WorldWideScience

Sample records for spine reposition sense

  1. Lip repositioning

    Reetika Gaddale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive gingival display is a frequent finding that can occur because of various intraoral or extraoral etiologies. This report describes the use of surgical lip repositioning technique for the management of a gummy smile associated with vertical maxillary excess and hypermobility of the upper lip. The procedure restricts the muscle pull of the elevator lip muscles by shortening the vestibule, thus reducing the gingival display when smiling. Healing was uneventful and follow-up examinations of 10 months revealed reduced gingival display. For patients desiring a less invasive alternative to orthognathic surgery, lip repositioning is a viable alternative.

  2. Comparison of cervical repositioning error between basketball and badminton players and control group

    Maryam Choromzadeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Proprioception is a type of feedback from limbs to CNS which defines a sensory tools to contribute position sense and movement sense. Precise and controlled movements are important sections of sports and activity daily living which needs to accurate information of proprioception. High concentration of proprioceptors are reported in cervical spine, sacroiliac and ankle joint. The purpose of this study was to compare repositioning error of cervical spine on high level badminton and basketball players and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: Twenty female basketball players (23.40 years old, 20 female badminton players (24.81years old and 20 healthy female (24,95years old subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Cervical total range of motion (ROM and repositioning error in target angle (30% of full ROM in each movement of flexion, extension, right and left lateral flexion and rotation were measured by CROM apparatus. Results : Our results indicate that two groups of athletes has significant differences with non-athletic subjects in flexion, extension, left lateral flexion and ro tation and there were significant differences in right lateral flexion and right rotation between badminton players and non-athletic subjects (P<0.005. Conclusion : Cervical proprioception may improve with specific sport movements. Basketball and badminton are non-contact sports that needs to eye and hand coordination, as our results showed that the cervical repositioning error was decreased in athletics related to non-athletic subjects, the mentioned sports may improve proprioception. Key Words: Proprioception, Cervical, Repositioning error, Basketball, Badminton

  3. Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Møller

    2011-01-01

    Liner shipping fleet repositioning consists of moving vessels between services in a liner ship- ping network in order to better orient the overall network to the world economy, and to ensure the proper maintenance of vessels. Thus, fleet repositioning involves sailing and loading activities subject...

  4. STRATEGICALLY REPOSITIONING RUSSIA

    Brandabur Raluca Ecaterina

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Positioning is a very important marketing concept. Its importance was strongly emphasized and implemented in the case of companies, but is somehow neglected when it comes to states. A country acquires a position in the mind of a person very much like any other product does, which is very important especially when that person exerts an executive role. Nowadays Russia has a poor image or no image at all, both internationally and in Romania. In order to regain an important position in the Balkans region, Russia must set aside any political agenda and reposition itself as a business partner on equal terms. The first goal of this article is to clarify Russias position in the minds of future Romanian executives. The second goal is to outline a recommended course of actions for Russias repositioning.

  5. Drug repositioning for personalized medicine

    Li, Yvonne Y.; Jones, Steven JM

    2012-01-01

    Human diseases can be caused by complex mechanisms involving aberrations in numerous proteins and pathways. With recent advances in genomics, elucidating the molecular basis of disease on a personalized level has become an attainable goal. In many cases, relevant molecular targets will be identified for which approved drugs already exist, and the potential repositioning of these drugs to a new indication can be investigated. Repositioning is an accelerated route for drug discovery because exi...

  6. The Loudon Chateau repositioning appliance.

    Loudon, Merle

    2014-01-01

    The LCR Appliance if fabricated and used properly, has many advantages over the Herbst and Twin Block appliances in solving tongue thrust, mandibular deficiency and repositioning with proper mandibular advancement and mandibular growth results. The regular Chateau appliance was named in 1904 after Dr. Chateau in Franc. It was originally used in Europe but was an uncomfortable removable appliance with wires used in the mandibular anterior lingual area to reposition the mandible. PMID:25745720

  7. SER: Subpixel Event Repositioning Algorithms

    Li, Dylan

    2014-04-01

    Subpixel Event Repositioning (SER) techniques significantly improve the already unprecedented spatial resolution of Chandra X-ray imaging with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). Chandra CCD SER techniques are based on the premise that the impact position of events can be refined, based on the distribution of charge among affected CCD pixels. Unlike ACIS SER models that are restricted to corner split (3- and 4-pixel) events and assume that such events take place at the split pixel corners, this IDL code uses two-pixel splits as well, and incorporates more realistic estimates of photon impact positions.

  8. Cancer: repositioned to kill stem cells

    Holyoake, Tessa; Vetrie, David

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem cells make it hard to cure many forms of the disease. Repositioning an existing drug to tackle this problem could significantly improve treatment for one form of leukaemia.

  9. Temporal Optimization Planning for Fleet Repositioning

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Møller

    2011-01-01

    Fleet repositioning problems pose a high financial bur- den on shipping firms, but have received little attention in the literature, despite their high importance to the shipping industry. Fleet repositioning problems are characterized by chains of interacting activities, but state-of-the-art pla......Fleet repositioning problems pose a high financial bur- den on shipping firms, but have received little attention in the literature, despite their high importance to the shipping industry. Fleet repositioning problems are characterized by chains of interacting activities, but state......-of-the-art planning and scheduling techniques do not offer cost models that are rich enough to represent essential objectives of these problems. To this end, we introduce a novel framework called Temporal Optimization Planning (TOP). TOP uses partial order planning to build optimization models associated with the...

  10. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  11. The spine

    MRI has become accepted as a noninvasive modality for evaluation of abnormalities of the spinal axis. It is the procedure of choice for evaluation of intramedullary disease, whether it be congenital, neoplastic, or demyelinating in origin. MRI has also been shown to be efficacious for evaluation of disk-space infection and, more recently, with the advent of surface coils, degenerative disease of the spine. In particular, surface coils have dramatically improved MRI accuracy, and it is anticipated that improvements in coil design and pulse-sequence optimization will add to its overall accuracy and patient acceptance. The use of MRI for evaluation of trauma, intradural neoplasms, arteriovenous malformations, and the post-operative spine, though promising, has yet to be defined. The disadvantages of MRI for evaluation of the spine include the potential hazard associated with patients with metallic implants or prostheses, exam time, motion problems, difficulty in imaging patients with severe scoliosis, and the inability of MRI to detect calcifications

  12. [Incisor repositioning: a new approach in orthodontics].

    Dallel, Ines; Khemiri, Mourad; Fathallah, Safa; Ben Rejeb, Salwa; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-12-01

    Lower incisors axis has a "key" position in different cephalometric analysis. However, several critics are directed towards the cephalometric profile and cephalometric landmarks (point, line and angle). The published norms and the cephalometric standards recommended for the optimal positioning of incisors could only be used as general clinical guidelines. Incisor repositioning to achieve optimal facial aesthetics requires taking into consideration the hard and soft tissues of the face, the profile, the muscular dynamics as well as the facial growth. In this work, we propose a new approach of incisor repositioning taking into account the variability of periodontal, functional and aesthetic factors. PMID:26655419

  13. Flip-Floppers and Wafflers: Explanations and Repositioning

    Robison, Joshua

    Repositioning by political elites plays a key role in a variety of political phenomena, including legislative policymaking, and campaigning. However, the likely electoral consequences from repositioning remain unclear due to conflicting results from the empirical literature. I contribute to this ...

  14. Repositioning chairs in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    West, Niels; Hansen, Søren; Møller, Martin Nue; Bloch, Sune Land; Klokker, Mads

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the clinical value of repositioning chairs in management of refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and to study how different BPPV subtypes respond to treatment. We performed a retrospective chart review of 150 consecutive cases with refractory vertigo...

  15. THE EFFECT OF WEARING HEADSCARVES ON CERVICAL SPINE PROPRIOCEPTION

    Samiah F. Alqabbani; Eric G. Johnson; Daher, Noha S.; Shilpa B. Gaikwad; SukrutDeshpande

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proprioception plays an important role in sensorimotor control of posture and movement. Impairments in cervical proprioception have been demonstrated in subjects with whiplash-associated disorder, patients with age-related degeneration, and patients with articular diseases or spondylosis. The joint position error test is widely used to measure head repositioning accuracy. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to compare cervical spine joint position error in females w...

  16. Cervical spine CT scan

    ... cervical spine; Computed tomography scan of cervical spine; CT scan of cervical spine; Neck CT scan ... Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to radiation Allergic reaction to contrast dye CT scans expose you to more radiation than ...

  17. Application of drug repositioning strategy to TOFISOPAM.

    Bernard, P; Dufresne-Favetta, C; Favetta, P; Do, Q-T; Himbert, F; Zubrzycki, S; Scior, T; Lugnier, C

    2008-01-01

    Drug repositioning strategy is an interesting approach for pharmaceutical companies; especially to increase their productivity. SELNERGY(tm) is a reverse docking based-program able to virtually screen thousands of compounds on more than 2000 3D biological targets. This program was successfully applied to tofisopam and revealed that the isomers of tofisopam are able to fit with phosphodiesterase 4. This old drug was used as a racemic mixture to treat anxiety in the eighties and was recently shown to act as a PDE4 inhibitor. Thanks to this strategy we demonstrated that tofisopam acts via the inhibition of PDE4 in the submicromolar range. Moreover, we firstly showed that the S-enantiomer of tofisopam is ten times more active than R-enantiomer. The identification of the biochemical mechanism of tofisopam isomers now allows to reposition this drug in new therapeutic indications where modulation of cAMP via PDE4 inhibitors are possible. PMID:19075663

  18. Computational drug repositioning through heterogeneous network clustering

    Chao WU; Gudivada, Ranga C; Aronow, Bruce J.; Jegga, Anil G

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the costly and time consuming process and high attrition rates in drug discovery and development, drug repositioning or drug repurposing is considered as a viable strategy both to replenish the drying out drug pipelines and to surmount the innovation gap. Although there is a growing recognition that mechanistic relationships from molecular to systems level should be integrated into drug discovery paradigms, relatively few studies have integrated information about heterogeneou...

  19. Comparison of craniocervical region repositioning error between wrestlers, taekwondo players and non-athlete subjects

    Masoumeh Yadollahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Proprioception is a component of somatosensory system. One of the most important somatosensory receptors is muscle spindles. Neck area with high density of muscle spindle, plays a significant role in providing this sense. With repeated contact sports, with high trauma on head and neck region, it is likely that proprioception will be impaired. The present study was conducted to compare proprioception between wrestlers, taekwondo players and non-athlete subjects to determine the effect of trauma on proprioception of craniocervical region. Material and Methods: This study was a case-control study of 75 male with the age range of 18-30 years (Including: 25 professional wrestlers, 25 professional taekwondo players and 25 non-athlete subjects. Participants were selected through simple non-probability sampling. To assess proprioception of craniocervical region, angular repositioning of two positions (neutral and 50% of range of motion was evaluated by using the cervical range of motion device (CROM device. The statistical method which used in this study was one way ANOVA. Results: Accuracy of target repositioning (50% of range of motion of extension, right and left rotation were significantly different between three groups (p<0.05. Returning to neutral position from mentioned movement was associated with a significant error (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is assumed that proprioception of craniocervical region has been affected by trauma in wrestlers and taekwondo players, so that the accuracy of head repositioning for both neutral and target positions were reduced in wrestlers. However, taekwondo players had more errors in repositioning of target angle. Keywords: Proprioception, Repositioning error, Craniocervical, Wrestlers, Taekwondo players

  20. Drug repositioning summit: finding new routes to success.

    Campas, Clara

    2009-03-01

    The Third Annual Drug Repositioning Summit 2008 was held at the Hyatt Harborside Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, October 6-7, and focused on new strategies for drug repositioning. The meeting, organized by The Cambridge Healthtech Institute, brought together a panel of speakers from the industry and the academia, who discussed and proposed new routes for success in drug repositioning based on their own experience in the field. This meeting report summarizes the most relevant presentations and issues discussed. PMID:19330171

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  2. Dual cervical thoracic coil for spine magnetic resonance imaging

    The need for repositioning of surface coils and patients in MR examinations of the cervical and thoracic spin prolongs examination time. A new receiver design is proposed which overcomes this problem. The device is composed of two actively decoupled receiver coils mounted on the frame of a Philadelphia collar. These coils may be used separately to image either the thoracic or cervical spine or together to produce larger field-of-view images of the combined region. Signal-to-noise ratios of the separate cervical and thoracic spine images are not degraded as a result of mounting the receivers together. The full cervical and thoracic region is shown to be imaged at a signal-to-noise ratio significantly higher than that afforded by the body coil. A retrospective review of our case load suggests that a time saving could be achieved in approximately 1/3 of spine examinations by using this coil. (orig.)

  3. An innovative cosmetic technique called lip repositioning

    Gupta Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical report describing the successful use of the lip repositioning technique for the reduction of excessive gingival display. A female patient aged 34 years reported with a chief complaint of gummy smile and was treated with this technique performed under local anesthesia with the main objective to reduce gummy smile by limiting the retraction of elevator muscles (e.g., zygomaticus minor, levator anguli, orbicularis oris, and levator labii superioris. The technique is fulfilled by removing a strip of mucosa from maxillary buccal vestibule and creating a partial thickness flap between mucogingival junction and upperlip musculature, and suturing the lip mucosa with mucogingival junction, resulting in a narrow vestibule and restricted muscle pull, thereby reducing gingival display.

  4. Repositioning Strategy for Malaysian Companies Internationalization

    Ismi Rajiani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The rise of the emerging-market countries offers both developing and developed countries a unique opportunity to gain the benefits of a truly international economy. Consequently, it is imper- ative to advance our knowledge of emerging-market countries MNC emergence and competitive- ness including Malaysian firms on how will they position their products strategically. Based on the framework of Porters Generic Strategy, this paper is composed of price/ volume segments and im- pacts on product strategy theory. The aim is to identify crucial triggering cues and focus areas for Malaysian companies and measure what role these play in different segments. This study argues that some Malaysian companies will reposition themselves strategically when internationalizing and that they will focus on other factors or triggering cues when doing so not merely adapting the prevalent price leadership strategy.

  5. Optimizing Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Plans

    Tierney, Kevin

    information to port authorities on two real ports, the port of Hamburg, Germany, and the Maasvlakte area of the port of Rotterdam, Netherlands. Finally, this thesis gives a polynomial time algorithm for an open problem from the container stowage literature, the capacitated k-shift problem with a xed number of......With the incredible growth of containerization over the past half century, shipping lines and ports are facing increasing challenges in ensuring that containers arrive at their destinations on time and on budget. This dissertation addresses several critical problems to the operations of shipping...... lines and ports, and provides algorithms and mathematical models for use by shipping lines and port authorities for decision support. One of these problems is the repositioning of container ships in a liner shipping network in order to adjust the network to seasonal shifts in demand or changes in the...

  6. Rapid, spatially accurate total-spine MR imaging

    The authors have developed a method of performing complete-spine MR imaging in which a positioning platform is used. Linear patient position is found with a sagittal scout (<1 minute) and adjusted along the Z axis by platform motion. Spinal cord obliquity is then determined by paraxial coronal scout (<1 minute) and corrected by platform rotation in the XY plane. The spinal cord midline is determined with a transverse scout (<1 minute) and followed by definitive imaging. Rapid, calibrated multiple repositioning along the Z axis for high-resolution imaging is accomplished without additional scout imaging, returning of the transmitter or receiver, or patient movement

  7. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  8. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal

  9. The ageing spine

    This book contain 15 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of age on the appearance of magnetic resonance images of the spine; Potential for image analysis in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the aging spine; Potential of x-ray diffraction computed tomography for discriminating between normal and osteoporotic bone; and Spinal fusion in the elderly

  10. Tumors of the spine.

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-02-18

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  11. Laryngeal dislocation after ventral fusion of the cervical spine

    Jenny Krauel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 70-year-old patient who underwent ventral fusion of the cervical spine (C3/4 and C4/5 for spinal canal stenosis performed by the neurosurgery department. The patient suffered an exceedingly rare complication of the surgery - laryngeal dislocation. Had the deformed laryngeal structures been overlooked and the patient extubated as usual after surgery, reintubation would have been impossible due to the associated swelling, which might have had disastrous consequences. Leftward dislocation of the larynx became apparent post-operatively, but prior to extubation. Extubation was therefore postponed and a subsequent computed tomography (CT scan revealed entrapment of laryngeal structures within the osteosynthesis. A trial of repositioning using microlaryngoscopy performed by otolaryngology (ears, nose and throat specialists failed, making open surgical revision necessary. At surgery, the entrapped laryngeal tissue was successfully mobilised. Laryngeal oedema developed despite prompt repositioning; thus, necessitating tracheotomy and long-term ventilation. Laryngeal dislocation may be an unusual cause of post-operative neck swelling after anterior cervical spine surgery and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if surgical site haematoma and other causes have been ruled out. Imaging studies including CT of the neck may be needed before extubation to confirm the suspicion and should be promptly obtained to facilitate specific treatment.

  12. Thoracic spine pain

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  13. Management of intrusive luxation with immediate surgical repositioning

    Mazumdar Dibyendu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrusive luxation is one of the most severe forms of traumatic injuries in which the affected tooth is forced to displace deeper into the alveolus. As a consequence of this type of injury, maximum damage occurs to the pulp and all the supporting structures. This report presents a case of severe intrusive luxation of mature maxillary central and lateral incisor in a 40-year-old male. The intruded tooth was immediately repositioned (surgical extrusion and splinted within hours following injury. Antibiotic therapy was initiated at the time of repositioning and maintained for 5 days. Pulp removal and calcium hydroxide treatment of the root canal was carried out after repositioning. Splint was removed 2 months later. Definitive root canal treatment with Gutta percha was accomplished at a later appointment. Clinical and radiographic examination 6, 12 and 24 months after the surgical extrusion revealed satisfactory progressive apical and periodontal healing.

  14. Laser measurement and analysis of reposition error in polishing systems

    Liu, Weisen; Wang, Junhua; Xu, Min; He, Xiaoying

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, robotic reposition error measurement method based on laser interference remote positioning is presented, the geometric error is analyzed in the polishing system based on robot and the mathematical model of the tilt error is presented. Studies show that less than 1 mm error is mainly caused by the tilt error with small incident angle. Marking spot position with interference fringe enhances greatly the error measurement precision, the measurement precision of tilt error can reach 5 um. Measurement results show that reposition error of the polishing system is mainly from the tilt error caused by the motor A, repositioning precision is greatly increased after polishing system improvement. The measurement method has important applications in the actual error measurement with low cost, simple operation.

  15. A PDDL Domain for the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem

    Tierney, Kevin; Coles, Amanda; Coles, Andrew; Jensen, Rune Møller

    The Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP) poses a large financial burden on liner shipping firms. During repositioning, vessels are moved between services in a liner shipping network. The LSFRP is characterized by chains of interacting activities, many of which have costs that are a ...... function of their duration; for example, sailing slowly between two ports is cheaper than sailing quickly. Despite its great industrial importance, the LSFRP has received little attention in the literature. We model the LSFRP using PDDL and solve it using the planner....

  16. Solving the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem with Cargo Flows

    Tierney, Kevin; Askelsdottir, Björg; Jensen, Rune Møller; Pisinger, David

    2015-01-01

    reposition vessels as cheaply as possible without disrupting cargo flows. The LSFRP is characterized by chains of interacting activities with a multicommodity flow over paths defined by the activities chosen. Despite its industrial importance, the LSFRP has received little attention in the literature. We...... actual repositioning scenario, one of many undertaken by our industrial collaborator in 2011. Our simulated annealing algorithm is able to increase the profit from $18.1 to $31.8 million using only a few minutes of CPU time. This shows that our algorithm could be used in a decision support system to...

  17. The illness trajectory experienced by patients having spine fusion surgery

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise; Birkelund, Regner

    The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long and uncoordinated trajectories. ...... rooted in the areas of the lifeworld. This can lead to psychological and social problems, which in turn can result in a compromised sense of identity and a reduced feeling of social belonging....... feelings are internalised as a sense of doubt and powerlessness, resulting in spine fusion patients experiencing that they are ”disappearing” as a person; losing their identity. Conclusion To conclude, the biomedical perspective obscures spine fusion patients’ horizon of meaning, which is existentially...

  18. Lumbar spine CT scan

    ... an x-ray of the spinal cord and spinal nerve roots (myelography) or an x-ray of the disk (discography). ... spine Bone problems Fracture Lumbar disk herniation Lumbar spinal stenosis Spondylolisthesis

  19. Spine Conditioning Program

    ... OrthoInfo Your orthopaedic connection to expert information about bones, joints, and muscles www.orthoinfo.org Spine Conditioning Program Strengthening Exercises 6. Bird Dog_________________________________________________________________________ Repetitions 5 Days per week Main muscles worked: ...

  20. North American Spine Society

    ... starts here. Become a Member Now. 24/7 online access to all education Sessions from the comfort ... Connecting Spine Care professionals with companies seeking qualified candidates Buyer's Guide View the latest innovative and cutting- ...

  1. Skeletal spine (image)

    The spine is divided into several sections. The cervical vertebrae make up the neck. The thoracic vertebrae comprise the chest section and have ribs attached. The lumbar vertebrae are the remaining vertebrae below ...

  2. Gorham's Disease of Spine

    Sekharappa, Vijay; Arockiaraj, Justin; Amritanand, Rohit; Krishnan, Venkatesh; David, Kenny Samuel; David, Sundararaj Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Gorham's disease is a rare disorder characterized by clinical and radiological disappearance of bone by proliferation of non-neoplastic vascular tissue. The disease was first reported by Jackson in 1838 in a boneless arm. The disease was then described in detail in 1955 by Gorham and Stout. Since then, about 200 cases have been reported in the literature, with only about 28 cases involving the spine. We report 2 cases of Gorham's disease involving the spine and review related literature to ga...

  3. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics are: CT of the Sacrum, The Postoperative Spine, Film Organizations and Case Reporting, Degeneration and Disc Disease of the Intervertebral Joint, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, and Cervical and Thoracic Spine.

  4. Mining integrated semantic networks for drug repositioning opportunities

    Mullen, Joseph; Tipney, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Current research and development approaches to drug discovery have become less fruitful and more costly. One alternative paradigm is that of drug repositioning. Many marketed examples of repositioned drugs have been identified through serendipitous or rational observations, highlighting the need for more systematic methodologies to tackle the problem. Systems level approaches have the potential to enable the development of novel methods to understand the action of therapeutic compounds, but requires an integrative approach to biological data. Integrated networks can facilitate systems level analyses by combining multiple sources of evidence to provide a rich description of drugs, their targets and their interactions. Classically, such networks can be mined manually where a skilled person is able to identify portions of the graph (semantic subgraphs) that are indicative of relationships between drugs and highlight possible repositioning opportunities. However, this approach is not scalable. Automated approaches are required to systematically mine integrated networks for these subgraphs and bring them to the attention of the user. We introduce a formal framework for the definition of integrated networks and their associated semantic subgraphs for drug interaction analysis and describe DReSMin, an algorithm for mining semantically-rich networks for occurrences of a given semantic subgraph. This algorithm allows instances of complex semantic subgraphs that contain data about putative drug repositioning opportunities to be identified in a computationally tractable fashion, scaling close to linearly with network data. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by mining an integrated drug interaction network built from 11 sources. This work identified and ranked 9,643,061 putative drug-target interactions, showing a strong correlation between highly scored associations and those supported by literature. We discuss the 20 top ranked associations in more detail, of which 14 are novel and 6 are supported by the literature. We also show that our approach better prioritizes known drug-target interactions, than other state-of-the art approaches for predicting such interactions. PMID:26844016

  5. The Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem with Cargo Flows

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Mller

    reposition vessels as cheaply as possible without disrupting the cargo flows of the network. The LSFRP is characterized by chains of interacting activities with a multi-commodity flow over paths defined by the activities chosen. Despite its great industrial importance, the LSFRP has received little attention...... in the literature. We introduce a novel mathematical model of the LSFRP with cargo flows based on a carefully constructed graph and evaluate it on real world data from our industrial collaborator....

  6. Lip repositioning: An alternative cosmetic treatment for gummy smile

    Dayakar, Mudnoor Manjunath; Gupta, Sachin; Shivananda, Hiranya

    2014-01-01

    Excessive gingival display, commonly referred to as gummy smile is a major hurdle in overall personality of an individual. Gummy smile, secondary to altered passive eruption and tooth mal-positioning, can be predictably treated with Surgery and orthodontic therapy. In patients with jaw deformities, orthognathic surgery can be performed. However, this requires hospitalization and entails significant discomfort. Lip repositioning is a simple surgical procedure to treat gummy smile. The proc...

  7. Drug Repositioning for Diabetes Based on 'Omics' Data Mining

    Zhang, Ming; Luo, Heng; Xi, Zhengrui; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Drug repositioning has shorter developmental time, lower cost and less safety risk than traditional drug development process. The current study aims to repurpose marketed drugs and clinical candidates for new indications in diabetes treatment by mining clinical ‘omics’ data. We analyzed data from genome wide association studies (GWAS), proteomics and metabolomics studies and revealed a total of 992 proteins as potential anti-diabetic targets in human. Information on the drugs that target thes...

  8. Spine Involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Ömer Faruk ŞENDUR

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis affecting the cervical spine has been well described. In contrast with the neck, thoracic and lumbar spine involvement has not been widely investigated. In this paper, pathophysiology, clinical findings and radiological imaging methods of spine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis was reviewed with the current reports. Turk J Phys Med Rehab 2008; 54 Suppl 1: 15-9

  9. Spine Involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Ömer Faruk ŞENDUR; Turan, Yasemin

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis affecting the cervical spine has been well described. In contrast with the neck, thoracic and lumbar spine involvement has not been widely investigated. In this paper, pathophysiology, clinical findings and radiological imaging methods of spine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis was reviewed with the current reports. Turk J Phys Med Rehab 2008; 54 Suppl 1: 15-9

  10. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    ... the front avoids the need to move the spinal nerves and spinal cord out of the way to get to ... the openings in the spine that allow the nerves to leave the spinal cord) taking pressure off of the nerve roots. ...

  11. Asymmetric division of cyst stem cells in Drosophila testis is ensured by anaphase spindle repositioning

    Cheng, Jun; Tiyaboonchai, Amita; Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Hunt, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Many stem cells divide asymmetrically to balance self-renewal and differentiation. In Drosophila testes, two stem cell populations, germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs), cohere and regulate one another. Here, we report that CySCs divide asymmetrically through repositioning the mitotic spindle around anaphase. CySC spindle repositioning requires functional centrosomes, Dynein and the actin-membrane linker Moesin. Anaphase spindle repositioning is required to achieve h...

  12. Patient repositioning and pressure ulcer risk—Monitoring interface pressures of at-risk patients

    Matthew J. Peterson, PhD; Nikolaus Gravenstein, MD; Wilhelm K. Schwab, PhD; Johannes H. van Oostrom, PhD; Lawrence J. Caruso, MD

    2013-01-01

    Repositioning patients regularly to prevent pressure ulcers and reduce interface pressures is the standard of care, yet prior work has found that standard repositioning does not relieve all areas of at-risk tissue in nondisabled subjects. To determine whether this holds true for high-risk patients, we assessed the effectiveness of routine repositioning in relieving at-risk tissue of the perisacral area using interface pressure mapping. Bedridden patients at risk for pressure ulcer formation (...

  13. A Node Flow Model for the Inflexible Visitation Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem with Cargo Flows

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Mller

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel, node flow based mathematical modelfor the fixed-time version of a central problem in the liner shipping industry called the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP). We call this version of the problem the Inflexible Visitation LSFRP (IVLSFRP).During repositioning, vessels are moved between routes in a linershipping network. Shipping lines wish to reposition vessels as cheaply as possible without disrupting the cargo flows of the network. The LSFRP is character...

  14. Beyond the spine

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol; Poulsen, Erik; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Kilsgaard, Jørgen; Blanchette, Marc-André; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...... highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession....... traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip osteoarthritis, and prevention of pain in children and adolescents to name a few. In this paper, we...

  15. SpineData

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher; Albert, Hanne Birgit; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Manniche, Claus

    2015-01-01

    that captures patient data electronically at the point of clinical contact. The setting is the government-funded Medical Department of the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, where patients receive a multidisciplinary assessment of their chronic spinal pain. Results: Started in 2011......, the database by early 2015 contained information on more than 36,300 baseline episodes of patient care, plus the available 6-month and 12-month follow-up data for these episodes. The baseline questionnaire completion rate has been 93%; 79% of people were presenting with low back pain as their main...... complaint, 6% with mid-back pain, and 15% with neck pain. Collectively, across the body regions and measurement time points, there are approximately 1,980 patient-related variables in the database across a broad range of biopsychosocial factors. To date, 36 research projects have used data from the Spine...

  16. Development of transducers for integrated garter spring repositioning system

    In order to reposition the dislocated garter springs in active channels of 235 MW Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), a tool named as Integrated Garter Spring Repositioning System (INGRES) has been developed. The tool consists of transducers to detect the concentricity between the Pressure Tube (P/T) and Calandria Tube (C/T) and also to detect garter springs in the channel besides different modules for correcting the eccentricity between P/T and C/T and garter spring repositioning. The transducers used in the system namely Concentricity Detection Probe (CDP) and Garter Spring Detection Probe (GSDP) are based on the eddy current techniques. The CDP makes use of four eddy current bobbin probes separated 90 degrees apart in cross sectional plane of channel assembly. The transducer gives output signal in proportional to the air gap between P/T and C/T in two axes (X and Y) which are designed for the purpose. The output of the unit is obtained on the Cathode Ray Oscilloscope (CRO) screen in the form of illuminated dot. The dot position on the CRO screen gives the information about mismatch in concentricity between P/T and C/T of the channel. The GSDP meant for detecting garter springs in PHWR channel uses two sets of primary and secondary coils connected in differential mode. The output signals from the transducers are processed through a signal processing unit devised for the purpose to obtain output from it as a horizontal beam on the CRO screen. The garter spring presence in the channel is indicated by a change in the voltage level of beam and also by audio-visual indication in the form of buzzer and LED illumination on the processing unit. This paper gives general design and development aspects of the CDP and GSDP transducers of the INGRES tool. (author). 3 figs

  17. An investigation of a video-based patient repositioning technique

    Purpose: We have investigated a video-based patient repositioning technique designed to use skin features for radiotherapy repositioning. We investigated the feasibility of the clinical application of this system by quantitative evaluation of performance characteristics of the methodology. Methods and Materials: Multiple regions of interest (ROI) were specified in the field of view of video cameras. We used a normalized correlation pattern-matching algorithm to compute the translations of each ROI pattern in a target image. These translations were compared against trial translations using a quadratic cost function for an optimization process in which the patient rotation and translational parameters were calculated. Results: A hierarchical search technique achieved high-speed (compute correlation for 128x128 ROI in 512x512 target image within 0.005 s) and subpixel spatial accuracy (as high as 0.2 pixel). By treating the observed translations as movements of points on the surfaces of a hypothetical cube, we were able to estimate accurately the actual translations and rotations of the test phantoms used in our experiments to less than 1 mm and 0.2 deg. with a standard deviation of 0.3 mm and 0.5 deg. respectively. For human volunteer cases, we estimated the translations and rotations to have an accuracy of 2 mm and 1.2 deg. Conclusion: A personal computer-based video system is suitable for routine patient setup of fractionated conformal radiotherapy. It is expected to achieve high-precision repositioning of the skin surface with high efficiency

  18. Interventional spine procedures

    Kelekis, A.D. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr; Somon, T. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Yilmaz, H. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Bize, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Brountzos, E.N. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece); Lovblad, K. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Ruefenacht, D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Martin, J.B. [Clinique Generale Beaulieu 12 chemin Beau Soleil 1206 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jbmartin@beaulieu.ch

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of some spinal diseases are percutaneous treatments, proposed before classic surgery. By using imaging guidance, one can significantly increase accuracy and decrease complication rates. This review report physiopathology and discusses indications, methods, complications and results of performing these techniques on the spine, including different level (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacroiliac) and different kind of treatments (nerve block, disc treatment and bone treatment). Finally the present article also reviews current literature on the controversial issues involved.

  19. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  20. 3-D repositioning and differential images of volumetric CT measurements

    In quantitative computed tomography (QCT), time serial measurements are performed to detect a global bone density loss or to identify localized bone density changes. A prerequisite for an unambiguous analysis is the comparison of identical bone volumes. Usually, manual repositioning is too coarse. The authors therefore developed a mathematical procedure that allows matching two three-dimensional image volumes. The algorithm is based on correlation techniques. The procedure has been optimized and applied to computer-tomographic 3-D images of the human knee. It has been tested with both artificially created and in vivo measured image data. Furthermore, typical results of differential images calculated from real bone measurements are presented

  1. Repositioning of malpositioned or flipped central venous catheters

    Primary misplaced or secondary flipped implanted catheters are located mostly in the right jugular vein. We demonstrate an effective method to replace fix implanted catheters such as Ports, Grochomg or Hickman catheters. Using a femoral venous approach, replacement into the superior vena cava can easily be done with a Sidewinder 1 catheter which is hooked over the misplaced central venous approach. In all our patients the method was successful. The repositioning technique described is simple, fast and has low costs. We can keep sterile conditions and do not need to solve the catheters' fixation. (orig.)

  2. Pioneering government-sponsored drug repositioning collaborations: progress and learning.

    Frail, Donald E; Brady, Madeleine; Escott, K Jane; Holt, Alison; Sanganee, Hitesh J; Pangalos, Menelas N; Watkins, Chris; Wegner, Craig D

    2015-12-01

    A new model for translational research and drug repositioning has recently been established based on three-way partnerships between public funders, the pharmaceutical industry and academic investigators. Through two pioneering initiatives - one involving the Medical Research Council in the United Kingdom and one involving the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health in the United States - new investigations of highly characterized investigational compounds have been funded and are leading to the exploration of known mechanisms in new disease areas. This model has been extended beyond these first two initiatives. Here, we discuss the progress to date and the unique requirements and challenges for this model. PMID:26585533

  3. Correction of Asian Short Nose with Lower Lateral Cartilage Repositioning and Ear Cartilage Grafting

    Jin Suk Byun, MD, PhD

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: LLC repositioning and ear cartilage grafting aid in the correction of short nose in Asians. With LLC repositioning and ear cartilage grafting, the nasal tip can be positioned in accordance with the patient’s anatomic limits. The entire nasal tip and columella can be lengthened, while the tip maintains its mobility.

  4. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  5. Cervical and thoracic spine

    Many facilities with confidence and expertise in lumbar CT work have met with considerable disappointment when attempting to extend their diagnostic capabilities to the cervical spine. The authors' experience is no exception, and in retrospect, there are two main reasons: differences in the gross sizes of anatomic structures and in the appropriateness of scanning and filming protocols. The second major reason for early disappointment in cervical work was the incorrect assumption that a single scanning and filming protocol would be as appropriate for cervical examinations as it was for lumbar examinations. Optimal cervical CT diagnosis requires more flexibility in terms of image manipulation and display options. Disorders of the cervical spine fall into four broad groups: (1) localized lesions of the craniocervical junction;(2) nonarthritic lesions of bone at any cervical level;(3) diseases of the spinal cord, and (4) degenerative diseases of the disc and the vertebral joint. It is very important for the scanning protocol to be tailored to the primary diagnostic category

  6. Degenerative disease of the spine.

    Gallucci, Massimo; Limbucci, Nicola; Paonessa, Amalia; Splendiani, Alessandra

    2007-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a definition that includes a wide spectrum of degenerative abnormalities. Degeneration involves bony structures and the intervertebral disk, although many aspects of spine degeneration are strictly linked because the main common pathogenic factor is identified in chronic overload. During life the spine undergoes continuous changes as a response to physiologic axial load. These age-related changes are similar to pathologic degenerative changes and are a common asymptomatic finding in adults and elderly persons. A mild degree of degenerative changes is paraphysiologic and should be considered pathologic only if abnormalities determine symptoms. Imaging allows complete evaluation of static and dynamic factors related to degenerative disease of the spine and is useful in diagnosing the different aspects of spine degeneration. PMID:17493541

  7. Remote repositioning of fuel channels in Bruce A reactors

    Due to axial elongation, the fuel channels in Bruce A reactor Units 1, 2 and 3 were approaching the limit of support bearing engagement at the channel free ends. The elongation is induced by fast neutron irradiation of the Zr 2.5 wt% Nb pressure tube material, the rate being in the order of 4 mm per year. By repositioning the elongated fuel channels towards the fixed end, the full amount of bearing engagement at the free end is utilized, providing a further 10 years of normal operation. Described herein is the project which was implemented to execute the shifts on each of the 480 channels per reactor. The project encompassed a full life cycle, from tooling system conception to implementation on the reactor face. Remote operation of dedicated purpose tooling was maximized. (orig.)

  8. DNAdigest and Repositive: Connecting the World of Genomic Data

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V.; Whicher, Charlotte; Richardson, Timothy D.; Smith, Craig; Grajciarova, Jana; Cardama, Xocas; Moreira, José; Alexa, Adrian; McMurray, Amanda A.; Nielsen, Fiona G. G.

    2016-01-01

    There is no unified place where genomics researchers can search through all available raw genomic data in a way similar to OMIM for genes or Uniprot for proteins. With the recent increase in the amount of genomic data that is being produced and the ever-growing promises of precision medicine, this is becoming more and more of a problem. DNAdigest is a charity working to promote efficient sharing of human genomic data to improve the outcome of genomic research and diagnostics for the benefit of patients. Repositive, a social enterprise spin-out of DNAdigest, is building an online platform that indexes genomic data stored in repositories and thus enables researchers to search for and access a range of human genomic data sources through a single, easy-to-use interface, free of charge. PMID:27011302

  9. Lip repositioning surgery: A pioneering technique for perio-esthetics

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In our esthetic conscious society people are now demanding all types of treatments possible to have a pleasing and attractive personality. A dazzling and beautiful smile can work wonders for anyone′s personality. Our smile mirrors our persona, our unique being. However, a beautiful smile comprises of a perfect balance of the white and pink. This imbalance of excessive gingival display (EGD can be managed by a variety of treatment modalities, depending on accurate diagnosis. This case report demonstrates the successful management of EGD with a lip-repositioning procedure in a patient with incompetent short upper lip. This was accomplished by removing a partial thickness strip of mucosa from the maxillary buccal vestibule and suturing the lip mucosa to the mucogingival line. This resulted in a narrower vestibule and restricted muscle pull, thereby resulting in competent lips and reduced gingival display during smiling.

  10. Lip repositioning surgery: A pioneering technique for perio-esthetics.

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Gupta, Anil; Luthra, Shailly

    2014-01-01

    In our esthetic conscious society people are now demanding all types of treatments possible to have a pleasing and attractive personality. A dazzling and beautiful smile can work wonders for anyone's personality. Our smile mirrors our persona, our unique being. However, a beautiful smile comprises of a perfect balance of the white and pink. This imbalance of excessive gingival display (EGD) can be managed by a variety of treatment modalities, depending on accurate diagnosis. This case report demonstrates the successful management of EGD with a lip-repositioning procedure in a patient with incompetent short upper lip. This was accomplished by removing a partial thickness strip of mucosa from the maxillary buccal vestibule and suturing the lip mucosa to the mucogingival line. This resulted in a narrower vestibule and restricted muscle pull, thereby resulting in competent lips and reduced gingival display during smiling. PMID:24808717

  11. DNAdigest and Repositive: Connecting the World of Genomic Data.

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Whicher, Charlotte; Richardson, Timothy D; Smith, Craig; Grajciarova, Jana; Cardama, Xocas; Moreira, José; Alexa, Adrian; McMurray, Amanda A; Nielsen, Fiona G G

    2016-03-01

    There is no unified place where genomics researchers can search through all available raw genomic data in a way similar to OMIM for genes or Uniprot for proteins. With the recent increase in the amount of genomic data that is being produced and the ever-growing promises of precision medicine, this is becoming more and more of a problem. DNAdigest is a charity working to promote efficient sharing of human genomic data to improve the outcome of genomic research and diagnostics for the benefit of patients. Repositive, a social enterprise spin-out of DNAdigest, is building an online platform that indexes genomic data stored in repositories and thus enables researchers to search for and access a range of human genomic data sources through a single, easy-to-use interface, free of charge. PMID:27011302

  12. Surgical results of anterior decompression for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the thoracic spine

    The treatment procedure of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the thoracic spine (OPLL/TS), which spontaneously results in severe progressive thoracic myelopathy, has not been standardized yet and presently requires anterior decompression by open surgery via ventral approach, of which results obtained in authors' department are described herein. Patients are 20 cases with OPLL/TS (8 M/12 F, av. age 56 y) and are followed up for 6 mo-14 y (av. 6 y 4 mo). Results are evaluated by surgical matters, imaging findings, complication and efficacy. Images after operation in all patients present the finding of fusion of transplanted bone to stabilize spines. The actual CT, MRI and X-ray images of typical 2 cases before and after operation are presented to exhibit decompressed spine re-positioned normally by surgery. Despite some tasks of approaching and spine numbers to be operable, effective improvement is found to be as high as 60% in average and authors' procedure is concluded to be useful. (R.T.)

  13. The spine problem: Finding a function for dendritic spines

    Sarah Malanowski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Why do neurons have dendritic spines? This question the heart of what Yuste calls the spine problem presupposes that why-questions of this sort have scientific answers: that empirical findings can favor or count against claims about why neurons have spines. Here we show how such questions can receive empirical answers. We construe such why-questions as questions about how spines make a difference to the behavior of some mechanism that we take to be significant. Why-questions are driven fundamentally by the effort to understand how some item, such as the dendritic spine, is situated in the causal structure of the world (the causal nexus. They ask for a filter on that busy world that allows us to see a parts individual contribution to a mechanism, independent of everything else going on. So understood, answers to why-questions can be assessed by testing the claims these answers make about the causal structure of a mechanism. We distinguish four ways of making a difference to a mechanism (necessary, modulatory, component, background condition, and we sketch their evidential requirements. One consequence of our analysis is that there are many spine problems and that any given spine problem might have many acceptable answers.

  14. Percutaneous transfemoral repositioning of malpositioned central venous access device: A report of two cases

    Chauhan Ashutosh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of long term central venous access devices (CVAD such as chemo ports and Hickman?s catheters are associated with a definite risk of catheter tip malpositioning. As such, malpositioning runs a risk of venous thrombosis and related complications; it is imperative to reposition the catheter. Percutaneous transfemoral venous approach has been described as a minimally invasive and safe method for the repositioning. We present two cases in which the CVAD implanted in one subclavian vein got malpositioned in contra lateral subclavian vein. A percutaneous transfemoral venous approach utilizing 5 Fr angiographic catheter was successful in repositioning of the catheters in both cases.

  15. Massive Pneumocephalus And Meiningitis Following Spine Instrumentation

    Kumar S; Ravi Kumar P; Manasseh N

    2005-01-01

    Pneumocephalus with meningitis usually occurs as a complication of head injury or surgery. It is uncommon after procedures or traumatic injuries to spine. We report an adolescent presenting with features of Pott′s spine who developed pneumocephalus and meningitis following spine instrumentation (stabilization of thoracic spine). Early recognition and prompt treatment with parenteral antibiotics resulted in a favorable outcome.

  16. The ‘addicted’ spine.

    Saturnino Spiga

    2014-10-01

    Medium Spiny Neurons of the Nucleus Accumbens show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized ‘strictly’ to second order dendritic branches where, dopamine-containing terminals impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling.

  17. Repositioning reference new methods and new services for a new age

    Rozaklis, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    Repositioning Reference reimagines reference services in libraries and information organizations and the role of reference librarians, taking into account rapid developments in technology and information-specific services in non-library sectors.

  18. Catastrophic spine injuries in sports.

    Boden, Barry P; Prior, Chris

    2005-02-01

    Catastrophic spine injuries in sports are rare but tragic events. The sports with the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing and snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and baseball. A common mechanism of injury for all at-risk sports is an axial compression force to the top of the head with the neck slightly flexed. We review common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for spine injuries in the at-risk sports. PMID:15659279

  19. Concept of Gunshot Wound Spine

    Jaiswal, Manish; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2013-01-01

    Gunshot wound (GSW) to the spine which was earlier common in the military population is now being increasingly noted in civilians due to easy availability of firearms of low velocity either licensed or illegal combined with an increased rate of violence in the society. Contributing to 13% to 17% of all spinal injuries, the management of complex injury to the spine produced by a GSW remains controversial. Surgery for spinal cord injuries resulting from low velocity GSWs is reserved for patient...

