithms for this type of storage media.

Al-Sabateen, Jaafer; Sumari, Putra

2012-01-01

305

An Overview of Video Allocation Algorithms for Flash-based SSD Storage Systems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Despite the fact that Solid State Disk (SSD data storage media had offered a revolutionary property storages community, but the unavailability of a comprehensive allocation strategy in SSDs storage media, leads to consuming the available space, random writing processes, time-consuming reading processes, and system resources consumption. In order to overcome these challenges, an efficient allocation algorithm is a desirable option. In this paper, we had executed an intensive investigation on the SSD-based allocation algorithms that had been proposed by the knowledge community. An explanatory comparison had been made between these algorithms. We reviewed these algorithms in order to building advanced knowledge armature that would help in inventing new allocation algorithms for this type of storage media

Jaafer Al-Sabateen

2012-03-01

306

Electromechanical Storage Systems for Application to Isolated Wind Energy Plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Substantial technology advances have occurred during the last decade that have had and appreciated impact on performance and feasibility of the Electromechanical Storage Systems. Improvements in magnetic bearings, composite materials, power conversion systems, microelectronic control systems and computer simulation models have increased flywheel reliability, and energy storage capacity, while decreasing overall system size, weight and cost. These improvements have brought flywheels to the forefront in the quest for alternate systems. The result of the study carried out under the scope of the SEDUCTOR, about the state of art of the Electromechanical Storage Systems is presented in this report. (Author) 15 refs

307

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems  

Science.gov (United States)

It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

Boenig, H.J.

1984-05-16

308

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program report for FY93  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contract development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility-energy-storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1993.

Butler, P.C.

1994-02-01

309

System Specification for Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This specification establishes the system-level functional, performance, design, interface, and test requirements for Phase 1 of the IHLW Interim Storage System, located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The IHLW canisters will be produced at the Hanford Site by a Selected DOE contractor. Subsequent to storage the canisters will be shipped to a federal geologic repository

310

Dry storage systems using casks for long term storage in an AFR and repository  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In conclusion it can be stated that two basic routes with respect to spent fuel storage casks are feasible. One is the Multiple Transport Cask, which with certain modifications can be upgraded to meet the criteria for intermediate storage. Its status is characterized by the licensing of several types of Castor Casks for an intermediate storage period of 30 years in the AFR Storage Facility of DWK at Gorleben in the FRG. The other one is the Final Disposal (Repository) Cask, which can be made suitable for long term storage before a final decision with respect to a repository application is taken. The licensing procedure for a Pilot Conditioning Facility with the Pollux Cask System as reference case will be initiated by DWK in the near future. Under the assumption that in addition to the present Multiple Transport/Storage Casks a license for a Final disposal Cask with respect to long term storage is available, the relative merits of different cask storage systems would have to be evaluated

311

Southern company energy storage study : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This study evaluates the business case for additional bulk electric energy storage in the Southern Company service territory for the year 2020. The model was used to examine how system operations are likely to change as additional storage is added. The storage resources were allowed to provide energy time shift, regulation reserve, and spinning reserve services. Several storage facilities, including pumped hydroelectric systems, flywheels, and bulk-scale batteries, were considered. These scenarios were tested against a range of sensitivities: three different natural gas price assumptions, a 15% decrease in coal-fired generation capacity, and a high renewable penetration (10% of total generation from wind energy). Only in the elevated natural gas price sensitivities did some of the additional bulk-scale storage projects appear justifiable on the basis of projected production cost savings. Enabling existing peak shaving hydroelectric plants to provide regulation and spinning reserve, however, is likely to provide savings that justify the project cost even at anticipated natural gas price levels. Transmission and distribution applications of storage were not examined in this study. Allowing new storage facilities to serve both bulk grid and transmission/distribution-level needs may provide for increased benefit streams, and thus make a stronger business case for additional storage.

Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Black, Clifton [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL; Jenkins, Kip [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL

2013-03-01

312

Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.

Greg Harper; Charles Powars

2003-10-31

313

Optimization of mass storage systems by quality of service  

Science.gov (United States)

With the explosive growth of digital information, storage systems are becoming larger and more complicated. Especially in large scale storage systems, they must be able to deliver satisfactory I/O performance (availability, reliability, etc.) under both expected and unexpected workloads, and handle data with real timeliness requirements. However, typical management methods of mass storage systems cannot meet these requirements. One solution is using Quality of Service (QoS) approaches in object-based storage systems. These QoS approaches include Quality of Storage Service (QoSS) framework and QoSS improvements. After researching the QoS requirements and the various data access characterizations in different applications, we designed a QoSS management framework. And then according to this framework, we gave some improvements to efficiently realize QoSS in object-based storage systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed solution, we developed a prototype of Attribute-managed Storage System with QoSS (AM-QoSS) by extending both OSD and iSCSI protocols. The measurement results finally show that the proposed QoS management approach achieves optimization of storage systems, such as higher performance and better guaranteed QoS.

Wu, Chentao; Cao, Qiang; Wan, Shenggang; Xiao, Liang; Huo, Dao'an

2008-12-01

314

Field testing of a high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) System has been operated as a field test facility for the past six years. Four short-term and two long-term cycles have been completed to data providing a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. A third long-term cycle is currently being planned to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact on the aquifer from heated waste storage cycles. The most critical activities in the preparation for the next cycle have proved to be the applications for the various permits and variances necessary to conduct the third cycle and the matching of the characteristics of the ATES system during heat recovery with a suitable adjacent building thermal load.

Sterling, R.L.; Hoyer, M.C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1989-03-01

315

Life cycle optimization of building energy systems  

Science.gov (United States)

A life cycle optimization model intended to potentially reduce the environmental impacts of energy use in commercial buildings is presented. A combination of energy simulation, life cycle assessment, and operations research techniques are used to develop the model. In addition to conventional energy systems, such as the electric grid and a gas boiler, cogeneration systems which concurrently generate power and heat are investigated as an alternative source of energy. Cogeneration systems appeared to be an attractive alternative to conventional systems when considering life cycle environmental criteria. Internal combustion engine and microturbine (MT) cogeneration systems resulted in a reduction of up to 38% in global warming potential compared with conventional systems, while solid oxide fuel cell and MT cogeneration systems resulted in a reduction of up to 94% in tropospheric ozone precursor potential (TOPP). Results include a Pareto-optimal frontier between reducing costs and reducing the selected environmental indicators.

Osman, Ayat; Norman, Bryan; Ries, Robert

2008-02-01

316

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01

317

Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System  

CERN Document Server

For over 10 years of development the ATLAS Nightly Build System has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The numerous branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains ~2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by ~1000 developers. The nightly releases lead up to stable releases used for data processing and analysis worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on the ATLAS Build Farm. The ATN testing framework runs unit and integration tests for the nightly releases.

Undrus, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01

318

WEB-GIS Decision Support System for CO2 storage  

Science.gov (United States)

Environmental decision support systems (DSS) paradigm evolves and changes as more knowledge and technology become available to the environmental community. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be used to extract, assess and disseminate some types of information, which are otherwise difficult to access by traditional methods. In the same time, with the help of the Internet and accompanying tools, creating and publishing online interactive maps has become easier and rich with options. The Decision Support System (MDSS) developed for the MUSTANG (A MUltiple Space and Time scale Approach for the quaNtification of deep saline formations for CO2 storaGe) project is a user friendly web based application that uses the GIS capabilities. MDSS can be exploited by the experts for CO2 injection and storage in deep saline aquifers. The main objective of the MDSS is to help the experts to take decisions based large structured types of data and information. In order to achieve this objective the MDSS has a geospatial objected-orientated database structure for a wide variety of data and information. The entire application is based on several principles leading to a series of capabilities and specific characteristics: (i) Open-Source - the entire platform (MDSS) is based on open-source technologies - (1) database engine, (2) application server, (3) geospatial server, (4) user interfaces, (5) add-ons, etc. (ii) Multiple database connections - MDSS is capable to connect to different databases that are located on different server machines. (iii)Desktop user experience - MDSS architecture and design follows the structure of a desktop software. (iv)Communication - the server side and the desktop are bound together by series functions that allows the user to upload, use, modify and download data within the application. The architecture of the system involves one database and a modular application composed by: (1) a visualization module, (2) an analysis module, (3) a guidelines module, and (4) a risk assessment module. The Database component is build by using the PostgreSQL and PostGIS open source technology. The visualization module allows the user to view data of CO2 injection sites in different ways: (1) geospatial visualization, (2) table view, (3) 3D visualization. The analysis module will allow the user to perform certain analysis like Injectivity, Containment and Capacity analysis. The Risk Assessment module focus on the site risk matrix approach. The Guidelines module contains the methodologies of CO2 injection and storage into deep saline aquifers guidelines.

Gaitanaru, Dragos; Leonard, Anghel; Radu Gogu, Constantin; Le Guen, Yvi; Scradeanu, Daniel; Pagnejer, Mihaela

2013-04-01

319

Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage and Photovoltaic Power Systems for Demand Charge Mitigation (Poster)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Commercial facility utility bills are often a strong function of demand charges -- a fee proportional to peak power demand rather than total energy consumed. In some instances, demand charges can constitute more than 50% of a commercial customer's monthly electricity cost. While installation of behind-the-meter solar power generation decreases energy costs, its variability makes it likely to leave the peak load -- and thereby demand charges -- unaffected. This then makes demand charges an even larger fraction of remaining electricity costs. Adding controllable behind-the-meter energy storage can more predictably affect building peak demand, thus reducing electricity costs. Due to the high cost of energy storage technology, the size and operation of an energy storage system providing demand charge management (DCM) service must be optimized to yield a positive return on investment (ROI). The peak demand reduction achievable with an energy storage system depends heavily on a facility's load profile, so the optimal configuration will be specific to both the customer and the amount of installed solar power capacity. We explore the sensitivity of DCM value to the power and energy levels of installed solar power and energy storage systems. An optimal peak load reduction control algorithm for energy storage systems will be introduced and applied to historic solar power data and meter load data from multiple facilities for a broad range of energy storage system configurations. For each scenario, the peak load reduction and electricity cost savings will be computed. From this, we will identify a favorable energy storage system configuration that maximizes ROI.

Neubauer, J.; Simpson, M.

