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Sample records for spent lignocellulose hydrolysates

  1. Hydrolysates of lignocellulosic materials for biohydrogen production

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    Rong Chen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic materials are commonly used in bio-H2 productionfor the sustainable energy resource development asthey are abundant, cheap, renewable and highly biodegradable.In the process of the bio-H2 production, the pretreated lignocellulosicmaterials are firstly converted to monosaccharidesby enzymolysis and then to H2 by fermentation. Since thestructures of lignocellulosic materials are rather complex, thehydrolysates vary with the used materials. Even using the samelignocellulosic materials, the hydrolysates also change withdifferent pretreatment methods. It has been shown that the appropriatehydrolysate compositions can dramatically improvethe biological activities and bio-H2 production performances.Over the past decades, hydrolysis with respect to differentlignocellulosic materials and pretreatments has been widelyinvestigated. Besides, effects of the hydrolysates on the biohydrogenyields have also been examined. In this review, recentstudies on hydrolysis as well as their effects on the biohydrogenproduction performance are summarized. [BMBReports 2013; 46(5: 244-251

  2. Fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates: Inhibition and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmqvist, E.

    1998-02-01

    The ethanol yield and productivity obtained during fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates is decreased due to the presence of inhibiting compounds, such as weak acids, furans and phenolic compounds produced during hydrolysis. Evaluation of the effect of various biological, physical and chemical detoxification treatments by fermentation assays using Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to characterise inhibitors. Inhibition of fermentation was decreased after removal of the non-volatile compounds, pre-fermentation by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei, treatment with the lignolytic enzyme laccase, extraction with ether, and treatment with alkali. Yeast growth in lignocellulosic hydrolysates was inhibited below a certain fermentation pH, most likely due to high concentrations of undissociated weak acids. The effect of individual compounds were studied in model fermentations. Furfural is reduced to furfuryl alcohol by yeast dehydrogenases, thereby affecting the intracellular redox balance. As a result, acetaldehyde accumulated during furfural reduction, which most likely contributed to inhibition of growth. Acetic acid (10 g 1{sup -1}) and furfural (3 g 1{sup -1}) interacted antagonistically causing decreased specific growth rate, whereas no significant individual or interaction effects were detected by the lignin-derived compound 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (2 g 1{sup -1}). By maintaining a high cell mass density in the fermentor, the process was less sensitive to inhibitors affecting growth and to fluctuations in fermentation pH, and in addition the depletion rate of bioconvertible inhibitors was increased. A theoretical ethanol yield and high productivity was obtained in continuous fermentation of spruce hydrolysate when the cell mass concentration was maintained at a high level by applying cell recirculation 164 refs, 16 figs, 5 tabs

  3. Detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates using sodium borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavka, Adnan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2013-05-01

    Addition of sodium borohydride to a lignocellulose hydrolysate of Norway spruce affected the fermentability when cellulosic ethanol was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Treatment of the hydrolysate with borohydride improved the ethanol yield on consumed sugar from 0.09 to 0.31 g/g, the balanced ethanol yield from 0.02 to 0.30 g/g, and the ethanol productivity from 0.05 to 0.57 g/(L×h). Treatment of a sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate gave similar results, and the experiments indicate that sodium borohydride is suitable for chemical in situ detoxification. The model inhibitors coniferyl aldehyde, p-benzoquinone, 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone, and furfural were efficiently reduced by treatment with sodium borohydride, even under mild reaction conditions (20 °C and pH 6.0). While addition of sodium dithionite to pretreatment liquid from spruce improved enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, addition of sodium borohydride did not. This result indicates that the strong hydrophilicity resulting from sulfonation of inhibitors by dithionite treatment was particularly important for alleviating enzyme inhibition. PMID:23567704

  4. Electrochemical detoxification of phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for Clostridium fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Min; Min, Kyoungseon; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Han, Sung Ok; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-07-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is being preferred as a feedstock in the biorefinery, but lignocellulosic hydrolysate usually contains inhibitors against microbial fermentation. Among these inhibitors, phenolics are highly toxic to butyric acid-producing and butanol-producing Clostridium even at a low concentration. Herein, we developed an electrochemical polymerization method to detoxify phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for efficient Clostridium fermentation. After the electrochemical detoxification for 10h, 78%, 77%, 82%, and 94% of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vanillin, and syringaldehyde were removed, respectively. Furthermore, 71% of total phenolics in rice straw hydrolysate were removed without any sugar-loss. Whereas the cell growth and metabolite production of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium beijerinckii were completely inhibited in un-detoxified hydrolysate, those in detoxifying rice straw hydrolysate were recovered to 70-100% of the control cultures. The electrochemical detoxification method described herein provides an efficient strategy for producing butanol and butyric acid through Clostridium fermentation with lignocellulosic hydrolysate. PMID:25863199

  5. Isolation and characterization of Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14 for biological removal of inhibitors from lignocellulosic hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Wierckx, Nick; Koopman, Frank; Bandounas, Luaine; Winde, Johannes H.; Ruijssenaars, Harald J.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of toxic fermentation inhibitors such as furfural and 5?hydroxy?2?methylfurfural (HMF) during acid (pre?)treatment of lignocellulose, calls for the efficient removal of these compounds. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be efficiently detoxified biologically with microorganisms that specifically metabolize the fermentation inhibitors while preserving the sugars for subsequent use by the fermentation host. The bacterium Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14 was isolated from enrich...

  6. Novel isolates for biological detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou-Rui, Zhang; Xiang-Xiang, Qin; Silva, Silvio S; Sarrouh, Boutros F; Ai-Hua, Cai; Yu-Heng, Zhou; Ke, Jin; Qiu, Xiang

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, two new strians, Issatchenkia occidentalis (Lj-3, CCTCC M 2006097) and Issatchenkia orienalis (S-7, CCTCC M 2006098), isolated from different environments on solid media, were used in the detoxification process of the hemicellulosic hydrolysate of sugarcane bagasse. High-pressure liquid chromatography elution curve of UV-absorption compounds represented by acetic acid, furfural, and guaiacol (toxic compounds found in the hemicellulosic hydrolysate) showed that several chromatographic peaks were evidently diminished for the case of detoxified hydrolysate with isolate strains compared to the high peaks resulted for no detoxified hydrolysate. It was clear that these inhibitors were degraded by the two new isolates during their cultivation process. Fermentation results for the biodetoxified hydrolysate showed an increase in xylitol productivity (Q (p)) by 1.97 and 1.95 times (2.03 and 2.01 g l(-1) h(-1)) and in xylitol yield (Y (p)) by 1.72 and 1.65 times (0.93 and 0.89 g xylitol per gram xylose) for hydrolysate treated with S-7 and Lj-3, respectively, in comparison with no detoxified hydrolysate (1.03 g l(-1) h(-1) and 0.54 g xylitol per gram xylose). This present work demonstrated the importance of Issatchenkia yeast in providing an effective biological detoxification approach to remove inhibitors and improve hydrolysate fermentability, leading to a high xylitol productivity and yield. PMID:18649037

  7. Pichia stipitis xylose reductase helps detoxifying lignocellulosic hydrolysate by reducing 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF

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    Röder Anja

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (Ps-XR has been used to design Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are able to ferment xylose. One example is the industrial S. cerevisiae xylose-consuming strain TMB3400, which was constructed by expression of P. stipitis xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase and overexpression of endogenous xylulose kinase in the industrial S. cerevisiae strain USM21. Results In this study, we demonstrate that strain TMB3400 not only converts xylose, but also displays higher tolerance to lignocellulosic hydrolysate during anaerobic batch fermentation as well as 3 times higher in vitro HMF and furfural reduction activity than the control strain USM21. Using laboratory strains producing various levels of Ps-XR, we confirm that Ps-XR is able to reduce HMF both in vitro and in vivo. Ps-XR overexpression increases the in vivo HMF conversion rate by approximately 20%, thereby improving yeast tolerance towards HMF. Further purification of Ps-XR shows that HMF is a substrate inhibitor of the enzyme. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that xylose reductase is also able to reduce the furaldehyde compounds that are present in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Possible implications of this newly characterized activity of Ps-XR on lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation are discussed.

  8. Pyrochars from bioenergy residue as novel bio-adsorbents for lignocellulosic hydrolysate detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monlau, F; Sambusiti, C; Antoniou, N; Zabaniotou, A; Solhy, A; Barakat, A

    2015-07-01

    The robust supramolecular structure of biomass often requires severe pretreatments conditions to produce soluble sugars. Nonetheless, these processes generate some inhibitory compounds (i.e. furans compounds and aliphatic acids) deriving mainly from sugars degradation. To avoid the inhibition of the biological process and to obtain satisfactory sugars conversion level into biofuels, a detoxification step is required. This study investigates the use of two pyrochars derived from solid anaerobic digestates for the detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. At a pyrochar concentration of 40gL(-1), more than 94% of 5-HMF and 99% of furfural were removed in the synthetic medium after 24h of contact time, whereas sugars concentration remained unchanged. Furfural was adsorbed faster than 5-HMF by both pyrochars and totally removed after 3h of contact. Finally, the two pyrochars were found efficient in the detoxification of corn stalks and Douglas fir wood chips hydrolysates without affecting the soluble sugars concentrations. PMID:25863902

  9. Enhanced bioproduction of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate from wheat straw lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesário, M Teresa; Raposo, Rodrigo S; de Almeida, M Catarina M D; van Keulen, Frederik; Ferreira, Bruno S; da Fonseca, M Manuela R

    2014-01-25

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bioplastics that can replace conventional petroleum-derived products in various applications. One of the major barriers for their widespread introduction in the market is the higher production costs compared with their petrochemical counterparts. In this work, a process was successfully implemented with high productivity based on wheat straw, a cheap and readily available agricultural residue, as raw material. The strain Burkholderia sacchari DSM 17165 which is able to metabolise glucose, xylose and arabinose, the main sugars present in wheat straw hydrolysates (WSHs), was used. Results in shake flask showed that B. sacchari cells accumulated about 70%gpoly(3-hydroxybutyrate)(P(3HB))/g cell dry weight (CDW) with a yield of polymer on sugars (YP/S) of 0.18g/g when grown on a mixture of commercial C6 and C5 sugars (control), while these values reached about 60%gP(3HB)/g CDW and 0.19g/g, respectively, when WSHs were used as carbon source. In fed-batch cultures carried out in 2L stirred-tank reactors (STRs) on WSH, a maximum polymer concentration of 105 g/L was reached after 61 hours of cultivation corresponding to an accumulation of 72% of CDW. Polymer yield and productivity were 0.22 gP(3HB)/g total sugar consumed and 1.6g/L hour, respectively. The selected feeding strategy successfully overcame the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) phenomenon observed with sugar mixtures containing hexoses and pentoses. This is the first work describing fed-batch cultivations aiming at PHA production using real lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Additionally, the P(3HB) volumetric productivities attained are by far the highest ever achieved on agricultural waste hydrolysates. PMID:24157713

  10. Molecular mechanisms of yeast tolerance and in situ detoxification of lignocellulose hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretreatment of lignocellulose biomass for biofuels production generates inhibitory compounds that interfere with microbial growth and subsequent fermentation. Remediation of the inhibitors by current physical, chemical, and biological abatement means is economically impractical and overcoming the i...

  11. Contribution of PRS3, RPB4 and ZWF1 to the resistance of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCUG53310 and PE-2 strains to lignocellulosic hydrolysate-derived inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Joana T; Aguiar, Tatiana Q; Romaní, Aloia; Oliveira, Carla; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-09-01

    PRS3, RPB4 and ZWF1 were previously identified as key genes for yeast tolerance to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. To better understand their contribution to yeast resistance to the multiple stresses occurring during lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentations, we overexpressed these genes in two industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CCUG53310 and PE-2, and evaluated their impact on the fermentation of Eucalyptus globulus wood and corn cob hydrolysates. PRS3 overexpression improved the fermentation rate (up to 32%) and productivity (up to 48%) in different hydrolysates. ZWF1 and RPB4 overexpression did not improve the fermentation performance, but their increased expression in the presence of acetic acid, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural was found to contribute to yeast adaptation to these inhibitors. This study expands our understanding about the molecular mechanisms involved in industrial yeast tolerance to the stresses occurring during lignocellulosic bioethanol production and highlights the importance of selecting appropriate strain backgrounds/hydrolysates combinations when addressing further improvement of these processes. PMID:25974617

  12. Fast chemical treatments for ligno-cellulosic yeast carriers??? production from brewers?? spent grains

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Eduardo J.; Teixeira, J. A., ed. lit.; Vicente, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Caustic (NaOH) and acid-caustic (HCl + NaOH) treatments have both been previously proposed to prepare ligno-cellulosic yeast carriers from Brewers?? Spent Grains (BSG) [1]. However, these treatments are time consuming (more than 24 h). Base-treated carriers are more hydrophobic if compared to acid-base treated, enhancing adhesion in one hand, but more floatable and easily washed out from the reactor in the other hand [2]. Thus, a balance between hydrophilic (cellulose) and hydr...

  13. Development of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain with Enhanced Resistance to Phenolic Fermentation Inhibitors in Lignocellulose Hydrolysates by Heterologous Expression of Laccase

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Simona; Cassland, Pierre; Jönsson, Leif J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve production of fuel ethanol from renewable raw materials, laccase from the white rot fungus Trametes versicolor was expressed under control of the PGK1 promoter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increase its resistance to phenolic inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates. It was found that the laccase activity could be enhanced twofold by simultaneous overexpression of the homologous t-SNARE Sso2p. The factors affecting the level of active laccase obtained, besides the cultivation tem...

  14. Development of a D-xylose fermenting and inhibitor tolerant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with high performance in lignocellulose hydrolysates using metabolic and evolutionary engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Demeke, Mekonnen M.; Dietz, Heiko; Li, Yingying; Foulquie?-moreno, Mari?a R.; Mutturi, Sarma; Deprez, Sylvie; Abt, Tom Den; Bonini, Beatriz M.; Liden, Gunnar; Dumortier, Franc?oise; Verplaetse, Alex; Boles, Eckhard; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The production of bioethanol from lignocellulose hydrolysates requires a robust, D-xylose-fermenting and inhibitor-tolerant microorganism as catalyst. The purpose of the present work was to develop such a strain from a prime industrial yeast strain, Ethanol Red, used for bioethanol production. Results: An expression cassette containing 13 genes including Clostridium phytofermentans XylA, encoding D-xylose isomerase (XI), and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway was inserted...

  15. Production of modified bentonite via adsorbing lignocelluloses from spent liquor of NSSC process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oveissi, Farshad; Fatehi, Pedram

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the adsorption of lignocelluloses from spent liquor (SL) of neutral sulfite semi chemical (NSSC) pulping process on bentonite was investigated. It was observed that 0.26g/g of lignin and 0.27g/g of hemicelluloses from SL were adsorbed on bentonite under the conditions of 50°C, 100rpm and 40g/gSL/bentonite after 3h of treatment. The adsorptions of lignin and hemicellulose were increased to 1.8g/g and 0.45g/g, respectively, via adding 15mg/g of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) in the system of SL/bentonite. The turbidity and COD removals were improved from 69% to 93% and from 25% to 38% by adding PDADMAC to the SL/bentonite system, respectively. The increase in the heating value of bentonite (from 0 to 15.4MJ/kg) confirmed the adsorption of lignocelluloses. The modified bentonite can be used as filler in corrugated medium paper production or as fuel. PMID:25463794

  16. Effect of overexpression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pad1p on the resistance to phenylacrylic acids and lignocellulose hydrolysates under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, S; Nilvebrant, N O; Jönsson, L J

    2001-10-01

    Lignocellulose hydrolysates, obtained by acid hydrolysis for production of bioethanol, contain, in addition to fermentable sugars, compounds that inhibit the fermenting micro-organism. One approach to alleviate the inhibition problem is to use genetic engineering to introduce increased tolerance. Phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (Pad1p) catalyses a decarboxylation step, by which aromatic carboxylic acids are converted to the corresponding vinyl derivatives. Pad1p-overexpressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated in synthetic medium in the presence of model compounds, ferulic acid [(2 E)-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-enoic acid] and cinnamic acid [(2 E)-3-phenylprop-2-enoic acid], as well as in a dilute acid hydrolysate of spruce to examine the resistance against fermentation inhibitors. Overexpression of S. cerevisiae phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (Pad1p) resulted in an improved growth rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of ferulic acid, cinnamic acid, and in a dilute acid hydrolysate of spruce. Vinyl guaiacol (2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol) was identified as a major metabolite of ferulic acid, and dihydroferulic acid [3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propanoic acid] was detected under oxygen-limited conditions. Styrene (vinylbenzene) and dihydrocinnamic acid (3-phenylpropanoic acid) were identified as metabolites of cinnamic acid. Transformants overexpressing Pad1p had the ability to convert ferulic and cinnamic acid at a faster rate than a control transformant (PAD(C)) not overexpressing Pad1p. This enabled faster growth for Pad1p-overexpressing transformants under both aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. Pad1p activity was also studied using non-growing cells. The overexpressing transformants showed approximately tenfold higher activity than PAD(C). The Pad1p overexpressing transformants also showed a 22-25% faster glucose consumption rate, a 40-45% faster mannose consumption rate, and a 24-29% faster ethanol production rate in the dilute acid hydrolysate of spruce. PMID:11693915

  17. Inhibitory action of the toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on xylose-to-xylitol bioconversion by Candida guilliermondii

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Roge?rio S.; Mussatto, Solange I.; Roberto, Ine?s Conceic?a?o

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic materials represent an abundant and inexpensive source of sugars which can be microbiologically converted to industrial products. However, hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials for sugars recovery always goes together with the formation of by-products that inhibit the fermentation process. Such by-products include acetic acid, phenolic compounds such as syringaldehyde, ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and vanillic acid, among others. These toxic compounds can...

  18. Biorefining of lignocellulose : Detoxification of inhibitory hydrolysates and potential utilization of residual streams for production of enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Cavka, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable resource that can be utilized for the production of biofuels, chemicals, and bio-based materials. Biochemical conversion of lignocellulose to advanced biofuels, such as cellulosic ethanol, is generally performed through microbial fermentation of sugars generated by thermochemical pretreatment of the biomass followed by an enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose. The aims of the research presented in this thesis were to address problems associated with pret...

  19. Xylulokinase Overexpression in Two Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Also Expressing Xylose Reductase and Xylitol Dehydrogenase and Its Effect on Fermentation of Xylose and Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Bjo?rn; Christensson, Camilla; Hobley, Timothy; Hahn-ha?gerdal, Ba?rbel

    2001-01-01

    Fermentation of the pentose sugar xylose to ethanol in lignocellulosic biomass would make bioethanol production economically more competitive. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an efficient ethanol producer, can utilize xylose only when expressing the heterologous genes XYL1 (xylose reductase) and XYL2 (xylitol dehydrogenase). Xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase convert xylose to its isomer xylulose. The gene XKS1 encodes the xylulose-phosphorylating enzyme xylulokinase. In this study, we dete...

  20. Second Generation Ethanol Production from Brewers’ Spent Grain

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    Rossana Liguori

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomasses raises a global interest because it represents a good alternative to petroleum-derived energies and reduces the food versus fuel conflict generated by first generation ethanol. In this study, alkaline-acid pretreated brewers’ spent grain (BSG was evaluated for ethanol production after enzymatic hydrolysis with commercial enzymes. The obtained hydrolysate containing a glucose concentration of 75 g/L was adopted, after dilution up to 50 g/L, for fermentation by the strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL YB 2293 selected as the best producer among five ethanologenic microorganims. When the hydrolysate was supplemented with yeast extract, 12.79 g/L of ethanol, corresponding to 0.28 g of ethanol per grams of glucose consumed (55% efficiency, was obtained within 24 h, while in the non-supplemented hydrolysate, a similar concentration was reached within 48 h. The volumetric productivity increased from 0.25 g/L·h in the un-supplemented hydrolysate to 0.53 g/L h in the yeast extract supplemented hydrolysate. In conclusion, the strain S. cerevisiae NRRL YB 2293 was shown able to produce ethanol from BSG. Although an equal amount of ethanol was reached in both BSG hydrolysate media, the nitrogen source supplementation reduced the ethanol fermentation time and promoted glucose uptake and cell growth.

  1. Effect of Lignocellulose Related Compounds on Microalgae Growth and Product Biosynthesis: A Review

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    Krystian Miazek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae contain valuable compounds that can be harnessed for industrial applications. Lignocellulose biomass is a plant material containing in abundance organic substances such as carbohydrates, phenolics, organic acids and other secondary compounds. As growth of microalgae on organic substances was confirmed during heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultivation, lignocellulose derived compounds can become a feedstock to cultivate microalgae and produce target compounds. In this review, different treatment methods to hydrolyse lignocellulose into organic substrates are presented first. Secondly, the effect of lignocellulosic hydrolysates, organic substances typically present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as well as minor co-products, on growth and accumulation of target compounds in microalgae cultures is described. Finally, the possibilities of using lignocellulose hydrolysates as a common feedstock for microalgae cultures are evaluated.

  2. Bioconversion of lignocellulose: inhibitors and detoxification

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    Jönsson Leif J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bioconversion of lignocellulose by microbial fermentation is typically preceded by an acidic thermochemical pretreatment step designed to facilitate enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Substances formed during the pretreatment of the lignocellulosic feedstock inhibit enzymatic hydrolysis as well as microbial fermentation steps. This review focuses on inhibitors from lignocellulosic feedstocks and how conditioning of slurries and hydrolysates can be used to alleviate inhibition problems. Novel developments in the area include chemical in-situ detoxification by using reducing agents, and methods that improve the performance of both enzymatic and microbial biocatalysts.

  3. Comparison of methods for detoxification of spruce hydrolysate for bacterial cellulose production

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xiang; Cavka, Adnan; Jo?nsson, Leif J.; Hong, Feng

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a nanostructured material with unique properties and wide applicability. In order to decrease the production cost of bacterial cellulose, lignocellulose-based media have considerable potential as alternative cost-effective feedstocks. However, pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose to sugars also generate fermentation inhibitors. Detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates is needed to achieve efficient production of BC. In this inve...

  4. Egg protein hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Amerongen, A.; Beelen, M. J. C.; Wolbers, L. A. M.; Gilst, W. H.; Buikema, J. H.; Nelissen, J. W. P. M.

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides egg-protein hydrolysates with DPP-IV inhibitory activity which are particularly suited for the treatment of diabetes. Particularly advantageous is to use hydrolysate of lysozyme for the treatment of diabetes.

  5. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues by Agrocybe cylindracea and Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom fungi--assessment of their effect on the final product and spent substrate properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutrotsios, Georgios; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Zervakis, Georgios I

    2014-10-15

    Nine agro-industrial and forestry by-products were subjected to solid-state fermentation by Agrocybe cylindracea and Pleurotus ostreatus, and the process and end-products were comparatively evaluated. Grape marc waste plus cotton gin trash was the best performing medium for both fungi, while substrate composition had a marked effect on most cultivation parameters. Biological efficiency was positively correlated with nitrogen, lignin and ash, and negatively with hemicelluloses and carbohydrate content of substrates. Spent substrates demonstrated high reductions in hemicelluloses and cellulose in contrast to lignin; fibre fractions were correlated with nitrogen, fat and ash content of initial materials, while residual mycelial biomass was affected by mushroom productivity. Mushroom proximate analysis revealed significant variations of constituents depending on the substrate. Crude protein and fat were correlated with substrates nitrogen for both species. Alternative cultivation substrates of high potential are proposed, while spent material could be exploited as animal feed due to its upgraded properties. PMID:24837930

  6. Fermentative hydrogen production from agroindustrial lignocellulosic substrates

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Valeria, Reginatto; Regina Vasconcellos, Antônio.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve economically competitive biological hydrogen production, it is crucial to consider inexpensive materials such as lignocellulosic substrate residues derived from agroindustrial activities. It is possible to use (1) lignocellulosic materials without any type of pretreatment, (2) lignocellul [...] osic materials after a pretreatment step, and (3) lignocellulosic materials hydrolysates originating from a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the current literature data on fermentative H2 production presented in this review, thermophilic conditions produce H2 in yields approximately 75% higher than those obtained in mesophilic conditions using untreated lignocellulosic substrates. The average H2 production from pretreated material is 3.17 ± 1.79 mmol of H2/g of substrate, which is approximately 50% higher compared with the average yield achieved using untreated materials (2.17 ± 1.84 mmol of H2/g of substrate). Biological pretreatment affords the highest average yield 4.54 ± 1.78 mmol of H2/g of substrate compared with the acid and basic pretreatment - average yields of 2.94 ± 1.85 and 2.41 ± 1.52 mmol of H2/g of substrate, respectively. The average H2 yield from hydrolysates, obtained from a pretreatment step and enzymatic hydrolysis (3.78 ± 1.92 mmol of H2/g), was lower compared with the yield of substrates pretreated by biological methods only, demonstrating that it is important to avoid the formation of inhibitors generated by chemical pretreatments. Based on this review, exploring other microorganisms and optimizing the pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions can make the use of lignocellulosic substrates a sustainable way to produce H2.

  7. Electricity generation by microbial fuel cells fuelled with wheat straw hydrolysate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricity production from microbial fuel cells fueled with hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw can achieve both energy production and domestic wastewater purification. The hydrolysate contained mainly xylan, carboxylic acids, and phenolic compounds. Power generation and substrate utilization from the hydrolysate was compared with the ones obtained by defined synthetic substrates. The power density increased from 47 mW m?2 to 148 mW m?2 with the hydrolysate:wastewater ratio (RHW in m3 m?3) increasing from 0 to 0.06 (corresponding to 0–0.7 g dm?3 of carbohydrates). The power density with the hydrolysate was higher than the one with only xylan (120 mW m?2) and carboxylic acids as fuel. The higher power density can be caused by the presence of phenolic compounds in the hydrolysates, which could mediate electron transport. Electricity generation with the hydrolysate resulted in 95% degradation of the xylan and glucan. The study demonstrates that lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be used for co-treatment with domestic wastewater for power generation in microbial fuel cells. -- Highlights: ? Electricity production in microbial fuel cells. ? Hydrolysate from hydrothermal treated wheat straw as fuel. ? Larger electricity production than with simple compounds as fuel. ? No need for detoxification and nutrients to the hydrolysate. ? Effective (95%) microbial utilization of the polymeric carbohydrates.

  8. Selective suppression of bacterial contaminants by process conditions during lignocellulose based yeast fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albers Eva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of bacteria in large-scale yeast fermentations is a serious problem and a threat to the development of successful biofuel production plants. Huge research efforts have been spent in order to solve this problem, but additional ways must still be found to keep bacterial contaminants from thriving in these environments. The aim of this project was to develop process conditions that would inhibit bacterial growth while giving yeast a competitive advantage. Results Lactic acid bacteria are usually considered to be the most common contaminants in industrial yeast fermentations. Our observations support this view but also suggest that acetic acid bacteria, although not so numerous, could be a much more problematic obstacle to overcome. Acetic acid bacteria showed a capacity to drastically reduce the viability of yeast. In addition, they consumed the previously formed ethanol. Lactic acid bacteria did not show this detrimental effect on yeast viability. It was possible to combat both types of bacteria by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol to the wood hydrolysate medium used. As a result of NaCl + ethanol additions the amount of viable bacteria decreased and yeast viability was enhanced concomitantly with an increase in ethanol concentration. The successful result obtained via addition of NaCl and ethanol was also confirmed in a real industrial ethanol production plant with its natural inherent yeast/bacterial community. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the number of bacteria and offer a selective advantage to yeast by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol when cultivated in lignocellulosic medium such as wood hydrolysate. However, for optimal results, the concentrations of NaCl + ethanol must be adjusted to suit the challenges offered by each hydrolysate.

  9. A comparative study of the hydrolysis of gamma irradiated lignocelluloses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Betiku

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high-dose irradiation as a pretreatment method on two common lignocellulosic materials; hardwood (Khaya senegalensis and softwood (Triplochiton scleroxylon were investigated by assessing the potential of cellulase enzyme derived from Aspergillus flavus Linn isolate NSPR 101 to hydrolyse the materials. The irradiation strongly affected the materials, causing the enzymatic hydrolysis to increase by more than 3 fold. Maximum digestibility occurred in softwood at 40kGy dosage of irradiation, while in hardwood it was at 90kGy dosage. The results also showed that, at the same dosage levels (p < 0.05, hardwood was hydrolysed significantly better compared to the softwood.

  10. Enzymatic conversion of lignocellulose into fermentable sugars : challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØrgensen, Henning; Kristensen, Jan Bach

    2007-01-01

    The economic dependency on fossil fuels and the resulting effects on climate and environment have put tremendous focus on utilizing fermentable sugars from lignocellulose, the largest known renewable carbohydrate source. The fermentable sugars in lignocellulose are derived from cellulose and hemicelluloses but these are not readily accessible to enzymatic hydrolysis and require a pretreatment, which causes an extensive modification of the lignocellulosic structure. A number of pretreatment technologies are under development and being tested in pilot scale. Hydrolysis of lignocellulose carbohydrates into fermentable sugars requires a number of different cellulases and hemicellulases. The hydrolysis of cellulose is a sequential breakdown of the linear glucose chains, whereas hemicellulases must be capable of hydrolysing branched chains containing different sugars and functional groups. The technology for pretreatment and hydrolysis has been developed to an extent that is close to a commercially viable level. Ithas become possible to process lignocellulose at high substrate levels and the enzyme performance has been improved. Also the cost of enzymes has been reduced. Still a number of technical and scientific issues within pretreatment and hydrolysis remain to be solved. However, significant improvements in yield and cost reductions are expected, thus making large-scale fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates possible. © 2007 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  11. Electricity generation by microbial fuel cells fuelled with wheat straw hydrolysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Poulsen, Finn Willy

    2011-01-01

    Electricity production from microbial fuel cells fueled with hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw can achieve both energy production and domestic wastewater purification. The hydrolysate contained mainly xylan, carboxylic acids, and phenolic compounds. Power generation and substrate utilization from the hydrolysate was compared with the ones obtained by defined synthetic substrates. The power density increased from 47 mW m?2 to 148 mW m?2 with the hydrolysate:wastewater ratio (RHW in m3 m?3) increasing from 0 to 0.06 (corresponding to 0–0.7 g dm?3 of carbohydrates). The power density with the hydrolysate was higher than the one with only xylan (120 mW m?2) and carboxylic acids as fuel. The higher power density can be caused by the presence of phenolic compounds in the hydrolysates, which could mediate electron transport. Electricity generation with the hydrolysate resulted in 95% degradation of the xylan and glucan. The study demonstrates that lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be used for co-treatment with domestic wastewater for power generation in microbial fuel cells.

  12. Controlled pilot development unit-scale fed-batch cultivation of yeast on spruce hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Andreas; Lequeux, Gaspard; Lidén, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Yeast production on hydrolysate is a likely process solution in large-scale ethanol production from lignocellulose. The hydrolysate will be available on site, and the yeast has furthermore been shown to acquire an increased inhibitor tolerance when cultivated on hydrolysate. However, due to over-flow metabolism and inhibition, efficient yeast production on hydrolysate can only be achieved by well-controlled substrate addition. In the present work, a method was developed for controlled addition of hydrolysate to PDU (process development unit)-scale aerobic fed-batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TMB 3000. A feed rate control strategy, which maintains the ethanol concentration at a low constant level, was adapted to process-like conditions. The ethanol concentration was obtained from on-line measurements of the ethanol mole fraction in the exhaust gas. A computer model of the system was developed to optimize control performance. Productivities, biomass yields, and byproduct formation were evaluated. The feed rate control worked satisfactorily and maintained the ethanol concentration close to the setpoint during the cultivations. Biomass yields of 0.45 g/g were obtained on added hexoses during cultivation on hydrolysate and of 0.49 g/g during cultivation on a synthetic medium with glucose as the carbon source. Exponential growth was achieved with a specific growth rate of 0.18 h-1 during cultivation on hydrolysate and 0.22 h-1 during cultivation on glucose. PMID:17330957

  13. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  14. Effect of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors on growth and hydrogen production by Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum W16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guang-Li; Ren, Nan-Qi; Wang, Ai-Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Xu, Ji-Fei; Liu, Bing-Feng [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2010-12-15

    In the process of producing H{sub 2} from lignocellulosic materials, inhibitory compounds could be potentially formed during pre-treatment. This work experimentally investigated the effect of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors on growth and hydrogen production by Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum W16. Representative compounds presented in corn stover acid hydrolysate were added in various concentrations, individually or in various combinations and subsequently inhibitions on growth and H{sub 2} production were quantified. Acetate sodium was not inhibitory to T. thermosaccharolyticum W16, rather than it was stimulatory to the growth and H{sub 2} production. Alternatively, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin and syringaldehyde were potent inhibitors of growth and hydrogen production even though these compounds showed inhibitory effect depending on their concentrations. Synergistic inhibitory effects were exhibited in the introduction of combinations of inhibitors to the medium and in hydrolysate with concentrated inhibitors. Fermentation results from hydrolysates revealed that to increase the efficiency of this bioprocess from corn stover hydrolysate, the inhibitory compounds concentration must be reduced to the levels present in the raw hydrolysate. (author)

  15. Sugar production from lignocellulosic materials by gamma photolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lignocellulosic plant materials were treated with swelling agent and exposed to gamma radiation from Cobalt 60 or Cesium 137. The swelling agents include NaOH, KOH, NH4OH, Benzyle trimethyl ammonium hydroxide, ZnCl2, CaCO3, H3PO4, and H2SO4. At 50 Mrads or above the lignocellulosic materials were extensively solubilized and formed a thick paste or liquid, depending upon the amount of liquid used. The brownish dark hydrolysate had a sweet molasses like odor. Complete solubilization has been acheived for samples such as sugarcane bagasse, newspaper, cotton linter, cotton clothes, saw dust, and alpha cellulose powder. About 40% total sugar and 7% reducing sugar per dry weight of sugarcane bagasse was obtained. The majority of the soluble carbohydrate seemed to be disaccharides or larger molecules. Solubilization of cellulose was dosage dependent, and the rate was facilitated by alkali. However, the released sugar was further decomposed by the alkali

  16. A mathematical model for the inhibitory effects of lignin in enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Roger H; Vaidya, Alankar A; Campion, Sylke H

    2013-02-01

    A new model for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass distinguishes causal influences from enzyme deactivation and restrictions on the accessibility of cellulose. It focuses on calculating the amount of unreacted cellulose at cessation of enzyme activity, unlike existing models that were constructed for calculating the time dependence of conversion. There are three adjustable parameters: (1) 'occluded cellulose' is defined as cellulose that cannot be hydrolysed regardless of enzyme loading or incubation time, (2) a 'characteristic enzyme loading' is sufficient to hydrolyse half of the non-occluded cellulose, (3) a 'mechanism index' measures deviations from first-order kinetics. This model was used to predict that the optimal incubation temperature is lower for lignocellulosics than for pure cellulose. For steam-exploded pine wood after 96h incubation, occluded cellulose was 24% and 26% at 30°C and 50°C, and the characteristic enzyme loadings were 10 and 18FPU/g substrate, respectively. PMID:23340076

  17. Industrial robust yeast isolates with great potential for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Francisco B; Roman??, Aloia; Ruiz, H??ctor A.; Teixeira, J. A.; Domingues, Luc??lia

    2014-01-01

    The search of robust microorganisms is essential to design sustainable processes of second generation bioethanol. Yeast strains isolated from industrial environments are generally recognised to present an increased stress tolerance but no specific information is available on their tolerance towards inhibitors that come from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials. In this work, a strategy for the selection of different yeasts using hydrothermal hydrolysate from Eucalyptus globulus wood,...

  18. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Fast-Growing and High Oil Content Chlorella pyrenoidosa in Rice Straw Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Penglin Li; Xiaoling Miao; Rongxiu Li; Jianjiang Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Rice straw hydrolysate was used as lignocellulose-based carbon source for Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation and the feasibility of in situ biodiesel production was investigated. 13.7?g/L sugar was obtained by enzymatic hydrolyzation of rice straw. Chlorella pyrenoidosa showed a rapid growth in the rice straw hydrolysate medium, the maximum biomass concentration of 2.83?g/L was obtained in only 48 hours. The lipid content of the cells reached as high as 56.3%. In situ transesterification w...

  19. Combining treatments to improve the fermentation of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysates by ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Ryan; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2015-08-01

    Inhibitory side products from dilute acid pretreatment is a major challenge for conversion of lignocellulose into ethanol. Six strategies to detoxify sugarcane hydrolysates were investigated alone, and in combinations (vacuum evaporation of volatiles, high pH treatment with ammonia, laccase, bisulfite, microaeration, and inoculum size). High pH was the most beneficial single treatment, increasing the minimum inhibitory concentration (measured by ethanol production) from 15% (control) to 70% hydrolysate. Combining treatments provided incremental improvements, consistent with different modes of action and multiple inhibitory compounds. Screening toxicity using tube cultures proved to be an excellent predictor of relative performance in pH-controlled fermenters. A combination of treatments (vacuum evaporation, laccase, high pH, bisulfite, microaeration) completely eliminated all inhibitory activity present in hydrolysate. With this combination, fermentation of hemicellulose sugars (90% hydrolysate) to ethanol was complete within 48h, identical to the fermentation of laboratory xylose (50g/L) in AM1 mineral salts medium (without hydrolysate). PMID:25864026

  20. Organic acids from lignocellulose: Candida lignohabitans as a new microbial cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Martina; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael; Marx, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Biorefinery applications require microbial cell factories for the conversion of various sugars derived from lignocellulosic material into value-added chemicals. Here, the capabilities of the yeast Candida lignohabitans to utilize a range of such sugars is characterized. Substrates efficiently converted by this yeast include the pentoses xylose and arabinose. Genetic engineering of C. lignohabitans with the isolated endogenous GAP promoter and GAP terminator was successful. GFP expression was used as a proof of functionality for the isolated transcription elements. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase and cis-aconitate decarboxylase resulted in stable and reproducible production of lactic acid and itaconic acid, respectively. The desired organic acids were accumulated converting pure sugars as well as lignocellulosic hydrolysates. C. lignohabitans proved therefore to be a promising reliable microbial host for production of organic acids from lignocellulosic material. PMID:25651876

  1. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DonnaMBates

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass, phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(PH, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts.

  2. Evaluation of the activated charcoals and adsorption conditions used in the treatment of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate for xylitol production

    OpenAIRE

    Marton, J. M.; Felipe, M. G. A.; Silva, J. B. Almeida E.; Pessoa Ju?nior, A.

    2006-01-01

    Xylitol has sweetening, anticariogenic and clinical properties that have attracted the attention of the food and pharmaceutical industries. The conversion of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass into xylitol by D-xylose-fermenting yeast represents an alternative to the chemical process for producing this polyol. A good source of D-xylose is sugarcane bagasse, which can be hydrolyzed with dilute acid. However, acetic acid, which is toxic to the yeast, also appears in the hydrolysate, inhibiting...

  3. The chemistry involved in the steam treatment of lignocellulosic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Pereira Ramos

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials is essential for bioconversion because of the various physical and chemical barriers that greatly inhibit their susceptibility to bioprocesses such as hydrolysis and fermentation. The aim of this article is to review some of the most important pretreatment methods developed to date to enhance the conversion of lignocellulosics. Steam explosion, which precludes the treatment of biomass with high-pressure steam under optimal conditions, is presented as the pretreatment method of choice and its mode of action on lignocellulosics is discussed. The optimal pretreatment conditions for a given plant biomass are defined as those in which the best substrate for hydrolysis is obtained with the least amount of soluble sugars lost to side reactions such as dehydration. Therefore, pretreatment optimization results from a compromise between two opposite trends because hemicellulose recovery in acid hydrolysates can only be maximized at lower pretreatment severities, whereas the development of substrate accessibility requires more drastic pretreatment conditions in which sugar losses are inevitable. To account for this heterogeneity, the importance of several process-oriented parameters is discussed in detail, such as the pretreatment temperature, residence time into the steam reactor, use of an acid catalyst, susceptibility of the pretreated biomass to bioconversion, and process design.

  4. The chemistry involved in the steam treatment of lignocellulosic materials

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luiz Pereira, Ramos.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials is essential for bioconversion because of the various physical and chemical barriers that greatly inhibit their susceptibility to bioprocesses such as hydrolysis and fermentation. The aim of this article is to review some of the most important pretreatment m [...] ethods developed to date to enhance the conversion of lignocellulosics. Steam explosion, which precludes the treatment of biomass with high-pressure steam under optimal conditions, is presented as the pretreatment method of choice and its mode of action on lignocellulosics is discussed. The optimal pretreatment conditions for a given plant biomass are defined as those in which the best substrate for hydrolysis is obtained with the least amount of soluble sugars lost to side reactions such as dehydration. Therefore, pretreatment optimization results from a compromise between two opposite trends because hemicellulose recovery in acid hydrolysates can only be maximized at lower pretreatment severities, whereas the development of substrate accessibility requires more drastic pretreatment conditions in which sugar losses are inevitable. To account for this heterogeneity, the importance of several process-oriented parameters is discussed in detail, such as the pretreatment temperature, residence time into the steam reactor, use of an acid catalyst, susceptibility of the pretreated biomass to bioconversion, and process design.

  5. Protein Hydrolysates/Peptides in Animal Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, Jeff; Waugh, Terry; Lohry, Eric

    The use of protein hydrolysates as an important nutrient for growth and maintenance has been increasing in animal nutrition. Although animal proteins and protein hydrolysates are widely used however, recently vegetable protein hydrolysates are gaining importance. This chapter reviews the use of protein hydrolysates developed by enzyme hydrolysis and by solid state fermentation process in animal nutrition especially for piglets and compares it with the standard products such as plasma and fishmeal.

  6. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Scarlata, C.; Tan, E. C. D.; Ross, J.; Lukas, J.; Sexton, D.

    2015-03-01

    This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic-derived hydrolysate. This model leverages expertise established over time in biomass deconstruction and process integration research at NREL, while adding in new technology areas for sugar purification and catalysis. The overarching process design converts biomass to die die diesel- and naphtha-range fuels using dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, purifications, and catalytic conversion focused on deoxygenating and oligomerizing biomass hydrolysates.

  7. Biogas from lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund Odhner, Peter; Schabbauer, Anna [Grontmij AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sarvari Horvath, Ilona; Mohseni Kabir, Maryam [Hoegskolan i Boraas, Boraas (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Grontmij AB has cooperated with the University of Boraas to evaluate the technological and economical possibilities for biogas production from substrates containing lignocellulose, such as forest residues, straw and paper. The state of knowledge regarding biogas production from cellulosic biomass has been summarized. The research in the field has been described, especially focusing on pretreatment methods and their results on increased gas yields. An investigation concerning commercially available pretreatment methods and the cost of these technologies has been performed. An economic evaluation of biogas production from lignocellulosic materials has provided answers to questions regarding the profitability of these processes. Pretreatment with steam explosion was economically evaluated for three feedstocks - wood, straw and paper - and a combination of steam explosion and addition of NaOH for paper. The presented costs pertain to costs for the pretreatment step as it, in this study, was assumed that the pretreatment would be added to an existing plant and the lignocellulosic substrates would be part of a co-digestion process. The results of the investigation indicate that it is difficult to provide a positive net result when comparing the cost of pretreatment versus the gas yield (value) for two of the feedstocks - forest residues and straw. This is mainly due to the high cost of the raw material. For forest residues the steam pretreatment cost exceeded the gas yield by over 50 %, mainly due to the high cost of the raw material. For straw, the production cost was similar to the value of the gas. Paper showed the best economic result. The gas yield (value) for paper exceeded the pretreatment cost by 15 %, which makes it interesting to study paper further.

  8. Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Diana, Abril; Alejandro, Abril.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available El etanol es un combustible líquido que debido a la experiencia de producción existente se ha convertido en una importante alternativa para sustituir el uso de gasolina. Es posible mezclarlo en diferentes proporciones con gasolina, los motores no requieren de mayores cambios para su empleo y para su [...] distribución es posible emplear la infraestructura existente para la gasolina. El uso de lignocelulosas como biomasa parece promisoria para la producción de etanol, aun cuando debería aun se analizado cuidadosamente con el propósito holístico que incluya todas la tecnologías actuales y sus posibles implicancias. En este artículo se revisa el conocimiento de las características y fuentes de biomasa de origen vegetal, como también el desarrollo, características y posibilidades de obtener etanol de fuentes lignocelulósicas. Abstract in english Ethanol is the liquid combustible that has become the most promising alternative substitute for gasoline because of the experience gained in its production, the possibility of mixing it with gasoline in different proportions, the possibility of using the existing gasoline distribution infrastructure [...] , and the fact that major changes in engines are not required for its use. Lignocelluloses offer great potential as a biomass source for ethanol production, although their use still requires in-depth analysis with an objective and holistic focus that includes present and future technologic implications. The present article reviews current knowledge about the characteristics and sources of vegetable biomass, as well as the development and possibilities for obtaining ethanol from lignocelluloses sources.

  9. Sugar cane bagasse as feedstock for second generation ethanol production: Part II: Hemicellulose hydrolysate fermentability

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gabriel J. Vargas, Betancur; Nei, Pereira Jr.

    2010-09-15

    Full Text Available Sugar cane bagasse is produced in Brazil as waste of the sugar and ethanol industries. This lignocellulosic material is a potential source for second-generation ethanol production; however a pretreatment stage is essential, which aims at removing the hemicellulose component by disorganizing the lign [...] ocellulosic complex. In this work sugar cane bagasse was pretreated by diluted acid hydrolysis resulting in xylose-rich hydrolysates, which could be fermented to ethanol by a strain of the yeast Pichia stipitis. Statistical approach was used to investigate the effects of factors associated with the diluted acid hydrolysis process (acid concentration, solid:liquid ratio and time of exposure) on the fermentability of different hydrolysates. The statistical analysis was useful for determining the effects of the individual factors and their interactions on the response variables. An acid concentration of 1.09% (v/v), a solid:liquid ratio of 1:2.8 (g:ml), and an exposure time of 27 min were established and validated as the optimum pretreatment conditions for ethanol production from hemicellulose hydrolysates of sugar cane bagasse. Under these conditions, a hydrolysate with 50 g/l of xylose, 6.04 g/l of acetic acid, 0.55 g/l of hydroxylmethylfurfural and 0.09 g/l of furfural was obtained and its fermentation yielded roughly 20 g/l of ethanol in 40 hrs.

  10. Production of Bioethanol From Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.

    2006-01-01

    Bioethanol (ethanol produced from biomass) as a motor fuel is an attractive renewable fully sustainable energy sources as a means of lowering dependence on fossil fuels and air pollution towards greenhouse gasses, particularly CO2. Bioethanol, unlike gasoline, is an oxygenated fuel, which burns cleaner and thus lowers emissions of CO, NOx and unburned hydrocarbons pollutants, which are constituents in ground level ozone and particulate matter pollution (smog). In addition, bioethanol can replace currently used gasoline octane booster MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), which causes serious environment and public health problems. Increasing demand of bioethanol for transportation sector and higher bioethanol prices than gasoline require utilization of cheap and unlimited raw materials in order to become bioethanol economically competitive with gasoline. Such alternative raw materials are residual lignocellulose (wastes) created from forest industries or from agricultural food crops (wheat straw, corn stover, rice straw). The lignocellulose contains lignin, which binds carbohydrate polymers (cellulose and hemicellulose) forming together a rather resistant structure. In this regards, a pre-treatment step is required in order to separate the lignin from polysaccharides. Once separated, the cellulose and hemicellulose fibres must be hydrolysed to monomeric sugars by enzymatic hydrolysis or dilute acid hydrolysis before being converted into ethanol. However, during the pretreatment and hydrolysis steps, various inhibitors towards microbial fermentation are generated along with the monomeric sugars. The inhibitors can be removed by various detoxification methods but the inclusion of this extra process step increases significantly the ethanol production cost. Compared with glucose, which can be readily fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bacterial strains of Zymomonas mobilis, xylose is more difficult to ferment because of a lack of industrially suitable microorganism able to rapidly and efficiently produce high concentrations of ethanol from xylose. In order to keep ethanol production cost at a minimum, the major sugars in lignocellulosic biomass (glucose and xylose) must be converted into ethanol due to high raw material cost, typically about 40% of the total ethanol production cost. The need for a microorganism able to utilize both glucose and xylose and to tolerate the inhibitory compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is therefore apparent. Several thermophilic anaerobic xylan degrading bacteria from our culture collection (EMB group at BioCentrum-DTU) have been screened for a potential ethanol producer from hemicellulose hydrolysates, and out of the screening test, one particular strain (A10) was selected for the best performance. The strain was morphologically and physiologically characterized as Thermoanaerobacter mathranii strain A10. Unlike other thermophilic anaerobic bacteria, the wild-type strain Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A10 was able to tolerate exogenously added ethanol of 5% (v/v) at 70oC in batch fermentation. To verify the potential of thermophilic anaerobe as an alternative ethanol producer from lignocellulose, ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance of lactate dehydrogenase deficient mutant strain Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 was further studied. The experiments were carried out in a continuous immobilized reactor system (a fluidized bed reactor), which is likely to be the process design configuration for xylose fermentation in a Danish biorefinery concept for production of fuel ethanol. The immobilization of the fermenting organism inside the reactor and a long-term strain adaptation to high ethanol concentrations enhance significantly organism tolerance to ethanol (>8.3% v/v) and improve its fermentation capability when exposed at 5% (v/v) ethanol required in practice. The use of this reactor system enables high xylose conversion, effective glucose/xylose co-fermentation, and ethanol productivity of 1 g/l/h required for an economically viable bioethanol

  11. Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasenko, Elena (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA); Xu, Feng (Davis, CA)

    2008-04-08

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermentating microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  12. Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasenko, Elena (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA); Xu, Feng (Davis, CA)

    2011-05-17

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microorganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  13. Production of bioethanol : Structural characterization of pretreated lignocellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranekjær, Michael; Sommer, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials to ethanol requires pretreatment and hydrolysis prior to the ethanolic fermentation. This pretreatment renders the biomass more susceptible to the subsequent hydrolysis. Of the wide variety of pretreatment methods presently available, wet oxidation (Bjerre et al., 1996; McGinnis et al., 1983; Schmidt & thomsen, 1997) and steam explosion (puls et al., 1985; Saddler et al., 1993) are among the most promising. However, fermentation of the pretreated hydrolysates with the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii strain A3M1, adapted to the hemicellulose hydrolysate, has until now resulted in low ethanol yields, indicating incomplete hydrolyzation or the presence of inhibitory compounds in the hydrolyzate (Ahring et al., 1996; Sommer, 1998). Therefore, a structural study of the hemicellulosefraction is being conducted. This includes investigations of the structure of the hemicellulose fraction prior to pretreatment, prior to hydrolysis, prior to fermentation, and after fermentation. Various techniques, such as gas chromatography / mass spectrometry (GC/MS), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), will be used in this study. Preliminary results from these investigations will be presented and discussed.

  14. Lignosulfonate and elevated pH can enhance enzymatic saccharification of lignocelluloses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ZJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonspecific (nonproductive binding (adsorption of cellulase by lignin has been identified as a key barrier to reduce cellulase loading for economical sugar and biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL is a relatively new process, but demonstrated robust performance for sugar and biofuel production from woody biomass especially softwoods in terms of yields and energy efficiencies. This study demonstrated the role of lignin sulfonation in enhancing enzymatic saccharification of lignocelluloses – lignosulfonate from SPORL can improve enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses, contrary to the conventional belief that lignin inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis due to nonspecific binding of cellulase. Results The study found that lignosulfonate from SPORL pretreatment and from a commercial source inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulosic substrates at low concentrations due to nonspecific binding of cellulase. Surprisingly, the reduction in enzymatic saccharification efficiency of a lignocellulosic substrate was fully recovered as the concentrations of these two lignosulfonates increased. We hypothesize that lignosulfonate serves as a surfactant to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis at higher concentrations and that this enhancement offsets its inhibitive effect from nonspecific binding of cellulase, when lignosulfonate is applied to lignocellulosic solid substrates. Lignosulfonate can block nonspecific binding of cellulase by bound lignin on the solid substrates, in the same manner as a nonionic surfactant, to significantly enhance enzymatic saccharification. This enhancement is linearly proportional to the amount of lignosulfonate applied which is very important to practical applications. For a SPORL-pretreated lodgepole pine solid, 90% cellulose saccharification was achieved at cellulase loading of 13 FPU/g glucan with the application of its corresponding pretreatment hydrolysate coupled with increasing hydrolysis pH to above 5.5 compared with only 51% for the control run without lignosulfonate at pH 5.0. The pH-induced lignin surface modification at pH 5.5 further reduced nonspecific binding of cellulase by lignosulfonate. Conclusions The results reported in this study suggest significant advantages for SPORL-pretreatment in terms of reducing water usage and enzyme dosage, and simplifying process integration, i.e., it should eliminate washing of SPORL solid fraction for direct simultaneous enzymatic saccharification and combined fermentation of enzymatic and pretreatment hydrolysates (SSCombF. Elevated pH 5.5 or higher, rather than the commonly believed optimal and widely practiced pH 4.8-5.0, should be used in conducting enzymatic saccharification of lignocelluloses.

  15. Thermotolerant Yeasts for Bioethanol Production Using Lignocellulosic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Chand; Rao, L. Venkateswar

    No other sustainable option for production of transportation fuels can match ethanol made from lignocellulosic biomass with respect to its dramatic environmental, economic, strategic and infrastructure advantages. Substantial progress has been made in advancing biomass ethanol (bioethanol) production technology to the point that it now has commercial potential, and several firms are engaged in the demanding task of introducing first-of-a-kind technology into the marketplace to make bioethanol a reality in existing fuel-blending markets. In order to lower pollution India has a long-term goal to use biofuels (bioethanol and biodiesel). Ethanol may be used either in pure form, or as a blend in petrol in different proportions. Since the cost of raw materials, which can account up to 50 % of the total production cost, is one of the most significant factors affecting the economy of alcohol, nowadays efforts are more concentrated on using cheap and abundant raw materials. Several forms of biomass resources exist (starch or sugar crops, weeds, oil plants, agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) but of all biomass cellulosic resources represent the most abundant global source. The lignocellulosic materials include agricultural residues, municipal solid wastes (MSW), pulp mill refuse, switchgrass and lawn, garden wastes. Lignocellulosic materials contain two types of polysaccharides, cellulose and hemicellulose, bound together by a third component lignin. The principal elements of the lignocellulosic research include: i) evaluation and characterization of the waste feedstock; ii) pretreatment including initial clean up or dewatering of the feedstock; and iii) development of effective direct conversion bioprocessing to generate ethanol as an end product. Pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials is a step in which some of the hemicellulose dissolves in water, either as monomeric sugars or as oligomers and polymers. The cellulose cannot be enzymatically hydrolyzed to glucose without a physical and chemical pre-treatment. The pre-treatment processes normally applied on the different substrates are acidic hydrolysis, steam explosion and wet oxidation. A problem for most pretreatment methods is the generation of compounds that are inhibitory towards the fermenting microorganisms, primarily phenols. Degradation products that could have inhibitory action in later fermentation steps are avoided during pre-treatment by wet oxidation. Followed by pre treatment, hydrolysed with enzymes known as cellulases and hemicellulases, which hydrolyse cellulose and hemicellulose respectively. The production of bioethanol requires two steps, fermentation and distillation. Practically all ethanol fermentation is still based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae . The fermentation using thermotolerant yeasts has more advantageous in that they have faster fermentation rates, avoid the cooling costs, and decrease the over all fermentation costs, so that ethanol can be made available at cheaper rates. In addition they can be used for efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose by cellulases because the temperature optimum of cellulase enzymes (about 40 ° C to 45 ° C) is close to the fermentation temperature of thermotolerant yeasts. Hence selection and improvement of thermotolerant yeasts for bioconversion of lignocellulosic substrates is very useful.

  16. Quantification of glucose, xylose, arabinose, furfural, and HMF in corncob hydrolysate by HPLC-PDA-ELSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejun; Ai, Ning; Zhang, Haiyan; Lu, Meizhen; Ji, Dengxiang; Yu, Fengwen; Ji, Jianbing

    2012-05-15

    Lignocellulose and other carbohydrates are being studied extensively as potential renewable carbon sources for liquid biofuels and other valuable chemicals. In the present study, a simple, sensitive, selective, and reliable HPLC method using a photodiode array (PDA) detector and an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was developed for the simultaneous determination of important sugars (D(+)-cellobiose, glucose, xylose, and arabinose), furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in lignocellulose hydrolysate. The analysis was carried out on an Aminex HPX-87H column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 ?m particle size). Ultra-pure water with 0.00035 M H(2)SO(4) was used as the mobile phase with a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. The temperature of the ELSD drift tube was kept at 50 °C, the carrier gas pressure was 350 kPa, and the gain was set at 7. Furfural and 5-HMF were quantified on a PDA detector at 275 nm and 284 nm, respectively. The sugar concentrations were determined by ELSD. This method was validated for accuracy and precision. The regression equation revealed a good linear relationship (r(2) = 0.9986 ± 0.0012) within the test ranges. The method showed good reproducibility for the quantification of six analytes in corncob hydrolysate, with intra- and inter-day variations less than 1.12%. This method is also convenient because it allows the rapid analysis of the primary products of biomass hydrolysis and carbohydrate degradation. PMID:22516168

  17. A biorefining process: Sequential, combinational lignocellulose pretreatment procedure for improving biobutanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Haifeng; Liu, Gang; He, Mingxiong; Tan, Furong

    2015-07-01

    Here, for the first time, we designed a sequential, combinatorial lignocellulose pretreatment procedure (SCLPP) for microbial biofuel fermentation to reduce generation of microbial growth inhibitors and furthermore increase sugar yields. We tested this pretreatment process using sugarcane bagasse as substrate and assessed the effectiveness by analysis of biobutanol production through microbial clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 conversion. Our results showed that there were no inhibitory effects when using the hydrolysates as fermentation substrate. Under the SSF scheme, we observed the highest concentrations of butanol (6.4g/L) and total ABE (11.9g/L), resulting in a higher ABE productivity, compared with the SHF method. These findings suggest that the SCLPP is a feasible method for improving ABE production, lowering microbial inhibitor generation, and ensuring success in the subsequent fermentation process. Therefore, our work demonstrated developing a tractable integrated process that facilitates to increase biofuel production from agricultural residues rich in lignocellulose is feasible. PMID:25846185

  18. Industrial robust yeast isolates with great potential for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Francisco B; Romaní, Aloia; Ruiz, Héctor A; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-06-01

    The search of robust microorganisms is essential to design sustainable processes of second generation bioethanol. Yeast strains isolated from industrial environments are generally recognised to present an increased stress tolerance but no specific information is available on their tolerance towards inhibitors that come from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials. In this work, a strategy for the selection of different yeasts using hydrothermal hydrolysate from Eucalyptus globulus wood, containing different concentrations of inhibitors, was developed. Ten Saccharomyces cerevisiae and four Kluyveromyces marxianus strains isolated from industrial environments and four laboratory background strains were evaluated. Interestingly, a correlation between final ethanol titer and percentage of furfural detoxification was observed. The results presented here highlight industrial distillery environments as a remarkable source of efficient yeast strains for lignocellulosic fermentation processes. Selected strains were able to resourcefully degrade furfural and HMF inhibitors, producing 0.8g ethanol/Lh corresponding to 94% of the theoretical yield. PMID:24704884

  19. Trends and challenges in the microbial production of lignocellulosic bioalcohol fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christian; Farwick, Alexander; Benisch, Feline; Brat, Dawid; Dietz, Heiko; Subtil, Thorsten; Boles, Eckhard [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. of Molecular Biosciences

    2010-07-15

    Bioalcohols produced by microorganisms from renewable materials are promising substitutes for traditional fuels derived from fossil sources. For several years already ethanol is produced in large amounts from feedstocks such as cereals or sugar cane and used as a blend for gasoline or even as a pure biofuel. However, alcohols with longer carbon chains like butanol have even more suitable properties and would better fit with the current fuel distribution infrastructure. Moreover, ethical concerns contradict the use of food and feed products as a biofuel source. Lignocellulosic biomass, especially when considered as a waste material offers an attractive alternative. However, the recalcitrance of these materials and the inability of microorganisms to efficiently ferment lignocellulosic hydrolysates still prevent the production of bioalcohols from these plentiful sources. Obviously, no known organism exist which combines all the properties necessary to be a sustainable bioalcohol producer. Therefore, breeding technologies, genetic engineering and the search for undiscovered species are promising means to provide a microorganism exhibiting high alcohol productivities and yields, converting all lignocellulosic sugars or are even able to use carbon dioxide or monoxide, and thereby being highly resistant to inhibitors and fermentation products, and easy to cultivate in huge bioreactors. In this review, we compare the properties of various microorganisms, bacteria and yeasts, as well as current research efforts to develop a reliable lignocellulosic bioalcohol producing organism. (orig.)