  20. Acute hypoxaemia due to intraoperative lung collapse after repositioning the patient

    Butala, Bina P.; Shah, Veena R.; Bhosale, Guruprasad P.

    2011-01-01

    Desaturation after induction of anaesthesia and repositioning due to mucus plug causing atelectasis (lung collapse) is a rare event. We present a case of intraoperative right lung collapse due to mucus plug in a patient undergoing left laparoscopic nephrectomy. Hypoxaemia occurred after the induction of anaesthesia and repositioning. X-ray chest revealed right lung collapse and surgery was subsequently postponed. Lung re-expanded after postural drainage and suction. Postoperatively patient wa...

  1. Immunity-based evolutionary algorithm for optimal global container repositioning in liner shipping

    Wong, EYC; Lau, HYK; Mak, KL

    2010-01-01

    Global container repositioning in liner shipping has always been a challenging problem in container transportation as the global market in maritime logistics is complex and competitive. Supply and demand are dynamic under the ever changing trade imbalance. A useful computation optimization tool to assist shipping liners on decision making and planning to reposition large quantities of empty containers from surplus countries to deficit regions in a cost effective manner is crucial. A novel imm...

  2. Investigating drug repositioning opportunities in FDA drug labels through topic modeling

    Bisgin Halil; Liu Zhichao; Kelly Reagan; Fang Hong; Xu Xiaowei; Tong Weida

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Drug repositioning offers an opportunity to revitalize the slowing drug discovery pipeline by finding new uses for currently existing drugs. Our hypothesis is that drugs sharing similar side effect profiles are likely to be effective for the same disease, and thus repositioning opportunities can be identified by finding drug pairs with similar side effects documented in U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug labels. The safety information in the drug labels ...

  3. Novel Modeling of Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Enables Systematic Drug Repositioning for Distinct Breast Cancer Metastases

    Zhao, Hong; Jin, Guangxu; Cui, Kemi; Ren, Ding; Liu, Timothy; Chen, Peikai; Wong, Solomon; Li, Fuhai; Fan, Yubo; Rodriguez, Angel; Chang, Jenny; Wong, Stephen TC.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of signaling network element, called cancer signaling bridges (CSB), has been shown to have the potential for systematic and fast-tracked drug repositioning. On the basis of CSBs, we developed a computational model to derive specific downstream signaling pathways that reveal previously unknown target-disease connections and new mechanisms for specific cancer subtypes. The model enables us to reposition drugs based on available patient gene expression data. We applied this model to ...

  4. Elimination of a "Gummy Smile" With Crown Lengthening and Lip Repositioning.

    Mahn, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Excessive gingival display is considered unattractive by many patients. A combination of surgical approaches may be required to correct this problem. Clinical crown lengthening involves recontouring crestal bone levels and moving the gingival margin in an apical direction. Lip repositioning reduces gingival display by limiting upper lip movement when smiling. This article describes a case in which a combination of clinical crown lengthening and lip repositioning was used to correct excessive gingival display when smiling. PMID:26863221

  5. Glocalisation of global market forces and the repositioning of a peripheral Russian mining community

    Suutarinen Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    Increasing globalisation and global market forces shape the development of resource peripheries in the Barents region. Foreign direct investments are concrete example of global market forces. Their glocalisation forces the locals to evaluate their consequences for the local development and reposition their communities in global context. This article studies glocalisation of global market forces and preferred directions of repositioning of a peripheral single-industry mining community in th...

  6. Postoperative spine infections

    Paolo Domenico Parchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of post-operative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication.

  7. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-09-28

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients' outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  8. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  9. Postoperative spine; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Schlaeger, R. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Basel (Switzerland); Lieb, J.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgie Koeln-Merheim, Koeln (Germany); Ahlhelm, F.J. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Institut fuer Radiologie, Baden (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    Approximately 15-30 % of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are associated with complications that require further diagnostic work-up. The choice of imaging modality for postoperative complications depends on the extent, pattern and temporal evolution of the postoperative neurological signs and symptoms as well as on the preoperative clinical status, the surgical procedure itself and the underlying pathology. The interpretation of imaging findings, in particular the distinction between postoperative complications and normally expected nonspecific postoperative imaging alterations can be challenging and requires the integration of clinical neurological information and the results of laboratory tests. The combination of different imaging techniques might help in cases of equivocal imaging results. (orig.) [German] Etwa 15-30 % der operativen Eingriffe im Bereich der lumbalen Wirbelsaeule verlaufen nicht komplikationsfrei und erfordern weiterfuehrende Abklaerungen. Die Auswahl des bildgebenden Verfahrens im Rahmen postoperativer Komplikationen haengt dabei wesentlich von der zeitlichen Entwicklung, dem Ausmass und Verteilungsmuster der neuaufgetretenen klinisch-neurologischen bzw. orthopaedischen Symptome sowie von den Ausfaellen vor dem Eingriff, der zugrundeliegenden Pathologie und der Lokalisation und Art des Eingriffs ab. Die Interpretation der bildgebenden Befunde, insbesondere die Abgrenzung postoperativer Komplikationen von natuerlicherweise zu erwartenden postoperativen Veraenderungen kann dabei eine Herausforderung darstellen. Bei unklaren Befunden kann ergaenzend zur eingehend klinisch-neurologischen und laborchemischen Bestandsaufnahme auch der kombinierte Einsatz mehrerer bildgebender Modalitaeten diagnostisch weiterhelfen. (orig.)

  10. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  11. Patient repositioning and pressure ulcer risk—Monitoring interface pressures of at-risk patients

    Matthew J. Peterson, PhD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Repositioning patients regularly to prevent pressure ulcers and reduce interface pressures is the standard of care, yet prior work has found that standard repositioning does not relieve all areas of at-risk tissue in nondisabled subjects. To determine whether this holds true for high-risk patients, we assessed the effectiveness of routine repositioning in relieving at-risk tissue of the perisacral area using interface pressure mapping. Bedridden patients at risk for pressure ulcer formation (n = 23, Braden score 95% of the observation period. Thirteen participants were observed in three distinct positions (supine, turned left, turned right, and all had specific skin areas (166 +/– 184 cm2 that exceeded pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. At-risk patients have skin areas that are likely always at risk throughout their hospital stay despite repositioning. Healthcare providers are unaware of the actual tissue-relieving effectiveness (or lack thereof of their repositioning interventions, which may partially explain why pressure ulcer mitigation strategies are not always successful. Relieving at-risk tissue is a necessary part of pressure ulcer prevention, but the repositioning practice itself needs improvement.

  12. Repositioning accuracy of cerebral fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy using CT scanning

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of patient repositioning in fractionated cerebral stereotactic radiotherapy using a Brain Lab stereotactic cranial mask in conjunction with standard dental fixation. Patients and methods: Fifty planning and checking CT scans were performed in 25 patients. The check CT scan was performed before or after one of the three sessions of treatment. Co registration to the planning CT scan was used to assess alignment of the iso centre to the reference markers. The relative position of the P.T.V. with regard to iso centre allowed us to determine its total displacement (3-dimensional vector). Results: Mean iso centre translations (± S.D.) taking into account direction were -0.01 ± 0.7, -0.2 ± 1.3 and 0.07 ± 0.5 mm in medio-lateral, cranio caudal and anteroposterior directions respectively. Mean rotations (±S.D.) were -0.02 ± 0.6, -0.08 ± 0.3 and -0.1 ± 0.3 degree in medio-lateral, cranio caudal and anteroposterior axes respectively. Mean overall P.T.V. displacement was 1.8 ± 1.5 mm. P.T.V. displacement was smaller than 2 and 3 mm in 19/25 and 23/25 patients respectively. Conclusion: The accuracy of patient positioning using a stereotactic cranial mask system is similar to those reported in the literature and shows a satisfactory reproducibility with a standard dental fixation. (authors)

  13. Imaging biomarkers of spine osteoarthritis.

    Popham, Maria; M K Williams, Frances

    2010-01-01

    While there is an acknowledged need for biomarkers to progress arthritis research, imaging biomarkers for the spine have lagged behind those for peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Progress has been slow for a number of reasons. First and perhaps most importantly, there is currently no international agreement on definition of spine osteoarthritis (OA), either histologically or on imaging. Secondly, spine OA comprises two main pathologies, and debate continues as to whether they are separate entities or linked: degenerative disc disease and facet joint arthritis. Imaging those neighbouring joints is not straightforward and usually requires separate imaging investigations. Thirdly, it is only just becoming clear to what extent changes on imaging are associated with the main clinical problem - back pain. To compound the problem, the organisation of clinical services usually means that different specialties tend to focus on different anatomical areas, so a combined approach is not commonly adopted. Systematic evaluation of facet joints in epidemiological study is still in its infancy. Regardless of these hurdles, we have attempted in this review to summarise the state of play of imaging biomarkers in the spine with the emphasis on degenerative disc disease. MR imaging clearly leads the way and there exists a variety of specialist techniques such as T1rho and which may offer spine research imaging biomarkers in the future. PMID:25693040

  14. Computed tomography of the spine

    It is well known that the computed tomography (CT) is very useful in identifying the boy structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. We have studied 69 cases of spine CT with EMI-CT 5005 whole body scanner from Oct. 1977 to Aug. 1979. The results were as follows: 1. CT of the spine provided the normal cross sectional anatomy which was not shown by the conventional radiographies including tomography. Spinal canal consists of osseous and articular segments. 2. CT of the spine permitted the diagnosis of hypertrophy of superior and inferior facets and adjacent lamina, causing encroachment into the lumbar spinal canal, which was often not shown by the conventional examinations. 3. In tumorous conditions, CT demonstrated more precise localization, contour and extent of intra-and extra-spinal tumor. 4. Under CT guidance, exact pathologic diagnosis could be made by percutaneous needle biopsy, and therapeutic percutaneous needle aspiration was possible in case of cyst or abscess. 5. We experienced one case of intramedullary astrocytoma enhancing homogeneously by contrast medium injection. 6. The followings are thought to be important limitations of the spine CT. First, the distinction of spinal cord from subarachnoid space and definition of nerve root pouches is difficult and misleading due to artifact and computer program limitations related to the encircling bone. Second, precise and reproducible positioning is difficult to achieve. Third, without coronal or sagittal scanning (or reconstruction), the important longitudinal dimension of the spinal canal is difficult to appreciate fully

  15. CASTOR: Cathode/Anode Satellite Thruster for Orbital Repositioning

    Mruphy, Gloria A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of CASTOR (Cathode/Anode Satellite Thruster for Orbital Repositioning) satellite is to demonstrate in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) a nanosatellite that uses a Divergent Cusped Field Thruster (DCFT) to perform orbital maneuvers representative of an orbital transfer vehicle. Powered by semi-deployable solar arrays generating 165W of power, CASTOR will achieve nearly 1 km/s of velocity increment over one year. As a technology demonstration mission, success of CASTOR in LEO will pave the way for a low cost, high delta-V orbital transfer capability for small military and civilian payloads in support of Air Force and NASA missions. The educational objective is to engage graduate and undergraduate students in critical roles in the design, development, test, carrier integration and on-orbit operations of CASTOR as a supplement to their curricular activities. This program is laying the foundation for a long-term satellite construction program at MIT. The satellite is being designed as a part of AFRL's University Nanosatellite Program, which provides the funding and a framework in which student satellite teams compete for a launch to orbit. To this end, the satellite must fit within an envelope of 50cmx50cmx60cm, have a mass of less than 50kg, and meet stringent structural and other requirements. In this framework, the CASTOR team successfully completed PDR in August 2009 and CDR in April 2010 and will compete at FCR (Flight Competition Review) in January 2011. The complexity of the project requires implementation of many systems engineering techniques which allow for development of CASTOR from conception through FCR and encompass the full design, fabrication, and testing process.

  16. Degenerative disease of the spine

    With few exceptions, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the modality of choice for the evaluation of degenerative disorders of the entire spine. With the implementation of surface coils and continued refinement and development of new pulse sequences, osseous and soft tissue structures of the spine can now be studied in great detail. The introduction of paramagnetic contrast agents has made it possible to differentiate epidural scar from recurrent disc herniation in the postoperative setting and to discern previously undetected degenerative changes within the intervertebral disc itself. This paper discusses the spectrum of degenerative diseases of the spine, including disc degeneration (intervertebral osteochondrosis), disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylosis deformans, and osteoarthritis. A brief description of the MR techniques and strategies used to evaluate these disorders is also

  17. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    ... MRI scan shows a fracture- dislocation in the thoracic spine. Note the disruption of the spinal cord. Tests ... the side of a fracture-dislocation in the thoracic spine. AAOS does not endorse any treatments, procedures, products, ...

  18. Detection and repositioning of tight fighting annulus spacers in CANDU fuel channels

    Hersak, G.; Kittmer, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Goszczynski, J. [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Kazimer, D. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    The latest generation of CANDU reactors has been constructed with tight-fitting annulus spacers to maintain the annular gap between the inner pressure tubes and the outer calandria tubes. These spacers cannot be detected and repositioned with the existing Spacer Location and Repositioning (SLAR) process, which is designed to work with loose-fitting annulus spacers. There is currently no established technology to detect and reposition tight-fitting annulus spacers. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has been performing research and development to locate and move tight-fitting annulus spacers using Modal Detection and Repositioning (MODAR) technology since 2005 and is currently working in collaboration with Candu Energy and Bruce Power on a production system to be deployed for an In-reactor demonstration in the next year. The MODAR technology uses controlled vibrations on a short, isolated length of pressure tube to locate and reposition tight-fitting annulus spacers. MODAR technology will allow the utilities to demonstrate fuel channel integrity to the regulator and obtain approval for additional years of reactor operation. This paper briefly describes the technology and provides an overview of the tool testing and development. (author)

  19. Adaptive prostate IGRT combining online re-optimization and re-positioning: a feasibility study

    In prostate radiation therapy, inter-fractional organ motion/deformation has posed significant challenges on reliable daily dose delivery. To correct for this issue, off-line re-optimization and online re-positioning have been used clinically. In this paper, we propose an adaptive images guided radiation therapy (AIGRT) scheme that combines these two correction methods in an anatomy-driven fashion. The AIGRT process first tries to find a best plan for the daily target from a plan pool, which consists of the original CT plan and all previous re-optimized plans. If successful, the selected plan is used for daily treatment with translational shifts. Otherwise, the AIGRT invokes the re-optimization process of the CT plan for the anatomy of the day, which is afterward added to the plan pool as a candidate for future fractions. The AIGRT scheme is evaluated by comparisons with daily re-optimization and online re-positioning techniques based on daily target coverage, organs at risk (OAR) sparing and implementation efficiency. Simulated treatment courses for 18 patients with re-optimization alone, re-positioning alone and AIGRT shows that AIGRT offers reliable daily target coverage that is highly comparable to daily re-optimization and significantly improves from re-positioning. AIGRT is also seen to provide improved OAR sparing compared to re-positioning. Apart from dosimetric benefits, AIGRT in addition offers an efficient scheme to integrate re-optimization to current re-positioning-based IGRT workflow.

  20. Novel insight into drug repositioning: Methylthiouracil as a case in point.

    Baek, Moon-Chang; Jung, Byeongjin; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-09-01

    Drug repositioning refers to the development of existing drugs for new indications. These drugs may have (I) failed to show efficacy in late stage clinical trials without safety issues; (II) stalled in the development for commercial reasons; (III) passed the point of patent expiry; or (IV) are being explored in new geographic markets. Over the past decade, pressure on the pharmaceutical industry caused by the 'innovation gap' owing to rising development costs and stagnant product output have become major reasons for the growing interest in drug repositioning. Companies that offer a variety of broad platforms for identifying new indications have emerged; some have been successful in building their own pipelines of candidates with reduced risks and timelines associated with further clinical development. The business models and platforms offered by these companies will be validated if they are able to generate positive proof-of-concept clinical data for their repositioned compounds. This review describes the strategy of biomarker-guided repositioning of chemotherapeutic drugs for inflammation therapy, considering the repositioning of methylthiouracil (MTU), an antithyroid drug, as a potential anti-inflammatory reagent. PMID:26117428

  1. Spine Plasticity in the Motor Cortex

    Yu, Xinzhu; Zuo, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian central nervous system. The morphology and dynamics of dendritic spines change throughout the lifespan of animals, in response to novel experiences and neuropathologies. New spines form rapidly as animals learn new tasks or experience novel sensory stimulations. This is followed by a selective elimination of previously existing spines, leading to significant synaptic remodeling. In the brain da...

  2. [Minimally invasive spine surgery: past and present].

    Corniola, M V; Stienen, M N; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2015-11-18

    In the early twentieth century, the understanding of spine biomechanics and the advent of surgical techniques of the lumbar spine, led to the currently emerging concept of minimal invasive spine surgery, By reducing surgical access, blood loss, infection rate and general morbidity, functional prognosis of patients is improved. This is a real challenge for the spine surgeon, who has to maintain a good operative result by significantly reducing surgical collateral damages due to the relatively traumatic conventional access. PMID:26742240

  3. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine Print A A A ... columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  4. Magnetic resonance of the spine

    This book contains 12 chapters. Three chapters discuss principles of cerebrospinal fluid flow, spinal imaging techniques, and the physical basis and anatomic correlates of signal intensity in the spine. There are chapters on normal anatomy, congenital anomalies, trauma, tumors, infection, demyelinating disease, degenerative disease, vascular conditions, and syringomyelia

  5. The Oxygen Sensor PHD2 Controls Dendritic Spines and Synapses via Modification of Filamin A

    Inmaculada Segura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal function is highly sensitive to changes in oxygen levels, but how hypoxia affects dendritic spine formation and synaptogenesis is unknown. Here we report that hypoxia, chemical inhibition of the oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs, and silencing of Phd2 induce immature filopodium-like dendritic protrusions, promote spine regression, reduce synaptic density, and decrease the frequency of spontaneous action potentials independently of HIF signaling. We identified the actin cross-linker filamin A (FLNA as a target of PHD2 mediating these effects. In normoxia, PHD2 hydroxylates the proline residues P2309 and P2316 in FLNA, leading to von Hippel-Lindau (VHL-mediated ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In hypoxia, PHD2 inactivation rapidly upregulates FLNA protein levels because of blockage of its proteasomal degradation. FLNA upregulation induces more immature spines, whereas Flna silencing rescues the immature spine phenotype induced by PHD2 inhibition.

  6. Modified lip repositioning: A surgical approach to treat the gummy smile

    Aditya Gopinath Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gummy smile has been an esthetic concern for many patients. This clinical report describes a successful surgical coverage obtained by modified lip repositioning, thus surgically treating the gummy smile. The technique was performed to limit the retraction of elevator muscles (e.g., zygomaticus minor, orbicularis oris, leviator anguli oris and levator labi oris. The technique is fulfilled by removing two strips of mucosa from maxillary buccal vestibule on both the sides leaving the frenum untouched and creating a partial thickness flap between mucogingival junction and upper lip musculature, and suturing the lip mucosa with mucogingival junction, resulting in a narrow vestibule and restricted muscle pull, thereby reducing gingival display. This technique is different from the conventional surgical lip repositioning as labial frenum is left untouched over here as it helps in maintain Litton the midline for lip repositioning and reduces the morbidity associated with it.

  7. Preliminary application of virtual simulation and reposition template for zygomatico-orbitomaxillary complex fracture.

    Li, Peng; Tang, Wei; Li, Jia; Tian, Dong W

    2012-09-01

    This report introduced and evaluated our computer-assisted surgical method in the treatment of complex maxillofacial fractures. One patient with zygomatico-orbitomaxillary complex fracture underwent computed tomography to obtain DICOM data. Three-dimensional reconstruction and virtual surgical planning were carried out in the software MIMICS 10.01. Three reposition templates and 1 skull model were manufactured in our three-dimensional rapid prototyping machine. Reconstruction surgery was carried out according to the preoperative planning and with the guide of reposition templates. At 3-month follow-up, the treatment outcome was consistent with preoperative planning exactly, and the patient expressed high satisfaction with the surgery. Combination of reposition templates and rapid prototyping method demonstrated great practical value in complex maxillofacial fracture surgery. PMID:22948624

  8. Drug repositioning: Re-investigating existing drugs for new therapeutic indications

    B M Padhy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and development is an expensive, time-consuming, and risky enterprise. In order to accelerate the drug development process with reduced risk of failure and relatively lower costs, pharmaceutical companies have adopted drug repositioning as an alternative. This strategy involves exploration of drugs that have already been approved for treatment of other diseases and/or whose targets have already been discovered. Various techniques including data mining, bioinformatics, and usage of novel screening platforms have been used for identification and screening of potential repositioning candidates. However, challenges in clinical trials and intellectual property issues may be encountered during the repositioning process. Nevertheless, such initiatives not only add value to the portfolio of pharmaceutical companies but also provide an opportunity for academia and government laboratories to develop new and innovative uses of existing drugs for infectious and neglected diseases, especially in emerging countries like India.

  9. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  10. A brief history of endoscopic spine surgery.

    Telfeian, Albert E; Veeravagu, Anand; Oyelese, Adetokunbo A; Gokaslan, Ziya L

    2016-02-01

    Few neurosurgeons practicing today have had training in the field of endoscopic spine surgery during residency or fellowship. Nevertheless, over the past 40 years individual spine surgeons from around the world have worked to create a subfield of minimally invasive spine surgery that takes the point of visualization away from the surgeon's eye or the lens of a microscope and puts it directly at the point of spine pathology. What follows is an attempt to describe the story of how endoscopic spine surgery developed and to credit some of those who have been the biggest contributors to its development. PMID:26828883

  11. Acute hypoxaemia due to intraoperative lung collapse after repositioning the patient

    Bina P Butala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Desaturation after induction of anaesthesia and repositioning due to mucus plug causing atelectasis (lung collapse is a rare event. We present a case of intraoperative right lung collapse due to mucus plug in a patient undergoing left laparoscopic nephrectomy. Hypoxaemia occurred after the induction of anaesthesia and repositioning. X-ray chest revealed right lung collapse and surgery was subsequently postponed. Lung re-expanded after postural drainage and suction. Postoperatively patient was diagnosed to have retrocardiac bronchiectasis. After preoperative preparation with postural drainage, chest physiotherapy, and antibiotics, the patient underwent surgery uneventfully.

  12. Thoracic spine CT, diagnostic efficacy

    In 67 patients the diagnostic efficacy of thoracic spine CT was assessed. Diagnoses suspected clinically or by other examination methods could be confirmed by CT in 81 % and excluded in 18 % of cases. In one per cent (one case) the diagnosis, myelopathia vascularis, could not be seen by CT nor by myelography. In 49 cases the results of thoracic spine CT and myelography were compared with each other. CT gave additional information to myelography in 27 % (13/49), but not in 73 % (36/49). In 27 % (18/67) of the whole material CT was able to replace myelography. It seems that CT is useless if myelography is normal, but CT may be useful in tumors, infections and medullary diseases. In traumas CT may replace myelography. (orig.)

  13. NMR imaging of the spine

    Han, J.S. (Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH); Kaufman, B.; El Yousef, S.J.; Benson, J.E.; Bonstelle, C.T.; Alfidi, R.J.; Haaga, J.R.; Yeung, H.; Huss, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images in the evaluation of spinal disorders below the craniocervical junction was studied. Six normal subjects and 41 patients with various spinal abnormalities were examined. NMR proved capable of demonstrating important normal and pathologic anatomic structures; it was useful in the evaluation of syringohydromyelia and cystic spinal cord tumors, and the bright signal intensity of lipoma was quite impressive. In the evaluation of herniated disk, NMR images offered a new perspective by visualizing abnormal degradation of the signal intensity of the nucleus pulposus itself. NMR images were least valuable in the evaluation of spondylosis and spinal stenosis. Although NMR imaging of the spine is still in a very early developmental stage, the absence of both ionizing radiation and risks associated with contrast material makes it especially attractive as a new diagnostic method. This limited experience with currently available equipment suggests that, with technical refinement, the efficacy of NMR of the spine will increase.

  14. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    Bulas, Dorothy [George Washington University Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  15. Understanding Competition in Spine Care.

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    The changing landscape from volume to value represents a natural transformation in the health care industry. Increasingly provider groups are finding themselves responding to unfamiliar market forces. Whether explicit or implicit, competition is playing a larger role for the sustainability of providers. For spine care providers who are attempting to navigate the transition from volume to value, understanding the forces that shape competition in health care can help achieve success. PMID:26925860

  16. Influence of Thoracic Flexion Syndrome on Proprioception in the Thoracic Spine

    Park, Kyue-nam; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to determine the difference in thoracic repositioning sense in young people with and without thoracic flexion syndrome (TFS) in target positions of half extension. [Subjects] People with TFS (n = 15; 7 men and 8 women) and people without TFS (n = 15; 7 men and 8 women) were recruited from three universities. Subjects were guided into a sitting extension target posture and were asked to move from a neutral position (2 s) to an extension target position (2 s);...

  17. Repositioning Your EMBA Program and Reinventing Your Brand: A Case Study Analysis

    Petit, Francis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to illustrate how Fordham University, the Jesuit University of New York, repositioned its Executive MBA Program and reinvented its brand, over a ten year period. More specifically, this research will analyze the current state of the Executive MBA market and will discuss the best practices and frameworks implemented…

  18. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve the...

  19. Repositioning Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) for Youths Employment and National Security in Nigeria

    Ogbunaya, T. C.; Udoudo, Ekereobong S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper focused on repositioning Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) for youth's employment and national security in Nigeria. It examined briefly the concepts of technical vocational education and training (TVET), youths, unemployment and national security as well as the effects of unemployment on national security in Nigeria.…

  20. Program management for spring location and repositioning (SLAR) operations at Pickering NGS

    In 1988 a major project was planned for Units 5 and 6 of Pickering NGS (Nuclear Generating Station). The project involved remotely locating and repositioning the four spacer (garter) springs separating each pressure tube from the surrounding calandria tube. This paper describes the requirements for SLAR, and the work being undertaken at Pickering NGS to implement the project

  1. Pre and post garter spring repositioning ultrasonic inspection of pressure tubes

    This paper present a description of the ultrasonic cracked hydride blister detections system used for pre and post inspection of pressure tubes during garter spring repositioning in CNE (Embalse Nuclear Power Station). Ultrasonic system setup configuration, transducers characteristics, blister detection head, calibration of parameters, operating procedure, records of ultrasonic inspections and evaluation. (author)

  2. Repositioning Guidance and Counselling and Curriculum Innovation in Higher Education in Nigeria

    Onyilofor, Florence N. C.

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on repositioning guidance and counseling and curriculum innovation in higher education in Nigeria. Descriptive survey research design was employed in the study. The study covered four Federal universities in the South-West Geopolitical zone of Nigeria, namely University of Ibadan in Oyo State; Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife

  3. Melting "Snow" and Shifting "Cultures": The Strategic Repositioning of Australian Universities' Research and Development.

    Poole, Millicent E.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that, for Australia, technological innovation and international competitiveness will require collaboration of two "cultures": science/technology and social sciences/humanities. Natural and social scientists will have to develop strategic alliances to reposition university research and development within Australian national priorities.

  4. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    2010-10-01

    ..., the lumbar spine assembly shall flex by an amount that permits the rigid thoracic spine to rotate from... that at 40 degrees of the lumbar spine flexion the applied force is perpendicular to the thoracic spine... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19...

  5. Thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for tuberculosis of cervical spine

    Sanjiv Huzurbazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective was to report this rare case and discuss the probable mechanism of thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for Kochs cervical spine.

  6. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between the watershed basins to trace the critical points in the density field and the separatrices defined by them. The separatrices are classified into walls and the spine, the network of filaments and node...

  7. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    Willems, M.H.A.; Braakman, R.; Linge, Bert

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine. the diagnosis should be considered in any patient with a fracture-dislocation of the thoracic spine. In these cases additional lateral tomographs are required. Early open reduction of bilateral loc...

  8. Giant Cell Tumor of Upper Thoracic Spine

    Lee, Chul Gab; KIM, SUNG HOON; Kim, Dong Min; Kim, Seok Won

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the spine is a rare benign tumor, but can be aggressive and can exhibit a high local recurrence rate. Furthermore, GCT of the upper thoracic spine may pose diagnostic and management difficulties. Here, we report a rare case of GCT of the upper thoracic spine with soft tissue extension to the spinal canal. The patient was managed by decompressive laminectomy and posterolateral fusion followed by an injection of polymethylmethacrylate into the vertebral lesion. The pat...

  9. Pathophysiology and Biomechanics of the Aging Spine

    Papadakis, Michael; Sapkas, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Katonis, Pavlos

    2011-01-01

    Aging of the spine is characterized by two parallel but independent processes: the reduction of bone mineral density and the development of degenerative changes. The combination of degeneration and bone mass reduction contribute, to a different degree, to the development of a variety of lesions. This results in a number of painful and often debilitating disorders. The present review constitutes a synopsis of the pathophysiological processes that take place in the aging spine as well as of the consequences these changes have on the biomechanics of the spine. The authors hope to present a thorough yet brief overview of the process of aging of the human spine. PMID:21966338

  10. Targeting the new generation woman: voice-over as a tool in gender repositioning traditionally male dominant product

    Staunton, Ciara

    1995-01-01

    This exploratory research study examines the power of the voice-over as a tool in gender re-positioning of a traditionally male dominant product and the response of the female market to such re-positioning. The increasing consumption by females of masculine products has led marketers to question how they can target such products at the female market, without losing the existing male customers. A potentially appropriate method of doing so is through subtle gender re-positioning by altering the...

  11. Pott's Spine with Bilateral Psoas Abscesses

    Masavkar, Sanjeevani; Shanbag, Preeti; Inamdar, Prithi

    2012-01-01

    A high degree of suspicion and appropriate imaging studies are required for the early diagnosis of Pott's spine. We describe a 4-year-old boy with Pott's disease of the lumbar spine with bilateral psoas abscesses. The child responded to conservative treatment with antituberculous treatment and ultrasonographically guided percutaneous drainage of the abscesses. PMID:23259114

  12. Pott's Spine with Bilateral Psoas Abscesses

    Sanjeevani Masavkar; Preeti Shanbag; Prithi Inamdar

    2012-01-01

    A high degree of suspicion and appropriate imaging studies are required for the early diagnosis of Pott’s spine. We describe a 4-year-old boy with Pott’s disease of the lumbar spine with bilateral psoas abscesses. The child responded to conservative treatment with antituberculous treatment and ultrasonographically guided percutaneous drainage of the abscesses.

  13. Anatomy and radiology of the sellar spine

    Five anatomical and radiological observations of a spine protruding into the pituitary fossa are reported. This osseous spine, about 4 mm long, arises in the midline from the inferior part of the anterior aspect of the dorsum sellae and extends upward and forward. The possible origins of this malformation are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Anatomy and radiology of the sellar spine

    Dietemann, J.L.; Wackenheim, A.; Lang, J.; Francke, J.P.; Clarisse, J.; Bonneville, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    Five anatomical and radiological observations of a spine protruding into the pituitary fossa are reported. This osseous spine, about 4 mm long, arises in the midline from the inferior part of the anterior aspect of the dorsum sellae and extends upward and forward. The possible origins of this malformation are discussed.

  15. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably

  16. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    Xu, Xin; Eric C. Miller; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability tha...

  17. Drug-repositioning opportunities for cancer therapy: novel molecular targets for known compounds.

    Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Bajetto, Adriana; Mazzanti, Michele; Florio, Tullio; Barbieri, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Drug repositioning is gaining increasing attention in drug discovery because it represents a smart way to exploit new molecular targets of a known drug or target promiscuity among diverse diseases, for medical uses different from the one originally considered. In this review, we focus on known non-oncological drugs with new therapeutic applications in oncology, explaining the rationale behind this approach and providing practical evidence. Moving from incompleteness of the knowledge of drug-target interactions, particularly for older molecules, we highlight opportunities for repurposing compounds as cancer therapeutics, underling the biologically and clinically relevant affinities for new targets. Ideal candidates for repositioning can contribute to the therapeutically unmet need for more-efficient anticancer agents, including drugs that selectively target cancer stem cells. PMID:26456577

  18. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve the...... rheumatology, were randomly allocated to either receive massage and a week later, act as controls or vice versa. The applied massage consisted of stimulating massage of the quadriceps femoris, sartorious, gracilus, and hamstrings muscles for 10 min on the affected leg. Participants had their JRE measured...... before and immediately after the 10 min massage and control sessions. Data were analyzed by using paired t-test. RESULTS: No significant change in JRE was observed (95% CI: -0.62 degrees to 0.85 degrees, p = 0.738). CONCLUSION: Massage has no effect on the immediate joint repositioning error in patients...

  19. NFFinder: an online bioinformatics tool for searching similar transcriptomics experiments in the context of drug repositioning.

    Setoain, Javier; Franch, Mònica; Martínez, Marta; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Sorzano, Carlos O S; Bakker, Annette; Gonzalez-Couto, Eduardo; Elvira, Juan; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Drug repositioning, using known drugs for treating conditions different from those the drug was originally designed to treat, is an important drug discovery tool that allows for a faster and cheaper development process by using drugs that are already approved or in an advanced trial stage for another purpose. This is especially relevant for orphan diseases because they affect too few people to make drug research de novo economically viable. In this paper we present NFFinder, a bioinformatics tool for identifying potential useful drugs in the context of orphan diseases. NFFinder uses transcriptomic data to find relationships between drugs, diseases and a phenotype of interest, as well as identifying experts having published on that domain. The application shows in a dashboard a series of graphics and tables designed to help researchers formulate repositioning hypotheses and identify potential biological relationships between drugs and diseases. NFFinder is freely available at http://nffinder.cnb.csic.es. PMID:25940629

  20. Helmet Versus Active Repositioning for Plagiocephaly: A Three-Dimensional Analysis

    Lipira, A.B.; Gordon, S.; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, N. V.; Van Pelt, A.E.; Naidoo, S.D.; Govier, D.; Kane, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    rigorously compare outcomes of these 2 treatment methods. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Whole-head 3D surface scans of 70 infants with DP were captured before and after treatment by using stereophotogrammetric imaging technology. Helmeted (n = 35) and nonhelmeted/actively repositioned (n = 35) infants were matched...... for severity of initial deformity. Surfaces were spatially registered to a symmetric template, which was deformed to achieve detailed right-to-left point correspondence for every point on the head surface. A ratio-metric asymmetry value was calculated for each point relative to its contralateral...... counterpart. Maximum and mean asymmetry values were determined. Change in mean and maximum asymmetry with treatment was the basis for group comparison. RESULTS: The helmeted group had a larger reduction than the repositioned group in both maximum (4.0% vs 2.5%; P = .02) and mean asymmetry (0.9% vs 0.5%; P...

  1. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve the...... neuromuscular function and thereby optimize the positive and minimize the negative performance factors in relation to an exercise program. METHODS: In a cross-over design, 19 patients with knee osteoarthritis, mean age of 73.1 years (SD: 9.4; range 56 to 88 years), recruited from the local department of...... before and immediately after the 10 min massage and control sessions. Data were analyzed by using paired t-test. RESULTS: No significant change in JRE was observed (95% CI: -0.62 degrees to 0.85 degrees, p = 0.738). CONCLUSION: Massage has no effect on the immediate joint repositioning error in patients...

  2. Transcatheter Retrieval and Repositioning of Embolized Stent from the Right Ventricle in an Infant

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Singh, Harinder R.; Turner, Daniel R.; Forbes, Thomas J.; Gowda, Srinath T.

    2012-01-01

    Intracardiac stent embolization is a challenging complication in a small infant. A Palmaz stent was placed across the atrial septum in a 3-month-old boy to relieve symptoms of right-side heart failure. On routine chest radiography one week later, the stent was found to have embolized into the right ventricle. The stent was retrieved and repositioned by means of transcatheter technique, without subsequent complications. We found this method to be a viable alternative to surgery in a high-risk infant. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the successful transcatheter retrieval and repositioning of an expandable intravascular stent from an intraventricular position in an infant. PMID:23109757

  3. Minimally invasive spine surgery in spinal infections.

    Verd-Lpez, F; Vanaclocha-Vanaclocha, V; Gozalbes-Esterelles, L; Snchez-Pardo, M

    2014-06-01

    Infections of the spine have been a constant throughout history. At present there are infections in the spine fostered in part by the same advances in medicine: there are a lot of immunocompromised patients, the life expectancy of patients with chronic diseases is augmented and the increasing number of complex spinal surgeries can result in secondary infection. In this review the main types of infection of the spine and its treatment highlighting techniques in minimally invasive surgery are discussed. Spontaneous pyogenic and nonpyogenic spine infections as well as iatrogenic infections can be treated in a different manner depending on its extension, location and microorganism involved. We will review the use and the indication of percutaneous image-guided techniques, endoscopic and microsurgical techniques with or without use of tubular retractors. We conclude that techniques in minimally invasive surgery in spine infections are safe, effective and have benefits in morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. PMID:24819481

  4. Sport injuries of the cervical spine

    The article reports on injuries of the cervical spine occurring during sports activities. An attempt is made to reconstruct the movements which led to the cervical spine injuries in question. In two cases of accidents occuring during bathing, one football accident and a toboggan accident, the injuries concerned point to hyperextension of the cervical spine as cause of the injury. In another football accident and a riding accident, the changes observed allow us to conclude that the movement leading to the injury must have been a hyperflexion. One accident occurring while jumping on the trampolin resulted in an injury of the upper cervical spine pointing to the action of a compressive force on the cervical spine in addition to the force resulting in hyperflexion. (orig.)

  5. Strategický re-branding a repositioning brokerjet Česká spořitelna

    Voldřichová, Kamila

    2012-01-01

    The thesis aims to analyze rebranding and repositioning of brokerjet České spořitelny. The theoretical part deals with these two marketing areas with special focus on brand marketing and process of creating company's positioning. The practical part begins with introduction of the company and its products, further on explains its competitors within Czech Republic and Austria. Last chapters form the key part with description of rebranding itself and proposal on repositioning strategy including ...

  6. Effect of Repositioning Maneuver Type and Postmaneuver Restrictions on Vertigo and Dizziness in Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo

    Michel Toupet; Evelyne Ferrary; Alexis Bozorg Grayeli

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. To compare the efficiency of Epley (Ep) and Sémont-Toupet (ST) repositioning maneuvers and to evaluate postmaneuver restriction effect on short-term vertigo and dizziness after repositioning maneuvers by an analog visual scale (VAS) in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV). Material and Methods. 226 consecutive adult patients with posterior canal BPPV were included. Patients were randomized into 2 different maneuver sequence groups (n = 113): 2 ST then 1 Ep or 2 Ep then 1 ...

  7. Using Composite Resin Inclined Plane for the Repositioning of a Laterally Luxated Primary Incisor: A Case Report

    Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the repositioning of a laterally luxated primary central incisor with occlusal interference, using a composite inclined plane. The patient was a 4-year-old girl who applied to our clinic three days after the injury. Because of the time delay between injury and presentation, it was not possible to reposition the tooth with pressure. Following a root-canal treatment, an inclined plane was prepared on the lower primary incisors, using composite resin. The tooth was rep...

  8. Comparison of Bernoulli and Gaussian HMMs using a vertical repositioning technique for off-line handwriting recognition

    Doetsch, Patrick; Hamdani, Mahdi; Ney, Hermann; Giménez Pastor, Adrián; ANDRÉS FERRER, JESÚS; Alfons Juan

    2012-01-01

    —In this paper a vertical repositioning method based on the center of gravity is investigated for handwriting recognition systems and evaluated on databases containing Arabic and French handwriting. Experiments show that vertical distortion in images has a large impact on the performance of HMM based handwriting recognition systems. Recently good results were obtained with Bernoulli HMMs (BHMMs) using a preprocessing with vertical repositioning of binarized images. In ...

  9. Towards Drug Repositioning: A Unified Computational Framework for Integrating Multiple Aspects of Drug Similarity and Disease Similarity

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    In response to the high cost and high risk associated with traditional de novo drug discovery, investigation of potential additional uses for existing drugs, also known as drug repositioning, has attracted increasing attention from both the pharmaceutical industry and the research community. In this paper, we propose a unified computational framework, called DDR, to predict novel drug-disease associations. DDR formulates the task of hypothesis generation for drug repositioning as a constraine...

  10. Use of Tongue Blade to Reposition Palatally Luxated Tooth due to Trauma: A Novel Technique

    Sharma, Akhilesh; Amitha M Hegde

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Luxational injuries to the permanent anterior teeth in children are a cause of concern. Palatal luxation of maxillary left central incisor with bleeding of gingival sulcus and fracture of maxillary right central incisor involving enamel and dentine in a 9-year- old girl is presented. The dental occlusion was deranged due to the luxation. Management consisted of repositioning of the luxated tooth using tongue blade under local anesthesia and composite build up of the fractured incisor...

  11. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. Objective We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. Methods We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. Conclusions We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning. PMID:27036325

  12. Repositioning urban governments? Energy efficiency and Australia’s changing climate and energy governance regimes.

    McGuirk, Pauline; Dowling, Robyn; Bulkeley, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Urban local governments are important players in climate governance, and their roles are evolving. This review traces the changing nexus of Australia’s climate policy, energy policy and energy efficiency imperatives and its repositioning of urban local governments. We characterise the ways urban local governments’ capacities and capabilities are being mobilised in light of a changing multi-level political opportunity structure around energy efficiency. The shifts we observe not only exten...

  13. Service network design with empty container repositioning in intermodal barge transportation

    Braekers, Kris; CARIS, An; Gerrit K. Janssens

    2012-01-01

    A decision support model for service network design in intermodal barge transportation is presented. The model determines optimal shipping routes for roundtrip services between a major sea port and several hinterland ports. The model decides on the hinterland ports to be visited and which transport demand should be ful lled in order to maximize pro t. Empty container repositioning movements are taken into account. A case study on the hinterland network of the port of Antwerp in Belgium is dis...

  14. Repositioning of the anthelmintic drug mebendazole for the treatment for colon cancer

    Nygren, Peter; Fryknäs, Mårten; Anagel, Bengt; Larsson, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we screened a compound library containing 1,600 clinically used compounds with the aim to identify compounds, which potentially could be repositioned for colon cancer therapy. Methods Two established colon cancer cell lines were tested using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA). For compound comparison connectivity map (CMAP) analysis, NCI 60 data mining and protein kinase binding measurements were performed. Results Sixty-eight compounds were ...

  15. Dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform security hologram with in-built repositioning

    Amit K Sharma; D P Chhachhia; D Mohan; A K Aggarwal

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple method for making dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform (EFRT) security holograms. The hologram possesses different stages of encoding so that security features are concealed and remain invisible to the counterfeiter. These concealed and encoded anticounterfeit security features in the security hologram can only be read through a key hologram. Key hologram also facilitates in-built repositioning of security hologram. The method of fabrication, the principle of reconstruction and the experimental results are presented.

  16. Phylogeny of horse chromosome 5q in the genus Equus and centromere repositioning.

    Piras, F M; Nergadze, S G; Poletto, V; Cerutti, F; Ryder, O A; Leeb, T; Raimondi, E; Giulotto, E

    2009-01-01

    Horses, asses and zebras belong to the genus Equus and are the only extant species of the family Equidae in the order Perissodactyla. In a previous work we demonstrated that a key factor in the rapid karyotypic evolution of this genus was evolutionary centromere repositioning, that is, the shift of the centromeric function to a new position without alteration of the order of markers along the chromosome. In search of previously undiscovered evolutionarily new centromeres, we traced the phylogeny of horse chromosome 5, analyzing the order of BAC markers, derived from a horse genomic library, in 7 Equus species (E. caballus, E. hemionus onager, E. kiang, E. asinus, E. grevyi, E. burchelli and E. zebra hartmannae). This analysis showed that repositioned centromeres are present in E. asinus (domestic donkey, EAS) chromosome 16 and in E. burchelli (Burchell's zebra, EBU) chromosome 17, confirming that centromere repositioning is a strikingly frequent phenomenon in this genus. The observation that the neocentromeres in EAS16 and EBU17 are in the same chromosomal position suggests that they may derive from the same event and therefore, E. asinus and E. burchelli may be more closely related than previously proposed; alternatively, 2 centromere repositioning events, involving the same chromosomal region, may have occurred independently in different lineages, pointing to the possible existence of hot spots for neocentromere formation. Our comparative analysis also showed that, while E. caballus chromosome 5 seems to represent the ancestral configuration, centric fission followed by independent fusion events gave rise to 3 different submetacentric chromosomes in other Equus lineages. PMID:20016166

  17. Rational drug repositioning guided by an integrated pharmacological network of protein, disease and drug

    Lee Hee; Bae Taejeong; Lee Ji-Hyun; Kim Dae; Oh Young; Jang Yeongjun; Kim Ji-Tea; Lee Jong-Jun; Innocenti Alessio; Supuran Claudiu T; Chen Luonan; Rho Kyoohyoung; Kim Sunghoon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The process of drug discovery and development is time-consuming and costly, and the probability of success is low. Therefore, there is rising interest in repositioning existing drugs for new medical indications. When successful, this process reduces the risk of failure and costs associated with de novo drug development. However, in many cases, new indications of existing drugs have been found serendipitously. Thus there is a clear need for establishment of rational methods...