2013-10-01

320

Modular vault dry storage systems for interim storage of irradiated fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Foster Wheeler Energy Application (FWEA) Modular Vault Dry Store (MVDS) is a dry storage concept for the storage of all types of irradiated reactor fuel. For applications in the US, FWEA submitted an MVDS Topical Report to the US NRC during 1986. Following NRC approval of the MVDS Topical Report concept for unconsolidated LWR fuel, US utilities have available a new, compact, economic and flexible system for the storage of irradiated fuel at the reactor site for time periods of at least 20 years (the period of the first license). The MVDS concept jointly developed by FWEA and GEC in the U.K., has other applications for large central away from reactor storage facilities such as a Monitorable Retrievable Storage installation. The licensed MVDS design is described, aspects of performance are discussed and capital costs compared with alternative concepts. Alternative configurations of MVDS are outlined. (author). 16 figs., 6 tabs., 3 refs

321

Novel heat recovery systems for building applications  

OpenAIRE

The work presented in this thesis will explore the development of novel heat recovery systems coupled with low carbon technologies, and its integration to become one device with multifunction (building integrated heat recovery/cooling/air dehumidifier. In the first part of this thesis, an experimental performance of an individual heat recovery unit using Micro Heat and Mass Cycle Core (MHM3C) made of fibre papers with cross flow arrangement has been carried out. The unit was tested in an env...

Ahmad, Mardiana Idayu

2011-01-01

322

Decentralized Minimum-Cost Repair for Distributed Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

There have been emerging lots of applications for distributed storage systems e.g., those in wireless sensor networks or cloud storage. Since storage nodes in wireless sensor networks have limited battery, it is valuable to find a repair scheme with optimal transmission costs (e.g., energy). The optimal-cost repair has been recently investigated in a centralized way. However a centralized control mechanism may not be available or is very expensive. For the scenarios, it is i...

Gerami, Majid; Xiao, Ming; Fischione, Carlo; Skoglund, Mikael

2013-01-01

323

Distributed Energy Systems with Wind Power and Energy Storage  

OpenAIRE

The topic of this thesis is the study of energy storage systems operating with wind power plants. The motivation for applying energy storage in this context is that wind power generation is intermittent and generally difficult to predict, and that good wind energy resources are often found in areas with limited grid capacity. Moreover, energy storage in the form of hydrogen makes it possible to provide clean fuel for transportation. The aim of this work has been to evaluate how loca...

Korpa?s, Magnus

2004-01-01

324

Viewing Systems for Large Underground Storage Tanks.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Specialized remote video systems have been successfully developed and deployed in a number of large radiological Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)that tolerate the hostile tank interior, while providing high resolution video to a remotely located operator. The deployment is through 100 mm (4 in) tank openings, while incorporating full video functions of the camera, lights, and zoom lens. The usage of remote video minimizes the potential for personnel exposure to radiological and hazardous conditions, and maximizes the quality of the visual data used to assess the interior conditions of both tank and contents. The robustness of this type of remote system has a direct effect on the potential for radiological exposure that personnel may encounter. The USTs typical of the Savannah River and Hanford Department Of Energy - (DOE) sites are typically 4.5 million liter (1.2 million gal) units under earth. or concrete overburden with limited openings to the surface. The interior is both highly contaminated and radioactive with a wide variety of nuclear processing waste material. Some of the tanks are -flammable rated -to Class 1, Division 1,and personnel presence at or near the openings should be minimized. The interior of these USTs must be assessed periodically as part of the ongoing management of the tanks and as a step towards tank remediation. The systems are unique in their deployment technology, which virtually eliminates the potential for entrapment in a tank, and their ability to withstand flammable environments. A multiplicity of components used within a common packaging allow for cost effective and appropriate levels of technology, with radiation hardened components on some units and lesser requirements on other units. All units are completely self contained for video, zoom lens, lighting, deployment,as well as being self purging, and modular in construction.

Heckendorn, F.M., Robinson, C.W., Anderson, E.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)], Pardini, A.F. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-31

325

Viewing Systems for Large Underground Storage Tanks  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Specialized remote video systems have been successfully developed and deployed in a number of large radiological Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)that tolerate the hostile tank interior, while providing high resolution video to a remotely located operator. The deployment is through 100 mm (4 in) tank openings, while incorporating full video functions of the camera, lights, and zoom lens. The usage of remote video minimizes the potential for personnel exposure to radiological and hazardous conditions, and maximizes the quality of the visual data used to assess the interior conditions of both tank and contents. The robustness of this type of remote system has a direct effect on the potential for radiological exposure that personnel may encounter. The USTs typical of the Savannah River and Hanford Department Of Energy - (DOE) sites are typically 4.5 million liter (1.2 million gal) units under earth. or concrete overburden with limited openings to the surface. The interior is both highly contaminated and radioactive with a wide variety of nuclear processing waste material. Some of the tanks are -flammable rated -to Class 1, Division 1,and personnel presence at or near the openings should be minimized. The interior of these USTs must be assessed periodically as part of the ongoing management of the tanks and as a step towards tank remediation. The systems are unique in their deployment technology, which virtually eliminates the potential for entrapment in a tank, and their ability to withstand flammable environments. A multiplicity of components used within a common packaging allow for cost effective and appropriate levels of technology, with radiation hardened components on some units and lesser requirements on other units. All units are completely self contained for video, zoom lens, lighting, deployment,as well as being self purging, and modular in construction

326

Integrated safeguards systems applicable to long term storage of irradiated fuel in wet and dry storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Irradiated fuel, principally LWR fuel, is stored in large quantities, in wet and dry storage. In wet storage, the fuel is in racks or containers, while in dry storage, the fuel is in massive containers required to provide radiation shielding. Safeguarding such storage configurations requires measures which, because of the relative, if not total, inaccessibility for verification by measurements, must rely on redundant/independent Containment and Surveillance (C/S). The extension of conventional C/S (cameras and seals) to Integrated Safeguards Systems, or, as recently termed, Integrated Safeguards Verification Systems (ISVS), offers the potential of achieving this goal. Combinations of current and future safeguards equipment into integrated systems are described and discussed

327

Macstor dry spent fuel storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

AECL, a Canadian Grown Corporation established since 1952, is unique among the world's nuclear organizations. It is both supplier of research reactors and heavy water moderated CANDU power reactors as well as operator of extensive nuclear research facilities. As part of its mandate, AECL has developed products and conceptual designs for the short, intermediate and long term storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. AECL has also assumed leadership in the area of dry storage of spent fuel. This Canadian Crown Corporation first started to look into dry storage for the management of its spent nuclear fuel in the early 1970's. After developing silo-like structures called concrete canisters for the storage of its research reactor enriched uranium fuel, AECL went on to perfect that technology for spent CANDU natural uranium fuel. In 1989 AECL teamed up with Trans nuclear, Inc.,(TN), a US based member of the international Trans nuclear Group, to extend its dry storage technology to LWR spent fuel. This association combines AECL's expertise and many years experience in the design of spent fuel storage facilities with TN's proven capabilities of processing, transportation, storage and handling of LWR spent fuel. From the early AECL-designed unventilated concrete canisters to the advanced MACSTOR concept - Modular Air-Cooled Canister Storage - now available also for LWR fuel - dry storage is proving to be safe, economical, practical and, most of all, well accepted by the genend, most of all, well accepted by the general public. AECL's experience with different fuels and circumstances has been conclusive

328

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed

329

Problem analysis functioning of technical systems "intelligent buildings"  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available  Tasks of the analysis of functioning of technical systems of an “intelligent building”. The basic tasks of the analysis of functioning of technical systems of an “intelligent building” and the concrete examples were considered.

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2006-02-01

330

A solar heating system with annual storage  

Science.gov (United States)

A solar heated house with long term storage capability, built in Trento, Italy, is described. The one story house was built from modular components and has a total heated volume of 1130 cu m. Flat plate solar collectors with a water-antifreeze medium are located beneath the lawn, and six cylindrical underground tanks holding 130 cu m of water heated by thermal energy from the collectors are situated under the garden. The house walls have an 8 cm cavity filled with 5 cm of formaldehyde foam, yielding a heat transmission (U) of 0.37 W/sq m/deg C. The roof and ceilings are insulated with fiberglass and concrete, producing U-values of 0.46 W/sq m/deg C and 0.57 W/sq m/deg C, respectively. Heat pumps using 6 kW move thermal energy between the house and the tanks. Direct hot water heating occurs in the summer, and direct home heating when the stored water temperature exceeds 32 C. A computer model was developed which traces the annual heat flow and it is shown that the system supplies all heating requirements for the house, with electrical requirements equal to 20 percent of the annual house needs.

Lazzari, F.; Raffellini, G.

1981-07-01

331

The CMS event builder and storage system  

CERN Document Server

The CMS event builder assembles events accepted by the first level trigger and makes them available to the high-level trigger. The event builder needs to handle a maximum input rate of 100\\,kHz and an aggregated throughput of 100\\,GB/s originating from approximately 500 sources. This paper presents the chosen hardware and software architecture. The system consists of 2 stages: an initial pre-assembly reducing the number of fragments by one order of magnitude and a final assembly by several independent readout builder (RU-builder) slices. The RU-builder is based on 3 separate services: the buffering of event fragments during the assembly, the event assembly, and the data flow manager. A further component is responsible for handling events accepted by the high-level trigger: the storage manager (SM) temporarily stores the events on disk at a peak rate of 2\\,GB/s until they are permanently archived offline. In addition, events and data-quality histograms are served by the SM to online monitoring clients. We disc...

Bauer, Gerry; Behrens, Ulf; Biery, Kurt; Brett, Angela; Branson, James; Cano, Eric; Cheung, Harry; Ciganek, Marek; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa, Jose Antonio; Deldicque, Christian; Dusinberre, Elizabeth; Erhan, Samim; Fortes Rodrigues, Fabiana; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino, Robert; Gutleber, Johannes; Hatton, Derek; Klute, Markus; Laurens, Jean-François; Loizides, Constantin; Lopez Perez, Juan Antonio; Meijers, Frans; Meschi, Emilio; Meyer, Andreas; Mommsen, Remigius K; Moser, Roland; O'Dell, Vivian; Oh, Alexander; Orsini, Luciano; Patras, Vaios; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Racz, Attila; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schwick, Christoph; Serrano Margaleff, Josep Francesc; Shpakov, Dennis; Simon, Sean; Sumorok, Konstanty; Zanetti, Marco

2010-01-01

332

Battery Energy Storage Technology for power systems-An overview  

OpenAIRE

The penetration of renewable sources (particularly wind power) in to the power system network has been increasing in the recent years. As a result of this, there have been serious concerns over reliable and satisfactory operation of the power systems. One of the solutions being proposed to improve the reliability and performance of these systems is to integrate energy storage devices into the power system network. Further, in the present deregulated markets these storage devices could also be...