  20. Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Wastes to Improve Ethanol and Biogas Production: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keikhosro Karimi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lignocelluloses are often a major or sometimes the sole components of different waste streams from various industries, forestry, agriculture and municipalities. Hydrolysis of these materials is the first step for either digestion to biogas (methane or fermentation to ethanol. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses with no pretreatment is usually not so effective because of high stability of the materials to enzymatic or bacterial attacks. The present work is dedicated to reviewing the methods that have been studied for pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes for conversion to ethanol or biogas. Effective parameters in pretreatment of lignocelluloses, such as crystallinity, accessible surface area, and protection by lignin and hemicellulose are described first. Then, several pretreatment methods are discussed and their effects on improvement in ethanol and/or biogas production are described. They include milling, irradiation, microwave, steam explosion, ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX, supercritical CO2 and its explosion, alkaline hydrolysis, liquid hot-water pretreatment, organosolv processes, wet oxidation, ozonolysis, dilute- and concentrated-acid hydrolyses, and biological pretreatments.

  1. Sugars metabolism and ethanol production by different yeast strains from coffee industry wastes hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Mussatto, Solange I.; Machado, Erci?lia M. S.; Carneiro, Li?via M.; Teixeira, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Significant amounts of wastes are generated by the coffee industry, among of which, coffee silverskin (CS) and spent coffee grounds (SCG) are the most abundantly generated during the beans roasting and instant coffee preparation, respectively. This study evaluated the sugars metabolism and production of ethanol by three different yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia stipitis and Kluyveromyces fragilis) when cultivated in sugar rich hydrolysates produced by acid hydrolysis of CS and...

  2. Efficient hydrogen production from the lignocellulosic energy crop Miscanthus by the extreme thermophilic bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vrije Truus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentation is one of the routes that can contribute to a future sustainable hydrogen economy. Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive feedstock because of its abundance, low production costs and high polysaccharide content. Results Batch cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana produced hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetic acid as the main products from soluble saccharides in Miscanthus hydrolysate. The presence of fermentation inhibitors, such as furfural and 5-hydroxylmethyl furfural, in this lignocellulosic hydrolysate was avoided by the mild alkaline-pretreatment conditions at a low temperature of 75°C. Both microorganisms simultaneously and completely utilized all pentoses, hexoses and oligomeric saccharides up to a total concentration of 17 g l-1 in pH-controlled batch cultures. T. neapolitana showed a preference for glucose over xylose, which are the main sugars in the hydrolysate. Hydrogen yields of 2.9 to 3.4 mol H2 per mol of hexose, corresponding to 74 to 85% of the theoretical yield, were obtained in these batch fermentations. The yields were higher with cultures of C. saccharolyticus compared to T. neapolitana. In contrast, the rate of substrate consumption and hydrogen production was higher with T. neapolitana. At substrate concentrations exceeding 30 g l-1, sugar consumption was incomplete, and lower hydrogen yields of 2.0 to 2.4 mol per mol of consumed hexose were obtained. Conclusion Efficient hydrogen production in combination with simultaneous and complete utilization of all saccharides has been obtained during the growth of thermophilic bacteria on hydrolysate of the lignocellulosic feedstock Miscanthus. The use of thermophilic bacteria will therefore significantly contribute to the energy efficiency of a bioprocess for hydrogen production from biomass.

  3. Food engineering residues: amino acid composition of hydrolysates and application for the decontamination of metal polluted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany) TU Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany)); Riemschneider, P. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany)); Bieniek, D. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany)); Kettrup, A. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany) TU Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany))

    1994-11-01

    Several residues of the brewing industry and slaughtering offals were investigated in order to evaluate their potential as raw materials for the hydrolytic preparation of amino acid containing solutions, applicable as extractants in amelioration processes for metal polluted soils. The residues were hydrolysed with 6 mol/L hydrochloric acid and the hydrolysates were analysed for their total nitrogen, TOC, amino acid and heavy metal contents. Then, the leaching capacities of the hydrolysates were examined in a series of batch tests with a contaminated soil. High amino acid yields in relation to the weight of the air-dried raw materials were achieved with blood meal (72.5%) and poultry feather meal (56.6%). The portion of the detected amino acids of the total organic carbon content of the hydrolysates ranged from 38.9% (brewer's spent grain) to 93.6% (blood meal). In extraction tests with hydrolysates adjusted to a total amino acid concentration of 60 mmol/L and to a pH value of 7.0, maximum extraction yields of 50.3% for copper (soil content 279 mg kg[sup -1]) and 38.7% for nickel (soil content 54 mg kg[sup -1]) were reached. An increase of the hydrolysate concentration and of the pH of an amino acid mixture resulted in higher solubilisation of the metals. (orig.)

  4. Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates as Natural Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Ghanbari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Actinopyga lecanora, a type of sea cucumber commonly known as stone fish with relatively high protein content, was explored as raw material for bioactive peptides production. Six proteolytic enzymes, namely alcalase, papain, pepsin, trypsin, bromelain and flavourzyme were used to hydrolyze A. lecanora at different times and their respective degrees of hydrolysis (DH were calculated. Subsequently, antibacterial activity of the A. lecanora hydrolysates, against some common pathogenic Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas sp. were evaluated. Papain hydrolysis showed the highest DH value (89.44%, followed by alcalase hydrolysis (83.35%. Bromelain hydrolysate after one and seven hours of hydrolysis exhibited the highest antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 51.85%, 30.07% and 30.45%, respectively compared to the other hydrolysates. Protein hydrolysate generated by papain after 8 h hydrolysis showed maximum antibacterial activity against S. aureus at 20.19%. The potent hydrolysates were further fractionated using RP-HPLC and antibacterial activity of the collected fractions from each hydrolysate were evaluated, wherein among them only three fractions from the bromelain hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 24%, 25.5% and 27.1%, respectively and one fraction of papain hydrolysate showed antibacterial activity of 33.1% against S. aureus. The evaluation of the relationship between DH and antibacterial activities of papain and bromelain hydrolysates revealed a meaningful correlation of four and six order functions.

  5. Industrial scale chromatographic separation of valuable compounds from biomass hydrolysates and side streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saari, P.

    2011-06-15

    Carbohydrates are composed of a number of various monosaccharides, glucose being the most abundant. Some of the monosaccharides are valuable compounds used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. They can be separated from biomass hydrolysates e.g. by chromatographic methods. In this thesis, chromatographic separation of valuable compounds using ion exchange resins was studied on an industrial scale. Of special interest were rare monosaccharides in biomass hydrolysates. A novel chromatographic separation process was developed for fucose, starting from pre-processed spent sulfite liquor. The core of the process consists of three chromatographic separations with different types of ion exchange resins. Chromatographic separation of galactose was tested with three biomass hydrolysates; lactose, gum arabic and hemicellulose hydrolysates. It was demonstrated that also galactose can be separated from complex carbohydrate mixtures. A recovery process for arabinose from citrus pectin liquid residual and for mannose from wood pulp hydrolysate were also developed and experimentally verified. In addition to monosaccharides, chromatographic separation of glycinebetaine from vinasse was examined with a hydrogen form weak acid cation exchange resin. The separation involves untypical peak formation depending, for example, on the pH and the cation composition. The retention mechanism was found to be hydrogen bonding between glycinebetaine and the resin. In the experimental part, all four resin types - strong acid cation, strong base anion, weak acid cation and weak base anion exchange resins - were used. In addition, adsorption equilibria data of seven monosaccharides and sucrose were measured with the resins in sodium and sulfate forms because such data have been lacking. It was found out that the isotherms of all sugars were linear under industrial conditions. A systematic method for conceptual process design and sequencing of chromatographic separation steps were developed. Heuristics were drawn from the current industrial practices also for the selection of a suitable ion exchange resin for the separation of a sugar from a biomass hydrolysate. (orig.)

  6. Enhanced anti-oxidative activity and lignocellulosic ethanol production by biotin addition to medium in Pichia guilliermondii fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Kai; Xia, Xiao-Xia; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Commercialization of lignocellulosic ethanol fermentation requires its high titer, but the reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation during the bioprocess damaged the cells and compromised this goal. To improve the cellular anti-oxidative activity during non-detoxified corncob residue hydrolysate fermentation, seed cells were prepared to possess a higher level of intracellular biotin pool (IBP), which facilitated the biosyntheses of catalase and porphyrin. As a result, the catalase activity increased by 1.3-folds compared to control while the ROS level reduced by 50%. Cell viability in high-IBP cells was 1.7-folds of control and the final ethanol titer increased from 31.2 to 41.8 g L(-1) in batch fermentation. The high-IBP cells were further used for repeated-batch fermentation in the non-detoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate, and the highest titer and average productivity of ethanol reached 63.7 g L(-1) and 1.2 g L(-1)h(-1). The results were favorable to future industrial application of this lignocellulosic bioethanol process. PMID:25864029

  7. Biofunctional properties of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-03-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 ?g/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 ?g/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  8. Hydrothermal carbonization of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2012-08-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermochemical conversion process to convert lignocellulosic biomass into value-added products. HTC processes were studied using two different biomass feedstocks: corn stalk and Tamarix ramosissima. The treatment brought an increase of the higher heating values up to 29.2 and 28.4 MJ/kg for corn stalk and T. ramosissima, respectively, corresponding to an increase of 66.8% and 58.3% as compared to those for the raw materials. The resulting lignite-like solid products contained mainly lignin with a high degree of aromatization and a large amount of oxygen-containing groups. Liquid products extracted with ethyl acetate were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The identified degradation products were phenolic compounds and furan derivatives, which may be desirable feedstocks for biodiesel and chemical production. Based on these results, HTC is considered to be a potential treatment in a lignocellulosic biomass refinery. PMID:22698445

  9. Ethanol from lignocellulose - Fermentation inhibitors, detoxification and genetic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Simona

    2000-07-01

    Ethanol can be produced from lignocellulose by first hydrolysing the material to sugars, and then fermenting the hydrolysate with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hydrolysis using dilute sulphuric acid has advantages over other methods, however, compounds which inhibit fermentation are generated during this kind of hydrolysis. The inhibitory effect of aliphatic acids, furans, and phenolic compounds was investigated. The generation of inhibitors during hydrolysis was studied using Norway spruce as raw material. It was concluded that the decrease in the fermentability coincided with increasing harshness of the hydrolysis conditions. The decrease in fermentability was not correlated solely to the content of aliphatic acids or furan derivatives. To increase the fermentability, detoxification is often employed. Twelve detoxification methods were compared with respect to the chemical composition of the hydrolysate and the fermentability after treatment. The most efficient detoxification methods were anion-exchange at pH 10.0, overliming and enzymatic detoxification with the phenol-oxidase laccase. Detailed analyses of ion exchange revealed that anion exchange and unspecific hydrophobic interactions greatly contributed to the detoxification effect, while cation exchange did not. The comparison of detoxification methods also showed that phenolic compounds are very important fermentation inhibitors, as their selective removal with laccase had a major positive effect on the fermentability. Selected compounds; aliphatic acids, furans and phenolic compounds, were characterised with respect to their inhibitory effect on ethanolic fermentation by S. cerevisiae. When aliphatic acids or furans were compared, the inhibitory effects were found to be in the same range, but the phenolic compounds displayed widely different inhibitory effects. The possibility of genetically engineering S. cerevisiae to achieve increased inhibitor resistance was explored by heterologous expression of laccase from Trametes versicolor and by homologous overexpression of phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase. Both procedures resulted in S. cerevisiae transformants displaying increased resistance towards lignocellulose-derived aromatic compounds.

  10. Improving the bioconversion yield of carbohydrates and ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewanick, Shannon M.

    Improving the efficiency of lignocellulosic ethanol production is of the utmost importance if cellulosic bioethanol is to be competitive with fossil fuels and first generation bioethanol from starch and sucrose. Improvements in individual processes (pretreatment, saccharification, fermentation) have been ongoing, but few researchers have considered the effect that the incoming raw biomass can have on the process. It is important to understand how biomass can be altered to provide the maximum yield of hydrolysable and fermentable sugars from whatever is available. Since the moisture content is highly variable and easily altered, the effect of drying and rewetting on bioconversion was studied on switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse and hybrid poplar. For switchgrass and sugarcane bagasse, the ethanol yield after simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was improved 18-24% by increasing the moisture content by soaking prior to pretreatment. It was also found that soaking had no effect when the samples were not catalyzed with SO2 confirming that the effect of moisture content is directly related to SO2 uptake and diffusion into the biomass. In hybrid poplar, the results were similar to herbaceous biomass for chips with less than 2% absorbed SO2. However, when the SO2 uptake was increased to 3% even the air dried chips exhibited high digestibility, indicating that increased SO2 uptake can overcome the poor diffusion in dried biomass. Alongside controlling the biomass moisture content, improving knowledge and control of the processes can also increase efficiency and product yields. By monitoring reactions continuously with accurate, robust, on-line sensors, operators can detect when reactions deviate from the norm, and when they are complete. Avoiding process upsets and contamination could be the difference between an economically viable biorefinery and one that struggles to compete. Real time, continuous Raman spectroscopy was used to continuously monitor both a synthetic glucose and a lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation and measure glucose and ethanol. Models developed using offline HPLC validation samples had extremely high correlation between predicted and observed values for ethanol in both fermentations (R2 = 0.98 and 0.94 for synthetic and hydrolysate, respectively) while glucose proved more difficult to detect in the hydrolysate fermentation (R2 = 0.92 and 0.51). This work showed that it is possible to monitor the ethanol and glucose in a hydrolysate with a high fluorescent background.

  11. Enhanced bioproduction of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate from wheat straw lignocellulosic hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Cesa?rio, M. Teresa; Raposo, Rodrigo S.; Almeida, M. Catarina M. D.; Keulen, Frederik; Ferreira, Bruno S.; Fonseca, M. Manuela R. Da

    2014-01-01

    "Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bioplastics that can replace conventional petroleum derived products in various applications. One of the major barriers for their widespread introduction in the market is the higher production costs when compared with their petrochemical counterparts. In this work, a process was successfully implemented with high productivity based on wheat straw, a cheap and readily available agricultural residue, as raw material. The strain Burkholderia sacchari DSM 17165 w...

  12. Separation of Lignin from Corn Stover Hydrolysate with Quantitative Recovery of Ionic Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underkofler, Kaylee A.; Teixeira, Rodrigo E.; Pietsch, Stephen A.; Knapp, Kurtis G.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-01-01

    Abundant lignocellulosic biomass could become a source of sugars and lignin, potential feedstocks for the now emergent bio-renewable economy. The production and conversion of sugars from biomass have been well-studied, but far less is known about the production of lignin that is amenable to valorization. Here we report the isolation of lignin generated from the hydrolysis of biomass dissolved in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. We show that lignin can be isolated from the hydrolysate slurry by simple filtration or centrifugation, and that the ionic liquid can be recovered quantitatively by a straightforward wash with water. The isolated lignin is not only free from ionic liquid, but also lacks cellulosic residues and is substantially depolymerized, making it a promising feedstock for valorization by conversion into fuels and chemicals. PMID:25866701

  13. Lignocellulosic residues: biodegradation and bioconversion by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The ability of fungi to degrade lignocellulosic materials is due to their highly efficient enzymatic system. Fungi have two types of extracellular enzymatic systems; the hydrolytic system, which produces hydrolases that are responsible for polysaccharide degradation and a unique oxidative and extracellular ligninolytic system, which degrades lignin and opens phenyl rings. Lignocellulosic residues from wood, grass, agricultural, forestry wastes and municipal solid wastes are particularly abundant in nature and have a potential for bioconversion. Accumulation of lignocellulosic materials in large quantities in places where agricultural residues present a disposal problem results not only in deterioration of the environment but also in loss of potentially valuable material that can be used in paper manufacture, biomass fuel production, composting, human and animal feed among others. Several novel markets for lignocellulosic residues have been identified recently. The use of fungi in low cost bioremediation projects might be attractive given their lignocellulose hydrolysis enzyme machinery. PMID:19100826

  14. Lime pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shushien

    Lignocellulose is a valuable alternative energy source. The susceptibility of lignocellulosic biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis is constrained due to its structural features, so pretreatment is essential to enhance enzymatic digestibility. Of the chemicals used as pretreatment agents, it has been reported that alkalis improve biomass digestibility significantly. In comparison with other alkalis such as NaOH and ammonia, lime (calcium hydroxide) has many advantages; it is very inexpensive, is safe, and can be recovered by carbonating wash water. The effects of lime pretreatment were explored on switchgrass and poplar wood, representing herbaceous and woody biomass, respectively. The effects of pretreatment conditions (time, temperature, lime loading, water loading, particle size, and oxygen pressure) have been systematically studies. Lime alone enhances the digestibility of switchgrass significantly; under the recommended conditions, the 3-d total sugar (glucose + xylose) yields of lime-treated switchgrass were 7 times that of untreated sample. When treating poplar wood, lime must be combined with oxygen to achieve high digestibility; oxidative lime pretreatment increased the 3-d total sugar yield of poplar wood to 12 times that of untreated sample. In a fundamental study, to determine why lime pretreatment is effective, the effects of three structural features on enzymatic digestibility were studied: lignin content, acetyl content, and crystallinity index (CrI). Poplar wood was treated with peracetic acid, potassium hydroxide, and ball milling to produce model lignocelluloses with a broad spectrum of lignin contents, acetyl contents, and CrI, respectively. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed on the model lignocelluloses to determine the digestibility. Correlations between lignin/carbohydrate ratio, acetyl/carbohydrate ratio, CrI and digestibility were developed. The 95% prediction intervals show that the correlations predict the 1-h and 3-d total sugar conversions of a biomass sample within a precision of 5% and 20%, respectively. The digestibility of a variety of lime-treated biomass and ball-milled alpha-cellulose was compared to the correlations determined from the model compounds. The agreement between the measured and predicted values shows that the correlations are satisfactory and the three structural features---lignin content, acetyl content, and CrI---are the major factors that determine enzymatic digestibility.

  15. Ionic liquids as a tool for lignocellulosic biomass fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, André; João, Karen; Morais, Ana Rita; Bogel-lukasik, Ewa; Bogel-Lukasik, R.

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass composes a diversity of feedstock raw materials representing an abundant and renewable carbon source. In majority lignocellulose is constituted by carbohydrate macromolecules, namely cellulose and hemicellulose, and by lignin, a polyphenilpropanoid macromolecule. Between these biomacromolecules, there are several covalent and non-covalent interactions defining an intricate, complex and rigid structure of lignocellulose. The deconstruction of the lignocellulosic biomass...

  16. Lipid accumulation by pelletized culture of Mucor circinelloides on corn stover hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cristiano E R; Zhang, Jianguo; Hu, Bo

    2014-09-01

    Microbial oil accumulated by fungal cells is a potential feedstock for biodiesel production, and lignocellulosic materials can serve as the carbon source to support the fungal growth. The dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover can effectively break down its lignin structure, and this process generates a hydrolysate containing mostly xylose at very dilute concentration and numerous by-products that may significantly inhibit the cell growth. This study utilized corn stover hydrolysate as the culture media for the growth of Mucor circinelloides. The results showed that Mucor cells formed pellets during the cell growth, which facilitates the cell harvest from dilute solution. The results also showed that the inhibitory effect of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and acetic acid could be avoided if their concentration was low. In fact, all these by-products may be assimilated as carbon sources for the fungal growth. The results proved the feasibility to reuse the cultural broth water for acid pretreatment and then use for subsequent cell cultivation. The results will have a direct impact on the overall water usage of the process. PMID:25080382

  17. The NILE Project - Advances in the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Materials into Ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NILE ('New Improvements for Lignocellulosic Ethanol') was an integrated European project (2005-2010) devoted to the conversion of lignocellulosic raw materials to ethanol. The main objectives were to design novel enzymes suitable for the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose and new yeast strains able to efficiently converting all the sugars present in lignocellulose into ethanol. The project also included testing these new developments in an integrated pilot plant and evaluating the environmental and socio-economic impacts of implementing lignocellulosic ethanol on a large scale. Two model raw materials - spruce and wheat straw - both preconditioned with similar pretreatments, were used. Several approaches were explored to improve the saccharification of these pretreated raw materials such as searching for new efficient enzymes and enzyme engineering. Various genetic engineering methods were applied to obtain stable xylose- and arabinose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that tolerate the toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The pilot plant was able to treat 2 tons of dry matter per day, and hydrolysis and fermentation could be run successively or simultaneously. A global model integrating the supply chain was used to assess the performance of lignocellulosic ethanol from an economical and environmental perspective. It was found that directed evolution of a specific enzyme of the cellulolytic cocktail produced by the industrial fungus, Trichoderma reesei, and modification of the composition of this cocktail led to improvements of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated raw material. These results, however, were difficult to reproduce at a large scale. A substantial increase in the ethanol conversion yield and in specific ethanol productivity was obtained through a combination of metabolic engineering of yeast strains and fermentation process development. Pilot trials confirmed the good behaviour of the yeast strains in industrial conditions as well as the suitability of lignin residues as fuels. The ethanol cost and the greenhouse gas emissions were highly dependent on the supply chain but the best performing supply chains showed environmental and economic benefits. From a global standpoint, the results showed the necessity for an optimal integration of the process to co-develop all the steps of the process and to test the improvements in a flexible pilot plant, thus allowing the comparison of various configurations and their economic and environmental impacts to be determined. (authors)

  18. Biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose to platform chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Gernot; Büchs, Jochen

    2012-09-01

    Naturally occurring lignocellulose can be used as a renewable resource for the sustainable production of platform chemicals that can in turn be converted to valuable fine chemicals, polymers, and fuels. The biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose is a very promising approach due to its high selectivity, mild conditions, and low exergy loss. However, such biocatalytic processes are still seldom applied at the industrial scale since the single conversion steps (pretreatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation) may exhibit low conversion rates, low efficiencies, or high costs. The biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose to platform chemicals is reviewed in this work. Structures and production rates of lignocellulose are described, and platform chemicals that may be produced from lignocellulose are summarized. Biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose is distinguished from conventional non-selective approaches. All essential conversion steps used in biocatalytic approaches (pretreatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation) are reviewed in detail. Finally, potential interactions between these conversion steps are highlighted and the advantages as well as disadvantages of integrated process configurations are elucidated. In conclusion, a comprehensive understanding of the biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose is provided in this review. PMID:22829529

  19. Ethanol production from wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate by thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a continuous immobilized reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2008-01-01

    Thermophilic ethanol fermentation of wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in a continuous immobilized reactor system. The experiments were carried out in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) at 70C. Undetoxified wheat straw hydrolysate was used (3-12% dry matter), corresponding to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/l. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/l) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate was not detoxified, ethanol yield in a range of 0.39-0.42 g/g was obtained. Overall, sugar efficiency to ethanol was 68-76%. The reactor was operated continuously for approximately 143 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. The tested microorganism has considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol. The work reported here also demonstrates that the use of FBR configuration might be a viable approach for thermophilic anaerobic ethanol fermentation.

  20. Ethanol Production from Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw Hydrolysate by Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a Continuous Immobilized Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    Thermophilic ethanol fermentation of wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in a continuous immobilized reactor system. The experiments were carried out in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) at 70°C. Undetoxified wheat straw hydrolysate was used (3-12% dry matter), corresponding to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/1. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/1) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate was not detoxified, ethanol yield in a range of 0.39-0.42 g/g was obtained. Overall, sugar efficiency to ethanol was 68-76%. The reactor was operated continuously for approximately 143 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. The tested microorganism has considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol. The work reported here also demonstrates that the use of FBR configuration might be a viable approach for thermophilic anaerobic ethanol fermentation.

  1. ARE LIGNOCELLULOSIC RESOURCES TOO VALUABLE TO BURN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Hubbe

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic matter often can be counted as a renewable resource, since it is produced by photosynthesis. But there are limits to how much biomass our society can use in a sustainable manner. People can debate whether or not it makes sense to use a substantial portion of lignocellulosic materials as a source of liquid fuel. This essay gives a qualified affirmative answer to the question in its title. However, combustion of lignocellulosic resources can be considered as wasteful and uneconomical, in the long run, if it is inefficient, if it fails to displace the combustion of fossil fuels, or if it displaces a higher-end use, for which there are available customers. In particular, it seems unlikely that combustion of fuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass can, by itself, solve problems that stem from society’s excessive thirst for motor fuels.

  2. Screening of a microbial consortium for highly simultaneous degradation of lignocellulose and chlorophenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiajin; Peng, Xiang; Yin, Dexing; Li, Beiyin; Wang, Dehan; Lin, Yunqin

    2015-08-01

    In this work, spent mushroom substrates were utilized for screening a microbial consortium with highly simultaneous degradation of lignocellulose and chlorophenols. The desired microbial consortium OEM1 was gained through successive cultivation for about 50 generations and its stability of composition was verified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) during screening process. It could degrade lignocellulose and chlorophenols at around 50% and 100%, respectively, within 7days. The diversity analysis and the growth characteristics of OEM1 during degradation process were investigated by PCR-DGGE combined with clone and sequence. The results indicated that OEM1 consisted of 31 strains. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the predominant bacterial groups. The dynamic change of OEM1 illustrated that consortium community structure was effected by pH and substrate alteration and tended to be stable after 6days' cultivation. Furthermore, bacteria (11 strains) and actinomycetes (2 strains) were obtained based on plate isolation and identified via 16S rDNA sequence. PMID:25974352

  3. Developing symbiotic consortia for lignocellulosic biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuroff, Trevor R.; Curtis, Wayne R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-02-15

    The search for petroleum alternatives has motivated intense research into biological breakdown of lignocellulose to produce liquid fuels such as ethanol. Degradation of lignocellulose for biofuel production is a difficult process which is limited by, among other factors, the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and biological toxicity of the products. Consolidated bioprocessing has been suggested as an efficient and economical method of producing low value products from lignocellulose; however, it is not clear whether this would be accomplished more efficiently with a single organism or community of organisms. This review highlights examples of mixtures of microbes in the context of conceptual models for developing symbiotic consortia for biofuel production from lignocellulose. Engineering a symbiosis within consortia is a putative means of improving both process efficiency and stability relative to monoculture. Because microbes often interact and exist attached to surfaces, quorum sensing and biofilm formation are also discussed in terms of consortia development and stability. An engineered, symbiotic culture of multiple organisms may be a means of assembling a novel combination of metabolic capabilities that can efficiently produce biofuel from lignocellulose. (orig.)

  4. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement...Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the...Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae on all food...

  5. Evaluation of the activated charcoals and adsorption conditions used in the treatment of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate for xylitol production

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J. M., Marton; M. G. A., Felipe; J. B., Almeida e Silva; A., Pessoa Júnior.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol has sweetening, anticariogenic and clinical properties that have attracted the attention of the food and pharmaceutical industries. The conversion of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass into xylitol by D-xylose-fermenting yeast represents an alternative to the chemical process for producing [...] this polyol. A good source of D-xylose is sugarcane bagasse, which can be hydrolyzed with dilute acid. However, acetic acid, which is toxic to the yeast, also appears in the hydrolysate, inhibiting microbe metabolism. Xylitol production depends on the initial D-xylose concentration, which can be increased by concentrating the hydrolysate by vacuum evaporation. However, with this procedure the amount of acetic acid is also increased, aggravating the problem of cell inhibition. Hydrolysate treatment with powdered activated charcoal is used to remove or decrease the concentration of this inhibitor, improving xylitol productivity as a consequence. Our work was an attempt to improve the fermentation of Candida guilliermondii yeast in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by treating the medium with seven types of commercial powdered activated charcoals (Synth, Carbon Delta A, Carbon Delta G, Carbon 117, Carbon 118L, Carbon 147 and Carvorite), each with its own unique physicochemical properties. Various adsorption conditions were established for the variables temperature, contact time, shaking, pH and charcoal concentration. The experiments were based on multivariate statistical concepts, with the application of fractional factorial design techniques to identify the variables that are important in the process. Subsequently, the levels of these variables were quantified by overlaying the level curves, which permitted the establishment of the best adsorption conditions for attaining high levels of xylitol volumetric productivity and D-xylose-to-xylitol conversion. This procedure consisted in increasing the original pH of the hydrolysate to 7.0 with CaO and reducing it to 5.5 with H3PO4. Next, the hydrolysate was treated under adsorption conditions employing CDA powdered activated charcoal (1%) for 30 min at 60ºC, 100 rpm and pH 2.5. The optimized xylitol volumetric productivity (0.50 g/L h) corresponded to a D-xylose-to-xylitol conversion of 0.66 g/g.

  6. Evaluation of the activated charcoals and adsorption conditions used in the treatment of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate for xylitol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Marton

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol has sweetening, anticariogenic and clinical properties that have attracted the attention of the food and pharmaceutical industries. The conversion of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass into xylitol by D-xylose-fermenting yeast represents an alternative to the chemical process for producing this polyol. A good source of D-xylose is sugarcane bagasse, which can be hydrolyzed with dilute acid. However, acetic acid, which is toxic to the yeast, also appears in the hydrolysate, inhibiting microbe metabolism. Xylitol production depends on the initial D-xylose concentration, which can be increased by concentrating the hydrolysate by vacuum evaporation. However, with this procedure the amount of acetic acid is also increased, aggravating the problem of cell inhibition. Hydrolysate treatment with powdered activated charcoal is used to remove or decrease the concentration of this inhibitor, improving xylitol productivity as a consequence. Our work was an attempt to improve the fermentation of Candida guilliermondii yeast in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by treating the medium with seven types of commercial powdered activated charcoals (Synth, Carbon Delta A, Carbon Delta G, Carbon 117, Carbon 118L, Carbon 147 and Carvorite, each with its own unique physicochemical properties. Various adsorption conditions were established for the variables temperature, contact time, shaking, pH and charcoal concentration. The experiments were based on multivariate statistical concepts, with the application of fractional factorial design techniques to identify the variables that are important in the process. Subsequently, the levels of these variables were quantified by overlaying the level curves, which permitted the establishment of the best adsorption conditions for attaining high levels of xylitol volumetric productivity and D-xylose-to-xylitol conversion. This procedure consisted in increasing the original pH of the hydrolysate to 7.0 with CaO and reducing it to 5.5 with H3PO4. Next, the hydrolysate was treated under adsorption conditions employing CDA powdered activated charcoal (1% for 30 min at 60ºC, 100 rpm and pH 2.5. The optimized xylitol volumetric productivity (0.50 g/L h corresponded to a D-xylose-to-xylitol conversion of 0.66 g/g.

  7. Evaluation of the activated charcoals and adsorption conditions used in the treatments of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate for xylitol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, J.M.; Felipe, M.G.A.; Almeida e Silva, J.B. [School of Chemical Engineering at Lorena (FAENQUIL), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Biotechnology], Email: jmarcelo@cetesb.sp.gov.br; Pessoa Junior, A. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    Xylitol has sweetening, anticariogenic and clinical properties that have attracted the attention of the food and pharmaceutical industries. The conversion of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass into xylitol by D-xylose-fermenting yeast represents an alternative to the chemical process for producing this polyol. A good source of D-xylose is sugarcane bagasse, which can be hydrolyzed with dilute acid. However, acetic acid, which is toxic to the yeast, also appears in the hydrolysate, inhibiting microbe metabolism. Xylitol production depends on the initial D-xylose concentration, which can be increased by concentrating the hydrolysate by vacuum evaporation. However, with this procedure the amount of acetic acid is also increased, aggravating the problem of cell inhibition. Hydrolysate treatment with powdered activated charcoal is used to remove or decrease the concentration of this inhibitor, improving xylitol productivity as a consequence. Our work was an attempt to improve the fermentation of Candida guilliermondii yeast in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by treating the medium with seven types of commercial powdered activated charcoals (Synth, Carbon Delta A, Carbon Delta G, Carbon 117, Carbon 118L, Carbon 147 and Carvorite), each with its own unique physicochemical properties. Various adsorption conditions were established for the variables temperature, contact time, shaking, pH and charcoal concentration. The experiments were based on multivariate statistical concepts, with the application of fractional factorial design techniques to identify the variables that are important in the process. Subsequently, the levels of these variables were quantified by overlaying the level curves, which permitted the establishment of the best adsorption conditions for attaining high levels of xylitol volumetric productivity and D-xylose-to-xylitol conversion. This procedure consisted in increasing the original pH of the hydrolysate to 7.0 with CaO and reducing it to 5.5 with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Next, the hydrolysate was treated under adsorption conditions employing CDA powdered activated charcoal (1%) for 30 min at 60 deg C, 100 rpm and pH 2.5. The optimized xylitol volumetric productivity (0.50 g/L h) corresponded to a D-xyloseto- xylitol conversion of 0.66 g/g. (author)

  8. Biofilm production by Zymomonas mobilis enhances ethanol production and tolerance to toxic inhibitors from rice bran hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhanakasem, Tatsaporn; Sangsutthiseree, Atit; Areerat, Kamonchanok; Young, Glenn M; Thanonkeo, Pornthap

    2014-09-25

    Microorganisms play a significant role in bioethanol production from lignocellulosic material. A challenging problem in bioconversion of rice bran is the presence of toxic inhibitors in lignocellulosic acid hydrolysate. Various strains of Zymomonas mobilis (ZM4, TISTR 405, 548, 550 and 551) grown under biofilm or planktonic modes were used in this study to examine their potential for bioconversion of rice bran hydrolysate and ethanol production efficiencies. Z. mobilis readily formed bacterial attachment on plastic surfaces, but not on glass surfaces. Additionally, the biofilms formed on plastic surfaces steadily increased over time, while those formed on glass were speculated to cycle through accumulation and detachment phases. Microscopic analysis revealed that Z. mobilis ZM4 rapidly developed homogeneous biofilm structures within 24 hours, while other Z. mobilis strains developed heterogeneous biofilm structures. ZM4 biofilms were thicker and seemed to be more stable than other Z. mobilis strains. The percentage of live cells in biofilms was greater than that for planktonic cells (54.32 ± 7.10% vs. 28.69 ± 3.03%), suggesting that biofilms serve as a protective niche for growth of bacteria in the presence of toxic inhibitors in the rice bran hydrolysate. The metabolic activity of ZM4 grown as a biofilm was also higher than the same strain grown planktonically, as measured by ethanol production from rice bran hydrolysate (13.40 ± 2.43 g/L vs. 0.432 ± 0.29 g/L, with percent theoretical ethanol yields of 72.47 ± 6.13% and 3.71 ± 5.24% respectively). Strain TISTR 551 was also quite metabolically active, with ethanol production by biofilm and planktonically grown cells of 8.956 ± 4.06 g/L and 0.0846 ± 0.064 g/L (percent theoretical yields were 48.37 ± 16.64% and 2.046 ± 1.58%, respectively). This study illustrates the potential for enhancing ethanol production by utilizing bacterial biofilms in the bioconversion of a readily available and normally unusable low value by-product of rice farming. PMID:24930397

  9. Evaluation of oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentability employing Pichia stipitis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luciana Cristina Silveira, Chaud; Débora Danielle Virgínio da, Silva; Rafael Taino de, Mattos; Maria das Graças de Almeida, Felipe.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate obtained by diluted acid hydrolysis was employed as fermentation medium for Pichia stipitis cultivation. A comparison between the use of treated hydrolysate with 1% activated charcoal to reduce the toxic compounds generated during the hydrolysis process and untrea [...] ted hydrolysate as a control was conducted. In the cultures using treated hydrolysate the total consumption of glucose, low xylose consumption and ethanol and glycerol formation were observed. The medium formulated with untreated hydrolysate showed morphological cell modifications with consequently cell death, no ethanol formation and formation of glycerol as byproduct of fermentative process, probably as a response to stressful conditions to yeast due to presence of high concentration of toxic compounds. Thus, further studies are suggested in order to determine the best conditions for hydrolysis and detoxification of the hydrolysate to improve the fermentative performance of P. stipitis.

  10. PROTEIN HYDROLYSATES IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anssi H. Manninen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein can be hydrolyzed, producing small chains of amino acids called peptides. Several studies have shown that protein hydrolysates containing mostly di- and tripeptides are absorbed more rapidly than free form amino acids and much more rapidly than intact proteins. In addition, there is recent evidence that protein hydrolysate ingestion has strong insulinotropic effect. Thus, recovery sports drinks containing protein hydrolysates may be of great value

  11. Comparison of Yeast Growth in Mesquite Wood Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Stanlake, Gary J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-water extracts of mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) wood were assayed for their total carbohydrate, reducing sugar, and glucose content. These hydrolysates were then used as complete media for yeast growth. A total of 10 strains of yeasts were evaluated for their biomass production in the mesquite wood hydrolysates. Levels of utilizable carbohydrate proved to be the limiting factor for yeast growth in the hydrolysates.

  12. Decolorization of hair dye by lignocellulosic waste materials from contaminated waters

    OpenAIRE

    AbelEnriqueNavarro; KarlaAliciaOrtiz; MaríaRosarioSun Kou

    2014-01-01

    Basic yellow 57 (BY57) was chosen as a model hair dye due to its prevalence in cosmetics wastewaters. This study proposes the use of lignocellulosic materials like spent tea leaves of peppermint (PM), chai tea (CT) and chamomile (CM) as raw adsorbents for the removal of BY57 from contaminated solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out at room temperature to achieve the maximum adsorption capacity. Results indicate that the highest removal is achieved at pH 6 – 8, with a minimu...

  13. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  14. Laccase Application for Upgrading of Lignocellulose Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Vaukner Gabri?

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Laccases have the ability to oxidize both phenolic and trough mediators non-phenolic lignin related compounds. When reacting on lignin, they can display both ligninolytic and polymerizing (cross-inking abilities, which makes them very useful for their application in industries based on lignocellulose material. Most of the published papers and applications of laccase and laccase-mediator systems on lignocellulose material relate to the pulp, paper and textile industry. Recent research has been done in terms of laccase assisted biografting of phenols and other compounds on wood surface and use of laccase for adhesion enhancement in fiberboard production. They can be introduced to wood technology as environmentally friendly enzymes. The paper reviews the application of laccases in industries based on lignocellulose material and discusses the future outlook and development in the above mentioned fields.

  15. Antioxidant activities of chick embryo egg hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hao; Ye, Ting; Wang, Yuntao; Wang, Ling; Chen, Yijie; Li, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Chick embryo egg hydrolysates (CEEH) were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of chick embryo egg in vitro-simulated gastrointestinal digestion. The antioxidant activities of CEEH were investigated by employing three in vitro assays, including the 2,2?-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate)/1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (ABTS/DPPH)/hydroxyl radical-scavenging assays. The radical-scavenging effect of CEEH (1.0?mg/mL) was in a dose-dependent manner, with the highest trolox equivalent ant...

  16. Production of Ethanol from Cocoa Pod Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Othman Abd Samah; Salihan Sias

    2011-01-01

    Cocoa pod (Theobroma cacao L.) hydrolysate was hydrolyzed into glucose using hydrochloric, sulphuric and nitric acids, respectively. The concentration of each acid was set at 0.25 M, 0.50 M, 0.75 M, 1.00 M and 1.25 M. They were treated under two different temperatures and time at 75?C and 90?C for 2 h and 4 h, respectively. The results showed that hydrolysis in 1.00 M of hydrochloric acid at 75?C for 4 h had produced the highest glucose content of 30.7% w/v compared to all others acids tre...

  17. Engineering Sugar Utilization and Microbial Tolerance toward Lignocellulose Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Lizbeth M.; Panyon, Larry A.; Wang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Production of fuels and chemicals through a fermentation-based manufacturing process that uses renewable feedstock such as lignocellulosic biomass is a desirable alternative to petrochemicals. Although it is still in its infancy, synthetic biology offers great potential to overcome the challenges associated with lignocellulose conversion. In this review, we will summarize the identification and optimization of synthetic biological parts used to enhance the utilization of lignocellulose-derived sugars and to increase the biocatalyst tolerance for lignocellulose-derived fermentation inhibitors. We will also discuss the ongoing efforts and future applications of synthetic integrated biological systems used to improve lignocellulose conversion. PMID:25741507

  18. GENETICALLY MODIFIED LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feed-stocks is of growing interest worldwide in recent years. However, we are currently still facing significant technical challenges to make it economically feasible on an industrial scale. Genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass has provided a potential alternative to address such challenges. Some studies have shown that genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass can increase its yield, decreasing its enzymatic hydrolysis cost and altering its composition and structure for ethanol production. Moreover, the modified lignocellulosic biomass also makes it possible to simplify the ethanol production procedures from lignocellulosic feed-stocks.

  19. Mineral and vitamin content of beef, chicken, and turkey hydrolysates mineral and vitamin content of protein hydrolysates

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria Elisabeth Machado, Pinto e Silva; Ive, Paton; Marlene, Trigo; Maria Carolina B. C., von Atzingen; Carmem S., Kira; Emiko I., Inomata; Leda C. A., Lamardo.

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the concentration of vitamins and minerals in meat protein hydrolysates. Calcium, phosphorus and iron were analyzed by inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry; vitamin C was analyzed by the reduction of cupric ions and vitamins B1 and B2 b [...] y fluorescence. Regarding minerals, the beef hydrolysate (BH) had more iron than the turkey hydrolysate (TH) and the chicken hydrolysate (CH); TH had a little more phosphorus. BH had the largest amount of vitamin C, and similar amounts of vitamins B1 and B2. The amount of these nutrients found in the hydrolysates suggests that it is possible to use them to enrich special dietary formulations.

  20. Mineral and vitamin content of beef, chicken, and turkey hydrolysates mineral and vitamin content of protein hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisabeth Machado Pinto e Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the concentration of vitamins and minerals in meat protein hydrolysates. Calcium, phosphorus and iron were analyzed by inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry; vitamin C was analyzed by the reduction of cupric ions and vitamins B1 and B2 by fluorescence. Regarding minerals, the beef hydrolysate (BH had more iron than the turkey hydrolysate (TH and the chicken hydrolysate (CH; TH had a little more phosphorus. BH had the largest amount of vitamin C, and similar amounts of vitamins B1 and B2. The amount of these nutrients found in the hydrolysates suggests that it is possible to use them to enrich special dietary formulations.

  1. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  2. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality. PMID:24801125

  3. The NILE Project — Advances in the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Materials into Ethanol Le projet NILE et la conversion des matériaux lignocellulosiques en éthanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monot F.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available NILE ("New Improvements for Lignocellulosic Ethanol" was an integrated European project (2005-2010 devoted to the conversion of lignocellulosic raw materials to ethanol. The main objectives were to design novel enzymes suitable for the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose and new yeast strains able to efficiently converting all the sugars present in lignocellulose into ethanol. The project also included testing these new developments in an integrated pilot plant and evaluating the environmental and socio-economic impacts of implementing lignocellulosic ethanol on a large scale. Two model raw materials – spruce and wheat straw – both preconditioned with similar pretreatments, were used. Several approaches were explored to improve the saccharification of these pretreated raw materials such as searching for new efficient enzymes and enzyme engineering. Various genetic engineering methods were applied to obtain stable xylose- and arabinose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that tolerate the toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The pilot plant was able to treat 2 tons of dry matter per day, and hydrolysis and fermentation could be run successively or simultaneously. A global model integrating the supply chain was used to assess the performance of lignocellulosic ethanol from an economical and environmental perspective. It was found that directed evolution of a specific enzyme of the cellulolytic cocktail produced by the industrial fungus, Trichoderma reesei, and modification of the composition of this cocktail led to improvements of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated raw material. These results, however, were difficult to reproduce at a large scale. A substantial increase in the ethanol conversion yield and in specific ethanol productivity was obtained through a combination of metabolic engineering of yeast strains and fermentation process development. Pilot trials confirmed the good behaviour of the yeast strains in industrial conditions as well as the suitability of lignin residues as fuels. The ethanol cost and the greenhouse gas emissions were highly dependent on the supply chain but the best performing supply chains showed environmental and economic benefits. From a global standpoint, the results showed the necessity for an optimal integration of the process to co-develop all the steps of the process and to test the improvements in a flexible pilot plant, thus allowing the comparison of various configurations and their economic and environmental impacts to be determined. Le projet NILE, acronyme de "New Improvements for Lignocellulosic Ethanol", était un projet européen (2005-2010 consacré à la conversion des matières premières lignocellulosiques en éthanol. Ses principaux objectifs étaient de concevoir de nouvelles enzymes adaptées à l’hydrolyse de la cellulose en glucose et de nouvelles souches de levure capables de convertir efficacement tous les sucres présents dans la lignocellulose en éthanol. Une autre partie du projet consistait à tester ces nouveaux systèmes dans une installation pilote et à évaluer les impacts environnementaux et socio-économiques de la production et utilisation à grande échelle d’éthanol lignocellulosique. Deux matières premières modèles (l’épicéa et la paille de blé prétraitées de façon semblable, ont été étudiées. Différentes approches ont été tentées pour améliorer la saccharification de ces matières premières, par exemple, la recherche de nouvelles enzymes efficaces ou l’ingénierie d’enzymes. Plusieurs stratégies d’ingénierie génétique ont été utilisées pour obtenir des souches stables de Saccharomyces cerevisiae capables de fermenter le xylose et l’arabinose, et de tolérer les composés toxiques présents dans les hydrolysats lignocellulosiques. L’installation pilote pouvait traiter 2 tonnes de matières sèches par jour, et l’hydrolyse et la fermentation pouvaient être menées successivement ou simultanément. Un modèle global intégrant la chaîne d’approvisionn

  4. Biogas production from brewery spent grain enhanced by bioaugmentation with hydrolytic anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ?ater, Maša; Fanedl, Lijana; Malovrh, Špela; Marinšek Logar, Romana

    2015-06-01

    Lignocellulosic substrates are widely available but not easily applied in biogas production due to their poor anaerobic degradation. The effect of bioaugmentation by anaerobic hydrolytic bacteria on biogas production was determined by the biochemical methane potential assay. Microbial biomass from full scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating brewery wastewater was a source of active microorganisms and brewery spent grain a model lignocellulosic substrate. Ruminococcus flavefaciens 007C, Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans Mz5(T), Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 and Clostridium cellulovorans as pure and mixed cultures were used to enhance the lignocellulose degradation and elevate the biogas production. P. xylanivorans Mz5(T) was the most successful in elevating methane production (+17.8%), followed by the coculture of P. xylanivorans Mz5(T) and F. succinogenes S85 (+6.9%) and the coculture of C. cellulovorans and F. succinogenes S85 (+4.9%). Changes in microbial community structure were detected by fingerprinting techniques. PMID:25836034

  5. Identification of short peptide sequences in complex milk protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Martina B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Numerous low molecular mass bioactive peptides (BAPs) can be generated during the hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. Low molecular mass BAP sequences are less likely to be broken down by digestive enzymes and are thus more likely to be active in vivo. However, the identification of short peptides remains a challenge during mass spectrometry (MS) analysis due to issues with the transfer and over-fragmentation of low molecular mass ions. A method is described herein using time-of-flight ESI-MS/MS to effectively fragment and identify short peptides. This includes (a) short synthetic peptides, (b) short peptides within a defined hydrolysate sample, i.e. a prolyl endoproteinase hydrolysate of ?-casein and (c) short peptides within a complex hydrolysate, i.e. a Corolase PP digest of sodium caseinate. The methodology may find widespread utilisation in the efficient identification of low molecular mass peptide sequences in food protein hydrolysates. PMID:25872436

  6. Utilisation of lignocellulose waste for fuel bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, J.S.; Negi, J.S.; Prabhakar, D.B.

    1983-12-28

    A process for the conversion of lignocellulosic material available as sawdust, rice husk, pine needles, water hyacinth into fuel bricks is described. The process does not need any costly binder or high compression hydraulic pressure. The fuel cakes possess good burning property (calorific value 3500-4000 kcal/kg) and can be used in fireplaces. A proper composition of such fuel bricks containing straw as one of the blends has also been found useful for mushroom cultivation.

  7. Lignocellulose as raw material in fermentation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Mussatto, Solange I.; Teixeira, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Lignocellulose in the form of forestry, agricultural, and agro-industrial wastes is accumulated in large quantities every year. These materials are mainly composed of three groups of polymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose and hemicellulose are sugar rich fractions of interest for use in fermentation processes, since microorganisms may use the sugars for growth and production of value added compounds such as ethanol, food additives, organic acids, enzymes,...

  8. Processes for converting lignocellulosics to reduced acid pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocal, Joseph Anthony; Brandvold, Timothy A

    2015-01-06

    Processes for producing reduced acid lignocellulosic-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. In a process, lignocellulosic material is fed to a heating zone. A basic solid catalyst is delivered to the heating zone. The lignocellulosic material is pyrolyzed in the presence of the basic solid catalyst in the heating zone to create pyrolysis gases. The oxygen in the pyrolysis gases is catalytically converted to separable species in the heating zone. The pyrolysis gases are removed from the heating zone and are liquefied to form the reduced acid lignocellulosic-derived pyrolysis oil.

  9. Can lignocellulosic hydrocarbon liquids rival lignocellulose-derived ethanol as a future transport fuel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Ding

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although transport fuels are currently obtained mainly from petroleum, alternative fuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass (LB have drawn much attention in recent years in light of the limited reserves of crude oil and the associated environmental issues. Lignocellulosic ethanol (LE and lignocellulosic hydrocarbons (LH are two typical representatives of the LB-derived transport fuels. This editorial systematically compares LE and LB from production to their application in transport fuels. It can be demonstrated that LH has many advantages over LE relative to such uses. However, most recent studies on the production of the LB-derived transport fuels have focused on LE production. Hence, it is strongly recommended that more research should be aimed at developing an efficient and economically viable process for industrial LH production.

  10. Torrefaction of non-lignocellulose biomass waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhungana, A. [Dalhousie University (Canada); Dutta, A. [University of Guelph (Canada); Basu, P. [Greenfield Research Incorporated (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    There have been major socio-economic and environmental impacts from the world's urban population overtaking the rural population in numbers. One of the impacts is that disposal of waste from densely populated urban areas has become a major concern. Sewage in urban centers must be collected centrally and disposed of appropriately. This disposal process must be ecologically sound and energy efficient. This paper presents the torrefaction of some non-lignocellulose biomass waste that was done to ascertain if this process could be as beneficial with such materials as it is with conventional lignocellulose biomass. Tests were conducted on digested and undigested sludge and on chicken litter from a municipality in Canada. The effects of the torrefaction process parameters, temperature and residence time, on torrefaction yield were analyzed. Under the same identical conditions, torrefaction of three lignocellulose biomasses, i.e. switch grass, coffee husk and wood pellet, was also carried out for reference purposes. This study uncovered a potential option for the production of composite waste pellets.

  11. Fungal Bioconversion of Lignocellulosic Residues; Opportunities & Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dashtban, Heidi Schraft, Wensheng Qin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of alternative energy technology is critically important because of the rising prices of crude oil, security issues regarding the oil supply, and environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution. Bioconversion of biomass has significant advantages over other alternative energy strategies because biomass is the most abundant and also the most renewable biomaterial on our planet. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues is initiated primarily by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria which are capable of degrading lignocellulolytic materials. Fungi such as Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger produce large amounts of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes, whereas bacterial and a few anaerobic fungal strains mostly produce cellulolytic enzymes in a complex called cellulosome, which is associated with the cell wall. In filamentous fungi, cellulolytic enzymes including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases (exoglucanases and ?-glucosidases work efficiently on cellulolytic residues in a synergistic manner. In addition to cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic activities, higher fungi such as basidiomycetes (e.g. Phanerochaete chrysosporium have unique oxidative systems which together with ligninolytic enzymes are responsible for lignocellulose degradation. This review gives an overview of different fungal lignocellulolytic enzymatic systems including extracellular and cellulosome-associated in aerobic and anaerobic fungi, respectively. In addition, oxidative lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms of higher fungi are discussed. Moreover, this paper reviews the current status of the technology for bioconversion of biomass by fungi, with focus on mutagenesis, co-culturing and heterologous gene expression attempts to improve fungal lignocellulolytic activities to create robust fungal strains.

  12. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  13. Antioxidant Effect and Water-Holding Capacity of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Seed Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatoumata Tounkara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in-vitro pepsin and pancreatin digestion of proteins extracted from Roselle seed on the production of bioactive peptides. Defatted Roselle seed flour was used to extract different protein fractions namely globulin, albumin and glutelin. The proteins were digested using pepsin (1 h followed by pancreatin (1 h in order to produce hydrolysates with good antioxidant activity. The prepared hydrolysates were as effective as antioxidants in model systems, in scavenging of free radicals and acting as reducing agents. This effect was concentration-dependent and was also influenced by the type of protein fraction. The albumin fraction hydrolysates prepared showed the highest antioxidant activity followed by Glutelin and Globulin hydrolysates respectively (Albumin hydrolysates>Glutelin hydrolysates>Globulin hydrolysates. All of the prepared hydrolysates were also found to be effective in enhancing water-holding capacity and cooking yield in a meat model system. Albumin hydrolysates showed the highest improved meat cooking ability followed by Glutelin and Globulin respectively (Albumin hydrolysates>Glutelin hydrolysates>Globulin hydrolysates. The molecular weight distribution analysis of the hydrolysates was determined and most of the peptides were found between 1000 Da and below. The study findings suggest that Roselle seed protein hydrolysates can be applied as functional food ingredients and that their composition determines their functional properties thus their potential application in the food and feed industries.

  14. A novel fermentation strategy for removing the key inhibitor acetic acid and efficiently utilizing the mixed sugars from lignocellulosic hydrolysates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Eiteman PHD; Elliot Altman Phd

    2009-02-11

    As part of preliminary research efforts, we have completed several experiments which demonstrate 'proof of concept.' These experiments addressed the following three questions: (1) Can a synthetic mixed sugar solution of glucose and xylose be efficiently consumed using the multi-organism approach? (2) Can this approach be used to accumulate a model product? (3) Can this approach be applied to the removal of an inhibitor, acetate, selectively from mixtures of xylose and glucose? To answer the question of whether this multi-organism approach can effectively consume synthetic mixed sugar solutions, we first tested substrate-selective uptake using two strains, one unable to consume glucose and one unable to consume xylose. The xylose-selective strain ALS998 has mutations in the three genes involved in glucose uptake, rendering it unable to consume glucose: ptsG codes for the Enzyme IICB{sup Glc} of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for carbohydrate transport (Postma et al., 1993), manZ codes for the IID{sup Man} domain of the mannose PTS permease (Huber, 1996), glk codes for glucokinase (Curtis and Epstein 1975) We also constructed strain ALS1008 which has a knockout in the xylA gene encoding for xylose isomerase, rendering ALS1008 unable to consume xylose. Two batch experiments and one continuous bioprocess were completed. In the first experiment, each strain was grown separately in a defined medium of 8 g/L xylose and 15 g/L glucose which represented xylose and glucose concentrations that can be generated by actual biomass. In the second experiment, the two strains were grown together in batch in the same defined, mixed-sugar medium. In a third experiment, we grew the strains continuously in a 'chemostat', except that we shifted the concentrations of glucose and xylose periodically to observe how the system would respond. (For example, we shifted the glucose concentration suddenly from 15 g/L to 30 g/L in the feed).

  15. Pork fat hydrolysed by Staphylococcus xylosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SØrensen, B. B.; Stahnke, Louise Heller

    1993-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is used as a starter culture in the production of fermented sausages. Its ability to hydrolyse pork fat was investigated. Within 15 days of incubation an interaction of bacterial growth, lipase production and lipase activity in a pork fat containing medium caused liberation of fatty acids. The free fatty acids were determined both qualitatively and quantitatively. The effects of incubtion temperature and pH were studied using Response Surface Methodology. Within the area of interest for the producion of fermented sausages, no local maximum or minimum liberation of fatty acids was found. A rise in pH increased the amount of free fatty acids. Below pH 5.0, the amount of liberated fatty acids was insignificant although the viable count was >10+6 cell/ g emulsion. Of the two factors, pH was most influential in affecting the amount of free fatty acids. A rise in temperaure only slightly increased the amount of free fatty acids and hydrolysis took place at all temperatures from 14°C to 27°C. The strain liberates the fatty acids in a nonspecific way, in about the same proportions as those in which they occur in the pork fat.

  16. BIOCONVERSION OF WATER HYACINTH HYDROLYSATE INTO ETHANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Bandopadhyay Mukhopadhyay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The fast growing aquatic weed water hyacinth, which is available almost year-round in the tropics and subtropics, was utilized as the chief source of cellulose for production of fuel ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. Fungal cellulases produced on-site by utilizing acid-alkali pretreated water hyacinth as the substrate were used as the crude enzyme source for hydrolysis of identically pretreated biomass. Four different modes of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation were trialed in the present study for optimization of the yield of ethanol. Two common yeasts viz., Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pachysolen tannophilus, were used for fermentation of hexose and pentose sugars in the hydrolysate. Significant enhancement of concentration (8.3 g/L and yield (0.21 g/g of ethanol was obtained through a prefermentation hydrolysis-simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (PH-SSF process, over the other three processes viz., separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF, and single batch bioconversion (SBB by utilizing fungal culture broth with and without filtration as crude enzyme source.

  17. LACTOBACILLUS BREVIS: A POTENTIAL BIOCATALYST FOR LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS TO ETHANOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignocellulosic biomass offers a plentiful alternative feedstock to grains and sugar cane for the production of fuel ethanol. Lignocellulose contains multiple sugars, which precludes the use of industrial Saccharomyces strains. While there have been major strides made in developing recombinant str...

  18. Bacterial biodegradation and bioconversion of industrial lignocellulosic streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Stephanie L; Pawlak, Joel; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulose is a term for plant materials that are composed of matrices of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignocellulose is a renewable feedstock for many industries. Lignocellulosic materials are used for the production of paper, fuels, and chemicals. Typically, industry focuses on transforming the polysaccharides present in lignocellulose into products resulting in the incomplete use of this resource. The materials that are not completely used make up the underutilized streams of materials that contain cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. These underutilized streams have potential for conversion into valuable products. Treatment of these lignocellulosic streams with bacteria, which specifically degrade lignocellulose through the action of enzymes, offers a low-energy and low-cost method for biodegradation and bioconversion. This review describes lignocellulosic streams and summarizes different aspects of biological treatments including the bacteria isolated from lignocellulose-containing environments and enzymes which may be used for bioconversion. The chemicals produced during bioconversion can be used for a variety of products including adhesives, plastics, resins, food additives, and petrochemical replacements. PMID:25722022

  19. Comparison of different pretreatment methods for separation hemicellulose from straw during the lignocellulosic bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhuber, Katharina; Krennhuber, Klaus; Steinmüller, Viktoria; Kahr, Heike; Jäger, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for 73% of carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and consequently contributes to global warming. This fact has enormously increased the interest in the development of methods to reduce greenhouse gases. Therefore, the focus is on the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic agricultural residues. The feedstocks used for 2nd generation bioethanol production are lignocellulosic raw materials like different straw types or energy crops like miscanthus sinensis or arundo donax. Lignocellulose consists of hemicellulose (xylose and arabinose), which is bonded to cellulose (glucose) and lignin. Prior to an enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharides and fermentation of the resulting sugars, the lignocelluloses must be pretreated to make the sugar polymers accessible to enzymes. A variety of pretreatment methods are described in the literature: thermophysical, acid-based and alkaline methods.In this study, we examined and compared the most important pretreatment methods: Steam explosion versus acid and alkaline pretreatment. Specific attention was paid to the mass balance, the recovery of C 5 sugars and consumption of chemicals needed for pretreatment. In lab scale experiments, wheat straw was either directly pretreated by steam explosion or by two different protocols. The straw was either soaked in sulfuric acid or in sodium hydroxide solution at different concentrations. For both methods, wheat straw was pretreated at 100°C for 30 minutes. Afterwards, the remaining straw was separated by vacuum filtration from the liquid fraction.The pretreated straw was neutralized, dried and enzymatically hydrolyzed. Finally, the sugar concentrations (glucose, xylose and arabinose) from filtrate and from hydrolysate were determined by HPLC. The recovery of xylose from hemicellulose was about 50% using the sulfuric acid pretreatment and less than 2% using the sodium hydroxide pretreatment. Increasing concentrations of sulfuric acid lead to increasing conversion of hemicellulose to xylose. In contrast, increasing sodium hydroxide concentrations degrade the hemicellulose to unknown derivates. Consequently, almost no sugars from hemicellulose remain for fermentation. The hydrolysis of sulfuric acid pretreated straw results in a maximum glucose concentration of 100 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 30 g/kg. Sodium hydroxide pretreated and hydrolyzed straw leads to a maximum glucose concentration of 90 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 20 g/kg. In comparison to the two chemical pretreatment methods (sodium hydroxide and sulfuric acid pretreatment), the steam explosion pretreatment (conditions: temperature 190°C, time 20 minutes) results in a higher glucose concentration of about 190 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 75 g/kg straw after enzymatic hydrolysis of the dried straw. Because of the small effect the sodium hydroxide pretreatment has on xylose recovery, this method won't be used for separation and conversion of hemicellulose into xylose and arabinose. Although pretreatment with sulfuric acid achieved promising results, further research and economical considerations have to be performed. In conclusion, the steam explosion method is still the state of the art pretreatment method for the production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Alkaline methods destroy most of the xylose part of the sugar fraction and a loss of up to 25 % of the fermentable sugars is not acceptable for a sustainable biofuel production. The acid pretreatment yields high amounts of accessible hemicellulose and cellulose, but the consumption of chemicals for acid pretreatment and neutralization has to be taken into account when considering technical implementation.