  18. The Effectiveness of a Modified Type of the Mandibular Repositioning Device on the Elimination of Snoring

    B Ebadian; SM. Hashemi; M Adeli

    2005-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Snoring is the most common sleep disorder which in itself may only be viewed as an obnoxious disturbance in human society; however it must be considered a potential indicator of significant medical problems such as: hypertension,obstructive sleep apnea, cerebrovascular infarction and ischemic heart disease.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified type of Mandibular Repositioning Device (MRD splint) on the treatment of snoring.Mat...

  19. Exploiting Drug Repositioning for Discovery of a Novel HIV Combination Therapy ▿

    Clouser, Christine L.; Patterson, Steven E.; Louis M Mansky

    2010-01-01

    The development of HIV drugs is an expensive and a lengthy process. In this study, we used drug repositioning, a process whereby a drug approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition, to identify clinically approved drugs that have anti-HIV activity. The data presented here show that a combination of two clinically approved drugs, decitabine and gemcitabine, reduced HIV infectivity by 73% at concentrations that had minimal antiviral activity when used individually. Dec...

  20. Repositioning chairs in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: implications and clinical outcome.

    West, Niels; Hansen, Søren; Møller, Martin Nue; Bloch, Sune Land; Klokker, Mads

    2016-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the clinical value of repositioning chairs in management of refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and to study how different BPPV subtypes respond to treatment. We performed a retrospective chart review of 150 consecutive cases with refractory vertigo referred to our clinic within a 10-month period. The BPPV patients were managed with classical manual manoeuvres, the Epley Omniax(®) rotator (EO) or the TRV chair (TRV). In addition, a comprehensive review of the literature was performed. BPPV was identified in 95 cases. The number of needed treatments for posterior canalolithiasis versus posterior cupulolithiasis, horizontal cupulolithiasis and multi-canal affection was significant (p < 0.01). Thirty-seven (38 %) patients required only one repositioning manoeuvre and the overall symptom relief was 91.7-100 % after 3 treatments. Eleven patients (12 %) experienced relapse within the ½-year follow-up period. Horizontal cupulolithiasis and multi-canal affection constituted the most resilient cases. The literature search identified 9 repositioning chair studies. The EO and the TRV are highly valuable assets in diagnosis and management of BPPV of particularly complex and refractory cases. However, further validation is anticipated through controlled clinical trials. PMID:25749489

  1. [Discovering L-type calcium channels inhibitors of antihypertensive drugs based on drug repositioning].

    Liang, Ying-xi; He, Yu-su; Jiang, Lu-di; Yue, Qiao-xin; Cui, Shuai; Bin, Li; Ye, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yang-ling

    2015-09-01

    This study was amid to construct the pharmacophore model of L-type calcium channel antagonist in the application of screening Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs resulting from virtual screening and discusses the relocation-based drug discovery methods, screening antihypertensive drugs with L-type calcium channel function from TCMD. Qualitative hypotheses wre generated by HipHop separately on the basis of 12 compounds with antagonistic action on L-type calcium channel expressed in rabbit cardiac muscle. Datebase searching method was used to evaluate the generated hypotheses. The optimum hypothesis was used to search Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs and evaluates the antihypertensive effect of the chemical constituent of traditional Chinese medicine resulting from virtual screening by the matching score and literature. The results showed that optimum qualitative hypothesis is with six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, four hydrophobic groups, and the CAI value of 2.78. Screening Drugbank achieves 93 approved drugs. Screening TCMD achieves 285 chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine. It was concluded that the hypothesis is reliable and can be used to screen datebase. The approved drugs resulting from virtual screening, such as pravastatin, are potentially L-type calcium channels inhibitors. The chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine, such as Arctigenin III and Arctigenin are potentially antihypertensive drugs. It indicates that Drug Repositioning based on hypothesis is possible. PMID:26983215

  2. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse. PMID:26414157

  3. Pharmacologically active metabolites, combination screening and target identification-driven drug repositioning in antituberculosis drug discovery.

    Kigondu, Elizabeth M; Wasuna, Antonina; Warner, Digby F; Chibale, Kelly

    2014-08-15

    There has been renewed interest in alternative strategies to address bottlenecks in antibiotic development. These include the repurposing of approved drugs for use as novel anti-infective agents, or their exploitation as leads in drug repositioning. Such approaches are especially attractive for tuberculosis (TB), a disease which remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally and, increasingly, is associated with the emergence of drug-resistance. In this review article, we introduce a refinement of traditional drug repositioning and repurposing strategies involving the development of drugs that are based on the active metabolite(s) of parental compounds with demonstrated efficacy. In addition, we describe an approach to repositioning the natural product antibiotic, fusidic acid, for use against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Finally, we consider the potential to exploit the chemical matter arising from these activities in combination screens and permeation assays which are designed to confirm mechanism of action (MoA), elucidate potential synergies in polypharmacy, and to develop rules for drug permeability in an organism that poses a special challenge to new drug development. PMID:24997576

  4. Benign tumors of the spine.

    Thakur, Nikhil A; Daniels, Alan H; Schiller, Jonathan; Valdes, Mauricio A; Czerwein, John K; Schiller, Alan; Esmende, Sean; Terek, Richard M

    2012-11-01

    Benign tumors in the spine include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, osteochondroma, neurofibroma, giant cell tumor of bone, eosinophilic granuloma, and hemangioma. Although some are incidental findings, some cause local pain, radicular symptoms, neurologic compromise, spinal instability, and deformity. The evaluation of spinal tumors includes a thorough history and physical examination, imaging, sometimes laboratory evaluation, and biopsy when indicated. Appropriate treatment may be observational (eg, eosinophilic granuloma) or ablative (eg, osteoid osteoma, neurofibroma, hemangioma), but generally is surgical, depending on the level of pain, instability, neurologic compromise, and natural history of the lesion. Knowledge of the epidemiology, common presentation, imaging, and treatment of benign bone tumors is essential for successful management of these lesions. PMID:23118137

  5. Vascular malformations of the spine

    The vascular malformations of the spine and spinal cord are rare diseases. Possible symptoms may consist in a transient neurological deficit, a progressive sensorimotor transverse lesion or an acute para- or tetraplegia. Damage to the spinal cord occurs by bleeding, space-occupying effects and venous congestion, rarely by steal effects. Classification of the true inborn malformations differentiates between arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), cavernomas and capillary teleangiectasias. The more frequent spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) of the elderly patient is a probably acquired lesion which is presented in a separate paper. Capillary teleangiectasias are mostly incidental findings but may cause differential diagnostic problems. Cavernomas are important causes of hemorrhage and may initially be obscured within the bleeding. MRI is the most relevant imaging procedure in the early diagnostic workup. In case of an AVM selective spinal angiography is required to define the type of the lesion and to decide about the appropriate therapy which may be endovascular-interventional, neurosurgical, combined or attentive. (orig.)

  6. The aging spine in sports.

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Elson, Lauren; Brand, Erik

    2012-07-01

    1. Masters athletes may experience low back pain from multiple sources. Masters athletes with discogenic back pain should avoid or modify sports with combined rotational and compressive forces; individuals with facet-mediated pain should avoid or modify sports with excessive extension and rotation. 2. Optimization of flexibility, strength, endurance, and core control is critical. Sports specific training, realistic goal setting, and counseling are of maximal importance. 3. Overall, the health benefits of continued sports and athletic participation outweigh the potential risks of spinal degeneration in middle-aged athletes. There is little correlation between radiographic appearance of the spine and symptoms; therefore, symptoms should serve as the primary guide when determining activity modifications. Overall, masters athletes should be encouraged to remain active and fit to enhance their quality of life and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22657996

  7. Cortical Composition Hierarchy Driven by Spine Proportion Economical Maximization or Wire Volume Minimization.

    Karbowski, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The structure and quantitative composition of the cerebral cortex are interrelated with its computational capacity. Empirical data analyzed here indicate a certain hierarchy in local cortical composition. Specifically, neural wire, i.e., axons and dendrites take each about 1/3 of cortical space, spines and glia/astrocytes occupy each about (1/3)(2), and capillaries around (1/3)(4). Moreover, data analysis across species reveals that these fractions are roughly brain size independent, which suggests that they could be in some sense optimal and thus important for brain function. Is there any principle that sets them in this invariant way? This study first builds a model of local circuit in which neural wire, spines, astrocytes, and capillaries are mutually coupled elements and are treated within a single mathematical framework. Next, various forms of wire minimization rule (wire length, surface area, volume, or conduction delays) are analyzed, of which, only minimization of wire volume provides realistic results that are very close to the empirical cortical fractions. As an alternative, a new principle called "spine economy maximization" is proposed and investigated, which is associated with maximization of spine proportion in the cortex per spine size that yields equally good but more robust results. Additionally, a combination of wire cost and spine economy notions is considered as a meta-principle, and it is found that this proposition gives only marginally better results than either pure wire volume minimization or pure spine economy maximization, but only if spine economy component dominates. However, such a combined meta-principle yields much better results than the constraints related solely to minimization of wire length, wire surface area, and conduction delays. Interestingly, the type of spine size distribution also plays a role, and better agreement with the data is achieved for distributions with long tails. In sum, these results suggest that for the efficiency of local circuits wire volume may be more primary variable than wire length or temporal delays, and moreover, the new spine economy principle may be important for brain evolutionary design in a broader context. PMID:26436731

  8. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described

  9. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can ...

  10. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw; Wichuk, Stephanie; Østergaard, Mikkel; Weber, Ulrich; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...... an important measure of treatment efficacy as well as a surrogate marker for new bone formation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new scoring method for fat lesions in the spine, the Fat SpA Spine Score (FASSS), which in contrast to the existing scoring method addresses the...... localization and phenotypic diversity of fat lesions in patients with axial SpA....

  11. THE SPINE OF THE COSMIC WEB

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between the watershed basins to trace the critical points in the density field and the separatrices defined by them. The separatrices are classified into walls and the spine, the network of filaments and nodes in the matter distribution. Testing the method with a heuristic Voronoi model yields outstanding results. Following the discussion of the test results, we apply the SpineWeb method to a set of cosmological N-body simulations. The latter illustrates the potential for studying the structure and dynamics of the Cosmic Web.

  12. Dendritic Spine Pathology in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Herms, Jochen; Dorostkar, Mario M

    2016-05-23

    Substantial progress has been made toward understanding the neuropathology, genetic origins, and epidemiology of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease; tauopathies, such as frontotemporal dementia; α-synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies; Huntington's disease; and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia, as well as prion diseases. Recent evidence has implicated dendritic spine dysfunction as an important substrate of the pathogenesis of dementia in these disorders. Dendritic spines are specialized structures, extending from the neuronal processes, on which excitatory synaptic contacts are formed, and the loss of dendritic spines correlates with the loss of synaptic function. We review the literature that has implicated direct or indirect structural alterations at dendritic spines in the pathogenesis of major neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on those that lead to dementias such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, as well as frontotemporal dementia and prion diseases. We stress the importance of in vivo studies in animal models. PMID:26907528

  13. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    Xu, Xin; Miller, Eric C.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25309341

  14. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    Lucas Pozzo-Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT. RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders.

  15. Computed tomography of the sellar spine

    The authors report the CT scan findings in a case of sellar spine. This osseous spine which arises on the midline of the anterior aspect of the dorsum sellae and is directed toward the center of the sella turcica has already been described on specimens and on plain films but never on CT scans. The CT scan findings confirm the normal appearance of the surrounding structures. (orig.)

  16. Computed tomography of the sellar spine

    Dietemann, J.L.; Bonneville, J.F.; Cattin, F.; Poulignot, D.

    1983-01-01

    The authors report the CT scan findings in a case of sellar spine. This osseous spine which arises on the midline of the anterior aspect of the dorsum sellae and is directed toward the center of the sella turcica has already been described on specimens and on plain films but never on CT scans. The CT scan findings confirm the normal appearance of the surrounding structures.

  17. Injuries of the spine sustained in rugby

    Thurston, John

    1984-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1982, 67 rugby players (63 rugby union, two rugby league, and two American football) sustained serious injuries of their spine. The injuries fell predominantly on the lower cervical spine. Forty eight of the players sustained serious injuries of the spinal cord, leading to paralysis and total incapacity. The incidence of such injuries appears to have increased in recent years, particularly those incurred in tackles and mauls and rucks, and particularly among schoolboys. Chang...

  18. Tophaceous gout in the cervical spine

    Cabot, Jonathan [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Mosel, Leigh; Kong, Andrew; Hayward, Mike [Flinders Medical Centre, Department of Medical Imaging, Bedford Park, South Australia (Australia)

    2005-12-01

    Gout is a common metabolic disorder typically affecting the distal joints of the appendicular skeleton. Involvement of the axial skeleton, particularly the facet joints and posterior column of the cervical spine, is rare. This case report highlights such a presentation in a 76-year old female who presented with cervical spine pain following a fall. Her radiological findings were suggestive of a destructive metastatic process. Histological diagnosis confirmed tophaceous gout. (orig.)

  19. Cervical spine involvements in Reiter's syndrome

    Cervical spine radiographs of 38 patients orginating from 145 consecutive cases with Reiter's syndrome (RS) were reviewed. Five of these 145 patients (3.4%) had cervical spine manifestations: anterior atlanto-axial dislocation 2, craniovertebral lesions typical for rhreumatoid arthritis (RA), spondylitis typical for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and anterior ossification, one each. Four of these patients were males. Cervical lesions in RS turned out to be rare. These lesions are alone indistinguisable from those of other chronic rheumatic inflammatory diseases. (orig.)

  20. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; van de Weygaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    We present a new concept, the Spine of the Cosmic Web, for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its filaments and walls. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the method invokes the local properties of the regions adjacent to the critical points, which define its separatrices. Our method allows their classification into walls and the spine of filaments and clusters. Tests on a heuristic Voronoi model yielded outstanding results.

  1. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae

  2. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. (Cleveland Chiropractic College, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  3. Management of Cervical Spine Injuries in Athletes

    Bailes, Julian E.; Petschauer, Meredith; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Marano, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Although the incidence of catastrophic cervical spine injury in sport has been significantly reduced over the past 3 decades, the injury warrants continued attention because of the altered quality of life that often accompanies such an injury. The purpose of our literature review was to provide athletic trainers with an understanding of the mechanisms, anatomical structures, and complications often associated with sport-related cervical spine injury. We also present the most curren...

  4. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  5. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  6. Biomechanical in vitro evaluation of the complete porcine spine in comparison with data of the human spine

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Geppert, Jürgen; Kienle, Annette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide quantitative biomechanical properties of the whole porcine spine and compare them with data from the literature on the human spine. Complete spines were sectioned into single joint segments and tested in a spine tester with pure moments in the three main anatomical planes. Range of motion, neutral zone and stiffness parameters of the spine were determined in flexion/extension, right/left lateral bending and left/right axial rotation. Comparison with da...

  7. Spine problems in young athletes.

    Sucato, Daniel J; Micheli, Lyle J; Estes, A Reed; Tolo, Vernon T

    2012-01-01

    As the number of young people involved in sports activities increases, acute and chronic back pain has become more common. With a careful medical history and physical examination, along with the judicious use of imaging modalities, the causes of back pain can be correctly diagnosed and treated so that young athletes can quickly return to sports participation. Although most back pain in these young patients is muscular in origin, findings that should trigger increased concern include night pain, marked hamstring tightness, pain with lumbar spine hyperextension, or any neurologic finding. When recently developed vague back pain is present, a delay in radiographic imaging is warranted. With new back pain after trauma, AP and lateral radiographs of the symptomatic spinal area are indicated. CT, bone scans, and MRI should be reserved for special circumstances. Spondylolysis is the most common bony cause of back pain in young athletes. Spondylolysis can be treated with activity limitation, a specific exercise program, a thoracolumbar orthosis, and/or surgery. Treatment should be based on the amount of pain as well as the desire of the young athlete to continue in the sports activity that caused the pain. Other significant causes of back pain that require more extensive treatment in these young athletes include spondylolisthesis, lumbar disk disorders, and sacral stress fractures. It is anticipated that nearly all young athletes can return to sports activity after successful treatment. Even if surgical treatment is needed, return to all sports is expected, with the occasional exception of collision sports. PMID:22301257

  8. New customized patient repositioning system for use in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and radiotherapy

    Purpose/Objective: To develop a safe and easy method for customized patient repositioning and immobilization prior to 3-D treatment planning and during precise radiotherapy. Materials and methods: The new material consists of impression material, and covering material to fix and hold the impression. The impression material is composed of numerous effervescent polystyrene beads (3.1 mm in diameter) coated by polymerizing substance, urethane prepolymer. When being wet, the material beads adhere to each other due to polymelization, and it is hardened in 5 to 10 minutes. Within one hour the mold is sufficiently dry to be used for treatment planning utilizing computed tomography(CT). The physical characteristics of the material, the subjective comfort of the patient, the reduction in time required for repositioning in the treatment of the head and neck tumors, and the reduction in patient movement in the treatment of the breast cancers were investigated. Results: During the hardening stage, the maximum temperature of the material was 33 deg. C. Non-toxic CO2 gas was produced and evaporated from the covering fabric. The mold, with a density of 0.095, was strong enough to endure compression, flexure, and scratching. In the healthy volunteers, no sensitivity to the skin was observed after 12 hours' attachment to the skin. The CT number of the material was less than minus 800, and no build-up effect was demonstrated in megavoltage photon therapy. Various molds were made and used as neck rest adjunctive to thermoplastic face mask, whole body cast, and arm rest (Figure). A questionnaire survey administered to 59 patients with brain, head and neck tumors, and to 18 patients with breast cancers, revealed that subjective comfort was markedly improved (90.9%) of improved (9.1%) by virtue of the new material. In the treatment of head and neck tumors, the mean time and SD for repositioning were 61.1 ± 13.6 seconds with the ready-made neck-rest and 49.4 ± 8.4 seconds with the individualized neck-rest. For 90 breast irradiations in 15 patients, the mean and standard deviations of displacement were 6.5 mm and 2.0 mm without the arm-rest, and 0.7 mm and 0.5 mm with the use of the arm-rest of new material (p< 0.0001). Conclusion: The new customized patient repositioning system is safer, easier, and more comfortable both for the patient and medical staffs than previous methods are, and it is suitable for precise 3-D treatment planning and radiotherapy

  9. Solving a static repositioning problem in bike-sharing systems using iterated tabu search

    Ho, Sin C.; Szeto, W. Y.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the static bike repositioning problem where the problem consists of selecting a subset of stations to visit, sequencing them, and determining the pick-up/drop-off quantities (associated with each of the visited stations) under the various operational constraints. The objec...... objective is to minimize the total penalties incurred at all the stations. We present an iterated tabu search heuristic to solve the described problem. Experimental results show that this simple heuristic can generate high quality solutions using small computing times....

  10. Persistent Direction-Fixed Nystagmus Following Canalith Repositioning Maneuver for Horizontal Canal BPPV: A Case of Canalith Jam

    Chang, Young-Soo; Choi, Jeesun

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a 64-year-old man who developed persistent direction fixed nystagmus after a canalith repositioning maneuver for horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV). The patient was initially diagnosed with right HC-BPPV given that the Dix-Hallpike test showed geotropic horizontal nystagmus that was more pronounced on the right side, although the roll test did not show any positional nystagmus. The patient was treated with a canalith repositioning maneuver (Lempert maneuver). The next day, the patient experienced a different character of dizziness, and left-beating spontaneous nystagmus regardless of head position was observed. After a forced prolonged left decubitus and frequent head shaking, his symptoms and nystagmus resolved. This condition, referred to as canalith jam, can be a complication after the repositioning maneuver in patients with BPPV. Atypical positional tests suggest that abnormal canal anatomy could be the underlying cause of canalith jam. PMID:24917912

  11. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  12. The dynamics of spine density changes.

    Lieshoff, Carsten; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2003-03-18

    Numerous papers have been published describing the effects of learning and environmental changes on the wiring of brain areas in mammals and birds. The density of dendritic spines, which can be taken as a measure of the complexity of a given neuronal network, has been shown to increase or to decrease depending on the experiment and on the brain area involved. Almost no information is available concerning the speed with which a given network reacts to learning events or environmental changes. We therefore examined the time course of spine density changes in two areas of the zebra finch forebrain, which have been shown previously to be either involved in sexual imprinting (LNH, lateral part of the neo-hyperstriatum) or to react to environmental changes (ANC, archi-neostriatum caudale). The decrease of spine density in LNH of zebra finch males after sexual imprinting is very fast, the new level of spine density is reached after 2 days. In contrast, decrease of spine density within ANC as a consequence of transferring birds from a social condition into isolation is very slow, lasting about 3 weeks. The increase of spine density within ANC after transfer of the males from isolation to a social condition occurs within 3 days. The differences in adaptation times cannot be due to limitations in the growth speed of single spines, because this has been shown to be much faster (hours instead of days). Instead, the speed of adaptation may be dependent on the availability of information about the final wiring diagram and on functional aspects like the energy demands for maintenance or alteration of a given neuronal network, or the necessity of quick adaptation to enhance the fitness of the animal. PMID:12644282

  13. Design of a robotic tool for percutaneous instrument distal tip repositioning.

    Walsh, Conor James; Franklin, Jeremy; Slocum, Alexander H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2011-01-01

    Manually performed image-guided percutaneous procedures are limited by targeting errors due to instrument misalignment, deflection and an inability to reposition the distal tip of the instrument after it has been percutaneously inserted. These limitations result in suboptimal instrument positioning that limits diagnosis and treatment for a variety of procedures as well as excessive procedure time and radiation dose (in the case of x-ray based imaging). Hence we are developing a robotic tool capable of repositioning the distal tip of a percutaneous instrument after a single insertion into the body. It is based on the concept of deploying a super-elastic pre-curved stylet from a concentric straight cannula. The proximal end of the cannula is attached to the distal end of a screw-spline that enables it to be translated and rotated with respect to the casing. Translation of the stylet relative to the cannula is achieved with a second threaded screw with a splined groove. The device is made of mostly plastic components and actuation is achieved using micro-stepper motors. Measurements of the maximum axial force for the cannula screw-spline and stylet screw were found to match those from design calculations. Evaluation of the mechanism positioning capability demonstrated sub-millimeter and sub-degree translation and angular accuracy. We foresee this robotic tool having wide application across a range of procedures such as biopsy, thermal ablation and brachytherapy seed placement. PMID:22254751

  14. Repositioning "old" drugs for new causes: identifying new inhibitors of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Shah, Esha T; Upadhyaya, Akanksha; Philp, Lisa K; Tang, Tiffany; Skalamera, Dubravka; Gunter, Jennifer; Nelson, Colleen C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Hollier, Brett G

    2016-04-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) deaths occur due to the metastatic spread of tumor cells to distant organs. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies once tumor cells have spread outside the prostate. It is therefore imperative to rapidly develop therapeutics to inhibit the metastatic spread of tumor cells. Gain of cell motility and invasive properties is the first step of metastasis and by inhibiting motility one can potentially inhibit metastasis. Using the drug repositioning strategy, we developed a cell-based multi-parameter primary screening assay to identify drugs that inhibit the migratory and invasive properties of metastatic PC-3 PCa cells. Following the completion of the primary screening assay, 33 drugs were identified from an FDA approved drug library that either inhibited migration or were cytotoxic to the PC-3 cells. Based on the data obtained from the subsequent validation studies, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, simvastatin, fluvastatin and vandetanib were identified as strong candidates that can inhibit both the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells without significantly affecting cell viability. By employing the drug repositioning strategy instead of a de novo drug discovery and development strategy, the identified drug candidates have the potential to be rapidly translated into the clinic for the management of men with aggressive forms of PCa. PMID:26932199

  15. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 μM drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug–drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis

  16. Conspicuous and aposematic spines in the animal kingdom

    Inbar, Moshe; Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2005-04-01

    Spines serve as a common physical defence mechanism in both the plant and animal kingdoms. Here we argue that as in plants, defensive animal spines are often conspicuous (shape and colour) and should be considered aposematic. Conspicuous spines may evolve as signals or serve as a cue for potential predators. Spine conspicuousness in animals has evolved independently across and within phyla occupying aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, indicating that this convergent phenomenon is highly adaptive. Still, many spines are cryptic, suggesting that conspicuity is not simply constrained by developmental factors such as differences in the chemical composition of the integument. Aposematism does not preclude the signalling role of conspicuous spines in the sexual arena.

  17. Confined prostate cancer treated by conformational irradiation with intensity modulation with or without echography repositioning: is the dose received equivalent to the prescribed dose?

    The results suggest it would be possible to dispense a homogenous dose in agreement with the ICRU recommendations, nearer than the forward looking dose when the daily echographic repositioning is applied. This repositioning does not influence significantly the dosimetry for the risk organs. These results will validated in a bigger population. (N.C.)

  18. Radiologic evaluation of cervical spine fractures

    The radiological findings of various cervical spine fractures were analyzed on the basis of J. Harris classification. It appears to be important for the radiologist to be familiar with radiographic findings of cervical spine fractures, particularly those of unstable fractures which can result in serious medical problems if improperly handled in the department of radiology. 68 cases of cervical spine fractures were analyzed. The results are as follows: 1. Stable and unstable fractures were about equal in incidence. 2. Anterior subluxation accounts for 43.4% of stable fractures, 19 % of all fractures. 3. Bilateral interfacetal dislocation accounts for 51.1% of unstable fractures, 25% of all fractures. 4. Associated fractures were involved in skull, scapula, mandible and femur. 5. About 80% of the patients is in third through fifth decade

  19. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-01

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (pmechanics exhibited significant relationships with age. Nonlinear flexibility curves described the functional response of the cervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects. PMID:23415075

  20. Actin Remodeling and Polymerization Forces Control Dendritic Spine Morphology

    Miermans, Karsten; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (re)configuration of the neuronal network during early development, learning and memory formation, and has been conjectured to be part of the machinery that encodes these processes at the scale of individual neuronal connections. It is well established that the structural plasticity of spines is strongly dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton inside the spine. A general framework that details the precise role of actin in directing the transitions between the various spine shapes is lacking. We address this issue, and present...

  1. [Ischemic optic neuropathy after lumbar spine surgery].

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Carpintero, M; García-Carro, G; Acebal, G; Fervienza, P; Cosío, F

    2007-12-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of visual complications after non-ophthalmic surgery. The incidence has varied in different case series, but prone-position spine surgery appears to be involved in most of the reports. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed near total blindness in the left eye following lumbar spine fusion surgery involving the loss of 900 mL of blood. An ophthalmic examination including inspection of the ocular fundus, fluorescein angiography, and visual evoked potentials returned a diagnosis of retrolaminar optic neuropathy. Outcome was poor. PMID:18200998

  2. Intrawound Vancomycin Powder for Spine Tumor Surgery.

    Okafor, Richard; Molinari, William; Molinari, Robert; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data. Objective To evaluate infection rates following intrawound vancomycin powder application during spine tumor surgery. Methods Patients ≥18 years old undergoing spine tumor surgery and receiving intrawound vancomycin powder at a single center between January 2008 and January 2015 were enrolled. Patient demographics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]), tumor type (metastatic, primary) and location, surgical data (estimated blood loss [EBL], levels fused, type of decompression, length of surgery and hospitalization, discharge status from hospital), radiation therapy use, and infection rates (surgery to a minimum of 30 days postoperative) were evaluated. Results Forty patients (46 procedures) undergoing spine tumor surgery and intrawound vancomycin powder application were identified. Five were excluded because of death less than 30 days postoperatively, and 35 patients (41 procedures) were enrolled: 11 women and 24 men with an average age of 61.4 years (range 19 to 92) and average BMI of 27.3 (range 17.4 to 36.8). Three cases were primary spine tumors. Five were hematologic malignancies, and 27 were metastatic cancers. Twenty-one tumors were in the thoracic spine, 12 in the lumbar spine, and 8 in the cervical spine. Average EBL was 899 mL (range 25 to 3,500), average length of surgery was 241 minutes (range 78 to 495), and average hospital stay was 15.1 days (range 3 to 49). Two culture-proven infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae) were noted in 41 procedures (4.9%). Ten patients (28.6%) had preoperative radiation only; 14 (40%) had postoperative radiation only, 5 (14.3%) had both preoperative and postoperative radiation, and 6 (17.1%) had no radiation. There were no associations between radiation treatment and postsurgical infections (p = 0.19). Conclusion In this first study evaluating intrawound vancomycin powder for spine tumor surgery, we report an infection rate of 4.9%. We found no correlations between radiation treatment and postsurgical infections. PMID:27099810

  3. Cervical spine fractures and dislocations in children

    A retrospectivce analysis of pediatric admissions over 10 years revealed 29 patients with cervical spine injuries. Eleven patients were below 12 years of age, and 10 of these had injuries involving C1, C2 or the occipitoatlantal articulation. Eighteen patients were between 12 and 16 years of age with injuries distributed throughout the cervical spine similar to injuries in the adult population. Our results suggest that teenagers with suspected cervical injuries are best evaluated by an adult radiographic series including trauma oblique views. In younger patients, careful evaluation of occipitoatlantoaxial alignment and the prevertebral soft tissues is required for diagnosis and selection of additional imaging evaluation. (orig.)

  4. Cervical spine injuries in rugby players.

    Sovio, O M; Van Peteghem, P K; Schweigel, J F

    1984-03-15

    Nine patients with serious cervical spine injuries that occurred while they were playing rugby were seen in a British Columbia acute spinal cord injury unit during the period 1975-82. All the injuries had occurred during the "scrum" or the "tackle". Two of the patients were rendered permanently quadriplegic, and one patient died. There is a need for a central registry that would record all cervical spine injuries in rugby players as well as for changes in the rules of the game. PMID:6697282

  5. Palpation of the upper thoracic spine

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Vach, Kirstin; Manniche, Claus; Haghfelt, Torben; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated...... procedure. RESULTS: Using an "expanded" definition of agreement that accepts small inaccuracies (+/-1 segment) in the numbering of spinal segments, we found--based on the pooled data from the thoracic spine--kappa values of 0.59 to 0.77 for the hour-to-hour and the day-to-day intraobserver reliability with...

  6. Conspicuous carotenoid-based pelvic spine ornament in three-spined stickleback populationsoccurrence and inheritance

    CR Amundsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Reports on reddish carotenoid-based ornaments in female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus are few, despite the large interest in the species behaviour, ornamentation, morphology and evolution. We sampled sticklebacks from 17 sites in north-western Europe in this first extensive study on the occurrence of carotenoid-based female pelvic spines and throat ornaments. The field results showed that females, and males, with reddish spines were found in all 17 populations. Specimens of both sexes with conspicuous red spines were found in several of the sites. The pelvic spines of males were more intensely red compared to the females spines, and large specimens were more red than small ones. Fish infected with the tapeworm (Schistocephalus solidus had drabber spines than uninfected fish. Both sexes had red spines both during and after the spawning period, but the intensity of the red colour was more exaggerated during the spawning period. As opposed to pelvic spines, no sign of red colour at the throat was observed in any female from any of the 17 populations. A rearing experiment was carried out to estimate a potential genetic component of the pelvic spine ornament by artificial crossing and rearing of 15 family groups during a 12 months period. The results indicated that the genetic component of the red colour at the spines was low or close to zero. Although reddish pelvic spines seem common in populations of stickleback, the potential adaptive function of the reddish pelvic spines remains largely unexplained.

  7. Development and validation of a strategic repositioning model for defense and aerospace contractors

    Bers, John A.

    Strategic repositioning refers to the organized efforts of defense contractors to "reposition" a technology that they have developed for a defense sector customer into a civilian or commercial market. The strategic repositioning model developed here is a structural model: it seeks to isolate the factors that influence choice of strategy, which in turn influences the organization's performance. The model draws from the prior experience of contractors (through interviews and surveys) and companies in other sectors (through a review of the relevant published research). (1) Over all, the model accounted for 55% of the variance in financial performance of the sample and 35% for the underlying population. (2) Key success factors include a rigorous planning process, a target market in the growth (vs. incubation) stage, a priority on market leadership as well as financial return, the ability to operate in an ambiguous business environment, and a relatively short time horizon but strong corporate support. (3) The greatest challenges that a contractor is likely to encounter are understanding his new customers' buying practices, strong competition, and adapting his technology to their needs and price expectations. (4) To address these issues contractors often involve partners in their entry strategy, but partnerships of equals tend to be more difficult to bring off than direct entry strategies. (5) The two major target market categories--government and commercial--present different challenges. Commercial customers are more likely to resist doing business with the contractor, while contractors entering government and other noncommercial markets are more likely to encounter price resistance, low technical sophistication among customers, and difficulties reaching their customer base. (6) Despite these differences across markets, performance is not influenced by the target market category, nor by the type of product or service or the contractor's functional orientation (marketing, technology, or operations). (7) The absence of a difference in performance may be partly due to natural selection. Noncommercial markets tend to attract contractors with more deliberative, consultative, and process-oriented corporate cultures, while commercial markets tend to attract contractors with results-oriented, opportunistic cultures.

  8. EphB/syndecan-2 signaling in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    Ethell, I M; Irie, F; Kalo, M S; Couchman, J R; Pasquale, E B; Yamaguchi, Y

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that the cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-2 can induce dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons. We demonstrate here that the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylates syndecan-2 and that this phosphorylation event is crucial for syndecan-2 clustering and spin...... receptors play a physiological role in dendritic spine morphogenesis. Our observations suggest that spine morphogenesis is triggered by the activation of Eph receptors, which causes tyrosine phosphorylation of target molecules, such as syndecan-2, in presumptive spines....

  9. "What Sort of Person Ought I to Be?"--Repositioning EPs in Light of the Children and Families Bill (2013)

    Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The changes brought by the Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) code of practice: 0 to 25 years, 2014, is an opportunity for educational psychologists (EPs) to reposition ourselves so that we can improve our contribution to the services for children and young people with special educational needs (SENs) or a disability. Underpinning

  10. A Novel Technique for Repositioning Lower Eyelid Fat via the Transoral Approach in Association with Midface Lift

    Mofid, M. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background Orbital fat repositioning in association with subperiosteal midface elevation has been variably described via both the transconjunctival and skin muscle flap approaches. Poor visualization, middle and posterior lamellar cicatricial fibrosis, technical difficulty, and incomplete release are disadvantages commonly ascribed to the transconjunctival approach. Lower eyelid malposition and retraction also are commonly seen in association with skin muscle flap approaches. A simple techniq...

  11. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John; Gebbeken, Norbert; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the in uence of dened geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilizing ve parametrized musculoskeletal lumbar spine ...

  12. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John; Gebbeken, Norbert; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the in uence of dened geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilizing ve parametrized musculoskeletal lumbar spine ...

  13. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    Hui Qiao; Ming-Xing Li; Chang Xu; Hui-Bin Chen; Shu-Cheng An; Xin-Ming Ma

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have ...

  14. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    2010-10-01

    ...) of this section, the lumbar spine assembly shall flex by an amount that permits the thoracic spine to rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... to the thoracic spine box. Apply the force at any torso deflection rate between 0.5 and 1.5...

  15. High Grade Infective Spondylolisthesis of Cervical Spine Secondary to Tuberculosis

    Hadgaonkar, Shailesh; Shah, Kunal; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Spondylolisthesis coexisting with tuberculosis is rarely reported. There is a controversy whether spondylolisthesis coexists or precedes tuberculosis. Few cases of pathological spondylolisthesis secondary to tuberculous spondylodiscitis have been reported in the lumbar and lumbosacral spine. All cases in the literature presented as anterolisthesis, except one which presented as posterolisthesis of lumbar spine. Spondylolisthesis in the cervical spine is mainly degenerative and traumatic. Spon...

  16. Automatic Thresholding for Frame-Repositioning Using External Tracking in PET Brain Imaging

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Keller, Sune; Sibomana, Merence; Larsen, Rasmus; Roed, Bjarne; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Motion correction (MC) in positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging become of higher importance with increasing scanner resolution. Several motion correction methods have been suggested and so far the Polaris Vicra tracking system has been the preferred one for motion registration. We...... present an automated algorithm for dividing PET acquisitions into subframes based on the registered head motion to correct for intra-frame motion with the frame repositioning MC method. The method is tested on real patient data (five 11C-SB studies and five 11C-PIB studies) and compared with an image...... based registration method (AIR). Quantitative evaluation was done using a correlation measure. The study shows that MC improves the correlation of the PET images and that AIR performed slightly better than the Polaris Vicra. We found significant intra-frame motion of 1-5 mm in 9 frames but the...

  17. Persistent otolith dysfunction even after successful repositioning in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Kim, Eui-Joong; Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Yang, Tae-Ho; Yang, Si-Young

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate utricular and saccular function during the acute and resolved phases of BPPV, ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were studied in 112 patients with BPPV and 50 normal controls in a referral-based University Hospital. Ocular (oVEMPs) and cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) were induced using air-conducted sound (1000Hz tone burst, 100dB normal hearing level) at the time of initial diagnosis and 2 months after successful repositioning in patients with BPPV, and the results were compared with those of the controls. Abnormalities of cVEMPs and oVEMPs in patients with BPPV were prevalent and significantly higher compare to the healthy control group (pdamage to the otolith organs. PMID:26371697

  18. Development of the Korean Spine Database and Automatic Surface Mesh Intersection Algorithm for Constructing e-Spine Simulator

    Dongmin Seo; Hanmin Jung; Won-Kyung Sung; Dukyun Nam

    2014-01-01

    By 2026, Korea is expected to surpass the UN’s definition of an aged society and reach the level of a superaged society. With an aging population come increased disorders involving the spine. To prevent unnecessary spinal surgery and support scientific diagnosis of spinal disease and systematic prediction of treatment outcomes, we have been developing e-Spine, which is a computer simulation model of the human spine. In this paper, we present the Korean spine database and automatic surface mes...

  19. Rational drug repositioning guided by an integrated pharmacological network of protein, disease and drug

    Lee Hee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of drug discovery and development is time-consuming and costly, and the probability of success is low. Therefore, there is rising interest in repositioning existing drugs for new medical indications. When successful, this process reduces the risk of failure and costs associated with de novo drug development. However, in many cases, new indications of existing drugs have been found serendipitously. Thus there is a clear need for establishment of rational methods for drug repositioning. Results In this study, we have established a database we call “PharmDB” which integrates data associated with disease indications, drug development, and associated proteins, and known interactions extracted from various established databases. To explore linkages of known drugs to diseases of interest from within PharmDB, we designed the Shared Neighborhood Scoring (SNS algorithm. And to facilitate exploration of tripartite (Drug-Protein-Disease network, we developed a graphical data visualization software program called phExplorer, which allows us to browse PharmDB data in an interactive and dynamic manner. We validated this knowledge-based tool kit, by identifying a potential application of a hypertension drug, benzthiazide (TBZT, to induce lung cancer cell death. Conclusions By combining PharmDB, an integrated tripartite database, with Shared Neighborhood Scoring (SNS algorithm, we developed a knowledge platform to rationally identify new indications for known FDA approved drugs, which can be customized to specific projects using manual curation. The data in PharmDB is open access and can be easily explored with phExplorer and accessed via BioMart web service (http://www.i-pharm.org/, http://biomart.i-pharm.org/.

  20. Intradural hemangiopericytoma of the lumbar spine

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumor that can affect the lumbar spine; the intradural location is very infrequent. We report a 54-years-old man with lumbociatic pain during a period of several month, with a diagnosis of lumbar intradural hemangiopericytoma. This case report describes the results obtained by RMI and pathology. (author)

  1. Degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine

    Hidetoshi Nojiri; Soichi Uta; Yoshio Sakuma

    2009-01-01

    We describe two cases of degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine that caused a gradually progressive myelopathy. One case had a cyst that arose from the facet joint and the other case had a cyst that formed in the ligamentum flavum. The symptoms improved immediately after posterior decompression by cystectomy with laminoplasty.

  2. Stretching the Spines of Gymnasts: A Review.

    Sands, William A; McNeal, Jeni R; Penitente, Gabriella; Murray, Steven Ross; Nassar, Lawrence; Jemni, Monèm; Mizuguchi, Satoshi; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Gymnastics is noted for involving highly specialized strength, power, agility and flexibility. Flexibility is perhaps the single greatest discriminator of gymnastics from other sports. The extreme ranges of motion achieved by gymnasts require long periods of training, often occupying more than a decade. Gymnasts also start training at an early age (particularly female gymnasts), and the effect of gymnastics training on these young athletes is poorly understood. One of the concerns of many gymnastics professionals is the training of the spine in hyperextension-the ubiquitous 'arch' seen in many gymnastics positions and movements. Training in spine hyperextension usually begins in early childhood through performance of a skill known as a back-bend. Does practising a back-bend and other hyperextension exercises harm young gymnasts? Current information on spine stretching among gymnasts indicates that, within reason, spine stretching does not appear to be an unusual threat to gymnasts' health. However, the paucity of information demands that further study be undertaken. PMID:26581832

  3. X-Ray parameters of lumbar spine

    Otabek Ablyazov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of anatomic spinal structures, especially its relation-ship to the functions performed, is necessary to form a correct diagnosis. The anatomical structure of the vertebrae varies de-pending on the level of the spinal segment. Normal anatomical parameters, derived from bone structures of the spine, are roughly determined by X-ray method.This paper presents the results of the survey radiography of the lumbar spine in a straight line and lateral projections in 30 individ-uals without pathology spine, aged 21-60 years with frequently observed lumbar spinal stenosis stenosis. Applying X-ray method there were studied shape, height, and the contours of the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disc in the front (interpedicular and sagittal planes; there were measured dimensions of the lumbar canal and foramen holes in the same planes. Using X-ray method can fully identify the bone parameters of vertebral column. How-ever, the informativity of the method depends on knowledge of radiologist about topographic anatomical features of spine.

  4. Congenital spine anomalies: the closed spinal dysraphisms

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The term congenital spinal anomalies encompasses a wide variety of dysmorphology that occurs during early development. Familiarity with current terminology and a practical, clinico-radiologic classification system allows the radiologist to have a more complete understanding of malformations of the spine and improves accuracy of diagnosis when these entities are encountered in practice. (orig.)

  5. Anterior approaches to the upper thoracic spine

    The upper thoracic spine region is difficult to access from an anterior approach because of the surrounding bones (ribs, sternum and scapulae) and organs (heart, lung and great vessels). The outcomes of 37 consecutive cases with lesions in the upper thoracic spine region (T1-4) were reviewed to study surgical approaches to the upper thoracic spine. We used anterior approaches in 13 cases. A full sternotomy was performed in 6 cases (5 cases ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), 1 case herniated disc), a high thoracotomy was performed in 6 cases (3 cases herniated disc, 2 cases spinal cord tumor, 1 case TB spine), and a partial resection of a unilateral sternoclavicular joint was performed in 1 case. A sternotomy is thought to be useful for OPLL in the T1-3 region, whereas a high thoracotomy is recommended for unilateral anterior lesions and lesions extending below the T3/4 level. Reconstructive CT sagittal images can supply useful anatomical informations for selecting a surgical approach. (author)

  6. Anatomy of large animal spines and its comparison to the human spine: a systematic review

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Wang, Xiang-yang; Xu, Hua-Zi; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Yi-fei

    2009-01-01

    Animal models have been commonly used for in vivo and in vitro spinal research. However, the extent to which animal models resemble the human spine has not been well known. We conducted a systematic review to compare the morphometric features of vertebrae between human and animal species, so as to give some suggestions on how to choose an appropriate animal model in spine research. A literature search of all English language peer-reviewed publications was conducted using PubMed, OVID, Springe...