Chandrashekhara, Divya K.; Østergaard, Jacob

2008-01-01

333

Development of a direct contact ice storage system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The program described involves the design, construction, and performance testing of a Direct Freeze Thermal Energy Storage System. Task 1 (Design) has been completed; and Task 2 (construction) is in progress, with equipment procurements presently underway. Once constructed, the system will undergo extensive laboratory performance testing and analysis, followed by an assessment of the system`s cost effectiveness. This study will advance the understanding and development of the direct freeze concept, which offers inherent benefits for thermal energy storage.

Poirier, R. [Chicago Bridge & Iron Company, Plainfield, IL (United States)

1989-03-01

334

High performance storage system at Sandia National Labs  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Scientific computing centers are acquiring large, distributed memory machines. With memory systems of .25 to 2.5 terabytes, these machines will deliver 1-10 teraflop computing capabilities. The need to move 10`s or 100`s of gigabytes, and the need to provide petabyte storage systems are issues that must be addressed before the year 2000. Work currently underway at Sandia addresses these issues. The High Performance Storage System (HPSS) is in limited production and the mass storage environment to support Sandia`s teraflop computer system is being constructed. 26 refs., 5 figs.

Cahoon, R.M.

1996-04-01

335

New data storage and retrieval systems for JET data  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Since the start of the Joint European Torus (JET), an IBM mainframe has been the main platform for data analysis and storage (J. Comput. Phys. 73 (1987) 85). The mainframe was removed in June 2001 and Solaris and Linux are now the main data storage and analysis platforms. New data storage and retrieval systems have therefore been developed: the Data Warehouse, the JET pulse file server, and the processed pulse file system. In this paper, the new systems will be described, and the design decisions that led to the final systems will be outlined

336

Building Management System Using Windows Communication Foundation And XAML  

OpenAIRE

Building Automation System (BAS) will be extended for including different kinds of information, working towards to goal of Intelligent Building Management System. The next generation ofInternet technology uses Windows Communication Foundation as middleware technology for integration of different building automation systems (BAS) since Web Services will support only http protocol which is stateless. The applications used for controlling building management system (BMS) components like sensors,...

Swarnalatha. P,; M.Rajasekhara Babu,; Surendhar Thallapelly

2011-01-01

337

Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

2009-01-01

338

Tritrophic Interactions in Maize Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

The interaction and compatibility of natural enemies with two currently used strategies of integrated pest management to lower post-harvest losses in maize were investigated, namely insect resistance, and storage practice. In a first study, insect resistance of a large number of maize genotypes was tested against five common storage pests in tropical maize stores. A large range of resistance was found to the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais, the larger grain borer, Prostephanus truncatus and ...

Savidan-niederer, Anita; Rahier, Martine

2004-01-01

339

STORAGE OPTIMIZATION OF EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM DATA  

OpenAIRE

There are described methods used to minimize data files dimension. There aredefined indicators for measuring size of files and databases. The storage optimization processis based on selecting from a multitude of data storage models the one that satisfies thepropose problem objective, maximization or minimization of the optimum criterion that ismapped on the size of used disk memory. The paper describes different solutions that areimplemented to minimize input/output file size for a software a...

Boja, Catalin

2006-01-01

340

Control system design for robotic underground storage tank inspection systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Control and data acquisition systems for robotic inspection and surveillance systems used in nuclear waste applications must be capable, versatile, and adaptable to changing conditions. The nuclear waste remediation application is dynamic -- requirements change as public policy is constantly re-examined and refocused, and as technology in this area advances. Control and data acquisition systems must adapt to these changing conditions and be able to accommodate future missions, both predictable and unexpected. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System that is being developed for remote surveillance and inspection of underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. It is a high-performance system which has been designed for future growth. The priority mission at the Hanford site is to retrieve the waste generated by 50 years of production from its present storage and process it for final disposal. The LDUA will help to gather information about the waste and the tanks it is stored in to better plan and execute the cleanup mission

341

A building heating system using solar energy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The system combines the advantages of the air and water solar heating which increases the energy efficiency of the building. The system includes first air space which is positioned between the southern wall of the building and vertical transparent coating. Above the southern pitched roof of the building, first and second transparent coating are fitted, under which second and third air spaces are found. The air spaces are connected to an air canal, formed above the northern pitched roof of the roofing, and they are parts of a common recirculation circuit. The air canal, by means of holes made in the inclined wall is connected to a short vertical tube connected, on its part, to horizontal tube to a second and a third holes. The holes are found in the lefts space under the roofing, and holes - in the right space under the roofing. Two water accumulators are envisaged. The southern and the northern pitched roofs includes an element with a step-like part on which an absorption coating is applied. In the step-like parts of the southern pitched roof air grooves are made which house tubes connected to the first parallel tubes in a common recirculation circuit by means of recirculation pumps. Similarly, second air canals are made in the step-like parts of the northern pitched roof in which second tubes are housed, connected to second parallel tubes in a common recirculation circuit by means of recirculation pumps. (authors)

342

Research and design of high speed mass image storage system  

Science.gov (United States)

The design of the high mass image storage system is introduced using DSP, FPGA and Flash structure. Texas Instruments Corporation DSP chip (TMS320VC5509APEG) is used as the main controller, Samsung's Flash chips (K9F2G08U0M) used as the main storage medium, and the Xilinx Corporation FPGA chip (XCV600E) used as logic control modules. In this system, Storage module consists of 32 Flash memory chips, which are divided into 8 groups that correspond to 8-level pipeline. The 4-Flash memory chip forms a basic 32-bit memory module. The entire system storage space is 64 G bit. Through simulation and verification, the storage speed is up to 352Mbps and readout speed is up to 290Mbps, it can meet the demand to the high-speed access, and which has strong environmental adaptability.

Li, Yu-feng; Xue, Rong-kun; Liang, Fei

2009-07-01

343

Unconventional systems for lunar base power generation and storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Recent advances in thin film solar photovoltaic converters (PV's) can furnish multimegawatt power levels during lunar daylight periods with only modest mass requirements. The extended duration of lunar night (ca. 354 hr) and the high specific mass of earth-imported energy storage systems (regenerative fuel cells, batteries, etc.) render PV plus import storage power systems non-competitive with nuclear power plants for lunar bases. However, power storage or generation methods which can be constructed using primarily lunar materials, used either alone or with lightweight PV's, can be attractive alternatives to nuclear power. Three separate generic systems which can provide favorable low import mass goals have been identified and studied. These are: gravitational energy generation using lunar soil, thermal energy storage using basalt rock or glass, and electrochemical storage using lunar derived electrodes or fuels. Design, structural and operational features of these methods are described

344

Chemical energy storage system for SEGS solar thermal power plant  

Science.gov (United States)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated the potential feasibility of using chemical energy storage at the Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS) power plants developed by Luz International. Like sensible or latent heat energy storage systems, chemical energy storage can be beneficially applied to solar thermal power plants to dampen the impact of cloud transients, extend the daily operating period, and/or allow a higher fraction of power production to occur during high-valued peak demand periods. Higher energy storage densities make chemical energy storage a potentially attractive option. The results of the evaluation indicated that a system based on the reversible reaction, CaO + H2O = Ca(OH)2, could be technically and economically feasible for this application, but many technical and economic issues must be resolved.

Brown, D. R.; Lamarche, J. L.; Spanner, G. E.

1992-04-01

345

Evaluation of thermal-energy storage media for advanced compressed-air energy-storage systems  

Science.gov (United States)

Proposed designs of adiabatic and hybrid compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants have utilized sensible heat storage systems to store the heat developed during the air compression phase of the operation cycle for subsequent use during the power generation phase. The performance and durability of several heat storage materials proposed for these systems were evaluated. Materials considered were: (1) 3/8 in. sintered iron oxide pellets; (2) 1/2-in. Denstone spheres; (3) 1 in. cast iron alloy balls; and (4) crushed rock. The results indicated that, from the standpoint of performance and durability, Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, or crushed rock (Dresser basalt) would be satisfactory. However, considering material costs in addition to performance and durability, crushed rock would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for these types of CAES plants.

Zaloudek, F. R.; Wheeler, K. R.; Marksberry, L.

346

Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System  

Science.gov (United States)

The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Build and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, testing, and creation of distribution kits. The ATN testing framework of the Nightly System runs unit and integration tests in parallel suites, fully utilizing the resources of multi-core machines, and provides the first results even before compilations complete. The NICOS error detection system is based on several techniques and classifies the compilation and test errors according to their severity. It is periodically tuned to place greater emphasis on certain software defects by highlighting the problems on NICOS web pages and sending automatic e-mail notifications to responsible developers. These and other recent developments will be presented and future plans will be described.

Undrus, A.

2012-12-01

347

Numerical modelling and experimental studies of thermal behaviour of building integrated thermal energy storage unit in a form of a ceiling panel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: • A new concept of heat storage in ventilation ducts is described. • Ceiling panel as a part of ventilation system is made of a composite with PCM. • A set-up for experimental investigation of heat storage unit was built. • Numerical model of heat transfer in the storage unit was developed. • Numerical code was validated on the base of experimental measurements. - Abstract: Objective: The paper presents a new concept of building integrated thermal energy storage unit and novel mathematical and numerical models of its operation. This building element is made of gypsum based composite with microencapsulated PCM. The proposed heat storage unit has a form of a ceiling panel with internal channels and is, by assumption, incorporated in a ventilation system. Its task is to reduce daily variations of ambient air temperature through the absorption (and subsequent release) of heat in PCM, without additional consumption of energy. Methods: The operation of the ceiling panel was investigated experimentally on a special set-up equipped with temperature sensors, air flow meter and air temperature control system. Mathematical and numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow in the panel account for air flow in the panel as well as real thermal properties of the PCM composite, i.e.: thermal conductivity variation with temperature and hysteresis of enthalpy vs. temperature curves for heating and cooling. Proposed novel numerical simulator consists of two strongly coupled sub models: the first one – 1D – which deals with air flowing through the U-shaped channel and the second one – 3D – which deals with heat transfer in the body of the panel. Results: Spatial and temporal air temperature variations, measured on the experimental set-up, were used to validate numerical model as well as to get knowledge of thermal performance of the panel operating in different conditions. Conclusion: Preliminary results of experimental tests confirmed the ability of the proposed heat storage unit to effectively control the air temperature inside the building. However, detailed measurement of the temperature of PCM composite have shown some disadvantages of the panel used in the study, e.g. thickness of the walls and distribution of PCM should be optimized. This can be achieved with the aid of the numerical simulator developed in this research. Practical implications: The proposed ceiling panel, optimised from the point of view of thermal performance in a given environmental conditions, can be used as a part of ventilation systems in residential and office buildings

348

Waste heat and chill storage in aquifer systems  

Science.gov (United States)

Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers is discussed. Winter chill, summer heat, and various forms of industrial waste heat and chill can be stored for future demand, reducing the need for generating primary energy. This seasonal storage of heat and chill in aquifer systems is assessed.