  20. SOIL FUNGI: POTENTIAL MYCOREMEDIATORS OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Avasn Maruthi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The continual expansion of urbanization and industrial activity has led to the accumulation of a large quantity of lignocellulosic residues throughout the world. In particular, large quantities of paper and bagasse are largely produced in Visakhapatnam. In this work we present the study of the degradability of these substrates with fungi. Three cultures of soil fungi were screened for their ability to degrade cellulose. Aspergillus flavus degraded the most, as shown by the highest CO2 release. Further, Aspergillus flavus was tested with the standard fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium for cellulose degradation, which showed nearly equivalent potential.

  1. Encapsulation-Induced Stress Helps Saccharomyces cerevisiae Resist Convertible Lignocellulose Derived Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan O. Westman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of macroencapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS8066 to withstand readily and not readily in situ convertible lignocellulose-derived inhibitors was investigated in anaerobic batch cultivations. It was shown that encapsulation increased the tolerance against readily convertible furan aldehyde inhibitors and to dilute acid spruce hydrolysate, but not to organic acid inhibitors that cannot be metabolized anaerobically. Gene expression analysis showed that the protective effect arising from the encapsulation is evident also on the transcriptome level, as the expression of the stress-related genes YAP1, ATR1 and FLR1 was induced upon encapsulation. The transcript levels were increased due to encapsulation already in the medium without added inhibitors, indicating that the cells sensed low stress level arising from the encapsulation itself. We present a model, where the stress response is induced by nutrient limitation, that this helps the cells to cope with the increased stress added by a toxic medium, and that superficial cells in the capsules degrade convertible inhibitors, alleviating the inhibition for the cells deeper in the capsule.

  2. Selection of the best chemical pretreatment for lignocellulosic substrate Prosopis juliflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseeruddin, Shaik; Srilekha Yadav, K; Sateesh, L; Manikyam, Ananth; Desai, Suseelendra; Venkateswar Rao, L

    2013-05-01

    Pretreatment is a pre-requisite step in bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass required to remove lignin and increase the porosity of the substrate for saccharification. In the present study, chemical pretreatment of Prosopis juliflora was performed using alkali (NaOH, KOH, and NH3), reducing agents (Na2S2O4, Na2SO3) and NaClO2 in different concentration ranges at room temperature (30±2 °C) to remove maximum lignin with minimum sugar loss. Further, biphasic acid hydrolysis of the various pretreated substrates was performed at mild temperatures. Considering the amount of holocellulose hydrolyzed and inhibitors released during hydrolysis, best chemical pretreatment was selected. Among all the chemicals investigated, pretreatment with sodium dithionite at concentration of 2% (w/v) removed maximum lignin (80.46±1.35%) with a minimum sugar loss (2.56±0.021%). Subsequent biphasic acid hydrolysis of the sodium dithionite pretreated substrate hydrolyzed 40.09±1.22% of holocellulose and released minimum amount of phenolics (1.04±0.022 g/L) and furans (0.41±0.012 g/L) in the hydrolysate. PMID:23567729

  3. Removal and upgrading of lignocellulosic fermentation inhibitors by in situ biocatalysis and liquid-liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomek, Kyle J; Saldarriaga, Carlos Rafael Castillo; Velasquez, Fernando Peregrino Cordoba; Liu, Tongjun; Hodge, David B; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids are known to inhibit microbial growth during fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates, and the ability to diminish hydroxycinnamic acid toxicity would allow for more effective biological conversion of biomass to fuels and other value-added products. In this work, we provide a proof-of-concept of an in situ approach to remove these fermentation inhibitors through constituent expression of a phenolic acid decarboxylase combined with liquid-liquid extraction of the vinyl phenol products. As a first step, we confirmed using simulated fermentation conditions in two model organisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that the product 4-vinyl guaiacol is more inhibitory to growth than ferulic acid. Partition coefficients of ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, 4-vinyl guaiacol, and 4-ethyl phenol were measured for long-chain primary alcohols and alkanes, and tetradecane was identified as a co-solvent that can preferentially extract vinyl phenols relative to the acid parent and additionally had no effect on microbial growth rates or ethanol yields. Finally, E. coli expressing an active phenolic acid decarboxylase retained near maximum anaerobic growth rates in the presence of ferulic acid if and only if tetradecane was added to the fermentation broth. This work confirms the feasibility of donating catabolic pathways into fermentative microorganisms in order to ameliorate the effects of hydroxycinnamic acids on growth rates, and suggests a general strategy of detoxification by simultaneous biological conversion and extraction. PMID:25311910

  4. Lupine protein hydrolysates inhibit enzymes involved in the inflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Linares, María del Carmen; Yust, María del Mar; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

    2014-05-15

    Lupine protein hydrolysates (LPHs) were obtained from a lupine protein isolate (LPI) by enzymatic hydrolysis using two proteases, Izyme AL and Alcalase 2.4 L, and their potential anti-inflammatory capacities were studied by determining their in vitro inhibition of the following enzymes that are involved in the inflammatory process: phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), thrombin, and transglutaminase (TG). The strongest inhibitory activities toward PLA2 and TG were found in the hydrolysates obtained by hydrolysis with Izyme and subsequently with Alcalase, with more than 70% inhibition obtained in some cases. All of the hydrolysates tested inhibited more than 60% of the COX-2 activity. In no case did the percentage of thrombin activity inhibition exceed 40%. The best inhibitory activities were found in the LPH obtained after 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase and in the LPH obtained after 60 min of hydrolysis with Izyme followed by 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase. Enzyme kinetic analyses were conducted to determine the Km and Vmax parameters of these two hydrolysates using the Lineweaver-Burk equation. Both hydrolysates competitively inhibited the thrombin and PLA2 activities. In the case of COX-2 and TG, the inhibition appeared to be the mixed type. PMID:24423513

  5. Impedance of nickel/cadmium cells with nylon separator hydrolysate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, M.S. (Battery Div., ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India))

    1994-07-01

    In sealed nickel/cadmium cells, degradation of the nylon separator leads to decrease in the electrolyte and, eventually, to shorting of the cells. To understand this effect further, a study of the influence of nylon hydrolysis on the impedance of nickel/cadmium cells has been undertaken. Measurements have been made of the impedance of a positive-limited nickel/cadmium cell (flooded type) with and without nylon hydrolysate. The nylon hydrolysate was expected to affect the double-layer impedance of the nickel oxide electrode around a cell voltage of 0.4 V. Unfortunately, the results show only small changes in the cell impedance due to nylon hydrolysate and these are not considered to be significant. It appears, therefore, that the impedance technique does not provide unequivocal information about nylon hydrolysis. (orig.)

  6. Enzymology of lignocellulose bioconversion by Streptomyces viridosporus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant progress has been made in lignin biodegradation research since 1983, when lignin peroxidases were discovered in fungi. A similar breakthrough in bacterial lignin biodegradation research is anticipated. Several laboratories have successfully demonstrated the ability of bacteria to mineralize [14C]-lignin lignocelluloses as well as 14C-labelled synthetic lignins. Attempts are being made to identify the key enzymes involved. In this dissertation, two studies are presented which address the enzymology of lignin biodegradation by Streptomyces viridosporus. The first study compares selected extracellular enzyme of wild-type and genetically manipulated strains with enhanced abilities to produced a water soluble lignin degradation intermediate, designated acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL). UV irradiation mutant T7A-81 and protoplast fusion recombinant SR-10 had higher and longer persisting peroxidase, esterase, and endoglucanase activity than did the wild type strain T7A. An extracellular lignocellulose-induced peroxidase with some similarities to fungal ligninases was described for the first time in Streptomyces. The second study describes purification and characterization of an extracellular lignin peroxidase produced by S. viridosporus T7A. This is the first report of a lignin peroxidase in any bacterium

  7. Optimisation of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition by whey protein hydrolysates using response surface methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Ven, C. van de; Gruppen, H.; Bont, D.B.A. de; Voragen, A. G. J.

    2002-01-01

    Protein hydrolysates inhibiting the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro, are potentially interesting constituents for blood pressure decreasing products. To minimise the amount of hydrolysate needed, the ACE inhibitory activity should be maximised. The total peptide composition of a hydrolysate determines its ACE inhibitory ability and depends on the specificity of the proteolytic enzyme and the process conditions used for the production of the hydrolysate. In the present research, t...

  8. Enzyme Hydrolysates from Stichopus horrens as a New Source for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Bita Forghani; Afshin Ebrahimpour; Jamilah Bakar; Azizah Abdul Hamid; Zaiton Hassan; Nazamid Saari

    2012-01-01

    Stichopus horrens flesh was explored as a potential source for generating peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacity using 6 proteases, namely alcalase, flavourzyme, trypsin, papain, bromelain, and protamex. Degree of hydrolysis (DH) and peptide profiling (SDS-PAGE) of Stichopus horrens hydrolysates (SHHs) was also assessed. Alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest DH value (39.8%) followed by flavourzyme hydrolysate (32.7%). Overall, alcalase hydrolysate exhibited t...

  9. Possible application of brewer’s spent grain in biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Jelena D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brewer’s spent grain is the major by-product in beer production. It is produced in large quantities (20 kg per 100 liters of produced beer throughout the year at a low cost or no cost, and due to its high protein and carbohydrates content it can be used as a raw material in biotechnology. Biotechnological processes based on renewable agro-industrial by-products have ecological (zero CO2 emission, eco-friendly by-products and economical (cheap raw materials and reduction of storage costs advantages. The use of brewer’s spent grain is still limited, being basically used as animal feed. Researchers are trying to improve the application of brewer’s spent grain by finding alternative uses apart from the current general use as an animal feed. Its possible applications are in human nutrition, as a raw material in biotechnology, energy production, charcoal production, paper manufacture, as a brick component, and adsorbent. In biotechnology brewer’s spent grain could be used as a substrate for cultivation of microorganisms and enzyme production, additive of yeast carrier in beer fermentation, raw material in production of lactic acid, bioethanol, biogas, phenolic acids, xylitol, and pullulan. Some possible applications for brewer’s spent grain are described in this article including pre-treatment conditions (different procedures for polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and cellulose hydrolysis, working microorganisms, fermentation parameters and obtained yields. The chemical composition of brewer’s spent grain varies according to barley variety, harvesting time, malting and mashing conditions, and a quality and type of unmalted raw material used in beer production. Brewer’s spent grain is lignocellulosic material rich in protein and fibre, which account for approximately 20 and 70% of its composition, respectively.

  10. Evaluation of continuous ethanol fermentation of dilute-acid corn stover hydrolysate using thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover is potential feedstock of industrial interest for second generation fuel ethanol production. However, the toxicity of corn stover hydrolysate (PCS) has been a challenge for fermentation by recombinant xylose fermenting organisms. In this work, the thermophilic anaerobic bacterial strain Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 was assessed for its ability to ferment undetoxified PCS hydrolysate in a continuous immobilized reactor system at 70°C. The tested strain showed significant resistance to PCS, and substrate concentrations up to 15% total solids (TS) were fermented yielding ethanol of 0.39–0.42 g/g-sugars consumed. Xylose was nearly completely utilized (89–98%) for PCS up to 10% TS, whereas at 15% TS, xylose conversion was lowered to 67%. The reactor was operated continuously for 135 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. This study demonstrated that the use of immobilized thermophilic anaerobic bacteria for continuous ethanol fermentation could be promising in a commercial ethanol process in terms of system stability to process hardiness and reactor contamination. The tested microorganism has considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol.

  11. Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2002-01-01

    A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

  12. [Xylitol production from corn cob hemicellulosic hydrolysate by Candida sp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiang-Nian; Huang, Wei; Xia, Li-Ming

    2004-03-01

    Xylitol, a five-carbon sugar alcohol, has many interesting applications in the food, pharmaceutical, and odontological industries, owing to its high sweetening power, its anticariogenic properties, and its insulin-independent metabolism. The bioconversion of detoxified hemicellulosic hydrolysate to xylitol by microorganisms could be a cheaper alternative to the current chemical process, since it is a simple process, with great specificity and low energy requirements. However, the success of fermentations for xylitol production depends on the productivity of the strain and its tolerance to different toxic or inhibitory compounds existing in the hydrolysates. In addition, a number of culture process parameters proved to have significant effects on xylitol production in hemicellulosic hydrolysate media. One of the most important control variables in this bioconversion is the aeration level, which affects the biochemical pathways in the xylose metabolism. The production of biomass is favored by aerobic conditions, while under anaerobic conditions xylose cannot be assimilated by yeast, whereas xylitol is formed in oxygen-limited incubation conditions. An adapted Candida sp. with enhanced resistance to the inhibitors in the hydrolysate can directly ferment the simply detoxified corn cob hemicellulosic hydrolysate to xylitol. In the present study, the combined effects of shaking speed, C/ N ratio, initial pH, and inoculum level on the fermentation of corn cob hemicellulosic hydrolysate to xylitol by an adapted Candida sp. were investigated using an orthogonal experimental design in flask. As a result, the optimum fermentation conditions were as follows: 180 r/min, a C/N ratio of 50, initial pH 5.5, and an inoculum level of 5% (volume ratio). Moreover, the optimum concentration factor of hydrolysate varied between 3.0 and 3.72 was obtained. Based on these results, in order to evaluate the effect of aeration rate on the fermentation of corn cob hemicellulosic hydrolysate to xylitol in fermentor, batch fermentations were carried out in a 3.7 L stirred fermentor using four different aeration strategies, including three kind of two-stage aeration strategies, which provided relatively high aeration rate in the early stage but reduced it in the later stage, and including a one-stage aeration strategy provided a constant aeration rate. With respect to xylitol yield, the results indicated that two-stage aeration strategy was significantly superior to one-stage aeration strategy. The highest xylitol yield (0.75 g/g) was obtained with oxygen supply strategy C (3.75 L/min for first 24 h, then lowered it to 1.25 L/min, 2.5 L fermentation medium was employed). In this process, without extensive detoxification of hydrolysate, an adapted Candida sp. can efficiently ferment the simply treated corn cob hemicellulosic hydrolysate to xylitol under the optimized fermentation conditions. This work should help the development of an efficient process for producing xylitol from corn cob hemicellulosic hydrolysate on a larger scale by bioconversion. PMID:15969126

  13. Spent fuel storing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reduce the depth of spent fuel storing pools as low as possible to thereby eliminate unnecessary hydraulic loads and reduce the installation cost. Constitution: Spent fuel storing pools are connected with a spent fuel assembly transporting pool, canal portions forming the transporting passage of spent fuel racks are disposed and the depth of the fuel assembly transporting pool is made greater than the depth of the spent fuel storing pools. In this way, since fuel replacing works of fuel assemblies to storing racks are carried out only in the deep pool portion formed in the transportating pool, the depth of the pools can be decreased except for the deepened portion. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Generation and identification of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from a brewers' spent grain protein isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Alan; O'Keeffe, Martina B; Piggott, Charles O; Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    An alkaline extracted brewers' spent grain protein-enriched isolate (BSG-PI) was hydrolysed using Alcalase, Corolase PP, Flavourzyme and Promod 144MG, yielding Alc hydrolysate (H), CorH, FlavH and ProH, respectively. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) of the protein hydrolysates varied from 4.45% for ProH to 16.4% for CorH. The in vitro ACE inhibitory activity of the BSG-PI increased significantly following 15min incubations with Alcalase, Corolase PP and Flavourzyme. The 5kDa ultrafiltration permeates of FlavH and CorH resulted in lower ACE IC50 values than their respective hydrolysates. The bioactivity of the BSG-PI hydrolysates was retained after simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGID) while SGID also resulted in the release of ACE inhibitory peptides from the BSG-PI and ProH. UPLC-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 34 peptides. Of 12 synthesised peptides, IVY and ILDL were the most potent, having ACE IC50 values at 80.4±11.9 and 96.4±8.36?M, respectively. PMID:25624207

  15. Evolution of organic matter during the mesophilic composting of lignocellulosic winery wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradelo, Remigio; Moldes, Ana Belén; Barral, María Teresa

    2013-02-15

    Winery wastes were composted in the laboratory during five months in order to study the composting process of lignocellulosic wastes. In a first experiment, spent grape marc was composted alone, and in a second one, hydrolyzed grape marc, which is the residue generated after the acid hydrolysis of spent grape marc for biotechnological purposes, was composted together with vinification lees. During the composting of spent grape marc, total organic matter did not change, and as total N increased only slightly (from 1.7% to 1.9%), the reduction in the C/N ratio was very low (from 31 to 28). The mixture of hydrolyzed grape marc and lees showed bigger changes, reaching a C/N ratio around 20 from the third month on. Water-soluble organic matter followed the usual trend during composting, showing a progressive decrease in both experiments. Although the mixture of hydrolyzed grape marc and lees presented the highest initial water-soluble carbon concentrations, the final values for both experiments were similar (8.1 g kg(-1) for the spent grape marc, and 9.1 g kg(-1) for the mixture). The analysis of the humification parameters did not allow an adequate description of the composting process, maybe as a consequence of the inherent problems existing with alkaline extractions. The total humic substances, which usually increase during composting as a consequence of the humification process, followed no trend, and they were even reduced with respect to the initial values. Notwithstanding, the fractionation of organic matter into cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin enabled a better monitoring of the waste decomposition. Cellulose and hemicellulose were degraded mainly during the first three months of composting, and the progressive reduction of the cellulose/lignin ratio proved that the main evolution of these wastes took place during the first three months of composting. PMID:23274588

  16. Development of Silane Hydrolysate Binder for Thermal-Control Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Technical report describes theoretical and experimental development of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) hydrolysate binder for white, titanium dioxidepigmented thermal-control coatings often needed on satellites. New coating is tougher and more abrasion-resistant than conventional coating, S-13G, which comprises zinc oxide in hydroxyl-therminated dimethylsiloxane binder.

  17. Selection of lactic acid bacteria able to ferment inulin hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian BASTON

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight homofermentative lactic acid bacteria isolates were tested for lactic acid production using chicory and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate as substrate. The pH, lactic acid yield and productivity were used to select the best homolactic bacteria for lactic acid production. The selected strains produced lactic acid at maximum yield after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was greater at 24 hours of fermentation. From all studied strains, Lb1 and Lb2 showed the best results regarding lactic acid yields andproductivity. After 48 hours of chicory and Jerusalem artichhoke hydrolysates fermentation, from all the studied strains, Lb2 produced the highest lactic acid yield (0.97%. Lb2 produced after 48 hours of fermentation the lowest pH value of 3.45±0.01. Lb2 showed greater lactic acid productivity compared to the other studied lactic acid bacteria, the highest values, 0.13 g·L-1·h-1fromJerusalem artichoke hydrolysate and 0.11g·L-1·h-1 from chicory hydrolysate, being produced after 24 hours of fermentation.

  18. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

  19. Extrusion Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Rehmann, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol has shown environmental, economic and energetic advantages in comparison to bioethanol produced from sugar or starch. However, the pretreatment process for increasing the enzymatic accessibility and improving the digestibility of cellulose is hindered by many physical-chemical, structural and compositional factors, which make these materials difficult to be used as feedstocks for ethanol production. A wide range of pretreatment methods has been developed to alter or remove structural and compositional impediments to (enzymatic) hydrolysis over the last few decades; however, only a few of them can be used at commercial scale due to economic feasibility. This paper will give an overview of extrusion pretreatment for bioethanol production with a special focus on twin-screw extruders. An economic assessment of this pretreatment is also discussed to determine its feasibility for future industrial cellulosic ethanol plant designs. PMID:25334065

  20. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Q.A.

    1999-03-30

    An apparatus is described for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

  1. Extrusion Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol has shown environmental, economic and energetic advantages in comparison to bioethanol produced from sugar or starch. However, the pretreatment process for increasing the enzymatic accessibility and improving the digestibility of cellulose is hindered by many physical-chemical, structural and compositional factors, which make these materials difficult to be used as feedstocks for ethanol production. A wide range of pretreatment methods has been developed to alter or remove structural and compositional impediments to (enzymatic hydrolysis over the last few decades; however, only a few of them can be used at commercial scale due to economic feasibility. This paper will give an overview of extrusion pretreatment for bioethanol production with a special focus on twin-screw extruders. An economic assessment of this pretreatment is also discussed to determine its feasibility for future industrial cellulosic ethanol plant designs.

  2. Techno-economic analysis of lignocellulosic ethanol: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Gnansounou, Edgard; Dauriat, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    Lignocellulosic ethanol is expected to be commercialised during the next decade as renewable energy for transport. Competiveness with first generation bioethanol and with gasoline is commonly considered in techno-economic analyses for commercial stage. Several existing reviews conclude about the high spread of current and projected production costs of lignocellulosic ethanol due to the significant differences in assumptions concerning the following factors: composition and cost of feedstock, ...

  3. USE OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC MATERIALS FOR A SUSTAINABLE CHEMICAL INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Shuiming Cheng; Shengdong Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Traditional chemical industry depends on non-renewable fossil resources and is now facing great challenges. Lignocellulosic materials are the most abundant renewable resources in the world, and their efficient utilization provides a practical route to maintain sustainable development of chemical industry. Modern chemical technology as well as industrial biotechnology will play an important role in comprehensive utilization of lignocellulosic materials in an environmentally friendly way. Bio-r...

  4. Antioxidant and cryoprotective effects of Amur sturgeon skin gelatin hydrolysate in unwashed fish mince.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoo, Mehdi; Benjakul, Soottawat; Xu, Xueming

    2015-08-15

    Antioxidant and cryoprotective effects of Amur sturgeon skin gelatin hydrolysates prepared using different commercial proteases in unwashed fish mince were investigated. Gelatin hydrolysates prepared using either Alcalase or Flavourzyme, were effective in preventing lipid oxidation as evidenced by the lower thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances formation. Gelatin hydrolysates were able to retard protein oxidation as indicated by the retarded protein carbonyl formation and lower loss in sulfhydryl content. In the presence of gelatin hydrolysates, unwashed mince had higher transition temperature of myosin and higher enthalpy of myosin and actin as determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Based on low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, gelatin hydrolysates prevented the displacement of water molecules between the different compartments, thus stabilizing the water associated with myofibrils in unwashed mince induced by repeated freeze-thawing. Oligopeptides in gelatin hydrolysates more likely contributed to the cryoprotective effect. Thus, gelatin hydrolysate could act as both antioxidant and cryoprotectant in unwashed fish mince. PMID:25794753

  5. Protein Hydrolysates as Hypoallergenic, Flavors and Palatants for Companion Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagodawithana, Tilak W.; Nelles, Lynn; Trivedi, Nayan B.

    Early civilizations have relied upon their good sense and experience to develop and improve their food quality. The discovery of soy sauce centuries ago can now be considered one of the earliest protein hydrolysates made by man to improve palatability of foods. Now, it is well known that such savory systems are not just sources for enjoyment but complex semiotic systems that direct the humans to satisfy the body's protein need for their sustenance. Recent developments have resulted in a wide range of cost effective savory flavorings, the best known of which are autolyzed yeast extracts and hydrolyzed vegetable proteins. New technologies have helped researchers to improve the savory characteristics of yeast extracts through the application of Maillard reaction and by generating specific flavor enhancers through the use of enzymes. An interesting parallel exists in the pet food industry, where a similar approach is taken in using animal protein hydrolysates to create palatability enhancers via Maillard reaction scheme. Protein hydrolysates are also utilized extensively as a source of nutrition to the elderly, young children and immuno-compromised patient population. These hydrolysates have an added advantage in having peptides small enough to avoid any chance of an allergenic reaction which sometimes occur with the consumption of larger sized peptides or proteins. Accordingly, protein hydrolysates are required to have an average molecular weight distribution in the range 800-1,500 Da to make them non-allergenic. The technical challenge for scientists involved in food and feed manufacture is to use an appropriate combination of enzymes within the existing economic constraints and other physical factors/limitations, such as heat, pH, and time, to create highly palatable, yet still nutritious and hypoallergenic food formulations.

  6. Effect of Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossum, Carlo G.; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk

    Effect of Fish Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells Carlo G. Ossum1, Lisa Lystbæk Andersen2, Henrik Hauch Nielsen2, Else K. Hoffmann1, and Flemming Jessen2 1University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology, Denmark, 2Technical University of Denmark (DTU), National Food Institute, Denmark Corresponding author: Carlo G. Ossum (cgossum@gmail.com) A large number of bioactive peptides have been identified in and isolated from various food sources. Milk seems to be a particularly rich source but also different fish species have been found to yield bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides, usually consisting of 3 to 20 amino acids, can be released from proteins upon degradation by proteolytic enzymes, e.g. in the intestinal tract. The numerous described bioactivities include antihypertensive, anticancerous, antimicrobial, and immunomodulating effects. Here, we investigate the effect of fish protein hydrolysates obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis on cancer cell proliferation. Skin and belly flap muscle from trout were hydrolysed with the unspecific proteases Alcalase, Neutrase, or UE1 (all from Novozymes, Bagsværd, Denmark) to a hydrolysis degree of 1-15%. The hydrolysates were tested for biological activities affecting cell proliferation and ability to modulate caspase activity in pancreatic cancer cells COLO357 and BxPC-3 in vitro. A number of the hydrolysates showed caspase promoting activity; in particular products containing muscle tissue, i.e. belly flap, were able to stimulate caspase activity. Selected hydrolysis products were further fractionated by ultrafiltration into molecular sizes above and below 5 kDa and their activity and dose-dependence was tested.

  7. Production of Lupinus angustifolius protein hydrolysates with improved functional properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millán, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein hydrolysates wer e obtained from lupin flour and from the purified globulin α -conglutin, and their functional properties were studied. Hydrolysis with alcalase for 60 minutes yielded degrees of hydrolysis ranging from 4 % to 11 % for lupin flour, and from 4 % to 13% for α -conglutin. Protein solubility, oil absorption, foam capacity and stability, emulsifying activity, and emulsion stability of hydrolysates with 6% degree of hydrolysis were determined and compared with the properties of the original flour. The protein hydrolysates showed better functional properties than the original proteins. Most importantly, the solubility of the α -conglutin and L. angustifolius flour hydrolysates was increased by 43 % and 52 %, respectively. Thus, lupin seed protein hydrolysates have improved functional properties and could be used in the elaboration of a variety of products such as breads, cakes, and salad dressings.Se obtuvieron hidrolizados proteicos de la harina del altramuz y de la globulina α - conglutina purificada y se estudiaron sus propiedades funcionales. La hidrólisis con alcalasa durante 60 minutos produjo hidrolizados con grados de hidrólisis entre el 4 % y el 11 % para la harina y entre el 4 % y el 13 % para la α - conglutina. Se estudió en un hidrolizado con un 6 % de grado de hidrólisis la solubilidad proteica, absorción de aceite, capacidad y estabilidad espumante y actividad y estabilidad emulsificante. Los hidrolizados proteicos mostraron mejores propiedades funcionales que las proteínas originales. Más aún, la solubilidad de los hidrolizados de α - conglutina y la harina se incrementó en un 43 % y 52 % respectivamente. Así pues, hidrolizados de proteínas de semilla de lupino presentan mejores propiedades funcionales y podrían usarse en la elaboración de productos como pan, dulces, salsas o cremas.

  8. Protein hydrolysates and recovery of muscle damage following eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A whey protein hydrolysate (NatraBoost XR; WPHNB has been shown to speed repair muscle damage. We sought to determine whether this benefit is specific to this hydrolysate to evaluate a marker for quality control. Methods: Three hydrolysates of the same whey protein isolate (WPI were prepared (WPHNB, WPH1 and WPH2. Isometric knee extensor strength was measured in 39 sedentary male participants before and after 100 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Participants were then randomised to consume 250 ml of flavoured water (FW, n=9, or 250 ml of FW containing 25 g of either NatraBoost XR (n=3, WPH1 (n=9, WPH2 (n=9 or WPI (n=9. Strength was reassessed over the next seven days while the supplements were consumed daily. Fibroblasts were cultured for 48 hr in the presence of the different hydrolysates, WPI, saline or fetal bovine serum to ascertain effects on cell proliferation. Results: Strength was reduced in all treatment groups after eccentric exercise (P<0.001. Strength recovered steadily over 7 days in the FW, WPI, WPH1 and WPH2 treatment groups (P<0.001, with no difference between treatments (P=0.87. WPHNB promoted faster strength recovery compared with the other treatments (P<0.001. Fibroblast proliferation was greater with WPHNB compared with saline, WPI or the other hydrolysates (P<0.001. Conclusions: Promoting recovery from muscle damage seems unique to WPHNB. In vitro fibroblast proliferation may be a useful marker for quality control. It is not clear whether effects on fibroblast proliferation contribute to the in vivo effect of WPHNB on muscle damage.

  9. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  10. Spent fuel management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle is divided into two sections; front end and back end of the fuel cycle. Front end of the fuel cycle, which covers all the activities of the fuel cycle before the fuel goes into the reactor has better developed and well-defined technologies. For storage of the spent fuel which are subjects of the back end of the fuel cycle, the waste management policies are not so well defined. There are three approaches that exist today for management of spent fuel. 1. For once through or open fuel cycles direct disposal of spent fuel in a deep geological repository, 2. For closed fuel cycles reprocessing of spent fuel and recycling of the recovered plutonium and uranium in new mixed oxide (MOX) fuels, 3. The spent fuel is placed in long term interim storage pending a decision as to its ultimate reprocessing or disposal. There are so large scale geological repositories for the final disposal of spent fuel in operation. Studies on suitable site selection, design, construction and licensing take about 30-40 years. Reprocessing, on the other hand, produces plutonium and is therefore under close inspection because of the Non Proliferation Treaty. Today more countries are delaying their final decision about the spent fuel management approach and using the long term interim storage approach

  11. Cellulase-lignin interactions in the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahikainen, J.

    2013-11-01

    Today, the production of transportation fuels and chemicals is heavily dependent on fossil carbon sources, such as oil and natural gas. Their limited availability and the environmental concerns arising from their use have driven the search for renewable alternatives. Lignocellulosic plant biomass is the most abundant, but currently underutilised, renewable carbon-rich resource for fuel and chemical production. Enzymatic degradation of structural polysaccharides in lignocellulose produces soluble carbohydrates that serve as ideal precursors for the production of a vast amount of different chemical compounds. The difficulty in full exploitation of lignocellulose for fuel and chemical production lies in the complex and recalcitrant structure of the raw material. Lignocellulose is mainly composed of structural polysaccharides, cellulose and hemicellulose, but also of lignin, which is an aromatic polymer. Enzymatic degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose is restricted by several substrate- and enzyme-related factors, among which lignin is considered as one of the most problematic issues. Lignin restricts the action of hydrolytic enzymes and enzyme binding onto lignin has been identified as a major inhibitory mechanism preventing efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks. In this thesis, the interactions between cellulase enzymes and lignin-rich compounds were studied in detail and the findings reported in this work have the potential to help in controlling the harmful cellulase-lignin interactions, and thus improve the biochemical processing route from lignocellulose to fuels and chemicals.

  12. Spent fuel workshop'2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the transparencies of the presentations given at the 2002 spent fuel workshop: Session 1 - Research Projects: Overview on the IN CAN PROCESSES European project (M. Cowper), Overview on the SPENT FUEL STABILITY European project (C. Poinssot), Overview on the French R and D project on spent fuel long term evolution, PRECCI (C. Poinssot); Session 2 - Spent Fuel Oxidation: Oxidation of uranium dioxide single crystals (F. Garrido), Experimental results on SF oxidation and new modeling approach (L. Desgranges), LWR spent fuel oxidation - effects of burn-up and humidity (B. Hanson), An approach to modeling CANDU fuel oxidation under dry storage conditions (P. Taylor); Session 3 - Spent Fuel Dissolution Experiments: Overview on high burnup spent fuel dissolution studies at FZK/INE (A. Loida), Results on the influence of hydrogen on spent fuel leaching (K. Spahiu), Leaching of spent UO2 fuel under inert and reducing conditions (Y. Albinsson), Fuel corrosion investigation by electrochemical techniques (D. Wegen), A reanalysis of LWR spent fuel flow through dissolution tests (B. Hanson), U-bearing secondary phases formed during fuel corrosion (R. Finch), The near-field chemical conditions and spent fuel leaching (D. Cui), The release of radionuclides from spent fuel in bentonite block (S.S. Kim), Trace actinide behavior in altered spent fuel (E. Buck, B. Hanson); Session 4 - Radiolysis Issues: The effect of radiolysis on UO2 dissolution determined from electrochemical experiments with 238Pu doped UO2 M. Stroess-Gascoyne (F. King, J.S. Betteridge, F. Garisto), doped UO2 studies (V. Rondinella), Preliminary results of static and dynamic dissolution tests with ? doped UO2 in Boom clay conditions (K. Lemmens), Studies of the behavior of UO2 / water interfaces under He2+ beam (C. Corbel), Alpha and gamma radiolysis effects on UO2 alteration in water (C. Jegou), Behavior of Pu-doped pellets in brines (M. Kelm), On the potential catalytic behavior of UO2(s): experimental approach and preliminary results on uranium oxide - water interface (J. Devoy), Preliminary results on studies on radiolysis effects on dissolution of UO2 (E. Ekeroth, M. Jonnson); Session 5 - Modeling of the Spent Fuel Dissolution: tUO2 dissolution and the effect of radiolysis (T. Lundstrom), Prediction of the effect of radiolysis (F. King), Experimental determination and chemical modeling of radiolytic processes at the spent fuel / water interface (E. Cera, J. Bruno, T. Eriksen, M. Grive, L. Duro); Session 6 - Influence of the Potential Evolution prior to the Water Access on IRF: Potential occurrence of ? self-irradiation enhanced-diffusion (H.J. Matzke, T. Petit), Are grain boundaries a stable microstructure? (Y. Guerin), Modeling RN instant release fractions from spent nuclear fuel under repository conditions (C.Poinssot, L. Johnson, P. Lovera). (J.S.)

  13. Allopurinol-mediated lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitor tolerance by Clostridium beijerinckii during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-04-01

    In addition to glucans, xylans, and arabinans, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates contain significant levels of nonsugar components that are toxic to the microbes that are typically used to convert biomass to biofuels and chemicals. To enhance the tolerance of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE)-generating Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to these lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs; e.g., furfural), we have been examining different metabolic perturbation strategies to increase the cellular reductant pools and thereby facilitate detoxification of LDMICs. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the effect of allopurinol, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H-generating xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), on C. beijerinckii grown in furfural-supplemented medium and found that it unexpectedly increased the rate of detoxification of furfural by 1.4-fold and promoted growth, butanol, and ABE production by 1.2-, 2.5-, and 2-fold, respectively. Since NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) levels in C. beijerinckii were largely unchanged upon allopurinol treatment, we postulated and validated a possible basis in DNA repair to account for the solventogenic gains with allopurinol. Following the observation that supplementation of allopurinol in the C. beijerinckii growth media mitigates the toxic effects of nalidixic acid, a DNA-damaging antibiotic, we found that allopurinol elicited 2.4- and 6.7-fold increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases, key purine-salvage enzymes. Consistent with this finding, addition of inosine (a precursor of hypoxanthine) and xanthine led to 1.4- and 1.7-fold increase in butanol production in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii. Taken together, our results provide a purine salvage-based rationale for the unanticipated effect of allopurinol in improving furfural tolerance of the ABE-fermenting C. beijerinckii. PMID:25690312

  14. Spent fuel storage chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a dry spent nuclear fuel storage chamber, an atmosphere in a closed loop comprising storage cell/heated air collecting chamber/cooling air circulation path is filled with gases having a high thermal radiation absorbing performance. Heat released from the spent fuels heats a cylindrical vessel, gases in contact with the peripheral surface thereof and metal blocks constituting the storage cell. Since the gases having highly heat absorbing performance are filled, they are heated by absorbing radiation heat of the spent fuels, to improve the heat dissipation efficiency of the spent fuels. Accordingly, even if the heat generation amount of the spent fuels is great, the temperature elevation can be suppressed since the heat dissipation efficiency of the spent fuels is great due to radiation absorption. In addition, a phenomenon that the temperature of the cylindrical vessel is raised can be suppressed. As a result, fuels or mixed oxide fuels of a high burnup degree having greater heat generation amount compared with usual fuels can be stored safely and economically. (N.H.)

  15. Laccase Enzymology in Relation to Lignocellulose Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitarz, Anna Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that cellulase action on cellulose fibers and their conversion to glucose is inhibited by lignin and lignin-derived phenolic substances, which are released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. A prerequisite for optimization of the cellulose-to-glucose conversion is to either get rid of the inhibitory substances or to alter them in a way, so they no longer decrease the action of cellulases. The main focus in the present work was the investigation of the influence of the enzymes that are being expressed from the white-rot fungi when lignin was present in the cultivation broth, on the cellulase catalyzed hydrolysis of pretreated biomass, and to understand the mechanism of their action on phenolic substances. In this thesis, 44 fungi from the genus Alternaria, Fusarium, Memnoniella, Stemphylium, Ulocladium, Ganoderma, Trametes, and Polyporus were evaluated for their ability to grow on lignocellulosic material, such as sugarcane bagasse – a competitive substrate forgrain bioethanol. From this investigation, four white-rot fungi (Ganoderma lucidum, Trametes versicolor, Polyporus brumalis, and Polyporus ciliatus), were selected for the growth on lignin (lignin alkaline) and investigated for production of enzymes under such conditions (Paper I). G. lucidum was found to produce high amounts of laccase which corresponded to its exceptional growth on lignocellulosic substrate and lignin. This observation led to a hypothesis that this particular laccase might act in a synergistic way with cellulase preparations and yield in higher cellulose-to-glucose catalyzed hydrolysis. To test this hypothesis the laccase-rich crude extract from G. lucidum was added to the cellulase catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose from the pretreated sugarcane bagasse (Paper I). A positive outcome of this reaction, a 17% increase in the total glucose yields during cellulase catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, led to amplification of laccase gene and its expression in Pichia pastoris (Paper II). This approach was directed into obtaining a monocomponent laccase enzyme and to prove that the higher yields of cellulose-to-glucose conversion are partly due to the presence of laccase, and are not caused by the other proteins, present in the laccase-rich crude protein extract. The addition of the laccase from G. lucidum, expressed in P. pastoris resulted in a total increase in the glucose yields by 20 and 33% depending on the cellulase cocktail preparation. This discovery is significant considering the fact that the cellulase cocktail preparations, namely Cellic®CTec1 and Cellic®CTec2, are improved in respect to phenolic-derived, and end-substrate inhibitors. Additionally, the molecular dynamics simulations (MD) of the obtained amino acid sequence of the laccase from G. lucidum highlighted a potential mechanism of laccase detoxification of the cellulase-pretreated-biomass-derived inhibitors (Paper II). The mechanism of laccase reaction on the phenolic substrates was further evaluated by the literature study of the reactions that take place in the catalytic pocket of this oxidoreductases and the structural alteration that can lead to a more robust, or completely inactive, laccase (Review paper).

  16. Sustainable Process Design of Lignocellulose based Biofuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangnimit, Saranya; Malakul, Pomthong

    Worldwide energy demand has increased steadily as the world population has grown and more countries have become industrialized. The major energy sources of the world still depend on fossil fuels, which are also the main sources for carbon dioxide emission. As the fossil fuels always pass through a combustion processing step, carbondioxide and other important greenhouse gases are released. This is considered non-renewable and non-sustainable energy and may be one of the major causes of global warming and therefore, climate change concerns coupled with high oil prices. This isdriving efforts to increase the production and use of alternative and sustainable energy sources as rapidly as possible. Biofuel is a type of alternative energy that can be produced from many sources including sugar substances (such as sugarcane juice and molasses), starchy materials (such as corn and cassava), and lignocellulosic materials such as agricultural residual, straw and wood chips, the residual from wood industry. However, thosesugar and starchy materials can be used not only to make biofuels but they are also food sources. Thus, lignocellulosic materials are interesting feed-stocls as they are inexpensive, abundantly available, and are also non-food crops. In this respect, Cassava rhizome has several characteristics that make it a potential feedstock for fuel ethanol production. It has high content of cellulose and hemicelluloses . The objective of this paper is to present a study focused on the sustainable process design of bioethanol production from cassava rhizome using various computer aided tools through a systematic and effiicient work-flow, The study includes process simulation, sustainability analysis, economic evaluation and life cycle assessment (LCA) according to a well-defined workflow that guarantees the deermination of sustainable process options, if they exist. . The paper will highlight an improved alternative process design compared to a base case (published) design in terms of production cost, waste, energy usage and environmental impacts, criteria that are asociated with sustainable process design. The final process design includes 39 unit operations, has a capacity of 150,000 L/day and produces dry ethanol (approximately 13.0% of cassava rhizome is converted to ethanol)

  17. Use of Protein Hydrolysates in Industrial Starter Culture Fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummadi, Madhavi (Soni); Curic-Bawden, Mirjana

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used as starter cultures for fermenting foods long before the importance of microorganisms were recognized. The most important group of LAB are the lactococci, lactobacilli, streptococci, and pediococci. Additionally, bifidobacteria have been included as a probiotic, providing added value to the product. Since the genera involved are so diverse, the nutritional requirements (energy, carbon and nitrogen sources) differ significantly between and within species. Designing an optimum fermentation medium for production of active and vigorous LAB starter cultures and probiotics requires selecting the right raw ingredients, especially protein hydrolysates that can provide adequate nutrients for growth and viability. This chapter attempts to describe the application of various commercial protein hydrolysates used for production of dairy and meat starter cultures, with special emphasis on meeting the nitrogen requirements of industrially important LAB species.

  18. Analysis of hydroxypropyl starch hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, M.; Kesavamoorthy, S.; Azemi, B.M.N.M.

    1985-08-01

    Acid hydrolysates of hydroxypropyl derivatives of wheat, maize, waxy maize and high amylose maize starches were separated using four HPLC procedures. An amine treated silica column gave best resolution of glucose and six nonglucose components. The proportions of these varied depending on the native starch and the acid used for hydrolysis. There was a linear relationship between molar substitution and ratio of nonglucose peak areas which varied between the native starches.

  19. Selection of lactic acid bacteria able to ferment inulin hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Baston, Octavian; Constantin, Oana Emilia

    2012-01-01

    Eight homofermentative lactic acid bacteria isolates were tested for lactic acid production using chicory and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate as substrate. The pH, lactic acid yield and productivity were used to select the best homolactic bacteria for lactic acid production. The selected strains produced lactic acid at maximum yield after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was greater at 24 hours of fermentation. From all studied strains, Lb1 and Lb2 showed the best results regardi...

  20. Hyperthermophilic endoglucanase for in planta lignocellulose conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klose Holger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzymatic conversion of lignocellulosic plant biomass into fermentable sugars is a crucial step in the sustainable and environmentally friendly production of biofuels. However, a major drawback of enzymes from mesophilic sources is their suboptimal activity under established pretreatment conditions, e.g. high temperatures, extreme pH values and high salt concentrations. Enzymes from extremophiles are better adapted to these conditions and could be produced by heterologous expression in microbes, or even directly in the plant biomass. Results Here we show that a cellulase gene (sso1354 isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus can be expressed in plants, and that the recombinant enzyme is biologically active and exhibits the same properties as the wild type form. Since the enzyme is inactive under normal plant growth conditions, this potentially allows its expression in plants without negative effects on growth and development, and subsequent heat-inducible activation. Furthermore we demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme acts in high concentrations of ionic liquids and can therefore degrade ?-cellulose or even complex cell wall preparations under those pretreatment conditions. Conclusion The hyperthermophilic endoglucanase SSO1354 with its unique features is an excellent tool for advanced biomass conversion. Here we demonstrate its expression in planta and the possibility for post harvest activation. Moreover the enzyme is suitable for combined pretreatment and hydrolysis applications.

  1. Advanced anaerobic bioconversion of lignocellulosic waste for the melissa life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissens, G.; Verstraete, W.; Albrecht, T.; Brunner, G.; Creuly, C.; Dussap, G.; Kube, J.; Maerkl, H.; Lasseur, C.

    The feasibility of nearly-complete conversion of lignocellulosic waste (70% food crops, 20% faecal matter and 10% green algae) into biogas was investigated in the context of the MELiSSA loop (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative). The treatment comprised a series of processes, i.e. a mesophilic laboratory scale CSTR (continuously stirred tank reactor), an upflow biofilm reactor, a fiber liquefaction reactor employing the rumen bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes and a hydrothermolysis system in near-critical water. By the one-stage CSTR, a biogas yield of 75% with a specific biogas production of 0.37 l biogas g-1 VSS (volatile suspended solids) added at a RT (hydraulic retention time) of 20-25 d was obtained. Biogas yields could not be increased considerably at higher RT, indicating the depletion of readily available substrate after 25 d. The solids present in the CSTR-effluent were subsequently treated in two ways. Hydrothermal treatment (T ˜ 310-350C, p ˜ 240 bar) resulted in effective carbon liquefaction (50-60% without and 83% with carbon dioxide saturation) and complete sanitation of the residue. Application of the cellulolytic Fibrobacter succinogenes converted remaining cellulose contained in the CSTR-effluent into acetate and propionate mainly. Subsequent anaerobic digestion of the hydrothermolysis and the Fibrobacter hydrolysates allowed conversion of 48-60% and 30%, respectively. Thus, the total process yielded biogas corresponding with conversions up to 90% of the original organic matter. It appears that particularly mesophilic digestion in conjunction with hydrothermolysis offers interesting features for (nearly) the MELiSSA system. The described additional technologies show that complete and hygienic carbon and energy recovery from human waste within MELiSSA is technically feasible, provided that the extra energy needed for the thermal treatment is guaranteed.

  2. Antioxidant activity of whey protein hydrolysates in milk beverage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Bimlesh; Kumari, Anuradha; Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, Rajan; Prajapati, Kishore; Mahboob, Shaik; Athira, S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of flavoured milk enriched with antioxidative whey protein hydrolysates (WPHs) by radical scavenging method. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was hydrolyzed by using three commercial proteases; flavouzyme, alcalase and corolase PP and these WPHs were analyzed for degree of hydrolysis and antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activities of these WPHs were evaluated using ABTS method. Trolox equivalent antioxidant activity of all the hydrolysates i.e. flavourzyme (0.81?±?0.04), alcalase (1.16?±?0.05) and corolase (1.42?±?0.12) was higher than the WPC (0.19?±?0.01). Among these, whey protein hydrolysates prepared using corolase showed maximum antioxidant activity. Total 15 ?-lactoglobulin, 1 ?-lactoalbumin, and 6 ?-casein derived peptide fragments were identified in the WPHs by LC-MS/MS. Due to their size and characteristic amino acid composition, all the identified peptides may contribute for the antioxidant activity. The strawberry and chocolate flavoured milk was supplemented with WPC and WPHs and 2 % addition has shown increase in antioxidant activity upto 42 %. The result suggests that WPH could be used as natural biofunctional ingredients in enhancing antioxidant properties of food products. PMID:26028704

  3. Thermophysical Properties of Lignocellulose: A Cell-Scale Study Down to 41K

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Zhe; Xu, Zaoli; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xinwei

    2014-01-01

    Thermal energy transport is of great importance in lignocellulose pyrolysis for bio-fuels. The thermophysical properties of lignocellulose significantly affect the overall properties of bio-composites and the related thermal transport. In this work, cell-scale lignocellulose (mono-layer plant cells) is prepared to characterize their thermal properties from room temperature down to 41 K. The thermal conductivities of cell-scale lignocellulose along different directions show a...

  4. Thermoset-cross-linked lignocellulose: a moldable plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karumuri, Sriharsha; Hiziroglu, Salim; Kalkan, A Kaan

    2015-04-01

    The present work demonstrates a high biomass content (i.e., up to 90% by weight) and moldable material by controlled covalent cross-linking of lignocellulosic particles by a thermoset through epoxide-hydroxyl reactions. As an example for lignocellulosic biomass, Eastern redcedar was employed. Using scanning fluorescence microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy, macroscopic to molecular scale interactions of the thermoset with the lignocellulose have been revealed. Impregnation of the polymer resin into the biomass cellular network by capillary action as well as applied pressure results in a self-organizing structure in the form of thermoset microrods in a matrix of lignocellulose. We also infer permeation of the thermoset into the cell walls from the reaction of epoxides with the hydroxyls of the lignin. Compression tests reveal, at 30% thermoset content, thermoset-cross-linked lignocellulose has superior mechanical properties over a commercial wood plastic composite while comparable stiffness and strength to bulk epoxy and wood, respectively. The failure mechanism is understood to be crack propagation along the particle-thermoset interface and/or interparticle thermoset network. PMID:25734539

  5. Evaluation of the biomass potential for the production of lignocellulosic bioethanol from various agricultural residues in Austria and Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Heike; Steindl, Daniel; Wimberger, Julia; Schürz, Daniel; Jäger, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Due to the fact that the resources of fossil fuels are steadily decreasing, researchers have been trying to find alternatives over the past few years. As bioethanol of the first generation is based on potential food, its production has become an increasingly controversial topic. Therefore the focus of research currently is on the production of bioethanol of the second generation, which is made from cellulosic and lignocellulosic materials. However, for the production of bioethanol of the second generation the fibres have to be pre-treated. In this work the mass balances of various agricultural residues available in Austria were generated and examined in lab scale experiments for their bioethanol potential. The residues were pretreatment by means of state of the art technology (steam explosion), enzymatically hydrolysed and fermented with yeast to produce ethanol. Special attention was paid the mass balance of the overall process. Due to the pretreatment the proportion of cellulose increases with the duration of the pre-treatment, whereby the amount of hemicellulose decreases greatly. However, the total losses were increasing with the duration of the pre-treatment, and the losses largely consist of hemicellulose. The ethanol yield varied depending on the cellulose content of the substrates. So rye straw 200 °C 20 min reaches an ethanol yield of 169 kg/t, by far the largest yield. As result on the basis of the annual straw yield in Austria, approximately 210 000 t of bioethanol (266 million litres) could be produced from the straw of wheat (Triticum vulgare), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa) and corn (Zea mays) as well as elephant grass (Miscanthus sinensis) using appropriate pre-treatment. So the greenhouse gas emissions produced by burning fossil fuels could be reduced significantly. About 1.8 million tons of motor gasoline are consumed in Austria every year. The needed quantity for a transition to E10 biofuels could thus be easily provided by bioethanol from straw. We also evaluated the production of world's most important grains (wheat, corn, rice, sugar cain) and we calculated the worldwide production of the relevant lignocellulosic residues. On the basis of our labs scale experiments on bioethanol production, the possible lignocellulosic bioethanol production word wide was determined.

  6. Spent fuel pyroprocessing demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major element of the shutdown of the US liquid metal reactor development program is managing the sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II to meet US environmental laws. Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for treating the spent fuel by a high-temperature electrochemical process commonly called pyroprocessing. Four products will be produced for storage and disposal. Two high-level waste forms will be produced and qualified for disposal of the fission and activation products. Uranium and transuranium alloys will be produced for storage pending a decision by the US Department of Energy on the fate of its plutonium and enriched uranium. Together these activities will demonstrate a unique electrochemical treatment technology for spent nuclear fuel. This technology potentially has significant economic and technical advantages over either conventional reprocessing or direct disposal as a high-level waste option

  7. PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Januši?

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is today most commonly produced from corn grain and sugar cane. It is expected that there will be limits to the supply of these raw materials in the near future. Therefore, lignocellulosic biomass, namely agricultural and forest waste, is seen as an attractive feedstock for future supplies of ethanol.Lignocellulosic biomass consists of lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose. Indeed, complexicity of the lignocellulosic biomass structure causes a pretreatment to be applied prior to cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis into fermentable sugars. Pretreatment technologies can be physical (mechanical comminution, pyrolysis, physico-chemical (steam explosion, ammonia fiber explosion, CO2 explosion, chemical(ozonolysis, acid hydrolysis, alkaline hydrolysis, oxidative delignification, organosolvent process and biological ones.

  8. Pretreatments employed in lignocellulosic materials for bioethanol production: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danay Carrillo-Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic materials are raw materials with high cellulose content and they constitute the most abun- dant sources of biomass on planet. They are attractive for their low cost and high availability in diverse climates and places for the bioethanol production, however, the main impediment for its use is the appro- priate selection from the technological and economic point of view of the stages of pretreatments and hydrolysis, that allow the breaking down of the lignocellulosic matrix to obtain the necessary substrates in the processes of fermentation. Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass and subsequent production of bioethanol, which have been divided in three groups for its study in: physi- cal-chemical, hydrothermal and biological. The aim of this paper is to analyze the potential of several pre- treatment methods for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic materials.

  9. Spent fuel reprocessing options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this publication is to provide an update on the latest developments in nuclear reprocessing technologies in the light of new developments on the global nuclear scene. The background information on spent fuel reprocessing is provided in Section One. Substantial global growth of nuclear electricity generation is expected to occur during this century, in response to environmental issues and to assure the sustainability of the electrical energy supply in both industrial and less-developed countries. This growth carries with it an increasing responsibility to ensure that nuclear fuel cycle technologies are used only for peaceful purposes. In Section Two, an overview of the options for spent fuel reprocessing and their level of development are provided. A number of options exist for the treatment of spent fuel. Some, including those that avoid separation of a pure plutonium stream, are at an advanced level of technological maturity. These could be deployed in the next generation of industrial-scale reprocessing plants, while others (such as dry methods) are at a pilot scale, laboratory scale or conceptual stage of development. In Section Three, research and development in support of advanced reprocessing options is described. Next-generation spent fuel reprocessing plants are likely to be based on aqueous extraction processes that can be designed to a country specific set of spent fuel partitioning criteria for recycling of fissile materials to advanced light water reactors or fast spectrum reactors. The physical design of these plants must incorporate effective means for materials accountancy, safeguards and physical protection. Section four deals with issues and challenges related to spent fuel reprocessing. The spent fuel reprocessing options assessment of economics, proliferation resistance, and environmental impact are discussed. The importance of public acceptance for a reprocessing strategy is discussed. A review of modelling tools to support the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles is also given. As a conclusion, spent fuel reprocessing options have evolved significantly since the start of nuclear energy application. There is a large body of industrial experience in fuel cycle technologies complemented by research and development programs in several countries

  10. Spent fuel leach tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is divided into two parts, pre-WISAP and WISAP. The pre-WISAP leach tests were started before WISAP sponsorship and do not give data directly applicable to the spent fuel release modeling studies being done in WISAP Task 2. However, the general leaching trends have suggested the general approach to some mechanistic studies. The WISAP portion of this presentation was started under WISAP sponsorship and is designed to fulfill the requirement of obtaining radionuclide release rates from spent fuel and understanding the radionuclide release process under simulated geologic storage conditions

  11. Cellulase production using biomass feed stock and its application in lignocellulose saccharification for bio-ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumaran, Rajeev K.; Singhania, Reeta Rani; Mathew, Gincy Marina; Pandey, Ashok [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, CSIR, Trivandrum-695 019 (India)

    2009-02-15

    A major constraint in the enzymatic saccharification of biomass for ethanol production is the cost of cellulase enzymes. Production cost of cellulases may be brought down by multifaceted approaches which include the use of cheap lignocellulosic substrates for fermentation production of the enzyme, and the use of cost efficient fermentation strategies like solid state fermentation (SSF). In the present study, cellulolytic enzymes for biomass hydrolysis were produced using solid state fermentation on wheat bran as substrate. Crude cellulase and a relatively glucose tolerant BGL were produced using fungi Trichoderma reesei RUT C30 and Aspergillus niger MTCC 7956, respectively. Saccharification of three different feed stock, i.e. sugar cane bagasse, rice straw and water hyacinth biomass was studied using the enzymes. Saccharification was performed with 50 FPU of cellulase and 10 U of {beta}-glucosidase per gram of pretreated biomass. Highest yield of reducing sugars (26.3 g/L) was obtained from rice straw followed by sugar cane bagasse (17.79 g/L). The enzymatic hydrolysate of rice straw was used as substrate for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yield of ethanol was 0.093 g per gram of pretreated rice straw. (author)

  12. Integration of Lignocellulosic Biomass into Renewable Energy Generation Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUSCH Sigrid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In all European countries various lignocellulosic biomasses such as agricultural residues (straw, strawcontaining dung or fractions from municipal solid waste are available in large amounts, but currently hardly any of thispotential is being used for energy generation. This paper reviews the different options for including lignocellulosicbiomass into renewable energy generation schemes. Not all wastes are suitable to be treated by principally availabletechniques such as anaerobic digestion, ethanol production or thermal valorisation. The present paper gives an overviewof utilisation options for lignocellulosic biomass to either produce biofuels or to integrate such biomass into anaerobicdigestion. Biorefinery concepts are discussed as well.

  13. Production, characterization and application of activated carbon from brewer’s spent grain lignin

    OpenAIRE

    Mussatto, Solange I.; Fernandes, Marcela; George J. M. Rocha; Órfão, José J. M.; Teixeira, J. A.; Roberto, Inês Conceição

    2010-01-01

    Different types of activated carbon were prepared by chemical activation of brewer’s spent grain (BSG) lignin using H3PO4 at various acid/lignin ratios (1, 2, or 3 g/g) and carbonization temperatures (300, 450, or 600 °C), according to a 22 full-factorial design. The resulting materials were characterized with regard to their surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution, and used for detoxification of BSG hemicellulosic hydrolysate (a mixture of sugars, phenolic compounds, metalli...

  14. Debittering of Protein Hydrolysates by Lactobacillus LBL-4 Aminopeptidase

    OpenAIRE

    Tchorbanov, Bozhidar; Marinova, Margarita; Grozeva, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Yoghurt strain Lactobacillus LBL-4 cultivated for 8–10?h at pH ~6.0 was investigated as a considerable food-grade source of intracellular aminopeptidase. Cell-free extract manifesting >200?AP U/l was obtained from cells harvested from 1?L culture media. Subtilisin-induced hydrolysates of casein, soybean isolate, and Scenedesmus cell protein with degree of hydrolysis 20–22% incubated at 45°C for 10?h by 10 AP?U/g peptides caused an enlarging of DH up to 40–42%, 46–48%, and 3...

  15. Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to nanocellulose: structure and chemical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H V; Hamid, S B A; Zain, S K

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate's application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein. PMID:25247208

  16. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Nanocellulose: Structure and Chemical Process

    OpenAIRE

    H. V. Lee; S. B. A. Hamid; Zain, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate's application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulo...