  7. Super-Brownian motion: Lp-convergence of martingales through the pathwise spine decomposition

    Murillo-Salas, A E Kyprianou A

    2011-01-01

    Evans (1992) described the semi-group of a superprocess with quadratic branching mechanism under a martingale change of measure in terms of the semi-group of an immortal particle and the semigroup of the superprocess prior to the change of measure. This result, commonly referred to as the spine decomposition, alludes to a pathwise decomposition in which independent copies of the original process `immigrate' along the path of the immortal particle. For branching particle diffusions the analogue of this decomposition has already been demonstrated in the pathwise sense, see for example Hardy and Harris (2009). The purpose of this short note is to exemplify a new {\\it pathwise} spine decomposition for supercritical super-Brownian motion with general branching mechanism (cf. Kyprianou et al. (2010)) by studying $L^p$ convergence of naturally underlying additive martingales in the spirit of analogous arguments for branching particle diffusions due to Hardys and Harris (2009). Amongst other ingredients, the Dynkin-K...

  8. Cervical spine injury in child abuse: report of two cases

    Pediatric cervical spine injuries have rarely been reported in the setting of child abuse. We report two cases of unsuspected lower cervical spine fracture-dislocation in twin infant girls who had no physical examination findings to suggest cervical spine injury. Classic radio-graphic findings of child abuse were noted at multiple other sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging proved to be valuable in both the initial evaluation of the extent of cervical spine injury and in following postoperative changes. The unexpected yet devastating findings in these two cases further substantiate the importance of routine evaluation of the cervical spine in cases of suspected child abuse. (orig.)

  9. Does applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduce cervical spine radiography rates in alert patients with blunt trauma to the neck? A retrospective analysis

    A cautious outlook towards neck injuries has been the norm to avoid missing cervical spine injuries. Consequently there has been an increased use of cervical spine radiography. The Canadian Cervical Spine rule was proposed to reduce unnecessary use of cervical spine radiography in alert and stable patients. Our aim was to see whether applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduced the need for cervical spine radiography without missing significant cervical spine injuries. This was a retrospective study conducted in 2 hospitals. 114 alert and stable patients who had cervical spine radiographs for suspected neck injuries were included in the study. Data on patient demographics, high risk & low risk factors as per the Canadian Cervical Spine rule and cervical spine radiography results were collected and analysed. 28 patients were included in the high risk category according to the Canadian Cervical Spine rule. 86 patients fell into the low risk category. If the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied, there would have been a significant reduction in cervical spine radiographs as 86/114 patients (75.4%) would not have needed cervical spine radiograph. 2/114 patients who had significant cervical spine injuries would have been identified when the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied. Applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule for neck injuries in alert and stable patients would have reduced the use of cervical spine radiographs without missing out significant cervical spine injuries. This relates to reduction in radiation exposure to patients and health care costs

  10. Clinical development of a failure detection-based online repositioning strategy for prostate IMRT--Experiments, simulation, and dosimetry study

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate clinic-ready adaptive imaging protocols for online patient repositioning (motion tracking) during prostate IMRT using treatment beam imaging supplemented by minimal, as-needed use of on-board kV. Methods: The authors examine the two-step decision-making strategy: (1) Use cine-MV imaging and online-updated characterization of prostate motion to detect target motion that is potentially beyond a predefined threshold and (2) use paired MV-kV 3D localization to determine overthreshold displacement and, if needed, reposition the patient. Two levels of clinical implementation were evaluated: (1) Field-by-field based motion correction for present-day linacs and (2) instantaneous repositioning for new-generation linacs with capabilities of simultaneous MV-kV imaging and remote automatic couch control during treatment delivery. Experiments were performed on a Varian Trilogy linac in clinical mode using a 4D motion phantom programed with prostate motion trajectories taken from patient data. Dosimetric impact was examined using a 2D ion chamber array. Simulations were done for 536 trajectories from 17 patients. Results: Despite the loss of marker detection efficiency caused by the MLC leaves sometimes obscuring the field at the marker's projected position on the MV imager, the field-by-field correction halved (from 23% to 10%) the mean percentage of time that target displacement exceeded a 3 mm threshold, as compared to no intervention. This was achieved at minimal cost in additional imaging (average of one MV-kV pair per two to three treatment fractions) and with a very small number of repositionings (once every four to five fractions). Also with low kV usage (∼2/fraction), the instantaneous repositioning approach reduced overthreshold time by more than 75% (23% to 5%) even with severe MLC blockage as often encountered in current IMRT and could reduce the overthreshold time tenfold (to <2%) if the MLC blockage problem were relieved. The information acquired for repositioning using combined MV-kV images was found to have submillimeter accuracy. Conclusions: This work demonstrated with a current clinical setup that substantial reduction of adverse targeting effects of intrafraction prostate motion can be realized. The proposed adaptive imaging strategy incurs minimal imaging dose to the patient as compared to other stereoscopic imaging techniques.

  11. Clinical development of a failure detection-based online repositioning strategy for prostate IMRT--Experiments, simulation, and dosimetry study

    Liu Wu; Qian Jianguo; Hancock, Steven L.; Xing, Lei; Luxton, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States) and Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate clinic-ready adaptive imaging protocols for online patient repositioning (motion tracking) during prostate IMRT using treatment beam imaging supplemented by minimal, as-needed use of on-board kV. Methods: The authors examine the two-step decision-making strategy: (1) Use cine-MV imaging and online-updated characterization of prostate motion to detect target motion that is potentially beyond a predefined threshold and (2) use paired MV-kV 3D localization to determine overthreshold displacement and, if needed, reposition the patient. Two levels of clinical implementation were evaluated: (1) Field-by-field based motion correction for present-day linacs and (2) instantaneous repositioning for new-generation linacs with capabilities of simultaneous MV-kV imaging and remote automatic couch control during treatment delivery. Experiments were performed on a Varian Trilogy linac in clinical mode using a 4D motion phantom programed with prostate motion trajectories taken from patient data. Dosimetric impact was examined using a 2D ion chamber array. Simulations were done for 536 trajectories from 17 patients. Results: Despite the loss of marker detection efficiency caused by the MLC leaves sometimes obscuring the field at the marker's projected position on the MV imager, the field-by-field correction halved (from 23% to 10%) the mean percentage of time that target displacement exceeded a 3 mm threshold, as compared to no intervention. This was achieved at minimal cost in additional imaging (average of one MV-kV pair per two to three treatment fractions) and with a very small number of repositionings (once every four to five fractions). Also with low kV usage ({approx}2/fraction), the instantaneous repositioning approach reduced overthreshold time by more than 75% (23% to 5%) even with severe MLC blockage as often encountered in current IMRT and could reduce the overthreshold time tenfold (to <2%) if the MLC blockage problem were relieved. The information acquired for repositioning using combined MV-kV images was found to have submillimeter accuracy. Conclusions: This work demonstrated with a current clinical setup that substantial reduction of adverse targeting effects of intrafraction prostate motion can be realized. The proposed adaptive imaging strategy incurs minimal imaging dose to the patient as compared to other stereoscopic imaging techniques.

  12. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine

    Alyas, F.; Connell, D. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: asif.saifuddin@rnoh.nhs.uk

    2008-09-15

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples.

  13. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples

  14. Morbidity and mortality of complex spine surgery

    Karstensen, Sven; Bari, Tanvir; Gehrchen, Poul Martin; Street, John; Dahl, Benny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Most literature on complications in spine surgery has been retrospective or based on national databases with few variables. The Spine AdVerse Events Severity (SAVES) system has been found reliable and valid in two Canadian centers, providing precise information regarding all...... adverse events (AEs). PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the mortality and examine the incidence of morbidity in patients undergoing complex spinal surgery, including pediatric patients, and to validate the SAVES system in a European population. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, consecutive cohort study...... was conducted using the SAVES version 2010 in the period from January 1, 2013 until December 31, 2013. A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients operated from November 1, 2011 until October 31, 2012 for comparison. PATIENT SAMPLE: Patients undergoing spinal surgery at a tertiary referral...

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for solitary spine metastasis

    Lee, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Mison [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi Jo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Eulji Universtiy School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    A clear consensus has not been established regarding the best treatment for solitary bone metastasis. Here, we reviewed the medical records of patients with a controlled primary malignancy who had only solitary spine metastasis without metastasis to the extraspinal bone or viscera and underwent treatment between April 2007 and December 2012 with stereotactic body radiosurgery using CyberKnife, with a total dose of 24 Gy in three to four fractions. During that time, there were only four cases. This was effective in each case, and all the four patients had no local failure and remained alive at a median follow-up of 68 months (range, 64 to 80 months). Although our experience is limited, this study suggests that stereotactic body radiotherapy could be a feasible, safe, effective, and noninvasive alternative treatment for solitary spine metastasis in patients who are medically inoperable or unsuitable for surgery.

  16. Detailed sectional anatomy of the spine

    Morphologic studies on the human spine constitute a special challenge because of the spine's complex topographic anatomy and the intimate relationship between the supporting skeleton and the contiguous soft tissues (muscles, discs, joint capsules) as well as the neurovascular contents of the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina. The improving resolution and multiplanar image reformatting capabilities of modern CT scanners call for accurate anatomic reference material. Such anatomic images should be available without distortion, in natural colors, and in considerable detail. The images should present the anatomy in the correct axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and should also be sufficiently closely spaced so as to follow the thin cuts of modern CT scanners. This chapter details one of several recent attempts to correlate gross anatomy with the images depicted by high-resolution CT. The methods of specimen preparation, sectioning, and photographing have been documented elsewhere

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for solitary spine metastasis

    A clear consensus has not been established regarding the best treatment for solitary bone metastasis. Here, we reviewed the medical records of patients with a controlled primary malignancy who had only solitary spine metastasis without metastasis to the extraspinal bone or viscera and underwent treatment between April 2007 and December 2012 with stereotactic body radiosurgery using CyberKnife, with a total dose of 24 Gy in three to four fractions. During that time, there were only four cases. This was effective in each case, and all the four patients had no local failure and remained alive at a median follow-up of 68 months (range, 64 to 80 months). Although our experience is limited, this study suggests that stereotactic body radiotherapy could be a feasible, safe, effective, and noninvasive alternative treatment for solitary spine metastasis in patients who are medically inoperable or unsuitable for surgery.

  18. Biomechanical Comparison Of Intact Lumbar Lamp Spine And Endoscopic Discectomized Lamp Spine

    Ahmet Karakasli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Purpose of current study was biomechanical comparison of changes wrought on motion segments after minimally invasive percutan endoscopic discectomized and intact spine. Materials and Methods: We prepared ten fresh-frozen lamb spines were used for this study. The spine of each specimen was dissected between L4-L5. The biomechanical tests for both intact spine and discectomized spine were performed by using axial compression testing machine (AG-I 10 kN, Shimadzu, Japanese. The axial compression was applied to all specimens with the loading speed of 5 mm/min. 8400 N/mm moment was applied to each specimen to achieve flexion and extension motions, right and left bending by a specially designed fixture. Results: In axial compression and flexion tests, the specimens were more stable according to displacement values. The displacement values of sectioned specimens were closer to intact specimens. Only displacement values of left-bending anteroposterior test for both situations were significant (0.05 ;#8805; P. Conclusion: PTED hasn't biomechanical and cilinical disadvantages. Endoscopic discectomy hadn't any disadvantages in stability. Only anterior-posterior displacement values of left bending test were statistically significant. We consider that cause of these results were due to the fact that all specimens had percutan transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED from left side.

  19. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Quiron Clinic, Avd. Blasco Ibanez, 14, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  20. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson χ2 test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  1. Spine revisited: Principles and parlance redefined

    Kothari M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A revised appreciation of the evolution and the nature of bone in general and of vertebrae in particular, allows revisiting the human spine to usher in some new principles and more rational parlance, that embody spine′s phylogeny, ontogeny, anatomy and physiology. Such an approach accords primacy to spine′s soft-tissues, and relegates to its bones a secondary place.

  2. Cutting Edge Imaging of THE Spine

    Vertinksy, A. Talia; Krasnokutsky, Michael V.; Augustin, Michael; Bammer, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Damage to the spinal cord may be caused by a wide range of pathologies and generally results in profound functional disability. Therefore, a reliable diagnostic workup of the spine is very important because even relatively small lesions in this part of the central nervous system can have a profound clinical impact. This is primarily due to the dense arrangement of long fiber tracts extending to and from the extremities within the spinal cord. Because of its inherent sensitivity to soft tissue...

  3. Dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine.

    Cakir, Balkan; Richter, Marcus; Huch, Klaus; Puhl, Wolfhart; Schmidt, Ren

    2006-08-01

    This study analyzed the outcome of patients treated with total disk replacement and posterior dynamic stabilization. For pathologies of different origin, dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine is a novel alternative to fusion surgery. Although a physiological reconstruction of the sagittal profile was not always achieved, improvement was seen in all subscales of the clinical outcome measures in both treatment groups. Posterior dynamic stabilization and total disk replacement are promising alternatives to fusion with acceptable morbidity for strictly defined indications. PMID:16924866

  4. Supratentorial Intraparenchymal Haemorrhages during Spine Surgery

    Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit; Chan, Johnny Ping Hon

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhages are rare but potentially life-threatening complications of spine surgery. Most reported cases involved subdural or cerebellar haemorrhages; supratentorial parenchymal bleeding is very uncommon. We report a 28-year-old woman who underwent resection of a thoracic Ewing's sarcoma, and developed fatal haemorrhages around her cerebral metastases during surgery. The clinical presentations, possible pathogenesis and potential preventive measures are discussed. Patients with...

  5. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization.

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine. PMID:26881098

  6. Barriers in the brain: resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization.

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and electric signals within the spine compartment. Such compartmentalization could minimize interspinal crosstalk and thereby support spine-specific synapse plasticity. However, to what extent compartmentalization is governed by spine morphology, and in particular the diameter of the spine neck, has remained unresolved. Here, we review recent advances in tool development - both experimental and theoretical - that facilitate studying the role of the spine neck in compartmentalization. Special emphasis is given to recent advances in microscopy methods and quantitative modeling applications as we discuss compartmentalization of biochemical signals, membrane receptors and electrical signals in spines. Multidisciplinary approaches should help to answer how dendritic spine architecture affects the cellular and molecular processes required for synapse maintenance and modulation. PMID:25538570

  7. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization

    Domnguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, Mara; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, Jos Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  8. Spine mineral change during osteoporosis therapy

    Powell, M.R.; Kolb, F.O.; Meier, K.A.; Schafer, S.A.

    1985-05-01

    Osteoporosis therapy has been handicapped by lack of means to quantitate the process. Dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) offers accurate (4%) and precise (2%) estimation of lumbar spine mineral. The authors followed 42 osteoporotics to determine response to therapy. There were 17 patients with normal menopause (NM), 4 with surgical menopause (SM), 3 with premature menopause (PM), and 18 with idiopathic osteoporoses (10). Intervals between DPA spine mineral estimation were 16.5 +- 5.2 mo. for NM, 14.3 +- 8.4 mo. for SM, 14.0 +- 7.5 mo. for PM and 16.7 +- 5.8 mo. for 10. Observed average percent change of spine mineral under therapy for those intervals was 5.2 +- 7.9% for NM, +7.3 +- 1.7% for SM, -2.4 +- 6.3% for PM and +1.8 +- 12.3% for 10. Therapy invariably was with Ca, low dose Premarin in NM and PM, often with phosphates in IO, sometimes with thiazides, often with Vitamin D and with occasional other modalities, including NaF. The authors find DPA is a cost-effective way to measure osteopenia in the osteoporeses, document response to therapy, identify need for therapy change when there is continued bone loss under therapy, and to encourage the patient's compliance with long-term, complex therapies.

  9. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. PMID:12151896

  10. Sports-related injuries of the spine

    Different sports show different patterns and frequencies of injuries, which are discussed in this paper. About 3% of all sports accidents relate to the spine. These injuries often have far-reaching consequences for the patients. A very early and extensive diagnosis of all changes is decisive for the start of an adequate therapy and thus for the prognosis of the injury. Radiological diagnosis is also of decisive importance for the documentation of late injuries and in the question of rehabilitation. Here special focus is put on MRT and CT diagnostics.A healthy spine of humans is normally able to resist all static and dynamic strains of the usual sports. However, anomalies and dysfunctions of the spine can reduce its capacity to resist strain. The recommendations of sporting activities are given according to the extent of deflection and the expected growth. The importance of radiology in primary diagnosis and in the follow-up due to typical changes like scoliosis, Morbus Scheuerman, spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis is discussed here as well. (orig.)

  11. Repositioning the patient: patient organizations, consumerism, and autonomy in Britain during the 1960s and 1970s.

    Mold, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how and why the patient came to be repositioned as a political actor within British health care during the 1960s and 1970s. Focusing on the role played by patient organizations, it is suggested that the repositioning of the patient needs to be seen in the light of growing demands for greater patient autonomy and the application of consumerist principles to health. Examining the activities of two patient groups-the National Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (NAWCH) and the Patients Association (PA)-indicates that while such groups undoubtedly placed more emphasis on individual autonomy, collective concerns did not entirely fall away. The voices of patients, as well as the patient, continued to matter within British health care. PMID:23811711

  12. A drug repositioning approach identifies tricyclic antidepressants as inhibitors of small cell lung cancer and other neuroendocrine tumors

    Jahchan, Nadine S.; Dudley, Joel T.; Mazur, Pawel K; Flores, Natasha; Yang, Dian; Palmerton, Alec; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Vaka, Dedeepya; Tran, Kim QT; Zhou, Margaret; Krasinska, Karolina; Riess, Jonathan W.; Neal, Joel W.; Khatri, Purvesh; Park, Kwon S

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine subtype of lung cancer with high mortality. We used a systematic drug-repositioning bioinformatics approach querying a large compendium of gene expression profiles to identify candidate FDA-approved drugs to treat SCLC. We found that tricyclic antidepressants and related molecules potently induce apoptosis in both chemonaïve and chemoresistant SCLC cells in culture, in mouse and human SCLC tumors transplanted into immunocompromised...

  13. Cervical spine models for biomechanical research.

    Panjabi, M M

    1998-12-15

    Biomechanical models have been used for the understanding of the basic normal function and dysfunction of the cervical spine and for testing implants and devices. Biomechanical models can be broadly categorized into four groups: 1) Physical models, made of nonanatomic material (e.g., plastic blocks), are often used for the testing of spinal instrumentation when only the device is to be evaluated. 2) In vitro models consisting of a cadaveric spine specimen are useful in providing basic understanding of the functioning of the spine. Human specimens are more suitable for these models than are animal specimens whenever anatomy, size (for instrumentation), and kinematics are important. Animal specimens are less costly, easier to obtain, and often have less variability but should be used with care because of the absence of anatomic fidelity with the human. 3) In vivo animal models provide the means to model living phenomena, such as fusion, development of disc degeneration, instability, and adaptive responses in segments adjacent to spinal instrumentation. Choosing the appropriate animal is important. The appropriate animal should have spinal loading, kinematics, kinetics, vertebral size, and healing-fusion rates as similar to those in humans as possible. For better interpretation of in vivo animal experimental results, in vitro biomechanical study using the same animal cadaveric specimen is useful but has not been used routinely. 4) Computer models are developed from mathematical equations that incorporate geometry and physical characteristics of the human spine and may be advantageously used for problems that are difficult to model by other means. Examples are the changes in disc and vertebral stresses in response to graded transection of facet joints and the study of changes in endplate loading caused by disc degeneration. Because these models are purely mathematical, their validation is essential. Validation is best achieved by first incorporating high-quality geometry and physical characteristics of the human spine and then comparing the model predictions with experimental observations. Sometimes an enthusiastic researcher may use a computer model beyond its validation boundary, making the model's predictions unreliable. In general, it is important to remember that a biomechanical model, similar to any other model, represents only a certain aspect of the real living human being. The aspect chosen for representation should be selected with great care. The model should be designed to answer specifically the question asked. Its predictions are valid only within the boundaries of assumptions and limitations that it incorporates. PMID:9879095

  14. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine

    Basic and clinical applications relating to air myelography of the cervical spine have already been studied and extensively been used as an adjuvant diagnostic method for diseases of the spine and the spinal cord. However, hardly any application and clinical evaluation have been made concerning gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The author examined X-ray findings of 183 cases with diseases of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine, including contral cases. Gas X-ray photography included simple profile, forehead tomography, sagittal plane, and CT section. Morphological characteristics of normal X-ray pictures of the throacic spine and the lumbar spine were explained from 54 control cases, and all the diameters of the subarachnoidal space from the anterior to the posterior part were measured. X-ray findings were examined on pathological cases, namely 22 cases with diseases of the throacic spine and 107 cases with diseases of the lumbar spine, and as a result these were useful for pathological elucidation of spinal cord tumors, spinal carries, yellow ligament ossification, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, hernia of intervertebral disc, etc. Also, CT gas myelography was excellent in stereoobservation of the spine and the spinal cord in spinal cord tumors, yellow ligament ossification, and spinal canal stenosis. On the other hand, it is not suitable for the diagnoses of intraspinal vascular abnormality, adhesive arachinitis, and running abnormality of the cauda equina nerve and radicle. Gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lambar spine, is very useful in clinics when experienced techniques are used in photographic conditions, and diagnoses are made, well understanding the characteristics of gas pictures. Thus, its application has been opened to selection of an operative technique, determination of operative ranges, etc. (J.P.N.)

  15. Repositioning template for mandibular reconstruction with fibular free flaps: an alternative technique to pre-plating and virtual surgical planning.

    Berrone, M; Crosetti, E; Succo, G

    2014-08-01

    Oral malignancies involving the mandibular bone require a complex reconstructive plan. Mandibular reconstruction with a fibular free flap is currently considered the best choice for functional and aesthetic rehabilitation after oncological surgery. This flap can be modelled with multiple osteotomies and can provide bone, muscle and skin for composite reconstruction. One of the most delicate aspects of mandibular reconstruction is the technique of bone modelling; the risk of prolonging the period of ischaemia and not restoring the correct maxillomandibular and occlusal relationships can ultimately lead to a higher rate of complications as well as poor aesthetic and functional results. Recently, there has been rising interest in virtual surgical planning and computer-assisted mandibular reconstruction in pre-operative planning; however, this is not always possible because of the costs involved and the set-up time for the entire procedure. In this paper, we present a simple and inexpensive technique for fibular free flap modelling and repositioning after segmental resection of the mandible; the technique entails the pre-operative preparation of a resin repositioning template on a stereolithographic model. This technique has been successfully applied in four cases: two cases underwent resection involving only the mandibular body, one case involving the mandibular body and symphysis and one case in which a ramus to ramus resection was performed. In this preliminary report, we show that the resin repositioning template is an easy, safe and useful tool for mandibular reconstruction with a fibular free flap. PMID:25210223

  16. Predictors of Success in the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome with Mandibular Repositioning Appliance: A Systematic Review

    Fernanda, Saffer; Jos Faibes Lubianca, Lubianca; Cassiano, Rsing; Caroline, Dias; Luciane, Closs.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome affects up to 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of adult women. It is associated with obesity. Objective The objective of this article is to review the literature to determine which factors best correlate with treatment success in patients with obstructive s [...] leep apnea syndrome treated with a mandibular repositioning appliance. Data Synthesis A search was performed of the PubMed, Cochrane, Lilacs, Scielo, and Web of Science databases of articles published from January 1988 to January 2012. Two review authors independently collected data and assessed trial quality. Sixty-nine articles were selected from PubMed and 1 from Cochrane library. Of these, 42 were excluded based on the title and abstract, and 27 were retrieved for complete reading. A total of 13 articles and 1 systematic review were considered eligible for further review and inclusion in this study: 6 studies evaluated anthropomorphic and physiologic factors, 3 articles addressed cephalometric and anatomic factors, and 4 studies evaluated variables related to mandibular repositioning appliance design and activation. All the studies evaluated had low to moderate methodologic quality and were not able to support evidence on prediction of treatment success. Conclusion Based on this systematic review on obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treatment, it remains unclear which predictive factors can be used with confidence to select patients suitable for treatment with a mandibular repositioning appliance.

  17. Target and peripheral dose from radiation sector motions accompanying couch repositioning of patient coordinates with the Gamma Knife Perfexion

    The GammaPlan treatment planning system (TPS) does not fully account for shutter dose when multiple shots are required to deliver a patients treatment. The unaccounted exposures to the target site and its periphery are measured in this study. The collected data are compared to a similar effect from the Gamma Knife model 4C. A stereotactic head frame was attached to a Leksell 16 cm diameter spherical phantom; using a fiducial-box, CT images of the phantom were acquired and registered in the TPS. Measurements give the relationship of measured dose to the number of repositions with the patient positioning system (PPS) and to the collimator size. An absorbed dose of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose line was prescribed to the target site and all measurements were acquired with an ionization chamber. Measured dose increases with frequency of repositioning and with collimator size. As the radiation sectors transition between the beam on and beam off states, the target receives more shutter dose than the periphery. Shutter doses of 3.530.04 and 1.590.04 cGy/reposition to the target site are observed for the 16 and 8 mm collimators, respectively. The target periphery receives additional dose that varies depending on its position relative to the target. The radiation sector motions for the Gamma Knife Perfexion result in an additional dose due to the shutter effect. The magnitude of this exposure is comparable to that measured for the model 4C

  18. Drug Repositioning and Pharmacophore Identification in the Discovery of Hookworm MIF Inhibitors

    Y Cho; J Vermeire; J Merkel; L Leng; X Du; R Bucala; M Cappello; E Lolis

    2011-12-31

    The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new pharmacophores. Hookworms are blood-feeding, intestinal nematode parasites that infect up to 600 million people worldwide. Vaccination with recombinant Ancylostoma ceylanicum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (rAceMIF) provided partial protection from disease, thus establishing a 'proof-of-concept' for targeting AceMIF to prevent or treat infection. A high-throughput screen (HTS) against rAceMIF identified six AceMIF-specific inhibitors. A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sodium meclofenamate, could be tested in an animal model to assess the therapeutic efficacy in treating hookworm disease. Furosemide, an FDA-approved diuretic, exhibited submicromolar inhibition of rAceMIF tautomerase activity. Structure-activity relationships of a pharmacophore based on furosemide included one analog that binds similarly to the active site, yet does not inhibit the Na-K-Cl symporter (NKCC1) responsible for diuretic activity.

  19. Repositioning the use of the Bible towards a mission-oriented theological education

    Adekunle O. Dada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It is an undeniable fact that mission remains the cardinal essence of the Church. However, in Africa and in Nigeria, the Church seems to have lost focus regarding the main reason for its existence, namely mission. One of the factors responsible for this may be the form of theological education in vogue. In view of this anomaly, this paper reflects on how the study of the Bible, which serves as the primary basis for theological education in some institutions, can be repositioned to enhance a mission-oriented theological education. The importance of proper interpretation of the Bible in enhancing missions can be premised on the fact that a sound biblical hermeneutics is prerequisite to the formulation of an effective and functional theology of missions. If our theology of mission is faulty, the practice cannot be anything but flawed. In view of this, the paper explores ways in which the Bible can be meaningfully studied in order to promote a mission-oriented theological education.

  20. From periphery to the centre: Towards repositioning churches for a meaningful contribution to public health care

    Vhumani Magezi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of communities in health care has gained prominence in the last few years. Churches as community structures have been identified as instrumental in health-care delivery. Whilst it is widely acknowledged that churches provide important health services, particularly in countries where there are poorly-developed health sectors, the role of churches in health care is poorly understood and often overlooked. This article discusses some causes of this lacuna and makes suggestions for repositioning churches for a meaningful contribution to health care. Firstly, the article provides a context by reviewing literature on the church and health care. Secondly, it clarifies the nature of interventions and the competencies of churches. Thirdly, it discusses the operational meaning of church and churches for assessing health-care contributions. Fourthly, it explores the health-care models that are discerned in church and health-care literature. Fifthly, it discusses the contribution of churches within a multidisciplinary health team. Sixthly, it proposes an appropriate motivation that should drive churches to be involved in health care and the ecclesiological design that underpins such health care interventions.

  1. Inversion of dynamically repositioned multi-axis electromagnetic data for ordnance characterization

    Keranen, Joe; Shubitidze, Fridon; Besaw, Lance; Casari, Matthew J.; Miller, Jonathan; Schultz, Gregory

    2011-06-01

    The challenges associated with removing UXO and explosive remnants of war have led to a variety of methods for detection and discrimination of buried metallic objects using time-domain electromagnetic induction (EMI). Recent work has shown that parameters recovered from physics-based inversions can discriminate and classify buried ordnance from non-ordnance. We present results of applying advanced processing to data from a dynamically repositioned multiaxis EMI instrument. Data are collected using an adaptive sampling process to find the center of the anomaly and collect minimal data while maintaining model fidelity. An ortho-normalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS) model is used to resolve various targets at different depths. The ONVMS model is a generalized volume dipole model, with the single dipole model being a special limiting case. Using the ONVMS model, an object's response to a sensor's primary magnetic field is modeled mathematically by a set of equivalent magnetic dipoles distributed inside a volume containing the object. We assess the utility and veracity of the dynamic sampling strategy coupled with the ONVMS model on data acquired over a set of calibration and simulant targets. Rapid target characterization codes are aggregated into a software package with particular focus on ease of use for non-expert users.

  2. The Effectiveness of a Modified Type of the Mandibular Repositioning Device on the Elimination of Snoring

    B. Ebadian

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Snoring is the most common sleep disorder which in itself may only be viewed as an obnoxious disturbance in human society; however it must be considered a potential indicator of significant medical problems such as: hypertension,obstructive sleep apnea, cerebrovascular infarction and ischemic heart disease.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified type of Mandibular Repositioning Device (MRD splint on the treatment of snoring.Materials and Methods: This before and after interventional study was carried out on 15 patients (4 females and 11 males who suffered from snoring. All subjects had no upper airway obstruction. Maxillary and mandibular splints were made by clear heatcuredacrylic resin. A special screw connected to the anterior portion of the maxillary splint and an orthodontic wire No 1 positioned on the lower splint. The devices were tried in the mouth and relined with a softliner. This appliance was designed to protrude the mandible by use of a screw system. Snoring grades were detemined before, and 3weeks after treatment with the MRD. Data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon test.Results: A significant difference was observed between the snoring severity, before and after using the splints (P = 0.001.Conclusion: The present study showed this modified type of splint can be effective in decreasing or eliminating snoring. The effectiveness of the splint in the treatment of snoring could be related to its role of widening the upper airway.

  3. Tubular foreign body or stent: safe retrieval or repositioning using the coaxial snare technique

    To evaluate the utility and advantages of the coaxial snare technique in the retrieval of tubular foreign bodies. Using the coaxial snare technique, we attempted to retrieve tubular foreign bodies present in seven patients. The bodies were either stents which were malpositioned or had migrated from their correct position in the vascular system (n=2), a fragmented venous introducer sheath (n=1), fragmented drainage catheters in the biliary tree (n=2), or fractured external drainage catheters in the urinary tract (n=2). After passing a guidewire and/or a dilator through the lumina of these foreign bodies, we introduced a loop snare over the guidewire or dilator, thus capturing and retrieving them. In all cases, it was possible to retrieve or reposition the various items, using a minimum-sized introducer sheath or a tract. No folding was involved. In no case were surgical procedures required, and no complications were encountered. The coaxial snare technique, an application of the loop snare technique, is a useful and safe method for the retrieval of tubular foreign bodies, and one which involves minimal injury to the patient

  4. Argus II retinal prosthesis malrotation and repositioning with intraoperative optical coherence tomography in a posterior staphyloma

    Seider, Michael I; Hahn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Argus II retinal prosthesis may improve visual function in patients with severe vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa. Optimal centration of the electrode array over the macula is important to achieve optimal visual results. Argus tack malrotation is a novel entity that may be encountered during placement, especially in patients with posterior staphyloma. Methods Retrospective case review. Results During tacking of the electronics array a clockwise rotation occurred resulting in malposition. We hypothesize this was secondary to undue rotation or posterior pressure applied during tack insertion in conjunction with placement over a previously unrecognized posterior staphyloma. Intraoperative optical coherence tomography, because of the cross-sectional images provided, was helpful in visualizing the distance between the electronics array and the retina, which was difficult to assess using the surgical microscope alone. Repositioning was achieved by adjusting the tack without removal. The patient experienced an improvement in vision as a result of the surgery. Conclusion Malrotation may occur when tacking the Argus II prosthesis, and the presence of a posterior staphyloma may increase this risk. It is important to differentiate malrotation from tack misplacement the former may be addressed with array unrotation or partial tack withdrawal and the latter may require tack removal and reinsertion. Also, intraoperative optical coherence tomography may be helpful in characterizing electronics array position during surgery. PMID:26648688

  5. Argus II retinal prosthesis malrotation and repositioning with intraoperative optical coherence tomography in a posterior staphyloma

    Seider MI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael I Seider, Paul Hahn Duke University Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA Introduction: The Argus II retinal prosthesis may improve visual function in patients with severe vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa. Optimal centration of the electrode array over the macula is important to achieve optimal visual results. Argus tack malrotation is a novel entity that may be encountered during placement, especially in patients with posterior staphyloma.Methods: Retrospective case review.Results: During tacking of the electronics array a clockwise rotation occurred resulting in malposition. We hypothesize this was secondary to undue rotation or posterior pressure applied during tack insertion in conjunction with placement over a previously unrecognized posterior staphyloma. Intraoperative optical coherence tomography, because of the cross-sectional images provided, was helpful in visualizing the distance between the electronics array and the retina, which was difficult to assess using the surgical microscope alone. Repositioning was achieved by adjusting the tack without removal. The patient experienced an improvement in vision as a result of the surgery.Conclusion: Malrotation may occur when tacking the Argus II prosthesis, and the presence of a posterior staphyloma may increase this risk. It is important to differentiate malrotation from tack misplacement the former may be addressed with array unrotation or partial tack withdrawal and the latter may require tack removal and reinsertion. Also, intraoperative optical coherence tomography may be helpful in characterizing electronics array position during surgery. Keywords: Argus, retinitis pigmentosa, retinal tack

  6. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    Fernndez-de-Las-Peas, Csar; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  7. Posterior transpedicular corpectomy for malignant cervical spine tumors

    Eleraky, Mohammed; Setzer, Matthias; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess surgical clinical and radiographic outcomes of using a posterior transpedicular approach (posterolateral) for ventral malignant tumors of the cervical spine. Access to ventral lesions of the cervical spine can be challenging in patients with malignant tumors. Anterior approaches are the gold standard for ventral pathology in the cervical spine, however, there are cases, where a posterior approach is indicated due to multilevel disease, previous radiation, ...

  8. Paget's disease of the spine: Unusual features and complications

    Paget's disease of bone is a common disorder, with the spine being involved in over 50% of cases. This pictorial review illustrates unusual features and complications of the disease as related to the spine. Unusual features include location in the atlanto-axial region, lytic vertebral Paget's disease and Pagetic ankylosis. Complications related to the spine are mainly neurological due to spinal stenosis, compression fractures and sarcomatous degeneration

  9. Flexible Robotic Spine Actuated by Shape Memory Alloy

    Shiquan Wang; Qiuguo Zhu; Rong Xiong; Jian Chu

    2014-01-01

    A flexible robotic spine actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) can achieve both bending motion and impact absorption, which will allow robots to realize a variety of postures. In this paper, the robotic spine is designed and simplified into a multi-segment dynamic model based on several verified assumptions. The SMA wire is modelled using the Seelecke-Muller-Acenbach theory. An iterative algorithm is developed to address the external forces distributed along the spine and compute the spine’s b...

  10. Helical tomotherapy for spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal malignancies

    Choi, Yunseon; Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae; Han, Hee Ji; Baek, Jonggeal; Seong, Jinsil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the treatment effectiveness and proper radiation dose of helical tomotherapy (HT) in spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal cancers. Materials and Methods From 2006 to 2010, 20 gastrointestinal cancer patients were treated with HT for spine oligometastases (31 spine lesions). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was the tumor evident from magnetic resonance imaging images fused with simulation computed tomography images. Clinical target volume (CTV) encompassed invol...

  11. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Koplyay, Peter; Jeffrey Carr, J.; Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest Univ. School of Medicine, Winston-salem (United States)

    2001-04-01

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm{sup 2} in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm{sup 2} and 0.765g/cm{sup 2}. Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures.

  12. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm2 in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm2 and 0.765g/cm2. Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures

  13. Biomechanical in vitro evaluation of the complete porcine spine in comparison with data of the human spine.

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Geppert, Jürgen; Kienle, Annette

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide quantitative biomechanical properties of the whole porcine spine and compare them with data from the literature on the human spine. Complete spines were sectioned into single joint segments and tested in a spine tester with pure moments in the three main anatomical planes. Range of motion, neutral zone and stiffness parameters of the spine were determined in flexion/extension, right/left lateral bending and left/right axial rotation. Comparison with data of the human spine reported in the literature showed that certain regions of the porcine spine exhibit greater similarities than others. The cervical area of C1-C2 and the upper and middle thoracic sections exhibited the most similarities. The lower thoracic and the lumbar area are qualitatively similar to the human spine. The remaining cervical section from C3 to C7 appears to be less suitable as a model. Based on the biomechanical similarities of certain regions of the porcine and human spines demonstrated by this study results, it appears that the use of the porcine spine could be an alternative to human specimens in the field of in vitro research. However, it has to be emphasized that the porcine spine is not a suitable biomechanics surrogate for all regions of the human spinal column, and it should be carefully considered whether other specimens, for example from the calf or sheep spine, represent a better alternative for a specific scientific question. It should be noted that compared with human specimens each animal model always only represents a compromise. PMID:21674213

  14. Percutaneous spine injection: considerations for improving treatment

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, In Sook; Choi, Jung Ah; Yoon, Chang Jin; Hwang, Sung Il; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Young Hwan; Hong, Sung Hwan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    To discuss the causes of treatment failure in percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radiculopathy by analyzing patients who have experienced negative treatment effect on their first visit and a positive treatment effect on their second visit. The authors reviewed the cases of 24 patients who visited the pain intervention outpatient department in our hospital due to back pain or radiculopathy. All patients reviewed experienced a negative treatment effect following their first spine injection, but a positive treatment effect following the second injection. The dates of the cases range from June 2003 to May 2004. Two radiologists analyzed the possible causes of the negative treatment effect following the first injection therapies by considering clinical aspects as well as reviewing radiological images. The most common condition was the presence of the change in the level of the second selective nerve root block (n=13). In seven cases, the methods for administering the injections were changed to facet block (n=2), midline epidural block (n=1), selective nerve root block (n=3) and caudal epidural block (n=1). In four cases, there were no changes in the methods for administering the injections nor were there any changes in the level of the selective nerve root block between first and second visit. In those cases, after reviewing spot radiographs performed during injection, we attributed the causes of failure of injection therapy to an inappropriate distribution of drugs. We can improve the effect of percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radioculopathy by determining the exact level of perineural root block, trying alternative methods, and insuring a good distribution of the injected drugs.

  15. Percutaneous spine injection: considerations for improving treatment

    To discuss the causes of treatment failure in percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radiculopathy by analyzing patients who have experienced negative treatment effect on their first visit and a positive treatment effect on their second visit. The authors reviewed the cases of 24 patients who visited the pain intervention outpatient department in our hospital due to back pain or radiculopathy. All patients reviewed experienced a negative treatment effect following their first spine injection, but a positive treatment effect following the second injection. The dates of the cases range from June 2003 to May 2004. Two radiologists analyzed the possible causes of the negative treatment effect following the first injection therapies by considering clinical aspects as well as reviewing radiological images. The most common condition was the presence of the change in the level of the second selective nerve root block (n=13). In seven cases, the methods for administering the injections were changed to facet block (n=2), midline epidural block (n=1), selective nerve root block (n=3) and caudal epidural block (n=1). In four cases, there were no changes in the methods for administering the injections nor were there any changes in the level of the selective nerve root block between first and second visit. In those cases, after reviewing spot radiographs performed during injection, we attributed the causes of failure of injection therapy to an inappropriate distribution of drugs. We can improve the effect of percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radioculopathy by determining the exact level of perineural root block, trying alternative methods, and insuring a good distribution of the injected drugs

  16. 78 FR 36306 - Proposed Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits...

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits... (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During the comment... forms of information technology. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: (Neck (Cervical Spine)...

  17. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... oira_submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-- NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  18. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  19. Surgical Site Infections After Pediatric Spine Surgery.

    Floccari, Lorena V; Milbrandt, Todd A

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal deformity surgery is a complication in the pediatric population resulting in high morbidity and cost. Despite modern surgical techniques and preventative strategies, the incidence remains substantial, especially in the neuromuscular population. This review focuses on recent advancements in identification of risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for acute and delayed pediatric spine infections. It reviews recent literature, including the best practice guidelines for infection prevention in high-risk patients. Targets of additional research are highlighted to assess efficacy of current practices to further reduce risk of SSI in pediatric patients with spinal deformity. PMID:26772947

  20. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    Cha, Jang-Gyu; Hong, Hyun-Sook [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Koh, Yoon-Woo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hee-Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Jung-Mi [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  1. Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Hestbæk, Lise

    Title Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire Authors & Affiliations Henrik Hein Lauridsen1, Lise Hestbæk1,2 1. Research Unit for Clinical Biomechanics, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Clinical Locomotion Network, Campusvej 55, DK-5230...... model of Wilson and Cleary (1995) and divided the YSQ into two parts: part one included spinal prevalence estimates (including pictures of spinal area) and part two questions regarding pain, activity restrictions, care seeking behaviour and influence of parental back trouble. During the developing phase...

  2. Organization of TNIK in dendritic spines.

    Burette, Alain C; Phend, Kristen D; Burette, Susan; Lin, Qingcong; Liang, Musen; Foltz, Gretchen; Taylor, Noël; Wang, Qi; Brandon, Nicholas J; Bates, Brian; Ehlers, Michael D; Weinberg, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2)- and noncatalytic region of tyrosine kinase (NCK)-interacting kinase (TNIK) has been identified as an interactor in the psychiatric risk factor, Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). As a step toward deciphering its function in the brain, we performed high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. We demonstrate here that TNIK is expressed in neurons throughout the adult mouse brain. In striatum and cerebral cortex, TNIK concentrates in dendritic spines, especially in the vicinity of the lateral edge of the synapse. Thus, TNIK is highly enriched at a microdomain critical for glutamatergic signaling. PMID:25753355

  3. Repositioning the Racial Gaze: Aboriginal Perspectives on Race, Race Relations and Governance

    Daphne Habibis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In Australia, public debate about recognition of the nation’s First Australians through constitutional change has highlighted the complexity and sensitivities surrounding Indigenous/state relations at even the most basic level of legal rights. But the unevenness of race relations has meant Aboriginal perspectives on race relations are not well known. This is an obstacle for reconciliation which, by definition, must be a reciprocal process. It is especially problematic in regions with substantial Aboriginal populations, where Indigenous visibility make race relations a matter of everyday experience and discussion. There has been considerable research on how settler Australians view Aboriginal people but little is known about how Aboriginal people view settler Australians or mainstream institutions. This paper presents the findings from an Australian Research Council project undertaken in partnership with Larrakia Nation Aboriginal Corporation. Drawing on in-depth interviews with a cross-section of Darwin’s Aboriginal residents and visitors, it aims to reverse the racial gaze by investigating how respondents view settler Australian politics, values, priorities and lifestyles. Through interviews with Aboriginal people this research provides a basis for settler Australians to discover how they are viewed from an Aboriginal perspective. It repositions the normativity of settler Australian culture, a prerequisite for a truly multicultural society. Our analysis argues the narratives of the participants produce a story of Aboriginal rejection of the White Australian neo-liberal deal of individual advancement through economic pathways of employment and hyper-consumption. The findings support Honneth’s arguments about the importance of intersubjective recognition by pointing to the way misrecognition creates and reinforces social exclusion.