Eliason, J. R.

349

Competitive solar heating systems for residential buildings  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The paper describes the ongoing research project “Competitive solar heating systems for residential buildings”. The aim of the project is to develop competitive solar combisystems which are attractive to buyers. The solar combisystems must be attractive compared to traditional energy systems, both from an economical and architectural point of view. The project includes education, research, development and demonstration. The project started in 2003 and will be finished by the end of 2006. The participants of the project, which is financed by Nordic Energy Research and the participants themselves, are the universities: Technical University of Denmark, Dalarna University, University of Oslo, Riga Technical University and Lund Institute of Technology, as well as the companies: Metro Therm A/S (Denmark), Velux A/S (Denmark), Solentek AB (Sweden) and SolarNor (Norway). The project consists of a number of Ph.D. studies in Denmark, Sweden and Latvia, and a post-doc. study in Norway. Close cooperation between the researchers and the industry partners ensures that the results of the project can be utilized. By the end of the project the industry partners will be able to bring the developed systems onto the market. In Denmark and Norway the focus is on solar heating/natural gas systems, and in Sweden and Latvia the focus is on solar heating/pellet systems. Additionally, Lund Institute of Technology and University of Oslo are studying solar collectors of various types being integrated into the roof and facade of the building.

Furbo, Simon; Thür, Alexander

2005-01-01

350

Wind Energy to Thermal and Cold Storage – A Systems Approach  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In this paper wind energy to thermal and cold storage scenarios were examined to enable high wind integration through converting renewable electricity excess into thermal or cooling energy, saving part of the energy used in an area and eliminating the need to possibly build a new coal fired plant. Case studies in Crete Island (not interconnected to the power grid of Greek mainland) with onshore wind power installed were investigated. The aim of this work was to review the options for greater integration of renewables into the grid and the main idea was to analyze the wind to thermal and to cold storage according to the needs of two small municipalities.

Xydis, George

2013-01-01

351

Prefeasibility study on compressed air energy storage systems  

Science.gov (United States)

A prefeasibility study on Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) systems is presented. The costs of excavating rock caverns for compressed air storage and those for forming suitable storage caverns in existing mines were estimated, and this information was used to calculate the economics of CAES. An analysis of the different possible systems is given following a review of literature on CAES. This was followed by an economic analysis which comprised two separate systems. The first consisted of conventional oil fueled gas turbine plants provided with CAES system. In the second system wind turbines were used to run the compressors which are used in charging the compressed air storage cavern. The results of the current prefeasibility study confirmed the economic attractiveness of the CAES in the first system. Wind turbines still seem, however, to be too expensive to compete with coal power plants. More accurate and straightforward results could be obtained only in a more comprehensive study.

Elmahgary, Yehia; Peltola, Esa; Sipila, Kari; Vaatainen, Anne

1991-08-01

352

Enabling data-intensive science with Tactical Storage Systems  

CERN Document Server

Large scale scientific computing requires the ability to share and consume data and storage in complex ways across multiple systems. However, conventional systems constrain users to the fixed abstractions selected by the local system administrator. The result is that users must either move data manually over the wide area or simply be satisfied with the resources of a single cluster. To remedy this situation, we introduce the concept of a tactical storage system (TSS) that allows users to create, reconfigure, and destroy distributed storage systems without special privileges or complex configuration. We have deployed a prototype TSS of 200 disks and 8 TB of storage at the University of Notre Dame and applied it to several problems in astrophysics, high energy physics, and bioinformatics. This talk will focus on novel system structures that support data-intensive science. About the speaker: Douglas Thain is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. He received ...

CERN. Geneva; Marquina, Miguel Angel

2006-01-01

353

Fatty acid esters-based composite phase change materials for thermal energy storage in buildings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this study, fatty acid esters-based composite phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage were prepared by blending erythritol tetrapalmitate (ETP) and erythritol tetrastearate (ETS) with diatomite and expanded perlite (EP). The maximum incorporation percentage for ETP and ETS into diatomite and EP was found to be 57 wt% and 62 wt%, respectively without melted PCM seepage from the composites. The morphologies and compatibilities of the composite PCMs were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT–IR) analysis techniques. Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The DSC analyses results indicated that the composite PCMs were good candidates for building applications in terms of their large latent heat values and suitable phase change temperatures. The thermal cycling test including 1000 melting and freezing cycling showed that composite PCMs had good thermal reliability and chemical stability. TG analysis revealed that the composite PCMs had good thermal durability above their working temperature ranges. Moreover, in order to improve the thermal conductivity of the composite PCMs, the expanded graphite (EG) was added to them at different mass fractions (2%, 5%, and 10%). The best results were obtained for the composite PCMs including 5wt% EG content in terms of the increase in thermal conductivity values increase in thermal conductivity values and the decrease amount in latent heat capacity. The improvement in thermal conductivity values of ETP/Diatomite, ETS/Diatomite, ETP/EP and ETS/EP were found to be about 68%, 57%, 73% and 75%, respectively. Highlights: ? Fatty acid esters-based composite PCMs were prepared by blending ETP and ETS with diatomite and expanded perlite. ? The composite PCMs were characterized by using SEM, FT–IR, DSC and TG analysis methods. ? The DSC results indicated that the composites PCMs had good thermal energy storage properties. ? TG analysis revealed that they had good thermal durability above their working temperature ranges.

354

Novel approach for decentralized energy supply and energy storage of tall buildings in Latin America based on renewable energy sources: Case study – Informal vertical community Torre David, Caracas – Venezuela  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper analyzes the concept of a decentralized power system based on wind energy and a pumped hydro storage system in a tall building. The system reacts to the current paradigm of power outage in Latin American countries caused by infrastructure limitations and climate change, while it fosters the penetration of renewable energy sources (RES) for a more diversified and secure electricity supply. An explicit methodology describes the assessment of technical, operational and economic potentials in a specific urban setting in Caracas/Venezuela. The suitability, applicability and the impacts generated by such power system are furthermore discussed at economic, social and technical level. - Highlights: ? We have modeled an innovative pico pumped hydro-storage system and wind power system for tall buildings. ? We conducted technical, economic and social analysis on these energy supply and storage alternatives. ? The energy storage system can achieve efficiencies within 30% and 35%. ? The energy storage is realistic and economic sensible in comparison to other solutions. ? The impacts of such a system in the current living conditions and safety issues of the building are minimum

355

Energy management system of hybrid microgrid with energy storage  

OpenAIRE

The economic scheduling of the generation units is playing a significant role in the energy management of the hybrid stand alone microgrid. Energy storage is an increasingly important part of the renewable energy sector because of the need to store power during peak production times for use in off-peak periods. This paper describes an energy management system (EMS) for an islanded microgrid (MG) comprising wind energy conversion system (WECS),photovoltaic (PV), energy storage (ES) system, ...

Marzband, Mousa; Sumper, Andreas; Chindris, Mircea; Tomoiaga, Bogdan

2012-01-01

356

Utility battery storage systems program report for FY 94  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1994.

Butler, P.C.

1995-03-01

357

Specific systems studies of battery energy storage for electric utilities  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. As a part of this program, four utility-specific systems studies were conducted to identify potential battery energy storage applications within each utility network and estimate the related benefits. This report contains the results of these systems studies.

Akhil, A.A.; Lachenmeyer, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jabbour, S.J. [Decision Focus, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States); Clark, H.K. [Power Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

1993-08-01

358

Impacts of energy storage on power systems with stochastic generation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The increasing penetration of renewable generation is currently creating rising stochastic energy flows and associated challenges in the planning and operation of interconnected power systems. The use of distributed energy storage is an intuitive countermeasure and has continuously been mentioned in related publications for many years. This book sets up a new theoretical, unified system planning framework for all kinds of stochastic energy storage techniques. The developed methodology is based on recent concepts of Monte Carlo simulation and reformulates the problem of stochastic generation and energy storage from a system design perspective. (orig.)

Kloeckl, B.

2008-07-01

359

Energy Storage Systems Program Report for FY99  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies. The goal of this program is to develop cost-effective electric energy storage systems for many high-value stationary applications in collaboration with academia and industry. Sandia National Laboratories is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage components and systems. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1999.

BOYES,JOHN D.

2000-06-01

360

Energy storage systems program report for FY97  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to collaborate with industry in developing cost-effective electric energy storage systems for many high-value stationary applications. Sandia National Laboratories is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage components and systems. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1997. 46 figs., 20 tabs.

Butler, P.C.

1998-08-01

361

Energy Storage Systems Program Report for FY98  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies. The goal of this program is to collaborate with industry in developing cost-effective electric energy storage systems for many high-value stationary applications. Sandia National Laboratories is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development and testing of energy storage components and systems. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1998.

Butler, P.C.