  17. Lignocellulose Biomass: Constitutive Polymers. Biological Processes of Lignin Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the lignocellulosic materials and the chemical composition of their main constitutive polymers, cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are described. The most promising transformation processes according to the type of biomass considered: hardwood, softwood an herbaceous and the perspectives of biotechnological processes for bio pulping, bio bleaching and effluents decolorisation in the paper pulp industry are also discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  18. Study on Hydrolysis Conditions of Flavourzyme in Soybean Polypeptide Alcalase Hydrolysate and Soybean Polypeptide Refining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Ma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Soybean protein Alcalase hydrolysate was further hydrolyzed by adopting Flavourzyme as hydrolytic enzyme. The optimal hydrolysis conditions of Flavourzyme was that pH was 7.0 at temperature 50°C and E/S(ratio of enzyme and substrate was 20LAPU/g. Bitterness value was reduced to 2 after Flavourzyme hydrolysis reaction in optimal hydrolysis conditions. The change of molecular weight distribution range from Alcalase hydrolysate to Flavourzyme hydrolysate was not obvious. DH (Degree of hydrolysis of soybean protein hydrolysate was increased to 24.2% which was improved 3.5% than Alcalase hydrolysate. Protein recovery proportion was increased to 73.2% which was improved 0.8% than Alcalase hydrolysate. Soybean polypeptide Flavourzyme hydrolysate was decolorized with activated carbon which optimal dosage was 1.2% solution amount (w/w. Anion/cation exchange process was used in the desalination processing of soybean polypeptide. Ratio of anion resin and cation resin was 2:3(V/V. The volume of hydrolysate processed was 5 times as the volume of anion resin. Ash content of soybean peptide solution reduced to 2.11% (dry basis, salinity decreased by 86% after desalination processing.

  19. Production of Defatted Palm Kernel Cake Protein Hydrolysate as a Valuable Source of Natural Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zarei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to produce a valuable protein hydrolysate from palm kernel cake (PKC for the development of natural antioxidants. Extracted PKC protein was hydrolyzed using different proteases (alcalase, chymotrypsin, papain, pepsin, trypsin, flavourzyme, and bromelain. Subsequently, antioxidant activity and degree of hydrolysis (DH of each hydrolysate were evaluated using DPPH• radical scavenging activity and O-phthaldialdehyde spectrophotometric assay, respectively. The results revealed a strong correlation between DH and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates, where among these, protein hydrolysates produced by papain after 38 h hydrolysis exhibited the highest DH (91 ± 0.1% and DPPH• radical scavenging activity (73.5 ± 0.25% compared to the other hydrolysates. In addition, fractionation of the most effective (potent hydrolysate by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated a direct association between hydrophobicity and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates. Isoelectric focusing tests also revealed that protein hydrolysates with basic and neutral isoelectric point (pI have the highest radical scavenging activity, although few fractions in the acidic range also exhibited good antioxidant potential.

  20. Wet storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly outlines the status of wet storage of spent fuels in the United States. The following information is presented: number of LWR fuel assemblies in wet storage; location, type, cladding and failed fuel of stored spent fuel assemblies; storage capabilities; current trend (extend burnup); basis for assessing spent fuel behavior in wet storage; handling operations with spent fuel. The report summarizes that there have been no problems encountered in the storage of spent fuels in pools, and that there is no evidence of fuel cladding degrading in wet storage

  1. Scintillator spent fuel monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monitor for rapidly measuring the gross gamma-ray flux immediately above spent fuel assemblies in underwater storage racks has been developed. It consists of a plastic scintillator, photomultiplier, collimator, and a small battery-powered electronics package. The crosstalk from an isolated fuel assembly to an adjacent void is only about 2%. The mean difference between the measured gamma-ray flux and the flux estimated from the declared burnup and cooling time with a simple formula is 22%

  2. Encapsulating spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system is described for encapsulating spent nuclear fuel discharged from nuclear reactors in the form of rods or multi-rod assemblies. The rods are completely and contiguously enclosed in concrete in which metallic fibres are incorporated to increase thermal conductivity and polymers to decrease fluid permeability. This technique provides the advantage of acceptable long-term stability for storage over the conventional underwater storage method. Examples are given of suitable concrete compositions. (UK)

  3. Spent fuel dissolution mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a literature survey on the dissolution mechanisms of spent fuel under disposal conditions. First, the effects of radiolysis products on the oxidative dissolution mechanisms and rates of UO2 are discussed. These effects have mainly been investigated by using electrochemical methods. Then the release mechanisms of soluble radionuclides and the dissolution of the UO2 matrix including the actinides, are treated. Experimental methods have been developed for measuring the grain-boundary inventories of radionuclides. The behaviour of cesium, strontium and technetium in leaching tests shows different trends. Comparison of spent fuel leaching data strongly suggests that the release of 90Sr into the leachant can be used as a measure of the oxidation/dissolution of the fuel matrix. Approaches to the modelling UO2, dissolution are briefly discussed in the next chapter. Lastly, the use of natural material, uraninite, in the evaluation of the long-term performance of spent fuel is discussed. (orig.). (81 ref., 37 figs., 8 tabs.)

  4. Antioxidative, DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting peptides from fish protein hydrolysed with intestinal proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Stagsted, Jan

    Proteins from fish tissue could be a promising source of peptides with a nutritional and pharmaceutical value, e.g. as treatment of type 2 diabetes with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibiting peptides, and could be used in health and functional foods and thereby increasing the value of secondary marine products. The approach in this study is to hydrolyse skin and belly flap tissue from Salmon with the use of mammalian digestive proteases from pancreas and intestinal mucosa and test hydrolysates for antioxidative capacity, intestinal DPP-IV and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting properties. 10kDa dialysis bags containing 10ml water were added to homogenized fish tissues, which were subsequently hydrolysed for 24 hours at 37?C and pH 8 with intestinal mucosa extract and/or pancreatin solution from pig. Dialysis bags were then removed and content were analyzed for free amino groups, antioxidative capacity by ABTS (2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonicacid)), DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity. Degree of hydrolysis (DH) of hydrolysates was approximately 13% and 10% for belly flap and skin respectively. No clear difference was observed in DH between pancreatin and pancreatin + mucosa hydrolysates. No DH was obtained for tissues hydrolysed with only intestinal mucosa extract. Preliminary results showed antioxidant activity and intestinal DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity in 10 kDa fraction from both belly flap and skin hydrolysates but with a higher antioxidative capacity in belly flap hydrolysates. No difference between hydrolysates with pancreatin and pancreatin+mucosa was observed. Hydrolysates will be further fractionated by gelfiltration. Fractions will be analyzed for the three bioactivities and also presented.

  5. The quality of silage of corn grain and spent P. ostreatus mushroom substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamovi? Milan J.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition, fermentation quality, mycological and mycotoxicological analyses of silage mixture, made of ground corn grain and spent P. ostreatus mushroom substrate, were investigated in this paper. Dry matter content in high moisture ground corn, at the time of ensiling was 70%, and in the spent substrate (on the Salt Cedar wood shaving basis was 52.7%. Corn grain to spent substrate ratio in trials was: 100:0% (I, 90:10% (II, 80:20% (III and 70:30% (IV respectively. Content of the lignocellulose fractions in silage was slightly increased, and protein content was slightly decreased with the increase of spent substrate content. Contents of the VFA (volatile fatty acids in silage, pH value, and NH3-N content were for the silage of very good quality. In the spent substrate 9 mold species were found, from which the most frequent were genus Penicillium, Paecilomyces variotii, and Trichoderma harzianum. In ground corn grain silage (I presence of the yeasts was dominant (90.000/g. In combined trials (II-IV only Penicillium (P. brevicompactum and P. echinulatum mold species were found. Presence of molds and yeasts in investigated trials was within tolerated values for ensiled feedstuffs. Mycotoxin presence in silage was not determined.

  6. Decolorization of hair dye by lignocellulosic waste materials from contaminated waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbelEnriqueNavarro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Basic yellow 57 (BY57 was chosen as a model hair dye due to its prevalence in cosmetics wastewaters. This study proposes the use of lignocellulosic materials like spent tea leaves of peppermint (PM, chai tea (CT and chamomile (CM as raw adsorbents for the removal of BY57 from contaminated solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out at room temperature to achieve the maximum adsorption capacity. Results indicate that the highest removal is achieved at pH 6 – 8, with a minimum adsorbent mass of 75 mg and in the absence of salinity, crowding agents and heavy metals. Adsorption equilibria were modeled according to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm theories and reported the following trend: PM>CT>CM, reaching qmax values of 105, 80, and 38 mg of dye per gram of adsorbent, respectively. Desorption experiments showed that diluted solution of HCl is able to desorb the up to 80% of the dye and recover the adsorbent to be used in consecutive cycles. Finally, the adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy, indicating that the adsorbents have a porous and heterogeneous surface, showing pockets and protrusions that are potential adsorption sites for the dye.

  7. The effect of Pleurotus ostreatus arabinofuranosidase and its evolved variant in lignocellulosic biomasses conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolongo, Loredana; Ionata, Elena; La Cara, Francesco; Amore, Antonella; Giacobbe, Simona; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2014-11-01

    The fungal arabinofuranosidase from Pleurotus ostreatus PoAbf recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris rPoAbf and its evolved variant rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F were tested for their effectiveness to enhance the enzymatic saccharification of three lignocellulosic biomasses, namely Arundo donax, corn cobs and brewer's spent grains (BSG), after chemical or chemical-physical pretreatment. All the raw materials were subjected to an alkaline pretreatment by soaking in aqueous ammonia solution whilst the biomass from A. donax was also pretreated by steam explosion. The capability of the wild-type and mutant rPoAbf to increase the fermentable sugars recovery was assessed by using these enzymes in combination with different (hemi)cellulolytic activities. These enzymatic mixtures were either entirely of commercial origin or contained the cellulase from Streptomyces sp. G12 CelStrep recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli in substitution to the commercial counterparts. The addition of the arabinofuranosidases from P. ostreatus improved the hydrolytic efficiency of the commercial enzymatic cocktails on all the pretreated biomasses. The best results were obtained using the rPoAbf evolved variant and are represented by increases of the xylose recovery up to 56.4%. These data clearly highlight the important role of the accessory hemicellulolytic activities to optimize the xylan bioconversion yields. PMID:25046861

  8. Production of Lactic Acid by a Local Isolate of Lactobacillus plantarum Using Cheap Starchy Material Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Al-asady, Amal Kadhim G.

    2012-01-01

    Some cheap starchy materials like sorghum grains and wheat bran were degraded by crude glucoamylase of a local isolate of Mucor sp., then Lactic Acid (LA) was produced by a local isolate of L. plantarum using sorghum flour hydrolysate, sorghum starch hydrolysate, soluble starch hydrolysate, wheat bran hydrolysate and date syrup with 10% reducing sugars. The yield of LA increased to 37.2 g/100 reducing sugars by using sorghum flour hydrolysate as a basal medium supplemented with (0.6+0.6)% yea...

  9. Spent fuel transportation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, problems of transportation of nuclear spent fuel to reprocessing plants are discussed. The solutions proposed are directed toward the achievement of the transportation as economic and safe as possible. The increase of the nuclear power plants number in the USSR and the great distances between these plants and the reprocessing plants involve an intensification of the spent fuel transportation. Higher burnup and holdup time reduction cause the necessity of more bulky casks. In this connection, the economic problems become still more important. One of the ways of the problem solution is the development of rational and cheap cask designs. Also, the enforcement in the world of the environmental and personnel health protection requires to increase the transportation reliability and safety. The paper summarizes safe transportation rules with clarifying the following questions: the increase of the transport unit quantity of the spent fuel; rational shipment organization that minimizes vehicle turnover cycle duration; development of the reliable calculation methods to determine strength, thermal conditions and nuclear safety of transport packaging as applied to the vehicles of high capacity; maximum unification of vehicles, calculation methods and documents; and cask testing on models and in pilot scale on specific test rigs to assure that they meet the international safe fuel shipment rules. Besides, some considerations on the choice and use of structural materials for casks are given, and problems of manufacturing such casks from uranium and lead are considered, as well as problems of the development of fireproof shells, control instrumentation, vehicles decontamination, etc. All the problems are considered from the point of view of normal and accidental shipment conditions. Conclusions are presented

  10. Uses of mechanically separated chicken meat for production from protein hydrolysates different proteolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Silvia Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of hydrolyzed protein, derived from animal and vegetable sources, in specific formulations, is an area of growing interest. The aim of this study was to develop different powder hydrolysates with high protein value, from the enzymatic hydrolysis of mechanically deboned meat (MDM, a byproduct of the poultry industry, which can be a low-cost source for the production of these hydrolysates. The raw material used was frozen poultry mechanically deboned meat (MDM purchased from an abattoir in southern Brazil, before use it was thawed under refrigeration and homogenized in a processor by 2 minutes. Three commercial enzymes were used, Papain, Protamex® and Flavourzyme®. The hydrolysis occurred in a thermostatized bath with temperature, time and pH controlled. Proximal composition of the raw material and lyophilized hydrolysates, control analysis such as hydrolysis degree of hydrolysis, protein, total solids, ash and amino acid characterization of the hydrolysates were performed. The results were evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey’s averages test. The hydrolyzed obtained from the papain enzyme showed the best behavior, followed by Protamex and Flavourzyme. The hydrolysates from papain enzyme had higher protein content, soluble solids and lower ash content compared to other hydrolysates. The amino acid composition showed that the hydrolyzate from papain has a closer composition to what is recommended by the control organs. It was concluded that the protein hydrolysates obtained from mechanically deboned chicken had high protein content characterizing them as a promising raw material in the formulation of special diets.

  11. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of lecithin free egg yolk protein preparation hydrolysates obtained with digestive enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Zambrowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Several biological activities have now been associated with egg protein- derived peptides, including antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anticancer and antioxidantactivities, highlighting the importance of these biopeptides in human health, and disease prevention and treatment. Special attention has been given to peptides with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities as a new source of natural preservatives in food industry. In this study, the antioxidant properties of the egg-yolk protein by-product (YP hydrolysates were evaluated based on their radical scavenging capacity (DPPH, Fe2+chelating effect and ferric reducing power (FRAP. Furthermore, antimicrobial properties of obtained hydrolysates against Bacillus species were studied. The degrees (DHs of hydrolysis for 4h hydrolysates were: 19.1%, 13.5% and 13.0%, for pepsin, chymotrypsin and trypsin, respectively. Pepsin was the most effective in producing the free amino groups (1410.3 ?molGly/g. The RP-HPLC profiles of the protein hydrolysates showed differences in the hydrophobicity of the generated peptides.Trypsin hydrolysate obtained after 4h reaction demonstrated the strongest DPPH free radical scavenging activity (0.85 µmol Troloxeq/mg. Trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysates obtained after 4h reaction exhibited 4 times higher ferric reducing capacity than those treated bypepsin. The hydrolysis products obtained from YP exhibited significant chelating activity. The 4h trypsin hydrolysate exhibited weak antimicrobial activity against B. subtilis B3; B. cereus B512; B. cereus B 3p and B. laterosporum B6.

  12. Advancing lignocellulose bioconversion through direct assessment of enzyme action on insoluble substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goacher, Robyn E.; Selig, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial utilization of lignocellulose from plant cell walls is integral to carbon cycling on Earth. Correspondingly, secreted enzymes that initiate lignocellulose depolymerization serve a crucial step in the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. Genome and metagenome sequencing efforts that span the past decade reveal the diversity of enzymes that have evolved to transform lignocellulose from wood, herbaceous plants and grasses. Nevertheless, there are relatively few examples where ‘omic’ technologies have identified novel enzyme activities or combinations thereof that dramatically improve the economics of lignocellulose bioprocessing and utilization. A likely factor contributing to the discrepancy between sequence-based enzyme discovery and enzyme application is the common practice to screen enzyme candidates based on activity measurements using soluble model compounds. In this context, the development and application of imaging, physicochemical, and spectromicroscopic techniquesthat allow direct assessment of enzyme action on relevant lignocellulosic substrates is reviewed.

  13. Thermophysical Properties of Lignocellulose: A Cell-scale Study down to 41K

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Zhe; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xinwei

    2014-01-01

    Thermal energy transport is of great importance in lignocellulose pyrolysis for bio-fuels. The thermophysical properties of lignocellulose significantly affect the overall properties of bio-composites and the related thermal transport. In this work, cell-scale lignocellulose (mono-layer plant cells) is prepared to characterize their thermal properties from room temperature down to 41 K. The thermal conductivities of cell-scale lignocellulose along different directions show a little anisotropy due to the cell structure anisotropy. It is found that with temperature going down, the volumetric specific heat of the lignocellulose shows a slower decreasing trend against temperature than that of microcrystalline cellulose, and its value is always higher than that of microcrystalline cellulose. The thermal conductivity of lignocellulose decreases with temperature from 243 K to 317 K due to increasing phonon-phonon scatterings. From 41 K to 243 K, the thermal conductivity rises with temperature and its change mainly d...

  14. Thermophysical properties of lignocellulose: a cell-scale study down to 41 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhe; Xu, Zaoli; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xinwei

    2014-01-01

    Thermal energy transport is of great importance in lignocellulose pyrolysis for biofuels. The thermophysical properties of lignocellulose significantly affect the overall properties of bio-composites and the related thermal transport. In this work, cell-scale lignocellulose (mono-layer plant cells) is prepared to characterize their thermal properties from room temperature down to ? 40 K. The thermal conductivities of cell-scale lignocellulose along different directions show a little anisotropy due to the cell structure anisotropy. It is found that with temperature going down, the volumetric specific heat of the lignocellulose shows a slower decreasing trend against temperature than microcrystalline cellulose, and its value is always higher than that of microcrystalline cellulose. The thermal conductivity of lignocellulose decreases with temperature from 243 K to 317 K due to increasing phonon-phonon scatterings. From 41 K to 243 K, the thermal conductivity rises with temperature and its change mainly depends on the heat capacity's change. PMID:25532131

  15. Spent fuel storage at KURRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI) has more than 200 MTR-type spent fuel elements stored in water pools. The longest pool residence time is 21 years at present. The integrity of spent fuel elements have been confirmed by a visual inspection and a sipping test. The spent fuel elements should be reprocessed in accordance with KURRI's policy. KURRI is now negotiating with a reprocessing plant to make a contract, as considering the consequences in U.S. (author)

  16. VALORIZATION AND BIODECOLORIZATION OF DYE ADSORBED ON LIGNOCELLULOSICS USING WHITE ROT FUNGI

    OpenAIRE

    Nesrin Ozmen,; Ozfer Yesilada

    2012-01-01

    Biosorption of dyes by lignocelluloses may be an effective method for removing dyes from textile effluents. However, the resulting dye-adsorbed lignocellulosic materials may constitute another pollution problem. An integrated method can solve this problem. Here, various lignocelluloses were tested for their Astrazon Black and Astrazon Blue dyes removal activities. The dye adsorbed after 30 min contact time was 90% (45 mg/L), 70% (35 mg/L), and 98% (49 mg/L) for wheat bran, pine cone, and cott...

  17. Exploiting the inter-strain divergence of Fusarium oxysporum for microbial bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Shahin S.; Khan, Mojibur; Fagan, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol still poses challenges in terms of substrate catabolism. A targeted evolution-based study was undertaken to determine if inter-strain microbial variability could be exploited for bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol. The microorganism studied was Fusarium oxysporum because of its capacity to both saccharify and ferment lignocellulose. Strains of F. oxysporum were isolated and assessed for their genetic variability. Using optimis...

  18. Anaerobic Biodegradation of the Lignin and Polysaccharide Components of Lignocellulose and Synthetic Lignin by Sediment Microflora †

    OpenAIRE

    Benner, Ronald; Maccubbin, A. E.; Hodson, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    Specifically radiolabeled [14C-lignin]lignocelluloses and [14C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses were prepared from a variety of marine and freshwater wetland plants including a grass, a sedge, a rush, and a hardwood. These [14C]lignocellulose preparations and synthetic [14C]lignin were incubated anaerobically with anoxic sediments collected from a salt marsh, a freshwater marsh, and a mangrove swamp. During long-term incubations lasting up to 300 days, the lignin and polysaccharide components o...

  19. Flow-through biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Christopher D.; Liu, Chaogang; Bardsley, John

    2014-07-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for biologically converting carbohydrates from lignocellulosic biomass comprising the steps of: suspending lignocellulosic biomass in a flow-through reactor, passing a reaction solution into the reactor, wherein the solution is absorbed into the biomass substrate and at least a portion of the solution migrates through said biomass substrate to a liquid reservoir, recirculating the reaction solution in the liquid reservoir at least once to be absorbed into and migrate through the biomass substrate again. The biological converting of the may involve hydrolyzing cellulose, hemicellulose, or a combination thereof to form oligosaccharides, monomelic sugars, or a combination thereof; fermenting oligosaccharides, monomelic sugars, or a combination thereof to produce ethanol, or a combination thereof. The process can further comprise removing the reaction solution and processing the solution to separate the ethanol produced from non-fermented solids.

  20. Canonical correlations between chemical and energetic characteristics of lignocellulosic wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Paula Protásio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Canonical correlation analysis is a statistical multivariate procedure that allows analyzing linear correlation that may exist between two groups or sets of variables (X and Y. This paper aimed to provide canonical correlation analysis between a group comprised of lignin and total extractives contents and higher heating value (HHV with a group of elemental components (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur for lignocellulosic wastes. The following wastes were used: eucalyptus shavings; pine shavings; red cedar shavings; sugar cane bagasse; residual bamboo cellulose pulp; coffee husk and parchment; maize harvesting wastes; and rice husk. Only the first canonical function was significant, but it presented a low canonical R². High carbon, hydrogen and sulfur contents and low nitrogen contents seem to be related to high total extractives contents of the lignocellulosic wastes. The preliminary results found in this paper indicate that the canonical correlations were not efficient to explain the correlations between the chemical elemental components and lignin contents and higher heating values.

  1. Spent fuel management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numbers of current nuclear electric generation together with spent fuel arising are updated and their future predictions are made. Spent fuel discharged from LWRs is now stored at reactor sites, waiting for being reprocessed in the future. Meanwhile, it is pointed out that the interim spent fuel storage facility should be constructed and commissioned by around 2010, to accommodate superfluous spent fuel from nuclear power stations. Recovered plutonium is currently scheduled to be used in LWRs as MOX fuel and ultimately to be burned in FBRs in accordance with the Long-Term Programme for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy. (author)

  2. System and method for conditioning a hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, Darrell; Arnold, Richard; St. Pierre, James; Pendse, Hemant P.; Ceckler, William H.

    2015-06-30

    A system and method for hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate conditioning includes a first evaporator receives a hardwood mix extract and outputting a quantity of vapor and extract. A hydrolysis unit receives the extract, hydrolyzes and outputs to a lignin separation device, which separates and recovers a quantity of lignin. A neutralization device receives extract from the lignin separation device and a neutralizing agent, producing a mixture of solid precipitate and a fifth extract. The solid precipitate is removed from the fifth extract. A second evaporator removes a quantity of acid from the fifth extract in a vapor form. This vapor may be recycled to improve total acid recovery or discarded. A desalination device receives the diluted extract, separates out some of the acid and salt and outputs a desalinated solution.

  3. System and method for conditioning a hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Darrell M; Arnold, Richard; St. Pierre, James; Pendse, Hemant P; Ceckler, William H

    2013-12-17

    A system and method for hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate conditioning includes a first evaporator receives a hardwood mix extract and outputting a quantity of vapor and extract. A hydrolysis unit receives the extract, hyrolyzes and outputs to a lignin separation device, which separates and recovers a quantity of lignin. A neutralization device receives extract from the lignin separation device and a neutralizing agent, producing a mixture of solid precipitate and a fifth extract. The solid precipitate is removed from the fifth extract. A second evaporator removes a quantity of acid from the fifth extract in a vapor form. This vapor may be recycled to improve total acid recovery or discarded. A desalination device receives the diluted extract, separates out some of the acid and salt and outputs a desalinated solution.

  4. Identification of bitter peptides in whey protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Deshou; Peterson, Devin G

    2014-06-25

    Bitterness of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) can negatively affect product quality and limit utilization in food and pharmaceutical applications. Four main bitter peptides were identified in a commercial WPH by means of sensory-guided fractionation techniques that included ultrafiltration and offline two-dimensional reverse phase chromatography. LC-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed the amino acid sequences of the bitter peptides were YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN that originated from ?-lactalbumin, ?-lactoglobulin, serum albumin, and ?-casein, respectively. Quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis reported the concentrations of YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN to be 0.66, 0.58, 1.33, and 2.64 g/kg powder, respectively. Taste recombination analysis of an aqueous model consisting of all four peptides was reported to explain 88% of the bitterness intensity of the 10% WPH solution. PMID:23998904

  5. Hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes for improved conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to monosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermanson Spencer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High enzyme loading is a major economic bottleneck for the commercial processing of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to produce fermentable sugars. Optimizing the enzyme cocktail for specific types of pretreated biomass allows for a significant reduction in enzyme loading without sacrificing hydrolysis yield. This is especially important for alkaline pretreatments such as Ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX pretreated corn stover. Hence, a diverse set of hemicellulases supplemented along with cellulases is necessary for high recovery of monosaccharides. Results The core fungal cellulases in the optimal cocktail include cellobiohydrolase I [CBH I; glycoside hydrolase (GH family 7A], cellobiohydrolase II (CBH II; GH family 6A, endoglucanase I (EG I; GH family 7B and ?-glucosidase (?G; GH family 3. Hemicellulases tested along with the core cellulases include xylanases (LX1, GH family 10; LX2, GH family 10; LX3, GH family 10; LX4, GH family 11; LX5, GH family 10; LX6, GH family 10, ?-xylosidase (L?X; GH family 52, ?-arabinofuranosidase (LArb, GH family 51 and ?-glucuronidase (L?Gl, GH family 67 that were cloned, expressed and/or purified from different bacterial sources. Different combinations of these enzymes were tested using a high-throughput microplate based 24 h hydrolysis assay. Both family 10 (LX3 and family 11 (LX4 xylanases were found to most efficiently hydrolyze AFEX pretreated corn stover in a synergistic manner. The optimal mass ratio of xylanases (LX3 and LX4 to cellulases (CBH I, CBH II and EG I is 25:75. L?X (0.6 mg/g glucan is crucial to obtaining monomeric xylose (54% xylose yield, while LArb (0.6 mg/g glucan and L?Gl (0.8 mg/g glucan can both further increase xylose yield by an additional 20%. Compared with Accellerase 1000, a purified cocktail of cellulases supplemented with accessory hemicellulases will not only increase both glucose and xylose yields but will also decrease the total enzyme loading needed for equivalent yields. Conclusions A diverse set of accessory hemicellulases was found necessary to enhance the synergistic action of cellulases hydrolysing AFEX pretreated corn stover. High glucose (around 80% and xylose (around 70% yields were achieved with a moderate enzyme loading (~20 mg protein/g glucan using an in-house developed cocktail compared to commercial enzymes.

  6. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT APPROACHES FOR THE DRYING OF LIGNOCELLULOSE RESIDUES

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Tenorio,; Roger Moya

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate three methodological approaches for the drying (air drying, solar drying, and hot-air drying) of three lignocelluloses residues in Costa Rica, namely the empty fruit bunches of oil palm (EFB), pineapple plant leaves (PL) with different treatments on this leaf, and sawdust from Gmelina arborea (GAD). The initial moisture content (MCi), the drying times, and the variation of moisture content (MC) with time were determined. A mathematical model of...

  7. Lab-scale Technology for Biogas Production from Lignocellulose Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Lukáš Krátký; Tomáš Jirout; Ji?í Nalezenec

    2012-01-01

    Currently-operating biogas plants are based on the treatment of lignocellulose biomass, which is included in materials such as agriculture and forestry wastes, municipal solid wastes, waste paper, wood and herbaceous energy crops. Lab-scale biogas technology was specially developed for evaluating the anaerobic biodegrability and the specific methane yields of solid organic substrates. This technology falls into two main categories – pretreatment equipments, and fermentation equipments. Pret...

  8. Fungal treated lignocellulosic biomass as ruminant feed ingredient: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kuijk, S J A; Sonnenberg, A S M; Baars, J J P; Hendriks, W H; Cone, J W

    2015-01-01

    In ruminant nutrition, there is an increasing interest for ingredients that do not compete with human nutrition. Ruminants are specialists in digesting carbohydrates in plant cell walls; therefore lignocellulosic biomass has potential in ruminant nutrition. The presence of lignin in biomass, however, limits the effective utilization of cellulose and hemicellulose. Currently, most often chemical and/or physical treatments are used to degrade lignin. White rot fungi are selective lignin degraders and can be a potential alternative to current methods which involve potentially toxic chemicals and expensive equipment. This review provides an overview of research conducted to date on fungal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for ruminant feeds. White rot fungi colonize lignocellulosic biomass, and during colonization produce enzymes, radicals and other small compounds to breakdown lignin. The mechanisms on how these fungi degrade lignin are not fully understood, but fungal strain, the origin of lignocellulose and culture conditions have a major effect on the process. Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Pleurotus eryngii are the most effective fungi to improve the nutritional value of biomass for ruminant nutrition. However, conclusions on the effectiveness of fungal delignification are difficult to draw due to a lack of standardized culture conditions and information on fungal strains used. Methods of analysis between studies are not uniform for both chemical analysis and in vitro degradation measurements. In vivo studies are limited in number and mostly describing digestibility after mushroom production, when the fungus has degraded cellulose to derive energy for fruit body development. Optimization of fungal pretreatment is required to shorten the process of delignification and make it more selective for lignin. In this respect, future research should focus on optimization of culture conditions and gene expression to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved and allow the development of superior fungal strains to degrade lignin in biomass. PMID:25447421

  9. Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production Potential and Regional Transportation Fuel Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Daianova, Lilia

    2011-01-01

    Road traffic dominates in domestic Swedish transportation and is highly dependent on fossil fuels, petrol and diesel. Currently, the use of renewable fuels in transportation accounts for less than 6% of the total energy use in transport. The demand for bioethanol to fuel transportation is growing and cannot be met through current domestic production alone. Lignocellulosic ethanol derived from agricultural crop residues may be a feasible alternative source of ethanol for securing a consistent ...

  10. Cellulosic hydrolysate toxicity and tolerance mechanisms in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Ryan T

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The sustainable production of biofuels will require the efficient utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. A key barrier involves the creation of growth-inhibitory compounds by chemical pretreatment steps, which ultimately reduce the efficiency of fermentative microbial biocatalysts. The primary toxins include organic acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds. Weak acids enter the cell and dissociate, resulting in a drop in intracellular pH as well as various anion-specific effects on metabolism. Furan derivatives, dehydration products of hexose and pentose sugars, have been shown to hinder fermentative enzyme function. Phenolic compounds, formed from lignin, can disrupt membranes and are hypothesized to interfere with the function of intracellular hydrophobic targets. This review covers mechanisms of toxicity and tolerance for these compounds with a specific focus on the important industrial organism Escherichia coli. Recent efforts to engineer E. coli for improved tolerance to these toxins are also discussed.

  11. Study of Lignocellulose/Epoxy Composites for Carbon-neutral Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Gen; Hayami, Tokusuke; Murayama, Kiyoko; Sato, Junichi; Kinoshita, Susumu; Todo, Yoko; Amano, Yoshihiko

    Carbon-neutral materials, which do not affect the density of CO2 in the atmosphere even if they burn, have attracted much attention form the viewpoint of environmental friendliness. In this study, lignocellulose/epoxy composites were newly prepared as carbon-neutral insulation materials, and their properties were evaluated. Hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose, which is composed of lignin and crystalline cellulose, was prepared by a treatment of corncob under high-pressure hot water at 190°C, 1.8 MPa for 10min. The 13C-NMR spectra showed that the amounts of non-crystalline cellulose in the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose were less than those of non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. Moreover, hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose was obtained by a reaction of maleic anhydride and glycidyl ether with the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose had lower water absorption and viscosity than those of the epoxy resin containing the non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose with SiO2 fillers showed an insulation breakdown strength as same as conventional material (an epoxy resin containing SiO2 fillers). In addition, mechanical and thermal properties of the epoxy-based composite were also comparable with a conventional material. Therefore, the epoxy-based composite seems to be a candidate as practical carbon neutral insulation materials.

  12. Techno-economic analysis of lignocellulosic ethanol: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnansounou, Edgard; Dauriat, Arnaud

    2010-07-01

    Lignocellulosic ethanol is expected to be commercialised during the next decade as renewable energy for transport. Competiveness with first generation bioethanol and with gasoline is commonly considered in techno-economic analyses for commercial stage. Several existing reviews conclude about the high spread of current and projected production costs of lignocellulosic ethanol due to the significant differences in assumptions concerning the following factors: composition and cost of feedstock, process design, conversion efficiency, valorisation of co-products, and energy conservation. Focusing on the studies in the United States of America and in Europe, the present review investigates the different natures of the techno-economic evaluations during the development process of the supply chain i.e., standard costing with respect to Value Engineering, and Target Costing based on the projected market price. The paper highlights the significant contribution of feedstock to the lignocellulosic ethanol production cost and the need to consider competition between different uses for resources. It is recommended the use of a value-based approach that considers sustainability characteristics and potential competition for resources complementarily to Target Costing and Value Engineering. PMID:20206505

  13. Spent fuel management overview: a global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper defines the main spent fuel management strategies and options, highlights the challenges for spent fuel storage and gives an overview of the regional balances of spent fuel storage capacity and spent fuel arising. The relevant IAEA activities in the area of spent fuel management are summarised. (author)

  14. Spent fuel management in Ukraine and spent fuel data tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukraine has eleven WWER-1000 and two WWER-440 operating reactors at four nuclear plants. These reactors generated almost 45% of Ukraine's electricity. The last of the three RBMK-1000 reactors of Chornobyl NPP was shut down on December 15, 2000. Two WWER-1000 units (one at Khmelnytskyy NPP and another at Rivne NPP) are under construction. According to the Spent Fuel Management Program of Ukraine, which was approved in 2000, the state policy in the spent fuel management field is 'wait and see'. In order to implement this state policy the following problems should be solved: Construction of interim spent fuel storage facilities; Provision of spent fuel transportation from the reactor site to the interim storage facility; Provision of scientific and technical support of the spent fuel management. (author)

  15. Spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A space is formed underground by partitioning walls made of radiation shielding material, in which only a storage cell is contained. The storage cell comprises metal blocks made of a heat conductive material such as stainless steels. A great number of holes each having a predetermined diameter are vertically arranged to the metal block, and storage pits are constituted by the holes. Spent nuclear fuels are contained in a first columnar vessel and the first columnar vessel is further contained in a large second columnar vessel. Both of the first columnar vessel and the second columnar vessel are made of a durable metal material such as stainless steels. The second columnar vessel is inserted to the storage pit of the storage cell. With such a constitution, heat emitted from the second columnar vessel is transferred to the metal block by radiation and dissipated from the metal block. Accordingly, a heat dissipation efficiency can be increased. (I.N.)

  16. Spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To cool irradiated fuels at an early stage and maintain the subcriticality even if water in the pit is removed. Constitution: The storage facility of the invention comprises a space between rack cells for irradiated fuel racks, concrete walls formed by casting and solidifying fresh concrete containing materials of a large neutron absorbing performance to the space between rack cells and pit walls, heat exchangers, conduits for guiding cooling water to below the rack cells, recycling pumps for pumping up the cooling water and plugs for sealing the rack cells. Since those rack cells containing already cooled spent fuels and empty rack cells are sealed with the plugs, cooling water uprises only in the not-cooled fuel racks to perform early cooling. Further, if water is eliminated in the pits, there is no risk that the fuel assemblies reach to the criticality due the presence of concrete walls. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Preparation and Characteristic of Iron-Binding Peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang-yan Ren; Guang-rong Huang; Jia-xin Jiang; Wen-wei Chen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was focused on preparation of iron-binding peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards (SPD) hydrolysate using response surface methodology (RSM) and characteristic of the iron-peptides complex. Six kinds of protease (tyrpsin, pepsin, protmex, flavourzyme, neutrase and alcalase) were used to hydrolysis the SPD protein and the trypsin hydrolysate showed the highest iron-binding activity. The factorial design experiments showed that pH, trypsin concentration and hydrolysis ti...

  18. Antioxidant Effect and Water-Holding Capacity of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) Seed Protein Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Fatoumata Tounkara; Bernard Sodio; Tidjani Amza; Guo-Wei Le; Yong-Hui Shi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in-vitro pepsin and pancreatin digestion of proteins extracted from Roselle seed on the production of bioactive peptides. Defatted Roselle seed flour was used to extract different protein fractions namely globulin, albumin and glutelin. The proteins were digested using pepsin (1 h) followed by pancreatin (1 h) in order to produce hydrolysates with good antioxidant activity. The prepared hydrolysates were as effective as antioxidants in mo...

  19. WPC Hydrolysates Obtained by the Action of a Pancreatin: Preparation, Analysis and Phenylalanine Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa L. Amorin; Mauro R. Silva; Silva, Viviane D. M.; Maite C. Silva; Marialice P.C. Silvestre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to use a pancreatin to obtain Whey Protein Concentrate (WPC) hydrolysates with high degree of hydrolysis, appropriate peptide profiles from the nutritional point of view as well as with reduced Phenylalanine (Phe) content. Six hydrolysates were prepared by varying the enzyme: Substrate ratio and the substrate concentration. The degree of hydrolysis was calculated by the ratio between a-amino and total nitrogen. The analysis of peptide profile involved the fractionatio...

  20. Systematic Investigation of Antioxidant Activity of Egg White Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Pepsin

    OpenAIRE

    Shuguo Sun; Meihu Ma; Qinlu Lin; Tao Yang; Huihui Niu

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidative activity of protein hydrolysates from egg white hydrolyzed by Pepsin with different Degrees of Hydrolysis (DHs) was investigated. As the DH increased from 6.47 to 18.22%, the antioxidative activity of Egg White Protein Hydrolysates (EWPHs) first increased and then decreased, except for the reducing power of EWPHs. The EWPHs with DH 16.93% showed higher DPPH radical scavenging activity (96.07±3.84%), hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (36.82±1.46%), superoxide anion scavengin...

  1. Industrial scale chromatographic separation of valuable compounds from biomass hydrolysates and side streams

    OpenAIRE

    Saari, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrates are composed of a number of various monosaccharides, glucose being the most abundant. Some of the monosaccharides are valuable compounds used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. They can be separated from biomass hydrolysates e.g. by chromatographic methods. In this thesis, chromatographic separation of valuable compounds using ion exchange resins was studied on an industrial scale. Of special interest were rare monosaccharides in biomass hydrolysates. A novel chroma...

  2. Improved Bioethanol Production Using Activated Carbon-treated Acid Hydrolysate from Corn Hull in Pachysolen tannophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Hyeon-beom; Kim, Seungseop; Lee, Hyeon-yong; Jung, Kyung-hwan

    2009-01-01

    To optimally convert corn hull, a byproduct from corn processing, into bioethanol using Pachysolen tannophlius, we investigated the optimal conditions for hydrolysis and removal of toxic substances in the hydrolysate via activated carbon treatment as well as the effects of this detoxification process on the kinetic parameters of bioethanol production. Maximum monosaccharide concentrations were obtained in hydrolysates in which 20 g of corn hull was hydrolyzed in 4% (v/v) H2SO4. Activated carb...

  3. Amino Acid Composition, Molecular Weight Distribution and Antioxidant Stability of Shrimp Processing Byproduct Hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.X. Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein hydrolysate have many practical applications in a various of industries due to the bioactive peptides related to their amino acid composition, sequence and molecular weight. The amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and antioxidant stability of alcalase hydrolysate were investigated in this study. The hydrolysate was separated into five fractions by ultra filtration system with different molecular weight cutoff with 10, 5, 3 and 1 kDa, respectively. The protein content, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and molecular weight of each fraction were determined. In addition, the antioxidant stability of the hydrolysate under several operating conditions was studied. The results showed that the hydrolysate was composed with high amounts of hydrophobic amino acids (40.4% which might contribute to the high antioxidant activity. The fraction with molecular weight lower than 1 kDa exhibited the highest antioxidative activity among the five fractions. The antioxidant stability experiments showed that the hydrolysate was stable when it was heated up to 100C and the relative antioxidative activity could be maintained nearly 70% at very low pH of 2.0. Glucose and sucrose had negative effects on the antioxidative activity, in which the relative activity of about 80% was retained. Sodium chloride and sodium benzoate had little or no effects on the antioxidative activity of the hydrolysate. The effects of Zn2+ and Cu2+ on the antioxidative activity were significant and dependent on metal concentration. The shrimp processing byproduct hydrolysate may be a potential natural food antioxidant in the future.

  4. Combination of yeast hydrolysates to improve CHO cell growth and IgG production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Mathilde; Chevalot, Isabelle; Olmos, Eric; Blanchard, Fabrice; Kapel, Romain; Oriol, Eric; Marc, Ivan; Marc, Annie

    2013-08-01

    Many studies underlined the great benefits of hydrolysates used as additives in animal free media on cell culture performances. However, to precisely define hydrolysate supplementation strategies, a deeper understanding of their effect on cell growth and protein production is required. In the present study, the effect of addition of one yeast extract (YE) and two yeast peptones (named YP.A and YP.B) in a chemically defined medium was first assessed on cell culture performances. Interestingly, specific effects were found depending on the degree of degradation of yeast hydrolysates. The YE at 1 g L(-1) increased the maximal cell density by 70 %, while a mixture of YE (1 g L(-1)) and YP.A (4 g L(-1)) increased IgG production by 180 %. These conditions were then evaluated on the CHO cell kinetics all over cultures. Hydrolysates extended the cell growth phase in Erlenmeyer flask and increased the maximal growth rate in bioreactor up to 20 %. Cell growth stimulation induced by hydrolysates addition was linked with energetic metabolism improvement suggesting that they promote oxidative pathway. Furthermore, hydrolysates provided an additional source of substrate that supported cell growth despite glutamine limitation. PMID:23239488

  5. Antioxidant Activities of Protein Hydrolysates from Little Hairtail (Trichiurus haumela of East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Jin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated antioxidant properties of the little hairtail (Trichiurus haumela protein hydrolysates obtained by commercial protease of Alcalase through using various antioxidant assays, including reducing power and free radical scavenging activities. The molecular mass distribution of hydrolysates was also examined to evaluate their relationship with antioxidant activity. The results showed that little hairtail protein hydrolysates had good ability to donate electron or hydrogen and scavenge DPPH, hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. The highest value of reducing power and radical scavenging activities was 1.89, 46.15% (DPPH radical, 75.65% (hydroxyl radical and 82.5% (superoxide anion radical, respectively. The reducing power and free radical scavenging activities of little hairtail protein hydrolysates were related to hydrolysis time to some extent. The molecular mass distribution of hydrolysates showed that their molecular mass was between 337 and 6007Da, which indicated that little hairtail protein hydrolysates were mainly composed of low molecular peptides with antioxidant activity. Conclusively, the little hairtail protein was a good natural source for producing antioxidants, which could be used as antioxidant ingredient with potential applications in various food products.

  6. Antioxidative and functional properties of protein hydrolysate from defatted skipjack (Katsuwonous pelamis) roe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarasirisawat, Rossawan; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Wu, Jianping

    2012-12-15

    Antioxidative and functional properties of protein hydrolysate from defatted skipjack (Katsuwonous pelamis) roe, hydrolysed by Alcalase 2.4 L (RPH) with different degrees of hydrolysis (DH) at various concentrations were examined. As DH increased, the reduction of DPPH, ABTS radicals scavenging activities and reducing power were noticeable (p<0.05). The increases in metal chelating activity and superoxide scavenging activity were attained with increasing DH (p<0.05). However, chelating activity gradually decreased at DH above 30%. All activities except superoxide anion radical scavenging activity increased as the concentration of hydrolysate increased (p<0.05). Hydrolysis using Alcalase could increase protein solubility to above 80% over a wide pH range (2-10). The highest emulsion ability index (EAI) and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were observed at low DH (5%) (p<0.05). Concentrations of hydrolysates determined interfacial properties differently, depending on DH. The molecular weight distribution of RPH with 5%DH (RPH5) was determined using Sephadex G-75 column. Two major peaks with the molecular weight of 57.8 and 5.5kDa were obtained. Fraction with MW of 5.5 had the strongest metal chelating activity and ABTS radical scavenging activity. The results reveal that protein hydrolysates from defatted skipjack roe could be used as food additives possessing both antioxidant activity and functional properties. PMID:22980906

  7. Advanced spent fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel from power reactors is currently stored either in at-reactor spent fuel storage pools or in independent spent fuel storage installations using wet or dry storage technology. Most of the spent fuel generated up to now is stored in spent fuel pools. The assumption that wet storage is expensive due to the need of active cooling systems and generation of waste had caused vendors to look favorable at dry storage systems. One of the latest achievements in wet storage technology is used in FRAMATOME ANP's wet storage facility as currently designed for the new spent fuel storage building at Goesgen Nuclear Power Station Switzerland. It provides a passive cooling system which reliably removes the heat generated by the spent fuel by natural circulation through air cooled heat exchanger. Due to the passive nature of the operating system, the number of active components which require maintenance is substantially reduced. The frequency of maintenance activities can be determined under consideration of actual usage due to advanced acquisition methodology of operational data. This usually leads to a considerable reduction of human intervention and the time needed to act in radiation areas reducing considerably waste generation and dose burden to personnel. Due to the fact that maintenance and repair concepts are available, it can be predicted, if correctly applied, such pools to be operable for extended periods of time. (author)

  8. Spent fuel treatment in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, 52 nuclear power reactors are operating with a total power generation capacity of 45 GWe. The cumulative amount of spent fuel arising, as of March 1998, is about 14,700 W. Spent fuel is reprocessed and recovered nuclear materials are to be recycled in LWRs and FBRs. Pu utilization in LWRs will commence in 1999. In January 1997, short-term policy measures were announced by the Atomic Energy Commission, which addressed promotion of the reprocessing programme in Rokkasho, plutonium utilization in LWRs, spent fuel management, back-end measures and FBR development. With regard to the spent fuel management, the policy measures included expansion of spent fuel storage capacity at reactor sites and a study on spent fuel storage away-from-reactor sites, considering the increasing amount of spent fuel arising. Valuable experience was been accumulated at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), from the start of hot operation in 1977 up to now. The role of the TRP will be changed from an operation-oriented to a more R and D oriented facility, when PNC is reorganized into the new organization JNC. The Rokkasho reprocessing plant is under construction and is expected to commence operation in 2003. R and D of future recycling technologies is also continued for the establishment of a nuclear fuel cycle based on FBRs and LWRs. (author)

  9. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  10. Chemical and ultrastructural studies of lignocellulose biodegradation during Agaricus bisporus cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Hexiang; Liu, Qinghong; Ng, TziBun

    2014-01-01

    During Agaricus bisporus cultivation, lignocellulose degradation is the result of the activity of both the mushroom and microbial communities developed during the composting. To investigate the lignocellulose degradation in detail from the beginning to the end of the process, the functional groups of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin have been studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the morphological changes of lignocelluloses were elucidated with scanning electron microscopy. The aperture of lignin and cellulose increased to enable the mycelia of A. bisporus to penetrate into the medium and to degrade lignocelluloses in a more direct way. The chemical structure changes implied a preferential use of lignin that could make for better use of cellulose to boost growth of A. bisporus. Changes in chemical structure together with ultrastructural changes induced by the microbial flora during cultivation substrate production by the composting substrate are important in promoting the utilization of lignocelluloses by A. bisporus. PMID:24033911

  11. Assessment of spent fuel cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F. [and others

    1997-02-01

    The paper presents the methodology, the findings, and the conclusions of a study that was done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) on loss of spent fuel pool cooling. The study involved an examination of spent fuel pool designs, operating experience, operating practices, and procedures. AEOD`s work was augmented in the area of statistics and probabilistic risk assessment by experts from the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. Operating experience was integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment to gain insight on the risks from spent fuel pools.

  12. Assessment of spent fuel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the methodology, the findings, and the conclusions of a study that was done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) on loss of spent fuel pool cooling. The study involved an examination of spent fuel pool designs, operating experience, operating practices, and procedures. AEOD's work was augmented in the area of statistics and probabilistic risk assessment by experts from the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. Operating experience was integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment to gain insight on the risks from spent fuel pools

  13. Antioxidant and Functional Properties of Collagen Hydrolysates from Spanish Mackerel Skin as Influenced by Average Molecular Weight

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Feng Chi; Zi-Hao Cao; Bin Wang,; Fa-Yuan Hu; Zhong-Rui Li; Bin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, the relationships between functional properties and average molecular weight (AMW) of collagen hydrolysates from Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorous niphonius) skin were researched. Seven hydrolysate fractions (5.04 ? AMW ? 47.82 kDa) from collagen of Spanish mackerel skin were obtained through the processes of acid extraction, proteolysis, and fractionation using gel filtration chromatography. The physicochemical properties of the collagen hydrolysate fractions were st...

  14. The effects of dietary marine protein hydrolysates on the development of sea bass larvae, Dicentrarchus labrax, and associated microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Delcroix, Jeremy; Gatesoupe, Joel; Desbruye?res, Elisabeth; Huelvan, Christine; Le Delliou, Herve; Le Gall, Marie-madeleine; Quazuguel, Patrick; Mazurais, David; Zambonino, Jose-luis

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydrolysate is an essential component of dry starter diets for fish larvae, as promoting healthy development. Peptides are also suitable substrates for many intestinal microbes. Five experimental diets were compared to a control diet (CONT) supplemented with a commercial fish protein hydrolysate. Each diet contained one marine protein hydrolysate, which differed by the proportion of di- and tri-peptides, and by raw materials. Two diets (HYD4 and HYD5) stimulated larval growth compared...

  15. A comparative study of the hydrolysis of gamma irradiated lignocelluloses

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    E., Betiku; O. A., Adetunji; T. V., Ojumu; B. O., Solomon.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high-dose irradiation as a pretreatment method on two common lignocellulosic materials; hardwood (Khaya senegalensis) and softwood (Triplochiton scleroxylon) were investigated by assessing the potential of cellulase enzyme derived from Aspergillus flavus Linn isolate NSPR 101 to hydrol [...] yse the materials. The irradiation strongly affected the materials, causing the enzymatic hydrolysis to increase by more than 3 fold. Maximum digestibility occurred in softwood at 40kGy dosage of irradiation, while in hardwood it was at 90kGy dosage. The results also showed that, at the same dosage levels (p

  16. Chemical imaging of lignocellulosic biomass by CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohling, Christoph; Brackmann, Christian; Duarte, Alex; Buckup, Tiago; Enejder, Annika; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and structural composition of wood biomass is studied by label-free and chemically specific Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy. A concept developed for assignment and semi-quantitative imaging of sample components; cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin; by multiplex CARS microspectroscopy and subsequent data analysis is presented. Specific imaging without fluorescence backround is achieved an order of magnitude faster compared with conventional Raman microscopy. Laser polarization control yield information on molecular arrangement in wood fibers. Narrowband CARS excitation of single vibrations allows for three-dimensional volume imaging. Thus, CARS microscopy has potential as an important instrument for characterization of lignocellulosic materials. PMID:23836627

  17. Mixed Enzyme Systems for Delignification of Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa M. Woolridge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of enzymes such as laccase and xylanase for the preparation of cellulose from lignocellulosic material is an option for those industries seeking to reduce the use of chlorine-containing bleach agents, thus minimizing the environmental impact of their processes. Mixed hydrolytic and oxidative enzyme systems have been well described in the context of biopulping, and thus provide good precedent regarding effectiveness, despite the susceptibility of xylanase to inactivation by laccase-generated oxidants. This paper examines the progress towards development of sequential and simultaneous mixed enzyme systems to accomplish delignification.

  18. Percutaneous removal of pulmonary artery emboli with hydrolyser catheter in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Hydrolyser catheter for per,cutaneous treatment of massive pulmonary embolism in pigs. Twelve pigs, each weighing between 55 kg and 89 kg, were used. Radio-opaque 9 cm x 0.8 cm and 4.5 cm x 0.8 cm clots, produced by mixing pig blood with iodinated contrast agent in vacutainers, were injected via the jugular vein until central pulmonary embolism (main and proximal lobar arteries) was obtained with significant systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic modifications. From a femoral approach, the 7-French Hydrolyser thrombectomy catheter was run over a 0.025-inch (0.64-mm) guide wire to remove the pulmonary emboli. Hemodynamic, gasometric and angiographic monitoring was performed before and after treatment. The procedure's safety and completeness of emboli removal was assessed by cardiopulmonary autopsy. Three of the 12 pigs died during embolization. Thrombectomy was therefore performed in 9, and central emboli could be obtained in 7 of the 9. The Hydrolyser could be manipulated only in central pulmonary arteries and could aspirate only central emboli in 5 of the 7 pigs that had them. Despite minimal angiographic improvement seen in these 5, there was no significant hemodynamic and gasometric improvement after treatment. The procedure induced an increase in free hemoglobin blood levels. Autopsies revealed an average of 2 endothelial injuries per pig (mainly adherent endocardial thrombi) in both nontreated (n = 3) and Hydrolyser-treated nontreated (n = 3) and Hydrolyser-treated (n = 9) groups. The Hydrolyser thrombectomy catheter can be promptly positioned and easily steered in central pulmonary arteries. It can be used to partially remove central emboli, but not peripheral pulmonary emboli. Most of the injuries observed may not have been strictly related to Hydrolyser use. The pig might not be a suitable animal model for treatment of massive pulmonary embolism. (author)

  19. Spent fuel element storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To always keep water level of a spent fuel cask pit equal with water level of spent fuel storage pool by means of syphon principle. Constitution: The pool water of a spent fuel storage pool is airtightly communicated through a pipe with the pool water of a spent fuel cask, and a gate is provided between the pool and the cask. Since cask is conveyed into the cask pit as the gate close while conveying, the pool water level is raised an amount corresponding to the volume of the cask, and water flow through scattering pipe and the communication pipe to the storage pool. When the fuel is conveyed out of the cask, the water level is lowered in the amount corresponding to the volume in the cask pit, and the water in the pool flow through the communication pipe to the cask pit. (Sekiya, K.)

  20. Intermodal transportation of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H.K.

    1983-09-01

    Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate.

  1. Intermodal transportation of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate

  2. Spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel management strategy in Spain is presented. The strategy includes temporary solutions and plans for final disposal. The need for R and D including partitioning and transmutation, as well as the financial constraints are also addressed. (author)

  3. Fast reactor spent fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of fast reactor fuel and of the fuel cycle and specific problems of fast reactor fuel reprocessing are discussed. Wet and dry methods of spent fuel reprocessing are described and the two methods are compared. Reprocessing efforts in France, FRG, Great Britain, USSR, Italy, Japan, and Belgium are reviewed. The problem is briefly outlined of proliferation associated with spent fuel reprocessing. (J.P.)

  4. Transportation of spent MTR fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisonnier, D.

    1997-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of the various aspects of MTR spent fuel transportation and provides in particular information about the on-going shipment of 4 spent fuel casks to the United States. Transnucleaire is a transport and Engineering Company created in 1963 at the request of the French Atomic Energy Commission. The company followed the growth of the world nuclear industry and has now six subsidiaries and affiliated companies established in countries with major nuclear programs.

  5. IAEA spent fuel storage glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this glossary is to provide a basis for improved international understanding of terms used in the important area of spent fuel storage technology. The glossary is the product of an IAEA Consultant Group with valuable input from a substantial list of reviewers. The glossary emphasizes fuel storage relevant to power reactors, but is also widely applicable to research reactors. The intention is to define terms from current technologies. Terms are limited to those directly related to spent fuel storage

  6. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  9. A study of the ability of bioactive extracts from brewers' spent grain to enhance the antioxidant and immunomodulatory potential of food formulations following in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Aoife L; O'Callaghan, Yvonne C; Connolly, Alan; Piggott, Charles O; FitzGerald, Richard J; O'Brien, Nora M

    2015-03-01

    Bioactivity of a snack-bar, chocolate-drink and yogurt fortified with brewers' spent grain (BSG) phenolic extracts (P2 or B2) or protein hydrolysates (barley protein hydrolysate (BPH), BPH 5 kDa) was measured following gastrointestinal in vitro digestion. Concentrations of 0.5 and 0.1% (v/v) digestates were chosen for addition to Caco-2 and Jurkat T cells, respectively. Yogurt and B2 digestate protected against H2O2-induced DNA damage in Caco-2 cells (p Snack-bar digestates possessed significant (p snack-bar while addition of BPH production to a greater extent than unfortified yogurt (p < 0.05). Selected BSG components can enhance the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of foods. PMID:25669234

  10. Compounds inhibiting the bioconversion of hydrothermally pretreated lignocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-05-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment using liquid hot water, steam explosion, or dilute acids enhances the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose by altering the chemical and/or physical structures of lignocellulosic biomass. However, compounds that inhibit both enzymes and microbial activity, including lignin-derived phenolics, soluble sugars, furan aldehydes, and weak acids, are also generated during pretreatment. Insoluble lignin, which predominantly remains within the pretreated solids, also acts as a significant inhibitor of cellulases during hydrolysis of cellulose. Exposed lignin, which is modified to be more recalcitrant to enzymes during pretreatment, adsorbs cellulase nonproductively and reduces the availability of active cellulase for hydrolysis of cellulose. Similarly, lignin-derived phenolics inhibit or deactivate cellulase and ?-glucosidase via irreversible binding or precipitation. Meanwhile, the performance of fermenting microorganisms is negatively affected by phenolics, sugar degradation products, and weak acids. This review describes the current knowledge regarding the contributions of inhibitors present in whole pretreatment slurries to the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and fermentation. Furthermore, we discuss various biological strategies to mitigate the effects of these inhibitors on enzymatic and microbial activity to improve the lignocellulose-to-biofuel process robustness. While the inhibitory effect of lignin on enzymes can be relieved through the use of lignin blockers and by genetically engineering the structure of lignin or of cellulase itself, soluble inhibitors, including phenolics, furan aldehydes, and weak acids, can be detoxified by microorganisms or laccase. PMID:25904131

  11. Lignocellulose pretreatment severity – relating pH to biomatrix opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    In cellulose-to-ethanol processes a physico-chemical pretreatment of the lignocellulosic feedstock is a critical prerequisite for increasing the amenability of the cellulose to enzymatic attack. Currently published pretreatment strategies span over a wide range of reaction conditions involving different pH values, temperatures, types of catalysts, and holding times. The consequences of the pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass are described with special emphasis on the chemical alterations of the biomass during pretreatment, especially highlighting the significance of the pretreatment pH. We present a new illustration of the pretreatment effects encompassing the differential responses to the pH and temperature. A detailed evaluation of the use of severity factor calculations for pretreatment comparisons signifies that the multiple effects of different pretreatment factors on the subsequent monosaccharide yields after enzymatic hydrolysis cannot be reliably compared by a one-dimensional severity factor, evenwithin the same type of pretreatment strategy. However, a quantitative comparison of published data for wheat straw pretreatment illustrates that there is some correlation between the hydrolysis yields (glucose, xylose) and the pretreatment pH, but no correlation with the pretreatment temperature (90–200 °C). A better recognition and understanding of the factors affecting biomatrix opening, and use of more standardized evaluation protocols, will allow for the identification of new pretreatment strategies that improve biomass utilization and permit rational enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose.

  12. Covalent Immobilization of ?-Glucosidase on Magnetic Particles for Lignocellulose Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alftrén, Johan; Hobley, Timothy John

    2013-01-01

    ?-Glucosidase hydrolyzes cellobiose to glucose and is an important enzyme in the consortium used for hydrolysis of cellulosic and lignocellulosic feedstocks. In the present work, ?-glucosidase was covalently immobilized on non-porous magnetic particles to enable re-use of the enzyme. It was found that particles activated with cyanuric chloride and polyglutaraldehyde gave the highest bead-related immobilized enzyme activity when tested with p-nitrophenyl-?-D-glucopyranoside (104.7 and 82.2 U/g particles, respectively). Furthermore, the purified ?-glucosidase preparation from Megazyme gave higher bead-related enzyme activities compared to Novozym 188 (79.0 and 9.8 U/g particles, respectively). A significant improvement in thermal stability was observed for immobilized enzyme compared to free enzyme; after 5 h (at 65 °C), 36 % of activity remained for the former, while there was no activity in the latter. The performance and recyclability of immobilized ?-glucosidase on more complex substrate (pretreated spruce)was also studied. It was shown that adding immobilized ?-glucosidase (16 U/g dry matter) to free cellulases (8 FPU/g dry matter) increased the hydrolysis yield of pretreated spruce from ca. 44 % to ca. 65 %. In addition, it was possible to re-use the immobilized ?-glucosidase in the spruce and retain activity for at least four cycles. The immobilized enzyme thus shows promise for lignocellulose hydrolysis.