  4. Anterior maxillary osteotomy: A technical note for superior repositioning: A bird wing segment

    V Sadesh Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a single piece bird wing osteotectomy segment during anterior maxillary osteotomy (AMO markedly reduces the duration of the surgery by nearly one-half of the time during bone removal with the conventional method thereby reducing the kinking effect to the palatal pedicle and gives good perfusion to the anterior segment. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at Karpaga Vinayaga Institute of Dental Sciences composing of 20 patients in which male: female ratio was 8:12, with a mean age of 25-30 years. This bird wing segment technique is performed following presurgical orthodontics under the guidance of clinical assessment of the gummy smile with an incisal show when the lip is at repose (vertical maxillary excess, especially for the calculated amount of superior repositioning. It is calculated by subtracting 2 mm from the total amount of an incisor show when the lip is at repose. The normal incisal show when the lip is at repose is 2 mm. After conventional primary AMO cut was performed, the precise calculated. Results: All our cases were tested positive for pulp vitality, no relapse, and minimal edema and with no changes in the bite or dentoalveolar relation followed until 1 year postoperatively indicating a good perfusion to the anterior segment and all the patients were satisfied esthetically and free of complaints. Conclusion: This simple technique allows the precise amount of calculated bone removal in a single piece from the nasal floor markedly reduces the duration of the surgery by nearly one-half of the time during bone removal with the conventional method there by reducing the kinking effect to the palatal pedicle and maintains good perfusion.

  5. Discovery of novel polyamine analogs with anti-protozoal activity by computer guided drug repositioning.

    Alberca, Lucas N; Sbaraglini, María L; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Medeiros, Andrea; Benitez, Diego; Comini, Marcelo; Talevi, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi that affects about 6 million people in Latin America. Despite its sanitary importance, there are currently only two drugs available for treatment: benznidazole and nifurtimox, both exhibiting serious adverse effects and limited efficacy in the chronic stage of the disease. Polyamines are ubiquitous to all living organisms where they participate in multiple basic functions such as biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, proliferation and cell differentiation. T. cruzi is auxotroph for polyamines, which are taken up from the extracellular medium by efficient transporters and, to a large extent, incorporated into trypanothione (bis-glutathionylspermidine), the major redox cosubstrate of trypanosomatids. From a 268-compound database containing polyamine analogs with and without inhibitory effect on T. cruzi we have inferred classificatory models that were later applied in a virtual screening campaign to identify anti-trypanosomal compounds among drugs already used for other therapeutic indications (i.e. computer-guided drug repositioning) compiled in the DrugBank and Sweetlead databases. Five of the candidates identified with this strategy were evaluated in cellular models from different pathogenic trypanosomatids (T. cruzi wt, T. cruzi PAT12, T. brucei and Leishmania infantum), and in vitro models of aminoacid/polyamine transport assays and trypanothione synthetase inhibition assay. Triclabendazole, sertaconazole and paroxetine displayed inhibitory effects on the proliferation of T. cruzi (epimastigotes) and the uptake of putrescine by the parasite. They also interfered with the uptake of others aminoacids and the proliferation of infective T. brucei and L. infantum (promastigotes). Trypanothione synthetase was ruled out as molecular target for the anti-parasitic activity of these compounds. PMID:26891837

  6. Stability of the Scoliotic Spine: Effect of Scoliosis Braces.

    Havey, Robert M; Gavin, Thomas M; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-04-01

    Orthotic treatment (braces) for scoliosis is best understood in light of the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis and the mechanics of spine stability. Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity confronted often by spine surgeons. With prompt recognition, treatment can be effective. PMID:26780611

  7. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more

  8. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the spine: a case report

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a synovial lesion of joints or tendon sheaths, characterized by villous and nodular overgrowth of the synovial membrane. It commonly occurs in synovial joints of the appendicular skeleton, particularly those of the knee and hip, but rarely affecting those of the spine. We report a case of PVNS of the lumbar spine mimicking epidural mass

  9. Micromechanics of Minor Cervical Spine Injuries

    Niederer, Peter F.; Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Muser, Markus H.; Walz, Felix H.

    Minor soft tissue injuries of the cervical spine are of increasing significance in public health. They may in particular be associated with long-term impairment. Such injuries are observed primarily in rear-end automobile collisions at low impact speeds and are attributed to a whiplash-type event. The question with respect to injury mechanisms of the cervical spine in cases of impacts of a low severity have raised controversial views in the past. Among proposed injury mechanisms, interactions between fluid and solid structures have been postulated: Viscous shear stresses or pressure gradients which arise in the deforming anatomical structures may have an adverse influence, e. g., on cellular membranes. In this communication, mathematical modeling approaches are presented which allow for a quantification of fluid/solid interactions under typical loading conditions of interest here. It is found, that the shear stresses caused by fluids and acting on accelerated surfaces of fluid-filled bodies depend largely on the size of the fluid space under consideration. Accelerations exhibit a stronger influence than their duration. It cannot be excluded that critical levels are reached even in a low speed impact scenario.

  10. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine

  11. Remote Sensing

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  12. Accuracy of combined maxillary and mandibular repositioning and of soft tissue prediction in relation to maxillary antero-superior repositioning combined with mandibular set back A computerized cephalometric evaluation of the immediate postsurgical outcome using the TIOPS planning system

    Donatsky, Ole; Bjørn-Jørgensen, Jens; Hermund, Niels Ulrich; Nielsen, Henrik; Holmqvist-Larsen, Michael; Nerder, Paul Henrik

    2009-01-01

    surgical planning system (TIOPS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Out of 100 prospectively and consecutively treated patients, 52 patients manifested dentofacial deformities requiring bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with maxillary antero-superior repositioning combined with mandibular set back and so were included...... positional changes were transferred to model surgery on a three-dimensional articulator system (SAM) and finally to surgery. Five to six weeks after surgery, the actually obtained hard and soft tissue profile changes were cephalometricly assessed. RESULTS: The mean accuracy of the planned and predicted hard...

  13. Upper spine morphology in hypophosphatemic rickets and healthy controls

    Gjørup, Hans; Sonnesen, Liselotte; Beck-Nielsen, Signe S; Haubek, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe upper spine morphology in adult patients with hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) compared with controls to assess differences in spine morphology in terms of severity of skeletal impact and to study associations between spine morphology and...... craniofacial morphology. MATERIAL/METHODS: The study population comprised 36 HR patients and 49 controls. The atlas and axis dimensions were measured on cephalograms, and the differences between the groups were estimated by regression analysis. The upper spine morphology was visually assessed to estimate the...... axis and the prevalence of the FUS were increased in HR patients compared with controls. Upper spine dimensions were associated with craniofacial dimensions, primarily in relation to the posterior cranial fossa....

  14. Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations

    Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements

  15. Children's experiences of the repositioning of their psychological birth order in a reconstituted family / Lizelle van Jaarsveld.

    Van Jaarsveld, Lizelle

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe children’s experiences of the repositioning of their psychological birth order in a reconstituted family. The aim of this study is also to contribute to a better understanding of this phenomenon to aid the parents of these children as well as professionals working with such families. The systems theory was used as the meta-theory of this study. Gestalt field theory formed the connection between the systems theory and Adlerian theory, to port...

  16. Self-repositioning of an embolized patent ductus arteriosus device--a nightmare turned into sweet dreams.

    Subramanian, Venkateshwaran; Kavassery Mahadevan, Krishnamoorthy; Sivasubramonian, Sivasankaran

    2015-05-01

    A 7-month-old boy was admitted for the device closure of symptomatic patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with moderate pulmonary hypertension. The PDA measured 4.2 mm with adequate ampulla. It was closed with an 8-6 mm Heart R device from pulmonary artery (PA) end. Post extubation, the device embolized to proximal descending thoracic aorta just distal to PDA ampulla. While attempting to snare from the venous side, the device self-repositioned to PDA. It was stable thereafter and patient was discharged after 2 days. We report a complication, which got self-corrected. PMID:25381681

  17. Strategic positioning and repositioning of oil companies in the upstream business: understanding the historical evolution of firms' strategic behavior

    This is the second article of a series whose objective is to use the analytical framework proposed by Michael Porter, from the University of Harvard, to study the global oil competition game and the competitive advantages of oil companies. The paper focuses on the historical changes in the positioning and behavior of various actors in the upstream oil industry. The authors start by describing the main oil actors and their initial strategic positioning before 1973. Then, the changes and the firm's strategic repositioning during the oil crisis in the 1970's and 1980's are analyzed. (author)

  18. Dosimetric implications of changes in patient repositioning and organ motion in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Purpose: To assess the influence of patient repositioning and organ motion on dose distribution within the prostate and the seminal vesicles (clinical target volume, (CTV)). Material and methods: Nine patients were simulated and treated in the supine position, with an empty bladder, and without immobilization devices. While on treatment, patients underwent weekly pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans under conditions identical to those at simulation. Patients were aligned using lasers on anterior and lateral skin tattoos, onto which lead markers were placed. After each CT scan (n=53) the CTV was redefined by contouring, and a new isocenter was obtained. A six-field technique was used. The field margins around the CTV were 20 mm in the cranio-caudal axis, and 13 mm in the other axes, except in the lateral fields where a 10 mm posterior margin was used. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for each organ were compared with those determined at simulation, using the notion of the proportional change in the area under the CTV-DVH curve resulting from a change in treatment plan (cDVH). Results: The reproducibility of the dose distribution was good for the prostate (%cDVH, mean±SD: -0.97±2.11%) and less than optimal for the seminal vesicles (%cDVH, mean±SD: -4.66±10.45%). When correlating prostate %cDVH variations with displacements of the isocenter in the Y axis (antero-posterior) the %cDVH exceeded (-)5% in only two dosimetries, both with an isocenter shift of >10 mm. For the seminal vesicles, however, ten out of 53 dosimetries showed a %cDVH exceeding (-) 5%. In nine of these ten dose distribution studies the posterior shift of the isocenter exceeded 8 mm. Conclusions: Precise targeting of prostate radiotherapy is primarily dependent on careful daily set-up and on random changes in rectal geometry. Margins no less than 10 mm around the prostate and at least 15 mm around the seminal vesicles are probably necessary to insure adequate target coverage with a six-field technique

  19. Glucose Sensing

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  20. Screening of the spine in adolescents

    Aartun, Ellen; Degerfalk, Anna; Kentsdotter, Linn; Hestbaek, Lise

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence on the reliability of clinical tests used for the spinal screening of children and adolescents is currently lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-rater reliability and measurement error of clinical tests commonly used when screening young spines....... METHODS: Two experienced chiropractors independently assessed 111 adolescents aged 12-14 years who were recruited from a primary school in Denmark. A standardised examination protocol was used to test inter-rater reliability including tests for scoliosis, hypermobility, general mobility, inter......, the LoA were quite wide compared with the range of assessments. CONCLUSION: Some clinical tests showed good, and some tests poor, reliability when applied in a spinal screening of adolescents. The results could probably be improved by additional training and further test standardization. This is the...

  1. Precision assessment of osteoporosis from spine radiographs

    Inter- and intra-observer variation in spine radiographs of 100 osteoporotic women and longitudinal change in roentgenologic status after 1 year of anti-osteoporotic treatment were assessed. The method applied was naked eye inspection, and a score system estimating severity of fractures-vertebral deformation score (VDS). Agreement was assessed by the Kappa coefficient corrected for agreement by change. The results showed a satisfactory inter- and intra-observer agreement for wedge (Kappa=0.72 and 0.90) and compression fractures (Kappa=0.60 and 0.92). The method proved less reliable for endplate fractures (Kappa=0.39 and 0.73). The authors think that the method of investigation is well suited for monitoring treatment effects in longitudinal studies. (author). 16 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  2. Giant cells reparative granuloma of the spine

    The giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG), was first described by Jaffe in 1953, which found it to be clinically and histopathologically different from the giant cell tumor. The GCRG accounts for 1.0 % of the osseous tumoral lesions, is more frequently found in females (68%) and in patients less than 30 years old (74%). It was believed that it only affected the jaw; it has been reported compromising other locations including the spine (7 cases). We report a case affecting the vertebral bodies of C2-C3 in a 10 years old, female patient, who was studied by plain film and MRI. The histological diagnosis was established at surgery, this report is the first one described in a cervical location and the second studied by MRI

  3. Congenital anomalies of the spine: radiologic findings

    Congenital anomalies of the spine are frequent and variable. Some are restricted to skeletal structures, while others involve combine neural tube defects or are associated with other multi-systemic disorders. Structural spinal anomalies can be classified according to their location: 1) the vertebral body, 2) the articular process, 3) the lamina with spinous process, 4) the pars interarticularis, 5) the facet joint, 6) the pedicle, or 7) other. Because of similarities between these congenital anomalies and (a) secondary changes involving infection or joint disease and (b) deformities resulting from trauma and uncertain tumorous conditions, significant confusion can occur during diagnosis. Moreover, since the anomalies often give rise to both functional impairment and cosmetic problem, appropriate treatment relies crucially on accurate diagnosis. The authors illustrate the pathogenesis and radiologic findings of the relatively common spinal anomalies confined to skeletal structures

  4. Solitary lymphoblastic lymphoma of the thoracic spine.

    Park, Dong Am; Park, Sang Gon; Kim, Seok Won

    2012-12-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma rarely originates from bone, and even more infrequently from a vertebral body. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and results from an abnormality in adaptive immune cells. A 27-year-old man presented with a two-month history of night sweats, weight loss, and severe back pain. Radiological studies demonstrated an osteolytic lesion compressing the subarachnoid space at the T11 level. Posterolateral fusion with decompression was performed and a pathologic examination confirmed lymphoblastic lymphoma of the B-cell precursor type. To our knowledge, this is the first report of solitary lymphoblastic lymphoma from B-cell precursors in of the thoracic spine. Herein, we discuss the presenting symptoms and the management of this rare case of lymphoblastic lymphoma. PMID:23346332

  5. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Mathiesen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A prospective observational quality assurance study was performed at Glostrup Hospital, Denmark, to describe patients undergoing spine surgery with regard to perioperative analgesic management, post-operative pain, opioid consumption and side effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... experienced acceptable pain levels, but instrumented lumbar fusion leads to moderate to severe pain levels and a relatively high opioid consumption. The scheduled standard pain management protocols were sparsely followed. Challenges exist in post-operative pain management as observed in previous surveys...... eligible for the study were identified consecutively from the operation chart. The following data were registered: post-operative visual analogue (VAS) pain score at rest and during mobilisation, opioid consumption for the first 24 h, other analgesics administered and side effects. RESULTS: A total of 87...

  6. Force sensing

    Sanders, David

    2007-01-01

    A young child can explore and learn and compensate for unknown dynamics by prodding, pushing, touching, grasping and feeling. Force sensing and software research could soon allow artificial mechanisms to do the same. Force sensing has its roots in strain gauges, piezoelectrics, Wheatstone bridges, automation, robotics, grippers and virtual reality. That force sensing research has now become commonplace and has expanded from those roots to include so much more: video games, athletic equipment,...

  7. Dual-photon densitometry of lumbar spine

    The method of measuring gamma radiation absorption (single-photon radiation, i.e., with a single radiation energy) was first applied to assess the contents of mineral substances in peripheral bones. The earlier and more marked lesions of the spine caused by osteoporosis led to the development of dual-photon densitometry, i.e., the differential assessment of absorption of gamma radiation with two energies. This allows to eliminate the contribution of soft tissues to radiation absorption (the source of radiation being gadolinium 153Gd). Equipment required for the procedure is more complex and most costly, the procedure itself more time consuming and technically more demanding. Various factors, most often changes of the spine with foci of increased density make it difficult or impossible to evaluate and use the results of this method in one third of patients with skeletal disorders (most frequently osteoporosis), including 50% of patients in the 60+ age group. Short-term reproducibility of the measurement is satisfactory: variation coefficients of repeat measurements in g.cm-1 and in g.cm-2 are less than 2%. The examinations of 183 controls (83 men, 100 women) indicated a drop in mineral content in L2 to L4 with age: in women from 25 to 30 years to old age with slight acceleration in the menopause, in men there was a decline only after the age of 60. In younger age groups the scatter of normal values was greater in men than in women. The bone density in g, in g.cm-1 as well as in g.cm-2 rises significantly from L2< L3< L4. Outside of the limited applicability of the method the experiences made are on the whole favorable. From the clinical point of view the most important aspect is the assessment of pathological findings. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs

  8. MRI of cervical spine injuries complicating ankylosing spondylitis

    The objective was to study characteristic MRI findings in cervical spine fractures complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Technical issues related to MRI are also addressed. A review of 6,774 consecutive cervical spine multidetector CT (MDCT) scans obtained during 6.2 years revealed 33 ankylosed spines studied for suspected acute cervical spine injury complicating AS. Of these, 20 patients also underwent MRI. On MRI, of these 20 patients, 19 had a total of 29 cervical and upper thoracic spine fractures. Of 20 transverse fractures traversing both anterior and posterior columns, 7 were transdiskal and exhibited less bone marrow edema than did those traversing vertebral bodies. One Jefferson's, 1 atlas posterior arch (Jefferson's on MDCT), 2 odontoid process, and 5 non-contiguous spinous process fractures were detectable. MRI showed 2 fractures that were undetected by MDCT, and conversely, MDCT detected 6 fractures not seen on MRI; 16 patients had spinal cord findings ranging from impingement and contusion to complete transection. Magnetic resonance imaging can visualize unstable fractures of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Paravertebral hemorrhages and any ligamentous injuries should alert radiologists to seek transverse fractures. Multiple fractures are common and often complicated by spinal cord injuries. Diagnostic images can be obtained with a flexible multipurpose coil if the use of standard spine array coil is impossible due to a rigid collar or excessive kyphosis. (orig.)

  9. Accelerometers for objective evaluation of physical activity following spine surgery.

    Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin; Maharaj, Monish M; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-04-01

    With the potential of bias from subjective evaluation scores in spine surgery, there is a need for practical and accurate quantitative methods of analysing patient recovery. In recent years, technologies such as accelerometers and global positioning systems have been introduced as potential objective measures for pain and symptoms following spine surgery. Overall, this perspective article aims to discuss and critique currently utilised methods of monitoring spine surgical outcomes. After analysing current modalities it will briefly analyse new potential methods before examining the place for accelerometers in the field of spine surgery. A literature review was performed on the use of accelerometers for objective evaluation of symptoms and disability after spine surgery, and perspectives are summarised in this article. Physical activity measurement with the use of accelerometers following spine surgery patients is practical and quantitative. The currently available accelerometers have the potential to transform the way functional outcomes from spine surgery are assessed. One key advantage is the collection of standardised objective measurements across studies. Future studies should aim to validate accelerometer data in relation to traditional measures of functional recovery, patient outcomes, and physical activity. PMID:26765766

  10. Testosterone modulation of dendritic spines of somatosensory cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Chen, Jeng-Rung; Wang, Tsyr-Jiuan; Lim, Seh-Hong; Wang, Yueh-Jan; Tseng, Guo-Fang

    2013-11-01

    Brain structures and functions are increasingly recognized to be directly affected by gonadal hormones, which classically determine reproductive functions and sexual phenotypes. In this regard, we found recently that ovariectomy trimmed the dendritic spines of female rat primary somatosensory cortical neurons and estradiol supplement reversed it. Here, we investigated whether in the male androgen also has a cortical modulatory effect. The dendritic arbors and spines of rat somatosensory cortical pyramidal neurons were studied following intracellular dye injection and three-dimensional reconstruction. Dendritic spines, but not length, of the layers III and V pyramidal neurons were found reduced at 2 weeks and rebounded slightly at 4 weeks and further at 8 and 24 weeks following castration, which, however, remained significantly fewer than those of the intact animals. Two weeks of osmotic pump-delivered testosterone treatment to animals castrated for 4 weeks replenished serum testosterone and reversed the densities of dendritic spines on these neurons to control animal levels. Androgen receptor appears to mediate this effect as its antagonist flutamide reduced the dendritic spines of normal adult rats while causing a mild feedback surge of serum testosterone. On the other hand, blocking the conversion of testosterone to estrogen with the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole failed to alter the dendritic spine densities in male adult rats. In conclusion, these results support our hypothesis that testosterone acts directly on the androgen receptor in males to modulate the dendritic spines of somatosensory cortical output neurons. PMID:23340667

  11. MRI features of hydatid disease of the spine

    Objective: To analyze the typical MRI findings and to evaluate the value of MRI in the diagnosis of hydatid disease of the spine. Methods: This retrospective study consisted of 16 patients with hydatidosis of the spine evaluated with MRI. All patients had surgery with histological diagnosis. MR myelography (MRM) was done in 4 eases, contrast-enhanced scan in 2 cases and perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) in 1 case. X-ray was performed in 8 cases and CT in 5 cases. Results: All 16 cases were diagnosed as hydatid disease with multicysts. Hydatid disease involved thoracic spine in 5 cases, lumbar spine in 4 cases, sacrum in 3 eases, lumbosacral spine in 2 cases and a combination of thoracic, lumbar spine and sacrum in 2 cases. MR imaging showed bone destruction with wedge shaped compression of single or multiple vertebra. The lesions were round in contour with different sizes and involved the bony spinal canal, appendix of vertebra and neighboring soft tissues. Cystic lesions with multiple daughter cysts demonstrated long T1 and long T2 abnormal signal intensity on MR imaging. On T2-weighted images, a hypointense rim was seen. Cystic lesions were better seen on T2 SPIR and MRM. Mild contrast enhancement of these lesions were seen. A single case showed iso-perfusion on PWI. Conclusions: MRI can demonstrate hydatid cysts in vertebra, spinal canal, paravertebral and neighboring soft tissue. MRI is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and treatment planning of hydatid disease of the spine. (authors)

  12. MRI of cervical spine injuries complicating ankylosing spondylitis

    Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Toeoeloe Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-09-15

    The objective was to study characteristic MRI findings in cervical spine fractures complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Technical issues related to MRI are also addressed. A review of 6,774 consecutive cervical spine multidetector CT (MDCT) scans obtained during 6.2 years revealed 33 ankylosed spines studied for suspected acute cervical spine injury complicating AS. Of these, 20 patients also underwent MRI. On MRI, of these 20 patients, 19 had a total of 29 cervical and upper thoracic spine fractures. Of 20 transverse fractures traversing both anterior and posterior columns, 7 were transdiskal and exhibited less bone marrow edema than did those traversing vertebral bodies. One Jefferson's, 1 atlas posterior arch (Jefferson's on MDCT), 2 odontoid process, and 5 non-contiguous spinous process fractures were detectable. MRI showed 2 fractures that were undetected by MDCT, and conversely, MDCT detected 6 fractures not seen on MRI; 16 patients had spinal cord findings ranging from impingement and contusion to complete transection. Magnetic resonance imaging can visualize unstable fractures of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Paravertebral hemorrhages and any ligamentous injuries should alert radiologists to seek transverse fractures. Multiple fractures are common and often complicated by spinal cord injuries. Diagnostic images can be obtained with a flexible multipurpose coil if the use of standard spine array coil is impossible due to a rigid collar or excessive kyphosis. (orig.)

  13. Vertebral locking lesion following cervical spine fracture in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Kuroiwa, Tomoyuki; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Sakaki, Kyohei; Inose, Hiroyuki; Tomizawa, Shoji; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kawabata, Shigenori; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Okawa, Atsushi

    2012-06-01

    Spine fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis frequently extend to all 3 columns, which can lead to displacement and deformity with severe instability. Cervical spine fractures occasionally cause severe kyphotic deformities, such as chin-on-chest deformities. In such cases, the patients typically exhibit a chronic progression of hyperkyphosis after the traumatic event. This article describes a unique case of ankylosing spondylitis associated with an acute chin-on-chest deformity following a spine fracture due to a vertebral locking lesion.A 60-year-old man fell while walking and sustained a compression fracture of the C6 vertebra. Two weeks later, the patient acutely developed an inability to raise his head, difficulties with chewing and swallowing, and a horizontal gaze. Radiographs demonstrated a severe kyphosis in the cervical spine with a locking lesion between the anterior wall of the C5 and C6 vertebrae. The patient also presented with neurological impairment in his hands. Because the anterior approach to the spine was anatomically impossible, halo traction was initially applied under a close observation of neurological symptoms. Three days after halo traction, release of the vertebral locking lesion and realignment of the spine were seen. The patient subsequently underwent spinal fusion using a combined anterior-posterior approach.Postoperatively, neurological dysfunction improved, and solid fusion was confirmed at 6 months. In cases of acute kyphotic deformity following cervical spine fracture in ankylosing spondylitis patients, halo traction followed by circumferential spine fusion is a safe and effective approach for improving the alignment and stability of the spine. PMID:22691645

  14. Reduced pressure for fewer pressure ulcers: can real-time feedback of interface pressure optimise repositioning in bed?

    Gunningberg, Lena; Carli, Cheryl

    2014-09-16

    The aim of this study was to (i) describe registered nurses' and assistant nurses' repositioning skills with regard to their existing attitudes to and theoretical knowledge of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention, and (ii) evaluate if the continuous bedside pressure mapping (CBPM) system provides staff with a pedagogic tool to optimise repositioning. A quantitative study was performed using a descriptive, comparative design. Registered nurses (n = 19) and assistant nurses (n = 33) worked in pairs, and were instructed to place two volunteers (aged over 70 years) in the best pressure-reducing position (lateral and supine), first without viewing the CBPM monitor and then again after feedback. In total, 240 positionings were conducted. The results show that for the same person with the same available pressure-reducing equipment, the peak pressure varied considerably between nursing pairs. Reducing pressure in the lateral position appeared to be the most challenging. Peak pressures were significantly reduced, based on visual feedback from the CBPM monitor. The number of preventive interventions also increased, as well as patients' comfort. For the nurses as a group, the knowledge score was 59·7% and the attitude score was 88·8%. Real-time visual feedback of pressure points appears to provide another dimension to complement decision making with respect to PU prevention. PMID:25224508

  15. Repositioning of Barcelona’s Image in the Light of a Redefinition of the Urban Tourism Planning Model

    Josep-Francesc Valls

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barcelona’s city tourism model over the last fifteen years has chalked up many successes in terms of soaring tourist numbers, overnight stays, cruise liner passengers, hotel beds and visits to priced sights. Growth in city breaks has soared to the point where Barcelona has become one of Europe’s most visited cities. But this growth has come at a heavy price: mass tourism, concentration in certain neighbourhoods, competition for space between tourists and residents, lack of adequate inter-modal transport. All of these problems threaten Barcelona’s competitive position. The paper reviews the city’s competitiveness, comparing Barcelona to ten other European cities. Starting out from a qualitative analysis of internal players and a Delphi Study with external players, we find thecity’s tourism model needs correcting. We also identify the vectors and most important factors for achieving this repositioning. The vectors reinforce the competitiveness concerning the model’s sustainability, integrated management and governance, and client orientation. The proposed strategic repositioning will allow Barcelona to continue competing with Europe’s main cities.

  16. Rugby injuries of the upper cervical spine. Case reports.

    Scher, A T

    1983-09-17

    Fractures and dislocations of the upper cervical spine (atlas and axis) differ markedly from those of the lower cervical spine (C3 - C7) because of the unique anatomy and function of these two vertebrae. Case reports of 4 rugby players who sustained serious injuries of the upper cervical spine are presented. The role of the high tackle in causing these injuries is described and the association of head and upper cervical spinal trauma is emphasized. The radiological management of the player with suspected injury is outlined. PMID:6623223

  17. Acquired pathology of the pediatric spine and spinal cord

    Palasis, Susan; Hayes, Laura L. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric spine pathology poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Acquired spine pathology often yields nonspecific signs and symptoms in children, especially in the younger age groups, and diagnostic delay can carry significant morbidity. This review is focused on some of the more common diagnostic dilemmas we face when attempting to evaluate and diagnose acquired pediatric spine anomalies in daily practice. An understanding of some of the key differentiating features of these disease processes in conjunction with pertinent history, physical exam, and advanced imaging techniques can indicate the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Vascular abnormalities of the spine: an imaging review.

    Boo, SoHyun; Hartel, James; Hogg, Jeffery P

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this educational article is to present a variety of vascular abnormalities of the spine to aid in recognition and accurate diagnosis. The lesions differ in clinical presentation, prognosis, and treatment. This has implications for patient care including treatment options. We provide an example-based illustrated glossary to help the reader identify varying types of vascular spine lesions. Collected cross-sectional and angiographic imaging of the spine from our tertiary care institution provides a clear patient-based representation. PMID:20307788

  19. Acquired pathology of the pediatric spine and spinal cord

    Pediatric spine pathology poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Acquired spine pathology often yields nonspecific signs and symptoms in children, especially in the younger age groups, and diagnostic delay can carry significant morbidity. This review is focused on some of the more common diagnostic dilemmas we face when attempting to evaluate and diagnose acquired pediatric spine anomalies in daily practice. An understanding of some of the key differentiating features of these disease processes in conjunction with pertinent history, physical exam, and advanced imaging techniques can indicate the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Osteoid Osteoma of Cervical Spine in two adjacent Vertebrae

    MR Etemadifar

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor, mainly seen in 10-30 years male. Spine is a relatively common site and almost always, posterior elements are involved. Plain X-Ray-, CT scan and Isotope scan help to identify and localize spine lesions. We described one 18 years old boy with 3 years low neck pain. Isotope scan, MRI and CT scan showed two lesions in C7 and T1. Gross inspection and histopathology examination confirmed osteoid osteoma in two adjacent vertebrae which has not been reported elsewhere in the literature. Key words: Osteoid Osteoma, Spine, Multifocal

  1. Theoretical Exploration of Barrel-Shaped Drops on Cactus Spines.

    Luo, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    To survive an arid environment, desert cacti are capable of harvesting water from fog by transporting condensed water drops using their spines. Cactus spines have a conical shape. In this work, on the basis of the difference of liquid pressure, a new theoretical model has been developed for a barrel-shaped liquid drop on a conical wire. This model is further simplified to interpret the effects of contact angles, conical angle, surface microgrooves, and gravity on the drop movement along a cactus spine. PMID:26473466

  2. Contextual Learning Induces Dendritic Spine Clustering in Retrosplenial Cortex

    Adam C Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and electrophysiological studies find convergent evidence suggesting that plasticity within a dendritic tree is not randomly dispersed, but rather clustered into functional groups. Further, results from in silico neuronal modeling show that clustered plasticity is able to increase storage capacity 45 times compared to dispersed plasticity. Recent in vivo work utilizing chronic 2-photon microscopy tested the clustering hypothesis and showed that repetitive motor learning is able to induce clustered addition of new dendritic spines on apical dendrites of L5 neurons in primary motor cortex; moreover, clustered spines were found to be more stable than non-clustered spines, suggesting a physiological role for spine clustering. To further test this hypothesis we used in vivo 2-photon imaging in Thy1-YFP-H mice to chronically examine dendritic spine dynamics in retrosplenial cortex (RSC during spatial learning. RSC is a key component of an extended spatial learning and memory circuit that includes hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Importantly, RSC is known from both lesion and immediate early gene studies to be critically involved in spatial learning and more specifically in contextual fear conditioning. We utilized a modified contextual fear conditioning protocol wherein animals received a mild foot shock each day for five days; this protocol induces gradual increases in context freezing over several days before the animals reach a behavioral plateau. We coupled behavioral training with four separate in vivo imaging sessions, two before training begins, one early in training, and a final session after training is complete. This allowed us to image spine dynamics before training as well as early in learning and after animals had reached behavioral asymptote. We find that this contextual learning protocol induces a statistically significant increase in the formation of clusters of new dendritic spines in trained animals when compared to home cage controls. Furthermore, most clustering occurs over the period where animals experience the largest increase in freezing behavior, suggesting that the clustered addition of spines may be subserving this learning process. Most importantly, the number of new clustered spines correlates with behavioral performance; specifically, animals with the highest proportion of new spines formed in clusters also have the highest context freezing, further supporting the hypothesis that clustered addition of spines is important for learning. In sum, these results support the hypothesis that spine clustering is a general mechanism for learning-related information storage in the brain and a mechanism specifically operating in the RSC.

  3. Fractionated stereotactic irradiation by Cyberknife of choroid melanomas: repositioning validation, closed eyelids; Irradiation stereotaxique fractionnee par Cyberknife des melanomes choroidiens: validation du repositionnement, paupieres fermees

    Horn, S.; Rezvoy, N.; Lacornerie, T.; Mirabel, X.; Labalette, P.; Lartigau, E. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Service de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2009-10-15

    The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife is an option in the treatment of eyes tumors. The advantages of the Cyberknife in the choroid melanomas are in its infra-millimetric precision, to the automated repositioning on the skull bones and to the conformity brought by the stereotaxy. The objective of this study was to validate the quality of repositioning and the immobility of the eyes with closed eyelids. Conclusion: the reproducibility of the eye positioning with closed eyelids seems enough to consider the conservative treatment of choroid melanomas by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife without implementation of fiducials nor retrobulbar anaesthesia. (N.C.)

  4. Lumbar position sense acuity during an electrical shock stressor

    Fallentin Nils

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal motor control of the spine depends on proprioceptive input as a prerequisite for co-ordination and the stability of the spine. Muscle spindles are known to play an important role in proprioception. Animal experiments suggest that an increase in sympathetic outflow can depress muscle spindle sensitivity. As the muscle spindle may be influenced by sympathetic modulation, we hypothesized that a state of high sympathetic activity as during mental stress would affect the proprioceptive output from the muscle spindles in the back muscles leading to alterations in proprioception and position sense acuity. The aim was to investigate the effect of mental stress, in this study the response to an electrical shock stressor, on position sense acuity in the rotational axis of the lumbar spine. Methods Passive and active position sense acuity in the rotational plane of the lumbar spine was investigated in the presence and absence of an electrical shock stressor in 14 healthy participants. An electrical shock-threat stressor lasting for approximately 12 minutes was used as imposed stressor to build up a strong anticipatory arousal: The participants were told that they were going to receive 8 painful electrical shocks however the participants never received the shocks. To quantify the level of physiological arousal and the level of sympathetic outflow continuous beat-to-beat changes in heart rate (beats*min-1 and systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure (mmHg were measured. To quantify position sense acuity absolute error (AE expressed in degrees was measured. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measurements (subjects as random factor and treatments as fixed factors was used to compare the different treatments. Results Significant increases were observed in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate during the stress sessions indicating elevated sympathetic activity (15, 14 and 10%, respectively. Despite pronounced changes in the sympathetic activity and subjective experiences of stress no changes were found in position sense acuity in the rotational plane of the lumbar spine in the presence of the electrical shock stressor compared to the control period. Conclusion The present findings indicate that position sense acuity in the rotational plane of the spine was unaffected by the electrical shock stressor.

  5. Tuberculosis of the spine radiological imaging. Case report

    Skeletal tuberculosis constitutes 1-3% of all cases of tuberculosis and involves the spine in up to 50% of cases, most commonly the thoracolumbar spine. The purpose of this article is to review the case of a 47-year-old man who complained of back pain, weakness of muscles and weight loss. He was examined with conventional anteriorposterior and lateral X-rays of thoracic spine, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging. Radiological imaging suggested tubercolosis of the spine. The authors present the imaging procedures applied to diagnose this case. Conventional radiography was used as the first basic examination. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) were used as complementary methods. The final diagnosis was based on a biopsy of the bone. The definite diagnosis is required to adequate treatment. In some cases surgical treatment is used. (author)

  6. Comparison of MRI and CT in spine disease

    The basic considerations in choice of computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance in spine diseases are described. Degenerative disc disease, spinal dysraphism/congenital, spinal cord trauma, infection, tumors and cord abnormalities are studied. (author)

  7. [Traumatic fracture of the thoracic spine T1-T10].

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Righesso Neto, Orlando; Ferraz, Fernando Antonio Patriani; Boniatti, Mrcio Manozzo

    2004-12-01

    We describe the incidence, causes, management and prognosis of traumatic fractures of the thoracic spine from T1 to T10 in surgical cases of traumatic fractures of spine during the period from June 1994 to June 2003 studied retrospectively. The type of fracture was determined according to the Gertzbein classification, and the degree of stability using the Denis classification. The neurological picture at admission and 30 days after surgery was evaluated using the ASIA/IMSOP classification. Surgery was performed in patients with complete spinal cord injury (n=7) for the purpose of stabilization using the posterior approach. In cases without spinal cord injury or incomplete injury (n=12), the surgical procedure was performed aiming to decompress the nerve tissue, to correct the alignment of the spine and to stabilize the spine. PMID:15608977

  8. Cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine in a 5-year-old girl

    Kim, Jung Ryul; Song, Ji Hun; Lee, Ju Hong [Chonbuk National University, Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Jeonju (Korea); Lee, Sang Yong [Chonbuk National University, Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Jeonju (Korea); Yoo, Wan Hee [Chonbuk National University, Medical School, Department of Rheumatology, Jeonju (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    Fractures of the tibial spine usually occur in children aged 8 to 14 years. Usually, radiographs will demonstrate a tibial spine fracture, with the degree of displacement. Tibial spine fractures in younger children have not been reported in the previously published literature. We report a tibial spine fracture that occurred in 5-year-old girl. The cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine was not revealed by radiographs because it was limited to the cartilaginous portion of the proximal tibia. (orig.)

  9. Cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine in a 5-year-old girl

    Fractures of the tibial spine usually occur in children aged 8 to 14 years. Usually, radiographs will demonstrate a tibial spine fracture, with the degree of displacement. Tibial spine fractures in younger children have not been reported in the previously published literature. We report a tibial spine fracture that occurred in 5-year-old girl. The cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine was not revealed by radiographs because it was limited to the cartilaginous portion of the proximal tibia. (orig.)

  10. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of the spine of stingray Himantura imbricata

    Kaliyamoorthy Kalidasan; Velayudham Ravi; Sunil Kumar Sahu; Murugan Lakshmi Maheshwaran; Kathiresan Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the spine structure of stingray Himantura imbricata (H. imbricata) and to evaluate the anticoagulant properties of the spine extract obtained through various solvents extracts followed by antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Methods: Spines of H. imbricata were collected from Nagappattinam coast, Tamil Nadu, India and their spines were observed under the light microscope. The grounded spines were subjected to extraction of metabolites using m...

  11. Combined injuries in the upper cervical spine: clinical and epidemiological data over a 14-year period

    Gleizes, V; Jacquot, F. P.; Signoret, F.; Fron, J.-M. G.

    2000-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic injuries in the upper cervical spine are often encountered and rarely reported. We examined the data concerning 784 patients with cervical spine injuries following trauma, including 116 patients with upper cervical spine injuries. Twenty-six percent of patients with upper cervical spine injuries (31 cases) were found to have combined injuries involving either the upper or the upper and lower cervical spine. The frequent patterns were combined type I bipedicular fracture ...

  12. Factors Related to Radiation Exposure during Lumbar Spine Intervention

    Choi, Moon Hyung; Choi, Byung Gil; Jung, Seung Eun; Byun, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroscopy guidance is useful to confirm anatomical landmark and needle location for spine intervention; however, it can lead to radiation exposure in patients, physicians, and medical staff. Physicians who used fluoroscopy should be cognizant of radiation exposure and intend to minimize radiation dose. We retrospectively reviewed three lumbar spine intervention procedures (nerve root block, medial branch block, and facet joint block) at our institution between June and December, 2014. We pe...

  13. Cervical Spine Injuries and the Return to Football

    Torg, Joseph S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The literature dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of cervical spine injuries is considerable. Absent, however, are comprehensive criteria or guidelines for permitting or prohibiting return to collusion activities such as tackle football. Objective: The purpose of this report is to describe developmental and posttraumatic conditions of the cervical spine as presenting (1) no contraindication, (2) relative contraindication, or (3) an absolute contraindication to continued part...

  14. Pediatric cervical spine trauma imaging: a practical approach

    Egloff, Alexia M.; Kadom, Nadja; Vezina, Gilbert; Bulas, Dorothy [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Cervical spine trauma in children is rare and the diagnosis can be challenging due to anatomical and biomechanical differences as compared to adults. A variety of algorithms have been used in adults to accurately diagnose injuries, but have not been fully studied in pediatric patients. In this article we review suggested imaging protocols and the general characteristics, types of injuries, and measurements used to diagnose cervical spine injuries in children. (orig.)

  15. Maintenance of graft compression in the adult cervical spine

    Bolger, Ciaran; Bourlion, Maurice; Leroy, Xavier; Petit, Dominique; Vanacker, Gerard; McEvoy, Linda; Nagaria, Jabir

    2006-01-01

    It is generally advised that the graft inserted in adult cervical spine should be pre-loaded with a compressive force or that the screws are inserted in a divergent orientation, in order to maximise compression and the chance of graft incorporation (Truumees et al. in Spine 28:1097–1102, 2003). However, there is little evidence that a compressive force is maintained once the force applicator has been removed, or that the divergent screws enhance compression. This study compared the maintenanc...

  16. Thoracic trauma with injury of the thoracic spine

    From a major series of surgically treated patients with fractures and fracture dislocations of the thoracic spine 4 cases are presented exhibiting different trauma mechanisms and presenting with a variety of associated acute and chronic intrathoracic lesions. Surgical stabilisation and treatment of additional intrathoracic injury (vascular, lymphatic duct, empyema, posttraumatic fibrothorax) nessecitated a transpleural approach, effective for the spine as well. Diagnostic radiology was restricted to minimal requirements due to urgency and/or difficulties of exposure. (orig.)

  17. Aneurysmal bone cyst of thoracic spine mimicking spinal tuberculosis

    Shobhit Mathur; Yashant Aswani; Sankhe, Shilpa S.; Hira, Priya R.

    2011-01-01

    A 22-year-old female presented to our services with back pain and paraparesis for 11 months. She was earlier diagnosed with tuberculosis of spine, and antitubercular chemotherapy was started. However her condition had worsened. Plain and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans of the thorax and magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed heterogenous, lytic, expansile lesion involving third thoracic vertebra with epidural extension and large bilateral paraspinal and mediastina...

  18. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development

    Federico Canavese; Alain Dimeglio

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same ma...

  19. Automated curved planar reformation of 3D spine images

    Traditional techniques for visualizing anatomical structures are based on planar cross-sections from volume images, such as images obtained by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, planar cross-sections taken in the coordinate system of the 3D image often do not provide sufficient or qualitative enough diagnostic information, because planar cross-sections cannot follow curved anatomical structures (e.g. arteries, colon, spine, etc). Therefore, not all of the important details can be shown simultaneously in any planar cross-section. To overcome this problem, reformatted images in the coordinate system of the inspected structure must be created. This operation is usually referred to as curved planar reformation (CPR). In this paper we propose an automated method for CPR of 3D spine images, which is based on the image transformation from the standard image-based to a novel spine-based coordinate system. The axes of the proposed spine-based coordinate system are determined on the curve that represents the vertebral column, and the rotation of the vertebrae around the spine curve, both of which are described by polynomial models. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained in an image analysis based optimization framework. The proposed method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on five CT spine images. The method performed well on both normal and pathological cases and was consistent with manually obtained ground truth data. The proposed spine-based CPR benefits from reduced structural complexity in favour of improved feature perception of the spine. The reformatted images are diagnostically valuable and enable easier navigation, manipulation and orientation in 3D space. Moreover, reformatted images may prove useful for segmentation and other image analysis tasks

  20. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the cervical spine: A case report

    Chee, Choong Guen; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Yeom, Jin S.; Choe, Ghee Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a rare, benign condition characterized by formation of cartilaginous nodules within the synovium. It rarely occurs at cervical spine, and only six cases have been previously reported in the English literature. We describe another case of synovial osteochondromatosis in the cervical spine in a 77-year-old man who presented with compressive myelopathy. Here we briefly review the literature and discuss the differential diagnosis based on CT and MR findings.