1999-04-01

362

Solar thermal energy systems for building integration  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Solar thermal energy has the potential to make a significant contribution to the energy supply for space heating and hot water production, even in locations at higher latitudes, and in this way to reduce the use of fossil fuels. It is therefore very important to increase the use of this technology. By integrating solar collectors into building envelopes, the cost effectiveness of the collectors can be increased, as building material and labour costs can be reduced. By also using concentrating reflectors the cost effectiveness can be further increased. The aim of this work is to identify cost effective design criteria for building integrated solar collectors and solar thermal systems. It is hoped that the outcome will give guidance and inspiration to product developers, architects, designers and constructors and thereby help boost the solar thermal market and increase the use of solar thermal systems. The presented work includes an investigation of solar thermal systems for highly insulated buildings, performed for the International Energy Agency, Solar Heating and Cooling Programme, Task 28, in which solar thermal systems are designed for apartment buildings at high latitudes. Design advice is given based on Polysun simulations and parametric studies of various design parameters. Special attention was paid to dimensioning of the collector area to avoid overheating. The thermal performance of three designs of collectors for non-insulated roofs with cold attics underneath has been evaluated from measurements. The idea is to produce a thin, cheep and flexible roof-integrated collector for easy installation. The results show that the annual thermal energy yield would be 320, 330 and 280 kWh/m2 respectively for the three collectors A, B and C, at 50 deg C operating temperature. The corresponding yield per absorber area is 360, 680 and 1140 kWh/m2 respectively. As the material costs should be low, there is a potential for the production of these solar collectors, Collector B in particular, as cost effective building elements. However, further investigations for improved efficiency are suggested. The characteristics of a solar simulator have been investigated in order to show how suitable it is for use as a light source for indoor measurements of concentrating collectors for evaluation of their incidence angle dependence. It is here concluded that accurate results can be achieved for lower angles of incidence but for higher angles, above 35-40 deg, outdoor measurements are more reliable. A large solar thermal system, with facade-integrated collectors in several directions, connected to the flow side of the district heating grid in Malmoe, Sweden, has been studied, e.g. from measured data, and described. WINSUN simulations were performed to validate that the plant works as expected, which was confirmed by the results. The simulated annual output of 174 kWh/m2a from the system agreed well with the measured output, 180 kWh/m2a. The results from each of the collectors are also described and a small parametric study is given. The good accuracy of these results implies that WINSUN and Meteonorm data can be used for relatively good estimations of a complex system design when climate data is unavailable. The geometrical design of a concentrating PV/thermal hybrid collector for integration in a wall element is optimised for maximal energy output by short circuit current measurements of thin film photovoltaic cells and MINSUN simulations. The results show that the annual energy output could increase from 70 kWh/m2 for a vertical reference cell to 120 kWh/m2 absorber area. Results for a number of geometries are presented. (author)

Gajbert, Helena

2008-07-01

363

Fabrication and properties of microencapsulated-paraffin/gypsum-matrix building materials for thermal energy storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Graphical abstract: DSC curves of microPCMs/gypsum composite samples before and after a thermal cycling treatment. Highlights: ? Microcapsules containing paraffin was fabricated by in-situ polymerization. ? Methanol-modified melamine–formaldehyde (MMF) was used as shell material. ? MicroPCMs/gypsum-matrix building materials were applied for solar energy storage. ? The structure and thermal conductivity of composites had been investigated. - Abstract: Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The aim of this work was to prepare and investigate the properties of microPCMs/gypsum-matrix building materials for thermal energy storage. MicroPCMs contain paraffin was fabricated by in situ polymerization using methanol-modified melamine–formaldehyde (MMF) as shell material. A series of microPCMs samples were prepared under emulsion stirring rates in range of 1000–3000 r min?1 with core/shell weight ratios of 3/1, 2/1, 1/1, 1/2 and 1/3, respectively. The shell of microPCMs was smooth and compact with global shape, its thickness was not greatly affected by the core/shell ratio and emulsion stirring rate. DSC tests showed that the shell of microPCMs did not influence the phase change behavior of pure paraffin. It was found from TGA analysis that microPCMs samples containing paraffin lost their weight at the temperature of nearly 250 temperature of nearly 250 °C, which indicated that the PCM had been protected by shell. More shell material in microPCMs could enhance the thermal stability and provide higher compact condition for core material. After a 100-times thermal cycling treatment, the microPCMs contain paraffin also nearly did not change the phase change behaviors of PCM. With the increasing of weight contents of microPCMs in gypsum board, the thermal conductivity (?) values of composites had decreased. The simulation of temperature tests proved that the microPCMs/gypsum composite could store the time-dependent and intermittent solar energy, which did not necessarily meet the energy needs for space heating at all times.

364

The architecture of the High Performance Storage System (HPSS)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The rapid growth in the size of datasets has caused a serious imbalance in I/O and storage system performance and functionality relative to application requirements and the capabilities of other system components. The High Performance Storage System (HPSS) is a scalable, next-generation storage system that will meet the functionality and performance requirements of large-scale scientific and commercial computing environments. Our goal is to improve the performance and capacity of storage systems by two orders of magnitude or more over what is available in the general or mass marketplace today. We are also providing corresponding improvements in architecture and functionality. This paper describes the architecture and functionality of HPSS.

Teaff, D.; Coyne, B. [IBM Federal, Houston, TX (United States); Watson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-01-01

365

Evolution of the MACSTORTM dry spent fuel storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The MACSTORTM (Modular Air Cooled Canister Storage) system was developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the interim storage of spent fuel discharged by LWRs. It is a hybrid system which combines the operational economies of metal cask technology with the capital economies of concrete technology. The system includes all the necessary equipment to transfer spent fuel from a storage pool to an independent interim dry spent fuel storage site. After presenting a description of the system and a brief history of its developed, the paper deals with its thermal performance and modelling for various design configurations. Finally, a brief summary of the experience being gained during the implementation of a MACSTOR system modified for CANDU spent fuel at the Gentilly-2 nuclear generating station in Quebec is presented. It includes progress made in licensing activities and in public hearings pertinent to the initiation of the project. (author). 2 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

366

Evolution of the MACSTOR trademark dry spent fuel storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The MACSTOR trademark (Modular Air-Cooled Canister Storage) system was developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) for the interim storage of spent fuel discharged by light water reactors. It is a hybrid system which combines the operational economies of metal cask technology with the capital economies of concrete technology. The system includes all the necessary equipment to transfer spent fuel from a storage pool to an independent interim dry spent fuel storage site. After presenting a description of the system and a brief history of its development, the paper addresses its thermal performance and modeling for various design configurations. Finally, a brief summary of the experience being gained during the implementation of a MACSTOR trademark system modified for CANDU spent fuel at the Gentilly-2 NPP in Quebec is presented. It includes progress made in licensing activities and in public hearings pertinent to the initiation of the project

367

Building Energy Management through a Distributed Fuzzy Inference System  

OpenAIRE

Buildings consume significant world’s energy resources, approximately 32% of the total primary energy. The rapid depletion of energy resources, has imparted researchers to focus on energy conservation and wastage. The next generation of smart buildings is becoming a trend to cope with the needs of energy and environmental ease in buildings. This advances the intelligent control of building to fulfill the occupants’ need. Intelligent system control for sustainable buildings is dynamic and ...

Pervez Hameed Shaikh; Nursyarizal Bin Mohd Nor; Perumal Nallagownden; Irraivan Elamvazuthi

2013-01-01

368

Energy Management System Audit and Implementation in Educational Buildings  

OpenAIRE

Concerning the high energy consumption of educational buildings in available study; it is conducted to estimate the energy consumption at the Faculty of Humanities (Building No. 2), Science and Research Campus (SRC) of the Islamic Azad University (IAU), Tehran, Iran. Auditing and implementing the energy management system in the implied building, efforts are finally made to propose managerial solutions towards reducing energy consumption in this building. After gathering data of the building, ...

Nouri, J.; Karbasi, A. R.; Borgheipour, R.; Taheri, A.

2006-01-01

369

Solar heating and cooling system for an office building at Reedy Creek Utilities  

Science.gov (United States)

The solar energy system installed in a two story office building at a utilities company, which provides utility service to Walt Disney World, is described. The solar energy system application is 100 percent heating, 80 percent cooling, and 100 percent hot water. The storage medium is water with a capacity of 10,000 gallons hot and 10,000 gallons chilled water. Performance to date has equaled or exceeded design criteria.

1978-01-01

370

Adapting the NUHOMS Interim Storage System for international spent fuel storage needs  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

NUHOMS systems are well established in USA and Europe as a reliable, safe and well proven option for dry storage of spent fuel. These systems can be used for either on-site storage or away from reactor storage because the canisters cab be transported in a B9U0 packaging. The proven NUHOMS flexibility can readily be adapted to meet new consumer needs in terms of handling limitations (size and weight), fuel characteristics, local regulation ect. As a licensee for the NUHOMS technology, Framatome - ANP has supplied a NUHOMS systems for storing WWER fuel assemblies at Metzamor in Armenia and also for storing RBMK fuel at Chernobyl in Ukraine. Discussion with potential clients are in progress and new design concepts are in preparation, including a vertical version of the NUHOMS system. (authors)

371

Criticality safety studies for the storage of waste from nuclear fuel service in Intercell Storage Wells 2 and 3 of Building 3019  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report provides computational evaluation results demonstrating that mixed oxide waste can be safely stored in Intercell Storage Wells 2 and 3 of Building 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Existing, verified computational techniques are validated with applicable critical experiments and tolerance limits for safety analyses are derived. Multiplication factors for normal and credible abnormal configurations are calculated and found to be far subcritical when compared to derived safety limits.

Primm, R.T. III; Hopper, C.M.; Smolen, G.R.

1992-11-01

372

Criticality safety studies for the storage of waste from nuclear fuel service in Intercell Storage Wells 2 and 3 of Building 3019  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report provides computational evaluation results demonstrating that mixed oxide waste can be safely stored in Intercell Storage Wells 2 and 3 of Building 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Existing, verified computational techniques are validated with applicable critical experiments and tolerance limits for safety analyses are derived. Multiplication factors for normal and credible abnormal configurations are calculated and found to be far subcritical when compared to derived safety limits

373

Summaries and present states on horizontal modular storage system for spent nuclear fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Japan also, importance on intermediate storage of spent nuclear fuels is raised to promote efforts forward its practice. A storing system giving shielding function to concrete modules is hopeful at a viewpoint of cost reduction, and is promoted some investigations on adaptability of plural systems with actual advanced results in U.S.A., and so on, into Japan. Here were introduced outlines, present states and future trends of actual practice in U.S.A., and efforts of actual practice in Japan, on horizontal modular (silo) storage system, which had the most storage results in U.S.A. As in this system, it is required to build no building and no module moving apparatus with shielding function, its initial investment can be reduced. Arrangement of the module can be freely selected on response to shapes of its site, this system is one on maximum activating features of modularity of stepwise introduction of its required numbers of the system. (G.K.)