  13. Energy and Environmental Performance of Bioethanol from Different Lignocelluloses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjalt Huppes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and the wish to reduce the dependence on oil are the incentives for the development of alternative energy sources. The use of lignocellulosic biomass together with cellulosic processing technology provides opportunities to produce fuel ethanol with less competition with food and nature. Many studies on energy analysis and life cycle assessment of second-generation bioethanol have been conducted. However, due to the different methodology used and different system boundary definition, it is difficult to compare their results. To permit a direct comparison of fuel ethanol from different lignocelluloses in terms of energy use and environmental impact, seven studies conducted in our group were summarized in this paper, where the same technologies were used to convert biomass to ethanol, the same system boundaries were defined, and the same allocation procedures were followed. A complete set of environmental impacts ranging from global warming potential to toxicity aspects is used. The results provide an overview on the energy efficiency and environmental performance of using fuel ethanol derived from different feedstocks in comparison with gasoline.

  14. Development of a Commerical Enzyme System for Lignocellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2011-02-14

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  15. Towards an Understanding of How Protein Hydrolysates Stimulate More Efficient Biosynthesis in Cultured Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemensma, André; Babcock, James; Wilcox, Chris; Huttinga, Hans

    In the light of the growing demand for high quality plant-derived hydrolysates (i.e., HyPep™ and UltraPep™ series), Sheffield Bio-Science has developed a new hydrolysate platform that addresses the need for animal-free cell culture medium supplements while also minimizing variability concerns. The platform is based upon a novel approach to enzymatic digestion and more refined processing. At the heart of the platform is a rationally designed animal component-free (ACF) enzyme cocktail that includes both proteases and non-proteolytic enzymes (hydrolases) whose activities can also liberate primary components of the polymerized non-protein portion of the raw material. This enzyme system is added during a highly optimized process step that targets specific enzyme-substrate reactions to expand the range of beneficial nutritional factors made available to cells in culture. Such factors are fundamental to improving the bio-performance of the culture system, as they provide not merely growth-promoting peptides and amino acids, but also key carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, and vitamins that improve both rate and quality of protein expression, and serve to improve culture life due to osmo-protectant and anti-apoptotic properties. Also of significant note is that, compared to typical hydrolysates, the production process is greatly reduced and requires fewer steps, intrinsically yielding a better-controlled and therefore more reproducible product. Finally, the more sophisticated approach to enzymatic digestion renders hydrolysates more amenable to sterile filtration, allowing hydrolysate end users to experience streamlined media preparation and bioreactor supplementation activities. Current and future development activities will evolve from a better understanding of the complex interactions within a handful of key biochemical pathways that impact the growth and productivity of industrially relevant organisms. Presented in this chapter are some examples of the efforts that have been made so far to elucidate the mechanisms for the often dramatic benefits that hydrolysates can impart on cell culture processes. Given the variety of roles that hydrolysates likely play in each cell type, close collaboration between protein hydrolysate manufacturers and biopharmaceutical developers will continue to be critical to expanding the industry's knowledge and retaining hydrolysates as a tool for enhancing media formulations.

  16. Amino acid composition and functional properties of giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) collagen hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zunying; Su, Yicheng; Zeng, Mingyong

    2011-03-01

    Giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) is an under-utilized species due to its high tendency to autolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of collagen hydrolysates from this species. The degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE, emulsion activity index (EAI), emulsion stability index (ESI), foam expansion (FE), and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were investigated. The effects of pH on the EAI, ESI FE and FS of hydrolysates were also investigated. The results indicated that the ? and ? 1 chains of the collagen were effectively hydrolyzed by trypsin at 50°c with an Enzyme/Substrate (E/S) ration of 1:20 (w:w). The DH of collagen was up to 17.3% after 3 h hydrolysis with trypsin. The hydrolysates had a molecular weight distribution of 1.1-17 kDa, and were abundant in glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), glutamic acid (Glu), alanine (Ala) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) residues. The hydrolysates were fractionated into three fractions ( 10 kDa), and the fraction of 3-10 kDa exhibited a higher EAI value than the fraction of > 10 kDa ( P 10 kDa had higher FE and FS values than other fractions ( P 10 kDa showed higher FE value, respectively. They are hoped to be utilized as functional ingredients in food and nutraceutical industries.

  17. Immunomodulating properties of protein hydrolysates for application in cow's milk allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewiet, M B G; Gros, M; van Neerven, R J J; Faas, M M; de Vos, P

    2015-05-01

    Cow's milk proteins cause allergic symptoms in 2-3% of all infants. In these individuals, the tolerogenic state of the intestinal immune system is broken, which can lead to sensitization against antigens and eventually to allergic responses. Although a true treatment for food allergy is not available, symptoms can be avoided by providing the infants with hydrolyzed proteins. Hydrolyzed proteins are proteins that are enzymatically degraded. They lack typical allergenic IgE-binding epitopes but are also thought to play a pertinent role in other mechanisms inducing hypoallergenic effects. This review discusses the mechanisms and evidence for immunomodulating properties of cow's milk hydrolysates. Hydrolysates are found to strengthen the epithelial barrier, modulate T-cell differentiation, and decrease inflammation. Some studies suggest a role for hydrolysates in manipulating pathogen recognition receptors signaling as underlying mechanism. Peptides from hydrolysates have been shown to bind to TLR2 and TLR4 and influence cytokine production in epithelial cells and macrophages. Current insight suggests that hydrolysates may actively participate in modulating the immune responses in subjects with cow's milk allergy and those at risk to develop cow's milk allergy. However, more research is required to design effective and reproducible means to develop targeting strategies to modulate the immune response. PMID:25692325

  18. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, B. S.; Park, Y. S.; Oh, S. C.; Kim, S. H.; Cho, M. W.; Hong, D. H

    1997-12-01

    Since the nation`s policy on spent fuel management is not finalized, the technical items commonly required for safe management and recycling of spent fuel - remote technologies of transportation, inspection, maintenance, and disassembly of spent fuel - are selected and pursued. In this regards, the following R and D activities are carried out : collision free transportation of spent fuel assembly, mechanical disassembly of spent nuclear fuel and graphical simulation of fuel handling / disassembly process. (author). 36 refs., 16 tabs., 77 figs

  19. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the nation's policy on spent fuel management is not finalized, the technical items commonly required for safe management and recycling of spent fuel - remote technologies of transportation, inspection, maintenance, and disassembly of spent fuel - are selected and pursued. In this regards, the following R and D activities are carried out : collision free transportation of spent fuel assembly, mechanical disassembly of spent nuclear fuel and graphical simulation of fuel handling / disassembly process. (author). 36 refs., 16 tabs., 77 figs

  20. Research reactor spent fuel status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the problems of spent fuel from research reactors have received increasing attention as concerns about ageing fuel storage facilities, their life extension and the ultimate disposal of spent fuel loom larger. The overall scope of these problems can be gauged by examination of the databases compiled and maintained by the IAEA. Data compiled in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel worldwide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialised and developing countries of the world are discussed. Some projections of spent fuel inventories to the year 2006 are presented and discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. It is clear that more exposure of the problems and concerns and more international co-operation will be necessary to resolve the outstanding issues. It is also clear that take-back programmes of foreign research reactor fuels, if and when they are implemented, will not continue indefinitely. At some stage in the not too distant future (in 2006 for foreign research reactors with US-origin fuel), research reactor operators will be faced withearch reactor operators will be faced with having to find their own solutions regarding the permanent disposal of their spent fuel. For countries with no nuclear power programme, the construction of geological repositories for the relatively small amounts of spent fuel from one or two research reactors is obviously not practicable. For such countries, access to a regional interim storage facility and eventually a regional or international repository for research reactor fuel would be an ideal solution. The time is ripe for serious discussion of regional or international solutions and to begin planning for the day when neither take-back programmes nor the reprocessing option might be available. (author)

  1. Acid-generated soy protein hydrolysates and their interfacial behavior on model surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda, Julio C; Rojas, Orlando J; Lucia, Lucian A

    2014-11-10

    The present work attempts to provide data to warrant the consideration of soy proteins (SP) as potentially useful biomolecules for practical chemical and surface applications. Despite their sundry properties, SP use has been limited by their high molecular weight. In response to this limitation, we analyze acid hydrolysates of soy proteins (0.1 N HCl, 70 °C) for surface modification. Techniques typical in protein (SDS-PAGE) as well as colloidal (charge demand and electrophoretic mobility) analyses were used to follow the effects of molecular changes that occur upon hydrolysis. Adsorption experiments on hydrophobic (polypropylene) and mineral (aluminum oxide) surfaces were subsequently carried out to further interrogate the surface activity resultant from soy hydrolysis. It was found that during adsorption the hydrolysates tended to form less surface aggregates and adsorbed at faster rates compared with unmodified SP. Overall, the benefits derived from the application of SP hydrolysates are highlighted. PMID:25314296

  2. Production of feather protein hydrolysate by keratinolytic bacterium Vibrio sp. kr2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazziotin, Adriane; Pimentel, Fernanda A; Sangali, Sidnei; de Jong, Erna V; Brandelli, Adriano

    2007-11-01

    A feather protein hydrolysate was produced using the keratinolytic bacterium Vibrio sp. strain kr2. Complete feather degradation was observed in medium containing up to 60 g L(-1) raw feathers. Cultivation on 40, 60 or 80 g L(-1) feathers for five days resulted in similar amounts of soluble protein, reaching maximum values around 2.5 g L(-1). Maximum yields of soluble protein were achieved at 30 degrees C and initial pH ranging from 6.0 to 8.0. Strain kr2 was effective in producing keratin hydrolysate from chicken feathers. Bacterial feather hydrolysate has the potential for utilization as an ingredient in animal feed or as organic fertilizer, thereby reducing the environmental impact of feather waste from the poultry industry. PMID:17223559

  3. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory, antihypertensive and antihyperlipidaemic activities of protein hydrolysates from Rhopilema esculentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Miansong; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Changheng

    2012-10-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory, antihypertensive and antihyperlipidaemic activities of protein hydrolysates (RPH) from the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum were investigated. R. esculentum was hydrolysed sequentially with pepsin and papain, and then the hydrolysate was ultrafiltered with a 2000 Da cut-off membrane. It was found that RPH contained high levels of Gly, Glu, Pro, Asp and Ala, having potential ACE inhibitory activity in vitro with an IC(50) of 1.28 mg/ml. It was also found that systolic blood pressure was reduced markedly in spontaneously hypertensive rats after single and chronic oral administration of RPH, indicating that RPH had an antihypertensive effect. In addition, oral administration of RPH decreased total serum cholesterol and triglyceride, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats fed with high-fat diet. These results indicate that RPH may prove to be a promising functional food for the prevention and treatment of hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. PMID:23442666

  4. Antioxidant and functional properties of collagen hydrolysates from Spanish mackerel skin as influenced by average molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chang-Feng; Cao, Zi-Hao; Wang, Bin; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Li, Zhong-Rui; Zhang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, the relationships between functional properties and average molecular weight (AMW) of collagen hydrolysates from Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorous niphonius) skin were researched. Seven hydrolysate fractions (5.04 ? AMW ? 47.82 kDa) from collagen of Spanish mackerel skin were obtained through the processes of acid extraction, proteolysis, and fractionation using gel filtration chromatography. The physicochemical properties of the collagen hydrolysate fractions were studied by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), gel filtration chromatography, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results indicated that there was an inverse relationship between the antioxidant activities and the logarithm of the AMW of the hydrolysate fractions in the tested AMW range. However, the reduction of AMW significantly enhanced the solubility of the hydrolysate fractions, and a similar AMW decrease of the hydrolysate fractions negatively affected the emulsifying and foaming capacities. This presented as a positive correlation between the logarithm of AMW and emulsion stability index, emulsifying activity index, foam stability, and foam capacity. Therefore, these collagen hydrolysates with excellent antioxidant activities or good functionalities as emulsifiers could be obtained by controlling the effect of the digestion process on the AMW of the resultant hydrolysates. PMID:25090114

  5. Antioxidant and Functional Properties of Collagen Hydrolysates from Spanish Mackerel Skin as Influenced by Average Molecular Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Feng Chi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the relationships between functional properties and average molecular weight (AMW of collagen hydrolysates from Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorous niphonius skin were researched. Seven hydrolysate fractions (5.04 ? AMW ? 47.82 kDa from collagen of Spanish mackerel skin were obtained through the processes of acid extraction, proteolysis, and fractionation using gel filtration chromatography. The physicochemical properties of the collagen hydrolysate fractions were studied by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, gel filtration chromatography, scanning electron microscope (SEM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The results indicated that there was an inverse relationship between the antioxidant activities and the logarithm of the AMW of the hydrolysate fractions in the tested AMW range. However, the reduction of AMW significantly enhanced the solubility of the hydrolysate fractions, and a similar AMW decrease of the hydrolysate fractions negatively affected the emulsifying and foaming capacities. This presented as a positive correlation between the logarithm of AMW and emulsion stability index, emulsifying activity index, foam stability, and foam capacity. Therefore, these collagen hydrolysates with excellent antioxidant activities or good functionalities as emulsifiers could be obtained by controlling the effect of the digestion process on the AMW of the resultant hydrolysates.

  6. Antioxidant potential of date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) seed protein hydrolysates and carnosine in food and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambigaipalan, Priyatharini; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2015-01-28

    Date seed protein hydrolysates were evaluated for antioxidant activity as well as solubility and water-holding capacity in food and biological model systems. Date seed protein hydrolysates as well as carnosine exhibited >80% of solubility over a pH range of 2-12. The hydrolysates and carnosine at 0.5% (w/w) were also found to be effective in enhancing water-holding capacity and cooking yield in a fish model system, which was nearly similar to sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP; 0.3%, w/w). Incorporation of hydrolysates (200 ppm) in fish model systems resulted in the highest inhibition (30%) of oxidation in comparison to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT; 9%). In addition, hydrolysates and carnosine inhibited ?-carotene oxidation by 75%. The hydrolysates (0.1 mg/mL) inhibited LDL cholesterol oxidation by 60%, whereas carnosine inhibited oxidation by 80% after 12 h of incubation. Additionally, hydrolysates and carnosine effectively inhibited hydroxyl (6 mg/mL) and peroxyl (0.1 mg/mL) radical-induced DNA scission. Therefore, date seed protein hydrolysates could be used as a potential functional food ingredient for health promotion. PMID:25553507

  7. Antioxidant Activity of Fish Protein Hydrolysates in in vitro Assays and in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk

    The aim of this study was to screen different protein hydrolysates with respect to their antioxidative properties in order to select the most promising extracts for further evaluation in oil-in-water emulsions. Three fractions of protein hydrolysates (Crude, >5kDa and 5kDa, 3-5kDa and

  8. Comparative environmental performance of lignocellulosic ethanol from different feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A renewable biofuel economy is projected as a pathway to decrease dependence on fossil fuels as well as to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions. Ethanol produced on large-scale from lignocellulosic raw materials is considered the most potential next generation automotive fuel. In this paper, a Life Cycle Assessment model was developed to evaluate the environmental implications of the production of ethanol from five lignocellulosic materials: alfalfa stems, poplar, Ethiopian mustard, flax shives and hemp hurds and its use in passenger cars. Two ethanol-based fuel applications, E10 (a mixture of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline by volume) and E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) were assessed and the results were compared to those of conventional gasoline (CG) in an equivalent car. The environmental performance was assessed in terms of fossil fuels requirements, global warming, photochemical oxidant formation, acidification and eutrophication by means of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology in order to identify the best environmental friendly lignocellulosic source. The results show that, compared to CG, life cycle greenhouse gases emissions are lower for etanol blends, specifically up to 145% lower for E85-fueled car derived from Ethiopian mustard. This crop is also the best option in terms of eutrophying emissions regardless the ratio of ethanol in the blend. In the remaining impact categories, other feedstocks are considered beneficial, that is, poplar re considered beneficial, that is, poplar in the case of photochemical oxidants formation and flax shives for acidification. Concerning fossil fuels requirements, decreases up to 10% and 63% for E10 and E85 derived from hemp hurds and Ethiopian mustard, respectively, were obtained. According to the results, the study clearly demonstrates the importance of using low intensive energy and high biomass yield crops. LCA procedure helps to identify the key areas in the ethanol production life cycle where the researchers and technicians need to work to improve the environmental performance. Technological development could help in lowering both the environmental impact and the prices of the ethanol fuels. (author)

  9. Sensory analysis of hydrolysed meat preparations / Análise sensorial de preparações com hidrolisados de carne

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria Elisabeth Machado Pinto E, Silva; Maria Carolina von, Atzingen.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de hidrolisados de carne em dietas melhora seu conteúdo protéico, de vitaminas e minerais. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar a aceitação de hidrolisados de carne. Quatro preparações foram desenvolvidas com três tipos de hidrolisados em condições similares às domésticas. . A ac [...] eitação foi avaliada com uso de escala hedônica de 9 pontos. Os testes foram realizados em três sessões (de acordo com o tipo de hidrolisado) e, incluiu-se na ficha de avaliação informações de idade. A análise estatística foi realizada por ANOVA e teste de Tukey. As preparações mais aceitas foram os bolinhos com hidrolisados de peru e frango. Os hidrolisados podem ser utilizados em diversas preparações, sendo necessário o conhecimento da faixa etária a qual se destinam, suas características sensoriais e físico-químicas, para garantir o sabor e a aparência do produto final. Abstract in english The use of hydrolysed meat in diets contributes to the improvement of protein, vitamin and mineral supply. This work aims at checking the acceptance pattern in meat hydrolysates. Four preparations have been developed with three types of hydrolysates in domestic-like conditions. Acceptance was verifi [...] ed by means of sensory analysis using the nine-point hedonic scale. Sensory tests have been carried out in three sessions (according to the kind of hydrolysates). In the evaluation file, information on age groups has been included. The statistical analysis has been made by ANOVA and Tukey test. The best accepted preparation have been the turkey and chicken hydrolysed balls. Hydrolysates can be used in many different kinds of preparations, but it is necessary to know both the age group it will be used to and its sensory and chemical-physical features to ensure the taste and the original appearance of the final product.

  10. IAEA spent fuel storage programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the IAEA's activities subsequent to 1976 when interim storage of spent fuel was recognized as a special need for many Member States. This need resulted from the lack of decisions relating to the management of the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The lack of decisive action can be traced to various economic, political, and technical considerations. The need for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel, regardless of the approach taken for final disposition, has been recognized. The general conclusions of INFCE Working Group No. 6 (spent fuel storage) are: (1) fuel assemblies have been stored in water basins for approximately 20 years with no significant problems, but safety studies should continue; (2) dry storage technique studies that are underway must continue; and (3) additional alternatives for expansion of capacities in existing storage pools are being considered

  11. Influence of the concentration of locust bean gum on the gelling ability of whey peptic hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Cristina M. R.; Hilliou, L.; Teixeira, J. A.; Gon??alves, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    The gelling ability of whey proteins can be changed by limited hydrolysis and by the presence of other components such as polysaccharides; depending on the environmental conditions it can either be improved or impaired. In this work the effect of LBG on the heat-set gelation of aqueous whey protein hydrolysates (10 % w/w) from pepsin was assessed at pH 7.0 by small deformation rheology. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) and hydrolysates with a degree of hydrolysis (DH) of 1.5, ...

  12. The protein encoded by the rolB plant oncogene hydrolyses indole glucosides.

    OpenAIRE

    Estruch, J. J.; Schell, J.; Spena, A.

    1991-01-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, whose expression stimulates the formation of roots by transformed plant tissues and other growth alterations in transgenic plants, codes for a beta-glucosidase able to hydrolyse indole-beta-glucosides. Indeed, we show that extracts of bacteria and/or plant tissue expressing the rolB protein hydrolyse indoxyl-beta-glucoside (plant indican). Because of the structural similarity between indoxyl-beta-glucoside and indole-3-acetyl-beta-glucoside (IAA-beta...

  13. In Vitro Antioxidant Activities of Protein Hydrolysate from Germinated Black Soybean (Glycine max L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralison Solominoarisoa Sefatie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available During this study, the effect of germination in combination with in vitro pepsin and pancreatin digestion of protein flours extracted from black soybean on the production of bioactive peptides was investigated. Black soybean (Glycine max L. were germinated for 3 days (at 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively germination periods and harvested. Protein hydrolysates from germinated black soybean were prepared from protein isolate by in vitro digestion using pepsin and pancreatin and then evaluated for antioxidant activity. Soy protein hydrolysate from 48 h of germination exhibited the highest scavenging activity against 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radicals (76.56 % at 2.5 mg/mL followed by 24 and 72 h (66.62 and 60.55% at 2.5 mg/mL, respectively. Protein hydrolysate from germinated black soybean also exhibited noticeable scavenging activity for hydroxyl. Soy protein hydrolysate from 48 h of germination (97.475% at 2 mg/mL significantly was the most effective in neutralizing •OH (p<0.05 than that from 24 and 72 h (88.56 and 92.5%, respectively at 2 mg/mL, compared to the nongerminated which was 34.42% also at the same concentration. In addition, soyprotein hydrolysate from 24 h of germination significantly showed the highest reducing power (0.32 at 2.0 mg/mL compared to that from 48 and 72 h germination period (0.25 and 0.23 at 2.0 mg/mL, respectively. Molecular Weights distribution of protein hydrolysates from germinated black soybean was believed to have correlation with their antioxidant activities. Results showed that germination with in vitro digestion (pepsin and pancreatin of protein hydrolysate from germinated black soybean was successful in production of natural antioxidant compounds which established obvious antioxidant potency than non-germinated. As conclusion, soy protein hydrolysate from 48 h of germination had the best antioxidant potency and could be used as natural antioxidant in food systems.

  14. Antioxidant Activity of Hydrolysates Prepared from Flaxseed Cake Proteins Using Pancreatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karama? Magdalena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteins were isolated from defatted flaxseed cake and hydrolysed with pancreatin. The hydrolysis process was conducted at a stable temperature of 50°C and pH 7.5, and monitored with the pH-stat method. The obtained hydrolysates with a degree of hydrolysis (DH of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25% were investigated in terms of antioxidant properties. The radical scavenging activity was assayed against DPPH· and ABTS·+, the reducing ability - with FRAP assay, and the capability to bind Fe(II - by reaction with ferrozine. SE-HPLC analysis was used to determine molecular weight distribution of hydrolysis products.

  15. Production of bioactive peptide hydrolysates from deer, sheep and pig plasma using plant and fungal protease preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Clara S F; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Carne, Alan; McConnell, Michelle A

    2015-06-01

    Plasma separated from deer, sheep and pig blood, obtained from abattoirs, was hydrolysed using protease preparations from plant (papain and bromelain) and fungal (FP400 and FPII) sources. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the peptide hydrolysates obtained after 1, 2, 4 and 24h of hydrolysis, were investigated. The release of trichloroacetic acid-soluble peptides over the hydrolysis period was monitored using the o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) assay, while the hydrolysis profiles were visualised using SDS-PAGE. The major plasma proteins in the animal plasmas were identified using MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Hydrolysates of plasma generated with fungal proteases exhibited higher DPPH radical-scavenging, oxygen radical-scavenging capacity (ORAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) than those generated with plant proteases for all three animal plasmas. No antimicrobial activity was detected in the hydrolysates. The results indicated that proteolytic hydrolysis of animal blood plasmas, using fungal protease preparations in particular, produces hydrolysates with high antioxidant properties. PMID:25624206

  16. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs

  17. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  18. Experimental modelling of a pilot lignocellulosic pellets stove plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-scale stoves, producing heat and hot water, are suited for domestic purposes. In order to optimise their efficiency when using lignocellulosic pellets, an important task is to do research on their real performance. The general behaviour depends on many operational factors (air flow and humidity, pressure, etc), dimension and pellet characteristics (moisture, size, raw material, density, friability, etc). In this paper, the first results and general performance of a 24 kW pellet fixed bed stove pilot plant are presented. The plant has been designed to study pellet combustion in the laboratory. The main targets are to reduce emissions of pollutants and to improve energy efficiency. Different situations can be simulated and tested due to its flexible design. Temperatures, pressures, flows and emissions are measured and analysed. An extensive study of different load conditions is presented through the application of both an experiment design technique and the later statistical analysis of the results. Fuel characterisation is also presented. (Author)

  19. Effect of microaerobic fermentation in preprocessing fibrous lignocellulosic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alattar, Manar Arica; Green, Terrence R; Henry, Jordan; Gulca, Vitalie; Tizazu, Mikias; Bergstrom, Robby; Popa, Radu

    2012-06-01

    Amending soil with organic matter is common in agricultural and logging practices. Such amendments have benefits to soil fertility and crop yields. These benefits may be increased if material is preprocessed before introduction into soil. We analyzed the efficiency of microaerobic fermentation (MF), also referred to as Bokashi, in preprocessing fibrous lignocellulosic (FLC) organic materials using varying produce amendments and leachate treatments. Adding produce amendments increased leachate production and fermentation rates and decreased the biological oxygen demand of the leachate. Continuously draining leachate without returning it to the fermentors led to acidification and decreased concentrations of polysaccharides (PS) in leachates. PS fragmentation and the production of soluble metabolites and gases stabilized in fermentors in about 2-4 weeks. About 2 % of the carbon content was lost as CO(2). PS degradation rates, upon introduction of processed materials into soil, were similar to unfermented FLC. Our results indicate that MF is insufficient for adequate preprocessing of FLC material. PMID:22639359

  20. Functionalized Polymers from Lignocellulosic Biomass: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred Vermerris

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the realization that global sustainability depends on renewable sources of materials and energy, there has been an ever-increasing need to develop bio-based polymers that are able to replace petroleum-based polymers. Research in this field has shown strong potential in generating high-performance functionalized polymers from plant biomass. With the anticipated large-scale production of lignocellulosic biomass, lignin, cellulose and hemicellulosic polysaccharides will be abundantly available renewable feedstocks for biopolymers and biocomposites with physico-chemical properties that match or exceed those of petroleum-based compounds. This review examines the state of the art regarding advances and challenges in synthesis and applications of specialty polymers and composites derived from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, ending with a brief assessment of genetic modification as a route to tailor crop plants for specific applications.

  1. Development of a commercial enzymes system for lignocellulosic biomass saccharification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manoj

    2012-12-20

    DSM Innovation Inc., in its four year effort was able to evaluate and develop its in-house DSM fungal cellulolytic enzymes system to reach enzyme efficiency mandates set by DoE Biomass program MYPP goals. DSM enzyme cocktail is uniquely active at high temperature and acidic pH, offering many benefits and product differentiation in 2G bioethanol production. Under this project, strain and process development, ratio optimization of enzymes, protein and genetic engineering has led to multitudes of improvement in productivity and efficiency making development of a commercial enzyme system for lignocellulosic biomass saccharification viable. DSM is continuing further improvement by additional biodiversity screening, protein engineering and overexpression of enzymes to continue to further lower the cost of enzymes for saccharification of biomass.

  2. TPS/LDPE blends reinforced with lignocellulose fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of their abundance, availability, low abrasiveness and mechanical properties, cellulose fibers have been frequently chosen as reinforcing fillers in composites. Castor bean cake, the residue from biodiesel production, is rich in lignocellulose fibers and proteins. One of these proteins is ricin, a toxin protein. In this work, ricin was denatured by heat treatment in water at 90 deg C for 4 h. Thermoplastic starch (TPS), low density polyethylene (LDPE), maleated polyethylene (used as the compatibilizing agent), and an organophilic clay were processed in the presence of different contents of heat treated castor bean cake. Processing was carried out in a single-screw extruder, at 400 rpm, with heat zones at 130 deg C, 135 deg C, 135 deg C and 130 deg C (from feed zone to die end). The structural and mechanical properties of the resulting polymeric composites were investigated, and revealed the reinforcing effect of the partially purified cellulose fibers. (author)

  3. Bioethanol from lignocellulose - pretreatment, enzyme immobilization and hydrolysis kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsai, Chien Tai

    2012-01-01

    Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis are two of the processes involved in the production of cellulosic ethanol. Several pretreatment methods were proposed, however new pretreatment strategies to increase enzymetic hydrolysis efficiency are still under investigation. For enzymatic hydrolysis, the cost of enzyme is still the bottle neck, re-using the enzyme is apossible way to reduce the input of enzyme in the process. In the point view of engineering, the prediction of enzymatic hydrolysis kinetics under different substrate loading, enzyme combination is usful for process design. Therefore, several kinetic models were proposed previously. In view of the connetions between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. The hypotheses and objective of this PhD study consists of three parts: (1) Pretreatment of barley straw by 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]Ac), which was done during 2009. Ionic liquid had been reported to be able to dissolve lignocellulose. However, as our knowledge, in all published researches, the concentration of lignocellulose in ionic liquid were low (5~10%). Besides, pretreatment time were long (from 1 hr to 1 day). Based on the hypothesis that the amount of ionic liquid and pretreatment time can be reduced, the influence of substrate concentration, pretreatment time and temperature were investigated and optimized. Pretreatment of barley straw by [EMIM]Ac, correlative models were constructed using 3 different pretreatment parameters (temperature, time, concentration of barley straw substrate) and sugar recoveries obtained following enzymatic hydrolysis. Elevated pretreatmenttemperature and longer pretreatment time favoured hydrolysis. However intensive pretreatment at high temperature also causes degradation of cellulose. In addition, [EMIM]Ac pretreated lignocellulose was found to stabilize and protect the enzymes at elevated temperatures. Therefore lower levels of enzymes were required to obtain similar hydrolytic efficiencies. Optimal pretreatment condition was found with the aid of models based on multiple linear regression. Consider the balanced against economic considerations, barley straw can be pretreated under 150°C for 50 min with dry matter of 20% (w/w). Glucose yield can be up to 70% after enzymatic hydrolysis. (2) Immobilization of ß-glucosidase (BG), which was done during 2010. One of the major bottlenecks in production of ethanol from lignocellulose is the required high cellulase enzyme dosages that increase the processing costs. One method to decrease the enzyme dosage is to re-use BG, which hydrolyze the soluble substrate cellobiose. Based on the hypothesis that immobilized BG can be re-used, how many times the enzyme could be recycled and how coupling with glutaraldehyde affected enzyme recovery after immobilization were investigated. Glutaraldehyde cross-linkedBG aggregates were entrapped in 3.75% calcium alginate. Glutaraldehyde inactivate enzyme activity but also reduce the leakage of enzyme from calcium alginate. Findings showed that more than 60% of enzymatic activity could be maintained under optimized immobilization condition. In order to evaluate stability, the immobilized enzymes were reused for the hydrolysis of Avicel. No significant loss of activity was observed up to 20th round. Similar glucose yields were obtained following enzymatic hydrolysis of hot water pretreated barley straw by immobilized and free BG. Finally, this is the first time that BG aggregates in a calcium alginate were visualized by confocallaser scanning microscope. The images prove that more BG aggregates were entrapped in the matrix when the enzyme was cross-linked by glutaraldehyde. (3) Validation and modification of a semimechanistic model, which was done during 2010 ~ 2012. A number of cellulosic hydrolysis kinetic models were proposed. Among the models, a simple and usful mathamatical model proposed by Kadam et al. (2004) has potential for supporting process design. However, like the other models, it was not validated intensivly, especially under high glucose concentration background and hi

  4. Lab-scale Technology for Biogas Production from Lignocellulose Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Krátký

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently-operating biogas plants are based on the treatment of lignocellulose biomass, which is included in materials such as agriculture and forestry wastes, municipal solid wastes, waste paper, wood and herbaceous energy crops. Lab-scale biogas technology was specially developed for evaluating the anaerobic biodegrability and the specific methane yields of solid organic substrates. This technology falls into two main categories – pretreatment equipments, and fermentation equipments. Pretreatment units use physical principles based on mechanical comminution (ball mills, macerator orhydrothermal treatment (liquid hot water pretreatment technology. The biochemical methane potential test is used to evaluate the specific methane yields of treated or non-treated organic substrates. This test can be performed both by lab testing units and by lab fermenter.

  5. Characterization of the Immunogenicity and Allergenicity of Two Cow's Milk Hydrolysates – A Study in Brown Norway Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    BØgh, Katrine Lindholm; Barkholt, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Hypoallergenic infant formulas based on hydrolysed milk proteins are used in the diet for cow's milk allergic infants. For a preclinical evaluation of the immunogenicity and allergenicity of new protein ingredients for such hypoallergenic infant formulas as well as for the investigation of which characteristics of hydrolysates that contribute to allergenicity, in vivo models are valuable tools. In this study, we examine the immunogenicity and allergenicity of two hydrolysates in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model, using i.p. dosing, which allows for the use of small quantities. Intact BLG, hydrolysed BLG and a hydrolysed whey product suitable for use in extensively hydrolysed formulas were thoroughly characterized for protein chemical features and administered to BN rats by i.p. immunization with or without adjuvant. Sera were analysed for specific IgG and IgE for evaluation of sensitizing capacity, immunogenicity and antibody?binding capacity. For evaluation of eliciting capacity a skin test was performed. The study showed that the hydrolysates had no residual allergenicity, lacking the capacity to sensitize and elicit reactions in the BN rats. Dosing with or without adjuvant induced a large difference in immunogenicity. Only antibodies from rats sensitized to intact BLG with adjuvant were able to bind the hydrolysates, and the whey?based hydrolysate only showed immunogenicity when dosed with adjuvant. This study showed that hydrolysates can be evaluated by an i.p. animal model, but that the choice of in vitro tests used for evaluation of antibody responses may greatly influence the result as well as may the use of adjuvant.

  6. Study of the formation of polyethylene composites and lignocellulose materials by means of irradiation and extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the greatest opportunities for using of biomass as a precursor in the production of polymeric materials is the lignocellulose composites that can combine high performance with low costs. This work is a initial study on the production of a lignocellulose reinforced polyethylene composite. A compatibilization made by a induced gamma radiation grafting reaction was used to increase the adhesion between the matrix and the reinforced or filled fibers. The lignocellulose materials were exposed to gamma radiation in order to promote a molecular degradation and increase its reactivity. The polymer, the lignocellulose material and the compatibilization were processed by extrusion and the composite produced by this process were characterized by mechanical tests. (author)

  7. SELF-ASSEMBLED LIGNOCELLULOSE MICELLES: A NEW GENERATION OF VALUE-ADDED FUNCTIONAL NANOSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Wang Mail

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulose-based self-assembled micelles have emerged as a new generation of value-added functional nanostructures that show promise to address issues concerning the depletion of non-renewable resources; also these materials may contribute to the growing enthusiasm of utilizing biomass resources. Lignocellulose micelles can be conveniently prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic lignocellulose derivatives in aqueous solution. They show great potential for applications in disparate fields, e.g. drug delivery, bioimaging diagnosis, sensing, nanoreacting, and so on. However, as a new research topic, a lot of research work would be needed to find out the critical structural factors that correlate with the formation, stability, morphology, and flexibility of lignocellulose micelles.

  8. Enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis: Improved cellulase productivity by insoluble solids recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Noah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is necessary to develop efficient methods to produce renewable fuels from lignocellulosic biomass. One of the main challenges to the industrialization of lignocellulose conversion processes is the large amount of cellulase enzymes used for the hydrolysis of cellulose. One method for decreasing the amount of enzyme used is to recycle the enzymes. In this study, the recycle of enzymes associated with the insoluble solid fraction after the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was investigated for pretreated corn stover under a variety of recycling conditions. Results It was found that a significant amount of cellulase activity could be recovered by recycling the insoluble biomass fraction, and the enzyme dosage could be decreased by 30% to achieve the same glucose yields under the most favorable conditions. Enzyme productivity (g glucose produced/g enzyme applied increased between 30 and 50% by the recycling, depending on the reaction conditions. While increasing the amount of solids recycled increased process performance, the methods applicability was limited by its positive correlation with increasing total solids concentrations, reaction volumes, and lignin content of the insoluble residue. However, increasing amounts of lignin rich residue during the recycle did not negatively impact glucose yields. Conclusions To take advantage of this effect, the amount of solids recycled should be maximized, based on a given processes ability to deal with higher solids concentrations and volumes. Recycling of enzymes by recycling the insoluble solids fraction was thus shown to be an effective method to decrease enzyme usage, and research should be continued for its industrial application.

  9. Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzina, Svetlana I.; Shilova, Irina A.; Mikhailov, Al'fa I.

    2011-09-01

    Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials were explored by 3-cm and 2-mm ESR spectroscopy. Background (intrinsic) singlet signals at g=2.003 from wood pulp and lignin and those arising during reaction of lignocellulose materials with acids and chlorine were attributed to radicals with conjugated C?C bonds. The 2-mm ESR signal with 3D anisotropy of g-factor from o-semiquinone radical ions formed in reaction of lignin with NaOH was recorded for the first time. The singlet signals derived from cellulose ?-irradiated at 77 K and marked out during post-thermal reactions were assigned to radicals with conjugated bonds. In wetted cellulose, a triplet signal with ??H?2.7 mT and imposed quadruplet structure (0.5-0.7 mT) from three ?-protons was detected at 300 K and attributed to ? 4-radicals. The triplet signals derived from ? 2- and ? 3-radicals in pyranose cycles of cellulose exhibited higher values of ??H (3.0-3.2 mT) and lower thermal stability (up to 250 K). In radiolyzed cotton pulp, detected were ESR signals derived from formyl radicals formed upon rupture of the ? 5?? 6 bond in pyranose cycles. Heating up irradiated samples under ? 2 was accompanied by formation of peroxide radicals. Photoinduced recombination of trapped electrons with ? 1-radicals was found to proceed as a chain reaction with a kinetic length of about 25 units. Photolysis ( ??360 nm) of radiolyzed cellulose enhanced the disclosure of pyranose cycles and, as a result, the evolution of CO 2 by a factor of 2-2.5.

  10. Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials were explored by 3-cm and 2-mm ESR spectroscopy. Background (intrinsic) singlet signals at g=2.003 from wood pulp and lignin and those arising during reaction of lignocellulose materials with acids and chlorine were attributed to radicals with conjugated C--C bonds. The 2-mm ESR signal with 3D anisotropy of g-factor from o-semiquinone radical ions formed in reaction of lignin with NaOH was recorded for the first time. The singlet signals derived from cellulose ?-irradiated at 77 K and marked out during post-thermal reactions were assigned to radicals with conjugated bonds. In wetted cellulose, a triplet signal with ??H?2.7 mT and imposed quadruplet structure (0.5-0.7 mT) from three ?-protons was detected at 300 K and attributed to S4-radicals. The triplet signals derived from S2- and S3-radicals in pyranose cycles of cellulose exhibited higher values of ??H (3.0-3.2 mT) and lower thermal stability (up to 250 K). In radiolyzed cotton pulp, detected were ESR signals derived from formyl radicals formed upon rupture of the S5--S6 bond in pyranose cycles. Heating up irradiated samples under O2 was accompanied by formation of peroxide radicals. Photoinduced recombination of trapped electrons with S1-radicals was found to proceed as a chain reaction with a kinetic length in reaction with a kinetic length of about 25 units. Photolysis (??360 nm) of radiolyzed cellulose enhanced the disclosure of pyranose cycles and, as a result, the evolution of CO2 by a factor of 2-2.5.

  11. Inhibition of Cellulase-Catalyzed Lignocellulosic Hydrolysis by Iron and Oxidative Metal Ions and Complexes ?

    OpenAIRE

    Tejirian, Ani; Xu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis plays a key role in microbially driven carbon cycling and energy conversion and holds promise for bio-based energy and chemical industries. Cellulases (key lignocellulose-active enzymes) are prone to interference from various noncellulosic substances (e.g., metal ions). During natural cellulolysis, these substances may arise from other microbial activities or abiotic events, and during industrial cellulolysis, they may be derived from biomass feedstocks or ...

  12. Ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass by recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Badal; Michael A. Cotta

    2012-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, upon pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, generates a mixture of hexose and pentose sugars such as glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. While Escherichia coli utilizes all these sugars it lacks the ability to produce ethanol from them. Recombinant ethanologenic E. coli strains have been created with a goal to produce ethanol from both hexose and pentose sugars. Herein, we review the current state of the art on the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic hydr...

  13. Cellulolytic enzymes on lignocellulosic substrates in solid state fermentation by Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, M. Subhosh; Viswanath, Buddolla; Reddy, B. Rajasekhar

    2007-01-01

    The production of cellulolytic enzymes by Aspergillus niger on lignocellulosic substrates groundnut fodder, wheat bran, rice bran and sawdust in solid state fermentation in a laboratory scale was compared. Czapek Dox liquid broth amended with cellulose (0.5%) was used to moisten lignocellulosic solid supports for cultivation of Aspergillus niger. The production of filter paperase, carboxymethyl cellulase and -glucosidase were monitored at daily intervals for 5 days. The peak production of the...

  14. Lignosulfonate and elevated pH can enhance enzymatic saccharification of lignocelluloses

    OpenAIRE

    Zj, Wang; Tq, Lan; Jy, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Nonspecific (nonproductive) binding (adsorption) of cellulase by lignin has been identified as a key barrier to reduce cellulase loading for economical sugar and biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL) is a relatively new process, but demonstrated robust performance for sugar and biofuel production from woody biomass especially softwoods in terms of yields and energy efficiencies. This study...

  15. Design and construction of modular genetic devices and the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, Damian Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The enzymatic deconstruction of lignocellulosic plant biomass is performed by specialist microbial species. It is a ubiquitous process within nature and central to the global recycling of carbon and energy. Lignocellulose is a complex heteropolymer, highly recalcitrant and resistant to hydrolysis due to the major polysaccharide cellulose existing as a crystalline lattice, intimately associated with a disordered sheath of hemicellulosic polysaccharides and lignin. In this thesis...

  16. Solar assisted alkali pretreatment of garden biomass: Effects on lignocellulose degradation, enzymatic hydrolysis, crystallinity and ultra-structural changes in lignocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S P M Prince; Vaidya, Atul N; Das, Sera; Wate, Satish R

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of solar assisted alkali pretreatment (SAAP) on garden biomass (GB). The pretreatment efficiency was assessed based on lignocellulose degradation, conversion of cellulose into reducing sugars, changes in the ultra-structure and functional groups of lignocellulose and impact on the crystallinity of cellulose, etc. SAAP was found to be efficient for the removal of lignin and hemicellulose that facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. FTIR and XRD studies provided details on the effectiveness of SAAP on lignocellulosic moiety and crystallinity of cellulose. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed ultra-structural disturbances in the microfibrils of GB as a result of pretreatment. The mass balance closer of 97.87% after pretreatment confirmed the reliability of SAAP pretreatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that SAAP is not only an efficient means of pretreatment but also economical as it involved no energy expenditure for heat generation during pretreatment. PMID:25816769

  17. Spent fuel storage pool facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent overflow of pool water through a vent port when the wave rising in pool water due to earthquake or the like or overfilling of pool water occurs by providing a floater adapted to the vent port formed at the wall surface of the spent fuel storage pool. Constitution: A ventilation air conditioning system is provided on the wall surface of the pool storing spent fuel, and this air conditioning system is communicated with spent fuel storage pool facilities and ventilation at the upper part of the pool is carried out. Furthermore, this air-conditioning system comprises a ventilation port suspending the floater down which is ordinarily floating on the upper surface of the pool, and is communicated with the outside of the building by a duct. For this reason, even when water rises up to the ventilation port due to the wave rising or the like of pool water by earthquake or the like, the floater floats up and shields the ventilation port. Therefore, water does not overflow from the ventilation port, and spent fuel cans be safely cooled and the exposure to radioactivity by water shielding can be suppressed. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. Study on spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to examine the storage proplem of spent fuel at nuclear power plants which may occur sometime in early 1990's and to fine out the best option for spent fuel management by the evaluating both technical and ecomomical aspects. In this study 3 scenaios have been evaluated: 1) once-through fuel cycle, 2) reprocessing outside our country and 3) reprocessing inside our country. Spent fuel arisings from nuclear power plants by 2000 have been calculated by using SCENARIOS program which was obtained from IAEA. Various storage options inculding rod consolidation at reactor and away from reactor storage have been analyzed mainly based on information which has been supplied U.S. DOE and Pacific Northwest Lab(PNL). This study has been performed as a part of U.S./Korea Joint Spent Fuel Study which was agreed between MOST of Korea and U.S. DOS/DOE in June, 1982. As an agreement, U.S. PNL and KAERI will primary carry out joint study under the guidance of both governments by the end of 1983. As a result of first yesr study, thermal recycle option with domestic reprocessing at around 2000 will be economically feasible comparing with once-through option. Due to the uncertainties and storage of reprocessing facilities in the world, thermal recycle option will toll reprocessing will not be feasible and most expensive, according to examination carried out by KEPCO and KAERI through this year. (Author)

  19. Spent fuel management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of spent nuclear fuel and waste in Sweden is carried out by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB, which is jointly owned by the utilities. SKB operates today facilities for intermediate storage of spent fuel, final disposal of waste from operation and a system for transportation. SKB has in autumn 1998 presented the R and D program 98. It is an overall program for research, development and demonstration of the encapsulation and deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The general goal for SKB activities for the period up to year 2001 is to nominate two candidate sites for the deep repository. Geological investigations are then planned to start on these sites. All spent fuel in Sweden is today transported to the interim storage facility, CLAB. The fuel is stored in water-filled pools situated in rock cavern at a depth of about 30 metres. CLAB has been designed for flexibility. Different types of fuel are stored in the facility; BWR, PWR, MOX and nuclear fuel residues from research. A system has also been developed and licensed to transport and store leaking fuel. Although it is possible to handle leaking fuel its more expensive owing to the special treatment and that the fuel requires more space. Before the spent fuel is emplaced in a deep repository it must be encapsulated in a durable canister. The residual heat of the fuel is an important factor for the final disposal canister. The residual heat influences the distance between dual heat influences the distance between the canisters in the final repository and even the quantity of fuel assemblies that can be accepted per canister. This means that a higher burn-up leads to fewer fuel assemblies but a higher back-end cost per assembly. (author)

  20. Characterization of Peptides Found in Unprocessed and Extruded Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus Pepsin/Pancreatin Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Montoya-Rodríguez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to characterize peptides found in unprocessed amaranth hydrolysates (UAH and extruded amaranth hydrolysates (EAH and to determine the effect of the hydrolysis time on the profile of peptides produced. Amaranth grain was extruded in a single screw extruder at 125 °C of extrusion temperature and 130 rpm of screw speed. Unprocessed and extruded amaranth flour were hydrolyzed with pepsin/pancreatin enzymes following a kinetic at 10, 25, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min for each enzyme. After 180 min of pepsin hydrolysis, aliquots were taken at each time during pancreatin hydrolysis to characterize the hydrolysates by MALDI-TOF/MS-MS. Molecular masses (MM (527, 567, 802, 984, 1295, 1545, 2034 and 2064 Da of peptides appeared consistently during hydrolysis, showing high intensity at 10 min (2064 Da, 120 min (802 Da and 180 min (567 Da in UAH. EAH showed high intensity at 10 min (2034 Da and 120 min (984, 1295 and 1545 Da. Extrusion produced more peptides with MM lower than 1000 Da immediately after 10 min of hydrolysis. Hydrolysis time impacted on the peptide profile, as longer the time lower the MM in both amaranth hydrolysates. Sequences obtained were analyzed for their biological activity at BIOPEP, showing important inhibitory activities related to chronic diseases. These peptides could be used as a food ingredient/supplement in a healthy diet to prevent the risk to develop chronic diseases.

  1. Xylose utilizing Zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Viitanen, Paul V; Stieglitz, Barry

    2013-10-29

    Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

  2. Antioxidant Activities of Hydrolysates of Arca Subcrenata Prepared with Three Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Song

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to get products with antioxidant activity from Arca subcrenata Lischke, the optimal hydrolase and hydrolysis conditionswere investigated in the paper. Three proteases (neutrase, alcalase and papain were applied to hydrolyze the homogenate of A. subcrenata. An orthogonaldesign was used to optimize hydrolysis conditions, and the pH-stat methods was used to determine the degree of hydrolysis. Viewed from the angle ofreducing power, such as scavenging activities against α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical and hydrogen peroxide, the antioxidantactivities of the alcalase hydrolysate (AH were superior to neutrase hydrolysate (NH and papain hydrolysate (PH, and its EC50 values in DPPHradical and hydrogen peroxide scavenging effect were 6.23 mg/ml and 19.09 mg/ml, respectively. Moreover, compared with products hydrolyzed byneutrase and papain, the molecular mass of AH was lower and its content ofamino acid of peptides was higher. Therefore, alcalase was selected as theoptimal enzyme to produce active ingredients since its hydrolysate exhibitedthe best antioxidant activity among them and possessed large amount ofpotential active peptides.

  3. Xylose utilizing zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Stieglitz, Barry; Viitanen, Paul V

    2013-07-02

    Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

  4. WPC Hydrolysates Obtained by the Action of a Pancreatin: Preparation, Analysis and Phenylalanine Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa L. Amorin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to use a pancreatin to obtain Whey Protein Concentrate (WPC hydrolysates with high degree of hydrolysis, appropriate peptide profiles from the nutritional point of view as well as with reduced Phenylalanine (Phe content. Six hydrolysates were prepared by varying the enzyme: Substrate ratio and the substrate concentration. The degree of hydrolysis was calculated by the ratio between a-amino and total nitrogen. The analysis of peptide profile involved the fractionation of hydrolysates by high performance size-exclusion liquid chromatography and the rapid correct fraction area method was used to quantify the chromatographic fraction components. The activated carbon was used to remove Phe and the efficiency of this procedure was evaluated by measuring the amount of this amino acid by second derivative spectrophotometry. The results showed that the degree of hydrolysis changed from 15 to 30%. An appropriate peptide profile was obtained with high free amino acid (55.43% and low large peptide (15.75% contents as well as an amount of di and tripeptides greater than 6%. Also, Phe removal changed from 59.1 to 81.3%. The economical advantage of using the smallest enzyme: Substrate ratio (1:100 was associated to the achievement of the best peptide profile. Thus, the use of a pancreatin in the hydrolytic conditions tested in the current study produced WPC hydrolysates with high degree of hydrolysis, suitable peptide profile and reduced Phe content.

  5. Effect of Adsorption Medium, Hydrolytic Parameters and Ultrafiltration on the Phenylalanine Removal from Pancreatic Whey Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M. Delvivo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of producing dietary supplements for phenylketonurics, using whey hydrolysates as protein sources, the effect of some procedures over phenylalanine (Phe removal was evaluated. Twelve whey hydrolysates were prepared by the action of a pancreatin, in three enzyme:substrate (E:S ratios and two temperatures. Half of the samples were submitted to the ultrafiltration (UF through 10,000 Da cut-off membranes. The activated carbon and the polymeric adsorbent XAD-4 were used for removing Phe from the hydrolysates. The results showed that the activated carbon was more advantageous than the resin, since it led to the lowest final Phe content (2.3 to 38.2 mg Phe/100 g hydrolysate. The effect of E:S ratio, temperature and ultrafiltration was also evaluated. The least final amount of Phe was obtained in absence of UF for three situations: E:S = 0.01% and 25°C, E:S = 0.1% and 50°C, E:S = 1.0% and 50°C.

  6. Distribution of calcium ions in hydrolyses products of proto-pectin of sunflower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of present work is determination calcium ions containing in hydrolyses products of proto-pectins of sunflowers heads which let elaborate optimal method of high quality pectin obtaining. Obtained data in this article indicate that at least one of chemical reactions at hydrolysis passes with participations calcium ions

  7. The extraction kinetics of calcium ions at hydrolyses of proto-pectin of sunflower heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of present work is studying of extraction kinetics of calcium ions at acid hydrolyses of proto-pectin of sunflower heads. Obtained experimental data in this article shows important role of calcium ions in stabilization of various component structures of proto-pectin hydrolysis and possibility of process regulation by selective removal of calcium ions

  8. Effects of chicken-liver hydrolysates on lipid metabolism in a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kou-Tai; Lin, Chen; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2014-10-01

    The contents of free hydrophobic amino acids, taurine and carnosine/anserine were elevated after hydrolyzing chicken livers by pepsin and compared to dried chicken livers. Chicken-liver-hydrolysates (CLHs) exhibited in vitro inhibitory lipase activity and bile-acid binding ability (pcarnosine/kg BW. CLHs alleviated (pcarnosine. PMID:24799221

  9. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polypropylene Composites Reinforced with Lignocellulose Nanofibers Dried in Melted Ethylene-Butene Copolymer

    OpenAIRE

    Shinichiro Iwamoto; Shigehiro Yamamoto; Seung-Hwan Lee; Hirokazu Ito; Takashi Endo

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose nanofibers were prepared by the wet disk milling of wood flour. First, an ethylene-butene copolymer was pre-compounded with wood flour or lignocellulose nanofibers to prepare master batches. This process involved evaporating the water of the lignocellulose nanofiber suspension during compounding with ethylene-butene copolymer by heating at 105 °C. These master batches were compounded again with polypropylene to obtain the final composites. Since ethylene-butene copolymer is a...

  10. Application of high rate, high temperature anaerobic digestion to fungal thermozyme hydrolysates from carbohydrate wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, C; O'Reilly, C; McLaughlin, L; Gilleran, G; Tuohy, M; Colleran, E

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using a two-step, fully biological and sustainable strategy for the treatment of carbohydrate rich wastes. The primary step in this strategy involves the application of thermostable enzymes produced by the thermophilic, aerobic fungus, Talaromyces emersonii, to carbohydrate wastes producing a liquid hydrolysate discharged at elevated temperatures. To assess the potential of thermophilic treatment of this hydrolysate, a comparative study of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion of four sugar rich thermozyme hydrolysate waste streams was conducted by operating two high rate upflow anaerobic hybrid reactors (UAHR) at 37 degrees C (R1) and 55 degrees C (R2). The operational performance of both reactors was monitored from start-up by assessing COD removal efficiencies, volatile fatty acid (VFA) discharge and % methane of the biogas produced. Rapid start-up of both R1 and R2 was achieved on an influent composed of the typical sugar components of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). Both reactors were subsequently challenged in terms of volumetric loading rate (VLR) and it was found that a VLR of 9 gCOD l(-1)d(-1) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 day severely affected the thermophilic reactor with instability characterised by a build up of volatile fatty acid (VFA) intermediates in the effluent. The influent to both reactors was changed to a simple glucose and sucrose-based influent supplied at a VLR of 4.5 gCOD l(-1)d(-1) and HRT of 2 days prior to the introduction of thermozyme hydrolysates. Four unique thermozyme hydrolysates were subsequently supplied to the reactors, each for a period of 10 HRTs. The applied hydrolysates were derived from apple pulp, bread, carob powder and cardboard, all of which were successfully and comparably converted by both reactors. The % total carbohydrate removal by both reactors was monitored during the application of the sugar rich thermozyme hydrolysates. This approach offers a sustainable technology for the treatment of carbohydrate rich wastes and highlights the potential of these wastes as substrates for the generation of second-generation biofuels. PMID:19371919

  11. Spent fuel storage process equipment development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy which is a major energy source of national energy supply entails spent fuels. Spent fuels which are high level radioactive meterials, are tricky to manage and need high technology. The objectives of this study are to establish and develop key elements of spent fuel management technologies: handling equipment and maintenance, process automation technology, colling system, and cleanup system. (author)

  12. Protein hydrolysates from the alga Chlorella vulgaris 87/1 with potentialities in immunonutrition

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Humberto J, Morris; Olimpia V, Carrillo; Ángel, Almarales; Rosa C, Bermúdez; María E, Alonso; Leonardo, Borges; María M, Quintana; Roberto, Fontaine; Gabriel, Llauradó; Martha, Hernández.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyta, Chlorophyceae) has received a particular attention in the programmes of microalgae utilisation in biotechnology. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cell proteins represents a very promising method to increase protein digestibility and thus, for obtaining hydrolysates with impro [...] ved nutritional and functional properties. However, this technology has been little approached and the biological evaluation of hydrolysates has had a strictly nutritional nature. The design of hydrolysis conditions that combined for the first time, the use of C.vulgaris 87/1 treated with ethanol and pancreatin at pH values of 7.5-8.0, led to a product with a degree of hydrolysis of 20-22% and yields of 50-55%, characterised by a high digestibility (97.2%) and nitrogen solubility over a wide pH range (2.0- 10.0). Hydrolysis curves were fitted to an exponential model, common to many food proteins. The bulk of the product dry matter consists of soluble peptides and free amino acids (47.7%) with three main peptides of molecular masses between 2 and 5 kDa. The oral administration of Chlorella hydrolysate (500 mg/kg) to undernourished Balb/c mice provided benefits in terms of liver protein metabolism and the induction of anabolic processes in gut mucosa. The hydrolysate also enhanced the immunological recovery, as judged by the stimulation of haemopoiesis, monocyte-macrophage system activation, as well as humoral and cell mediated immune functions, like T-dependent antibody response and the reconstitution of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. These results represent the first findings in the world concerning the immunomodulating effects of a microalgae protein hydrolysate.

  13. Protein hydrolysates from the alga Chlorella vulgaris 87/1 with potentialities in immuno nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyta, Chlorophyceae) has received a particular attention in the programmes of microalgae utilisation in biotechnology. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cell proteins represents a very promising method to increase protein digestibility and thus, for obtaining hydrolysates with improved nutritional and functional properties. However, this technology has been little approached and the biological evaluation of hydrolysates has had a strictly nutritional nature. The design of hydrolysis conditions that combined for the first time, the use of C.vulgaris 87/1 treated with ethanol and pancreatin at pH values of 7.5-8.0, led to a product with a degree of hydrolysis of 20-22% and yields of 50-55%, characterised by a high digestibility (97.2%) and nitrogen solubility over a wide pH range (2.0-10.0). Hydrolysis curves were fitted to an exponential model, common to many food proteins. The bulk of the product dry matter consists of soluble peptides and free amino acids (47.7%) with three main peptides of molecular masses between 2 and 5 kDa. The oral administration of Chlorella hydrolysate (500 mg/kg) to undernourished Balb/c mice provided benefits in terms of liver protein metabolism and the induction of anabolic processes in gut mucosa. The hydrolysate also enhanced the immunological recovery, as judged by the stimulation of haemopoiesis, monocyte macrophage system activation, as well as humoral and cell mediated immune functions, like T-dependent antibody respofunctions, like T-dependent antibody response and the reconstitution of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. These results represent the first findings in the world concerning the immunomodulating effects of a microalgae protein hydrolysate. (author)

  14. Antimicrobial potential for the combination of bovine lactoferrin or its hydrolysate with lactoferrin-resistant probiotics against foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P-W; Jheng, T T; Shyu, C-L; Mao, F C

    2013-03-01

    Previous reports have shown that several probiotic strains can resist the antibacterial activity of bovine lactoferrin (bLf), but the results are inconsistent. Moreover, a portion of orally administered apo-bLf is digested in vivo by pepsin to yield bLf hydrolysate, which produces stronger antibacterial activity than that observed with apo-bLf. However, whether bLf hydrolysate affects the growth of probiotic strains is unclear. Therefore, various probiotic strains in Taiwan were collected and evaluated for activity against apo-bLf and bLf hydrolysate in vitro. Thirteen probiotic strains were evaluated, and the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356, Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103, Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707, and Bifidobacterium lactis BCRC 17394 were inhibited by both apo-bLf and bLf hydrolysate. The growth of 8 strains were not affected by apo-bLf and bLf hydrolysate, including L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469, Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 23272, Lactobacillus fermentum ATCC 11739, Lactobacillus coryniformis ATCC 25602, L. acidophilus BCRC 14065, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 15697, Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521, and Pediococcus acidilactici ATCC 8081. However, apo-bLf and its hydrolysate inhibited the growth of foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Moreover, the supernatants produced by L. fermentum, B. lactis, and B. longum inhibited the growth of most pathogens. Importantly, a combination of apo-bLf or bLf hydrolysate with the supernatants of cultures of the organisms described above showed synergistic or partially synergistic effects against the growth of most of the selected pathogens. In conclusion, several probiotic strains are resistant to apo-bLf and bLf hydrolysate, warranting clinical studies to evaluate the antimicrobial potential for the combination of apo-bLf or its hydrolysate with specific probiotics. PMID:23332852

  15. Characterization of Animal By-Product Hydrolysates to Be Used as Healthy and Bioactive Ingredients in Food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Trine Desiree

    2014-01-01

    The world meat production and consumption has increased rapidly over the last couple of decades, due to population and income growth. In contrast to the meat, the consumption of animal by-products has been declining, leaving large amounts of by-products underutilized. As many by-products are highly nutritious as well as being good sources of protein, they represent interesting substrates for the generation of bioactive hydrolysates and peptides. Different porcine and bovine by-products were hydrolysed with a mixture consisting of Alcalase®and Protamex, and tested in relation to antioxidant capacity and their “meat factor” effect, i.e. their ability to enhance in vitro iron availability. Hydrolysates of different animal by-products displayed antioxidant capacities as observed by several assays intended to test different antioxidant mechanisms. The radical scavenging capacity of the hydrolysates was found to correlate with the content of Trp, Tyr, Met and Arg whereas the ability to inhibit the oxidation of lineoleic acid correlated with the content of Glu and His. The iron chelating capacity of hydrolysates of some bovine tissues displayed the strongest iron chelation capacity prior to hydrolysis, and which was found to decrease significantly throughout time of hydrolysis. In contrast, hydrolysates of other bovine tissues displayed an initial increase in iron chelation capacity, but then reached a time point from where on the capacities decreased. The iron chelation capacities of some of these tissues showed strong negative correlations with increasing proportions of low molecular peptides in the hydrolysates. Hydrolysates of bovine tissues were tested for their “meat factor” effect. Hydrolysed liver and hanger steak –tissues were capable of enhancing the in vitro iron availability as observed by their ability to reduce and chelate ferric iron. An udder hydrolysate also exhibited chelating capacity, but no reducing capacity was observed. Furthermore, the hydrolysed hanger steak displayed a concentration-dependenteffect on its ability to reduce and chelate ferric iron, as both were observed to increase with a higher dose. These results are interesting in regard to optimizing the value of animal by-products by converting such tissues into bioactive hydrolysates for potential use as natural ingredients in functional foods.