  1. Villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the spine

    To describe the imaging features of spinal pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of pathologically proven spinal PVNS. Patient demographics and clinical presentation were reviewed. Radiologic studies were evaluated by consensus of two musculoskeletal radiologists for spinal location, spinal segments affected, lesion center, detection of facet origin and intrinsic characteristics on radiography (n =11), myelography (n =7), CT (n =6) and MR imaging (n =6). Women (64%) were more commonly affected than men (36%) with an average age of 28 years. Clinical symptoms were pain (45%), neurologic (9%) or both (36%). Lesions most frequently affected the cervical spine (53%) followed by the thoracic (27%) and lumbar regions (20%). The majority of lesions (93%) were centered in the posterior elements with frequent involvement of the pedicle (67%), neural foramina (73%), lamina (67%) and facets (93%). No lesions showed calcification. Determination of a facet origin by imaging was dependent on imaging modality and lesion size. A facet origin could be determined in 45% of cases by radiography vs 67% of patients by CT (n=6) and MR (n=6). Large lesions (greater than 3 cm in at least one dimension) obscured the facet origin in all cases with CT and/or MR imaging (44%,n=4). Small lesions (less than 3 cm in any dimension) demonstrated an obvious facet origin in all cases by CT and/or MR imaging (56%,n=5). Low-to-intermediate signal intensity was seen in all cases on T2-weighted MR images resulting from hemosiderin deposition with ''blooming effect'' in one case with gradient echo MR images. PVNS of the spine is rare. Large lesions obscure the facet origin and simulate an aggressive intraosseous neoplasm. Patient age, a solitary noncystic lesion centered in the posterior elements, lack of mineralization and low-to-intermediate signal intensity on all MR pulse sequences may suggest the diagnosis in these cases. Small lesions demonstrate a facet origin on CT or MR imaging. This limits differential considerations to synovial-based lesions and additional features of a solitary focus, lack of underlying disease or systemic arthropathy, no calcification as well as low-to-intermediate signal intensity on all MR images should allow spinal PVNS to be suggested as the likely diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the spine

    Motamedi, Kambiz [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Department of Radiologic Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology (Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology), 200 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 165-59, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Murphey, Mark D. [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Department of Radiologic Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States); University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fetsch, John F.; Furlong, Mary A. [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Department of Soft Tissue Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Vinh, Tinhoa N.; Sweet, Donald E. [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Department of Orthopedic Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Laskin, William B. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgical Pathology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2005-04-01

    To describe the imaging features of spinal pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of pathologically proven spinal PVNS. Patient demographics and clinical presentation were reviewed. Radiologic studies were evaluated by consensus of two musculoskeletal radiologists for spinal location, spinal segments affected, lesion center, detection of facet origin and intrinsic characteristics on radiography (n =11), myelography (n =7), CT (n =6) and MR imaging (n =6). Women (64%) were more commonly affected than men (36%) with an average age of 28 years. Clinical symptoms were pain (45%), neurologic (9%) or both (36%). Lesions most frequently affected the cervical spine (53%) followed by the thoracic (27%) and lumbar regions (20%). The majority of lesions (93%) were centered in the posterior elements with frequent involvement of the pedicle (67%), neural foramina (73%), lamina (67%) and facets (93%). No lesions showed calcification. Determination of a facet origin by imaging was dependent on imaging modality and lesion size. A facet origin could be determined in 45% of cases by radiography vs 67% of patients by CT (n=6) and MR (n=6). Large lesions (greater than 3 cm in at least one dimension) obscured the facet origin in all cases with CT and/or MR imaging (44%,n=4). Small lesions (less than 3 cm in any dimension) demonstrated an obvious facet origin in all cases by CT and/or MR imaging (56%,n=5). Low-to-intermediate signal intensity was seen in all cases on T2-weighted MR images resulting from hemosiderin deposition with ''blooming effect'' in one case with gradient echo MR images. PVNS of the spine is rare. Large lesions obscure the facet origin and simulate an aggressive intraosseous neoplasm. Patient age, a solitary noncystic lesion centered in the posterior elements, lack of mineralization and low-to-intermediate signal intensity on all MR pulse sequences may suggest the diagnosis in these cases. Small lesions demonstrate a facet origin on CT or MR imaging. This limits differential considerations to synovial-based lesions and additional features of a solitary focus, lack of underlying disease or systemic arthropathy, no calcification as well as low-to-intermediate signal intensity on all MR images should allow spinal PVNS to be suggested as the likely diagnosis. (orig.)

  3. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1° tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1° degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1°. In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 ± 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 ± 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis (± SD) were 0.7 ± 0.5 mm and 0.5 ± 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1° correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9° with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15–20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion allowing for safe spine SBRT delivery.

  4. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    Hyde, Derek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); British Columbia Cancer Agency, The Sindi Hawkins Cancer Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna (Canada); Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: Arjun.sahgal@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1 Degree-Sign tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1 Degree-Sign degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1 Degree-Sign . In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 {+-} 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 {+-} 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis ({+-} SD) were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm and 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1 Degree-Sign correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9 Degree-Sign with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15-20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion allowing for safe spine SBRT delivery.

  5. Effect of Associative Learning on Memory Spine Formation in Mouse Barrel Cortex.

    Jasinska, Malgorzata; Siucinska, Ewa; Jasek, Ewa; Litwin, Jan A; Pyza, Elzbieta; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Associative fear learning, in which stimulation of whiskers is paired with mild electric shock to the tail, modifies the barrel cortex, the functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning, by inducing formation of new inhibitory synapses on single-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows and thus producing double-synapse spines. In the barrel cortex of conditioned, pseudoconditioned, and untreated mice, we analyzed the number and morphological features of dendritic spines at various maturation and stability levels: sER-free spines, spines containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and spines containing spine apparatus. Using stereological analysis of serial sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, we found that the density of double-synapse spines containing spine apparatus was significantly increased in the conditioned mice. Learning also induced enhancement of the postsynaptic density area of inhibitory synapses as well as increase in the number of polyribosomes in such spines. In single-synapse spines, the effects of conditioning were less pronounced and included increase in the number of polyribosomes in sER-free spines. The results suggest that fear learning differentially affects single- and double-synapse spines in the barrel cortex: it promotes maturation and stabilization of double-synapse spines, which might possibly contribute to permanent memory formation, and upregulates protein synthesis in single-synapse spines. PMID:26819780

  6. Effect of Associative Learning on Memory Spine Formation in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    Jasinska, Malgorzata; Siucinska, Ewa; Jasek, Ewa; Litwin, Jan A.; Pyza, Elzbieta; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Associative fear learning, in which stimulation of whiskers is paired with mild electric shock to the tail, modifies the barrel cortex, the functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning, by inducing formation of new inhibitory synapses on single-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows and thus producing double-synapse spines. In the barrel cortex of conditioned, pseudoconditioned, and untreated mice, we analyzed the number and morphological features of dendritic spines at various maturation and stability levels: sER-free spines, spines containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and spines containing spine apparatus. Using stereological analysis of serial sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, we found that the density of double-synapse spines containing spine apparatus was significantly increased in the conditioned mice. Learning also induced enhancement of the postsynaptic density area of inhibitory synapses as well as increase in the number of polyribosomes in such spines. In single-synapse spines, the effects of conditioning were less pronounced and included increase in the number of polyribosomes in sER-free spines. The results suggest that fear learning differentially affects single- and double-synapse spines in the barrel cortex: it promotes maturation and stabilization of double-synapse spines, which might possibly contribute to permanent memory formation, and upregulates protein synthesis in single-synapse spines.

  7. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Ming-Xing; Xu, Chang; Chen, Hui-Bin; An, Shu-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms.

  8. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters.

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John; Gebbeken, Norbert; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the influence of defined geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilising five parametrised musculoskeletal lumbar spine models for four different postures. The influence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine was studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most influential. These parameters can be easily acquired from X-rays and should be used to morph a musculoskeletal lumbar spine model for subject-specific approaches with respect to bone geometry. Furthermore, the model was very sensitive to uncommon configurations and therefore, it is advised that stiffness properties of discs and ligaments should be individualised. PMID:26680014

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis: Radiological changes in the cervical spine

    Objective was to describe the radiographic cervical spine changes in rheumatoid arthritis patients.Forty-nine patients (37 females and 12 males ) diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between June 1998 and December 2000, were studied for their radiographic cervical spine changes . Their mean age at disease onset was 41.4+ 13.4 years (range of 18-73)and mean duration of disease was 9.1+-6.28 years (range of 2-34). Their demographic data including rheumatoid factor status was obtained. Standard conventional radiographs cervical spine were obtained to study the cervical spine changes. Cervical radiographic changes were found in 34 patients (27 females and 7 males) 10 had subluxation (7 with atlanto-axial subluxation,2 with sub-axial subluxation,and one with lateral subluxation ). No vertical impaction was seen. Erosion of odontoid process was seen in one patient .All were rheumatoid seropositive Cervical spine changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are common, in particular subluxation in the upper cervical spine. Our study showed somewhat lesser prevalence of these changes. These were clinically correlated with disease duration, female sex, and rheumatoid factor, but were not clinically significant. (author)

  10. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models.

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Ming-Xing; Xu, Chang; Chen, Hui-Bin; An, Shu-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms. PMID:26881133

  11. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.

    Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-07-01

    The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain. PMID:23412281

  12. SU-E-J-34: Setup Accuracy in Spine SBRT Using CBCT 6D Image Guidance in Comparison with 6D ExacTrac

    Purpose Volumetric information of the spine captured on CBCT can potentially improve the accuracy in spine SBRT setup that has been commonly performed through 2D radiographs. This work evaluates the setup accuracy in spine SBRT using 6D CBCT image guidance that recently became available on Varian systems. Methods ExacTrac radiographs have been commonly used for Spine SBRT setup. The setup process involves first positioning patients with lasers followed by localization imaging, registration, and repositioning. Verification images are then taken providing the residual errors (ExacTracRE) before beam on. CBCT verification is also acquired in our institute. The availability of both ExacTrac and CBCT verifications allows a comparison study. 41 verification CBCT of 16 patients were retrospectively registered with the planning CT enabling 6D corrections, giving CBCT residual errors (CBCTRE) which were compared with ExacTracRE. Results The RMS discrepancies between CBCTRE and ExacTracRE are 1.70mm, 1.66mm, 1.56mm in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions and 0.27°, 0.49°, 0.35° in yaw, roll and pitch respectively. The corresponding mean discrepancies (and standard deviation) are 0.62mm (1.60mm), 0.00mm (1.68mm), −0.80mm (1.36mm) and 0.05° (0.58°), 0.11° (0.48°), −0.16° (0.32°). Of the 41 CBCT, 17 had high-Z surgical implants. No significant difference in ExacTrac-to-CBCT discrepancy was observed between patients with and without the implants. Conclusion Multiple factors can contribute to the discrepancies between CBCT and ExacTrac: 1) the imaging iso-centers of the two systems, while calibrated to coincide, can be different; 2) the ROI used for registration can be different especially if ribs were included in ExacTrac images; 3) small patient motion can occur between the two verification image acquisitions; 4) the algorithms can be different between CBCT (volumetric) and ExacTrac (radiographic) registrations

  13. Repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine

    The objective is to present the surgical experience in the repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine. Background: Spodylolysis is an important cause of low back pain in young adults and is responsible for high grade of incapacity. Classically, patients with surgical indications with Spondylolysis have been treated with vertebral arthrodesis arthrodesis, with the following functional lost of the intervened segment and biomechanical overload of the upper contiguous segment. There are not previous reports about repairing of lysis in national literature and international references in this technique are scarce. Materials and methods: Eight patients within 2002-2004 were operated, a direct repairing of the lyses by in situ, fusion and interfragmental osteosynthesis with AO 3.5 mm titanium cortical screws with autogenous bone grafts was achieved. The casuistic was analyzed depending on clinical presentation, consolidation, mobility and vitality of the disc in imaginology studies. Results: During the follow-up a firm fusion in all cases, mobility and vitality preservation of the L5-S1 intervertebral disc was detected. There was neither infection nor neurological deficit. Recommendations: Repairing of spondylolysis in lumbar column, in young symptomatic patients without or with mild lystesis (grade I) and without associated disc damage, is a safe surgical technique

  14. Conjoined nerve root of the lumbar spine

    There have been a number of reports on lumbosacral nerve root anomalies. Among the most common of these anomalies is the conjoined nerve root. However, it is difficult to diagnose this condition preoperatively. We review the records of 142 patients who underwent microendoscopic discectomy (MED) for herniation of the lumbar disc. All patients had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine before surgery. For most patients, only sagittal and axial images were obtained; coronal images were obtained in only a minority of the patients. Postoperative coronal images were obtained in patients with conjoined nerve roots. A diagnosis of conjoined nerve roots was made intraoperatively in 4 patients; this diagnosis had not been possible preoperatively. After surgery, new coronal images were obtained for the 4 patients with conjoined nerve roots; however, there was no evidence of the condition on the new images. The surgical procedure employed was endoscopic decompression and herniotomy. The results were favorable, even though pediculotomy was not performed. It is difficult to diagnose nerve root anomalies preoperatively. However, the possibility of nerve root anomalies should always be considered during surgery to ensure a safe procedure, without intraoperative occurrence of nerve root injury. (author)

  15. Sodium pump organization in dendritic spines.

    Blom, Hans; Bernhem, Kristoffer; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in fluorescence imaging with the invention of several super-resolution microscopy modalities (e.g., PALM/STORM and STED) has opened up the possibility of deciphering molecular distributions on the nanoscale. In our quest to better elucidate postsynaptic protein distribution in dendritic spines, we have applied these nanoscopy methods, where generated results could help improve our understanding of neuronal functions. In particular, we have investigated the principal energy transformer in the brain, i.e., the [Formula: see text]-ATPase (or sodium pump), an essential protein responsible for maintaining resting membrane potential and a major controller of intracellular ion homeostasis. In these investigations, we have focused on estimates of protein amount, giving assessments of how variations may depend on labeling strategies, sample analysis, and choice of nanoscopic imaging method, concluding that all can be critical factors for quantification. We present a comparison of these results and discuss the influences this may have for homeostatic sodium regulation in neurons and energy consumption. PMID:27175374

  16. CT in the evaluation of spine trauma

    The introduction of computed tomography has had a major impact on the diagnostic approach to the spine trauma patient. The high resolution of new generation CT equipment allows definitive evaluation of bony disruption within the spinal column. Multiplanar image reformation permits three-dimensional assessment of the injury, optimizes patient comfort and safety, and minimizes the time necessary for the diagnosis. Water-soluble contrast can be used to expand greatly the utility of computed tomography. Utilizing the cervical puncture approach, small doses of contrast can be instilled in the subarachnoid space with the patient supine and semi-upright on a tiltable gurney. Such contrast enhancement can provide additional information in acutely traumatized patients with neurologic deficits. Dynamic sequence scanning with automatic table incrementation permits thorough evaluation of severe spinal trauma in less than 15 minutes following patient transfer onto the scanning couch. Because of its many advantages, CT has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in the evaluation of spinal injury when plain films and/or clinical data indicate the need for further diagnostic measures

  17. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the lumbar spine.

    Avimadje, A M; Goupille, P; Zerkak, D; Begnard, G; Brunais-Besse, J; Valat, J P

    2000-01-01

    Monostotic fibrous dysplasia is exceedingly rare. We report a case in a 61-year-old woman with a history of recurrent low back pain and sciatica since 35 years of age. While walking, she suddenly experienced pain in her right thigh. The pain spread gradually to the buttock and calf on the same side, becoming increasingly severe. The time pattern was mechanical, with exacerbation during straining. Paresthesia developed over the dorsal aspect of the right foot. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were ineffective. Radiographs of the spine showed an expansile and heterogeneous lesion in the body of L2. Hyperactivity of L3 and L4 was seen on the bone scan. Computed tomography demonstrated heterogeneity of L2, L3, and L4, as well as hypertrophy of the neural arch of L3 and of the right posterior lamina and spinous process of L4. Alterations in L2, L3, and L4 were noted on the magnetic resonance imaging study, which showed no evidence of epidural involvement. Laboratory tests were normal. A surgical biopsy of L3 established the diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. Since the seminal description of fibrous dysplasia in 1891, only 21 cases of monostotic spinal involvement have been published. The spinal lesions can remain clinically silent or cause spinal pain with or without neurological symptoms. Radiographic findings are variable (heterogeneity, osteolysis, expansion without cortical violation or soft tissue involvement). Calcium and phosphate levels are normal. The diagnosis depends on examination of a vertebral biopsy specimen. PMID:10773971

  18. Peribrachiocephalic approaches to the anterior cervicothoracic spine.

    Sattarov, Kamran V; Fard, Salman Abbasi; Patel, Apar S; Alkadhim, Mustafa; Avila, Mauricio J; Walter, Christina M; Baaj, Ali A

    2015-11-01

    This cadaveric study aims to reexamine the corridors to the anterior cervicothoracic junction, relative to the left brachiocephalic vein, and to present these working corridors as either supra- or infra-brachiocephalic. The anterior cervicothoracic junction incorporates the seventh cervical vertebrae through the fourth thoracic vertebrae (C7-T4) and involves critical anatomical structures. Operative approaches to this area are well described in the literature, with the predominant implementation of three surgical corridors. We used three embalmed, human, cadaveric specimens for this study. No pathology involving the cervicothoracic junction was noted. While dissecting, we tried to imitate the actual surgery. For each surgical step, photographs were taken, drawing attention to the critical structures and highlighting the different corridors to the spine relative to the left brachiocephalic vein. It is possible to access the cervicothoracic junction relative to the brachiocephalic vein from the left. The supra-brachiocephalic approach gives access to the C7-T4 vertebrae, whereas if T4-T5 is the goal, the infra-brachiocephalic approach may be utilized. In the supra-brachiocephalic approach, the brachiocephalic artery can be either medialized or lateralized as needed. A re-examination of the anterior cervicothoracic junction anatomy has allowed us to classify approaches relative to the left brachiocephalic vein. Identifying and understanding the approaches relative to this structure will assist in safe and effective spinal surgery in this area. PMID:26165469

  19. Technical note: spine loading in automotive seating.

    Zenk, R; Franz, M; Bubb, H; Vink, P

    2012-03-01

    For car manufacturers, seat comfort is becoming more important in distinguishing themselves from their competitors. Therefore, many studies on participative seat comfort are carried out. In this paper, an objective assessment approach is reported which evaluates the concept of "optimal load distribution", based on the identification of a close relationship between the pressure on the seat and the discomfort felt by the person sitting. An in vivo measurement of the pressure in the spinal disc, which is an indicator of the load in the spine, was performed. For this research, a pressure sensor was implanted with a canula in the middle of the disc intervertebralis of a participant. The local pressure on the disc was established for the participant in an automobile seat set in various seat positions. The results indicate that in the seat position with the pressure distribution corresponding to the most comfortable posture the pressure in the intervertebral disc is lowest. The pressure in this position is 0.5 bar, while in the upright seated position the pressure is 1.6 bar. PMID:21745653

  20. Spine evaluation in children with anorectal malformations

    The value of radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting skeletal and intraspinal pathology was assessed in infants with anorectal malformations, and the need for spinal MRI examination in this group of patients was evaluated. Twenty-one infants were examined with radiography, ultrasound and MRI of the lower spine. The detection of skeletal and intraspinal abnormalities was compared for the three imaging modalities. Fifteen patients were normal in all three examinations. Radiography showed bony skeletal abnormalities in six children, although sometimes very subtle. By ultrasound both bony and cartilaginous malformations were detected in all six patients and by MRI in five patients. Five of the six children with skeletal abnormalities had intraspinal pathology, detected in all cases by ultrasound and MRI. However, the abnormalities were more clearly demonstrated by MRI than by ultrasound. Spinal radiographs must be examined carefully for abnormalities, because they can indicate the presence or absence of intraspinal pathology. Normal radiographic and sonographic appearance of spinal anatomy in children with anorectal malformation makes MRI superfluous, but if radiographs or ultrasound are abnormal, MRI should be used to accurately depict possible intraspinal pathology. (orig.)

  1. Spine evaluation in children with anorectal malformations

    Beek, F.J.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Utrecht Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Boemers, T.M.L. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Witkamp, T.D. [Dept. of Radiology, Utrecht Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Leeuwen, M.S. van [Dept. of Radiology, Utrecht Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Mali, W.P.T.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Utrecht Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Bax, N.M.A. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-11-01

    The value of radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting skeletal and intraspinal pathology was assessed in infants with anorectal malformations, and the need for spinal MRI examination in this group of patients was evaluated. Twenty-one infants were examined with radiography, ultrasound and MRI of the lower spine. The detection of skeletal and intraspinal abnormalities was compared for the three imaging modalities. Fifteen patients were normal in all three examinations. Radiography showed bony skeletal abnormalities in six children, although sometimes very subtle. By ultrasound both bony and cartilaginous malformations were detected in all six patients and by MRI in five patients. Five of the six children with skeletal abnormalities had intraspinal pathology, detected in all cases by ultrasound and MRI. However, the abnormalities were more clearly demonstrated by MRI than by ultrasound. Spinal radiographs must be examined carefully for abnormalities, because they can indicate the presence or absence of intraspinal pathology. Normal radiographic and sonographic appearance of spinal anatomy in children with anorectal malformation makes MRI superfluous, but if radiographs or ultrasound are abnormal, MRI should be used to accurately depict possible intraspinal pathology. (orig.)

  2. Aesthetic management of gingival recession by root biomodification with carbon dioxide laser and subepithelial connective tissue graft with lateral repositioned flap technique

    Rastogi, Pavitra Kumar; Lal, Nand; Garg, Nimit; Anand, Vishal; Singhal, Rameshwari

    2012-01-01

    Localised gingival recessions continue to represent an important aesthetic condition requiring treatment in periodontics. Various techniques have been tried to treat exposed root surfaces to improve aesthetics with high percentage of success and minimal discomfort. Root biomodification is done to improve the predictability of these procedures. This clinical report describes periodontal plastic procedure involving subepithelial connective tissue graft with lateral repositioned flap technique a...

  3. DicoogleWeb: uma interface web para repositório de imagem médica

    Novo, António Mário Constantino Malta

    2013-01-01

    O Dicoogle é uma solução de software, em código fonte aberto, que foi desenhada para suportar o fluxo de informação num laboratório de imagem médica. Além disso, está dotado de um mecanismo de indexação que permite indexar todos os metadados contidos nos ficheiros DICOM do seu repositório. A actual implementação pode ser lançada em modo servidor (por omissão) mas também dispõem de um módulo gráfico cliente que pode conectar-se a qualquer instância servidor através de Java RMI. Isto proporc...

  4. SENILE DEGENERATIVE CHANGES IN ADULT LUMBAR SPINE! - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Garjesh Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP is a common presenting complaint affecting mostly middle aged and older person and traditionally considered as ageing process, but now-a-days large number of younger people are also affected by this debilitating chronic disorder. The cause of early onset of degenerative spine disease is multifactorial, but genetical predisposition plays very important role. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To find out association between genetic predisposition and degenerative spine disease in adult patients and to assess the pattern of MRI findings of various degenerative diseases in lumbo-sacral spine. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The present cross-sectional study had been performed among 100 selected patients in 1yr period, who presented with chief complaint of chronic low back pain. After taking detailed clinical and professional history, MRI of lumbosacral spine had been performed. Total 100 patients were divided in two groups on the basis of genetical predisposition. Prevalence and spectrum of degenerative changes were compared between both groups. RESULTS: Hundred patients of 20 to 35-year age had been selected with mean age of 27yr. Out of 100 patients; 47 were male and 53 were female. The most common degenerative findings were desiccation of disc (95% followed by disc bulge, herniation, spinal canal stenosis, ligamentum flavum hypertrophy, facet joint hypertrophy and modic changes. L4-L5 and L5- S1 were the most commonly involved spinal levels for any degenerative pathology. CONCLUSION: Good association is seen between early onset of degenerative spine disease and genetical predisposition in patients who have history of similar type degenerative spine disease in one or more first degree relatives in comparison to those patients who do not have any genetical predisposition. So it can be concluded that heredity play important role in early onset of degenerative spine disease in adults.

  5. Helical tomotherapy for spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal malignancies

    Choi, Yun Seon; Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae; Han, Hee Ji; Baek, Jong Geal; Seong, Jin Sil [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    This study evaluated the treatment effectiveness and proper radiation dose of helical tomotherapy (HT) in spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal cancers. From 2006 to 2010, 20 gastrointestinal cancer patients were treated with HT for spine oligometastases (31 spine lesions). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was the tumor evident from magnetic resonance imaging images fused with simulation computed tomography images. Clinical target volume (CTV) encompassed involved vertebral bodies or dorsal elements. We assumed that the planning target volume was equal to the CTV. We assessed local control rate after HT for 31 spine metastases. Pain response was scored by using a numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS, from 0 to 10). Spine metastatic lesions were treated with median dose of 40 Gy (range, 24 to 51 Gy) and median 5 Gy per fraction (range, 2.5 to 8 Gy) to GTV with median 8 fractions (range, 3 to 20 fraction). Median biologically equivalent dose (BED, {alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy) was 52 Gy10 (range, 37.5 to 76.8 Gy10) to GTV. Six month local control rate for spine metastasis was 90.3%. Overall infield failure rate was 15% and outfield failure rate was 75%. Most patients showed pain relief after HT (93.8%). Median local recurrence free survival was 3 months. BED over 57 Gy10 and oligometastases were identified as prognostic factors associated with improved local progression free survival (p = 0.012, p = 0.041). HT was capable of delivering higher BED to metastatic lesions in close proximity of the spinal cord. Spine metastases from gastrointestinal tumors were sensitive to high dose radiation, and BED ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy) higher than 57 Gy10 could improve local control.

  6. Diagnostic value of high resolutional computed tomography of spine

    Non-enhanced high resolution computed tomography provide clear visualization of soft tissue in the canal and bony details of spine, particularly of the lumbar spine. We observed 70 cases of spine CT using GE CT/T 8800 scanner during the period from Dec. 1982 to Sep. 1983 at Jeonbug National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 55 males and 15 females : age was from 17 years to 67 years; sites were 11 cervical spine, 5 thoracic spine and 54 lumbosacral spine. 2. CT diagnosis showed 44 cases of lumbar disc herniation, 7 cases of degenerative disease, 3 cases of spine fracture and each 1 cases of cord tumor, metastatic tumor, spontaneous epidural hemorrhage, epidural abscess, spine tbc., meningocele with diastematomyelia. 3. Sites of herniated nucleus pulposus were 34 cases (59.6%) between L4-5 interspace and 20 cases (35.1%) between L5-S1 interspace. 13 cases (29.5%) of lumbar disc herniation disclosed multiple lesions. Location of herniation were central type in 28 cases(49.1%), right-central type in 12 cases(21.2%), left-central type in 11 cases (19.2%) and far lateral type in 6 cases(10.5%). 4. CT findings of herniated nucleus pulposus were as follows : focal protrusion of posterior disc margin and obliteration of anterior epidural fat in all cases, dural sac indentation in 26 cases(45.6%), soft tissue mass in epidural fat in 21 cases(36.8%), displacement or compression of nerve root sheath in 12 cases(21%). 5. Multiplanar reformatted images and Blink mode provide more effective evaluation about definite level and longitudinal dimension of lesion, such as obscure disc herniation, spine fracture, cord tumor and epidural abscess. 6. Non-enhanced and enhanced high resolutional computed tomography were effectively useful in demonstrating compression or displacement of spinal cord and nerve root, examing congenital anomaly such as meningocele and primary or metastatic spinal lesions

  7. Cervical spine trauma: Radiologic manifestations and imaging algorithms

    Cervical spine trauma is very critical injury that is incurred most frequently in automobile accidents, mining incidents, and war. Injuries of the cervical spine produce neurologic damage in approximately 40% of cases, whereas injuries of the thoracolumbar junction produce neurologic damage in 4% and injuries of the thoracic spine do so in 10%. Radiology has a fundamental role in the recognition and follow-up of patients. Radiologists should be quite familiar with the imaging algorithms and various radiologic manifestations of cervical spine injuries. In this paper, techniques of examining severely injured patients as well as those with slight or questionable injuries are demonstrated. Indications and limitations of various diagnostic procedures (plain film radiography, tomography, CT, and MR imaging) are discussed. A systematic plan for the study of the cervical spine with an emphasis on joints, bones, ligaments and soft tissues (JO-B-LI-ST) is introduced. Mechanisms of injury and the stability or instability of the injuries are presented. Plain radiography as well as other imaging modalities are used to demonstrate the most important forms of injuries at various levels. Follow-up of some of the treated cases is shown. The late complications of spinal cord damage in closed injuries and open wounds (urinary stones, myositis, ossificans, contractures, fractures, disuse atrophy, and bone infections) are presented at the end

  8. Functional diagnostics of the cervical spine by using computer tomography

    Dvorak, J.; Hayek, J.; Grob, D.; Penning, L.; Panjabi, M.M.; Zehnder, R.

    1988-04-01

    35 healthy adults and 137 patients after cervical spine injury were examined by functional CT. The range of axial rotation at the level occiput/atlas, atlas/axis and the segment below were measured in all subjects. A rotation occiput/atlas of more than 7/sup 0/, and C1/C2 more than 54/sup 0/ could refer to segmental hypermobility, a rotation at the segment C1/C2 less than 29/sup 0/ to hypomobility. According to the postulated normal values based upon a 98% confidence level, out of 137 patients examined after cervical spine injury and with therapy-resistant neck pain, 45 showed signs of segmental hypermobility of the upper cervical spine, 17 showed hyper- or hypomobility at different levels, 10 patients presented segmental hypomobility at C1/C2 level alone. In all patients, according to the clinical assessment, functional pathology was suspected in the upper cervical spine. Surgical correction of rotatory instability should be considered as a possible therapeutic procedure after successful diagnostic stabilisation of the cervical spine by minerva cast.

  9. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development.

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  10. Spine Shape Predicts Vertebral Fractures in Postmenopausal Women

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, P.C.; A. Ghosh; M. G. Sorensen; Nielsen, Mads

    of fragility fractures in the spine. The study included 568 elderly women of whom 455 maintained skeletal integrity during the mean observation period of 4.8 years and 113 sustained at least one vertebral fracture in the same period. At baseline, none of the women had experienced a previous...... (AUC) was 0.65, and the odds ratio (OR) for fracture 5.2 [95% CI 2.3, 11.6]. Significant predictive value remained after adjustment for age and spine BMD (p < 10-6, AUC=0.66, OR=2.0 [1.0, 3.9]).Measures of spine shape can predict vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women, independent of age and spine......Early diagnosis and treatment of patients at high risk of developing fragility fractures is crucial in the management of osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the shape of the spine as can be observed from lateral X-rays is indicative for the risk of future development...

  11. Functional diagnostics of the cervical spine by using computer tomography

    35 healthy adults and 137 patients after cervical spine injury were examined by functional CT. The range of axial rotation at the level occiput/atlas, atlas/axis and the segment below were measured in all subjects. A rotation occiput/atlas of more than 70, and C1/C2 more than 540 could refer to segmental hypermobility, a rotation at the segment C1/C2 less than 290 to hypomobility. According to the postulated normal values based upon a 98% confidence level, out of 137 patients examined after cervical spine injury and with therapy-resistant neck pain, 45 showed signs of segmental hypermobility of the upper cervical spine, 17 showed hyper- or hypomobility at different levels, 10 patients presented segmental hypomobility at C1/C2 level alone. In all patients, according to the clinical assessment, functional pathology was suspected in the upper cervical spine. Surgical correction of rotatory instability should be considered as a possible therapeutic procedure after successful diagnostic stabilisation of the cervical spine by minerva cast. (orig.)

  12. Prevention of spine deforimities in adoloscents due to inaduquate posture

    Lazović Milica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The spine deformities tend to increase, and in 90% of children they change the quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the percents of spinal deformity in our population of adolescents, and long bad posture in and out of school as a factor for its increase. Material and methods. The study included 124 adolescents attending High Musical School in Bitola and Skopje, who underwent four standard spine tests and an interview. Results. According to the test 3, 50% of the examined adolescents in Bitola and 69% in Skopje had the postural spine deformity, the average being 59.5%. The results obtained by the questionnaire showed that 50% of adolescents did not have any physical activity out of school, the longest daily activity, lasting four hours, in 48% of the examinees was practising their musical instruments; 40% of the examinees spent two hours watching TV or using the computer, whereas 18% did not use any of them at all. Conclusion. The bad spine posture tends to deteriorate in adolescents and the factor influencing this result should be established by studies aimed at determining the effects of physical activity on reducing such deformities, since the specific type of their education induces the risk of developing pain and early degenerative changes of the spine, which are predominant in the professionals.

  13. A spine-sheath model for strong-line blazars

    Sikora, Marek; Rutkowski, Mieszko; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a quasi-analytical model for the production of radiation in strong-line blazars, assuming a spine-sheath jet structure. The model allows us to study how the spine and sheath spectral components depend on parameters describing the geometrical and physical structure of `the blazar zone'. We show that typical broad-band spectra of strong-line blazars can be reproduced by assuming the magnetization parameter to be of order unity and reconnection to be the dominant dissipation mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spine-sheath model can explain why γ-ray variations are often observed to have much larger amplitudes than the corresponding optical variations. The model is also less demanding of jet power than one-zone models, and can reproduce the basic features of extreme γ-ray events.

  14. [Indications for surgical management of injuries of the cervical spine].

    Bhren, V; Hofmeister, M; Militz, M; Potulski, M

    1998-01-01

    The indication for operative treatment of serious injuries to the cervical spine is basically determinated by instability and dislocation. Timing of the operation is based on the neurological deficit. If there is a chance for recovery operative treatment is urgent. For the upper cervical spine defined indications are existing for type-2-fractures of the dens and C 2/C 3-instabilities of the hangman-type with major dislocation. Fractures of C 0 and C 1 are preferably treated by conservative methods. Only cases with compound injury patterns with a high degree of ligamentous instability may require dorsal fusion. For serious injuries of the lower cervical spine operative treatment is needed in most instances. Conservative treatment is only indicated if functional stability can be proofed and injuries to the discs and compression to the myelon are ruled out. PMID:9757535

  15. Psoas abscess like metastasis mimicking Koch?s spine

    Dhiraj V Sonawane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In endemic country like India, psoas abscess is commonly associated with dorsolumbar tuberculosis. A 56-year-old HIV-negative female treated case of carcinoma of cervix presented to rural hospital with psoas abscess like lesion and vertebral involvement. Patient was managed as tuberculosis of lumbar spine. Patient presented to us after 1 year with progressive neurodefecit and huge psoas abscess. USG-guided FNAC of psoas abscess revealed squamous malignant cell. This was recurrence of the operated FIGO stage 1b carcinoma of cervix, presenting as metastasis to lumbar spine and psoas muscle. We report a rare case of cervical carcinoma in HIV-negative women presenting as lumbar vertebra involvement and psoas abscess like metastasis initially managed as tuberculosis of spine. This case report also highlights possible errors that could be made in such rare cases.

  16. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  17. Cervical spine tuberculosis and retropharyngeal abscess in an adult Nigerian

    Okechukwu S Ogah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, there has been an increase in the incidence of tuberculosis by 2.2 million from 1997 to 2005 and 95% of this is occurring in developing countries. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare. To present our experience with a case of cervical spine tuberculosis. We present a case report of tuberculosis of the C3/C4 cervical spine associated with retropharyngeal abscess in a 36-year-old Nigerian woman. The disease was also associated with pulmonary tuberculosis. Neck pain, neck stiffness, radicular pain, especially to the left shoulder and wasting of the muscles of the hand, were the main features. Our patient improved on anti-tuberculous therapy and conservative supportive care. This case stresses the usefulness of simple pain cervical X-radiograph, especially in environments like ours where sophisticated investigations are either not available or beyond the reach of most patients. Conservative management in our patient resulted in remarkable improvement.

  18. A spine-sheath model for strong-line blazars

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a quasi-analytical model for the production of radiation in strong-line blazars, assuming a spine-sheath jet structure. The model allows us to study how the spine and sheath spectral components depend on parameters describing the geometrical and physical structure of "the blazar zone". We show that typical broad-band spectra of strong-line blazars can be reproduced by assuming the magnetization parameter to be of order unity and reconnection to be the dominant dissipation mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spine-sheath model can explain why gamma-ray variations are often observed to have much larger amplitudes than the corresponding optical variations. The model is also less demanding of jet power than one-zone models, and can reproduce the basic features of extreme gamma-ray events.

  19. MR manifestations of vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of a vertebral artery injury occurring from major cervical spine trauma. Conventional MR findings of 63 patients and 63 control subjects were compared to detect a possible change in the vertebral arteries resulted from trauma. Plain films, CT and clinical records were also reviewed to correlate the degree of cervical spine injury with vascular change. Nine cases of absent flow signals in vessel lumen were observed in eight patients and one was observed in the control group. Patients more frequently demonstrated other abnormalities such as intraluminal linear signals (n=3) or focal luminal narrowing (n=9) but there was no statistical significance. There was a close relationship between degree of cord damage and occlusion of the vertebral artery. Conventional MR imaging is useful in the detection of vertebral artery occlusion resulting from cervical spine trauma

  20. Analysis of cervical spine function in healthy persons

    Radiograms were taken of subjects with no symptoms of cervical spine problems; the cervical spine was evaluated in the spontaneous posture and at maximal flexion and extension. The position and movement of the vertebra, intervertebral height and gliding were calculated. The results showed that (1) lordosis in women occurred less pronouncedly than in men, and that there was an increase with age; (2) C 2-3 was the least flexible segment and mobility increased in the caudal direction; mobility decreased with age and the segments of the lower cervical spine with the highest mobility decreased the most; (3) all posterior and ventral intervertebral heights showed a decrease with age at C 5-6 and C 6-7; (4) vertebral gliding decreased with age. (orig.)

  1. Analytical and experimental investigations of human spine flexure.

    Moffatt, C. A.; Advani, S. H.; Lin, C.-J.

    1971-01-01

    The authors report on experiments to measure the resistance of fresh human spines to flexion in the upper lumbar and lower thoracic regions and evaluate results by using a combination of strength of materials theory and effects of shear and comparing with data reported by other authors. The test results indicate that the thoraco-lumbar spine behaves approximately as a linear elastic beam, without relaxation effects. The authors formulate a simple continuum dynamic model of the spine simulating aircraft ejection and solve the resulting boundary value problem to illustrate the importance of the flexural mode. A constant cross-section, the selected model is a sinusoidally curved elastic beam with an end mass subjected to a Heaviside axial acceleration at the other end. The paper presents transient response results for the spinal model axial and bending displacements and axial force.-

  2. Region-based enhancement of chest and cervical spine radiographs

    Lin, Jyh-Shyan; Steller Artz, Dorothy E.; Li, Huai; Legendre, Kevin; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a region-based image processing method to enhance selective radiodense regions on digital radiographs. We employ a wavelet filtering technique to locate the radiodense regions-of-interest and then apply different degrees of enhancement procedure to them. The enhancement procedure is based on an unsharp masking technique controlled by a set of sigmoidal functions. The method was tested on computed chest radiographs to improve the visualization of the mediastinum and radiodense spine areas. The enhanced chest images showed improved visualization in the mediastinum area, and the visibility of vascular structures which were obscured by the diaphragm and mediastinum was improved. To demonstrate the method's potential in other medical image processing tasks, we applied it to cervical spine images. The processed cervical spine images also showed better visualization of the seventh cervical vertebrae and the first thoracic vertebrae in the high radiodense area caused by the superimposition of the patient's shoulder tissue over these regions of interest.

  3. Benign compression fractures of the spine: signal patterns

    Fifteen patients with 38 compression fractures of the spine underwent magnetic resonance(MR) imaging. We retrospectively evaluated MR images in those benign compression fractures. MR images showed four patterns in T1-weighted images. MR imaging patterns were normal signal(21), band like low signal(8), low signal with preservation of peripheral portion of the body(8), and diffuse low signal through the vertebral body(1). The low signal portions were changed to high signal intensities in T2-weighted images. In 7 of 15 patients (11 compression fractures), there was a history of trauma, and the remaining 8 patients (27 compression fractures) had no history of trauma. Benign compression fractures of trauma, remained 8 patients (27 compression fractures) were non-traumatic. Benign compression fractures of the spine reveal variable signal intensities in MR imagings. These patterns of benign compression fractures may be useful in interpretation of MR imagings of the spine

  4. Vascular malformations of the spine; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Thron, A.; Mull, M. [Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie; Reith, W. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2001-11-01

    The vascular malformations of the spine and spinal cord are rare diseases. Possible symptoms may consist in a transient neurological deficit, a progressive sensorimotor transverse lesion or an acute para- or tetraplegia. Damage to the spinal cord occurs by bleeding, space-occupying effects and venous congestion, rarely by steal effects. Classification of the true inborn malformations differentiates between arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), cavernomas and capillary teleangiectasias. The more frequent spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) of the elderly patient is a probably acquired lesion which is presented in a separate paper. Capillary teleangiectasias are mostly incidental findings but may cause differential diagnostic problems. Cavernomas are important causes of hemorrhage and may initially be obscured within the bleeding. MRI is the most relevant imaging procedure in the early diagnostic workup. In case of an AVM selective spinal angiography is required to define the type of the lesion and to decide about the appropriate therapy which may be endovascular-interventional, neurosurgical, combined or attentive. (orig.) [German] Die Gefaessmalformationen des Spinalkanals und Rueckenmarks sind seltene Erkrankungen, deren moegliche Symptome von transienten neurologischen Ausfaellen bis zur akuten Querschnittlaehmung reichen. Eine Schaedigung des Rueckenmarks kann durch Blutungen, Raumforderungswirkung, venoese Kongestion oder ''Steal-Effekte'' entstehen. Haeufiger als die echten (angeborenen) Malformationen, wozu arteriovenoese Malformationen (AVMs), Kavernome und kapillaere Teleangiektasien gerechnet werden, sind die vermutlich erworbenen spinalen duralen arteriovenoesen Fisteln (SDAVF) des aelteren Patienten, die gesondert dargestellt werden. Die kapillaeren Teleangiektasien sind meist Zufallsbefunde, koennen aber differenzialdiagnostische Verwirrung verursachen. Kavernome sind eine wichtige Ursache fuer Blutungen, wobei sie sich innerhalb eines Haematoms zunaechst der Diagnostik entziehen koennen. Der MRT kommt im Vorfeld die groesste diagnostische Bedeutung zu. Bei Vorliegen einer AVM muss durch selektive spinale Angiographie der Typ des AV-Angioms genau geklaert und ueber die Wahl der Behandlung entschieden werden. Waehrend Kavernome als ''Low-flow-Malformationen'' nur operativ zu behandeln sind, kommen bei AVMs prinzipiell endovaskulaer-interventionelle, neurochirurgische oder auch beides kombinierende Behandlungen in Betracht. In Einzelfaellen kann ein abwartendes Verhalten gerechtfertigt sein. (orig.)

  5. Injuries of the spine sustained during rugby.

    Silver, J R; Gill, S

    1988-05-01

    In 1984 JR Silver reported on 63 patients who had sustained serious injuries of their cervical spine as a result of games of rugby between the years 1952 and 1982. In this paper his results have been brought up to date. A further 19 players who were treated personally are reported, sustaining their injuries between 1983 and 1987. The mechanism of injury was still blows to the head or the head being driven into the ground. Seven injuries occurred in the scrums all were front row forwards. One was injured when the players charged, two players were inexperienced and the other cases all followed a collapse of the scrum after which the second rows continued to push. Five players were injured while tackling, six players were injured in a ruck and maul situation--in each case they were pushed to the ground while stooping to pick up the ball, other players piled on top of them (one player broke from the scrum and he endeavoured to retrieve a low ball and then fell striking his head). Further research was carried out by circularising all the spinal units in the United Kingdom to obtain the overall figures. It has been found that there has been a reduction in the number of injuries from ten in 1983 to five in 1986/7, presumably from a change in the laws. In order to determine whether a further change in the laws was necessary or whether the existing laws were adequate, research was carried out by video recording several games of rugby and analysing the games later in slow motion and determining how injuries occurred. Most of the injuries in these small number of games occurred in the ruck and maul situation. It was concluded that the majority of such injuries were not due to bad luck but were caused by irresponsible actions. The laws were still being broken and not being enforced. The existing laws were adequate since there has been a reduction in the number of injuries overall, particularly at first class and schoolboy levels, but were not enforced at junior levels-they were the main source of injury. PMID:3387737

  6. Computational reconstitution of spine calcium transients from individual proteins

    Thomas Matthew Bartol

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We have built a stochastic model in the program MCell that simulates Ca2+ transients in spines from the principal molecular components believed to control Ca2+ entry and exit. Proteins, with their kinetic models, are located within two segments of dendrites containing 88 intact spines, centered in a fully reconstructed 5 x 5 x 6 µm cube of hippocampal neuropil. Protein components include AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, L- and R-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases, smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases, immobile Ca2+ buffers, and calbindin. Kinetic models for each protein were taken from published studies of the isolated proteins in vitro. For simulation of electrical stimuli, the time course of voltage changes in the dendritic spine was generated with the desired stimulus in the program NEURON. Voltage-dependent parameters were then continuously re-adjusted during simulations in MCell to reproduce the effects of the stimulus. Nine parameters of the model were optimized within realistic experimental limits by a process that compared results of simulations to published data. We find that simulations in the optimized model reproduce the timing and amplitude of Ca2+ transients measured experimentally in intact neurons. Thus, we demonstrate that the characteristics of individual isolated proteins determined in vitro can accurately reproduce the dynamics of experimentally measured Ca2+ transients in spines. The model will provide a test bed for exploring the roles of additional proteins that regulate Ca2+ influx into spines and for studying the behavior of protein targets in the spine that are regulated by Ca2+ influx.