374

Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Active Noise Cancellation, Solar Energy Harvesting, and Energy Storage in Building Windows  

Science.gov (United States)

This research explores the application of carbon nanotube (CNT) films for active noise cancellation, solar energy harvesting and energy storage in building windows. The CNT-based components developed herein can be integrated into a solar-powered active noise control system for a building window. First, the use of a transparent acoustic transducer as both an invisible speaker for auxiliary audio playback and for active noise cancellation is accomplished in this work. Several challenges related to active noise cancellation in the window are addressed. These include secondary path estimation and directional cancellation of noise so as to preserve auxiliary audio and internal sounds while preventing transmission of external noise into the building. Solar energy can be harvested at a low rate of power over long durations while acoustic sound cancellation requires short durations of high power. A supercapacitor based energy storage system is therefore considered for the window. Using CNTs as electrode materials, two generations of flexible, thin, and fully solid-state supercapacitors are developed that can be integrated into the window frame. Both generations consist of carbon nanotube films coated on supporting substrates as electrodes and a solid-state polymer gel layer for the electrolyte. The first generation is a single-cell parallel-plate supercapacitor with a working voltage of 3 Volts. Its energy density is competitive with commercially available supercapacitors (which use liquid electrolyte). For many applications that will require higher working voltage, the second-generation multi-cell supercapacitor is developed. A six-cell device with a working voltage as high as 12 Volts is demonstrated here. Unlike the first generation's 3D structure, the second generation has a novel planar (2D) architecture, which makes it easy to integrate multiple cells into a thin and flexible supercapacitor. The multi-cell planar supercapacitor has energy density exceeding that of other planar supercapacitors in literature by more than one order of magnitude. All-solution fabrication processes were developed for both generations to achieve economical and scalable production. In addition to carbon nanotubes, nickel/nickel oxide core-shell nanowires were also studied as electrode materials for supercapacitors, for which high specific capacitance but low working voltage were obtained. Semi-transparent solar cells with carbon nanotube counter electrodes are developed to power the active noise cancellation system. They can be directly mounted on the glass panes and become part of the home window. The 2.67% efficiency achieved is higher than the 1.8% efficiency required for harvesting adequate energy to cancel noise of 70dB Day-Night-Level, which impacts on a north-facing window. In summary, this project develops several fundamental technologies that together can contribute to a solar-powered active noise cancellation system for a building window. At the same time, since the component technologies being developed are fundamental, it is also likely that they will have wider applications in other domains beyond building windows.

Hu, Shan

375

Building machine learning systems with Python  

CERN Document Server

This is a tutorial-driven and practical, but well-grounded book showcasing good Machine Learning practices. There will be an emphasis on using existing technologies instead of showing how to write your own implementations of algorithms. This book is a scenario-based, example-driven tutorial. By the end of the book you will have learnt critical aspects of Machine Learning Python projects and experienced the power of ML-based systems by actually working on them.This book primarily targets Python developers who want to learn about and build Machine Learning into their projects, or who want to pro

Richert, Willi

2013-01-01

376

DNA and microfluidics: Building molecular electronics systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The development of molecular electronics using DNA molecules as the building blocks and using microfluidics to build nanowire arrays is reviewed. Applications of DNA conductivity to build sensors and nanowire arrays, and DNA conjugation with other nanostructures, offers an exciting opportunity to build extremely small analytical devices that are suitable for single-molecule detection and also target screening.

Ye Yun [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Chen Lu [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Liu Xuezhu [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich J. [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: ukrull@utm.utoronto.ca

2006-05-24

377

DNA and microfluidics: Building molecular electronics systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The development of molecular electronics using DNA molecules as the building blocks and using microfluidics to build nanowire arrays is reviewed. Applications of DNA conductivity to build sensors and nanowire arrays, and DNA conjugation with other nanostructures, offers an exciting opportunity to build extremely small analytical devices that are suitable for single-molecule detection and also target screening

378

Bulk energy storage increases United States electricity system emissions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Bulk energy storage is generally considered an important contributor for the transition toward a more flexible and sustainable electricity system. Although economically valuable, storage is not fundamentally a "green" technology, leading to reductions in emissions. We model the economic and emissions effects of bulk energy storage providing an energy arbitrage service. We calculate the profits under two scenarios (perfect and imperfect information about future electricity prices), and estimate the effect of bulk storage on net emissions of CO2, SO2, and NOx for 20 eGRID subregions in the United States. We find that net system CO2 emissions resulting from storage operation are nontrivial when compared to the emissions from electricity generation, ranging from 104 to 407 kg/MWh of delivered energy depending on location, storage operation mode, and assumptions regarding carbon intensity. Net NOx emissions range from -0.16 (i.e., producing net savings) to 0.49 kg/MWh, and are generally small when compared to average generation-related emissions. Net SO2 emissions from storage operation range from -0.01 to 1.7 kg/MWh, depending on location and storage operation mode. PMID:25629631

Hittinger, Eric S; Azevedo, Inês M L

2015-03-01

379

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System provides the capability to detect, control, and extinguish fires and/or mitigate explosions throughout the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Fire protection includes appropriate water-based and non-water-based suppression, as appropriate, and includes the distribution and delivery systems for the fire suppression agents. The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System includes fire or explosion detection panel(s) controlling various detectors, system actuation, annunciators, equipment controls, and signal outputs. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for mounting of fire protection equipment and components, location of fire suppression equipment, suppression agent runoff, and locating fire rated barriers. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for adequate drainage and removal capabilities of liquid runoff resulting from fire protection discharges. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building Electrical Distribution System for power to operate, and with the Site Fire Protection System for fire protection water supply to automatic sprinklers, standpipes, and hose stations. The system interfaces with the Site Fire Protection System for fire signal transmission outside the WHB as needed to respond to a fire emergency, and with the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System to detect smoke and fire in specific areas, to protect building high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and to control portions of the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System for smoke management and manual override capability. The system interfaces with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Operations Monitoring and Control System for annunciation, and condition status

380

Energy storage systems: a strategic road-book  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Dealing with the development and deployment of thermal and electric energy storage systems, this report first identifies four main challenges: to take environmental challenges into account during all the storage system life (design, production, use, end of life), to integrate the issue of economic valorization of the device into its design phase, to promote the development of standards, to make an institutional and legal framework emerge. It defines the geographical scope and the time horizon for the development of these systems. It evokes research and development programs in the United States, Japan, China, Germany and the European Union. These programs concern: mobile electric storage systems, electric storage systems in support of energy networks and renewable energies, heat storage systems. The authors outline that business models are now favourable to the deployment of storage systems. They discuss some key technological and economical parameters. They propose some prospective visions by 2050 with different possible orientations for this sector. They also identify and discuss the possible technological and socio-economical obstacles, research priorities, and stress the importance of implementing experimental platforms and research demonstrators

381

Energy storage and thermal control system design status  

Science.gov (United States)

The Space Station Freedom electric power system (EPS) will initially rely on photovoltaics for power generation and Ni/H2 batteries for electrical energy storage. The current design for and the development status of two major subsystems in the PV Power Module is discussed. The energy storage subsystem comprised of high capacity Ni/H2 batteries and the single-phase thermal control system that rejects the excess heat generated by the batteries and other components associated with power generation and storage is described.

Simons, Stephen N.; Willhoite, Bryan C.; Vanommering, Gert

1989-01-01

382

Optimization of Experimental Model Parameter Identification for Energy Storage Systems  

OpenAIRE

The smart grid approach is envisioned to take advantage of all available modern technologies in transforming the current power system to provide benefits to all stakeholders in the fields of efficient energy utilisation and of wide integration of renewable sources. Energy storage systems could help to solve some issues that stem from renewable energy usage in terms of stabilizing the intermittent energy production, power quality and power peak mitigation. With the integration of energy storag...

Rosario Morello; Mario Luiso; Daniele Gallo; Carmine Landi

2013-01-01

383

Engineering and cost analysis of a dry cooling system augmented with a thermal storage pond  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An engineering and cost study of the capacitive thermal storage pond added to a state-of-the-art dry cooling system is described. The purpose of the study was to assess the potential for reducing the cost of all-dry cooling for thermal electric power plants using a dry cooling system that includes a thermal storage pond. Using the modified BNW-I computer code, the effect of varying significant design parameters was investigated. The parametric study included studying the effects of varying turbine type, pond size, replacement energy costing, capacity penalty methodology, pond location with respect to the dry cooling tower, design temperature, and site location (meteorology). Incremental power production costs for dry cooling (i.e., the portion of the cost of bus-bar electricity from the plant which is attributable to the cost of building and operating the heat rejection system) with a thermal storage pond system were determined for meteorologies of both Wyodak, Wyoming and Phoenix, Arizona. For Wyodak the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 2.81 mills/kWh as compared to 2.55 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. For Phoenix the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 3.66 mills/kWh as compared to 4.31 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. If the use of a modified conventional turbine with the dry-cooled system is stipulated in order to stay with proven technology for large turbines, then results of this study show that in extremely hot climates the thermal storage pond can reduce the cost of dry cooling. If no cost penalty is assigned to high back pressure turbines and it can be used, then the thermal storage pond has no advantage in hot climates. However, collateral use of the pond for makeup or emergency cooling water storage may decreae the cost. (LCL)

Drost, M.K.; Allemann, R.T.

1978-09-01

384

Building energy information systems. User case studies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Measured energy performance data are essential to national efforts to improve building efficiency, as evidenced in recent benchmarking mandates, and in a growing body of work that indicates the value of permanent monitoring and energy information feedback. This paper presents case studies of energy information systems (EIS) at four enterprises and university campuses, focusing on the attained energy savings, and successes and challenges in technology use and integration. EIS are broadly defined as performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to store, analyze, and display building energy information. Case investigations showed that the most common energy savings and instances of waste concerned scheduling errors, measurement and verification, and inefficient operations. Data quality is critical to effective EIS use, and is most challenging at the subsystem or component level, and with non-electric energy sources. Sophisticated prediction algorithms may not be well understood but can be applied quite effectively, and sites with custom benchmark models or metrics are more likely to perform analyses external to the EIS. Finally, resources and staffing were identified as a universal challenge, indicating a need to identify additional models of EIS use that extend beyond exclusive in-house use, to analysis services.