  16. Overview of spent fuel management and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results compiled in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel worldwide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialized and developed countries of the world are discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. Some projections of spent fuel inventories to the year 2006 are presented and discussed. (author)

  17. Spent fuel corrosion and dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the current status of the Swedish programme for the study of the corrosion of spent fuel in bicarbonate groundwaters. Results from the on-going experimental programme are presented and compared with the data base accumulated over the past ten years. Release of uranium and the other actinides was solubility-controlled under the semi-static type of experiments performed. The limiting solubility for uranium under oxic conditions was consistent with the hypothesis that the redox potential of the system is assumed to correspond to the U3O7/U3O8 transition. The measured release fractions for 137Cs, 90Sr and 99Tc are discussed and used to exemplify the probable dissolution and corrosion processes involved. A substantial part of the Swedish programme is directed to the characterization of spent fuel before and after corrosion tests. Recent results are presented on the identification of possible corrosion sites. (26 refs.) (au)

  18. Storage vessel for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The storage vessel of the present invention can effectively utilize after heat generated by decay of spent fuels discharged from a reactor. Namely, the storage vessel is constituted with radiation shielding materials and comprises following members. (1) A chamber in which air is circulated and discharged from an air exhaustion port. (2) Storage tubes for containing spent fuels and disposed in the inside of the chamber. (3) An after heat recovering device disposed in the vicinity of an air exhaustion port for recovering the heat transferred from the storage tubes to the air which circulates in the inside of the chamber. Further, the after heat recovering device also comprises a heat exchanger for recovering heat of the air, a heat pump utilizing the recovered heat. The heat recovered by those members can be utilized for air conditioning and supply of warm water to storage facilities and peripheries thereof. (I.S.)

  19. The Idaho spent fuel project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Department of Energy awarded a privatized contract to TTFWI (Tetra Tech Foster Wheeler Inc.) in May 2000 for the design, licensing, construction and operation of a spent nuclear fuel repackaging and storage facility. The TTFWI Team consists TTFWI (the primary contractor), Alstec, RWE-Nukem, RIO Technical Services, Winston and Strawn, and Utility Engineering. The Idaho Spent Fuel (ISF) facility is an integral part of the DOE-EM approach to accelerating SNF disposition at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Construction of this facility is also important in helping DOE to meet the provisions of the Idaho Settlement Agreement. The ISF Facility is a substantial facility with heavy shielding walls in the repackaging and storage bays and state-of-the-art features required to meet the provisions of 10 CRF 72 requirements. The facility is designed for a 40-year life. (author)

  20. Dry spent nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport News Shipbuilding, (NNS), has been transferring spent nuclear fuel in a dry condition for over 25 years. It is because of this successful experience that NNS decided to venture into the design, construction and operation of a commercial dry fuel transfer project. NNS is developing a remote handling system for the dry transfer of spent nuclear fuel. The dry fuel transfer system is applicable to spent fuel pool-to-cask or cask-to-cask or both operations. It is designed to be compatible with existing storage cask technology as well as the developing multi-purpose canister design. The basis of NNS' design is simple. It must be capable of transferring all fuel designs, it must be capable of servicing 100 percent of the commercial nuclear plants, it must protect the public and nuclear operators, it must be operated cost efficiently and it must be transportable. Considering the basic design parameters, the following are more specific requirements included in the design: (a) Total weight of transfer cask less than 24 tons; (b) no requirement for permanent site modifications to support system utilization; (c) minimal radiation dose to operating personnel; (d) minimal generation of radioactive waste; (e) adaptability to any size and length fuel or cask; (f) portability of system allowing its efficient movement from site to site; (g) safe system; all possible ''off normal'' situations are being considered, and resultant safety systems are being engineered into NNS' desigstems are being engineered into NNS' design to mitigate problems. The primary focus of this presentation is to provide an overview of NNS' Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer System. (author). 5 refs

  1. Worldwide spent fuel transportation logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the worldwide transportation requirements for spent fuel. Included are estimates of numbers and types of shipments by mode and cask type for 1985 and the year 2000. In addition, projected capital and transportation costs are presented. For the year 1977 and prior years inclusive, there is a cumulative worldwide requirement for approximately 300 MTU of spent fuel storage at away-from-reactor (AFR) facilities. The cumulative requirements for years through 1985 are projected to be nearly 10,000 MTU, and for the years through 2000 the requirements are conservatively expected to exceed 60,000 MTU. These AFR requirements may be related directly to spent fuel transportation requirements. In total nearly 77,000 total cask shipments of spent fuel will be required between 1977 and 2000. These shipments will include truck, rail, and intermodal moves with many ocean and coastal water shipments. A limited number of shipments by air may also occur. The US fraction of these is expected to include 39,000 truck shipments and 14,000 rail shipments. European shipments to regional facilities are expected to be primarily by rail or water mode and are projected to account for 16,000 moves. Pacific basin shipments will account for 4500 moves. The remaining are from other regions. Over 400 casks will be needed to meet the transportation demands. Capital investment is expected to reach $800,000,000 in 1977 dollars. Cumulative transport costs will be a staggeumulative transport costs will be a staggering $4.4 billion dollars

  2. Spent fuel receipt scenarios study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports on the results of an assignment from the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to evaluate of the effects of different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel on the potential performance of the waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. The initial evaluations were performed and an interim letter report was prepared during the fall of 1988. Subsequently, the scope of work was expanded and additional analyses were conducted in 1989. This report combines the results of the two phases of the activity. This study is a part of a broader effort to investigate the options available to the DOE and the nuclear utilities for selection of spent fuel for acceptance into the Federal Waste Management System for disposal. Each major element of the system has evaluated the effects of various options on its own operations, with the objective of providing the basis for performing system-wide trade-offs and determining an optimum acceptance scenario. Therefore, this study considers different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel by the repository only from the narrow perspective of their effect on the very-near-field temperatures in the repository following permanent closure. This report is organized into three main sections. The balance of this section is devoted to a statement of the study objective, a summary of the assumptions. The second section of the report contains a discussion of the major elements of the study. The third section summarizes the results of the study and draws some conclusions from them. The appendices include copies of the waste acceptance schedule and the existing and projected spent fuel inventory that were used in the study. 10 refs., 27 figs

  3. Spent fuel integrity during transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies

  4. Spent fuel: Nuclear security issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives an overview of the current global security threats facing the nuclear industry, with particular reference to spent fuel. It describes the types of nuclear facilities and activities involving radioactive materials that are at risk and the international measures established to counter the risks. In particular, it describes the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency aimed at assisting its Member States in the nuclear security area. (author)

  5. Extended storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the final report on the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Behaviour of Spent Fuel and Storage Facility Components during Long Term Storage (BEFAST-II, 1986-1991). It contains the results on wet and dry spent fuel storage technologies obtained from 16 organizations representing 13 countries who participated in the co-ordinated research programme. Considerable quantities of spent fuel continue to arise and accumulate. Many countries are investigating the option of extended spent fuel storage prior to reprocessing or fuel disposal. Wet storage continues to predominate as an established technology with the construction of additional away-from-reactor storage pools. However, dry storage is increasingly used with most participants considering dry storage concepts for the longer term. Depending on the cladding type options of dry storage in air or inert gas are proposed. Dry storage is becoming widely used as a supplement to wet storage for zirconium alloy clad oxide fuels. Storage periods as long as under wet conditions appear to be feasible. Dry storage will also continue to be used for Al clad and Magnox type fuel. Enhancement of wet storage capacity will remain an important activity. Rod consolidation to increase wet storage capacity will continue in the UK and is being evaluated for LWR fuel in the USA, and may start in some other countries. High density storage racks have been successfully introduced in many existing pools and are planned for future facilities. For extremely long wet storage (?50 years), there is a need to continue work on fuel integrity investigations and LWR fuel performance modelling. it might be that pool component performance in some cases could be more limiting than the FA storage performance. It is desirable to make concerted efforts in the field of corrosion monitoring and prediction of fuel cladding and poll component behaviour in order to maintain good experience of wet storage. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Rhodamine B removal with activated carbons obtained from lignocellulosic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Lacerda, Viviane; López-Sotelo, Juan B; Correa-Guimarães, Adriana; Hernández-Navarro, Salvador; Sánchez-Báscones, Mercedes; Navas-Gracia, Luis M; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2015-05-15

    By-products from the wax production process from carnauba palm (leaves), from the extraction of oil from macauba seeds (endocarp) and from pine nut production (shell) have been assessed for activated carbon production, using H3PO4 or CaCl2 for their chemical activation. The resulting activated charcoals have been thoroughly characterized by elemental and thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron scanning microscopy and N2 adsorption behavior. Subsequently, their adsorption capacity for the removal of rhodamine B (RhB) from aqueous solutions has been evaluated by studying different parameters: contact time, pH, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration and solution temperature. The adsorption of RhB followed Freundlich's model in all cases. Kinetic studies indicate that the pseudo-second order model can be used for describing the dynamics of the adsorption process. Thermodynamic parameters have also been evaluated, indicating its endothermic and spontaneous nature. Finally, a preliminary analysis of the impact of cellulose content in the carbon precursor materials has been conducted, by using a mixture of native cellulose with one of the lignocellulosic materials. PMID:25770964

  7. Life cycle evaluation of emerging lignocellulosic ethanol conversion technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatari, Sabrina; Bagley, David M; MacLean, Heather L

    2010-01-01

    Lignocellulosic ethanol holds promise for addressing climate change and energy security issues associated with personal transportation through lowering the fuel mixes' carbon intensity and petroleum demand. We compare the technological features and life cycle environmental impacts of near- and mid-term ethanol bioconversion technologies in the United States. Key uncertainties in the major processes: pre-treatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation are evaluated. The potential to reduce fossil energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions varies among bioconversion processes, although all options studied are considerably more attractive than gasoline. Anticipated future performance is found to be considerably more attractive than that published in the literature as being achieved to date. Electricity co-product credits are important in characterizing the GHG impacts of different ethanol production pathways; however, in the absence of near-term liquid transportation fuel alternatives to gasoline, optimizing ethanol facilities to produce ethanol (as opposed to co-products) is important for reducing the carbon intensity of the road transportation sector and for energy security. PMID:19762231

  8. New products made with lignocellulosic nanofibers from Brazilian amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalino, L.; Mendes, L. M.; Tonoli, G. H. D.; Rodrigues, A.; Fonseca, A.; Cunha, P. I.; Marconcini, J. M.

    2014-08-01

    The biodiversity of the Amazon forest is undoubtedly rich; hence there is considerable variety of plant fibers regarding their morphological, chemical and structural properties. The legal exploration of the Brazilian Amazon is based on sustainable management techniques, but the generation of a relevant amount of plant wastes still cant be avoided. The correct destination of such materials is a challenge that Brazilian companies have to face. In this context, the National Council of Science and Technology (CNPq) promoted the creation of investigation nets on sustainability of Brazilian agribusiness. The Brazilian Net on Lignocellulosic Composites and Nanocomposites was then created, with partnership between several national and international research institutions. Until the moment, the results showed that Amazon plant fibers that are discarded as residues have great potential to nanofiber production. Nanopapers with considerable high mechanical and physical strength, proper opacity and great crystalline index were produced by using a clean and simple mechanical method. Those materials are candidates to several uses such as packaging, substrates transparent conductive films, gas barrier films, solar cells and e-papers.

  9. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT APPROACHES FOR THE DRYING OF LIGNOCELLULOSE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Tenorio,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to evaluate three methodological approaches for the drying (air drying, solar drying, and hot-air drying of three lignocelluloses residues in Costa Rica, namely the empty fruit bunches of oil palm (EFB, pineapple plant leaves (PL with different treatments on this leaf, and sawdust from Gmelina arborea (GAD. The initial moisture content (MCi, the drying times, and the variation of moisture content (MC with time were determined. A mathematical model of the relation between MC and drying time was also established. The results showed that the MCi was the highest in PL (over 79%, followed by EFB (over 47%, and GAD (lower than 47%. Drying times were higher for air drying, followed by solar drying, and finally hot-air drying. PL showed the longest drying times, followed by GAD and EFB. However, it can be reduced by shortening strands, application of grooves in the cuticle, or crushing the leaf. The MC variation model revealed that the function was Y = ax3 + bx2 + cx + d for all three drying techniques, and the weather conditions where the drying was tested. This model presents high coefficients of determination (over 0.97 and low percentage of errors (1.85-4.73%.

  10. Pinch analysis for bioethanol production process from lignocellulosic biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioethanol produced from carbon neutral and renewable biomass resources is an attractive process for the mitigation of greenhouse gases from vehicle exhaust. This study investigated energy utilization during bioethanol production from lignocellulose while avoiding competition with food production from corn and considering the potential mitigation of greenhouse gases. Process design and simulations were performed for bioethanol production using concentrated sulfuric acid. Mass and heat balances were obtained by process simulations, and the heat recovery ratio was determined by pinch analysis. An energy saving of 38% was achieved. However, energy supply and demand were not effectively utilized in the temperature range from 95 to 100 oC. Therefore, a heat pump was used to improve the temperature range of efficient energy supply and demand. Results showed that the energy required for the process could be supplied by heat released during the process. Additionally, the power required was supplied by surplus power generated during the process. Thus, pinch analysis was used to improve the energy efficiency of the process. - Highlights: ? Effective energy utilization of bioethanol production was studied by using pinch analysis. ? It was found that energy was not effectively utilized in the temperature range from 95 to 100 oC. ? Use of a heat pump was considered to improve the ineffective utilization. ? Then, remarkable energy savings could be achikable energy savings could be achieved by it. ? Pinch analysis effectively improved the energy efficiency of the bioethanol production.

  11. Using Populus as a lignocellulosic feedstock for bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Ilga; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2015-04-01

    Populus species along with species from the sister genus Salix will provide valuable feedstock resources for advanced second-generation biofuels. Their inherent fast growth characteristics can particularly be exploited for short rotation management, a time and energy saving cultivation alternative for lignocellulosic feedstock supply. Salicaceae possess inherent cell wall characteristics with favorable cellulose to lignin ratios for utilization as bioethanol crop. We review economically important traits relevant for intensively managed biofuel crop plantations, genomic and phenotypic resources available for Populus, breeding strategies for forest trees dedicated to bioenergy provision, and bioprocesses and downstream applications related to opportunities using Salicaceae as a renewable resource. Challenges need to be resolved for every single step of the conversion process chain, i.e., starting from tree domestication for improved performance as a bioenergy crop, bioconversion process, policy development for land use changes associated with advanced biofuels, and harvest and supply logistics associated with industrial-scale biorefinery plants using Populus as feedstock. Significant hurdles towards cost and energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and yield maximization with regards to biomass pretreatment, saccharification, and fermentation of celluloses and the sustainability of biorefineries as a whole still need to be overcome. PMID:25676392

  12. Switchable ionic liquids as delignification solvents for lignocellulosic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugwom, Ikenna; Eta, Valerie; Virtanen, Pasi; Mäki-Arvela, Päivi; Hedenström, Mattias; Hummel, Michael; Sixta, Herbert; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-04-01

    The transformation of lignocellulosic materials into potentially valuable resources is compromised by their complicated structure. Consequently, new economical and feasible conversion/fractionation techniques that render value-added products are intensely investigated. Herein an unorthodox and feasible fractionation method of birch chips (B. pendula) using a switchable ionic liquid (SIL) derived from an alkanol amine (monoethanol amine, MEA) and an organic super base (1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene, DBU) with two different trigger acid gases (CO2 and SO2 ) is studied. After SIL treatment, the dissolved fractions were selectively separated by a step-wise method using an antisolvent to induce precipitation. The SIL was recycled after concentration and evaporation of anti-solvent. The composition of undissolved wood after MEA-SO2 -SIL treatment resulted in 80 wt % cellulose, 10 wt % hemicelluloses, and 3 wt % lignin, whereas MEA-CO2 -SIL treatment resulted in 66 wt % cellulose, 12 wt % hemicelluloses and 11 wt % lignin. Thus, the MEA-SO2 -SIL proved more efficient than the MEA-CO2 -SIL, and a better solvent for lignin removal. All fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and Gel permeation chromatography (GPC). PMID:24616172

  13. Caracterização de hidrolisados enzimáticos de pescado / Characterization of enzymatic fish hydrolysates

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    R.A.M., Neves; N.V.M. de, Mira; U.M. Lanfer, Marquez.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Hidrolisados enzimáticos são utilizados no tratamento clínico de pacientes com dificuldade em digerir e absorver proteínas, sendo preferidos em relação às misturas de aminoácidos livres. Neste trabalho foram caracterizados quimicamente seis hidrolisados de minced de pescado, obtidos pelo emprego de [...] diferentes sistemas enzimáticos, quanto à extensão da hidrólise, distribuição de peso molecular dos peptídios, composição química e perfil de aminoácidos. A hidrólise resultou na solubilização de 63,4 a 94,2% das proteínas, sendo esta diretamente proporcional ao grau de hidrólise e dependente do sistema enzimático e das variáveis do processo (relação enzima/substrato e atividade enzimática). A composição dos hidrolisados atendeu à recomendação de ingestão dietética para aminoácidos essenciais, tanto para crianças como para adultos. A relação entre a concentração de aminoácidos ramificados e aromáticos (Relação de Fischer) resultou em valores superiores a 3,5 indicando que os hidrolisados obtidos podem ser úteis para a manutenção dietética de pacientes com doenças hepáticas crônicas. Os hidrolisados forneceram peptídios com pesos moleculares bem definidos, destacando-se o obtido com pepsina e protease de Streptomyces griseus, que apresentou 57% de peptídios menores do que 3 kDa, adequado para o uso em formulações hipoalergênicas. Abstract in english Enzymatic hydrolysates have been used in the clinical treatment of patients with protein digestion and absorption impairment and have been preferred to mixtures of free amino acids. In this present work, six protein hydrolysates of minced fish, obtained by distinct enzymatic systems were characteriz [...] ed regarding the extent of hydrolysis, distribution of molecular size of peptides, chemical composition and amino acids profiles. The hydrolysis resulted in solubilization of 63,4% to 94,2% of proteins according to the enzymes used and process variables (enzyme substrate ratio and enzyme activity) and was proportional to the degree of hydrolysis. The composition of all the hydrolysates attends the dietary reference intakes for essential amino acids established for adults and infant nutrition. The ratio between the concentration of branched chain and aromatic amino acids (Fischer Ratio) was higher than 3,5 indicating that the hydrolysates obtained could be useful for dietetic management of patients with chronic liver diseases. The hydrolysates were composed of peptides with fairly defined molecular weights, highlighting the hydrolysate obtained by pepsin and Streptomyces griseus protease which showed a high percentage (57%) of peptides smaller than 3kDa suitable for use in hypoallergenic formulas.

  14. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM A MEMBRANE PURIFIED HEMICELLULOSIC HYDROLYSATE DERIVED FROM SUGAR MAPLE BY PICHIA STIPITIS NRRL Y-7124

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna M. Stoutenburg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to devise inexpensive and sustainable production of ethanol fuel, experiments were conducted to establish conditions for Pichia stipitis NRRL Y-7124 to ferment a membrane treated wood hydrolysate derived from sugar maple to produce ethanol. The degree of aeration required to effectively utilize xylose, produce ethanol, and minimize xylitol formation as well as the optimal hydrolysate concentration were the conditions examined. P. stipitis produced the highest concentrations of ethanol in shake flasks at 150 rpm (14.3 g/L in 71 h, and 50% hydrolysate maximized ethanol yield (12.4 g/L in 51.5 h. In the 50% hydrolysate cultures, P. stipitis produced ethanol at a rate of 0.24 g/L?h with a yield of 0.41 g ethanol/g wood-derived carbohydrate.

  15. VALORIZATION AND BIODECOLORIZATION OF DYE ADSORBED ON LIGNOCELLULOSICS USING WHITE ROT FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Ozmen,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of dyes by lignocelluloses may be an effective method for removing dyes from textile effluents. However, the resulting dye-adsorbed lignocellulosic materials may constitute another pollution problem. An integrated method can solve this problem. Here, various lignocelluloses were tested for their Astrazon Black and Astrazon Blue dyes removal activities. The dye adsorbed after 30 min contact time was 90% (45 mg/L, 70% (35 mg/L, and 98% (49 mg/L for wheat bran, pine cone, and cotton stalk, respectively. These dye-adsorbed lignocellulosic wastes then were used as solid substrates to produce laccase enzyme with Funalia trogii and Trametes versicolor under solid state fermentation (SSF. Among the lignocellulosic substrates, the dye-adsorbed wheat bran served as the best solid substrate for laccase production under SSF. Therefore, it was also tested as a solid source for laccase production under submerged fermentation. During solid state fermentation, these two fungi were able to highly decolorize these dyes. While F. trogii decolorized 80% of Astrazon Black dye adsorbed onto wheat bran, T. versicolor decolorized 86%. On the other hand, the decolorization values for Astrazon Blue dye were 69% and 84%, respectively.

  16. Xylose fermentation as a challenge for commercialization of lignocellulosic fuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sànchez Nogué, Violeta; Karhumaa, Kaisa

    2015-04-01

    Fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials is at a level where commercial biofuel production is becoming a reality. The solubilization of the hemicellulose fraction in lignocellulosic-based feedstocks results in a large variety of sugar mixtures including xylose. However, allowing xylose fermentation in yeast that normally is used for fuel ethanol production requires genetic engineering. Moreover, the efficiency of lignocellulosic pretreatment, together with the release and generation of inhibitory compounds in this step, are some of the new challenges faced during second generation ethanol production. Successful advances in all these aspects will improve ethanol yield, productivity and titer, which will reduce the impact on capital and operating costs, leading to the consolidation of the fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass as an economically feasible option for the production of renewable fuels. Therefore the development of yeast strains capable of fermenting a wide variety of sugars in a highly inhibitory environment, while maintaining a high ethanol yield and production rate, is required. This review provides an overview of the current status in the use of xylose-engineered yeast strains and describes the remaining challenges to achieve an efficient deployment of lignocellulosic-based ethanol production. PMID:25522734

  17. Ultrasound-assisted production of biodiesel and ethanol from spent coffee grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte; de Matos, Leonardo José Brandão Lima; Lima, Larissa Pinto de; Figueiredo, Pablo Marciano da Silva; Lucena, Izabelly Larissa; Fernandes, Fabiano André Narciso; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates the production of biodiesel and ethanol from spent coffee grounds (SCG). The extraction of oil from SCG, biodiesel production and ethanol production processes were studied. The liquid-to-solid ratio and temperature were evaluated in the ultrasound-assisted extraction of the oil from SCG. The highest yield (12%) was obtained using 4 mL g(-1) liquid-to-solid ratio at 60°C for 45 min. The process to produce biodiesel showed a yield of 97% into fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). The highest glucose yield (192 mg g SCG(-1)) was obtained by hydrolysis with 0.4 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid at 121°C for 15 min. The hydrolysate was used as fermentation medium for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtaining 19.0 g L(-1) at 10h of process of ethanol with a yield of ethanol and productivity of 0.50 g g(-1) and 1.90 g L(-1)h(-1), respectively. Spent coffee grounds were considered a potential feedstock for biodiesel and ethanol production. PMID:24997378

  18. Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Hydrolysates Produced on a Plant Scale Have Antitumor Activity and Immunostimulating Effects in BALB/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Zhong Zhang; Xiu-Lan Chen; Bai-Cheng Zhou; Guo-Fan Wang; Hao Wu; Hai-Lun He; Yu-Kai Wang

    2010-01-01

    Oyster extracts have been reported to have many bioactive peptides. But the function of oyster peptides produced by proteolysis is still unknown. In this study, the oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysates from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) were produced using the protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 at laboratory level, and scaled up to pilot (100 L) and plant (1,000 L) levels with the same conditions. And the antitumor activity and immunostimulating effects of the oyster hydrolysates in BALB/c mice we...

  19. Comparative Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration of Egg Yolk Protein Enzymatic Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Yves Pouliot; Tsutomu Okubo; Juneja, Lekh R.; Yoshinori Mine; Chay Pak Ting, Bertrand P.; Gauthier, Sylvie F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the antioxidant activity of two distinct hydrolysates and their peptide fractions prepared by ultrafiltration (UF) using membranes with molecular weight cut-off of 5 and 1 kDa. The hydrolysates were a delipidated egg yolk protein concentrate (EYP) intensively hydrolyzed with a combination of two bacterial proteases, and a phosphoproteins (PPP) extract partially hydrolyzed with trypsin. Antioxidant activity, as determined by the oxygen radical absorban...

  20. Metabolomics analysis of soy hydrolysates for the identification of productivity markers of mammalian cells for manufacturing therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jason; Shah, Bhavana; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Bhebe, Prince; Zhang, Zhongqi; Nicklaus, Michele; Kombe, Maua C

    2015-03-01

    Soy hydrolysates are widely used as a nutrient supplement in mammalian cell culture for the production of recombinant proteins. The batch-to-batch variability of a soy hydrolysate often leads to productivity differences. This report describes our metabolomics platform, which includes a battery of LC-MS/MS modes of operation, and advanced data analysis software for automated data processing. The platform was successfully used for screening productivity markers in soy hydrolysates during the production of two therapeutic antibodies in two Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. A total of 123 soy hydrolysate batches were analyzed, from which 62 batches were used in the production runs of cell line #1 and 12 batches were used in the production runs of cell line #2. For cell line #1, out of 19 amino acids, 106 other metabolites and 4,131 peptides identified in the soy hydrolysate batches being used, several nucleosides and short hydrophobic peptides showed negative correlation with antibody titer, while ornithine, citrulline and several amino acids and organic acids correlated positively with titer. For cell line #2, only ornithine and citrulline showed strong positive correlation. When ornithine was spiked into the culture media, both cell lines demonstrated accelerated cell growth, indicating ornithine as a root cause of the performance difference. It is proposed that better soy hydrolysate performance resulted from better bacterial fermentation during the hydrolysate production. A few selected markers were used to predict the performance of other soy hydrolysate batches for cell line #1. The predicted titers agreed with the experimental values with good accuracy. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 31:522-531, 2015. PMID:25583076

  1. Peptide-peptide and protein-peptide interactions in mixtures of whey protein isolate and whey protein isolate hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Creusot, N.P.; Gruppen, H.; Koningsveld, G.A., van; Kruif, C.G., de; Voragen, A. G. J.

    2006-01-01

    The extent of aggregation in whey protein isolate (WPI) hydrolysates induced by Bacillus licheniformis protease was quantified as a function of degree of hydrolysis (DH), temperature and ionic strength. The capacity of the hydrolysates to aggregate added intact protein was also studied. The amount of aggregated material and the size of the aggregated peptides were measured by nitrogen content and size exclusion chromatography, respectively. Aggregation increased with DH up to the practical en...

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF HYDROLYSATE OF MEAT PROTEIN OF INDONESIAN LOCAL LIVESTOCKS

    OpenAIRE

    Jamhari; Yusiati, L. M.; Suryanto, E.; Cahyanto, M. N.; Erwanto, Y.; Muguruma, M.

    2013-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of hydrolysate in meat protein of Bali cattle, Kacang goat, native chicken, and local duck. The meats of Bali cattle, Kacang goat, native chicken, and local duck were used in this study. The meats were ground using food processor added with aquadest to obtain meat extract. The meat extracts were then hydrolyzed using protease enzymes to obtain hydrolysate of meat protein. Protein concentrat...

  3. Spent nuclear fuel storage - Basic concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the procedures adopted in others countries in the world, the spent nuclear fuel elements burned to produce electrical energy in the Brazilian Nuclear Power Plant of Angra do Reis, Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto - CNAAA will be stored for a long time. Such procedure will allow the next generation to decide how they will handle those materials. In the future, the reprocessing of the nuclear fuel assemblies could be a good solution in order to have additional energy resource and also to decrease the volume of discarded materials. This decision will be done in the future according to the new studies and investigations that are being studied around the world. The present proposal to handle the nuclear spent fuel is to storage it for a long period of time, under institutional control. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to introduce a proposal of a basic concept of spent fuel storage, which involves the construction of a new storage building at site, in order to increase the present storage capacity of spent fuel assemblies in CNAAA installation; the concept of the spent fuel transportation casks that will transfer the spent fuel assemblies from the power plants to the Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Building and later on from this building to the Long Term Intermediate Storage of Spent Fuel; the concept of the spent fuel canister and finally the basic concept of the spent fuel long term storage. (author)

  4. Antioxidant activity and anti-exercise-fatigue effect of highly denatured soybean meal hydrolysate prepared using neutrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Zhao, Qingshan; Qu, Yanyan; Ye, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Highly denatured soybean meal is a by-product of soybean oil extraction obtained through high-temperature desolventization. High-temperature treatment can result in soybean protein denaturation. Compare with ordinary soybean meal, the protein structure of highly denatured soybean meal has changed. Highly denatured soybean meal was pretreated with thermal treatment or ultrasonication, and then hydrolyzed with neutrase. The ultrasonicated hydrolysate exhibited better antioxidant activity than the thermally treated hydrolysate. The ultrasonication increased 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity by 8.31 % and reduction capacity by 10.19 %. The highly denatured soybean meal hydrolysate ultrasonicated at 400 W exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. The DPPH radical scavenging activity was 56.22 % and reduction capacity was 0.717. The ultrasonicated hydrolysate at 400 W was fractionated using ultrafiltration into three fractions: I (>10 kDa), II (5 kDa to 10 kDa), and III (nitrogen and blood lactic acid. Fraction III improved the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and reduced the malonaldehyde (MDA) content in mouse livers. Therefore, the highly denatured soybean meal hydrolysate has an anti-oxidative effect and it significantly alleviates exercise-fatigue in mice. Amino acids of hydrolysate were determined. Results showed that the antioxidant activity and anti-exercise-fatigue effect were related to the amino acid compositions. PMID:25829578

  5. Oyster (Crassostrea gigas Hydrolysates Produced on a Plant Scale Have Antitumor Activity and Immunostimulating Effects in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhong Zhang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Oyster extracts have been reported to have many bioactive peptides. But the function of oyster peptides produced by proteolysis is still unknown. In this study, the oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysates from oyster (Crassostrea gigas were produced using the protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 at laboratory level, and scaled up to pilot (100 L and plant (1,000 L levels with the same conditions. And the antitumor activity and immunostimulating effects of the oyster hydrolysates in BALB/c mice were investigated. The growth of transplantable sarcoma-S180 was obviously inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in BALB/c mice given the oyster hydrolysates. Mice receiving 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/g of body weight by oral gavage had 6.8%, 30.6% and 48% less tumor growth, respectively. Concurrently, the weight coefficients of the thymus and the spleen, the activity of natural killer (NK cells, the spleen proliferation of lymphocytes and the phagocytic rate of macrophages in S180-bearing mice significantly increased after administration of the oyster hydrolysates. These results demonstrated that oyster hydrolysates produced strong immunostimulating effects in mice, which might result in its antitumor activity. The antitumor and immunostimulating effects of oyster hydrolysates prepared in this study reveal its potential for tumor therapy and as a dietary supplement with immunostimulatory activity.

  6. Replacement of mechanically deboned chicken meat with its protein hydrolysate in mortadella-type sausages

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carlos Pasqualin, Cavalheiro; Fernanda Luisa, Lüdtke; Flávia Santi, Stefanello; Ernesto Hashime, Kubota; Nelcindo Nascimento, Terra; Leadir Lucy Martins, Fries.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mortadella-type sausage manufactured using mechanically deboned chicken meat were reformulated replacing MDCM with increasing amounts of MDCM protein hydrolysates (10%, 20%, and 30%), and their physicochemical, microbiological, and sensorial characteristics were evaluated for 60 days of storage at 4 [...] °C. The higher substitutions resulted in sausages more susceptible to lipid oxidation with higher TBARS values during storage; however, these values were lower than the organoleptic perception threshold. The sausages were darker and less red, with lower lightness (L*) and redness (a*) values than those of the control treatment. They had soft texture, which was evidenced by both the instrumental and sensory analysis. Therefore, the formulation containing 10% of MDCM protein hydrolysates proved to be the most suitable for mortadella-type sausage elaboration.

  7. Identification of food-derived collagen peptides in human blood after oral ingestion of gelatin hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Koji; Hasegawa, Takanori; Taguchi, Yasuki; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Sato, Kenji; Nakamura, Yasushi; Higashi, Akane; Kido, Yasuhiro; Nakabo, Yukihiro; Ohtsuki, Kozo

    2005-08-10

    In the present study, we identified several food-derived collagen peptides in human blood after oral ingestion of some gelatin hydrolysates. Healthy human volunteers ingested the gelatin hydrolysates (9.4-23 g) from porcine skin, chicken feet, and cartilage after 12 h of fasting. Negligible amounts of the peptide form of hydroxyproline (Hyp) were observed in human blood before the ingestion. After the oral ingestion, the peptide form of Hyp significantly increased and reached a maximum level (20-60 nmol/mL of plasma) after 1-2 h and then decreased to half of the maximum level at 4 h after the ingestion. Major constituents of food-derived collagen peptides in human serum and plasma were identified as Pro-Hyp. In addition, small but significant amounts of Ala-Hyp, Ala-Hyp-Gly, Pro-Hyp-Gly, Leu-Hyp, Ile-Hyp, and Phe-Hyp were contained. PMID:16076145

  8. Utilisation Of Spirulinasp. And Chlorellapyrenoidosa Biomass For The Productionof Enzymatic Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane R. Lisboa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This aim of this study was to assess the hydrolysis reaction of the biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosaandSpirulinasp. LEB 18,using commercial proteases that act in different pH ranges, to obtain protein hydrolysates with promising application in food or food supplement, improving functional and nutritional food properties. Threecentral composite study designs were carried out for each microalga (Chlorella and Spirulina. The 2 3 type central composite design was utilized with three replications at the central point, varying the enzyme concentration (5 to 10 U.mL-1 , the concentrationof substrate (5 to 10 % and reaction time (60 to 240 min, for a total of 11 experiments per planning. The highestdegrees of hydrolysis (52.9% and 55.31% forSpirulinaand Chlorella,respectively, were obtained with 4 h of reaction. The results show that it is possible to obtain enzymatic protein hydrolysates with different DH from microalgae biomass.

  9. Production of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot fungi on lignocellulosic wastes using novel pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A K; Vishwakarma, S K; Srivastava, A K; Pandey, V K; Agrawal, S; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    Production of extracellular ligninolytic enzymes (laccase and polyphenol oxidase) secreted by three species of white rot fungi (Pleurotus florida, P. flabellatus and P. sajor—caju) under in vivo condition was studied on two lignocellulosic substrates i.e., paddy straw and wheat straw. These lignocellulosic substrates were treated with neem (Azadirachta indica) oil and ashoka (Saraca indica) leaves extract. Between the two lignocellulosic substrates, paddy straw pretreated with neem oil supported maximum activity of laccase and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). The activities of both the enzymes were low on the 5th day of cultivation which increased on the 10th day and reached at peak on the 15th day. Thereafter, there was continuous decrease in the enzymatic activity. Among the three species, P. flabellatus (P3) showed maximum ligninolytic enzymatic activity followed by P. florida (P2)and P. sajor—caju (P1). PMID:25535711

  10. Production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic materials via the biochemical pathway: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioethanol is by far the most widely used biofuel for transportation worldwide. Production of bioethanol from biomass is one way to reduce both consumption of crude oil and environmental pollution. Bioethanol can be produced from different kinds of raw materials. These raw materials are classified into three categories of agricultural raw materials: simple sugars, starch and lignocellulose. The price of the raw materials is highly volatile, which can highly affect the production costs of the bioethanol. One major problem with bioethanol production is the availability of raw materials for the production. Lignocellulosic biomass is the most promising feedstock considering its great availability and low cost, but the large-scale commercial production of fuel bioethanol from lignocellulosic materials has still not been implemented.

  11. Augmented digestion of lignocellulose by steam explosion, acid and alkaline pretreatment methods: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Joginder; Suhag, Meenakshi; Dhaka, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Lignocellulosic materials can be explored as one of the sustainable substrates for bioethanol production through microbial intervention as they are abundant, cheap and renewable. But at the same time, their recalcitrant structure makes the conversion process more cumbersome owing to their chemical composition which adversely affects the efficiency of bioethanol production. Therefore, the technical approaches to overcome recalcitrance of biomass feedstock has been developed to remove the barriers with the help of pretreatment methods which make cellulose more accessible to the hydrolytic enzymes, secreted by the microorganisms, for its conversion to glucose. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in cost effective manner is a major challenge to bioethanol technology research and development. Hence, in this review, we have discussed various aspects of three commonly used pretreatment methods, viz., steam explosion, acid and alkaline, applied on various lignocellulosic biomasses to augment their digestibility alongwith the challenges associated with their processing. PMID:25498680

  12. Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Feedstocks Based on Enzymatic Hydrolysis: Current Status and Recent Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura El-Ahmady El-Naggar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All over the world, research on bioethanol production has grown with increasing of energy needs and it has become a research area of great interest to many governments, academic groups and companies. Ethanol which is presently the most common renewable fuel, can be produced biologically from a variety of feedstocks and wastes. Due to advances in agriculture and biotechnology one can envision inexpensive production of ethanol based on lignocellulosic biomass. This review summarizes various processes involved in lignocellulosic-derived biofuel bioconversion. Several methods of pretreatment of lignocelluloses are discussed. Characteristics of enzymes and important factors in enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose and hemicellulose are reviewed. Different strategies are then described and illustrated in a simpler form for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation, including separate enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation and consolidated bioprocessing. Furthermore, recent trends, major challenges and perspective of future development are highlighted.

  13. The Use of Ram Horn Hydrolysate as a Supplement for Glycerol Production by Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbanog?lu, Esabi Bas?aran

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the interesting potential of ram horns to be used as a supplement for glycerol production in batch fermentation. The use of ram horn hydrolysate (RHH) as a supplement for glycerol production was investigated using baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For this purpose, RHH was first produced. The production and chemical composition of the RHH was as described in our previous study. The effects of different concentrations (1 to 10% v/v) of RHH on the productio...

  14. Sensory and aromatic characteristics of tongue sole by-products hydrolysates (Cynoglossus senegalensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Sylla, K. S. B.; Berge, Jean-pascal; Prost, Carole; Musabyemariya, B.; Seydi, Mg

    2009-01-01

    Tongue sole by-products coming from fish-filleting plant were hydrolyzed by Protamex® protease. To identify the future application of hydrolysates, a sensory analysis was carried out.The sensory profile was performed with a jury of 14 specialized judges.11 profiles were found by this panel of tasting. In addition, the aromatic characterization revealed that 57 molecules are responsible for these odours described in sensory analysis.The description of these aromatic compounds opens potentia...

  15. Nutritional evaluation of caseins and whey proteins and their hydrolysates from Protamex*

    OpenAIRE

    Sindayikengera, Séverin; Xia, Wen-shui

    2006-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC 80) and sodium caseinate were hydrolyzed by Protamex to 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% degree of hydrolysis (DH). WPC 80, sodium caseinate and their hydrolysates were then analyzed, compared and evaluated for their nutritional qualities. Their chemical composition, protein solubility, amino acid composition, essential amino acid index (EAA index), biological value (BV), nutritional index (NI), chemical score, enzymic protein efficiency ratio (E-PER) and in vitro protein d...

  16. Aggregation of Whey Protein Hydrolysate Using Alcalase 2.4 L

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chunhong; Liu, Wen; Feng, Zhibiao; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe peptide aggregation, which is also known as enzymatic protein resynthesis. Whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) is the starting material for assembling peptides. Analyses of the involved amino acids, intrinsic fluorescence, fluorescence phase diagram, secondary structure, turbidity, and surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the reaction process. The aggregation mechanism consists of two parts: 1) formation and 2) aggregation of the building blocks that form the orde...

  17. Chemometric Analysis of the Amino Acid Requirements of Antioxidant Food Protein Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Chibuike C. Udenigwe; Aluko, Rotimi E.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of individual amino acid residues or groups of amino acids to antioxidant activities of some food protein hydrolysates were investigated using partial least squares (PLS) regression method. PLS models were computed with amino acid composition and 3-z scale descriptors in the X-matrix and antioxidant activities of the samples in the Y-matrix; models were validated by cross-validation and permutation tests. Based on coefficients of the resulting models, it was observed that su...

  18. Multifunctional peptides derived from an egg yolk protein hydrolysate: isolation and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Pokora, Marta; Setner, Bartosz; D?browska, Anna; Szo?tysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Trziszka, Tadeusz; Lubec, Gert; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2014-01-01

    An egg yolk protein by-product following ethanol extraction of phospholipids (YP) was hydrolyzed with pepsin to produce and identify novel peptides that revealed antioxidant, ACE inhibitory and antidiabetic (?-glucosidase and DPP-IV inhibitory) activities. The peptic hydrolysate of YP was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Isolated peptides were identified using mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF) and the Mascot Search Results databas...

  19. Production of protein hydrolysates from fish byproduct prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Murna Muzaifa; Novi Safriani; Fahrizal Zakaria

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the production of fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) from fish by-product prepared by enzymatichydrolysis. Fish by-product were prepared using Alcalase and Flavourzyme enzyme and properties of FPH were analyzed. The resultsshowed that FPH prepared using Alcalase enzyme had greater amount of protein (82.66%) than FPH prepared using Flavourzyme enzyme(73.51%). Solubility, emulsifying and foaming properties of FPH prepared using Alcalase were also better t...

  20. [Soy hydrolysate-based nutrient media: development and study of biological properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanov, Z Z; Kakulina, E A; Sultanova, E I; Aliev, A Z; Perepelitsa, L G; Ramazanova, N P

    2011-03-01

    By using the designed soy hydrolysate, the authors developed dry nutrient media that were analogues of trypticase soy broth, trypticase soy agar, and Eugon agar. The media showed a high sensitivity and a significant accumulative activity against test strains that belonged to different taxonomy groups and they were as good as the known Merck media in these parameters and in the number, size, and shape of colonies. PMID:21574462

  1. Preparative separation of 14C-labelled amino acids from protein hydrolysate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method was developed of preparative separation of protein hydrolysate labelled with 14C. HPLC was used to separate the mixture of amino acids containing aspartic acid, threonine, serine, asparagine, glutamine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, lysine, histidine and arginine. The yield is about 90%. The capacity of the separation system is ca. 9 GBq or 250 mg amino acids per one separation which takes approximately 36 hours. (author)

  2. Optimisation of amino sugar quantification by HPLC in soil and plant hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Indorf, Caroline; Dyckmans, Jens; Khan, Khalid; Joergensen, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Amino sugars are increasingly used as indicators for the accumulation of microbial residues in soil and plant material. A reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was improved for the simultaneous determination of muramic acid, mannosamine, glucosamine and galactosamine in soil and plant hydrolysates via ortho-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) pre-column derivatisation and fluorescence detection. The retention time was reduced, and the separation of muramic acid and mannosamine was op...

  3. Effect of cooking temperatures on protein hydrolysates and sensory quality in crucian carp (Carassius auratus) soup

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinjie; Yao, Yanjia; Ye, Xingqian; Fang, Zhongxiang; Chen, Jianchu; Wu, Dan; Liu, Donghong; Hu, Yaqin

    2011-01-01

    Cooking methods have a significant impact on flavour compounds in fish soup. The effects of cooking temperatures (55, 65, 75, 85, 95, and 100 °C) on sensory properties and protein hydrolysates were studied in crucian carp (Carassius auratus) soup. The results showed that the soup prepared at 85 °C had the best sensory quality in color, flavour, amour, and soup pattern. Cooking temperature had significant influence on the hydrolysis of proteins in the soup showed by SDS-PAGE result. The co...

  4. Spent fuel canister docking station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working report for the spent fuel canister docking station presents a design for the operation and structure of the docking equipment located in the fuel handling cell for the spent fuel in the encapsulation plant. The report contains a description of the basic requirements for the docking station equipment and their implementation, the operation of the equipment, maintenance and a cost estimate. In the designing of the equipment all the problems related with the operation have been solved at the level of principle, nevertheless, detailed designing and the selection of final components have not yet been carried out. In case of defects and failures, solutions have been considered for postulated problems, and furthermore, the entire equipment was gone through by the means of systematic risk analysis (PFMEA). During the docking station designing we came across with needs to influence the structure of the actual disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel, too. Proposed changes for the structure of the steel lid fastening screw were included in the report. The report also contains a description of installation with the fuel handling cell structures. The purpose of the docking station for the fuel handling cell is to position and to seal the disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel into a penetration located on the cell floor and to provide suitable means for executing the loading of the disposal canister and the changing of atmosphere. The designed docking station consisphere. The designed docking station consists of a docking ring, a covering hatch, a protective cone and an atmosphere-changing cap as well as the vacuum technology pertaining to the changing of atmosphere and the inert gas system. As far as the solutions are concerned, we have arrived at rather simple structures and most of the actuators of the system are situated outside of the actual fuel handling cell. When necessary, the equipment can also be used for the dismantling of a faulty disposal canister, cut from its upper end by machining. The overall cost estimate for the manufacture of the equipment, value added tax not included, totalled 669 000 EUR, of which 189 000 EUR constituted designing costs and 73 000 EUR installation costs. (orig.)

  5. Spent nuclear fuel sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes a strategy for sampling the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in the 105-K Basins (105-K East and 105-K West). This strategy will support decisions concerning the path forward SNF disposition efforts in the following areas: (1) SNF isolation activities such as repackaging/overpacking to a newly constructed staging facility; (2) conditioning processes for fuel stabilization; and (3) interim storage options. This strategy was developed without following the Data Quality Objective (DQO) methodology. It is, however, intended to augment the SNF project DQOS. The SNF sampling is derived by evaluating the current storage condition of the SNF and the factors that effected SNF corrosion/degradation

  6. Spent fuel management in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the present and the future spent fuel management in the Slovak utility - Slovak Power Enterprises (SEP) is presented. The annual arising of spent fuel in The Slovak Republic is approximately 40 MtHm. The average burn-up is 32 GWd/TU. Since the first unit started operating in 1978 an amount of 400 MtHM have been generated and will reach 860 MtHM by the year 2000. In the past the spent fuel management based on the assumption, that all spent fuel from WWER reactors will be transported to the reprocessing plant in Russia. After the political changes in the former USSR no spent fuel transports from Slovakia were realized. Only a small amount of the generated WWER spent fuel was transported to the reprocessing plant in Russia. The rest is stored on the territory of the NPP Bohunice in the reactor pools or in the AFR storage. (author). 9 figs

  7. What does time spent on searching indicate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia; Jensen, Sabine Dreier Elgaard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report a comparative study on what users’ time spent on searching for information is an indication of. Time spent is commonly interpreted as an implicit measure of interest, but might indeed describe other circumstances of the information retrieval (IR) interaction. This phenomenon of time spent is interesting from an IR evaluation point of view with reference to how time spent is to be interpreted. A comparison of time spent between a semi-lab interactive IR (IIR) study using simulated work task situations and a naturalistic IIR study is presented. The findings of this comparison are further related to a study on information searching and seeking in the real work environment that provides a resonance board for the reported IIR studies. The main conclusion is that time spent searching depends not only on interest, but also on circumstances such as prior knowledge and external requirements.

  8. The protein encoded by the rolB plant oncogene hydrolyses indole glucosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, J J; Schell, J; Spena, A

    1991-11-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, whose expression stimulates the formation of roots by transformed plant tissues and other growth alterations in transgenic plants, codes for a beta-glucosidase able to hydrolyse indole-beta-glucosides. Indeed, we show that extracts of bacteria and/or plant tissue expressing the rolB protein hydrolyse indoxyl-beta-glucoside (plant indican). Because of the structural similarity between indoxyl-beta-glucoside and indole-3-acetyl-beta-glucoside (IAA-beta-glucoside), we propose that the physiological and developmental alterations in transgenic plants expressing the rolB gene could be the result of an increased intracellular auxin activity caused by the release of active auxins from inactive beta-glucosides. Thus two of the oncogenes carried by the T-DNA of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium rhizogenes (rolB and rolC) perturb plant growth and development by coding for beta-glucosidases with distinct specificities. Whereas the rolC beta-glucosidase releases cytokinins from their glucoside conjugates, the rolB encoded protein hydrolyses indole-beta-glucosides. The combined action of these two genes therefore is expected to modulate the intracellular concentration of two of the main growth factors active in plants. PMID:1915286

  9. Bio-mimetic mineralization potential of collagen hydrolysate obtained from chromium tanned leather waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Madhu, S; Chandra Babu, N K; Shanthi, C

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics serve as an alternative to autogenous-free bone grafting by virtue of their excellent biocompatibility. However, chemically synthesized HA lacks the strong load-bearing capacity as required by bone. The bio-mimetic growth of HA crystals on collagen surface provides a feasible solution for synthesizing bone substitutes with the desired properties. This study deals with the utilization of the collagen hydrolysate recovered from leather waste as a substrate for promoting HA crystal growth. Bio-mimetic growth of HA was induced by subjecting the hydrolysate to various mineralization conditions. Parameters that would have a direct effect on crystal growth were varied to determine the optimal conditions necessary. Maximum mineralization was achieved with a combination of 10mM of CaCl2, 5mM of Na2HPO4, 100mM of NaCl and 0.575% glutaraldehyde at a pH of 7.4. The metal-protein interactions leading to formation of HA were identified through Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The crystal dimensions were determined to be in the nanoscale range by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The size and crystallinity of bio-mimetically grown HA indicate that hydrolysate from leather waste can be used as an ideal alternative substrate for bone growth. PMID:25686958

  10. Enhanced xylitol production by precultivation of Candida guilliermondii cells in sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rita C L B; Sene, Luciane; Matos, Gilvane S; Roberto, Inês C; Pessoa, Adalberto; Felipe, Maria G A

    2006-07-01

    The present work evaluated the key enzymes involved in xylitol production (xylose reductase [XR] and xylitol dehydrogenase [XDH]) and their correlation with xylose, arabinose, and acetic acid assimilation during cultivation of Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 cells in sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate. For this purpose, inocula previously grown either in sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate (SBHH) or in semidefined medium (xylose as a substrate) were used. The highest xylose/acetic acid consumption ratio (1.78) and the lowest arabinose consumption (13%) were attained in the fermentation using inoculum previously grown in semidefined medium (without acetic acid and arabinose). In this case, the highest values of XR (1.37 U mg prot(-1)) and XDH (0.91 U mg prot(-1)) activities were observed. The highest xylitol yield (approximately 0.55 g g(-1)) and byproducts (ethanol and glycerol) formation were not influenced by inoculum procedure. However, the cell previously grown in the hydrolysate was effective in enhancing xylitol production by keeping the XR enzyme activity at high levels (around 0.99 U.mg(prot) (-1)), reducing the XDH activity (34.0%) and increasing xylitol volumetric productivity (26.5%) with respect to the inoculum cultivated in semidefined medium. Therefore, inoculum adaptation to SBHH was shown to be an important strategy to improve xylitol productivity. PMID:16775788

  11. Optimization of the Preparation of Fish Protein Anti-Obesity Hydrolysates Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinju Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic condition for producing the anti-obesity hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was optimized with the aid of response surface methodology, which also derived a statistical model for experimental validation. Compared with neutral protease, papain and protamex, the porcine pancreas lipase inhibitory rate of hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was higher with alkaline protease. Results showed that the model terms were significant, the terms of lack of fit were not significant, and the optimal conditions for the hydrolysis by alkaline protease were initial pH 11, temperature 39 °C, enzyme dosage 122 U/mL and 10 h of hydrolysis time. Under these conditions, the porcine pancreas lipase and the ?-amylase inhibitory rate could reach 53.04% ± 1.32% and 20.03 ± 0.89%, while predicted value were 54.63% ± 1.75%, 21.22% ± 0.70%, respectively. In addition, Lineweaver-Burk plots showed noncompetitive inhibition. The Ki value calculated was 84.13 mg/mL. These results demonstrated that fish water-soluble protein could be used for obtaining anti-obesity hydrolysates.

  12. Optimization of the Preparation of Fish Protein Anti-Obesity Hydrolysates Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyuan; Wang, Yanping; Peng, Chen; Wang, Jinju

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic condition for producing the anti-obesity hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was optimized with the aid of response surface methodology, which also derived a statistical model for experimental validation. Compared with neutral protease, papain and protamex, the porcine pancreas lipase inhibitory rate of hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was higher with alkaline protease. Results showed that the model terms were significant, the terms of lack of fit were not significant, and the optimal conditions for the hydrolysis by alkaline protease were initial pH 11, temperature 39 °C, enzyme dosage 122 U/mL and 10 h of hydrolysis time. Under these conditions, the porcine pancreas lipase and the ?-amylase inhibitory rate could reach 53.04% ± 1.32% and 20.03 ± 0.89%, while predicted value were 54.63% ± 1.75%, 21.22% ± 0.70%, respectively. In addition, Lineweaver-Burk plots showed noncompetitive inhibition. The Ki value calculated was 84.13 mg/mL. These results demonstrated that fish water-soluble protein could be used for obtaining anti-obesity hydrolysates. PMID:23377020

  13. Transcriptomic and peptidomic analysis of protein hydrolysates from the white shrimp (L. vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Marie; Zatylny-Gaudin, Céline; Fournier, Vincent; Corre, Erwan; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Bernay, Benoît; Henry, Joël

    2014-09-30

    An RNAseq approach associated to mass spectrometry was conducted to assess the composition, molecular mass distribution and primary sequence of hydrolytic peptides issued from hydrolysates of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) by-products. High performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) analyses indicated that 69.2% of the 214-nm-absorbing components had apparent molecular masses below 1000 Da, and 88.3% below 2000 Da. OFFGEL-nLC-MALDI-TOF/TOF and nLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses led to the identification of 808 peptides based on the NCBI EST databank (161,397 entries) completed by the new L. vannamei databank (58,508 entries) that we created from the RNAs of tissues used for hydrolysate production. Whereas most of hydrolytic peptides have a MW below 2000 Da, preliminary investigations of antimicrobial properties revealed three antibacterial fractions that demonstrate functional activities. The abundance of small peptides as well as the biological activities detected could imply very interesting applications for shrimp hydrolysate in the field of aquaculture feeding. PMID:24998765

  14. Separation of FFA from Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil Hydrolysate by Means of Membrane Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jala, Ram Chandra Reddy; Guo, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Different types of commercial porous and non-porous polymeric membranes have been investigated for their capabilities to separate free fatty acids (FFA) from hydrolysate of partially hydrogenated soybean oil. A regenerated cellulose (RC, PLAC) membrane exhibited the most prominent difference in rejection between FFA and glycerides and the highest flux (27 kg h?1 m?2) in hydrolysate ethanol solution. The results also showed that, besides the pore size of membrane, the membrane flux depended largely on the property matching between membrane and solvent, as observed (40 kg h?1 m?2) flux was achieved with methanol but no flux detected with hexane for PLAC. The polyvinyl alcohol (PVA, NTR-729 HF) and Polyamide (PA, NTR-759HR) membranes gave the second and third highest flux (10.1 and 5.7 kg h?1 m?2, respectively), where solute rejections for NTR-759HR were 95.9% for triacylglycerols (TG), 83.3% for diacylglycerols (DG); 87.7% for monoacylglycerols (MG) and 22.9% for FFA, respectively. A discontinuous membrane filtration using an RC membrane with ethanol changed the composition of hydrolysate from 32.2:34.2:7.9:25.7 TG/DG/MG/FFA to 47.8:36.0:10.2:6.0. The results from this work proved that FFA can be efficiently separated from a hydrolysis mixture of oil using an RC membrane in methanol and ethanol.

  15. Upgrading of straw hydrolysate for production of hydrogen and phenols in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Marzorati, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    In a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw was used for hydrogen production during selective recovery of phenols. The average H2 production rate was 0.61 m3 H2/m3 MEC·day and equivalent to a rate of 0.40 kg COD/m3 MEC·day. The microbial community in the anode biofilm was adapted by establishment of xylose-degrading bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum (16%) and Geobacter sulfurreducens (49%). During the process, 61% of the chemical oxygen demand was removed as hydrogen at 64% yield. The total energy production yield was 78% considering the energy content in the consumed compounds and the cell voltage of 0.7 V. The highest hydrogen production was equivalent to 0.8 kg COD/m3 MEC·day and was obtained at pH 7–8 and 25°C. Accumulation of 53% w/v phenolic compounds in the liquor was obtained by stepwise addition of the hydrolysate during simultaneous production of hydrogen from consumption of 95% for the hemicellulose and 100% of the fatty acids. Final calculations showed that hydrolysate produced from 1 kg wheat straw was upgraded by means of the MEC to 22 g hydrogen (266 L), 8 g xylan, and 9 g polyphenolics for potential utilization in biobased materials.

  16. Polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis and simultaneous remotion of organic inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by Burkholderia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera; Taciro, Marilda Keico; Mendonça, Thatiane Teixeira; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia sp. F24, originally isolated from soil, was capable of growth on xylose and removed organic inhibitors present in a hemicellulosic hydrolysate and simultaneously produced poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB). Using non-detoxified hydrolysate, Burkholderia sp. F24 reached a cell dry weight (CDW) of 6.8 g L(-1), containing 48 % of P3HB and exhibited a volumetric productivity (PP3HB) of 0.10 g L(-1) h(-1). Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate copolymers (P3HB-co-3HV) were produced using xylose and levulinic acid (LA) as carbon sources. In shake flask cultures, the 3HV content in the copolymer increased from 9 to 43 mol% by adding LA from 1.0 to 5.0 g L(-1). In high cell density cultivation using concentrated hemicellulosic hydrolysate F24 reached 25.04 g L(-1) of CDW containing 49 % of P3HB and PP3HB of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1). Based on these findings, second-generation ethanol and bioplastics from sugarcane bagasse is proposed. PMID:25059637

  17. Chemometric Analysis of the Amino Acid Requirements of Antioxidant Food Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibuike C. Udenigwe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The contributions of individual amino acid residues or groups of amino acids to antioxidant activities of some food protein hydrolysates were investigated using partial least squares (PLS regression method. PLS models were computed with amino acid composition and 3-z scale descriptors in the X-matrix and antioxidant activities of the samples in the Y-matrix; models were validated by cross-validation and permutation tests. Based on coefficients of the resulting models, it was observed that sulfur-containing (SCAA, acidic and hydrophobic amino acids had strong positive effects on scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and H2O2 radicals in addition to ferric reducing antioxidant power. For superoxide radicals, only lysine and leucine showed strong positive contributions while SCAA had strong negative contributions to scavenging by the protein hydrolysates. In contrast, positively-charged amino acids strongly contributed negatively to ferric reducing antioxidant power and scavenging of DPPH and H2O2 radicals. Therefore, food protein hydrolysates containing appropriate amounts of amino acids with strong contribution properties could be potential candidates for use as potent antioxidant agents. We conclude that information presented in this work could support the development of low cost methods that will efficiently generate potent antioxidant peptide mixtures from food proteins without the need for costly peptide purification.