  7. Recurrent spine surgery patients in hospital administrative database

    M. Sami Walid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital patient databases are typically used by administrative staff to estimate loss-profit ratios and to help with the allocation of hospital resources. These databases can also be very useful in following rehospitalization. This paper studies the recurrence of spine surgery patients in our hospital population based on administrative data analysis. Methods: Hospital data on 4,958 spine surgery patients operated between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. After sorting the cohort per ascending discharge date, the patient official name, consisting of first, middle and last names, was used as the variable determining duplicate cases in the SPSS statistical program, designating the first case in each group as primary. Yearly recurrence rate and change in procedure distribution were studied. In addition, hospital charges and length of stay were compared using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 4,958 spine surgery patients 364 (7.3% were categorized as duplicate cases by SPSS. The number of primary cases from which duplicate cases emerged was 327 meaning that some patients had more than two spine surgeries. Among primary patients (N=327 the percentage of excision of intervertebral disk procedures was 33.3% and decreased to 15.1% in recurrent admissions of the same patients (N=364. This decrease was compensated by an increase in lumbar fusion procedures. On the other hand, the rate of cervical fusion remained the same. The difference in hospital charges between primary and duplicate patients was $2,234 for diskectomy, $6,319 for anterior cervical fusion, $8,942 for lumbar fusion – lateral technique, and $12,525 for lumbar fusion – posterior technique. Recurrent patients also stayed longer in hospital, up to 0.9 day in lumbar fusion – posterior technique patients. Conclusion: Spine surgery is associated with an increasing possibility of additional spine surgery with rising invasiveness and cost.

  8. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design?Literature review. Objective?To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods?The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results?The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion?This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today. PMID:26835204

  9. Clinical implications of alignment of upper and lower cervical spine

    Sherekar S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The alignment of upper and lower cervical spine is presumed to be closely interrelated and the knowledge of this is mandatory when performing occipito-cervical and upper cervical fusions. The aim of this study was to establish standard values for upper and lower cervical spine alignment in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Five hundred eighteen asymptomatic volunteers (261 males and 257 females between 12 and 80 years of age underwent lateral radiography with their neck in the neutral position. Angles for occipital to 2nd cervical (Oc-C2, 1st to 2nd cervical (C1-C2 and sagittal alignment of 2nd to 7th cervical vertebrae (C2-C7 were measured. Statistical analyses were performed using a statistical package SPSS 10 for windows and the students ?t? test. Results: The mean Oc-C2, C1-C2 and C2--C7 angles were 14.66 + 9.5, 25.6 + 7.9 and 16.8 + 12.7 in male, while same angles in female were 15.59 + 8.26, 26.9 + 6.8 and 9.11 + 10.4 respectively. Weak statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the measured angles of the upper (Oc-C2 and C1-C2 and lower (C2-C7 cervical spines, which means if the lordosis of the occiput and upper cervical spine increases (if the Oc-C2 angle increases, the alignment of lower cervical spine becomes kyphotic and vice versa. This negative correlation was stronger between the Oc-C2 and C2-C7 angles than between the C1-C2 and C2-C7 angles. Conclusions: Relationship between alignment of the upper and the lower cervical spine should be taken into consideration when performing cervical fusion.

  10. Spine Research Is Multidisciplinary: 25 Years of Experiences.

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Spine research has advanced substantially over the past 25 years through a highly multidisciplinary process. Through early work on fracture healing, osteosynthesis, tissue engineering, and joint biomechanics, researchers discerned 2 main areas of study: musculoskeletal biomechanics and musculoskeletal regeneration. Investigations of the spine continually move from the research bench-through endeavors that incorporate basic science, biology, biomaterials, mechanical testing, finite element analysis, and mathematical modeling-to the bedside-through treatments, devices, and procedures designed to improve patient health while safeguarding quality of life. PMID:27015056

  11. Biometric X-ray-function diagnosis of the cervical spine

    Subject of this study was the investigation of functional disorders of the cervical spine and their possible causal relation with the symptoms and signs of pathological cervical images. In order to approach this investigation with objectively measurable time criteria, functional X-ray diagnostics results to be the appropriate method. From the results obtained in individual and statistical group examinations as well as in examinations of the longitudinal section the conclusion is drawn that a functional disorder of the cervical spine may provoke a cervical syndrome. (APR)

  12. CT guided percutaneous biopsy of the cervical spine

    To evaluate the effects of CT guided biopsy of cervical spine in clinical treatment, and discuss the technique involved, ten patients underwent percutaneous biopsy of cervical lesions under CT guidance. Anterior approach with the patient sitting and the needle passing through the mouth was done in one case; latero posterior approach with patient in lateral decubitus position in 5 cases; and lateral approach with 3 patients supine and 1 in lateral decubitus. Nine of ten patients had definitive histological diagnosis, the accuracy of biopsy was 90%, no complications were found. CT guided biopsy of cervical spine is safe and effective, with rare complications, providing important information for clinical treatment

  13. Surgical treatment in spine Paget's disease: a systematic review.

    Jorge-Mora, Alberto; Amhaz-Escanlar, Samer; Lois-Iglesias, Ana; Leborans-Eiris, Susana; Pino-Minguez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a disease characterized by a disorder in the bone metabolism. The spine is the second region affected after the pelvis. Surgical treatment is reserved for cases refractory to medical treatment. We performed a systematic review of patients with Paget disease of bone affecting the spine, treated surgically in the last 30 years. The main objective of the review is to find out indications for surgery, outcomes of these patients and also the standard perioperative management. PMID:26126588

  14. Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Setup with Two Spine Fields

    Craniospinal irradiation is an integral part of treatment for a number of cancers. Typically, patients are positioned prone, which allows visualization of field matches. However, a supine position allows better airway access for patients requiring anesthesia, and is more comfortable for patients. One potential difficulty with supine positioning occurs when the patient is tall and requires matching 2 spine fields. We describe a technique to match the spine fields using light fields on the bottom of the treatment table, and verified the approach on a phantom. The accuracy of the technique is demonstrated for the first 4 patients, with the majority of field gaps and overlaps below our clinical tolerance of 2 mm.

  15. A generic detailed rigid-body lumbar spine model

    De Zee, Mark; Hansen, Lone; Wong, Christian; Rasmussen, John; Simonsen, Erik B

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present a musculo-skeletal model of the lumbar spine, which can be shared and lends itself to investigation in many locations by different researchers. This has the potential for greater reproducibility and subsequent improvement of its quality from the combined...... literature. The work resulted in a detailed lumbar spine model with seven rigid segments with 18 degrees-of-freedom and 154 muscles. The model is able to produce a maximum extension moment of 238 Nm around L5/S1. Moreover, a comparison was made with in vivo intradiscal pressure measurements of the L4-5 disc...

  16. Neck swelling: Unusual manifestation of Pott’s spine

    D. Deviprasad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB of the skeletal system constitutes only 1–3% of extrapulmonary TB and usually involves the thoracic spine. These patients usually present with malaise, weight loss, night sweats, muscle spasms, paraspinal swellings or neurological deficits. We report a case of tuberculosis of the spine, which had an unusual presentation only as a painless neck swelling, without any neurological complications. The patient did not respond well to antitubercular therapy (ATT, necessitating thoracotomy and drainage of pus. Then his ATT was continued for 1 year and is asymptomatic during 1 year of follow up thereafter.

  17. Scoliosis and spine involvement in fibrous dysplasia of bone

    Mancini, Federico; Corsi, Alessandro; De Maio, Fernando; Riminucci, Mara; Ippolito, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Few studies focused on the prevalence of scoliosis and involvement of the spine in patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) of bone. We examined for FD involvement of the spine and scoliosis in 56 patients affected by FD of bone. Fifty patients were part of a cohort reported in a multicentric study on FD promoted by European Pediatric Orthopedic Society (EPOS) in 1999, and six were new patients. There were 30 females and 26 males (mean age 12.5years; range 142years). Twenty-three had monostoti...

  18. Effective directional self-gathering of drops on spine of cactus with splayed capillary arrays

    Chengcheng Liu; Yan Xue; Yuan Chen; Yongmei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    We report that the fast droplet transport without additional energy expenditure can be achieved on the spine of cactus (Gymnocalycium baldianum) with the assistance of its special surface structure: the cactus spine exhibits a cone-like structure covered with tilted scales. A single scale and the spine surface under it cooperatively construct a splayed capillary tube. The arrays of capillary tube formed by the overlapping scales build up the out layer of the spine. The serial drops would be d...

  19. Spine Pruning Drives Antipsychotic-sensitive Locomotion via Circuit Control of Striatal Dopamine

    Kim, Il Hwan; Rossi, Mark A.; Aryal, Dipendra K.; Racz, Bence; Kim, Namsoo; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Wang, Fan; Wetsel, William C.; Weinberg, Richard J.; Yin, Henry; Soderling, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders may arise from anomalies in long-range neuronal connectivity downstream of pathologies in dendritic spines. However, the mechanisms that may link spine pathology to circuit abnormalities relevant to atypical behavior remain unknown. Using a mouse model to conditionally disrupt a critical regulator of the dendritic spine cytoskeleton, Arp2/3, we report here a molecular mechanism that unexpectedly reveals the interrelationship of progressive spine pr...

  20. Cervical spine movement during intubation using the Airtraq and direct laryngoscopy

    ERDEN, ?. Ayd?n; PAMUK, A. Glsn; Uzun, ?ennur; GEY?K, Serdar; EK?RGE, Saruhan; Aypar, lk

    2010-01-01

    To compare 2 endotracheal intubation techniques, namely direct laryngoscopy and Airtraq, according to their influence on cervical spine movement and intubation time and success rates, complications, and hemodynamic responses. Materials and methods: Thirty three patients without cervical spine problems were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomized into direct laryngoscopy and Airtraq groups. Assessment of movement of the cervical spine was made by taking 3 lateral cervical spine X-ra...

  1. Transient expansion of synaptically connected dendritic spines upon induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation

    Lang, Cynthia; Barco, Angel; Zablow, Leonard; Kandel, Eric R.; Siegelbaum, Steven A.; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions from dendritic shafts that contain the postsynaptic sites of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Spines undergo dramatic activity-dependent structural changes that are particularly prominent during neuronal development. Although changes in spine shape or number have been proposed to contribute to forms of synaptic plasticity that underlie learning and memory, the extent to which spines remain plastic in the adult brain is unclear. We find that induction...

  2. A non-proteinaceous toxin from the venomous spines of the lionfish Pterois volitans (Linnaeus).

    Nair, M S; Cheung, P; Leong, I; Ruggieri, G D

    1985-01-01

    The venomous spines of P. volitans contain a non-proteinaceous ichthyotoxin of low molecular weight. This toxin could be isolated only from spines excised from the living fish; the toxin is apparently destroyed following death, as the extracts of the spines of the dead fish were non-toxic. PMID:4024148

  3. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    2010-10-01

    ...— (1) Flex by an amount that permits the rigid thoracic spine to rotate from the torso's initial... that when the lumbar spine flexion is 40 degrees, the applied force is perpendicular to the thoracic... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly...

  4. Chandra/ACIS Subpixel Event Repositioning. II. Further Refinements and Comparison between Backside and Front-side Illuminated X-ray CCDs

    Li, Jingqiang; Kastner, Joel H.; Prigozhin, Gregory Y.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.

    2004-01-01

    We further investigate subpixel event repositioning (SER) algorithms in application to Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) CCD imaging. SER algorithms have been applied to backside illuminated (BI) Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) devices, and demonstrate spatial resolution improvements in Chandra/ACIS observations. Here a new SER algorithm that is charge split dependent is added to the SER family. We describe the application of SER algorithms to frontside illuminated (FI) ACIS devices. T...

  5. Fibrin glue application in conjunction with tetracycline hydrochloride root conditioning and semilunar coronally repositioned flap in the treatment of gingival recession

    George, Joann Pauline; Prabhuji, M. L. V.; Shaeesta, K. B.; Lazarus, Flemingson

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present the results of Fibrin Adhesive System (FAS) application, a topical biological tissue adhesive in the treatment of maxillary buccal recessions. A 40-year-old male patient presented with a pair of class I buccal recession defects on maxillary cuspids. Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Semilunar coronally repositioned flap (Tarnow's technique), root debridement, root conditioning with tetracycline hydrochloride sol...

  6. Using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device to assess head repositioning accuracy in individuals with cervical radiculopathy in comparison to neck- healthy individuals

    Wibault, Johanna; Vaillant, Jacques; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Dedering, sa; Peolsson, Anneli

    2013-01-01

    This study had two purposes: to compare head repositioning accuracy (HRA) using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device between individuals with cervical radiculopathy caused by disc disease (CDD; n=71) and neck- healthy individuals (n=173); and to evaluate the testretest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD, and criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals, with quantification of measurement errors. Parameters of reliability and...

  7. Outfracture of the inferior turbinates during superior repositioning Le Fort I osteotomy with cone-beam computed tomographic analysis of the volume of the nasal cavity.

    Kim, Hyo-Geon; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Song, Jae-Min; Sandor, George K; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the volumes of the nasal cavities of 35 patients treated with superior repositioning Le Fort I osteotomy by analysing cone-beam computed tomography (CT) data with a 3-dimensional reconstruction program to correlate changes in the volume of the nasal cavity that were associated with the maxillary superior repositioning and the role of outfracture of the inferior turbinates. The patients were treated at the Pusan National Dental Hospital during the 14-month period January 2011-March 2012.. The patients were divided into two groups, the first of which consisted of 20 patients who had superior repositioning of 4mm or more with a mean superior movement of 5.2mm and outfracture of the inferior turbinates (outfracture group). The second group consisted of 15 patients who also had more than 4mm impaction with a mean superior movement of 5.0mm and for whom outfracture was not done (no outfracture group). Nasal symptoms were investigated preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively using the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale, and 3-dimensional volumetric analysis was made using cone-beam CT data to assess changes in nasal volume. There were significant differences between the groups in volumetric changes (V1-V2) (p=0.001) but no significant differences between the sexes. The volume of the nasal cavity in the outfracture group decreased by 20% after superior repositioning, but that in the no outfracture group decreased by 33%. Among the 20 patients in the outfracture group not one complained of nasal symptoms postoperatively. We conclude that outfracture of the inferior turbinates should be considered when the amount of superior movement of maxilla is more than 4mm. PMID:26818114

  8. Modeling the Effects of Moisture-Related Skin-Support Friction on the Risk for Superficial Pressure Ulcers during Patient Repositioning in Bed

    AmitGefen

    2013-01-01

    Patient repositioning when the skin is moist e.g. due to sweat or urine may cause skin breakdown since wetness increases the skin-support coefficient of friction (COF) and hence also the shear stresses that are generated in the skin when the patient is being moved. This everyday hospital scenario was never studied systematically however. The aim of this study was to simulate such interactions using a biomechanical computational model which is the first of its kind, in order to quantitatively...

  9. Modeling the Effects of Moisture-Related Skin-Support Friction on the Risk for Superficial Pressure Ulcers during Patient Repositioning in Bed

    Shaked, Eliav; Gefen, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Patient repositioning when the skin is moist, e.g., due to sweat or urine may cause skin breakdown since wetness increases the skin-support coefficient of friction (COF) and hence also the shear stresses that are generated in the skin when the patient is being moved. This everyday hospital scenario was never studied systematically however. The aim of this study was to simulate such interactions using a biomechanical computational model which is the first of its kind, in order to quantitativel...

  10. Changes in temporomandibular joint morphology in class II patients treated with fixed mandibular repositioning and evaluated through 3D imaging: a systematic review.

    Al-Saleh, M A Q; Alsufyani, N; Flores-Mir, C; Nebbe, B; Major, P W

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the effects of skeletal class II malocclusion treatment using fixed mandibular repositioning appliances on the position and morphology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Two independent reviewers performed comprehensive electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM reviews and Scopus (until May 5, 2015). The references of the identified articles were also manually searched. All studies investigating morphological changes of the TMJ articular disc, condyle and glenoid fossa with 3D imaging following non-surgical fixed mandibular repositioning appliances in growing individuals with class II malocclusions were included in the analysis. Of the 269 articles initially reviewed, only 12 articles used magnetic resonance imaging and two articles used computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT images. Treatment effect on condyle and glenoid fossa was discussed in eight articles. Treatment effect on TMJ articular disc position and morphology was discussed in seven articles. All articles showed a high risk of bias due to deficient methodology: inadequate consideration of confounding variables, blinding of image assessment, selection or absence of control group and outcome measurement. Reported changes in osseous remodelling, condylar and disc position were contradictory. The selected articles failed to establish conclusive evidence of the exact nature of TMJ tissue response to fixed mandibular repositioning appliances. PMID:26260422

  11. The examination of mechanical properties of spine unit with Norian

    Florian, Z.; Wendsche, P.; Reinish, M.; Kotek, Vladimír

    Vol. 3. Praha : ÚTAM AV ČR, 2000 - (Náprstek, J.; Minster, J.), s. 111-114 ISBN 80-86246-06-X. [International conference Engineering mechanics 2000. Svratka (CZ), 15.05.2000-18.05.2000] R&D Projects: GA MZd ND5191 Keywords : mechanical properties of spine unit * biocompatible ceramic material Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery

  12. Positional device for cinematographic MR of the cervical spine

    A novel positioning device is explained and the experience obtained so far with its application in cinematic MRI of the cervical spine, allowing an extended range of movement from 60 degrees ante- to 40 degrees retroflexion. The tests were done with volounteers. (orig./MG)

  13. Creating A Sustainable Model of Spine Care in Underserved Communities

    Haldeman, Scott; Nordin, Margareta; Outerbridge, Geoff; Hurwitz, Eric L; Hondras, Maria; Brady, O'Dane; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah; Ford, Timothy; Acaroğlu, Emre

    2015-01-01

    delivering adequate care, World Spine Care (WSC) was established to "improve lives in underserved communities through sustainable, integrated, evidence-based, spinal care." WSC is comprised of volunteers and institutions from 6 continents and several countries, and incorporates a Board of Directors, an...

  14. [Morphological differences and classifications of small spines of puffer fishes].

    Fujimoto, Yoshimichi; Uchida, Kenichi; Oyaizu, Makoto; Hamano, Yonekazu

    2007-08-01

    The differences among the small spines of 6 species of puffers have been clarified by means of microscopic observation. Small spines of puffers arise from the basement, which is composed of spines protruding from the surface skin, with roots extending horizontally in all directions in the layer under the surface skin. Using the characteristic shapes of the basement, we have classified the puffer group of "Sansaifugu" (Takifugu flavidus) and "Mefugu" (T. obscurus) as Type I and the group of "Shirosabafugu" (Lagocephalus wheeleri), "Kurosabafugu" (L. gloveri), "Dokusabafugu" (L. lunaris) and "Motosabafugu" (L. spadiceus) as Type II. The number of fore and back roots, including the branches at the ends, further varies in each group. The length and width of each root were measured. As a result, similar species within the group comprising "Sansaifugu" (T. flavidus) and "Mefugu" (T. obscurus) and 4 species of the "Sabafugu" (Lagocephalus) group including "Dokusabafugu" (L. lunaris) have been clearly distinguished. We conclude that examination of the shape of the basement of small spines can be an effective identification index. PMID:17892006

  15. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric spine radiography

    Seidenbusch, Michael; Schneider, Karl [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology - Paediatric Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric x-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for segmental spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional segmental spine radiographs were calculated performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented may be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during spine radiographs of patients of all age groups and all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. (orig.)

  16. DISH of the cervical spine causing epiglottis impingement

    Bartalena, Tommaso; Buia, Francesco; Borgonovi, Alberto; Rinaldi, Maria Francesca; Modolon, Cecilia; Bassi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a condition characterized by calcification and ossification of ligaments and entheses; it mainly affects the vertebral column. We report the case of a patient with pharyngeal dysphagia and episodic aspiration secondary to DISH involvement of the cervical spine, which had caused alteration in the epiglottic tilt mechanism during deglutition.

  17. Landmarking and feature localization in spine x-rays

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2001-10-01

    The general problem of developing algorithms for the automated or computer-assisted indexing of images by structural contents is a significant research challenge. This is particularly so in the case of biomedical images, where the structures of interest are commonly irregular, overlapping, and partially occluded. Examples are the images created by digitizing film x-rays of the human cervical and lumbar spines. We have begun work toward the indexing of 17 000 such spine images for features of interest in the osteoarthritis and vertebral morphometry research communities. This work requires the segmentation of the images into vertebral structures with sufficient accuracy to distinguish pathology on the basis of shape, labeling of the segmented structures by proper anatomical name, and classification of the segmented, labeled structures into groups corresponding to high level semantic features of interest, using training data provided by biomedical experts. In this paper, we provide a technical characterization of the cervical spine images and the biomedical features of interest, describe the evolving technical approach for the segmentation and indexing problem, and provide results of algorithms to acquire basic landmark data and localization of spine regions in the images.

  18. Conservative Management for a Traumatic Cervical Spine Cycling Injury

    Rebeca Yde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Competitive cycling holds an inherent risk of traumatic injury often resulting in fracture. Questions regarding the probability of return to sport then arise. The purpose of this case report is to describe the treatment approach and likelihood of returning to cycling after traumatic fracture of the cervical spine and clavicle. This case report describes the use of an original combination of interventions for a C1 fracture with an associated open reduction internal fixation of a left clavicle fracture in a 39-year-old male cyclist. The patient lost control of his bike while descending a slippery slope and was propelled over the handlebars landing head first. The resultant cervical spine and clavicle fractures required twelve weeks in a cervical collar. Physical therapy interventions focused on regaining strength and functional mobility of the cervical spine and shoulder. Following treatment a minimal detectable change was seen for range of motion (>6% of the cervical spine and shoulder, the Numerical Pain Rating Scale (3 point change, and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (29.2% change. The patient returned to his prior level of function at home and work. Medical clearance was received to return to training, with a hopeful prognosis of eventually returning to competition.

  19. Reconstitution of lost cervical spine function: management strategies

    Ernst, Arne

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The cervical spine (CS is the most vulnerable part of the whole spine because it has least protection. This is due to its high mobility (few bone, but largely muscle and joint support which is associated with a high injury risk. The anatomical characteristics are based on evolutionary biological reasons, i.e. humans had to be able to freely controlling the surrounding space with their eyes and to have permanent postural control by an upright position of the head. The cervical spine, its joint and the surrounding muscles are highly interconnected (e.g. direct neuronal projections into the brain stem, connections to the TMJ, Head's zones with projections to the skin surface. Moreover, the spinal pain memory store can lead to a variets of multi-facette clinical pictures. In addition to reversible disorders of the cervical spine, posttraumatic disorders play a major role. The therapy options available include physiotherapy, drug therapy and surgical measures. However, a multidisciplinary approach is most favourable.

  20. Examination of Cervical Spine Histological Sections - A Technical Note

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Ullerup, Rita; Vesterby, Annie; Gregersen, Markil Ebbe Gregers

    2006-01-01

    of these joints has not yet been performed, nor has any generally accepted histological classification system for degenerative changes in the cervical spine facet joints been proposed. In the case of whiplash injuries the presented histological method has particular relevance since it allows detailed...

  1. Radiographic abnormalities in the thoracolumbar spine of young elite skiers.

    Rachbauer, F; Sterzinger, W; Eibl, G

    2001-01-01

    An increased frequency of radiologic abnormalities in the thoracolumbar spine has been reported among young athletes in various sports, but there are no data concerning ski sports. To evaluate the incidence of these abnormalities in young elite skiers, we compared 120 skiers younger than 17 years old (alpine skiers, ski jumpers, and Nordic cross-country skiers) with a random sample of 39 control subjects of the same age who had no history of high-performance sports participation. Standardized anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the entire lumbar spine, the lower thoracic spine, and the upper part of the sacrum were obtained from each athlete and each control subject. Radiographs were evaluated by two independent observers for the presence and size of anterior and posterior endplate lesions and Schmorl's nodes. The elite alpine skiers and ski jumpers demonstrated a significantly higher rate of anterior endplate lesions than did the control subjects. This finding might be attributable to excessive loading and repetitive trauma of the immature spine under high velocity, especially in the forward bent posture. PMID:11476384

  2. Some borderlands of the cervical spine. Pt. 2

    The complexity of the structure of the cervical spine as well superimposition by the parts of adjacent vertebrae, as well as other structures may cause some abnormalities to be overlooked. Among those abnormalities are, the short sagittal diameter, neoplasm in the cancellous part of the vertebral bodies, spurs in the apophyseal joints, trauma, infection and others. (orig.)

  3. Identification and classification of spine vertebrae by automated methods

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2001-07-01

    We are currently working toward developing computer-assisted methods for the indexing of a collection of 17,000 digitized x-ray images by biomedical content. These images were collected as part of a nationwide health survey and form a research resource for osteoarthitis and bone morphometry. This task requires the development of algorithms to robustly analyze the x-ray contents for key landmarks, to segment the vertebral bodies, to accurately measure geometric features of the individual vertebrae and inter-vertebral areas, and to classify the spine anatomy into normal or abnormal classes for conditions of interest, including anterior osteophytes and disc space narrowing. Subtasks of this work have been created and divided among collaborators. In this paper, we provide a technical description of the overall task, report on progress made by collaborators, and provide the most recent results of our own research into obtaining first-order location of the spine region of interest by automated methods. We are currently concentrating on images of the cervical spine, but will expand the work to include the lumbar spine as well. Development of successful image processing techniques for computer-assisted indexing of medical image collections is expected to have a significant impact within the medical research and patient care systems.

  4. Critical care of obese patients during and after spine surgery.

    Elgafy, Hossein; Hamilton, Ryan; Peters, Nicholas; Paull, Daniel; Hassan, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most prevalent health problems facing the United States today, with a recent JAMA article published in 2014 estimating the prevalence of one third of all adults in the United States being obese. Also, due to technological advancements, the incidence of spine surgeries is growing. Considering these overall increases in both obesity and the performance of spinal surgeries, it can be inferred that more spinal surgery candidates will be obese. Due to this, certain factors must be taken into consideration when dealing with spine surgeries in the obese. Obesity is closely correlated with additional medical comorbidities, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. The pre-operative evaluation may be more difficult, as a more extensive medical evaluation may be needed. Also, adequate radiographic images can be difficult to obtain due to patient size and equipment limitations. Administering anesthesia becomes more difficult, as does proper patient positioning. Post-operatively, the obese patient is at greater risk for reintubation, difficulty with pain control, wound infection and deep vein thrombosis. However, despite these concerns, appropriate clinical outcomes can still be achieved in the obese spine surgical candidate. Obesity, therefore, is not a contraindication to spine surgery, and appropriate patient selection remains the key to obtaining favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:26855897

  5. Transoral approach to the cervical spine: report of four cases

    O'Laoire, SA; Thomas, Dgt

    1982-01-01

    The transoral approach to the upper cervical spine is an established but little used route, offering excellent access with good wound healing, to lesions of the bodies of the atlas, axis and upper part of the third cervical vertebra. The authors report four cases which demonstrate the value of the procedure.

  6. A Computational Investigation Of Minimal Invasive Spine Surgery

    Rasmussen, Sten; Rasmussen, John

    Introduction: MISS has been used for more than a decade. The reasoning is the perception that a gentle surgery is more beneficial for the patient. Especially since traditional open spine surgery (TOSS) has several reported limitations including blood loss, muscle pain and infection. Minimal...

  7. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric spine radiography

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric x-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for segmental spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional segmental spine radiographs were calculated performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented may be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during spine radiographs of patients of all age groups and all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. (orig.)

  8. Instrumental design for anterior fixation of dorsal and lumbar spine

    This is an experimental work; the main purpose is design a system for anterior fixation of thoracolumbar spine. The system includes screws, rods and transverse connectors. Mechanical tests to the system with axial and rotation charges showed elevated resistance and plasticity. The process include the development of elements for application of the system

  9. Plasma cellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine - a case report

    The authors report the case of a young patient suffering from plasmacellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine, an unusual localisation of this type of chronic osteomyelitis. They discuss the role of imaging diagnostic modalities in this disease, focussing on MRI. (orig.)

  10. Percutaneous approach to the upper thoracic spine: optimal patient positioning

    Bayley, Edward; Clamp, Jonathan; Boszczyk, Bronek M.

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous access to the upper thoracic vertebrae under fluoroscopic guidance is challenging. We describe our positioning technique facilitating optimal visualisation of the high thoracic vertebrae in the prone position. This allows safe practice of kyphoplasty, vertebroplasty and biopsy throughout the upper thoracic spine.

  11. Eleven Levels of Spinous Process Fractures in Thoracolumbar Spine

    Kim, Whoan Jeang; Chi, Yong Joo; Park, Kyung Hoon; Choy, Won Sik

    2014-01-01

    Cases of over 5-level spinous process fractures are extremely rare. Thoracolumbar region of spine is superimposed on ribs; and as such additional studies such as computerized tomography are needed to diagnose fractures in this region. We report a case of 11 contiguous level thoracolumbar spinous process fractures, which has been treated conservatively.

  12. Role of early minimal-invasive spine fixation in acute thoracic and lumbar spine trauma

    Schmidt Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Polytraumatized patients following a severe trauma suffer from substantial disturbances of the immune system. Secondary organ dysfunction syndromes due to early hyperinflammation and late immunparalysis contribute to adverse outcome. Consequently the principle of damage control surgery / orthopedics developed in the last two decades to limit secondary iatrogenic insult in these patients. New percutaneous internal fixators provide implants for a damage control approach of spinal trauma in polytraumatized patients. The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of minimal-invasive instrumentation in the setting of minor and major trauma and to discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of this procedure. Materials and Methods: The present study is a prospective analysis of 76 consecutive patients (mean age 53.3 years with thoracolumbar spine fractures following major or minor trauma from August 2003 to January 2007 who were subjected to minimal-invasive dorsal instrumentation using CD Horizon ® Sextant TM Rod Insertion System and Longitude TM Rod Insertion System (Medtronic ® Sofamor Danek. Perioperative and postoperative outcome measures including e.g. local and systemic complications were assessed and discussed. Results: Forty-nine patients (64.5% suffered from minor trauma (Injury Severity Score < 16. Polytraumatized patients (n=27; 35.5% had associated chest (n=20 and traumatic brain injuries (n=22. For mono- and bisegmental dorsal instrumentation the Sextant TM was used in 60 patients, whereas in 16 longer ranging instrumentations the (prototype Longitude TM system was implanted. Operation time was substantially lower than in conventional approach at minimum 22.5 min for Sextant and 36.2 min for Longitude TM , respectively. Geriatric patients with high perioperative risk according to ASA classification benefited from the less invasive approach and lack of approach-related complications including no substantial blood loss. Conclusion: Low rate of approach-related complications in association with short operation time and virtually no blood loss is beneficial in the setting of polytraumatized patients regarding damage control orthopedics, as well as in geriatric patients with high perioperative risk. The minimal-invasive instrumentation of the spine is associated with beneficial outcome in a selected patient population.

  13. Vitrectoma pars plana y reimplante de lente intraocular en surco Pars plana vitrectomy and intraocular lens repositioning in the sulcus

    Alejandro Guerra Garca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se present un caso de lente intraocular luxado a vtreo en paciente con conteo bajo de clulas endoteliales e intolerancia a lentes de contacto. Se practic vitrectoma pars plana con reimplante de lente en surco ciliar con el objetivo de demostrar la fiabilidad de la tcnica para casos que presenten condiciones adecuadas y situaciones especiales. Se revis la bibliografa para conocer las tendencias actuales con respecto al manejo de esta patologa. El paciente alcanz una agudeza visual de 20/30. El lente permaneci estable en el surco 3 meses despus de practicada la vitrectoma. El manejo de esta entidad debe ser personalizado. La tcnica utilizada debe ser siempre la primera opcin de tratamiento y parece ser segura en casos cuidadosamente escogidos.A case of dislocated intraocular lens moved to the vitreous cavity in a patient with low endothelial cell count and contact lens intolerance was reported. A pars plana vitrectomy with lens repositioning was performed to demonstrate the safety of this technique for some special cases under adequate conditions. The literature was reviewed to learn about the current management of this pathology. Finally, patient's best visual acuity was 20/30. The stability of the lens was confirmed three month l after the vitrectomy. Management of this disorder should be customized. This technique should be considered as the first option of treatment and seems to be safe in selected cases.

  14. Repositioning accuracy of cerebral fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy using CT scanning; Evaluation par tomodensitometrie du repositionnement en radiotherapie stereotaxique fractionnee cerebrale

    Pasquier, D.; Dubus, F.; Castelain, B.; Delplanque, M.; Lartigau, E. [Centre O.-Lambret, Dept. Universitaire de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Pasquier, D. [Centre Galilee, Polyclinique de la Louviere, 59 - Lille (France); Bernier, V.; Buchheit, I. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Kerr, C.; Santoro, I. [Centre Val d' Aurelle, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 34 - Montpellier (France); Huchet, A.; Causse, N. [Hopital Saint-Andre, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Dubus, F.; Castelain, B.; Delplanque, M.; Lartigau, E. [Lille-2 Univ., 59 (France)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of patient repositioning in fractionated cerebral stereotactic radiotherapy using a Brain Lab stereotactic cranial mask in conjunction with standard dental fixation. Patients and methods: Fifty planning and checking CT scans were performed in 25 patients. The check CT scan was performed before or after one of the three sessions of treatment. Co registration to the planning CT scan was used to assess alignment of the iso centre to the reference markers. The relative position of the P.T.V. with regard to iso centre allowed us to determine its total displacement (3-dimensional vector). Results: Mean iso centre translations ({+-} S.D.) taking into account direction were -0.01 {+-} 0.7, -0.2 {+-} 1.3 and 0.07 {+-} 0.5 mm in medio-lateral, cranio caudal and anteroposterior directions respectively. Mean rotations ({+-}S.D.) were -0.02 {+-} 0.6, -0.08 {+-} 0.3 and -0.1 {+-} 0.3 degree in medio-lateral, cranio caudal and anteroposterior axes respectively. Mean overall P.T.V. displacement was 1.8 {+-} 1.5 mm. P.T.V. displacement was smaller than 2 and 3 mm in 19/25 and 23/25 patients respectively. Conclusion: The accuracy of patient positioning using a stereotactic cranial mask system is similar to those reported in the literature and shows a satisfactory reproducibility with a standard dental fixation. (authors)

  15. Different therapeutic mechanisms of rigid and semi-rigid mandibular repositioning devices in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Suga, Hokuto; Mishima, Katsuaki; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Asuka; Matsumura, Mayumi; Mano, Takamitsu; Yamasaki, Youichi; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2014-12-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of rigid and semi-rigid mandibular repositioning devices (MRDs) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), seven and 13 patients received rigid and semi-rigid MRDs, respectively. Each patient underwent polysomnographic and computed tomographic examinations at the initial consultation and after symptom improvement. Three-dimensional models of the upper airway (hard palate level to epiglottic base) were reconstructed by image processing software (Mimics version 14.2) to measure airway morphology. The mean age and body mass index were 58.1 years and 24.8 kg/m(2), respectively, in the rigid MRD group and 57.9 years and 23.2 kg/m(2), respectively, in the semi-rigid MRD group. The apnea-hypopnea index significantly improved (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test) from 22.0 to 8.9 and 20.5 to 11.5 events per hour of sleep in the respective groups. The cross-sectional areas measured at the epiglottic tip (from 2.0 to 2.6 cm(2)) and hard palate (from 2.6 to 3.3 cm(2)) levels also increased in the respective groups (P < 0.05). However, airway volume, cross-sectional area measured at the uvular tip level, and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the airway were not significantly different. In conclusion, both types of MRDs improve respiratory status, but they affect different parts of the airway. PMID:24969766

  16. Relative Contribution of Upper and Lower Lumbar Spinal Segments to Flexion/Extension: Comparison between Normal Spines and Spines with Disc Disease in Asian Patients

    Bali, Tarun; Malhar N Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To evaluate the contribution of upper and lower lumbar segments to flexion and extension of the lumbar spine in normal and diseased spines. Overview of Literature The specific contributions of upper and lower lumbar segments during flexion/extension have rarely been reported. Furthermore, no comparisons between the flexion/extension behaviors of normal and diseased spines have been reported until now. Methods Flexion and extension lateral radiogr...

  17. Heterogeneous meshing and biomechanical modeling of human spine.

    Teo, J C M; Chui, C K; Wang, Z L; Ong, S H; Yan, C H; Wang, S C; Wong, H K; Teoh, S H

    2007-03-01

    We aim to develop a patient-specific biomechanical model of human spine for the purpose of surgical training and planning. In this paper, we describe the development of a finite-element model of the spine from the VHD Male Data. The finite-element spine model comprises volumetric elements suitable for deformation and other finite-element analysis using ABAQUS. The mesh generation solution accepts segmented radiological slices as input, and outputs three-dimensional (3D) volumetric finite element meshes that are ABAQUS compliant. The proposed mesh generation method first uses a grid plane to divide the contours of the anatomical boundaries and its inclusions into discrete meshes. A grid frame is then built to connect the grid planes between any two adjacent planes using a novel scheme. The meshes produced consist of brick elements in the interior of the contours and with tetrahedral and wedge elements at the boundaries. The nodal points are classified according to their materials and hence, elements can be assigned different properties. The resultant spine model comprises a detailed model of the 7 cervical vertebrae, 12 thoracic vertebrae, 5 lumbar vertebrae, and S1. Each of the vertebrae and intervertebral disc has between 1200 and 6000 elements, and approximately 1200 elements, respectively. The accuracy of the resultant VHD finite element spine model was good based on visual comparison of volume-rendered images of the original CT data, and has been used in a computational analysis involving needle insertion and static deformation. We also compared the mesh generated using our method against two automatically generated models; one consists of purely tetrahedral elements and the other hexahedral elements. PMID:16679044

  18. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    Izzo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guarnieri, Gianluigi, E-mail: gianluigiguarnieri@hotmail.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guglielmi, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.gugliemi@unifg.it [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability.

  19. In Vivo Proton Beam Range Verification Using Spine MRI Changes

    Purpose: In proton therapy, uncertainty in the location of the distal dose edge can lead to cautious treatment plans that reduce the dosimetric advantage of protons. After radiation exposure, vertebral bone marrow undergoes fatty replacement that is visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This presents an exciting opportunity to observe radiation dose distribution in vivo. We used quantitative spine MRI changes to precisely detect the distal dose edge in proton radiation patients. Methods and Materials: We registered follow-up T1-weighted MRI images to planning computed tomography scans from 10 patients who received proton spine irradiation. A radiation dose-MRI signal intensity curve was created using the lateral beam penumbra in the sacrum. This curve was then used to measure range errors in the lumbar spine. Results: In the lateral penumbra, there was an increase in signal intensity with higher dose throughout the full range of 0-37.5 Gy (RBE). In the distal fall-off region, the beam sometimes appeared to penetrate farther than planned. The mean overshoot in 10 patients was 1.9 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.8-3.1 mm), on the order of the uncertainties inherent to our range verification method. Conclusions: We have demonstrated in vivo proton range verification using posttreatment spine MRI changes. Our analysis suggests the presence of a systematic overshoot of a few millimeters in some proton spine treatments, but the range error does not exceed the uncertainty incorporated into the treatment planning margin. It may be possible to extend our technique to MRI sequences that show early bone marrow changes, enabling adaptive treatment modification.

  20. Nicotine induces dendritic spine remodeling in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Oda, Akira; Yamagata, Kanato; Nakagomi, Saya; Uejima, Hiroshi; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the CNS are involved in synaptic plasticity and cognition. Both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) influence plasticity and cognitive function. The mechanism underlying nAChR-induced plasticity, however, has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate morphological changes in dendritic spines following activation of α4β2* nAChRs, which are expressed on glutamatergic pre-synaptic termini of cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposure of the neurons to nicotine resulted in a lateral enlargement of spine heads. This was abolished by dihydro-β-erythroidine, an antagonist of α4β2* nAChRs, but not by α-bungarotoxin, an antagonist of α7 nAChRs. Tetanus toxin or a mixture of 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, antagonists of NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors, blocked the nicotine-induced spine remodeling. In addition, nicotine exerted full spine-enlarging response in the post-synaptic neuron whose β2 nAChR expression was knocked down. Finally, pre-treatment with nicotine enhanced the Ca(2+)-response of the neurons to glutamate. These data suggest that nicotine influences the activity of glutamatergic neurotransmission through the activation of pre-synaptic α4β2 nAChRs, resulting in the modulation of spinal architecture and responsiveness. The present findings may represent one of the cellular mechanisms underlying cholinergic tuning of brain function. Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brain influences plasticity and cognition. Here, activation of α4β2* nAChRs, which are expressed on glutamatergic presynaptic termini, results in the enlargement of dendritic spines through the modulation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission. The remodeled spinal architecture might be responsible for the change in responsiveness of neural circuitry, leading to cholinergic tuning of brain function. PMID:24117996

  1. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability

  2. Percutaneous vertebroplasty for multiple myeloma of the cervical spine

    Mont' Alverne, Francisco [Universite Paris VI, Department of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Sao Paulo University, Department of Radiology, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Vallee, Jean-Noel; Guillevin, Remy; Cormier, Evelyne; Jean, Betty; Rose, Michelle; Chiras, Jacques [Universite Paris VI, Department of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Caldas, Jose Guilherme [Sao Paulo University, Department of Radiology, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    Spinal involvement is a common presentation of multiple myeloma (MM); however, the cervical spine is the least common site of myelomatous involvement. Few studies evaluate the results of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) in the treatment of MM of the spine. The purpose of this series is to report on the use of PV in the treatment of MM of the cervical spine and to review the literature. From January 1994 to October 2007, four patients (three men and one woman; mean age, 45 years) who underwent five PV for painful MM in the cervical spine were retrospectively reviewed. The pain was estimated by the patient on a verbal analogic scale. Clinical follow-up was available for all patients (mean, 27.5 months; range, 1-96 months). The mean volume of cement injected per vertebral body was 2.3 {+-} 0.8 mL (range, 1.0-4.0 mL) with a mean vertebral filling of 55.0 {+-} 12.0% (range, 40.0-75.0%). Analgesic efficacy was achieved in all patients. One patient had a spinal instability due to a progression of spinal deformity noted on follow-up radiographs, without clinical symptoms. Cement leakage was detected in three (60%) of the five treated vertebrae. There was no clinical complication. The present series suggests that PV for MM of the cervical spine is safe and effective for pain control; nonetheless, the detrimental impact of the disease on bone quality should prompt close radiological follow-up after PV owing to the risk of spinal instability. (orig.)

  3. Percutaneous vertebroplasty for multiple myeloma of the cervical spine

    Spinal involvement is a common presentation of multiple myeloma (MM); however, the cervical spine is the least common site of myelomatous involvement. Few studies evaluate the results of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) in the treatment of MM of the spine. The purpose of this series is to report on the use of PV in the treatment of MM of the cervical spine and to review the literature. From January 1994 to October 2007, four patients (three men and one woman; mean age, 45 years) who underwent five PV for painful MM in the cervical spine were retrospectively reviewed. The pain was estimated by the patient on a verbal analogic scale. Clinical follow-up was available for all patients (mean, 27.5 months; range, 1-96 months). The mean volume of cement injected per vertebral body was 2.3 0.8 mL (range, 1.0-4.0 mL) with a mean vertebral filling of 55.0 12.0% (range, 40.0-75.0%). Analgesic efficacy was achieved in all patients. One patient had a spinal instability due to a progression of spinal deformity noted on follow-up radiographs, without clinical symptoms. Cement leakage was detected in three (60%) of the five treated vertebrae. There was no clinical complication. The present series suggests that PV for MM of the cervical spine is safe and effective for pain control; nonetheless, the detrimental impact of the disease on bone quality should prompt close radiological follow-up after PV owing to the risk of spinal instability. (orig.)