Granderson, J.; Piette, M.A.; Ghatikar, G. [Lawrence Berkeley, National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-01-15

385

Building Energy Information Systems: User Case Studies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Measured energy performance data are essential to national efforts to improve building efficiency, as evidenced in recent benchmarking mandates, and in a growing body of work that indicates the value of permanent monitoring and energy information feedback. This paper presents case studies of energy information systems (EIS) at four enterprises and university campuses, focusing on the attained energy savings, and successes and challenges in technology use and integration. EIS are broadly defined as performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to store, analyze and display building energy information. Case investigations showed that the most common energy savings and instances of waste concerned scheduling errors, measurement and verification, and inefficient operations. Data quality is critical to effective EIS use, and is most challenging at the subsystem or component level, and with non-electric energy sources. Sophisticated prediction algorithms may not be well understood but can be applied quite effectively, and sites with custom benchmark models or metrics are more likely to perform analyses external to the EIS. Finally, resources and staffing were identified as a universal challenge, indicating a need to identify additional models of EIS use that extend beyond exclusive in-house use, to analysis services.

Granderson, Jessica; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish

2010-03-22

386

Design of reactor building foundation mat system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The design of the reactor building foundation mat system represents a great challenge to industry, since the design codes are not written specifically for such large and complicated interfacing configurations. The experimental data are also not available for such mats. It relies heavily upon the designer to decide the appropriate analysis techniques and code applications. The large number of loading combinations in design and the complexity of detailing and construction demonstrate the difficulty of the task. A case study of a BWR 6, Mark III containment vessel reactor building foundation mat system is presented here to describe a complete design. Code jurisdictional boundaries for each component are attempted. The design of the mat has to comply with all the loading combinations required by the regulatory agencies. However, this results in a very large number of combinations to be considered. By inspection, the large number of loading combinations is reduced to a smaller number of controlling combinations, which is analyzed using computer programs. A finite elements model is used for analysis. The soil is represented as elastic springs at the nodes. Using a process of trial and error, the springs that produce tensile stresses are eliminated from subsequent analysis, and only compression springs are retained. This process should give a true picture of the stress conditionn under the mat, and also the stresses within the mat. An acceptance is discussed for the residualn acceptance is discussed for the residual local tension forces. (orig./HP)

387

Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document. Revision 1  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document (MRS-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and technical requirements for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility subelement and the On-Site Transfer and Storage (OSTS) subelement. The MRS facility subelement provides for temporary storage, at a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operated site, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in an NRC-approved Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) storage mode, or other NRC-approved storage modes. The OSTS subelement provides for transfer and storage, at Purchaser sites, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in MPCs. Both the MRS facility subelement and the OSTS subelement are in support of the CRWMS. The purpose of the MRS-SRD is to define the top-level requirements for the development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. The document also presents an overall description of the MRS facility and the OSTS, their functions (derived by extending the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) Store Waste Document), their segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the top-level interface requirements of the MRS facility and the OSTS are included. As such, the MRS-SRD provides the technical baseline for the MRS Safety Analysis Report (SAR) design and the OSTS Safety Analysis Report design.

1994-03-01

388

Particle swarm optimization for redundant building cooling heating and power system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An optimal and redundant building cooling heating and power (BCHP) system can yield economical savings, but more importantly can save energy as well as reduce the emission of pollutants. This paper presents the energy flow analysis of the conventional separation production (SP) system and the redundant BCHP system. Four decision variables (the capacity of power generation unit (PGU), the capacity of heat storage tank, the on-off coefficient of PGU and the ratio of electric cooling to cool load) to be optimized are selected in consideration of the design and the operation strategy of BCHP system. An objective function to simultaneously measure the energetic, economical and environmental benefits achieved by BCHP system in comparison to SP system is constructed and maximized. Particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSOA) is employed to search the optimal solutions. A case study of BCHP system with thermal storage unit and hybrid cooling system is presented to ascertain the feasibility and validity of the optimization method. (author)

Wang, Jiangjiang; Jing, Youyin; Zhang, Chunfa [School of Energy and Power Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Baoding, Hebei Province 071003 (China); Zhai, Zhiqiang (John) [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 428 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0428 (United States)

2010-12-15

389

Flywheel energy storage systems with magnetic bearings; Magnetgelagerte Schwungmassenspeicher  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In the present paper development and status of new conceptions of flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) are presented. Carbon and glass fiber materials provide a high energy density while magnetic bearings are capable to reduce the rotational losses and increase the storage efficiency substantially. Flywheel storage systems with magnetic stabilization of the rotor can provide UPS functions after electric power fault till diesel generator are started and deliver electricity. Due to the fast flywheel reaction in milliseconds power quality functions (load levelling) are provided as well. A 250 kW / 5 kWh engineering prototype Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) was designed and assembled For the first time a heavy - load 0.6 ton rotor is suspended total magnetically by an HTS magnetic bearing. Potential FESS applications are described and discussed. (orig.)

Werfel, Frank N. [Adelwitz Technologiezentrum GmbH (ATZ), Arzberg-Adelwitz (Germany)

2009-07-01

390

Hydrogen based energy storage for solar energy systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The main technical constraint in solar energy systems which operate around the year is the lack of suitable long-term energy storage. Conventional solutions to overcome the problem of seasonal storage in PV power systems are to use oversized batteries as a seasonal energy storage, or to use a diesel back-up generator. However, affordable lead-acid batteries are not very suitable for seasonal energy storage because of a high self-discharge rate and enhanced deterioration and divergence of the single cells during prolonged periods of low state of charge in times of low irradiation. These disadvantages can be avoided by a back-up system, e.g. a diesel generator, which car supply energy to the loads and charge the battery to the full state of charge to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. Unfortunately, diesel generators have several disadvantages, e.g. poor starting reliability, frequent need for maintenance and noise

Vanhanen, J.; Hagstroem, M.; Lund, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

1998-10-01

391

Neutronic and thermal hydraulic of dry cask storage systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Interim spent fuel storage systems must provide for the safe receipt, handling, retrieval and storage of spent nuclear fuel before reprocessing or disposal. In the context of achieving these objectives, the following features of the design are to be taken into consideration: to maintain fuel subcritical, to remove spent fuel residualheat, and to provide for radiation protection. These features in the design of a dry cask storage system were analyzed for normal operating conditions by employing COBRA-SFS, SCALE4.4 (ORIGEN, XSDOSE, CSAS6) codes. For a metal-shielded type storage system, appropriate designs, in accordance with safety assurance limits of IAEA, were obtained for spent fuel burned to 33000, 45000 and 55000 MW d/t and cooled for 5 and 10 years

392

Solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system with thermal energy storage  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system has both terrestrial and space applications because thermal energy storage can be utilized. Excellent properties (heat of fusion=1800 j/gm and melting temperature=1680 K) make silicon the ideal thermal storage material for an STPV system. Using a one dimensional model with tapering of the silicon storage material, it was found that several hours of running time with modest lengths ({approximately}15 cm) of silicon are possible. Calculated steady-state efficiencies for an STPV system using an Er-YAG selective emitter and ideal photovoltaic (PV) cell model are in the range of 15{percent}{endash}17{percent}. Increasing the taper of the storage material improves both efficiency and power output. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Chubb, D.L.; Good, B.S. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Lowe, R.A. [School of Technology, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States)

1996-02-01

393

Solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system with thermal energy storage  

Science.gov (United States)

A solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system has both terrestrial and space applications because thermal energy storage can be utilized. Excellent properties (heat of fusion=1800 j/gm and melting temperature=1680 K) make silicon the ideal thermal storage material for an STPV system. Using a one dimensional model with tapering of the silicon storage material, it was found that several hours of running time with modest lengths (˜15 cm) of silicon are possible. Calculated steady-state efficiencies for an STPV system using an Er-YAG selective emitter and ideal photovoltaic (PV) cell model are in the range of 15%-17%. Increasing the taper of the storage material improves both efficiency and power output.

Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Lowe, Roland A.

1996-02-01

394

A View on Future Building System Modeling and Simulation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This chapter presents what a future environment for building system modeling and simulation may look like. As buildings continue to require increased performance and better comfort, their energy and control systems are becoming more integrated and complex. We therefore focus in this chapter on the modeling, simulation and analysis of building energy and control systems. Such systems can be classified as heterogeneous systems because they involve multiple domains, such as thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, electrical systems, control systems and communication systems. Also, they typically involve multiple temporal and spatial scales, and their evolution can be described by coupled differential equations, discrete equations and events. Modeling and simulating such systems requires a higher level of abstraction and modularisation to manage the increased complexity compared to what is used in today's building simulation programs. Therefore, the trend towards more integrated building systems is likely to be a driving force for changing the status quo of today's building simulation programs. Thischapter discusses evolving modeling requirements and outlines a path toward a future environment for modeling and simulation of heterogeneous building systems.A range of topics that would require many additional pages of discussion has been omitted. Examples include computational fluid dynamics for air and particle flow in and around buildings, people movement, daylight simulation, uncertainty propagation and optimisation methods for building design and controls. For different discussions and perspectives on the future of building modeling and simulation, we refer to Sahlin (2000), Augenbroe (2001) and Malkawi and Augenbroe (2004).

Wetter, Michael

2011-04-01

395

Eighth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies in Cooperation with the Seventeenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems  

Science.gov (United States)

This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Eighth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies which is being held in cooperation with the Seventeenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems at the University of Maryland University College Inn and Conference Center March 27-30, 2000. As one of an ongoing series, this Conference continues to provide a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the management of large volumes of data. The Conference encourages all interested organizations to discuss long term mass storage requirements and experiences in fielding solutions. Emphasis is on current and future practical solutions addressing issues in data management, storage systems and media, data acquisition, long term retention of data, and data distribution. This year's discussion topics include architecture, future of current technology, new technology with a special emphasis on holographic storage, performance, standards, site reports, vendor solutions. Tutorials will be available on stability of optical media, disk subsystem performance evaluation, I/O and storage tuning, functionality and performance evaluation of file systems for storage area networks.

Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

2000-01-01

396

Underground gas storage Uelsen: Findings from planning, building and commissioning. Part 1: Deposit; Untertagegasspeicher Uelsen: Erkenntnisse aus Planung, Bau und Inbetriebnahme. Teil 1: Lagerstaette  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The underground gas storage at Uelsen which was built as a H-gas storage in a former variegated sandstone gasfield in Western Lower Saxony close to the town of Nordhorn has added to the gas supply system of the BEB Erdgas and Erdoel GmbH. The underground storage is connected to the Bunde-Rheine transport pipeline BEB-grid gas system by a 27 km pipeline and is a consequent expansion of BEB`s underground storage/transport system. Planning, building and commissioning were handled by BEB. Findings to date are described. [Deutsch] Der Untertagegasspeicher (UGS) Uelsen, der in einem ehemaligen Buntsandstein Gasfeld im westlichen Niedersachsen in der Naehe der Stadt Nordhorn als H-Gasspeicher eingerichtet wurde, hat die BEB Erdgas und Erdoel GmbH eine weitere Staerkung ihres Gasversorgungssystems erreicht. Der UGS Uelsen ist ueber eine 27 km lange Anbindungsleitung mit der zum BEB - Ferngasleitungssystems gehoerenden Bunde-Rheine Transportleitung verbunden und stellt eine konsequente Erweiterung des BEB Untertagegasspeicher-/Transportsystems dar. Planung, Bau und Inbetriebnahme erfolgten durch BEB im Rahmen einer integrierten bereichsuebergreifenden Projektbearbeitung. Die hierbei gewonnenen Erkenntnisse werden im Folgenden fuer den Untertagebereich dargestellt. (orig.)

Wallbrecht, J.; Beckmann, H.; Reiser, H.; Wilhelm, R. [BEB Erdgas und Erdoel GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

1998-12-31

397

Optimal sizing of battery storage for stand-alone hybrid (photo-voltaic + diesel) power systems  

Science.gov (United States)

An important element of hybrid photo- voltaic(PV) + diesel sytem is battery storage. Size of battery storage plays a role in optimum operation of the hybrid system. Emphasis needs to be placed on this issue. In this perspective, hourly solar radiation data, for the period 1986 93 recorded at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, have been analyzed to investigate the optimum size of battery storage capacity for hybrid (PV + diesel) power systems. Various sizing configurations have been simulated. The monthly average daily values of solar global radiation range from 3.61 to 7.96kWh/m2. As a case study, hybrid systems considered in the present analysis consist of 225m2 PV array area (panels/modules) supplemented with battery storage unit and diesel backup generators (to meet the load requirements of a typical residential building with annual electrical energy demand of 35,200kWh). The monthly average energy generated from the aforementioned hybrid system for different scenarios has been presented. More importantly, the study explores the influence of variation of battery storage capacity on hybrid power generation. The results exhibit a trade-off between size of the storage capacity and diesel power to be generated to cope with annual load distribution. Concurrently, the energy to be generated from the diesel generator and the number of operational hours of the diesel system to meet the load demand have been also addressed.The study shows that for optimum operation of diesel system, storage capacity equivalent to 12 18h of maximum monthly average hourly demand need to be used. It has been found that in the absence of battery bank, ˜58% of the load needs to be provided by the diesel system. However, use of 12h of battery storage (autonomy) reduces diesel energy generation by ˜49% and the number of hours of operation of the diesel system get reduced by about ˜82%. The findings of this study can be employed as a tool for sizing of battery storage for PV/diesel systems for other regions having climates similar to the location considered in the study.

Shaahid, S. M.; Elhadidy, M. A.

2005-09-01

398

The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage  

Science.gov (United States)

The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

1976-01-01

399

ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

2011-07-18

400

A Prototype Steam Storage System for Power Production  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Use of solar energy on a large scale is mainly limited to the sun duration hours, weather conditions and adequate solar thermal storage technology. A means of addressing this problem using local materials is provided. A prototype pressure storage system was designed using auto cad 2010 and fabricated using locally available materials. The steam storage system was tested using ASME 2000b guidelines for boiler and pressure vessels at a small scale. The maximum continuous rating for the storage system was 60 kg maximum instantaneous demand 40 kg , storage capacity 50 kg and mean off peak load of 100 W was realized. The maximum test temperatures of operation obtained using seamless galvanized iron pipe was 264.7 o C and 140 o C using polypropylene pipes. The steam storage system operated between 1.0 Pa and 1.0 Pa. Its charging duration was twenty minutes and would discharge at the rate of 50 l continuously after full charge with solar irradiance between 800 W/ and 1020 W/ . The length of complete discharge for the heat transfer fluids was found to range between 4.4 hours. and 6.9 hours. The power output for the heat transfer fluids were in the range of 251.8 W and 486.9W. The steam storage system was found to have an efficiency of 93.5 % and a thermal capacity of 4.54 k J. This system presents a means of storing solar energy in form of steam during low energy demand and its conversion to power during high peak demand twenty four hours a day depending on the size of the storage and application and hence addressing the problem of variability and low density of solar energy.

Kawira M. , Kinyua R. , Kamau J.N.

2014-01-01

401

Primary energy savings using heat storage for biomass heating systems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available District heating is an efficient way to provide heat to residential, tertiary and industrial users. The heat storage unit is an insulated water tank that absorbs surplus heat from the boiler. The stored heat in the heat storage unit makes it possible to heat even when the boiler is not working, thus increasing the heating efficiency. In order to save primary energy (fuel, the boiler operates on nominal load every time it is in operation (for the purpose of this research. The aim of this paper is to analyze the water temperature variation in the heat storage, depending on the heat load and the heat storage volume. Heat load is calculated for three reference days, with average daily temperatures from -5 to 5°C. The primary energy savings are also calculated for those days in the case of using heat storage in district heating.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 33051: The concept of sustainable energy supply of settlements with energy efficient buildings

Mitrovi? Dejan M.

2012-01-01

402

Flexibility of the BNFL dry storage systems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To widen its range of spent fuel management services, BNFL entered the fuel storage market in 1995; entry was by acquisition rather than internal product development. The need for a transportable product was identified very early, but represents only the first phase of a philosophy of continuous improvement. Strong synergy exists between the new business area and existing fuel handling and transportation expertise, which has been of considerable assistance to the new business. (author)

403

Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

1980-02-01

404

Pumped storage systems introduction in isolated power production systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The present paper investigates the introduction of pumped storage systems (PSS) in isolated power production systems with high thermoelectric production and wind energy rejection. The introduced PSS aims at: circle the maximisation of the wind energy penetration and circle the minimisation of the energy production cost. In former studies, the introduction of PSS in power production systems aims at the power demand peaks saving. In the present study, the PSS storage-production procedure is accomplished without any predefined schedule. Energy is stored whenever: circle wind energy is rejected and circle the thermal generators that burn cheap heavy fuel oil do not operate at their nominal powers. Furthermore, the production of the thermal generators that burn expensive diesel oil is substituted during the power demand peak hours. Two case studies for Crete and Rhodes are accomplished. An iterative procedure is performed, in order to calculate the optimum pumps and hydro turbines nominal powers in both islands. The optimisation criterion is the energy production specific cost minimisation. The PSS introduction in Crete yields to almost 10% annual electricity production cost reduction. The annual wind energy rejection is nullified. The investment payback period may be less than 5 years. The PSS introduction in Rhodes leads to a 1.85% annual electricity production cost reduction. The PSS project does not exhibit attractive economic indexes. Conclusively, isolated power production systems with energy production specific cost higher than approximately 0.05EUR/kW h seem to be appropriate for PSS introduction, following the operation algorithm of the present paper. (author)

Katsaprakakis, Dimitris Al.; Christakis, Dimitris G. [Wind Energy Laboratory, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Estavromenos, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Zervos, Arthouros; Papantonis, Dimitris; Voutsinas, Spiros [Fluids Department, School of Mechanical Engineer, National Technical University of Athens, Politehnioupoli Zografou, Iroon Politehniou 9, Zografou, Athens (Greece)

2008-03-15

405

Tendering and Contract Procedures in System Building  

Science.gov (United States)

A model structure for organization and management in the building process, with special reference to tendering procedures--management of the relations between two or more operators of the building process. (Author)

Simonazzi, Marco; Zambelli, Ettore

1971-01-01

406

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS AND BUILDING ENVELOPE SYSTEMS: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A bibliography of published papers describing models, measurement techniques, apparatus, and data for the thermal performance of whole buildings and building envelope systems has been collected (aggregate energy consumption of whole buildings, performance of HVAC equipment, and solar technologies are not included). Summary descriptions of the content of each citation are provided. Measurements on whole buildings or on systems other than walls are sparse. However, new and recently completed measurement facilities are increasing these capabilities. Measurements under dynamic conditions are difficult to accomplish and few reliable data exist. Some analogs have been explored experimentally and analytically. Citations on analytical models are selective and concentrate on methodology that forms the basis of computer programs for whole-building energy analysis. Interesting future directions include new approaches to dynamic measurements, both in the laboratory and in the field, for envelope systems and for whole buildings.

Carroll, William L.

1979-04-01

407

Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems -- Energy Storage (SEGIS-ES).  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper describes the concept for augmenting the SEGIS Program (an industry-led effort to greatly enhance the utility of distributed PV systems) with energy storage in residential and small commercial applications (SEGIS-ES). The goal of SEGIS-ES is to develop electrical energy storage components and systems specifically designed and optimized for grid-tied PV applications. This report describes the scope of the proposed SEGIS-ES Program and why it will be necessary to integrate energy storage with PV systems as PV-generated energy becomes more prevalent on the nation's utility grid. It also discusses the applications for which energy storage is most suited and for which it will provide the greatest economic and operational benefits to customers and utilities. Included is a detailed summary of the various storage technologies available, comparisons of their relative costs and development status, and a summary of key R&D needs for PV-storage systems. The report concludes with highlights of areas where further PV-specific R&D is needed and offers recommendations about how to proceed with their development.

Hanley, Charles J.; Ton, Dan T. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.); Boyes, John D.; Peek, Georgianne Huff

2008-07-01

408

Shielding analysis of the NAC-MPC storage system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper presents the shielding analyses of the NAC-MPC dry cask storage system. The NAC-MPC dry cask storage system consists of a transportable storage canister, a transfer cask, and a vertical concrete storage cask. The NAC-MPC is designed to accommodate 36 open-quotes Yankee Classclose quotes fuel assemblies with a maximum burnup of 36,000 MWd/tonne U burnup and 8 yr cooling time. The shielding analysis is performed with the SCALE 4.3 code package which includes SAS2H for source term generation and SAS4A, a modification of SAS4, for shielding evaluations. SAS4 utilizes a one