  18. Determination of optimal regimes in obtaining kilka protein hydrolysates for sturgeon starter diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamdari Hojatollah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the optimal regimes of obtaining hydrolysates of minced fish (Clupeonella sp., kilka with a predictable output of water-soluble protein and non-protein nitrogen compounds in them. The technological process has been studied by two types of raw material: whole fish and fish without head and entrails. Studying the process of obtaining kilka hydrolysates for sturgeon starter diets showed that the most rational way of hydrolysis in this case is enzymatic-acid method by pre-grinding of raw materials in meat-mincer with a die diameter 4.5 mm. The following optimal process parameters have been identified: temperature – 55 °C, the duration of hydrolysis – 3 days at duty of water – 1 : 3; a dose of formic acid – 3 % and a dose of sodium chloride – 0.25 %. Comparison of the experimental results showed that hydrolysates reception from intact kilka is much more efficient than that of gutted kilka. Optimal regimes, both in the first and in the second case, practically do not differ.

  19. Detoxification of biomass hydrolysates with nucleophilic amino acids enhances alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rui; Tu, Maobing; Carvin, Jamarius; Wu, Yonnie

    2015-06-01

    Carbonyl compounds generated in biomass pretreatment hinder the biochemical conversion of biomass hydrolysates to biofuels. A novel approach of detoxifying hydrolysates with amino acids for ethanol production was developed. Among the 20 amino acids assessed for their detoxification efficiency and nucleophilicity, cysteine was the most effective one. It increased both ethanol productivity and final yield of biomass hydrolysates from 0.18 (untreated) to 1.77g/L/h and from 0.02 to 0.42g/g, respectively. Detoxification efficiency was followed by histidine and it increased the final yield to 0.42g/g, then by lysine, tryptophan and asparagine. It was observed all five effective amino acids contained reactive side-chain functional groups, which played important roles in the amino acid detoxification reaction. The study further showed cysteine and glycine detoxifications were temperature and pH dependent. The mechanistic study using mass spectrometry revealed thiazolidine carboxylic acid, a Schiff base, was formed by condensation of aldehyde and cysteine. PMID:25812813

  20. High performance maleated lignocellulose epicarp fibers for copper ion removal

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A. P., Vieira; S. A. A., Santana; C. W. B., Bezerra; H. A. S., Silva; K. C. A., Santos; J. C. P., Melo; E. C., Silva Filho; C., Airoldi.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural lignocellulosic fiber epicarp extracted from the babassu coconut (Orbignya speciosa) was chemically modified through reaction with molten maleic anhydride without solvent, with incorporation of 189.34 mg g-1 of carboxylic acid groups into the biopolymer structure. The success of this reactio [...] n was also confirmed by the presence of carboxylic acid bands at 1741 and 1164 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum. Identically, the same group is observed through 13C NMR CP/MAS in the solid state, via high field signals in the 167 pm region. Both the precursor and the immobilized maleated biopolymers presented nearly the same thermal stability and similar crystallinity to cellulose. However, the pendant carboxylic groups have the ability to remove copper with maximum sorption through a batchwise process at pH 6.0, as expected from the point of zero charge, determined to be 6.45. The sorption kinetic data were fitted to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich-chemisorption and intra-particle diffusion models and the equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, the Freundlich and Tenkim isotherm models. Taking into account a statistical error function and determination coefficients, the data were fit to the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm models, with a maximum sorption capacity of copper ions of 55.09 mg g-1. This value suggests the application of this biopolymer with incorporated carboxylate groups as a favorable agent for copper removal from appropriate systems.

  1. Immobilization of commercial laccase on spent grain

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Andreia Machado da; Tavares, Ana P. M.; Rocha, Cristina M. R.; Raquel O. Cristóvão; Teixeira, J. A.; Macedo, Eugénia A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of using beer spent grain (a byproduct of beer’s brewing industry) as a carrier for laccase immobilization. Both adsorption (on spent grain – SG and on digested spent grain – DSG) and covalent binding (using glycidol and glycidol followed by ethylenediamine on DSG) were used. The effect of different immobilization conditions on the immobilization yields and recovered activities such as contact time, enzyme concentration and pH was evalu...

  2. Overview on spent fuel management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview on spent fuel management strategies which range from reprocessing to interim storage in a centralised facility followed by final disposal in a repository. In either case, more spent fuel storage capacity (wet or dry, at-reactor or away-from-reactor, national or regional) is required as spent fuel is continuously accumulated while most countries prefer to defer their decision to choose between these two strategies. (author)

  3. Characterization of Spent Ni-MH Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, Marta; Nogueira, C. A.; Margarido, F.

    2013-01-01

    Spent Ni-MH batteries are not considered too dangerous for the environment, but they have a considerable economical value due to the chemical composition of electrodes which are highly concentrated in metals. The present work aimed at the physical and chemical characterisation of spent cylindrical and thin prismatic Ni-MH batteries, contributing for a better definition of the recycling process of these spent products. The electrode materials correspond to more than 50% of the batteries weight...

  4. Spent fuel shipping cask accident evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, S.R.

    1975-12-01

    Mathematical models have been developed to simulate the dynamic behavior, following a hypothetical accident and fire, of typical casks designed for the rail shipment of spent fuel from nuclear reactors, and to determine the extent of radioactive releases under postulated conditions. The casks modeled were the IF-300, designed by the General Electric Company for the shipment of spent LWR fuel, and a cask designed by the Aerojet Manufacturing Company for the shipment of spent LMFBR fuel.

  5. Relationship between Calorific Value and Elementary Composition of Torrefied Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yusup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationship between calorific value and elementary composition of torrefied oil palm wastes (empty fruit bunches, mesocarp fiber and kernel shell and other lignocellulosic biomass is discussed. Several correlations for calorific value vs. elementary composition for biomass were examined for their applicability to torrefied lignocellulosic biomass. One of the correlations was selected as the most appropriate for the purpose, based on average absolute error between observed and estimated calorific values. In addition, the triangle plot of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen contents in untreated and pyrolyzed biomass is proposed as an appropriate tool for discussing biomass decomposition behavior.

  6. Bioethanol - Status report on bioethanol production from wood and other lignocellulosic feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott-Kerr, Chris; Johnson, Tony; Johnson, Barbara; Kiviaho, Jukka

    2010-09-15

    Lignocellulosic biomass is seen as an attractive feedstock for future supplies of renewable fuels, reducing the dependence on imported petroleum. However, there are technical and economic impediments to the development of commercial processes that utilise biomass feedstocks for the production of liquid fuels such as ethanol. Significant investment into research, pilot and demonstration plants is on-going to develop commercially viable processes utilising the biochemical and thermochemical conversion technologies for ethanol. This paper reviews the current status of commercial lignocellulosic ethanol production and identifies global production facilities.

  7. Behavior of spent fuel under unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the performance of spent fuel in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, spent fuel fragments are being exposed to small and intermittent amounts of simulated groundwater under unsaturated conditions. Both the leachate and the visual appearance of the spent fuel have been characterized for 581 days of testing. The amount of Am and Cm measured in the leachates was one to two orders of magnitude greater than that released from spent fuel under saturated conditions. The cause of this difference has not been firmly identified but may be attributable to the presence of large amounts of actinide-containing colloids in the leachate of the unsaturated tests

  8. Process for recovering uranium from spent shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is claimed for the recovery of uranium from spent shale by treating the spent shale with a compound selected from the group consisting of methanol, a mixture of methanol and water, and a mixture of methanol and sodium methoxide at between about 2400 and 4500C and atmospheric pressure or higher. The treated spent shale is then leached with an aqueous acid solution such as hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, or nitric acid to remove 90% of the uranium from the spent shale and the leached uranium is recovered from the acid solution in a manner known per se

  9. Spent fuel management in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presentation describes the spent fuel management in the Slovak Republic with reference to possibility of burnup credit using. First experiences with spent fuel were gained in the seventies. Spent fuel form A-1 NPP was handled at Jaslovske Bohunice site, in order to prepare the spent fuel for the transport to the former USSR. After shut down of the A-1 NPP, all spent fuel was transported to the USSR. In 1978 first unit of V-1 NPP was set into operation. Actually there are six NPP units of the WWER-440 type at Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce sites in operation in the Slovak Republic. In 1988 an Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility was build at Jaslovske Bohunice site. In 2004 Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic approved transport container C-30 for transport of forty-eight spent fuel assemblies partially using burnup credit in decision making for emergency conditions criticality calculations. Following the development in spent fuel storage area Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic started support programs in order to verify and validate burnup credit and its components. Burnup credit will be an important element in solving future spent fuel transport and storage tasks. (author)

  10. Radiological Implications of Spent Fuel Pool Capacity increase by Spent Fuel Consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our recent analysis showed that from the criticality standpoint it is possible to increase capacity of the NPP Krko spent fuel pool by spent fuel consolidation to accommodate spent fuel assemblies for plant lifetime. The spent fuel consolidation will also impact the radiation dose rates in the vicinity of the NPP Krko spent fuel pool. In this paper we have investigated the radiological impact of spent fuel consolidation using simple engineering evaluation, QAD-CGGP code and SAS4 sequence of the SCALE code system. Gamma dose rates and neutron dose rates are calculated at different positions close to spent fuel pool surface for current and consolidated spent fuel pool configuration. The obtained dose rates are compared to dose limit 10 CFR 20 for the restricted work area. (author)

  11. Spent fuel storage monitoring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns storage for spent fuels and provides a monitoring method whether radioactive materials generated from spent fuels are leaked to the inside of the fuel containing tubes or not. Namely, one end of a sampling tube A is connected to each of a plurality of fuel containing tubes while the other end thereof is connected to a sampling tube B. The tube B is connected to a gas exhaustion pump by way of a radiation detector. Two valves, namely, a valve-1 and a valve-2 are disposed to each of the tubes A such that the capacity therebetween is equal. The valve-1 on the side of the containing tube is closed relative to each of a plurality of containing tubes, and gas is exhausted by a gas exhaustion pump. Subsequently, the valve-2 is closed and the valve-1 is opened, and a sampling gas is sampled from each of the containing tubes to each of the portions between the valve-1 and the valve-2. Each of the valve-1 and the valve-2 is opened successively, and the gases are recovered to detect them in a radiation detector. The amount of the sampling gas from each of the containing tubes is equal, the gases from the fuel containing tubes are not mixed and the gases in a plurality of fuel containing tubes can be detected rapidly. (I.S.)

  12. Intermodal transfer of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses RADTRAN calculational models and parameter values for describing dose to workers during incident-free ship-to-truck transfer of spent fuel. Data obtained during observation of the offloading of research reactor spent fuel at Newport News Terminal in the Port of Hampton Roads, Virginia, are described. These data include estimates of exposure times and distances for handlers, inspectors, and other workers during offloading and overnight storage. Other workers include crane operators, scale operators, security personnel, and truck drivers. The data are compared to the default data in RADTRAN 4, and the latter are found to be conservative. The casks were loaded under IAEA supervision at their point of origin, and three separate radiological inspections of each cask were performed at the entry to the port (Hampton Roads) by the U.S. Coast Guard, the state of Virginia, and the shipping firm. As a result of the international standardization of containerized cargo handling in ports around the world, maritime shipment handling is particularly uniform. Thus, handler exposure parameters will be relatively constant for ship-truck and ship-rail transfers at ports throughout the world. Inspectors' doses are expected to vary because of jurisdictional considerations. The results of this study should be applicable to truck-to-rail transfers. (author)

  13. Spent fuel. Dissolution and oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from studies of the low temperature air oxidation of spent fuel were retrieved in order to provide a basis for comparison between the mechanism of oxidation in air and corrosion in water. U3O7 is formed by diffusion of oxygen into the UO2 lattice. A diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the fuel matric was calculated for 25 degree C to be in the range of 10-23 to 10-25 m2/s. The initial rates of U release from spent fuel and from UO2 appear to be similar. The lowest rates (at 25 degree c >10-4 g/(m2d)) were observed under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions the rates depend mainly of the nature and concentraion of the oxidant and/or on corbonate. In contact with air, typical initial rates at room temperature were in the range between 0.001 and 0.1 g/(m2d). A study of apparent U solubility under oxidizing conditions was performed and it was suggested that the controlling factor is the redox potential at the UO2 surface rather than the Eh of the bulk solution. Electrochemical arguments were used to predict that at saturation, the surface potential will eventually reach a value given by the boundaries at either the U3O7/U3O8 or the U3O7/schoepite stability field, and a comparison with spent fuel leach data showed that the solution concentration of uranium is close to the calculated U solubility at the U3O7/U3O8 boundary. The difference in the cumulative Sr and U release was calculated from data from Studsvik laboratory. The results reveal that the rate of Sr release decreases with the square root of time under U-saturated conditions. This time dependence may be rationalized either by grain boundary diffusion or by diffusion into the fuel matrix. Hence, there seems to be a possibility of an agreement between the Sr release data, structural information and data for oxygen diffusion in UO2. (G.B.)

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEROY, P.G.

    2000-11-03

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

  15. Ultrasonic inspection of spent nuclear fuel casks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotina, I.; Bulavinov, A.; Lider, A.; Sednev, D.; Shtaynbreher, A.

    2015-04-01

    The paper describes the main aspects of ultrasonic non-destructive inspection of casks with spent fuel. Digital Focus Array technique is proposed for acoustic imaging of spent nuclear fuel casks’ closure weld. Scientific and engineering basics and imaging algorithms of this technique are discussed. Advantages of Digital Focus Array technique in comparison with common techniques of acoustic images processing are revealed.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities

  17. CANDU spent fuel dry storage interim technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU heavy water reactor is developed by Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) it has 40 years of design life. During operation, the reactor can discharge a lot of spent fuels by using natural uranium. The spent fuel interim storage should be considered because the spent fuel bay storage capacity is limited with 6 years inventory. Spent fuel wet interim storage technique was adopted by AECL before 1970s, but it is diseconomy and produced extra radiation waste. So based on CANDU smaller fuel bundle dimension, lighter weight, lower burn-up and no-critical risk, AECL developed spent fuel dry interim storage technique which was applied in many CANDU reactors. Spent fuel dry interim storage facility should be designed base on critical accident prevention, decay heat removal, radiation protection and fissionable material containment. According to this introduction, analysis spent fuel dry interim storage facility and equipment design feature, it can be concluded that spent fuel dry interim storage could be met with the design requirement. (author)

  18. Costing of spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with economic analysis and cost estimation, based on exploration of relevant issues, including a survey of analytical tools for assessment and updated information on the market and financial issues associated with spent fuel storage. The development of new storage technologies and changes in some of the circumstances affecting the costs of spent fuel storage are also incorporated. This report aims to provide comprehensive information on spent fuel storage costs to engineers and nuclear professionals as well as other stakeholders in the nuclear industry. This report is meant to provide informative guidance on economic aspects involved in selecting a spent fuel storage system, including basic methods of analysis and cost data for project evaluation and comparison of storage options, together with financial and business aspects associated with spent fuel storage. After the review of technical options for spent fuel storage in Section 2, cost categories and components involved in the lifecycle of a storage facility are identified in Section 3 and factors affecting costs of spent fuel storage are then reviewed in the Section 4. Methods for cost estimation and analysis are introduced in Section 5, and other financial and business aspects associated with spent fuel storage are discussed in Section 6.

  19. Temporal relationship between the deposition and microbial degradation of lignocellulosic detritus in a Georgia salt marsh and the Okefenokee Swamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, R; Maccubbin, A E; Hodson, R E

    1986-09-01

    Temperature dependence and seasonal variations in rates of microbial degradation of the lignin and polysaccharide components of specifically radiolabeled lignocelluloses were determined in sediment and water samples from a Georgia salt marsh and the nearby Okefenokee Swamp. Although temperature regimes in the two ecosystems were similar, rates of mineralization ofSpartina alterniflora lignocellulose in salt marsh sediments increased eightfold between winter and summer, whereas rates of mineralization of lignocellulose from an analogous freshwater macrophyte,Carex walteriana, in Okefenokee sediments increased only twofold between winter and summer. Temperature was the major factor influencing seasonal variations in rates of lignocellulose degradation in both environments. At any given temperature, no substantial differences in lignocellulolytic potential were observed with sediment samples collected at each season. In both ecosystems, the bulk of the lignocellulosic detritus was not degraded at the time of its peak deposition during the fall and winter. Instead, the periods of maximal decomposition occurred during the following spring and summer. These results suggest that periods of maximal nutrient regeneration from the mineralization of lignocellulosic detritus coincide with periods of highest primary production, and that, depending on hydrologic conditions, significant horizontal transport of essentially intact lignocellulosic material is possible due to the lag period between deposition and microbial degradation. PMID:24212682

  20. Autohydrolysis Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang

    Autohydrolysis, a simple and environmental friendly process, has long been studied but often abandoned as a financially viable pretreatment for bioethanol production due to the low yields of fermentable sugars at economic enzyme dosages. The introduction of mechanical refining can generate substantial improvements for autohydrolysis process, making it an attractive pretreatment technology for bioethanol commercialization. In this study, several lignocellulosic biomass including wheat straw, switchgrass, corn stover, waste wheat straw have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment followed by mechanical refining to evaluate the total sugar recovery at affordable enzyme dosages. Encouraging results have been found that using autohydrolysis plus refining strategy, the total sugar recovery of most feedstock can be as high as 76% at 4 FPU/g enzymes dosages. The mechanical refining contributed to the improvement of enzymatic sugar yield by as much as 30%. Three non-woody biomass (sugarcane bagasse, wheat straw, and switchgrass) and three woody biomass (maple, sweet gum, and nitens) have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment to acquire a fundamental understanding of biomass characteristics that affect the autohydrolysis and the following enzymatic hydrolysis. It is of interest to note that the nonwoody biomass went through substantial delignification during autohydrolysis compared to woody biomass due to a significant amount of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. It has been found that hardwood which has a higher S/V ratio in the lignin structure tends to have a higher total sugar recovery from autohydrolysis pretreatment. The economics of bioethanol production from autohydrolysis of different feedstocks have been investigated. Regardless of different feedstocks, in the conventional design, producing bioethanol and co-producing steam and power, the minimum ethanol revenues (MER) required to generate a 12% internal rate of return (IRR) are high enough to discourage investors due to the high capital investment relative to low US ethanol price. Nevertheless, the economics of autohydrolysis can be substantially improved by upgrading the value of unhydrolyzed residues, such as the fuel pellets. Moreover, the utilization of proven technology and equipment renders autohydrolysis adaptable to pulp and paper industrial. Attractive economics have been found when autohydrolysis based bioethanol plant is co-located to a pulp and paper mill or the distressed pulp and paper mill is being repurposed to produce bioethanol. An alternative to autohydrolysis combined with refining, thermomechanical pulping (TMP) process has been evaluated using corn stover as the feedstock. A significant low solids yield after the pretreatment process has been observed due to the harsh condition operated and the limitation of lab equipment. But the TMP process has great potential to be employed as a pretreatment for bioethanol production in an industrial scale if the process is optimized.

  1. Experimental methods for laboratory-scale ensilage of lignocellulosic biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic fermentation is a potential storage method for lignocellulosic biomass in biofuel production processes. Since biomass is seasonally harvested, stocks are often dried or frozen at laboratory scale prior to fermentation experiments. Such treatments prior to fermentation studies cause irreversible changes in the plant cells, influencing the initial state of biomass and thereby the progression of the fermentation processes itself. This study investigated the effects of drying, refrigeration, and freezing relative to freshly harvested corn stover in lab-scale ensilage studies. Particle sizes, as well as post-ensilage drying temperatures for compositional analysis, were tested to identify the appropriate sample processing methods. After 21 days of ensilage the lowest pH value (3.73 ± 0.03), lowest dry matter loss (4.28 ± 0.26 g. 100 g-1DM), and highest water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) concentrations (7.73 ± 0.26 g. 100 g-1DM) were observed in control biomass (stover ensiled within 12 h of harvest without any treatments). WSC concentration was significantly reduced in samples refrigerated for 7 days prior to ensilage (3.86 ± 0.49 g. 100 g?1 DM). However, biomass frozen prior to ensilage produced statistically similar results to the fresh biomass control, especially in treatments with cell wall degrading enzymes. Grinding to decrease particle size reduced the variance amongst replicates for pH values of individual reactors to a minor extent. Drying biomass prior to extraction of WSCs resulted in degradation of the carbohydrates and a reduced estimate of their concentrations. The methods developed in this study can be used to improve ensilage experiments and thereby help in developing ensilage as a storage method for biofuel production. -- Highlights: ? Laboratory-scale methods to assess the influence of ensilage biofuel production. ? Drying, freezing, and refrigeration of biomass influenced microbial fermentation. ? Freshly ensiled stover exhibited the most preferable characteristics. ? Frozen biomass was statistically similar to freshly ensiled stover. ? Modified phenol-sulfuric method provides appropriate results and better resolution.

  2. Remote technology applications in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel management has become a prospective area for application of remote technology in recent years with a steadily growing inventory of spent fuel arising from nuclear power production. A remark that could be made from the review of technical information collected from the IAEA meetings was that remote technology in spent fuel management has matured well through the past decades of industrial experiences. Various remote technologies have been developed and applied in the past for facility operation and maintenance work in spent fuel examination, storage, transportation, reprocessing and radioactive waste treatment, among others, with significant accomplishments in dose reduction to workers, enhancement of reliability, etc. While some developmental activities are continuing for more advanced applications, industrial practices have made use of simple and robust designs for most of the remote systems technology applications to spent fuel management. In the current state of affairs, equipment and services in remote technology are available in the market for applications to most of the projects in spent fuel management. It can be concluded that the issue of critical importance in remote systems engineering is to make an optimal selection of technology and equipment that would best satisfy the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) requirements in terms of relevant criteria like dose reduction, reliability, costs, etc. In fact, good selection methodology is the key to efficient implementation of remote systems applications in the modern globalized market. This TECDOC gives a review of the current status of remote technology applications for spent fuel management, based on country reports from some Member States presented at the consultancy meetings, of which updated reports are attached in the annex. The scope of the review covers the series of spent fuel handling operations involved in spent fuel management, from discharge from reactor to reprocessing or packaging for disposal, depending on the options chosen for spent fuel management. Because of the predominant amount of work required for spent fuel storage in the current and foreseeable future requirements for spent fuel management, more details are described on remote technology associated with storage of spent fuel. Some information on the application methodology of remote systems technology is provided with discussions on the basic principles that seem to be applicable in the development and application of remote technologies for all aspects of spent fuel handling. In addition, some practical guidance is provided on the selection of appropriate technology for implementation of a system. Finally, presented are some advanced technologies that would find applications in the longer term including the innovative fuel cycle concepts now in early stage of developments by some international initiatives like Gen IV of the USA and INPRO of the IAEA

  3. Spent Fuel Management in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skills in handling spent fuel have been collected in Slovakia for more than 35 years. During this time period a well-established spent fuel management system was created. The Slovak Government established the basic policy of spent fuel management in several resolutions. In 2008, the Slovak Government accepted in its Decision Nr. 328/2008 'The proposal on the strategy of the back-end of the nuclear power engineering'. The state supervision on nuclear safety of spent fuel management is performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). The legislative framework in the Slovak Republic is based on acts and regulations. Act No. 541/2004 Coll. on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy is the main legislative norm. In Slovakia there are four nuclear power units in operation. These units produce about 300 spent fuel assemblies (approximately 36 ton of heavy metal) a year. For temporary storage of the spent fuel after its terminate reloading from the reactor core the at-reactor spent fuel storage pools are used. After at least 2.5 years of storage in the at-reactor pools, the spent fuel is removed to the Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility (ISFSF). In 2009 the UJD approved the spent fuel transportation container C-30 for next utilization. The license was issued for the transport of spent nuclear fuel from four units in operation as well as from two shut-downed units. UJD supports various research tasks under the Research and Development program (R and D). A methodology on burnup credit application has been developed. Another R and D project is focused on determination of the relation between the spent fuel residual heat generation and surface temperature of the transport container C-30. In 2005 the operator of the ISFSF started installation of an inspection stand. The stand is intended to be used for dismantling of leaky assemblies. By the end of 2009 first two modules - visual inspection and gamma spectroscopy - were put into operation. New requirements on spent fuel management (higher burnup, residual heat generation, shorter cooling time, new licenses...) have required a new approach from UJD. We have started several projects, which results will be used for a better understanding of spent fuel behavior during its storage, transportation and deposition. (author)

  4. Bio-Product Recovery from Lignocellulosic Materials Derived from Poultry Manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pascale; Li, Caijian

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the hydrolysis of lignocellulose extracted from poultry manure for the purpose of investigating low-cost feedstocks for ethanol production while providing an alternative solid waste management strategy for agricultural livestock manures. Poultry manure underwent various pretreatments to enhance subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis…

  5. Cellulose and lignocellulose materials - influence of the atmosphere of diluted vapors of essential oils.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gojný, J.; Mikala, O.; ?ešek, B.; Milichovský, M.; K??mal, Kamil

    ?ód? : Stowarzyszenie Papierników Polskich, 2014, s. 1-8. ISBN 978-83-60419-08-6. [International Papermaking Conference and Exhibition PROGRESS’14 /18./. ?ód? (PL), 23.09.2014-25.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA MK DF11P01OVV028 Keywords : essential oil * fungicide * paper properties * lignocellulose materials Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  6. Designing relevant biochars as soil amendments using lignocellulosic-based and manure-based feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Biochars are a soil amendment produced from lignocellulosic and manure feedstocks. Not all biochars are viable soil amendments because of differences in their physical and chemical properties. Biochar could deliver more effective service as a soil amendment if its chemis...

  7. Lignocellulosic ethanol production from woody biomass: The impact of facility siting on competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just as temperate region pulp and paper companies need to compete with Brazilian eucalyptus pulp producers, lignocellulosic biofuel producers in North America and Europe, in the absence of protectionist trade policies, will need to be competitive with tropical and sub-tropical biofuel producers. This work sought to determine the impact of lignocellulosic ethanol biorefinery siting on economic performance and minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) for both east and west coast North American fuel markets. Facility sites included the pine-dominated Pacific Northwest Interior, the mixed deciduous forest of Ontario and New York, and the Brazilian state of Espírito Santo. Feedstock scenarios included both plantation (poplar, willow, and eucalyptus, respectively) and managed forest harvest. Site specific variables in the techno-economic model included delivered feedstock cost, ethanol delivery cost, cost of capital, construction cost, labour cost, electricity revenues (and co-product credits), and taxes, insurance, and permits. Despite the long shipping distance from Brazil to North American east and west coast markets, the MESP for Brazilian-produced eucalyptus lignocellulosic ethanol, modelled at $0.74 L?1, was notably lower than that of all North American-produced cases at $0.83–1.02 L?1. - Highlights: • Lignocellulosic ethanol production costs vary notably by region. • Feedstock cost is the primary site-specific production cost variable. Woody feedstocks in North America have a higher cost than those in Brazil. • Use of Brazilian eucalyptus resulted in the lowest MESP for considered feedstocks. • MESP ranged from ?1 to >$1.00 L?1

  8. Ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass by recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignocellulosic biomass, upon pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, generates a mixture of hexose and pentose sugars such as glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. Escherichia coli utilizes all these sugars well but it lacks the ability to produce ethanol from them. Recombinant ethanologenic E...

  9. Weedy lignocellulosic feedstock and microbial metabolic engineering. Advancing the generation of 'Biofuel'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandel, Anuj K. [Jawaharlal Nehru Technological Univ., Hyderabad (India). Centre of Biotechnology; Singh, Om V. [Pittsburgh Univ., Bradford, PA (United States). Div. of Biological and Health Sciences

    2011-03-15

    Lignocellulosic materials are the most abundant renewable organic resources ({proportional_to}200 billion tons annually) on earth that are readily available for conversion to ethanol and other value-added products, but they have not yet been tapped for the commercial production of fuel ethanol. The lignocellulosic substrates include woody substrates such as hardwood (birch and aspen, etc.) and softwood (spruce and pine, etc.), agro residues (wheat straw, sugarcane bagasse, corn stover, etc.), dedicated energy crops (switch grass, and Miscanthus etc.), weedy materials (Eicchornia crassipes, Lantana camara etc.), and municipal solid waste (food and kitchen waste, etc.). Despite the success achieved in the laboratory, there are limitations to success with lignocellulosic substrates on a commercial scale. The future of lignocellulosics is expected to lie in improvements of plant biomass, metabolic engineering of ethanol, and cellulolytic enzyme-producing microorganisms, fullest exploitation of weed materials, and process integration of the individual steps involved in bioethanol production. Issues related to the chemical composition of various weedy raw substrates for bioethanol formation, including chemical composition-based structural hydrolysis of the substrate, need special attention. This area could be opened up further by exploring genetically modified metabolic engineering routes in weedy materials and in biocatalysts that would make the production of bioethanol more efficient. (orig.)

  10. Highly Thermostable Xylanase Production from A Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain WSUCF1 Utilizing Lignocellulosic Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Sani, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars requires a complete repertoire of biomass deconstruction enzymes. Hemicellulases play an important role in hydrolyzing hemicellulose component of lignocellulose to xylooligosaccharides and xylose. Thermostable xylanases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to their long shelf life at high temperatures. Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 produced thermostable xylanase activity (crude xylanase cocktail) when grown on xylan or various inexpensive untreated and pretreated lignocellulosic biomasses such as prairie cord grass and corn stover. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude xylanase cocktail were 6.5 and 70°C, respectively. The WSUCF1 crude xylanase was found to be highly thermostable with half-lives of 18 and 12?days at 60 and 70°C, respectively. At 70°C, rates of xylan hydrolysis were also found to be better with the WSUCF1 secretome than those with commercial enzymes, i.e., for WSUCF1 crude xylanase, Cellic-HTec2, and AccelleraseXY, the percent xylan conversions were 68.9, 49.4, and 28.92, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, WSUCF1 crude xylanase cocktail is among the most thermostable xylanases produced by thermophilic Geobacillus spp. and other thermophilic microbes (optimum growth temperature ?70°C). High thermostability, activity over wide range of temperatures, and better xylan hydrolysis than commercial enzymes make WSUCF1 crude xylanase suitable for thermophilic lignocellulose bioconversion processes. PMID:26137456

  11. Electropolar effects on anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic materials in novel single-electrode cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Guangfei; Qiu, Weixia; Liu, Yuhuan; Zhong, Dongwei; Ning, Ping

    2014-05-01

    As a promising renewable energy technology, anaerobic fermentation is consistently limited by low production and calorific value of biogas, along with the difficulty of lignocellulose degradation. The effects of polarity and micro-voltage on anaerobic fermentation from lignocellulosic materials were investigated in single-electrode fermenter to explore cost-efficient technology. The results illustrated that the biogas production and quality were significantly affected by electric polarity. And cathode-assisted fermentation led to more positive effects than anode-assisted. Compared with results in control group without electrode, the average biogas and methane yield under cathodic micro-voltage (-250 mV) were astonishingly improved by 2.82 and 2.44 mL g(-1)d(-1) respectively. Meanwhile, the degradation ratios of lignin and cellulose were also improved by 23.11% and 19.46%. It demonstrated that single micro-voltage can not only promote lignocellulose degradation but biogas production and calorific value. These micro-voltage effects on fermentation process also provided great opportunity to breakthrough the present limitation of lignocellulosic materials fermentation. PMID:24632630

  12. The Challenge of Lignocellulosic Bioenergy in a Water-Limited World.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    King, J. S.; Ceulemans, R.; Albaugh, J. M.; Dillen, S.; Domec, J. C.; Fichot, R.; Fischer, Milan; Leggett, Z.; Sucre, E.; Trnka, Miroslav; Zenone, T.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 63, ?. 2 (2013), s. 102-117. ISSN 0006-3568 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : climate change * lignocellulosic bioenergy * water availability * drought * sustainability Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.439, year: 2013

  13. Weedy lignocellulosic feedstock and microbial metabolic engineering: advancing the generation of 'Biofuel'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandel, Anuj K; Singh, Om V

    2011-03-01

    Lignocellulosic materials are the most abundant renewable organic resources (~200 billion tons annually) on earth that are readily available for conversion to ethanol and other value-added products, but they have not yet been tapped for the commercial production of fuel ethanol. The lignocellulosic substrates include woody substrates such as hardwood (birch and aspen, etc.) and softwood (spruce and pine, etc.), agro residues (wheat straw, sugarcane bagasse, corn stover, etc.), dedicated energy crops (switch grass, and Miscanthus etc.), weedy materials (Eicchornia crassipes, Lantana camara etc.), and municipal solid waste (food and kitchen waste, etc.). Despite the success achieved in the laboratory, there are limitations to success with lignocellulosic substrates on a commercial scale. The future of lignocellulosics is expected to lie in improvements of plant biomass, metabolic engineering of ethanol, and cellulolytic enzyme-producing microorganisms, fullest exploitation of weed materials, and process integration of the individual steps involved in bioethanol production. Issues related to the chemical composition of various weedy raw substrates for bioethanol formation, including chemical composition-based structural hydrolysis of the substrate, need special attention. This area could be opened up further by exploring genetically modified metabolic engineering routes in weedy materials and in biocatalysts that would make the production of bioethanol more efficient. PMID:21181146

  14. Regeneration of Spent Catalysts for Furfural Decarbonylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Erkegulovna Bitemirova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the reasons for the decontamination of industrial catalysts for furfural decarbonylation. Various methods for regenerating of the supported catalyst are studied. For example, organic and inorganic solvents were used for the regeneration of spent catalyst for obtaining industrial furan. To improve the activity of spent-regenerated samples of CDF-1 catalyst, the method of modifying with d-metals additives from aqueous solutions was applied. Iron, cobalt, and nickel were used as modifying additives. Results for furfural decarbonylation on additives regenerated-modified with transitive d-metals batches of spent CDF-1 catalyst shows that implementing spent modifying additives to the regenerated catalyst increases the stability and activity. The article provides methods for regenerating spent CDF-1 catalyst, and modifying the regenerated catalyst and its reusing in the process of decarbonylation.

  15. Spent fuel storage in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 1. Introduction: Indian Nuclear Power Programme has grown from twin BWR reactors at Tarapur to 12 PHWRs of 220 MW each working at various locations. Additionally six PHWR reactors are in advanced stage of construction. India has gone for closed nuclear fuel cycle option to reprocess the spent fuel for recovery of Uranium and Plutonium to meet ever increasing energy demand. There is a programme to achieve 20,000 MW installed nuclear power capacity by the year 2020. It is planned to construct Spent Fuel Storage Facilities (SFSFs) as the need arises. Wet storage of Spent Fuel has been the main mode of storage in India pending reprocessing. This paper describes various important issues related to design, construction, licensing and operational experience of spent fuel storage facilities at Tarapur and Kalpakkam. 2. Design of Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF): The new SFSFs are located at existing nuclear site to take maximum advantage of existing infrastructure already in place, nearness to reactor and approved site for nuclear facility. Layout: The smooth handling of trailer loaded with shipping cask is ensured by providing two independent airlocks and 7 m wide road with proper turning radius. Location of cask decontamination area, pool water cooling and polishing system and effluent handling system have been suitably decided based on ease of operation and optimum space utilization. The active and in-active services have been suitably located. Seismic design:ave been suitably located. Seismic design: IAEA TECDOC-250 is followed for seismic design of SFSFs. The independent SFSF are designed for OBE (Operating Basis Earthquake) level of earthquake. The soil-structure interaction has been considered as per ASCE 4-98 standard. The pool structure has been designed for hydrodynamic response during seismic event. The design of various mechanical system and components is carried out as per the respective design codes and standards based on their safety classification and seismic categorization. Fuel Pool: The fuel pool is designed as fully underground structure with single walled construction on hard rock/ strata. Minimum biological shielding of 3m. above a stack of trays has been ensured. The radiation level at water surface and at working level, when fuel pool is filled to its design capacity is less than 10-3 mGy/hr (0.1mR/hr). Lining and Leak Detection System: The pool walls and floor are lined with SS 304L plates to avoid ingress/egress of pool water. The SS liner plates are welded to closed channel inserts (embedment) inside concrete wall. The fuel pool is provided with an elaborate leak collection and detection system. Provision has been made for inspection of pool liners. Pool water-cooling and polishing System: The maximum pool water temperature is limited to 42 deg C in normal condition and 60 deg C in accidental conditions. Suitable heat exchangers have been provided to remove the decay heat generated from spent fuel bundles. A polishing system consisting of a cartridge type filter, a cation cartridge (disposable type) and a mixed bed unit (regenerative type) have been provided to remove the fission product impurities like Cs137, Sr92 etc with a turnover time of less than 72 hr. This ensures pool water activity within limits as specified by regulatory authority. Provision has been made to incorporate disposable type mixed bed unit for polishing of pool water. Fuel Handling: Single failure proof EOT Crane has been provided to handle shipping cask. The reach of the crane has been limited to cask handling area of the pool by layout. Other Facilities: Cask decontamination, handling of low level and intermediate level liquid waste, assorted solid waste, make-up DM water treatment plant are other systems provided for smooth operation. SFSFs are also provided with safety systems such as Ventilation System, Fire detection, fire alarms and fire mitigation system, Access Control System and CCTV monitors, Radiation monitoring system, Class-III and Class-II power supply. 3. Licensing of the Facility: Design review and sa

  16. 5 CFR 551.425 - Time spent receiving medical attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... false Time spent receiving medical attention. 551.425 Section 551.425 ...425 Time spent receiving medical attention. (a) Time spent waiting for and receiving medical attention for illness or injury shall be...

  17. Preventive effect of feeding high-risk infants a casein hydrolysate formula or an ultrafiltrated whey hydrolysate formula. A prospective, randomized, comparative clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; HØst, A

    1993-01-01

    In a prospective study of a 1-year birth cohort of 158 high-risk infants the effect of feeding breastmilk, a casein hydrolysate (Nutramigen) or a new ultrafiltrated whey hydrolysate (Profylac) on the development of cow milk protein allergy/intolerance (CMPA/CMPI) was assessed and compared. All the infants had biparental or severe single atopic predisposition, the latter combined with cord blood IgE > or = 0.5 kU/L. At birth all infants were randomized to Nutramigen or Profylac, which was used when breastfeeding was insufficient or not possible during the first 6 months of life. During the same period this regimen was combined with avoidance of solid foods and cow milk protein. All mothers had unrestricted diets and were encouraged to do breastfeeding only. Moreover, avoidance of daily exposure to tobacco smoking, furred pets and dust-collecting materials in the bedroom was advised. The infants were followed prospectively from birth to 18 months of age. All possible atopic symptoms were registered and controlled elimination/challenge studies were performed when symptoms suggested CMPA/CMPI. A total of 154 (97%) were followed up and 141 followed the diet strictly. Eighty-eight (62%) of the infants were breastfed for at least 6 months, 20 (14%) were breastfed exclusively, 59 and 62 had varying amounts of Nutramigen or Profylac respectively. CMPA/CMPI was diagnosed in 1/20, 1/59 and 3/62 in the breastfed, the Nutramigen and Profylac groups respectively, but 1 of the latter also had Nutramigen. None of the infants showed reactions against Nutramigen or Profylac. In 4 infants symptoms were provoked by breastmilk when the mother ingested cow milk and in 1 only by cow milk.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Enhanced lipid production with undetoxified corncob hydrolysate by Rhodotorula glutinis using a high cell density culture strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yating; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, energy crisis and environmental issues such as greenhouse effect, global warming, etc. has roused peoples' concern. Biodiesel, as renewable energy, has attracted much attention to deal with such problems. This work studied the lipid production by Rhodotorula glutinis with undetoxified corncob hydrolysate. The results indicated that R. glutinis had high tolerance to the inhibitors in corncob hydrolysate and it could utilize undetoxified corncob hydrolysate directly for lipid production. The cell grew well with undetoxified hydrolysate in the batch culture of 5L fermentor with the optimized C/N ratio of 75, lipid titer and lipid content reached 5.5g/L and 36.4%, respectively. High cell density culture with two-stage nitrogen feeding strategy was studied to enhance the lipid production, biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of 70.8, 33.5g/L and 47.2% were obtained. The results indicated the potential application for lipid production by R. glutinis with corncob hydrolysate directly. PMID:25585258

  19. Oral Administration of Gelatin Hydrolysate Reduces Clinical Signs of Canine Osteoarthritis in a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Beynen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There are indications that the intake of gelatin hydrolysate has a beneficial impact on the clinical signs of osteoarthritis in dogs. Data from a controlled trial were required to substantiate these indications. Approach: A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with privately owned dogs was carried out to assess the efficacy of a preparation of gelatin hydrolysate in the treatment of osteoarthritis. With the use of a questionnaire, the clinical signs were evaluated by the owners. For a period of 8 weeks, the test dogs daily received 10 g of gelatin hydrolysate; as a placebo, soya protein isolate was used. The supplements were mixed with the diet; all dogs were fed on the same dry food. There were 15 dogs per treatment group. Results: The administration of gelatin hydrolysate significantly improved activity (vitality and significantly reduced stiffness and lameness. Conclusion: Gelatin hydrolysate is commonly used as a component of human foods and is generally considered as safe. It is suggested that a dose of about 2.5% in a dry food would be beneficial for dogs with osteoarthritis.

  20. Comparative Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration of Egg Yolk Protein Enzymatic Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Pouliot

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the antioxidant activity of two distinct hydrolysates and their peptide fractions prepared by ultrafiltration (UF using membranes with molecular weight cut-off of 5 and 1 kDa. The hydrolysates were a delipidated egg yolk protein concentrate (EYP intensively hydrolyzed with a combination of two bacterial proteases, and a phosphoproteins (PPP extract partially hydrolyzed with trypsin. Antioxidant activity, as determined by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC assay, was low for EYP and PPP hydrolysates with values of 613.1 and 489.2 µM TE×g?1 protein, respectively. UF-fractionation of EYP hydrolysate increased slightly the antioxidant activity in permeate fractions (720.5–867.8 µM TE×g?1 protein. However, ORAC values were increased by more than 3-fold in UF-fractions prepared from PPP hydrolysate, which were enriched in peptides with molecular weight lower than 5 kDa. These UF-fractions were characterized by their lower N/P atomic ratio and higher phosphorus content compared to the same UF-fractions obtained from EYP-TH. They also contained high amounts of His, Met, Leu, and Phe, which are recognized as antioxidant amino acids, but also high content in Lys and Arg which both represent target amino acids of trypsin used for the hydrolysis of PPP.

  1. Enzymatic hydrolyzing performance of Acremonium cellulolyticus and Trichoderma reesei against three lignocellulosic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Katsuji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioethanol isolated from lignocellulosic biomass represents one of the most promising renewable and carbon neutral alternative liquid fuel sources. Enzymatic saccharification using cellulase has proven to be a useful method in the production of bioethanol. The filamentous fungi Acremonium cellulolyticus and Trichoderma reesei are known to be potential cellulase producers. In this study, we aimed to reveal the advantages and disadvantages of the cellulase enzymes derived from these fungi. Results We compared A. cellulolyticus and T. reesei cellulase activity against the three lignocellulosic materials: eucalyptus, Douglas fir and rice straw. Saccharification analysis using the supernatant from each culture demonstrated that the enzyme mixture derived from A. cellulolyticus exhibited 2-fold and 16-fold increases in Filter Paper enzyme and ?-glucosidase specific activities, respectively, compared with that derived from T. reesei. In addition, culture supernatant from A. cellulolyticus produced glucose more rapidly from the lignocellulosic materials. Meanwhile, culture supernatant derived from T. reesei exhibited a 2-fold higher xylan-hydrolyzing activity and produced more xylose from eucalyptus (72% yield and rice straw (43% yield. Although the commercial enzymes Acremonium cellulase (derived from A. cellulolyticus, Meiji Seika Co. demonstrated a slightly lower cellulase specific activity than Accellerase 1000 (derived from T. reesei, Genencor, the glucose yield (over 65% from lignocellulosic materials by Acremonium cellulase was higher than that of Accellerase 1000 (less than 60%. In addition, the mannan-hydrolyzing activity of Acremonium cellulase was 16-fold higher than that of Accellerase 1000, and the conversion of mannan to mannobiose and mannose by Acremonium cellulase was more efficient. Conclusion We investigated the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials by cellulase derived from two types of filamentous fungi. We found that glucan-hydrolyzing activity of the culture supernatant from A. cellulolyticus was superior to that from T. reesei, while the xylan-hydrolyzing activity was superior for the cellulase from T. reesei. Moreover, Acremonium cellulase exhibited a greater glucan and mannan-hydrolyzing activity than Accellerase 1000.

  2. Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel are being developed to meet safeguards and materials managment requirements at nuclear facilities. Spent-fuel measurement technology and its applications are reviewed

  3. Modeling the highway transportation of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There will be a substantial increase in the number of spent fuel shipments on the nation's highway system in the next thirty years. Most of the spent fuel will be moving from reactors to a spent fuel repository. This study develops two models that evaluate the risk and cost of moving the spent fuel. The Minimum Total Transport Risk Model (MTTRM) seeks an efficient solution for this problem by finding the minimum risk path through the network and sending all the spent fuel shipments over this one path. The Equilibrium Transport Risk Model (ETRM) finds an equitable solution by distributing the shipments over a number of paths in the network. This model decreases the risk along individual paths, but increases society's risk because the spent fuel shipments are traveling over more links in the network. The study finds that there is a trade off between path risk and societal risk. As path risk declines, societal risk rises. The cost of shipping also increases as the number of paths expand. The cost and risk of shipping spent fuel from ten reactors to four potential repository sites are evaluated using the MTTRM. The temporary monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in Tennessee is found to be the minimum cost and minimum risk solution. When direct shipment to the permanent sites is considered, Deaf Smith, Texas is the least cost and least incident free transport risk location. Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the least risk location when the focus is placed on the potential consequences of an accident

  4. The ability of fruit and vegetable enzyme system to hydrolyse ester bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mironowicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The pulp of potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum, topinambur (Helianthus tuberosus and apples (Malus silvestris can hydrolyse totally, or almost totally, ester bonds in phenyl, ?- and ?-naphthyl, benzyl and cinnamyl acetates. In methyl 4-acetoxy-3-metoxybenzoate and methyl 2,5-diacetoxybenzoate as well as testosterone propionate and 16,17-acetonide of 21-acetoxy-6-fluoro-16?,17?,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3,20-dione, the hydrolysis is selective towards the substrate and the bioreagent. In contrast, ethyl benzoate and cinnamate are resistant to hydrolysis.

  5. Rheological and structural characterization of gels from whey protein hydrolysates/locust bean gum mixed systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Cristina M. R.; Teixeira, J. A.; Hilliou, L.; Sampaio, Paula; Gon??alves, M. P.

    2009-01-01

    The gelling ability of whey proteins can be changed by limited hydrolysis and by the addition of other components such as polysaccharides. In this work the effect of the concentration of locust bean gum (LBG) on the heat-set gelation of aqueous whey protein hydrolysates (10% w/w) from pepsin and trypsin was assessed at pH 7.0. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) mild hydrolysis (up to 2.5% in the case of pepsin and 1.0% in the case of trypsin) ameliorates the gelling ability. The WPC synergism wit...

  6. Unrefined wood hydrolysates are viable reactants for the reproducible synthesis of highly swellable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Laleh; Edlund, Ulrica; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2014-08-01

    A value-adding robust and sequential synthetic pathway was elaborated to produce hydrogel structures with ionic character from crude acetylated galactoglucomannan-rich wood hydrolysate (WH). The WH was first-step liquor originating from a sulphite cracking pulp process for dissolving pulp. The synthetically modified WH fractions were verified at each step by NMR and FTIR, and the hydrogels were characterized with respect to their swelling and mechanical properties. Altering the crosslinking chemistry and the content of ionic moieties resulted in hydrogels with various swelling ratios and mechanical properties. Renewable hydrogel formulations with swelling ratios as high as Qeq=270 were achieved. PMID:24751275

  7. Analysis of whey protein hydrolysates: peptide profile and ACE inhibitory activity

    OpenAIRE

    Marialice Pinto Coelho Silvestre; Mauro Ramalho Silva; Viviane Dias Medeiros Silva; Mariana Wanessa Santana de Souza; Carlos de Oliveira Lopes Junior; Wendel de Oliveira Afonso

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare enzymatic hydrolysates from whey protein concentrate with a nutritionally adequate peptide profile and the ability to inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. The effects of the type of enzyme used (pancreatin or papain), the enzyme:substrate ratio (E:S ratio=0.5:100, 1:100, 2:100 and 3:100) and the use of ultrafiltration (UF) were investigated. The fractionation of peptides was performed by size-exclusion-HPLC, and the quantification of the c...

  8. Antihypertensive activities of royal jelly protein hydrolysate and its fractions in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    OpenAIRE

    Takaki-doi, Shima; Hashimoto, Ken; Yamamura, Michio; Kamei, Chiaki

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and hypotensive effects of 7 peptide fractions (Frs) of royal jelly protein hydrolysate (RJPH) were studied in comparison with those of RJPH alone. Fr 4 and Fr 5 were the highest in ACE inhibitory activity and yield, respectively. Molecular weights (MWs) of RJPH and Fr 1-Fr 7 were distributed from 100 to 5,000 and those of Fr 1-Fr 7 increased in order from Fr 1 to Fr 7. RJPH, Fr 3 and Fr 4 at doses of 10, 30 and 100mg/kg i.v. and Fr 5 ...

  9. Isolation of active peptides from plant hydrolysates that promote Vero cells growth in stirred cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Rourou Samia; Hssiki Rym; Kallel Héla

    2011-01-01

    Vero cells are adherent cell lines commonly used for the production of viral vaccines. We had developed an animal component free medium that allows an optimal growth of this cell line in stirred bioreactor [1,2]. We had also showed that Vero cells grown in this medium (called IPT-AFM) sustained rabies virus replication, and resulted in an overall yield comparable to the level obtained in serum-supplemented medium. IPT-AF medium contains plant hydrolysates, namely soy (Hypep 1510) and wheat gl...

  10. Caracterización de un hidrolizado ácido de caseína / Characterization of a casein acid hydrolysate

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Diana Rosa, Viera Oramas; Raisa, Zhurbenko; Claudio, Rodríguez Martínez.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: la mayor disponibilidad de caseína seca en polvo en el mercado y la escasa oferta de caseína húmeda, ocasionaron la factibilidad de modificar el proceso tecnológico de obtención del hidrolizado ácido de caseína. OBJETIVO: caracterización del hidrolizado ácido de caseína obtenido a esca [...] la industrial por una nueva tecnología en el Centro Nacional de Biopreparados (Cuba) y su desempeño en los medios de cultivo. MÉTODOS: se evaluaron 10 lotes del producto, a los cuales se les realizó el análisis químico, así como la evaluación del desempeño mediante la determinación de la densidad microbiana en el tiempo y la realización de las pruebas de susceptibilidad antimicrobiana. RESULTADOS: se demostró que el hidrolizado posee valores de los principales componentes químicos característicos de los productos que se comercializan en el mercado internacional: nitrógeno amínico 6,59 ± 0,71 %, nitrógeno total 8,12 ± 0,41 % y composición aminoacídica. Como características distintivas el producto muestra un contenido reducido de cloruro de sodio (32,63 ± 2,46 %), calcio (334 mg/L), magnesio (133 mg/L) y pérdida por desecación (3,34 ± 0,66 %). La capacidad de promoción de crecimiento de Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 y Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 no mostraron diferencia significativa con respecto a hidrolizados proteicos de otros proveedores: Biotécnica International, Merck y Oxoid Ltd. (p Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: the great availability of dry powdered casein in the market and low accessibility of wet casein induced the viability of modifying the technological process for obtaining casein acid hydrolysate. OBJECTIVES: to characterize the casein acid hydrolysate obtained at industrial scale by a [...] new technology in the National Center of Biological Products of Cuba and to test its performance in culture media. METHODS: ten product batches were tested by chemical composition analysis, and their performance was evaluated through measuring the microbial density vs time and conducting susceptibility antimicrobial tests. RESULTS: it was demonstrated that the hydrolysate had values of the main chemical components inherent to the products in the international market such as amino nitrogen 6,59 ± 0,71 %, total nitrogen 8,12 ± 0,41 % and aminoacid composition. As distinctive characteristics, the product shows reduced contents of some components like: sodium chloride (32,63 ± 2,46 %), calcium (334 mg/L), magnesium (133 mg/L) and loss on drying (3,34 ± 0,66 %). The growth encouraging capacity for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 did not show significant differences with protein hydrolysates from other commercial sources, namely Biotecnica International, Merck and Oxoid Ltd. (p

  11. Effect of diets containing tuna head hydrolysates on the survival and growth of shrimp Penaeus vannamei

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thi-my-huong; Perez-galvez, Raul; Berge, Jean-pascal

    2012-01-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of the supplementation of hydrolysates from tuna head on the survival and growth of Penaeus vannamei. To this end, a feeding trial was performed on eleven groups of shrimps of average weight 4.34 g. Every group was distributed into three tanks (30 shrimps per tank of 150 L) and was fed with one of the following eleven diets, all of them containing 40% crude protein: one diet containing tuna head meal as the principal protein source, which w...

  12. Efficacy of a diet containing caseinate hydrolysate on signs of stress in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    PALESTRINI, CLARA; Minero, Michela; CANNAS, SIMONA; BERTESELLI, GRETA VERONICA; SCAGLIA, ELISABETTA; BARBIERI, SARA; CAVALLONE, ELENA; PURICELLI, MARIA LAURA; SERVIDA, FRANCESCO; DALL'ARA, PAOLA EMANUELA

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate 3 the efficacy of a diet containing caseinate hydrolysate (CH) on signs of stress in 2 4 groups of dogs (defined as Anxious and Non-anxious) using physiological (serum 5 cortisol and lysozyme, N:L ratios and heart rate) and behavioral parameters. 6 From an initial group of 40 female Beagle dogs, ranging in age from 10 months to 4 7 years (mean = 1.47 years; SD = 0.53) belonging to a dog colon...

  13. Biocatalysts and methods for conversion of hemicellulose hydrolysates to biobased products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, James F

    2015-03-31

    The invention relates to processes and biocatalysts for producing ethanol and other useful products from biomass and/or other materials. Initial processing of lignocellulosic biomass frequently yields methylglucuronoxylose (MeGAX) and related products which are resistant to further processing by common biocatalysts. Strains of Enterobacter asburiae are shown to be useful in bioprocessing of MeGAX and other materials into useful bioproducts such as ethanol, acetate, lactate, and many others. Genetic engineering may be used to enhance production of desired bioproducts.

  14. Production d'éthanol a partir de biomasse lignocellulosique Ethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogier J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cette étude fait le point des connaissances scientifiques et techniques dans le domaine de la production alcoolique à partir de susbstrats lignocellulosiques. Ce travail, réalisé dans le cadre d'Agrice (Agriculture pour la chimie et l'énergie, est une synthèse bibliographique qui a cherché à identifier les avancées capables de débloquer certains verrous technologiques et économiques liés à ce type de procédé. La biomasse lignocellulosique est un substrat complexe, constitué des trois principales fractions que sont la cellulose, les hémicelluloses et la lignine. Le procédé de production d'éthanol consiste à récupérer par hydrolyse le maximum de sucres issus à la fois des fractions cellulosiques et hémicellulosiques, puis de fermenter ces sucres en éthanol. Les premiers procédés d'hydrolyse utilisés étaient surtout chimiques, mais ils sont peu compétitifs à l'heure actuelle, en raison notamment du coût des réactifs et de la formation de nombreux sous-produits et de composés inhibiteurs rendant les hydrolysats peu fermentescibles. Ils sont désormais concurrencés par les procédés enzymatiques, plus spécifiques et qui permettent de meilleurs rendements d'hydrolyse dans des conditions moins sévères. Cependant, la biomasse lignocellulosique n'est pas directement accessible aux enzymes, et elle doit subir au préalable une phase de prétraitement dont l'objectif est d'améliorer la susceptibilité à l'hydrolyse enzymatique de la cellulose et éventuellement d'hydrolyser la fraction hémicellulosique en sucres monomères. Parmi les nombreuses méthodes de prétraitement qui ont été étudiées, nous en avons identifié trois répondant au mieux aux objectifs précédemment cités : le prétraitement à l'acide dilué, l'explosion à la vapeur avec utilisation d'un catalyseur, et la thermohydrolyse. Ces trois méthodes permettraient d'atteindre des rendements d'hydrolyse enzymatique de la cellulose proches de 100 %, tout en permettant un taux d'hydrolyse des hémicelluloses supérieur à 80 %, et en minimisant la formation de composés de dégradation. L'hydrolyse enzymatique doit encore être améliorée afin de réduire le coût lié à la consommation d'enzymes. Les principales voies de recherche devraient porter sur l'amélioration de l'activité des cellulases, afin de se rapprocher le plus possible de celles d'enzymes telles que les amylases. Le développement du procédé SFS (saccharification et fermentation simultanées permet d'améliorer l'efficacité des enzymes en minimisant les réactions d'inhibition des enzymes par les produits formés. Son inconvénient est lié aux différences entre les températures optimales de l'hydrolyse enzymatique et de la fermentation. La recherche de micro-organismes conservant de bonnes performances fermentaires à température élevée doit donc se poursuivre. Un autre verrou technologique du procédé concerne la fermentation alcoolique des pentoses, qui peuvent représenter jusqu'à 25 à 40 % des sucres totaux contenus dans la biomasse lignocellulosique. C'est pourquoi il est indispensable de les valoriser en éthanol. Contrairement à la fermentation alcoolique du glucose, largement connue et maîtrisée, celle des pentoses n'est toujours pas résolue, en raison des performances fermentaires médiocres des micro-organismes utilisés. Le développement des outils génétiques et les nouvelles voies de recherche portant sur la transformation de Saccharomyces cerevisiae et de Zymomonas mobilis afin de leur faire acquérir la capacité à fermenter les pentoses, devraient permettre d'améliorer les performances, et éventuellement de se rapprocher de celles enregistrées sur glucose par Saccharomyces Cette étude fait le point des connaissances scientifiques et techniques dans le domaine de la production alcoolique à partir de susbstrats lignocellulosiques. Ce travail, réalisé dans le cadre d'Agrice (Agriculture pour la chimie et l'énergie, est une synthèse bibliographique qui a cherché à identifier les avancées ca

  15. Solid-state fermentation of Acanthogobius hasta processing by-products for the production of antioxidant protein hydrolysates with Aspergillus oryzae

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yaowei, Fang; Shujun, Wang; Shu, Liu; Mingsheng, Lu; Yuliang, Jiao; Guoqiang, Chen; Jianmei, Pan.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional properties and antioxidative activity of a protein hydrolysate prepared from Acanthogobius hasta processing by-product protein during solid-state fermentation with Aspergillus oryzae were investigated. Overall, protease activity increased with the degree of hydrolysis (DH) decreased durin [...] g solid-state fermentation. All the protein hydrolysate had excellent solubility, possessed interfacial properties, and varying degrees of antioxidant activity which were governed by their concentrations and DH, molecular weight distribution and amino acid composition. After 5 days fermentation, the DH of the protein hydrolysate was 31.23%. The protein hydrolysate had the highest total hydrophobic amino acid content, the highest DPPH scavenging activity, reducing power, and the chelating activity. The radical-scavenging activity of the hydrolysates at 6 mg/mL was 78.6%. The reducing power of protein hydrolysate at the range of 0-6 mg/mL was lower than that of BHA at the range of 0-60 µg/mL, while the chelating activity of APs was similar to that of BHA at the range of 0-60 µg/mL. Moreover, the protein hydrolysate showed good emulsifying and foaming properties over a wide pH range from 2 to 12. Therefore, solid state fermentation provided a suitable and low-cost method for converting Acanthogobius hasta processing by-product protein into antioxidant protein hydrolysates.

  16. Solid-state fermentation of acanthogobius hasta processing by-products for the production of antioxidant protein hydrolysates with aspergillus oryzae

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yaowei, Fang; Shujun, Wang; Shu, Liu; Mingsheng, Lu; Yuliang, Jiao; Guoqiang, Chen; Jianmei, Pan.