  4. HORIZON SENSING

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine appropriately. The Horizon Sensor program began development in 1998 and experienced three major design phases. The final version, termed HS-3, was commissioned in 2000 with the assistance of the DOE-Mining Industry of the Future program, commercialized in 2002, and has been used 14 times in 12 different mines within the United States. The Horizon Sensor has applications in both underground and surface mining operations. This technology is primarily used in the coal industry, but is also used to mine trona and potash. All horizon sensor components have Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) (United States) and IEC (International) certification. Horizon Sensing saves energy by maximizing cutting efficiency, cutting only desired material. This desired material is cleaner fuel, therefore reducing pollutants to the atmosphere when burned and burning more efficiently. Extracting only desired material increases productivity by reducing or eliminating the cleaning step after extraction. Additionally, this technology allows for deeper mining, resulting in more material gained from one location. The remote sensing tool allows workers to operate the machinery away from the hazards of cutting coal, including noise, breathing dust and gases, and coal and rock splintering and outbursts. The HS program has primarily revolved around the development of the technology. However, the end goal of the program has always been the commercialization of the technology and only within the last 2 years of the program has this goal been realized. Real-time horizon sensing on mining machines is becoming an industry tool. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing.

  5. The hip-spine connection: understanding its importance in the treatment of hip pathology.

    Redmond, John M; Gupta, Asheesh; Nasser, Rima; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-01-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Discuss the kinematic relationship between the hip and lumbar spine. 2. Explain the innervation of the hip and lumbar spine and how they relate to one another. 3. Recognize the effect of hip disease on the lumbar spine in an athletic population, prior to the onset of degenerative changes. 4. Describe an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of patients who present with concomitant hip and lumbar spine pain. The hip and lumbar spine are closely related and can create similar patterns of pain and dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of hip and spine-related conditions can be challenging due to symptom overlap. Successful evaluation and treatment of hip and lumbar spine conditions requires a thorough understanding the hip-spine connection. Historically the hip-spine connection has been considered in the context of arthrosis; however, the hip-spine connection also needs to be considered in a younger athletic population. The purpose of this review is to describe the hip-spine connection, discuss the clinical implications of this connection, and offer an approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25611411

  6. Spine morphology of neurons in the avian forebrain is affected by rearing conditions.

    Rollenhagen, A; Bischof, H J

    1994-09-01

    An area of the caudal forebrain of male zebra finches, the Archi-Neostriatum caudale (ANC), which is active during arousal (Bischof & Herrmann, 1986, 1988), shows rearing-dependent changes in neuron morphology (Rollenhagen & Bischof, 1991). We demonstrate here that rearing conditions also affect the shape of spines of one of the four ANC neuron types. This neuron type was examined in birds reared under five different conditions--in isolation (1), caged (2), in the aviary (3), and with social contact (4) or chasing (5) after an isolation period. Our results show that social experience determines the proportion of the three types of spines (thin, mushroom, and stubby) of the investigated neuron type. Rearing conditions and short social contact also affect the spine stem length of the thin spine type. Long-term isolation results in a reduction in number and elongation of shafts of thin spines, along with an increase of stubby-and mushroom-shaped spines. Short-term social contact or arousal enhances the number of mushroom-and thin-shaped spines and reduces the length of spine stems of thin spines. We suggest that isolation prevents the ANC neuron from reaching full development. The increase of mushroom and thin spine types due to social contact indicates that the stubby-shaped spines are replaced by, or transformed into, mushroom-shaped spines, and the mushroom-shaped spines are replaced by, or transformed into, thin spines. These results confirm and extend the experimental background for our hypothesis (Rollenhagen & Bischof, 1991) that social contact is necessary for development of normal morphology of ANC neurons. PMID:7993307

  7. The effect of forward head posture on cervical joint position sense

    Elaheh Sajjadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have investigated the effect of age, trauma, disease and fatigue on cervical joint position sense. However, there is an absence in data regarding the role of posture on proprioception. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of Forward Head Posture (FHP on cervical joint position sense. Twenty Forward Head Posture volunteers (14 women, 6 men, with the mean age of 23.94 (SD=3.26 years, and 17 normal head posture volunteers (8 women, 9 men with the mean age of 23.50 (SD=2.68 years were asked to perform the Cervicocephalic relocation test (CRT to the neutral head position (NHP. The aim of this test was to evaluate the participants' ability to relocate the head to neutral position after they actively rotated it to left and right sides. Three trials were performed for each rotation to the left and right. In order to assess cervical joint repositioning accuracy, Absolute, Constant and Variable errors were used. No significant difference in repositioning errors was observed between experimental and control group in absolute and constant errors (P>0.05; however, compared to normal group, Forward Head Posture subjects manifested significantly higher levels of variable errors (P<0.05. Forward Head Posture can significantly affect the positioning consistency of cervical proprioception. Nonetheless, further investigation on the effect of Forward Head Posture on cervical proprioception in altered situations is recommended.

  8. From Participatory Sensing to Mobile Crowd Sensing

    Guo, Bin; Yu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Daqing; Zhou, Xingshe

    2014-01-01

    The research on the efforts of combining human and machine intelligence has a long history. With the development of mobile sensing and mobile Internet techniques, a new sensing paradigm called Mobile Crowd Sensing (MCS), which leverages the power of citizens for large-scale sensing has become popular in recent years. As an evolution of participatory sensing, MCS has two unique features: (1) it involves both implicit and explicit participation; (2) MCS collects data from two user-participant d...

  9. Motility of dendritic spines in visual cortex in vivo: Changes during the critical period and effects of visual deprivation

    Majewska, Ania; Sur, Mriganka

    2003-01-01

    Cortical dendritic spines are highly motile postsynaptic structures onto which most excitatory synapses are formed. It has been postulated that spine dynamics might reflect synaptic plasticity of cortical neurons. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated spine dynamics during the critical period in mouse visual cortex in vivo with and without sensory deprivation. The motility of spines on apical dendrites of layer 5 neurons was assayed by time-lapse two-photon microscopy. Spines were mot...

  10. Cost-Sensitive Bayesian Control Policy in Human Active Sensing

    Sheeraz Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An important but poorly understood aspect of sensory processing is the role of active sensing, the use of self-motion such as eye or head movements to focus sensing resources on the most rewarding or informative aspects of the sensory environment. Here, we present behavioral data from a visual search experiment, as well as a Bayesian model of within-trial dynamics of sensory processing and eye movements. Within this Bayes-optimal inference and control framework, which we call C-DAC (Context-Dependent Active Controller, various types of behavioral costs, such as temporal delay, response error, and sensor repositioning cost, are explicitly minimized. This contrasts with previously proposed algorithms that optimize abstract statistical objectives such as anticipated information gain (Infomax (Butko and Movellan, 2010 and one-step look-ahead accuracy (greedy MAP (Najemnik and Geisler, 2005. We find that C-DAC captures human visual search dynamics better than previous models, in particular a certain form of confirmation bias apparent in the way human subjects utilize prior knowledge about the spatial distribution of the search target to improve search speed and accuracy. We also examine several computationally efficient approximations to C-DAC that may present biologically more plausible accounts of the neural computations underlying active sensing, as well as practical tools for solving active sensing problems in engineering applications. To summarize, this paper makes several key contributions: human visual search behavioral data, a context-sensitive Bayesian active sensing model, a comparative study between different models of human active sensing, and a family of efficient approximations to the optimal model.

  11. Plasmonic sensing

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic sensors typically rely on detection of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium. Here, an alternative approach is reported based on electrical surface screening and controlled dissolution of ultrasmall silver nanoparticles (NPs; R < 5 nm) that can result in a great...... increase in the sensitivity, as compared to traditional refractive index sensing. Here, a detection scheme based on controlled dissolution is reported. Monitoring the plasmon band, while the particles are continuously decreased in size, enables the investigation of size-related effects on the same fixed...... in the plasmon band. This is demonstrated by using the strong nucleophiles, cyanide and cysteamine, as ligands. The “dissolution paths” in terms of peak wavelength and amplitude shifts differ significantly between different types of analytes, which are suggested as a means to obtain selectivity of...

  12. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery

    Javier DeFelipe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it show us that progress in the study of the structure of the nervous system is based not only on the emergence of new techniques but also on our ability to exploit the methods already available and correctly interpret their microscopic images.

  13. Diseases of the spine, spinal cord, and extremities

    This paper covers the following topics: acupuncture needle in the spinal canal of the neck; thoracic tuberculous spondylitis: cold abscess; comminuted fracture of the fifth cervical vertebra; lumbar spondylolysis; lumbar spondylosis; ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament; disk herniation of the cervical spine: narrowing of the root tunnel; ankylosing spondylitis: narrowing of the root tunnel; ossification of the ligamentum flavum; narrow spinal canal syndrome; syringomyelia; epidural neurinoma of the cervical spine; neurofibromatosis; spinal arteriovenous malformation; atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the rib; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the left femur; chronic osteomyelitis of the left humerus; malignant giant cell tumor of the left femur; rheumatoid arthritis of the left hip joint; arthrosis deformans of the left hip joint; and enchondroma of the left index finger: Proximal Phalanx

  14. Computed Tomography of the spine in multiple myeloma

    Computed Tomography (CT) of the spine was performed on 17 patients with myeloma in order to assess the role of the technique in recognizing and evaluating the extent of the lesions. Myelomatous lesions followed two patterns at CT: first of all, multiple focal lesions, whose density is either solid, liquid, or fatty; second, an extensive pattern involving the spongiosa of the vertebra, including the posterior arch. CT detected more lesions than conventional radiology; furthermore, the extent of the lesions was much better demonstrated by CT. CT should thus be performed: a) in case of pain and/or neurological findings in negative radiological examinations; b) to evaluate the extent of myelomatous lesions (mainly in the spine); c) in solitary myeloma CT may be performed on different bone segments with clinical symptomatology but normal X-ray findings

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of canine degenerative lumbar spine diseases

    Degenerative lumbar spine diseases, i.e., sacrolumbar stenosis, intervertebral disk degeneration and protrusion and spondylosis deformans of the canine lumbar spine were studied in eleven canine patients and three healthy controls using radiography and 0.02 T and 0.04 T low field magnetic resonance imaging. The T1 and T2 weighted images were obtained in sagittal and transverse planes. The loss of hydration of nucleus pulposus, taken as a sign of degeneration in the intervertebral disks, could be evaluated in both T1 and T2 weighted images. As a noninvasive method magnetic resonance imaging gave more exact information about the condition of intervertebral disks than did radiography. Sacrolumbar stenosis and compression of the spinal cord or cauda equina and surrounding tissue could be evaluated without contrast medium

  16. 3-dimensional reconstructions of computer tomograms of the lumbar spine

    In this study, 50 patients were examined by a Siemens 'Somatom Plus'; continuous 2 mm sections between the third lumbar and first sacral vertebra were obtained. All these imaging procedures were suitable for the diagnosis of osteochondrosis and chondrosis. Spondylosis was diagnosed more frequently on 3-D CT. Spondyloarthrosis, with narrowing of the invertebral foramina and root canals is shown particularly well by 3-D CT, since the entire extent of these structures can be seen. 3-D surface reconstruction of the lumbar spine is useful in the diagnosis of lumbar spondyloarthrosis with narrowing of the root canals and of the spinal canal. This method of axial CT is superior to conventional radiography of the lumbar spine in the usual two planes. (orig./GDG)

  17. A Case of Cervical Spine Tuberculosis in an Infant.

    Singh, S N; Bhatt, Trilok C; Kumar, Savit; Chauhan, Vikas; Pandey, Anjali

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of cervical spine is an extremely rare entity in infants with only few case reports available in the literature. The diagnosis is often delayed due to less dramatic effects of paraplegia or quadriplegia in an infant as compared to older paediatric population. Along with clinical and laboratory investigations, imaging plays a crucial role in defining the extent of involvement, evaluation of complications, providing suitable differential diagnosis and monitoring response to treatment. Tuberculosis typically involves the discovertebral complex while involvement of isolated vertebral body or multiple vertebrae without involving the intervertebral discs is much less common. We present such an unusual case of cervical spine tuberculosis in an infant involving a single vertebral body without adjacent intervertebral disc involvement complicated with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and communicating hydrocephalus. The early medical intervention in this case resulted in early diagnosis, active treatment and resultant near normal recovery. PMID:26894144

  18. Computed tomography of the spine: an update and review.

    Sartoris, D J; Resnick, D

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has proven to be an important diagnostic imaging technique for the evaluation of a variety of spinal disorders. The method is useful for identifying and characterizing acute fractures in traumatized patients and can accurately quantify spinal canal encroachment. Intervertebral disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis are readily demonstrated by CT in both the cervical and lumbar regions. The technique can reliably distinguish between infection and neoplastic disease in the spine and is helpful for the guidance of percutaneous biopsy. A variety of congenital and developmental vertebral abnormalities, including dysraphic states, spondylolysis, and spinal stenosis, are optimally assessed using CT. Quantitative CT affords selective analysis of trabecular bone in the spine and has proven useful for the detection and follow-up of osteoporosis as well as other forms of metabolic bone disease. Most recently, the application of multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional image reconstruction has enhanced presentation of diagnostic information contained on cross-sectional images. PMID:3322678

  19. Management of difficult airway in penetrating cervical spine injury

    Mukesh Kumar Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of airway in trauma victim with penetrating cervical/thoracic spine injury has always been a challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Stabilisation of spine during airway manipulation, to prevent any further neural damage, is of obvious concern to the anaesthesiologist. Most anaesthesiologists are not exposed to direct laryngoscopy and intubation in lateral position during their training period. Tracheal intubation in the lateral position may be unavoidable in some circumstances. Difficult airway in an uncooperative patient compounds the problem to secure airway in lateral position. We present a 46-year-old alcoholic, hypertensive, morbidly obese person who suffered a sharp instrument (screwdriver spinal injury with anticipated difficult intubation; the case was managed successfully.

  20. Imaging the spine in arthritis-a pictorial review

    Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2011-01-01

    Spinal involvement is frequent in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative spondyloarthritides (SpA), and its diagnosis is important. Thus, MRI and CT are increasingly used, although radiography is the recommended initial examination. The purpose of this review is to present the typical...... radiographic features of spinal changes in RA and SpA in addition to the advantages of MRI and CT, respectively. RA changes are usually located in the cervical spine and can result in serious joint instability. Subluxation is diagnosed by radiography, but supplementary MRI and/or CT is always indicated to...... visualise the spinal cord and canal in patients with vertical subluxation, neck pain and/or neurological symptoms. SpA may involve all parts of the spine. Ankylosing spondylitis is the most frequent form of SpA and has rather characteristic radiographic features. In early stages it is characterised by...

  1. A radiological study on the cervical spine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Taketomi, Eiji; Sakoh, Takashi; Sunahara, Nobuhiko [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The cervical spine was examined with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the conventional roentgenograms in 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The MRI findings of upper cervical disorders were compared with various values determined in roentgenograms: the atlanto-dental interval (ADI), the space available for the spinal cord (SAC), and the Ranawat and Redlund-Johnell values. In patients with vertical setting (VS), MRI showed medullary compression in all those with abnormal Redlund-Johnell values and Ranawat values of 7 mm or less. In patients with anterior atlanto-axial subluxation, compression of the upper cervical cord was observed in all patients with SAC of 13 mm or less. In subaxial lesion of the cervical spine, MRI was found to be as good as roentgenograms in evaluating plate erosion and disc space narrowing and MRI showed extradural pannus. (author).

  2. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed.

  4. Stability Properties of Strongly Magnetized Spine Sheath Relativistic Jets

    Hardee, Philip E

    2007-01-01

    The linearized relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet spine embedded in a uniform axially magnetized relativistically moving sheath are derived. The displacement current is retained in the equations so that effects associated with Alfven wave propagation near light speed can be studied. A dispersion relation for the normal modes is obtained. Analytical solutions for the normal modes in the low and high frequency limits are found and a general stability condition is determined. A trans-Alfvenic and even a super-Alfvenic relativistic jet spine can be stable to velocity shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz modes. The resonance condition for maximum growth of the normal modes is obtained in the kinetically and magnetically dominated regimes. Numerical solution of the dispersion relation verifies the analytical solutions and is used to study the regime of high sound and Alfven speeds.

  5. [Sports in functional rehabilitation of the lumbar spine].

    Martini, G; Vitangeli, L; Assennato, P

    1990-06-15

    Having analyzed the biomechanics of the spine, especially of the lumbar spine, the authors describe postural lumbalgia, a very topical problem As a matter of fact, standing is not always actively maintained by the alpha-tonic system but by capsulo-ligamentous resistance. For the latter type of pathologic or "passive" orthostatic position, postural gymnastics according to Mézière's technique after thorough objective examination of the patient is the ideal treatment. But sports after postural reeducation are a valid means for the maintenance of muscular tonicity and trophism. The sports to be recommended should be non competitive and non traumatic such as walking, swimming, rowing, and other activities involving the muscles of the trunk and all four limbs. PMID:2143717

  6. Degenerative spine disorders in the context of clinical findings

    Hardly any other structure in the human body is held responsible for so many complaints, pain, and costs as the spine and its degenerative disorders. In the following article, the role of imaging procedures in diagnosing disorders of the spine is presented. Due to the fact that disk herniation represents the most frequent cause for degenerative disorders the anatomy of the intervertebral disk and the pathology of the entities that can cause diseases of the disks are described. In particular, the authors focus on the significance of radiological findings with respect to patient history, subjective symptoms, and objective clinical findings. In addition to presenting the technical procedures and their indications and contraindications also practical tips and tricks in conducting these examinations are presented in this paper

  7. Virchow's Triad and spinal manipulative therapy of the cervical spine

    Symons, Bruce P; Westaway, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this review paper is to borrow Virchow's Triad as a conceptual framework to examine the state of the art in research on thrombosis, specifically in the vertebrobasilar system as a consequence of high velocity, low amplitude spinal manipulation of the cervical spine. A revised Virchow's Triad is presented which emphasizes the interactions between various risk factors, as a tool for clinicians and researchers to use in their analyses of vertebrobasilar stroke. Endothelial injur...

  8. Trilobite spines and beetle horns: sexual selection in the Palaeozoic?

    Knell, Robert J; Fortey, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Raphiophorid trilobites commonly bore median cephalic protuberances such as spines or bulbs, showing a remarkable variety of form. It is unlikely that their primary function was for protection or in hydrodynamics. A case is made that they were secondary sexual features, by comparison with similar morphological structures developed on rhinoceros beetles and other arthropods. This interpretation is supported by four lines of evidence: their ontogeny, their diversity, the existence of plausible ...

  9. Risk Factors for Delirium after Spine Surgery in Elderly Patients

    Seo, Jin Suk; Park, Seung Won; Lee, Young Seok; Chung, Chan; Kim, Young Baeg

    2014-01-01

    Objective Postoperative delirium is a common complication in the elderly after surgery but few papers have reported after spinal surgery. We analyzed various risk factors for postoperative delirium after spine surgery. Methods Between May 2012 and September 2013, 70 patients over 60 years of age were examined. The patients were divided into two groups : Group A with delirium and Group B without delirium. Cognitive function was examined with the Mini-Mental State Examination-Korea (MMSE-K), Cl...

  10. Critical care of obese patients during and after spine surgery

    Elgafy, Hossein; Hamilton, Ryan; Peters, Nicholas; Paull, Daniel; Hassan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most prevalent health problems facing the United States today, with a recent JAMA article published in 2014 estimating the prevalence of one third of all adults in the United States being obese. Also, due to technological advancements, the incidence of spine surgeries is growing. Considering these overall increases in both obesity and the performance of spinal surgeries, it can be inferred that more spinal surgery candidates will be obese. Due to this, certain factors mu...

  11. Modern posterior screw techniques in the pediatric cervical spine

    Hedequist, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of children with cervical spine disorders requiring fusion is a challenging endeavor for a variety of reasons. The size of the patients, the corresponding abnormal bony anatomy, the inherent ligamentous laxity of children, and the relative rarity of the disorders all play a part in difficulty of treatment. The benefits of modern posterior cervical instrumentation in children, defined as rigid screw-rod systems, have been shown to be many including: improved arthrodesis rates, dimini...

  12. General Computational Model for Human Musculoskeletal System of Spine

    Kyungsoo Kim; Yoon Hyuk Kim; SuKyoung Lee

    2012-01-01

    A general computational model of the human lumbar spine and trunk muscles including optimization formulations was provided. For a given condition, the trunk muscle forces could be predicted considering the human physiology including the follower load concept. The feasibility of the solution could be indirectly validated by comparing the compressive force, the shear force, and the joint moment. The presented general computational model and optimization technology can be fundamental tools to un...

  13. Bone mineral density of lumbar spine and femur in acromegaly

    Acromegaly is regarded as a cause for secondary osteoporosis, whereas recent papers suggest that growth hormone increases bone mineral density (BMD). In 16 patients with active acromegaly we found an increased BMD compared to normal controls in the lumbar spine and the proximal femur by means of dual energy X-ray absoptiometry. This increase in BMD was statistically significant in the femoral neck and in Ward's triangle (P=0.05). Moreover, no signs of osteoporosis were found radiologically. (orig.)

  14. Beyond the Spine: A New Clinical Research Priority

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol; Poulsen, Erik; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Kilsgaard, Jrgen; Blanchette, Marc-Andr; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip o...

  15. Conservative Management for a Traumatic Cervical Spine Cycling Injury

    Rebeca Yde; Kate Jochimsen; Jacklyn Goddard

    2015-01-01

    Competitive cycling holds an inherent risk of traumatic injury often resulting in fracture. Questions regarding the probability of return to sport then arise. The purpose of this case report is to describe the treatment approach and likelihood of returning to cycling after traumatic fracture of the cervical spine and clavicle. This case report describes the use of an original combination of interventions for a C1 fracture with an associated open reduction internal fixation of a left clavicle...

  16. Efficacy and safety of instrumentation in caries spine

    Basu Saumyajit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal instrumentation may be used in tuberculosis of spine for prevention or correction of deformity. Methods: Thirty eight patients of caries spine underwent surgery with spinal instrumentation in the last 3 years. Out of these patients, 30 cases have completed a minimum follow-up of 9 months (Range 9 to 39 months, mean 12.8 months. The regional distribution was 1 in the craniocervical junction, 7 in the subaxial cervical spine, 3 in the cervicothoracic junction, 3 in the thoracic region, 4 in the thoracolumbar junction and 8 in the lumbar region and 1 in the lumbosacral junction. All the cases had anterior lesions except one, which had both anterior and posterior lesions. All of them had decompression, debridement of the lesion and instrumented fusion. Indication of surgery was caries spine with neurodeficit and /or osseous destruction and deformity, which was not responding to conservative treatment of one month. Results: Results were analyzed keeping in mind the clinical and radiological criteria. The former included recovery of pain, and neural deficit with a feeling of general well being. The latter included correction of deformity and evidence of fusion. There was no case which had wound healing/infection related problems. Complications included one case of implant failure and one case of transient neurological deterioration. Results were excellent in 20, good in 5, fair in one and poor in one patient. Majority of the patients were very satisfied with the surgery and all the patients had full anti-tubercular chemotherapy for one year. Conclusions: In properly selected patients, spinal instrumentation is justified because of its safety and efficacy in achieving deformity correction and solid fusion.

  17. SENILE DEGENERATIVE CHANGES IN ADULT LUMBAR SPINE! - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Garjesh Singh; Tribhuwan Narayan; Alankrita

    2015-01-01

    : BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a common presenting complaint affecting mostly middle aged and older person and traditionally considered as ageing process, but now-a-days large number of younger people are also affected by this debilitating chronic disorder. The cause of early onset of degenerative spine disease is multifactorial, but genetical predisposition plays very important role. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To find out association between genetic predisposition and degenera...

  18. Computed tomographic evaluation of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine

    Computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine is a new modality of far-reaching significance. Experience with this new technique has been extremely limited, less than 3 years at most institutions. There are few hard data, and few adequate clinical studies have been performed. Accordingly, the purpose of this article is to provide an understanding of the pathogenesis as well as the CT findings of the degenerative diseases affecting the spinal canal

  19. Thoracolumbar spine trauma: Evaluation and surgical decision-making

    Andrei F Joaquim; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Thoracolumbar spine trauma is the most common site of spinal cord injury, with clinical and epidemiological importance. Materials and Methods: We performed a comprehensive literature review on the management and treatment of TLST. Results: Currently, computed tomography is frequently used as the primary diagnostic test in TLST, with magnetic resonance imaging used in addition to assess disc, ligamentous, and neurological injury. The Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System is ...

  20. Learning from history: Adaptive calibration of 'tilting spine' fiber positioners

    Gilbert, James; Dalton, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a new approach for determining the calibration parameters of independently-actuated optical fibers in multi-object astronomical fiber positioning systems. This work comes from the development of a new type of piezoelectric motor intended to enhance the 'tilting spine' fiber positioning technology originally created by the Australian Astronomical Observatory. Testing has shown that the motor's performance can vary depending on the fiber's location within its accessible fie...

  1. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically unde...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in multiple myeloma

    The characteristics of diagnostic imaging of the spine in multiple myeloma were examined. Twenty-one patients with stage II-III multiple myeloma (male=12, female=9, mean age=64) underwent MRI of the spine. Other diagnostic imaging modalities used in these patients included, CT bone scintigraphy, and radiography. All images of the spine were assessed and compared with the MRI images. The type of progression was evaluated based on the tumor distribution classification established by Sezaki. T1-weighted images of all 21 patients showed low signals in vertebral bodies, including 14 cases with a focal low signal intensity and 7 cases with diffuse low signal intensity. On the T2-weighted images, 15 of the 21 cases (71%) showed equivalent signals, while T2*-weighted images obtained by the field-echo method yielded high signals in 10 out of 11 cases. It was difficult to differentiate between senile osteoporosis and multiple myeloma by MRI, but CT images clearly distinguished between them. The results suggested that fat-suppressive T1-contrast images and T2*-weighted images are useful in detecting lesions, especially focal low signal intensity lesions. Patients with the multiple-lesion-tumor type of disease were more likely to develop paralysis more than those with the diffuse myeloproliferative type. Thus, the tumor distribution classification established by Sezaki was useful in considering radiotherapy for the treatment of patients at risk of paralysis. Bone scintigraphy revealed accumulation only in spinal lesions caused by compression fractures, while CT appeared to be useful in localizing the diffuse myeloproliferative type of lesions. The problems associated with diagnosis by MRI are differentiation of multiple myeloma from senile osteoporosis and metastatic bone tumors of the spine. There are few specific findings in multiple myeloma. (K.H.)

  3. Evaluation of unilateral cage-instrumented fixation for lumbar spine

    Chen Hung-Yi; Wang Chien-Shiung; Chang Jia-Hao; Chang Ti-Sheng; Cheng Ching-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To investigate how unilateral cage-instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) affects the three-dimensional flexibility in degenerative disc disease by comparing the biomechanical characteristics of unilateral and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF. Methods Twelve motion segments in sheep lumbar spine specimens were tested for flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending by nondestructive flexibility test method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus....

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in multiple myeloma

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Koura, Hiroshi; Kai, Nobuo; Asaumi, Koji; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Sezaki, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Shunichi; Sunami, Kazutaka [National Okayama Hospital (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    The characteristics of diagnostic imaging of the spine in multiple myeloma were examined. Twenty-one patients with stage II-III multiple myeloma (male=12, female=9, mean age=64) underwent MRI of the spine. Other diagnostic imaging modalities used in these patients included, CT bone scintigraphy, and radiography. All images of the spine were assessed and compared with the MRI images. The type of progression was evaluated based on the tumor distribution classification established by Sezaki. T1-weighted images of all 21 patients showed low signals in vertebral bodies, including 14 cases with a focal low signal intensity and 7 cases with diffuse low signal intensity. On the T2-weighted images, 15 of the 21 cases (71%) showed equivalent signals, while T2*-weighted images obtained by the field-echo method yielded high signals in 10 out of 11 cases. It was difficult to differentiate between senile osteoporosis and multiple myeloma by MRI, but CT images clearly distinguished between them. The results suggested that fat-suppressive T1-contrast images and T2*-weighted images are useful in detecting lesions, especially focal low signal intensity lesions. Patients with the multiple-lesion-tumor type of disease were more likely to develop paralysis more than those with the diffuse myeloproliferative type. Thus, the tumor distribution classification established by Sezaki was useful in considering radiotherapy for the treatment of patients at risk of paralysis. Bone scintigraphy revealed accumulation only in spinal lesions caused by compression fractures, while CT appeared to be useful in localizing the diffuse myeloproliferative type of lesions. The problems associated with diagnosis by MRI are differentiation of multiple myeloma from senile osteoporosis and metastatic bone tumors of the spine. There are few specific findings in multiple myeloma. (K.H.)

  5. Minimal Invasive Percutaneous Fixation of Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    Stefania Paderni; Michele Cappuccio; Federico De Iure; Giuseppe Bosco; Luca Amendola(INAF)

    2012-01-01

    We studied 122 patients with 163 fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine undergoing the surgical treatment by percutaneous transpedicular fixation and stabilization with minimally invasive technique. Patient followup ranged from 6 to 72 months (mean 38 months), and the patients were assessed by clinical and radiographic evaluation. The results show that percutaneous transpedicular fixation and stabilization with minimally invasive technique is an adequate and satisfactory procedure to be u...

  6. Twelve Contiguous Spinous Process Fracture of Cervico-Thoracic Spine

    Han, Seong Rok; Sohn, Moon Jun

    2014-01-01

    The clay-shoveler's fracture is an isolated avulsion fracture of the lower cervical or upper thoracic spinous process. Among them, multiple spinous process fractures are very rare. We present 34-year-old male patient who have multiple spinous process fractures with twelve contiguous levels of cervico-thoracic spine (from C4 to T8) after motorcycle accident. This case is multiple isolated spinous process fractures with good clinical outcome.

  7. Fracture of the thoracic spine with paralysis and esophageal perforation

    Brouwers, M. A. M.; Veldhuis, E. F. M.; Zimmerman, K. W.

    1997-01-01

    A 17-year-old young man presented with a highly unstable fracture dislocation of the third and fourth thoracic vertebrae with neurological deficit, in which the fractured spine had perforated the thoracic esophagus. Open reduction and internal fixation of the spinal fractures in combination with aggressive treatment of the mediastinitis caused by esophageal perforation, consisting of two re-thoracotomies, was performed. Two years after the accident, the patient had recovered well. The neurolo...

  8. Ophaceous Gout Involving the Whole Spine: An Unusual Case Report

    Shin, Min Woo; Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Woo Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Gout is a relatively common, crystal deposition disease, in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited in joint and periarticular tissues of the extremities. Involvement of the spine is exceedingly rare. Most patients with spinal gout present with symptomatic spinal cord compression. Diffuse involvement of tophi deposition inside the spinal central canal has not been reported. We now present a case of chronic tophaceous gout with extensive spinal involvement that resulted in diffuse spinal cord compression and led to paraplegia.

  9. Treatment for the Lumbosacral Soft Tissue Defect after Spine Surgery

    Choi, Sun Jin; Lee, Chang Bum; Park, Hyung Taek; PARK, JONG HOON; Lee, Hyeong Seok; Kim, Yong Jin

    2010-01-01

    The lumbosacral area is one of the most frequently operated spine regions because of the prevalence of disease in that area. Although a lumbosacral soft tissue defect after surgery due to inflammation and other causes is rare, such soft tissue defects are difficult to treat. Therefore, suitable methods for treating lumbosacral soft tissue defects are necessary. Therefore, this study introduces a case-treated with a transverse lumbosacral rotational flap.

  10. Lymphangioma in the Epidural Space of the Thoracic Spine

    Ha, Bok Yong; Park, Jun Bum; Kim, Young Min; Lyo, In Uk

    2010-01-01

    A rare case of solitary intraspinal epidural lymphangioma is described with a review of the literature. A 16-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with a history of two-year of progressive paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging study revealed a 2 × 2 × 6 cm sized epidural cystic mass in the thoracic spine. Surgical total removal and biopsy were performed. The final pathologic report on the mass indicated lymphangioma.

  11. In vivo imaging demonstrates dendritic spine stabilization by SynCAM 1.

    Körber, Nils; Stein, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Formation and stability of synapses are required for proper brain function. While it is well established that synaptic adhesion molecules are important regulators of synapse formation, their specific role during different phases of synapse development remains unclear. To investigate the function of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 in the formation, stability, and maintenance of spines we used 2-photon in vivo imaging to follow individual spines over a long period of time. In SynCAM 1 knockout mice the survival rate of existing spines was reduced and fewer filopodia-like structures were converted into stable spines. SynCAM 1(flag) overexpression resulted in more stable spines and fewer filopodia-like structures. When SynCAM 1(flag) overexpression is turned on the spine density rapidly increases within a few days. Interestingly, the spine density stayed at an elevated level when SynCAM 1(flag) overexpression was turned off. Our data indicate that the SynCAM 1 induced altered spine density is not caused by the formation of newly emerging protrusions, instead SynCAM 1 stabilizes nascent synaptic contacts which promotes their maturation. Concomitant with the synaptic stabilization, SynCAM 1 generally prolongs the lifetime of spines. In summary, we demonstrate that SynCAM 1 is a key regulator of spine stability. PMID:27053173

  12. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of the spine of stingray Himantura imbricata

    Kaliyamoorthy Kalidasan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the spine structure of stingray Himantura imbricata (H. imbricata and to evaluate the anticoagulant properties of the spine extract obtained through various solvents extracts followed by antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Methods: Spines of H. imbricata were collected from Nagappattinam coast, Tamil Nadu, India and their spines were observed under the light microscope. The grounded spines were subjected to extraction of metabolites using methanol, ethanol, chloroform and acetone. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion technique against 10 human pathogens. Similarly, anticoagulant activity was also assessed by following United States Pharmacopeia method. Results: Light microscopic observation of spine revealed that the venom apparatus of the stingray H. imbricata consisted of two to three spines, glandular tissue and a sheath. The spine extract showed potent antibacterial activity against all tested pathogen. Maximum activity (14 mm was found against Staphylococcus aureus. Crude extract showed 91.50 USP units/mg of anticoagulant activity. Conclusions: Microscopic observations gave new insight about the spine structure of the stingray. The spine extracts of H. imbricate showed potent activity against human pathogens revealed by the good zone of inhibition. Chloroform extracts conferred the most prominent antibacterial activity. The anticoagulant activity was also comparable with that of standard heparin.

  13. General practitioners' willingness to request plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations

    Objectives: To examine general practitioners' attitudes to plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations. Design: A postal questionnaire consisting of questions on background data and doctors' opinions about plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, as well as eight vignettes (imaginary patient cases) presenting indications for lumbar radiography, and five vignettes focusing on the doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiography on the basis of patients' age and duration of symptoms. The data were analysed according to the doctor's age, sex, workplace and the medical school of graduation. Setting: Finland. Subjects: Six hundred and fifteen randomly selected physicians working in primary health care (64% of original target group). Results: The vignettes revealed that the use of plain lumbar radiographic examination varied between 26 and 88%. Patient's age and radiation protection were the most prominent factors influencing doctors' decisions to request lumbar radiographies. Only slight differences were observed between the attitudes of male and female doctors, as well as between young and older doctors. Doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiographies increased with the patient's age in most vignettes. The duration of patients' symptoms had a dramatic effect on the doctor's decision: in all vignettes, doctors were more likely to request lumbar radiography when patient's symptoms had exceeded 4 weeks. Conclusions: General practitioners commonly use plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, despite its limited value in the diagnosis of low back pain. Further consensus and medical education is needed to clarify the indications for plain lumbar radiographic examination

  14. Posterior longitudinal ligament status in cervical spine bilateral facet dislocations

    Carrino, John A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Manton, Geoffrey L.; Morrison, William B.; Flanders, Adam E. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vaccaro, Alex R. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [New York University, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-07-15

    It is generally accepted that cervical spine bilateral facet dislocation results in complete disruption of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The goal of this study was to evaluate the integrity of numerous spine-stabilizing structures by MRI, and to determine if any associations between injury patterns exist with respect to the posterior longitudinal ligament status. Retrospective case series. A retrospective review was performed of 30 cervical spine injury subjects with bilateral facet dislocation. Assessment of 1.5T MRI images was carried out for: intervertebral disc disruption, facet fracture, and ligamentous disruption. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate for associations between various injury patterns and posterior longitudinal ligament status. The frequency of MRI abnormalities was: anterior longitudinal ligament disruption (26.7%), disc herniation or disruption (90%), posterior longitudinal ligament disruption (40%), facet fracture (63.3%) and disruption of the posterior column ligament complex (97%). There were no significant associations between injury to the posterior longitudinal ligament and other structures. Compared to surgical reports, MRI was accurate for determining the status for 24 of 26 ligaments (three of three anterior longitudinal ligament, seven of nine posterior longitudinal ligament, and 14 of 14 posterior column ligament complex) but generated false negatives in two instances (in both MRI showed an intact posterior longitudinal ligament that was torn at surgery). (orig.)

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of reconstructed lumbosacral spine after total sacrectomy.

    Murakami, Hideki; Kawahara, Norio; Tomita, Katsuro; Sakamoto, Jiro; Oda, Juhachi

    2002-01-01

    When a sacral tumor involves the first sacral vertebra, total sacrectomy is necessary. It is mandatory to reconstruct the continuity between the spine and the pelvis after total sacrectomy. In this study, strain and stress on the instruments and the bones were evaluated for two reconstruction methods: a modified Galveston reconstruction (MGR) and a triangular frame reconstruction (TFR). Compressive loading tests were performed using polyurethane vertebral models, and a finite element model of a lumbar spine and pelvis was constructed. Then three-dimensional MGR and TFR models were reconstructed, and finite element analysis was performed to account for the stress on the bones and instruments. With MGR, excessive stress was concentrated at the spinal rod, and there was a strong possibility that the rod between the spine and the pelvis might fail. Although there was no stress concentration on the instruments with TFR, excessive stress on the iliac bone around the sacral rod was more than the yielding stress of the iliac bone. Such stress may cause loosening of the sacral rod from the iliac bone. If the patient were to stand or sit immediately after MGR or TFR, instrumentation failure or loosening might occur. PMID:12486469

  16. Imaging evaluation of traumatic thoracolumbar spine injuries: Radiological review

    Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Rathinam, Deepak; Rangarajan, Krithika; Kumar, Atin; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Spine fractures account for a large portion of musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. A classi?cation of spine fractures is necessary in order to develop a common language for treatment indications and outcomes. Several classification systems have been developed based on injury anatomy or mechanisms of action, but they have demonstrated poor reliability, have yielded little prognostic information, and have not been widely used. For this reason, the Arbeitsgemeinschaftfr Osteosynthesefragen (AO) committee has classified thorocolumbar spine injuries based on the pathomorphological criteria into3 types (A: Compression; B: Distraction; C: Axial torque and rotational deformity). Each of these types is further divided into 3 groups and 3 subgroups re?ecting progressive scale of morphological damage and the degree of instability. Because of its highly detailed sub classifications, the AO system has shown limited interobserver variability. It is similar to its predecessors in that it does not incorporate the patients neurologic status.The need for a reliable, reproducible, clinically relevant, prognostic classification system with an optimal balance of ease of use and detail of injury description contributed to the development of a new classification system, the thoracolumbar injury classification and severity score (TLICS). The TLICS de?nes injury based on three clinical characteristics: injury morphology, integrity of the posterior ligamentous complex, and neurologic status of the patient. The severity score offers prognostic information and is helpful in decision making about surgical vs nonsurgical management. PMID:26435776

  17. Dimensional coordinate measurements: application in characterizing cervical spine motion

    Zheng, Weilong; Li, Linan; Wang, Shibin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Nianke; Xue, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Cervical spine as a complicated part in the human body, the form of its movement is diverse. The movements of the segments of vertebrae are three-dimensional, and it is reflected in the changes of the angle between two joint and the displacement in different directions. Under normal conditions, cervical can flex, extend, lateral flex and rotate. For there is no relative motion between measuring marks fixed on one segment of cervical vertebra, the cervical vertebrae with three marked points can be seen as a body. Body's motion in space can be decomposed into translational movement and rotational movement around a base point .This study concerns the calculation of dimensional coordinate of the marked points pasted to the human body's cervical spine by an optical method. Afterward, these measures will allow the calculation of motion parameters for every spine segment. For this study, we choose a three-dimensional measurement method based on binocular stereo vision. The object with marked points is placed in front of the CCD camera. Through each shot, we will get there two parallax images taken from different cameras. According to the principle of binocular vision we can be realized three-dimensional measurements. Cameras are erected parallelly. This paper describes the layout of experimental system and a mathematical model to get the coordinates.

  18. Access related complications during anterior exposure of the lumbar spine

    Gary A Fantini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new millennium has witnessed the emergence of minimally invasive, non-posterior based surgery of the lumbar spine, in particular via lateral based methodologies to discectomy and fusion. In contrast, and perhaps for a variety of reasons, anterior motion preservation (non-fusion technologies are playing a comparatively lesser, though incompletely defined, role at present. Lateral based motion preservation technologies await definition of their eventual role in the armamentarium of minimally invasive surgical therapies of the lumbar spine. While injury to the major vascular structures remains the most serious and feared complication of the anterior approach, this occurrence has been nearly eliminated by the use of lateral based approaches for discectomy and fusion cephalad to L5-S1. Whether anterior or lateral based, non-posterior approaches to the lumbar spine share certain access related pitfalls and complications, including damage to the urologic and neurologic structures, as well as gastrointestinal and abdominal wall issues. This review will focus on the recognition, management and prevention of these anterior and lateral access related complications.

  19. Occurrence of cervical spine injuries during the rugby scrum.

    Wetzler, M J; Akpata, T; Laughlin, W; Levy, A S

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study of cervical spine injuries that occurred during the rugby scrum in the United States was undertaken. In the U.S., from 1970 to 1996, 36 (58%) of the 62 documented injured players injured their cervical spines during the scrum. Thirty-five men (97%) and one woman (3%) were injured. Twenty-three of the injuries (64%) occurred when the opposing packs came together (engagement), and 13 (36%) occurred when the scrum collapsed. Twenty-eight (78%) hookers, seven (19%) props, and one (3%) second-row player were injured. Twenty (56%) hookers and three (8%) props were hurt during engagement. Eight hookers (22%), four props (11%), and one second-row player (3%) were injured when the scrum collapsed. Significantly more injuries occurred during engagement than during collapse, and hookers were injured significantly more than props. We conclude that in the rugby scrum in the U.S., the hooker suffers most of the cervical spine injuries (78% in this study) and this position is by far the most vulnerable. This study should be used to develop rugby law (rule) changes and educate players, coaches, and referees in United States rugby. PMID:9548109

  20. Current intraoperative devices to reduce visual loss after spine surgery.

    Uribe, Alberto A; Baig, Mirza N; Puente, Erika G; Viloria, Adolfo; Mendel, Ehud; Bergese, Sergio D

    2012-08-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) after spine surgery performed with the patient prone is a rare but devastating postoperative complication. The incidence and the mechanisms of visual loss after surgery are difficult to determine. The 4 recognized causes of POVL are ischemic optic neuropathy (approximately 89%), central retinal artery occlusion (approximately 11%), cortical infarction, and external ocular injury. There are very limited guidelines or protocols on the perioperative practice for "prone-position" surgeries. However, new devices have been designed to prevent mechanical ocular compression during prone-position spine surgeries. The authors used PubMed to perform a literature search for devices used in prone-position spine surgeries. A total of 7 devices was found; the authors explored these devices' features, advantages, and disadvantages. The cause of POVL seems to be a multifactorial problem with unclear pathophysiological mechanisms. Therefore, ocular compression is a critical factor, and eliminating any obvious compression to the eye with these devices could possibly prevent this devastating perioperative complication. PMID:22853832