    Full Text Available Functional properties and antioxidative activity of a protein hydrolysate prepared from Acanthogobius hasta processing by-product protein during solid-state fermentation with Aspergillus oryzae were investigated. Overall, protease activity increased with the degree of hydrolysis (DH) decreased durin [...] g solid-state fermentation. All the protein hydrolysate had excellent solubility, possessed interfacial properties, and varying degrees of antioxidant activity which were governed by their concentrations and DH, molecular weight distribution and amino acid composition. After 5 days fermentation, the DH of the protein hydrolysate was 31.23%. The protein hydrolysate had the highest total hydrophobic amino acid content, the highest DPPH scavenging activity, reducing power, and the chelating activity. The radical-scavenging activity of the hydrolysates at 6 mg/mL was 78.6%. The reducing power of protein hydrolysate at the range of 0-6 mg/mL was lower than that of BHA at the range of 0-60 µg/mL, while the chelating activity of APs was similar to that of BHA at the range of 0-60 µg/mL. Moreover, the protein hydrolysate showed good emulsifying and foaming properties over a wide pH range from 2 to 12. Therefore, solid state fermentation provided a suitable and low-cost method for converting Acanthogobius hasta processing by-product protein into antioxidant protein hydrolysates.

  17. Ensiling as pretreatment of grass for lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambye-Jensen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Development of sound technologies of biomass conversion will be increasingly important for many years to come as planetary bounderies drive the development towards a biobased society. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is, in this regard, an essential technology. Current pretreatment methods, based on severe physio-chemical processes, are effective, however, they are also costly and energy demanding. An alternative biological pretreatment method, based on the well-known biomass preservation of ensiling, has been proposed. Ensiling holds potential as an integrated storage and pretreatment method with low cost and low energy requirements, plus brings about multiple advantages with regards to agricultural management. However, the pretreatment effect of ensiling, and the overall effects for further conversion are limited. In this study, ensiling was evaluated as a method of pretreatment for subsequent enzymatic saccharification of cellulose and hemicellulose, by using the temperate grass Festulolium Hykor. The method was additionally combined with hydrothermal treatment, in order to decrease the required severity of an industrial applied pretreatment method. The first part of the project was devoted to method development. This resulted in the development of a simple and flexible standard method forlaboratory ensilingwith a high reproducibility,which is well suited for high-throughput experiments.   A comprehensive study on important parameters in ensiling was conducted to find optimal conditions providing the best possible pretreatment effect. The parameters were biomass composition, varied by ensiling of four seasonal cuts of grass, different dry matter (DM) content at ensiling, and an addition of different lactic acid bacteria species. First of all, the study confirmed that ensiling can act as a method of pretreatment and improve the enzymatic cellulose convertibility of grass. Furthermore, low DM ensiling was found to improve the effects of pretreatment due to a higher production of organic acids in the silage. The effect of applied lactic acid bacteria species was, however, insignificant. Cellulose conversion was noted to be largely determined by the stage of maturity of the four different cuts of grass. Less mature grass had high convertibility but less amount of cellulose and vice versa. This led to the conclusion that an optimal maturity of grass can be found, which gives an optimal glucose release. However, limitations of the method were also noted. The ensiling of grass came with a considerable loss of water soluble carbohydrates (WSC), which was in fact higher than the improved glucose release. Furthermore, the amount of released glucose was not adequate to support an efficient production of ethanol. Lastly, the conversion of xylan was extremely low in both grass and grass silage. Optimization of the enzymatic saccharification of grass was attempted through improvement of the hemicellulase content in the enzyme blend. However, neither additional xylanases (Cellic HTec2® and ß-xylosidase) nor hemicellulose degrading esterases (acetyl xylan esterase and ferulic acid esterase) showed any improvements of xylan or glucan convertibility. Furthermore, hemicellulases were added before ensiling in order to assist and improve the pretreatment effect. This resulted in, however, the undesired effect that additionally released monosaccharides were utilized during storage and had a negative impact on sugar release after enzymatic saccharification. In both of the above mentioned experiments on optimization ofsugar release by means of enzymes, it was noted that the hemicellulose structure of Festulolium Hykor appeared unusually resistant to enzymatic degradation. Due to the low conversion results on Festulolium Hykor, the last part of the project was based on a new tenet: Ensiling can not provide sufficient pretreatment effect to be a stand-alone pretreatment method. Ensiling was therefore combined with hydrothermal treatment (HTT), and the pretreatment combination was applied to both grass (Festulolium  Hykor) and whea

  18. Proceedings of the third spent fuel workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third workshop, held in Boston, Mass. November 10-11, 1983 was organized by Battelle PNL. Questions concerning spent fuel behaviour in nuclear waste repositories were discussed. The following three lectures were presented. The corrosion of Spent UO2-Fuel in Synthetic Groundwater, R.S. Forsyth, K. Svanberg and L.O. Werme. Leaching and Radiolysis Studies on UO2 Fuel, L.H. Johnson, S. Stroes-Gascoyne, D.W. Shoesmith, M.G. Bailey and D.M. Sellinger. Comparison of Spent Fuel and UO2 Release in Salt Brines, W.J. Gray and G.L. McVay. (G.B.)

  19. EDF's programme for spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French policy is presently to reprocess spent fuel and before any fuel assembly can be used, it has to be proven that it is reprocessable after irradiation. Nevertheless, in order to maintain the separated plutonium inventory, reprocessing is only implemented for producing the quantity of plutonium to be recycled. That strategy leads to slowly increase the inventory of spent fuel since the number of authorized reactors for recycling is presently limited. This fact and the French law (of 30 December 1991), which demands to study various fuel cycle back end strategies, led to develop an extended reflection concerning spent fuel storage and disposal. (author)

  20. Spent fuel management newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the newsletter consists of two parts. The first part describes the IAEA Secretariat activities - work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes. The second part contains country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage and treatment of spent fuel

  1. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  2. Advances in HTGR spent fuel treatment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA Technologies, Inc. has been investigating the burning of spent reactor graphite under Department of Energy sponsorship since 1969. Several deep fluidized bed burners have been used at the GA pilot plant to develop graphite burning techniques for both spent fuel recovery and volume reduction for waste disposal. Since 1982 this technology has been extended to include more efficient circulating bed burners. This paper includes updates on high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel cycle options and current results of spent fuel treatment testing for fluidized and advanced circulating bed burners

  3. TRIGA spent fuel storage criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new spent fuel storage has been built at the J. Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. Detailed criticality safety analysis was performed within the framework of the licensing procedure. Two independent computer codes were applied: Monte-Carlo code MCNP and lattice cell code WIMS. Two types of fuel elements were considered: 12 w% standard and FLIP. Parametric study on lattice geometry, water density and burn-up was performed. Main results are new findings about the reactor physics properties of the spent fuel storage in particular, and experience and guidelines in performing criticality safety analysis of research reactor spent fuel storage in general. (author)

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  5. Simultaneous consumption of pentose and hexose sugars: an optimal microbial phenotype for efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Han; Block, David E; Mills, David A

    2010-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive carbon source for bio-based fuel and chemical production; however, its compositional heterogeneity hinders its commercial use. Since most microbes possess carbon catabolite repression (CCR), mixed sugars derived from the lignocellulose are consumed sequentially, reducing the efficacy of the overall process. To overcome this barrier, microbes that exhibit the simultaneous consumption of mixed sugars have been isolated and/or developed and evaluated for the lignocellulosic biomass utilization. Specific strains of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Zymomonas mobilis have been engineered for simultaneous glucose and xylose utilization via mutagenesis or introduction of a xylose metabolic pathway. Other microbes, such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus buchneri, and Candida shehatae possess a relaxed CCR mechanism, showing simultaneous consumption of glucose and xylose. By exploiting CCR-negative phenotypes, various integrated processes have been developed that incorporate both enzyme hydrolysis of lignocellulosic material and mixed sugar fermentation, thereby enabling greater productivity and fermentation efficacy. PMID:20838789

  6. New Aldehyde Reductase Genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Contribute In Situ Detoxification of Lignocellulose-to-Ethanol Conversion Inhibitiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are inhibitory compounds commonly encountered during lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion for cleaner transportation fuels. It is possible to in situ detoxify the aldehyde inhibitors by tolerant ethanologenic yeast strains. Multiple gene-mediated reductio...

  7. Spent fuel management in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Indian point of view, the spent fuel management by the reprocessing and plutonium recycle option is considered to be a superior and an inevitable option. The nuclear energy programme in Indian envisages three stages of implementation involving installation of thermal reactors in the first phase followed by recycling of plutonium from reprocessed fuel in fast breeder reactors and in the third phase utilization of its large thorium reserves in reactor system based on U-233-Th cycle. The Indian programme for Waste Management envisages disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in near surface disposal facilities and deep geological disposal for high level and alpha bearing wastes. A Waste Immobilization Plant (WHIP), employing metallic melter for HLW vitrification is operational at Tarapur. Two more WIPs are being set up at Kalpakkam and Tarapur. A Solid waste Storage Surveillance Facility (SSSF) is also set up for interim storage of vitrified HLW. Site investigations are in progress for selecting site for ultimate disposal in igneous rock formations. R and D works is taken up on partitioning of HLW. Solvent extraction and extraction chromatographic studies are in progress. Presently emphasis is on separation of heat generating short lived nuclides like strontium and alpha emitters. (author)

  8. Comparison of Nitrogen Bioaccessibility from Salmon and Whey Protein Hydrolysates using a Human Gastrointestinal Model (TIM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomi Framroze

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The TIM-1 system is a computer-controlled multi-compartmental dynamic model that closely simulates in vivo gastrointestinal tract digestion in humans. During digestion, the compounds released from meal matrix by gastric and intestinal secretions (enzymes are progressively absorbed through semipermeable membranes depending on their molecular weight. These absorbed (dialysed compounds are considered as bioaccessible, which means that they can be theoretically absorbed by the small intestine in the body. Methods: Salmon protein hydrolysate (SPH, whey protein hydrolysates extensively (WPH??High or weakly (WPH-Low hydrolysed, non-hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI and mixtures of WPI:SPH (90:10, 80:20 were digested in TIM-1 using the conditions for a fast gastrointestinal transit that simulate the digestion of a liquid meal in human adults. During digestion (2 hours, samples were collected in intestinal compartments (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum and in both jejunal and ileal dialysates to determine their nitrogen content. All the products were compared in terms of kinetics of nitrogen absorption through the semipermeable membranes (bioaccessible nitrogen and nitrogen distribution throughout the intestinal compartments at the end of the 2 hour digestion. Results: After a 2 h-digestion in TIM-1, SPH was the protein substrate from which the highest amount of nitrogen (67.0% becomes available for the small intestine absorption. WPH-High had the second highest amount (56.0% of bioaccessible nitrogen while this amount decreased to 38.5–42.2% for the other protein substrates. The high nitrogen bioaccessibility of SPH is consistent with its richness in low molecular weight peptides (50% < 1000 Da. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that SPH provides a higher proportion of bioaccessible nitrogen to a healthy adult compared to all forms of whey proteins, including extensively hydrolysed whey protein hydrolysate. The substitution of non-hydrolysed WPI by small amounts of SPH (10–20% improved slightly its nitrogen bioaccessibility, making the mixture particularly suitable for applications such as medical foods that require rapid protein uptake and where the use of extensively hydrolysed whey protein is unfeasible due to its undesirable organoleptic properties

  9. Simultaneous consumption of pentose and hexose sugars: an optimal microbial phenotype for efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-han; Block, David E.; Mills, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive carbon source for bio-based fuel and chemical production; however, its compositional heterogeneity hinders its commercial use. Since most microbes possess carbon catabolite repression (CCR), mixed sugars derived from the lignocellulose are consumed sequentially, reducing the efficacy of the overall process. To overcome this barrier, microbes that exhibit the simultaneous consumption of mixed sugars have been isolated and/or developed and evaluated for ...

  10. Thermophilic Anaerobic Biodegradation of [14C]Lignin, [14C]Cellulose, and [14C]Lignocellulose Preparations

    OpenAIRE

    Benner, Ronald; Hodson, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic enrichment cultures were incubated with [14C-lignin]lignocellulose, [14C-polysaccharide]lignocellulose, and kraft [14C]lignin prepared from slash pine, Pinus elliottii, and 14C-labeled preparations of synthetic lignin and purified cellulose. Significant but low percentages (2 to 4%) of synthetic and natural pine lignin were recovered as labeled methane and carbon dioxide during 60-day incubations, whereas much greater percentages (13 to 23%) of kraft lignin were...

  11. Consolidation of spent fuel rods as an option to increase the capacity of spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the SCALE-4 code package we have analyzed consolidation possibilities of the NPP Krsko spent fuel pool. We considered an approach to capacity increase of the NPP Krsko spent fuel pool. We considered an approach to capacity increase of the designed and installed in the free space of the spent fuel pool. Two case were analyzed: the first case assuming that old fuel (fuel that is already in the spent fuel pool) would be consolidated and the second case assuming that new fuel (fuel that will be used in the future) would be consolidated. We have showed that it is possible to design the additional canisters (with consolidated fuel) in free space of the spent fuel pool with the sufficient total capacity to store all the spent fuel generated during the 40 years lifetime of the plant.(author)

  12. Examination of lignocellulosic fibers for chemical, thermal, and separations properties: Addressing thermo-chemical stability issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carter David

    Natural fiber-plastic composites incorporate thermoplastic resins with fibrous plant-based materials, sometimes referred to as biomass. Pine wood mill waste has been the traditional source of natural fibrous feedstock. In anticipation of a waste wood shortage other fibrous biomass materials are being investigated as potential supplements or replacements. Perennial grasses, agricultural wastes, and woody biomass are among the potential source materials. As these feedstocks share the basic chemical building blocks; cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, they are collectively called lignocellulosics. Initial investigation of a number of lignocellulosic materials, applied to fiber-plastic composite processing and material testing, resulted in varied results, particularly response to processing conditions. Less thermally stable lignocellulosic filler materials were physically changed in observable ways: darkened color and odor. The effect of biomass materials' chemical composition on thermal stability was investigated an experiment involving determination of the chemical composition of seven lignocellulosics: corn hull, corn stover, fescue, pine, soy hull, soy stover, and switchgrass. These materials were also evaluated for thermal stability by thermogravimetric analysis. The results of these determinations indicated that both chemical composition and pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials can have an effect on their thermal stability. A second study was performed to investigate what effect different pretreatment systems have on hybrid poplar, pine, and switchgrass. These materials were treated with hot water, ethanol, and a 2:1 benzene/ethanol mixture for extraction times of: 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. This factorial experiment demonstrated that both extraction time and medium have an effect on the weight percent of extractives removed from all three material types. The extracted materials generated in the above study were then subjected to an evaluation of thermal stability by thermogravimetric analysis in a subsequent experiment. Overlay plots, combining individual weight loss curves, demonstrate that the experimental factors, solvent system and extraction time, produce effects on the thermal stability of the treated biomass samples. These data also indicated that the individual lignocellulosic materials had unique responses to the type of solvent used for pretreatment. Increasing extraction time had either no correlation with or a positive effect on thermal stability of the biomass samples.

  13. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  14. Spent fuel management of NPPs in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two Nuclear Power Plants in operation in Argentina: 'Atucha I' (unique PHWR design) in operation since 1974, and 'Embalse' (typical Candu reactor) which started operation in 1984. Both NPPs are operated by 'Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A' which is responsible for the management and interim storage of spent fuel till the end of the operative life of the plants. A third NPP, 'Atucha II' is under construction, with a similar design of Atucha I. The legislative framework establishes that after final shutdown of a NPP the spent fuel will be transferred to the 'National Atomic Energy Commission', which is also responsible for the decommissioning of the Plants. In Atucha I, the spent fuel is stored underwater, until another option is implemented meanwhile in Embalse the spent fuel is stored during six years in pools and then it is moved to a dry storage. A decision about the fuel cycle back-end strategy will be taken before year 2030. (authors)

  15. Rationale for determining MCC spent fuel acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the suitability of the Topopah Spring Tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for use as a disposal site for spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste forms. The performance of the high-level waste forms and the engineered barrier system at the site must be shown to comply with the requirements in 10 CFR 60. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for determining the performance of the US commercial reactor spent nuclear fuels under potential repository conditions. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) performs testing of these highly radioactive materials in support of the LLNL program. This report summarizes the rationale for selecting additional spent fuels that should be acquired to support the LLNL and PNL testing programs. These programs have identified specific attributes that may affect spent fuel behavior in a repository

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  17. IAEA overview of global spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel storage is a common issue in all Member States with nuclear reactors. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, the storage of spent fuel will contribute an imminent and significant part thereof. Notwithstanding considerable efforts to increase the efficient use of nuclear fuel and to optimise storage capacity, delays in realizing geological repositories in most countries or in implementing reprocessing in some countries entail in increased spent fuel storage capacity needs in combination with longer storage durations over the foreseeable future. An overview of global and regional spent fuel arisings and storage capacity is presented in this paper. Some trends are identified and recent Agency activities in the subject area discussed. (author)

  18. Management of spent sealed sources in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the effort of the Center for Development of Radioactive Waste Management (CDRWM) to develop and implement activities in maintaining and improving the safety of spent sealed radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials over their life cycle. There is a wide variety of uses of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Indonesia, while the CDRWM plan to cover all spent radiation sources. Primary consideration is given to sealed radiation sources with relatively high levels of radioactivity which might necessitate interventional measures should control over them be lost. The policy of the Government of Indonesia for spent radiation sources is, whenever possible, spent sealed sources should be returned to the supplier. CDRWM has a general principle that sealed sources should not be removed from their holders, or the holders physically modified (except for Ra-226 needles, smoke detector and lighting preventer). (author)

  19. Spent fuel workshop'2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch

    2002-07-01

    This document gathers the transparencies of the presentations given at the 2002 spent fuel workshop: Session 1 - Research Projects: Overview on the IN CAN PROCESSES European project (M. Cowper), Overview on the SPENT FUEL STABILITY European project (C. Poinssot), Overview on the French R and D project on spent fuel long term evolution, PRECCI (C. Poinssot); Session 2 - Spent Fuel Oxidation: Oxidation of uranium dioxide single crystals (F. Garrido), Experimental results on SF oxidation and new modeling approach (L. Desgranges), LWR spent fuel oxidation - effects of burn-up and humidity (B. Hanson), An approach to modeling CANDU fuel oxidation under dry storage conditions (P. Taylor); Session 3 - Spent Fuel Dissolution Experiments: Overview on high burnup spent fuel dissolution studies at FZK/INE (A. Loida), Results on the influence of hydrogen on spent fuel leaching (K. Spahiu), Leaching of spent UO{sub 2} fuel under inert and reducing conditions (Y. Albinsson), Fuel corrosion investigation by electrochemical techniques (D. Wegen), A reanalysis of LWR spent fuel flow through dissolution tests (B. Hanson), U-bearing secondary phases formed during fuel corrosion (R. Finch), The near-field chemical conditions and spent fuel leaching (D. Cui), The release of radionuclides from spent fuel in bentonite block (S.S. Kim), Trace actinide behavior in altered spent fuel (E. Buck, B. Hanson); Session 4 - Radiolysis Issues: The effect of radiolysis on UO{sub 2} dissolution determined from electrochemical experiments with {sup 238}Pu doped UO{sub 2} M. Stroess-Gascoyne (F. King, J.S. Betteridge, F. Garisto), doped UO{sub 2} studies (V. Rondinella), Preliminary results of static and dynamic dissolution tests with {alpha} doped UO{sub 2} in Boom clay conditions (K. Lemmens), Studies of the behavior of UO{sub 2} / water interfaces under He{sup 2+} beam (C. Corbel), Alpha and gamma radiolysis effects on UO{sub 2} alteration in water (C. Jegou), Behavior of Pu-doped pellets in brines (M. Kelm), On the potential catalytic behavior of UO{sub 2}(s): experimental approach and preliminary results on uranium oxide - water interface (J. Devoy), Preliminary results on studies on radiolysis effects on dissolution of UO{sub 2} (E. Ekeroth, M. Jonnson); Session 5 - Modeling of the Spent Fuel Dissolution: tUO{sub 2} dissolution and the effect of radiolysis (T. Lundstrom), Prediction of the effect of radiolysis (F. King), Experimental determination and chemical modeling of radiolytic processes at the spent fuel / water interface (E. Cera, J. Bruno, T. Eriksen, M. Grive, L. Duro); Session 6 - Influence of the Potential Evolution prior to the Water Access on IRF: Potential occurrence of {alpha} self-irradiation enhanced-diffusion (H.J. Matzke, T. Petit), Are grain boundaries a stable microstructure? (Y. Guerin), Modeling RN instant release fractions from spent nuclear fuel under repository conditions (C.Poinssot, L. Johnson, P. Lovera). (J.S.)

  20. Spent fuel storage requirements 1993--2040

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historical inventories of spent fuel are combined with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projections of future discharges from commercial nuclear reactors in the United States to provide estimates of spent fuel storage requirements through the year 2040. The needs are estimated for storage capacity beyond that presently available in the reactor storage pools. These estimates incorporate the maximum capacities within current and planned in-pool storage facilities and any planned transshipments of spent fuel to other reactors or facilities. Existing and future dry storage facilities are also discussed. The nuclear utilities provide historical data through December 1992 on the end of reactor life are based on the DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates of future nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges

  1. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  2. Development of spent fuel storage process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of the research and development project covers the development of various remote operation technologies which are important assets for the repairment and maintenance of spent fuel handling facilities as well as the actual handling of spent fuels. As a key technology pertaining to such an objective, an anti-swing overhead crane system is developed. The anti-swing crane system is designed to provide oscillation free transportation of heavy equipments and materials such as spent fuel casks in nuclear facilities, therefore, an increased level of safety may be achieved. Also a teleoperated robotic impact wrench system is developed by adopting multi-sensor integration and suitably designed impact wrench module. The performance of the impact wrench system is tested by opening the spent fuel cask lid. Other related efforts in technological innovations are also made in the development of fuzzy logic controller for a tele-visual surveillance system and the design of a three-dimensional range finder. (Author)

  3. International experience in conditioning spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to compile and present in a clear form international experience (USA, Canada, Sweden, FRG, UK, Japan, Switzerland) gained to date in conditioning spent fuel elements. The term conditioning is here taken to mean the handling and packaging of spent fuel elements for short- or long-term storage or final disposal. Plants of a varying nature fall within this scope, both in terms of the type of fuel element treated and the plant purpose eg. experimental or production plant. Emphasis is given to plants which bear some similarity to the concept developed in Germany for direct disposal of spent fuel elements. Worldwide, however, relatively few conditioning plants are in existence or have been conceived. Hence additional plants have been included where aspects of the experience gained are also of relevance eg. plants developed for the consolidation of spent fuel elements. (orig./HP)

  4. Development of silane-hydrolysate binder for UV-resistant thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed characterizaton and formulation studies were performed on a methyltriakoxysilane hydrolysate as a binder for thermal control coatings. The binder was optimized by varying hydrolysis temperature, time, catalyst type, and water concentration. The candidate coating formulations, based on this binder with TiO2 pigment, were optimized via a detailed series of sprayed test panels that included the parameters of binder/pigment ratio, ethanol content, pigment particle size, coating thickness and cure conditions. A typical optimized coating was prepared by acetic acid catalyzed hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane with 3.25 mol-equivalents of water over a 24 hour period at room temperature. The resulting hydrolysate was directly mixed with pre-milled TiO2 (12 grams pigment/26 grams binder) to yield a sprayable consistency. Panels were sprayed to result in a nominal cure coating thickness of 2 mils. Cure was affected by air drying for 24 hr at room temperature plus 72 hr at 150 F. These coatings are typically extremely tough and abrasion-resistant, with an absorptance (alpha) of 0.20 and emittance (e) of 0.89. No significant coating damage was observed in the mandrel bend test, even after exposure to thermal cycling from -160 to 160 F. Vacuum exposure of the coatings for 930 hours at 1 equivalent UV sun resulted in no visible degradation and no significant increase in absorptance.

  5. Efficient production of succinic acid from macroalgae hydrolysate by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bing; Zhou, Jie-Min; Yang, Mao-Hua; Liu, Yi-Lan; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Xing, Jian-Min

    2015-06-01

    In this study, microbial production of succinic acid from macroalgae (i.e., Laminaria japonica) was investigated for the first time. The engineered Escherichia coli BS002 exhibited higher molar yield of succinic acid on mannitol (1.39±0.01mol/mol) than glucose (1.01±0.05mol/mol). After pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, L. japonica hydrolysate was mainly glucose (10.31±0.32g/L) and mannitol (10.12±0.17g/L), which was used as the substrate for succinic acid fermentation with the recombinant BS002. A final 17.44±0.54g/L succinic acid was obtained from the hydrolysate after 72h dual-phase fermentation. The yield was as high as 1.24±0.08mol/mol total sugar, which reached 73% of the maximum theoretical yield. The results demonstrate that macroalgae biomass represents a novelty and economical alternative feedstock for biochemicals production. PMID:25747879

  6. Electro-oxidation of hydrolysed poly-oxymethylene-dimethylether on PtRu supported catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaux, Didier [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4, Kofu 400-8510, Yamanashi (Japan); ARKEMA, 420 rue d' Estienne d' Orves, 95705 Colombes Cedex (France); Yano, Hiroshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4, Kofu 400-8510, Yamanashi (Japan); Dubois, Jean-Luc [ARKEMA, 420 rue d' Estienne d' Orves, 95705 Colombes Cedex (France); Watanabe, Masahiro, E-mail: m-watanabe@yamanashi.ac.j [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4, Kofu 400-8510, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Poly-oxymethylene-dimethylether (CH{sub 3}-O-(CH{sub 2}-O){sub n}-CH{sub 3} (n = 3), abbreviated as POMM{sub 3}), which has no toxicity and a very low vapour pressure, unlike methanol, was investigated as a possible liquid fuel for a direct oxidation-type fuel cell. The electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of methanol, formaldehyde and a fully hydrolysed form of POMM{sub 3} in 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} HClO{sub 4} solution was examined from 30 {sup o}C to 90 {sup o}C by using a channel flow cell system at three different types of PtRu catalysts, dispersed on high surface area supports, i.e., carbon black, antimony-doped tin oxide (Sb-SnO{sub 2}), and the latter mixed with a certain fraction of acetylene black (AB) to improve the electronic conductivity. The PtRu/Sb-SnO{sub 2} + AB catalyst exhibited the best electrocatalytic activity and thermal stability towards the fully hydrolysed POMM{sub 3} and formaldehyde oxidations, for which the mass activity was about ten times higher than that for methanol.

  7. Electro-oxidation of hydrolysed poly-oxymethylene-dimethylether on PtRu supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly-oxymethylene-dimethylether (CH3-O-(CH2-O)n-CH3 (n = 3), abbreviated as POMM3), which has no toxicity and a very low vapour pressure, unlike methanol, was investigated as a possible liquid fuel for a direct oxidation-type fuel cell. The electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of methanol, formaldehyde and a fully hydrolysed form of POMM3 in 0.1 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution was examined from 30 oC to 90 oC by using a channel flow cell system at three different types of PtRu catalysts, dispersed on high surface area supports, i.e., carbon black, antimony-doped tin oxide (Sb-SnO2), and the latter mixed with a certain fraction of acetylene black (AB) to improve the electronic conductivity. The PtRu/Sb-SnO2 + AB catalyst exhibited the best electrocatalytic activity and thermal stability towards the fully hydrolysed POMM3 and formaldehyde oxidations, for which the mass activity was about ten times higher than that for methanol.

  8. Characterization and Potential Use of Cuttlefish Skin Gelatin Hydrolysates Prepared by Different Microbial Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jridi, Mourad; Lassoued, Imen; Nasri, Rim; Ayadi, Mohamed Ali; Nasri, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Composition, functional properties, and in vitro antioxidant activities of gelatin hydrolysates prepared from cuttlefish skin were investigated. Cuttlefish skin gelatin hydrolysates (CSGHs) were obtained by treatment with crude enzyme preparations from Bacillus licheniformis NH1, Bacillus mojavensis A21, Bacillus subtilis A26, and commercial alcalase. All CSGHs had high protein contents, 74.3–78.3%, and showed excellent solubility (over 90%). CSGH obtained by alcalase demonstrated high antioxidant activities monitored by ?-carotene bleaching, DPPH radical scavenging, lipid peroxidation inhibition, and reducing power activity. Its antioxidant activity remained stable or increased in a wide range of pH (1–9), during heating treatment (100°C for 240?min) and after gastrointestinal digestion simulation. In addition, alcalase-CSGH was incorporated into turkey meat sausage to determine its effect on lipid oxidation during 35 days of storage period. At 0.5?mg/g, alcalase-CSGH delayed lipid oxidation monitored by TBARS and conjugated diene up to 10 days compared to vitamin C. The results reveal that CSGHs could be used as food additives possessing both antioxidant activity and functional properties. PMID:25025053

  9. Alcoholic fermentation of carbon sources in biomass hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maris, Antonius J A; Abbott, Derek A; Bellissimi, Eleonora; van den Brink, Joost; Kuyper, Marko; Luttik, Marijke A H; Wisselink, H Wouter; Scheffers, W Alexander; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T

    2006-11-01

    Fuel ethanol production from plant biomass hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of great economic and environmental significance. This paper reviews the current status with respect to alcoholic fermentation of the main plant biomass-derived monosaccharides by this yeast. Wild-type S. cerevisiae strains readily ferment glucose, mannose and fructose via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway of glycolysis, while galactose is fermented via the Leloir pathway. Construction of yeast strains that efficiently convert other potentially fermentable substrates in plant biomass hydrolysates into ethanol is a major challenge in metabolic engineering. The most abundant of these compounds is xylose. Recent metabolic and evolutionary engineering studies on S. cerevisiae strains that express a fungal xylose isomerase have enabled the rapid and efficient anaerobic fermentation of this pentose. L: -Arabinose fermentation, based on the expression of a prokaryotic pathway in S. cerevisiae, has also been established, but needs further optimization before it can be considered for industrial implementation. In addition to these already investigated strategies, possible approaches for metabolic engineering of galacturonic acid and rhamnose fermentation by S. cerevisiae are discussed. An emerging and major challenge is to achieve the rapid transition from proof-of-principle experiments under 'academic' conditions (synthetic media, single substrates or simple substrate mixtures, absence of toxic inhibitors) towards efficient conversion of complex industrial substrate mixtures that contain synergistically acting inhibitors. PMID:17033882

  10. Glycyl endopeptidase from papaya latex: partial purification and use for production of fish gelatin hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnjanapratum, Supatra; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2014-12-15

    An aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in combination with ammonium sulphate ((NH4)2SO4) precipitation was applied to fractionate glycyl endopeptidase from the papaya latex of Red Lady and Khack Dum cultivars. ATPS containing polyethylene glycol (PEG 2000 and 6000) and salts ((NH4)2SO4 and MgSO4) at different concentrations were used. Glycyl endopeptidase with high purification fold (PF) and yield was found in the salt-rich bottom phase of ATPS with 10%PEG 6000-10% (NH4)2SO4. When ATPS fraction from Red Lady cultivar was further precipitated with 40-60% saturation of (NH4)2SO4, PF of 2.1-fold with 80.23% yield was obtained. Almost all offensive odorous compounds, particularly benzyl isothiocyanate, were removed from partially purified glycyl endopeptidase (PPGE). The fish gelatin hydrolysates prepared using PPGE showed higher ABTS radical scavenging activity and less odour, compared with those of crude extract (CE). Thus antioxidative gelatin hydrolysate with negligible undesirable odour could be prepared with the aid of PPGE. PMID:25038693

  11. Targeted separation of antibacterial peptide from protein hydrolysate of anchovy cooking wastewater by equilibrium dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenting; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Li; Qian, Haifeng; Qi, Xiguang

    2015-02-01

    Anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) cooking wastewater (ACWW) is a by-product resulted from the production of boiled-dried anchovies in the seafood processing industry. In this study, the protein hydrolysate of ACWW (ACWWPH) was found to have antimicrobial activity after enzymatic hydrolysis with Protamex. For the targeted screening of antibacterial peptides, liposomes constructed from Staphylococcus aureus membrane lipids were used in an equilibrium dialysis system. The hydrolysate was further purified by liposome equilibrium dialysis combined with high performance liquid chromatography. The purified antimicrobial peptide (ACWWP1) was determined to be GLSRLFTALK, with a molecular weight of 1104.6622Da. The peptide exhibited no haemolytic activity up to a concentration of 512?g/ml. It displayed a dose-dependent bactericidal effect in reconstituted milk. The change in cell surface hydrophobicity and membrane-permeable action of the purified ACWWP1 may have contributed to the antibacterial effect. This study suggests that liposome equilibrium dialysis can be used for the targeted screening of antimicrobial peptides. PMID:25172690

  12. Sm-like protein enhanced tolerance of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inhibitors in hemicellulosic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Xia, Liming

    2012-11-01

    A current challenge of the cellulosic ethanol industry is to improve the resistance of inhibitors present in biomass hydrolysates. RNA-binding protein gene lsm6 was cloned from industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae ZU-E8, which is able to conferment glucose and xylose, and transformed into ZU-E8 via expression vector pRS426. The positive transformant ZU-910 with over-expressing lsm6 was identified on the culture plates using high concentration of acetate and re-screened by fermentation test. Fermentation by the recombinants was performed in a medium containing 80 g/L xylose and 2 g/L acetic acid or 20 g/L NH(4)Ac/NaAc. After 96 h shaking-flask fermentation, ZU-910 utilized 90.2% xylose with an ethanol yield of 26.9 g/L, which was 8.5- and 10-fold higher than ZU-E8. Further, in the corn stover hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentation, both the xylose conversion and ethanol production by ZU-910 was larger by 50% and 40% than ZU-E8. ZU-910 has also enhanced tolerance against furfural and SO(4)(2-). PMID:23021959

  13. Synthesis And Characterisation Of Nano-Films Of Hydrolysable Synthetic Biodegradable Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.SRILALITHA, K.N.JAYAVEERA, S.S.MADHVENDHRA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation is the natural process by which organic chemicals in the environment are converted to simpler compounds, mineralized and redistributed through elemental cycles. Biodegradation can occur within the biosphere and micro organisms play a central role in the biodegradation process. A polymer material is called biodegradable if all its organic components undergo a total biodegradation. Hydrolysable polymers such as poly esters are often more prone to degradation but at the same time are often less suitable than hydrophobic polymers for many technical applications. Aliphatic homo polyesters such as poly (tetra methylene adipate (PTMA and block copolymers such as poly (ethylene succinate-b-poly (ethylene glycol (PES/PEG and poly (ethylene succinate-b-(tetra methylene glycol (PEG/PTMG have been synthesized and the materials obtained showed thermoplastic elastomer behavior. The synthetic hydrolysable poly anhydrides are useful to biomedical applications due to the fiber forming properties. The aliphatic polycarbonate is useful as a biodegradable polymer for medical applications which displays hydrolytic degradation.

  14. Multifunctional peptides derived from an egg yolk protein hydrolysate: isolation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Pokora, Marta; Setner, Bartosz; D?browska, Anna; Szo?tysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Trziszka, Tadeusz; Lubec, Gert; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2015-02-01

    An egg yolk protein by-product following ethanol extraction of phospholipids (YP) was hydrolyzed with pepsin to produce and identify novel peptides that revealed antioxidant, ACE inhibitory and antidiabetic (?-glucosidase and DPP-IV inhibitory) activities. The peptic hydrolysate of YP was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Isolated peptides were identified using mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF) and the Mascot Search Results database. Four peptides of MW ranging from 1,210.62 to 1,677.88 Da corresponded to the fragments of Apolipoprotein B (YINQMPQKSRE; YINQMPQKSREA), Vitellogenin-2 (VTGRFAGHPAAQ) and Apovitellenin-1 (YIEAVNKVSPRAGQF). These peptides were chemically synthesized and showed antioxidant, ACE inhibitory or/and antidiabetic activities. Peptide YIEAVNKVSPRAGQF exerted the strongest ACE inhibitory activity, with IC50 = 9.4 µg/mL. The peptide YINQMPQKSRE showed the strongest DPPH free radical scavenging and DPP-IV inhibitory activities and its ACE inhibitory activity (IC50) reached 10.1 µg/mL. The peptide VTGRFAGHPAAQ revealed the highest ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50 = 365.4 µg/mL). A novel nutraceutical effect for peptides from an egg yolk hydrolysate was shown. PMID:25408464

  15. Morphology and structural properties of high-amylose rice starch residues hydrolysed by amyloglucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Jianmin; Yang, Yang; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Changquan; Zhang, Fengmin; Wang, Youping; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan; Wei, Cunxu

    2013-06-15

    High-amylose starches are attracting considerable attention because of their potential health benefits and industrial uses. Enzyme hydrolysis of starch is involved in many biological and industrial processes. In this paper, starches were isolated from high-amylose transgenic rice (TRS) and its wild type rice, Te-qing (TQ). The morphological and structural changes of starch residues following Aspergillus niger amyloglucosidase (AAG) hydrolysis were investigated. AAG hydrolysed TQ starch from the granule surface, and TRS starch from the granule interior. During AAG hydrolysis, the content of amorphous structure increased, the contents of ordered structure and single helix decreased, and gelatinisation enthalpy decreased in TQ and TRS starch residues. The A-type polymorph of TRS C-type starch was hydrolysed faster than the B-type polymorph. The short-range ordered structure and B-type polymorph in the peripheral region of the subgranule and the surrounding band of TRS starch increased the resistance of TRS starch to AAG hydrolysis. PMID:23497862

  16. Salmon protein hydrolysate as a protein source in feed for young pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NØrgaard, Jan Værum; Blaabjerg, Karoline

    2012-01-01

    Salmon protein hydrolysate (SPH) is made from fresh by-products from farmed salmon that are minced and acidified to hydrolyse proteins into peptides and free amino acids. The objective of this study was to evaluate SPH in young pigs compared to soy protein concentrate (SPC), fish meal (FM) and combinations hereof. Five diets were composed, all fulfilling the nutrient recommendations for young pigs. All diets contained 172gsoybeanmeal/kg. One diet was supplemented with 123gSPH/kg, and equivalent protein was supplied as SPC or FM in two other diets. Two diets were composed by combining half the amount of SPH and SPC or half the amount of SPH and FM. One week after weaning, one hundred individually housed pigs were allocated to one of five diets (n=20) and fed ad libitum for four weeks. Pigs fed the SPH and SPH+FM diets ate 12–14% more (P<0.05) than pigs fed the SPC diet, but the results on gain and feed utilization was not significantly different among treatments. No differences were observed in faeces characteristics when scored by visual judgment during two 5-d periods. In conclusion, pigs responded equally to diets containing SPH and FM, and SPH resulted in greater feed intake than SPC.

  17. Preparation of linear maltodextrins using a hyperthermophilic amylopullulanase with cyclodextrin- and starch-hydrolysing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolei; Li, Dan

    2015-03-30

    A novel method for the preparation of linear maltodextrins from cyclodextrins and starch was proposed. To accomplish this process, an amylopullulanase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Caldivirga maquilingensis (CMApu) was characterized and used. CMApu with an estimated molecular mass of 62.7 kDa by SDS-PAGE had a maximal pullulan-hydrolysing activity at 100°C and pH 5.0. It could also hydrolyse amylopectin (AP), starch, ?-CD and amylose (AM), in a decreasing order of relative activities from 88.96% to 57.17%. TLC and HPAEC analysis revealed that CMApu catalyzed the debranching and degrading reactions to produce linear malto-oligosaccharides (? G8-G1) from G8-?-CD and/or normal CDs, amylodextrins (DP6-96) from AM, and amylodextrins (DP1-76) from AP and potato starch. Our results showed that CMApu had a great potential for the industrial preparation of linear maltodextrins from normal starch instead of waxy starch, malto-oligosaccharides or sucrose. And the high optimal temperature of CMApu facilitated the simultaneous gelatinization and hydrolysis of cereal starch. PMID:25563953

  18. Intakes of whey protein hydrolysate and whole whey proteins are discriminated by LC-MS metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan; Rasmussen, Jakob Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Whey protein improves fasting lipids and insulin response in overweight and obese individuals. Whey hydrolysate was recently shown to be more active than whole protein but the differences in metabolite profiles after intake remain unknown. This study discriminates plasma profiles after intake of four different whey protein fractions and establishes new hypotheses for the observed effects. Obese, non-diabetic subjects were included in the randomized, blinded, cross-over meal study. Subjects ingested a high-fat meal containing whey isolate (WI), whey concentrate hydrolysate (WH), ?-lactalbumin or caseinoglycomacropeptide as the protein source. Plasma samples were collected at five time points and metabolites analysed using LC-Q-TOF-MS. Plasma concentrations of ten amino acids (AAs) were different between the meals. The plasma levels of AAs and AA derivatives were generally directly related to the AA composition of the meals. Highly elevated plasma levels of a number of cyclic dipeptides and other AA metaboliteswere found following intake of the WH meal and these metabolites are primary candidates to explain the superior insulinotropic effect of WH. The manufacturing process of WH caused oxidization of methionine to methionine sulfoxide which in turn caused in vivo generation of N-phenylacetyl-methionine and N-phenylacetyl-methionine sulfoxide. These two compounds have not previously been described in biological systems. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  19. Effect of cooking temperature on the crystallinity of acid hydrolysed-oil palm cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthi, Fatin Afifah Binti Ahmad; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    In this research, we studied the effect of acid hydrolysis temperature on the crystallinity of cellulose produced from empty fruit bunch (EFB). The hydrolysis temperature was studied from 120 to 140 °C at a fixed time and sulfuric acid, H2SO4 concentration which were 1 h and 1% (v/v) respectively. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was carried out to measure the crystallinity of cellulose produced at varying hydrolysis temperatures. During hydrolysis, the amorphous region of ?-cellulose was removed and the crystalline region was obtained. Percentage of crystallinity (CrI) for acid hydrolysed cellulose at 120, 130 and 140 °C were 54.21, 50.59 and 50.55 % respectively. Morphological studies using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that acid hydrolysis defibrilised to microfibrils in ?-cellulose. The extraction process to produce ?-cellulose has also been successfully carried out as the impurities at the outer surface, lignin and hemicellulose were removed. These findings were supported by the disappearance of peaks at 1732, 1512 and 1243 cm-1 on Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of ?-cellulose. Similar peaks were identified in both the commercial microcrystalline cellulose (C-MCC) and acid hydrolysed cellulose (H-EFB), indicating the effectiveness of heat-catalysed acid hydrolysis.

  20. Status on spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To confront the lack of spent fuel storage locations at the pools of the nuclear power plants, different actions have been undertaken by Enresa in conjunction with the Plant utilities. Basically, these measures have consisted in expanding the capacities of the spent fuel storage pools to their maximum capacity by exchanging their racks and in those cases where reracking is no further possible, dry storage will be provided, initially by means of dual purpose metallic casks. (author)

  1. Independent spent fuel storage installation task analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a task analysis and recommendations for the training and certification of operations technicians at independent spent fuel storage installations. Its purpose is to provide a technical basis for initial and continuation training for operations technicians at Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSI). It also provides guidance for testing operations technicians to ensure that training objectives have been achieved. The recommended testing provides a basis for certification of ISFSI operators

  2. Recent spent fuel shipment: a case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Burlington Northern train with a cargo of three IF-300 cask cars loaded with spent nuclear fuel arrived at the General Electric Morris facility in August of 1984. The shipment was the first intra-state use of the GE IF-300 cask system and was the largest free-world shipment of commercial spent fuel. This paper traces the hurdles and opposition road blocks that had to be overcome during the three year period prior to the shipment

  3. Interim storage of spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel discharged from light water reactors (LWR) is cooled at the reactor sites for at least 5 months to allow short-lived radioactive isotopes to decay. Recently, spent fuel has been considered as a possible waste form suitable for interim storage or even ultimate disposal. Several alternatives have been demonstrated or proposed for retrievable storage of spent fuel for periods of up to 100 years. These include storage in water-cooled basins, air-cooled vaults, concrete surface silos, geologic formations, or near-surface heat sinks. Water-cooled storage of spent fuel in near-surface cells of heavily reinforced concrete lined with stainless steel has been proven by about 30 years of operating experience at reactor sites and fuel reprocessing plants. Near-surface storage with forced-draft air cooling of HTGR (High Temperature Gas Reactor) fuels is being used by INEL (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) and is feasible for unpackaged LWR fuel that has been out of the reactor at least 3 to 4 years. Natural-draft cooling of spent fuel has also been proposed, and demonstration programs are in progress for CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel. Spent fuel assemblies are sealed in thick low-carbon steel containers and placed in large cylindrical concrete housings (silos) located outdoors. The cooling is completely passive, requiring little maintenance and only minimal surveillance. Recent studies comparing the economics of interim storage of spent fuel (throwaway fueterim storage of spent fuel (throwaway fuel cycle) with prompt chemical reprocessing conclude that disposal as fuel decreases the Nation's natural resources significantly and is not cost justified if both plutonium and uranium are recycled in the nuclear fuel cycle

  4. Potential international safeguards on DOE spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate openness to the world community, the US is placing some nuclear material connected with its weapons program under international inspection. Currently this does not include the large amount of spent fuel at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This paper presents some possible scenarios that would require international safeguards of spent fuel at DOE facilities. It also describes the likely activities of such an inspection regime

  5. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  6. Spent Fuel Reprocessing: More Value for Money Spent in a Geological Repository?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, each utility or country operating nuclear power plants can select between two long-term spent fuel management policies: either, spent fuel is considered as waste to dispose of through direct disposal or, spent fuel is considered a resource of valuable material through reprocessing-recycling. Reading and listening to what is said in the nuclear community, we understand that most people consider that the choice of policy is, actually, a choice among two technical paths to handle spent fuel: direct disposal versus reprocessing. This very simple situation has been recently challenged by analysis coming from countries where both policies are on survey. For example, ONDRAF of Belgium published an interesting study showing that, economically speaking for final disposal, it is worth treating spent fuel rather than dispose of it as a whole, even if there is no possibility to recycle the valuable part of it. So, the question is raised: is there such a one-to-one link between long term spent fuel management political option and industrial option? The purpose of the presentation is to discuss the potential advantages and drawbacks of spent fuel treatment as an implementation of the policy that considers spent fuel as waste to dispose of. Based on technical considerations and industrial experience, we will study qualitatively, and quantitatively when possible, the different answers proposed by treatment to the main concerns of spent-fuel-as-a-whole geological disposal-fuel-as-a-whole geological disposal

  7. Spent fuel dry storage in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paks Nuclear Power Plant is the only NPP in Hungary. It has four WWER-440 type reactor units. Since 1989, approximately 40-50% of the total annual electricity generation of the country has been supplied by this plant. The fresh fuel is imported from Russia. Most of the spent fuel assemblies have been shipped back to Russia. Difficulties with spent fuel transportation to Russia have begun in 1992. Since that time, some of the shipments were delayed, some of them were completely cancelled, thus creating a backlog of spent fuel filling all storage positions of the plant. To provide assurance of the continued operation, Paks NPPs management decided to implement an independent spent fuel storage facility and chose GEC-Althom's MVDS design. The construction of the facility started in February 1995 and the first spent fuel assembly was placed in the store in September 1997. The paper gives an overview of the situation, describing the conditions leading to the construction of the dry storage facility at Paks and its implementation. Finally, some information is given about the new Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management established this year and responsible for managing the issues related to spent fuel management. (author)

  8. LWR spent fuel management in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel management strategy in the Federal Republic of Germany is based alternatively on interim storage and subsequent reprocessing of spent fuel or on extended storage and direct disposal of spent fuel. By economic and strategic reasons the spent fuel burnup is presently achieving 50 GWd/tHM and will targeting 55 GWd/tHM batch average. Recently the CASTOR V/19 license is issued to store spent fuel assemblies (SFAs) with up to 55 GWd/tU burnup (batch average) for 40 years. The integral pool storage capacity in Germany is 5600 tHM without the necessary full core reserve. The AFR spent fuel storage sites of Ahaus ( 4200 tHM) and Gorleben (3800 tHM) are in operation. The PKA pilot-facility to condition the SFAs is in the final state of erection and alternative approaches for SFAs with a higher burnup and/or MOX fuel are under investigation. The underground exploration of the Gorleben salt dome is in progress. Presently the non heat generating waste is disposed in the former Morsleben salt mine. Licensing of the larger Konrad iron mine for that purpose is under treatment. (author)

  9. Development of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research on spent fuel management focuses on the maximization of the disposal efficiency by a volume reduction, the improvement of the environmental friendliness by the partitioning and transmutation of the long lived nuclides, and the recycling of the spent fuel for an efficient utilization of the uranium source. In the second phase which started in 2001, the performance test of the advanced spent fuel management process consisting of voloxidation, reduction of spent fuel and the lithium recovery process has been completed successfully on a laboratory scale. The world-premier spent fuel reduction hot test of a 5 kgHM/batch has been performed successfully by joint research with Russia and the valuable data on the actinides and FPs material balance and the characteristics of the metal product were obtained with experience to help design an engineering scale reduction system. The electrolytic reduction technology which integrates uranium oxide reduction in a molten LiCl-Li2O system and Li2O electrolysis is developed and a unique reaction system is also devised. Design data such as the treatment capacity, current density and mass transfer behavior obtained from the performance test of a 5 kgU/batch electrolytic reduction system pave the way for the third phase of the hot cell demonstration of the advanced spent fuel management technology

  10. Spent Fuel Management Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter has been prepared in accordance with the recommendations of the International Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management and the Agency's programme (GC XXXII/837, Table 76, item 14). The main purpose of the Newsletter is to provide Member States with new information about the state-of-the-art in one of the most important parts of the nuclear fuel cycle - Spent Fuel Management. The contents of this publication consists of two parts: (1) IAEA Secretariat contribution -work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes, etc. (2) Country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage, treatment of spent fuel, some aspects of uranium and plutonium recycling, etc. The IAEA expects to publish the Newsletter once every two years between the publications of the Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management. Figs and tabs

  11. Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term wide development of nuclear power requires new approaches towards the realization of nuclear fuel cycle, namely, closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with respect to fission materials. Plant nuclear fuel cycle (PNFC), which is in fact the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel unloaded from the reactor and the production of new nuclear fuel (NF) at the same place together with reactor plant, can be one variant of CNFC. Developing and projecting of PNFC is a complicated high-technology innovative process that requires modern information support. One of the components of this information support is developed by the authors. This component is the programme conducting calculations for various variants of process flow sheets for reprocessing SNF and production of NF. Central in this programme is the blocks library, where the blocks contain mathematical description of separate processes and operations. The calculating programme itself has such a structure that one can configure the complex of blocks and correlations between blocks, appropriate for any given flow sheet. For the ready sequence of operations balance calculations are made of all flows, i.e. expenses, element and substance makeup, heat emission and radiation rate are determined. The programme is open and the block library can be updated. This means that more complicated and detailed models of technological processes will be added to the library basing on the results of testing processes using real equipment, in test operating mode. The development of the model for the realization of technical-economic analysis of various variants of technologic PNFC schemes and the organization of 'operator's advisor' is expected. (authors)

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel: Research Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2005, the global inventory of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is approximately 175,000 metric tonnes (slightly less than one third is in the USA) (Ewing, 2004). Most of this SNF is still at 236 nuclear power stations where it was originally generated in 36 different countries. In the USA, the inventory in 2010 will be 61,800 metric tonnes of heavy metal (tHM) with a total activity of 32.6 GCi. The USA presently has an open nuclear fuel cycle (without reprocessing) with ultimate disposal at the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The SNF represents >95% of the radioactivity. Thus, a major challenge of successful geologic disposal of radioactive waste is to understand the long-term behavior of SNF. SNF is essentially UO2 with minor impurities, mainly the fission product (3%) and transuranium elements (1%). The precise radionuclide inventory and physical state of the fuel depend on its irradiation and thermal history. Three critical parameters change dramatically during the first 10,000 years in the repository: (1) the thermal output will decrease to 239Pu, 237Np, 129I and 99Tc. Less problematic elements include: 241Am, 79Se and 36Cl. These elements exist in a variety of chemical forms: incorporated into the UO2 structure, as separate phases in inclusions and at grain boundaries. Corrosion under oxidizing conditions leads to the formation of a variety of U(VI)-phases. An understanding of their long-term behavior requires an improved knowledge of their structures, thermochemical parameters, solubilities, substitution mechanisms for trace radionuclides, surface properties and the kinetics of dissolution/precipitation reactions. Natural uranium deposits, such as the Oklo natural reactors, also provide important data. This paper reviews recent research on these topics, and its relation to the properties of SNF

  13. Development of biocatalysts for production of commodity chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsul, M G; Singhvi, M S; Gaikaiwari, S A; Gokhale, D V

    2011-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is recognized as potential sustainable source for production of power, biofuels and variety of commodity chemicals which would potentially add economic value to biomass. Recalcitrance nature of biomass is largely responsible for the high cost of its conversion. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce some cost effective pretreatment processes to make the biomass polysaccharides easily amenable to enzymatic attack to release mixed fermentable sugars. Advancement in systemic biology can provide new tools for the development of such biocatalysts for sustainable production of commodity chemicals from biomass. Integration of functional genomics and system biology approaches may generate efficient microbial systems with new metabolic routes for production of commodity chemicals. This paper provides an overview of the challenges that are faced by the processes converting lignocellulosic biomass to commodity chemicals. The critical factors involved in engineering new microbial biocatalysts are also discussed with more emphasis on commodity chemicals. PMID:21277771

  14. Effect of thermal pretreatment on equilibrium moisture content of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharjee, Tapas C; Coronella, Charles J; Vasquez, Victor R

    2011-04-01

    The equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of raw lignocellulosic biomass, along with four samples subjected to thermal pretreatment, was measured at relative humidities ranging from 11% to 97% at a constant temperature of 30 °C. Three samples were prepared by treatment in hot compressed water by a process known as wet torrefaction, at temperatures of 200, 230, and 260 °C. An additional sample was prepared by dry torrefaction at 300 °C. Pretreated biomass shows EMC below that of raw biomass. This indicates that pretreated biomass, both dry and wet torrefied, is more hydrophobic than raw biomass. The EMC results were correlated with a recent model that takes into account additional non-adsorption interactions of water, such as mixing and swelling. The model offers physical insight into the water activity in lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:21310606

  15. Fungal Beta-Glucosidases: A Bottleneck in Industrial Use of Lignocellulosic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Annette; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2013-01-01

    Profitable biomass conversion processes are highly dependent on the use of efficient enzymes for lignocellulose degradation. Among the cellulose degrading enzymes, beta-glucosidases are essential for efficient hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass as they relieve the inhibition of the cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases by reducing cellobiose accumulation. In this review, we discuss the important role beta-glucosidases play in complex biomass hydrolysis and how they create a bottleneck in industrial use of lignocellulosic materials. An efficient beta-glucosidase facilitates hydrolysis at specified process conditions, and key points to consider in this respect are hydrolysis rate, inhibitors, and stability. Product inhibition impairing yields, thermal inactivation of enzymes, and the high cost of enzyme production are the main obstacles to commercial cellulose hydrolysis. Therefore, this sets the stage in the search for better alternatives to the currently available enzyme preparations either by improving known or screening for new beta-glucosidases. PMID:24970184

  16. Fungal Beta-Glucosidases: A Bottleneck in Industrial Use of Lignocellulosic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S. Lübeck

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Profitable biomass conversion processes are highly dependent on the use of efficient enzymes for lignocellulose degradation. Among the cellulose degrading enzymes, beta-glucosidases are essential for efficient hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass as they relieve the inhibition of the cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases by reducing cellobiose accumulation. In this review, we discuss the important role beta-glucosidases play in complex biomass hydrolysis and how they create a bottleneck in industrial use of lignocellulosic materials. An efficient beta-glucosidase facilitates hydrolysis at specified process conditions, and key points to consider in this respect are hydrolysis rate, inhibitors, and stability. Product inhibition impairing yields, thermal inactivation of enzymes, and the high cost of enzyme production are the main obstacles to commercial cellulose hydrolysis. Therefore, this sets the stage in the search for better alternatives to the currently available enzyme preparations either by improving known or screening for new beta-glucosidases.

  17. Direct fungal fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass into itaconic, fumaric, and malic acids: current and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondala, Andro H

    2015-04-01

    Various economic and environmental sustainability concerns as well as consumer preference for bio-based products from natural sources have paved the way for the development and expansion of biorefining technologies. These involve the conversion of renewable biomass feedstock to fuels and chemicals using biological systems as alternatives to petroleum-based products. Filamentous fungi possess an expansive portfolio of products including the multifunctional organic acids itaconic, fumaric, and malic acids that have wide-ranging current applications and potentially addressable markets as platform chemicals. However, current bioprocessing technologies for the production of these compounds are mostly based on submerged fermentation, which necessitates physicochemical pretreatment and hydrolysis of lignocellulose biomass to soluble fermentable sugars in liquid media. This review will focus on current research work on fungal production of itaconic, fumaric, and malic acids and perspectives on the potential application of solid-state fungal cultivation techniques for the consolidated hydrolysis and organic acid fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:25557737

  18. Production of cellulolytic enzymes by Pleurotus species on lignocellulosic wastes using novel pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M P; Pandey, A K; Vishwakarma, S K; Srivastava, A K; Pandey, V K; Singh, V K

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation three species of Pleurotus i.e. P. sajor—caju (P1), P. florida (P2) and P. flabellatus (P3) along with two lignocellulosic substrates namely paddy straw and wheat straw were selected for evaluation of production of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes. During the cultivation of three species of Pleurotus under in vivo condition, the two lignocellulosic substrates were treated with plants extracts (aqueous extracts of ashoka leaves (A) and neem oil (B)), hot water (H) and chemicals (C).Among all treatments, neem oil treated substrates supported better enzyme production followed by aqueous extract of ashoka leaves, hot water and chemical treatment. Between the two substrates paddy straw supported better enzyme production than wheat straw. P. flabellatus showed maximum activity of exoglucanase, endoglucanase and ?—glucosidase followed by P. florida and P. sajor—caju. PMID:25535714

  19. Structure–morphology–mechanical properties relationship of some polypropylene/lignocellulosic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural lignocellulosic materials have an outstanding potential as thermoplastic reinforcement. Polypropylene composites were prepared using different types of lignocellulosic materials by melt blending of 70 wt% polypropylene (PP) and 30 wt% biomasses. The specimens were firstly evaluated for structural and morphological properties by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and polarized optical microscopy. Depending on the biomass type, there were evidenced some particular shifts of the infrared bands and also crystallinity changes. An increase in crystallinity is explained by nucleating agent role of biomass. The morphological changes are directly related to variation in mechanical and rheological properties, an increase in Young modulus, melt viscosity and storage and loss moduli being recorded. - Highlights: • Composites based on polypropylene and different biomass filler were prepared by simple melting-mixing. • The specimens were evaluated for structural, morphological, mechanical and rheological properties. • The biomass filler act as a nucleation agent in the polymeric matrix

  20. Exploiting composting biodiversity: study of the persistent and biotechnologically relevant microorganisms from lignocellulose-based composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Macarena; López, María J; Suárez-Estrella, Francisca; Vargas-García, María C; López-González, Juan A; Moreno, Joaquín

    2014-06-01

    The composting ecosystem is a suitable source for the discovery of novel microorganisms and secondary metabolites. This work analyzes the identity of microbial community that persists throughout lignocellulose-based composting, evaluates their metabolic activities and studies the capability of selected isolates for composting bioaugmentation. Bacterial species of the phyla Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria and fungi of the phylum Ascomycota were ubiquitous throughout the composting. The species Arthrobacter russicus, Microbacterium gubbeenense, Ochrocladosporium frigidarii and Cladosporium lignicola are detected for the first time in this ecosystem. In addition, several bacterial and fungal isolates exhibited a wide range of metabolic capabilities such as polymers (lignocellulose, protein, lipids, pectin and starch) breakdown and phosphate-solubilization that may find many biotechnological applications. In particular, Streptomyces albus BM292, Gibellulopsis nigrescens FM1397 and FM1411, Bacillus licheniformis BT575, Bacillus smithii AT907 and Alternaria tenuissima FM1385 exhibited a great potential as inoculants for composting bioaugmentation. PMID:24759645