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1

Hydrolysates of lignocellulosic materials for biohydrogen production  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic materials are commonly used in bio-H2 production for the sustainable energy resource development as they are abundant, cheap, renewable and highly biodegradable. In the process of the bio-H2 production, the pretreated lignocellulosic materials are firstly converted to monosaccharides by enzymolysis and then to H2 by fermentation. Since the structures of lignocellulosic materials are rather complex, the hydrolysates vary with the used materials. Even using the same lignocellulosic materials, the hydrolysates also change with different pretreatment methods. It has been shown that the appropriate hydrolysate compositions can dramatically improve the biological activities and bio-H2 production performances. Over the past decades, hydrolysis with respect to different lignocellulosic materials and pretreatments has been widely investigated. Besides, effects of the hydrolysates on the biohydrogen yields have also been examined. In this review, recent studies on hydrolysis as well as their effects on the biohydrogen production performance are summarized. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(5): 244-251] PMID:23710634

Chen, Rong; Wang, Yong-Zhong; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Xu, Teng-Fei

2013-01-01

2

Fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates: Inhibition and detoxification  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The ethanol yield and productivity obtained during fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates is decreased due to the presence of inhibiting compounds, such as weak acids, furans and phenolic compounds produced during hydrolysis. Evaluation of the effect of various biological, physical and chemical detoxification treatments by fermentation assays using Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to characterise inhibitors. Inhibition of fermentation was decreased after removal of the non-volatile compounds, pre-fermentation by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei, treatment with the lignolytic enzyme laccase, extraction with ether, and treatment with alkali. Yeast growth in lignocellulosic hydrolysates was inhibited below a certain fermentation pH, most likely due to high concentrations of undissociated weak acids. The effect of individual compounds were studied in model fermentations. Furfural is reduced to furfuryl alcohol by yeast dehydrogenases, thereby affecting the intracellular redox balance. As a result, acetaldehyde accumulated during furfural reduction, which most likely contributed to inhibition of growth. Acetic acid (10 g 1{sup -1}) and furfural (3 g 1{sup -1}) interacted antagonistically causing decreased specific growth rate, whereas no significant individual or interaction effects were detected by the lignin-derived compound 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (2 g 1{sup -1}). By maintaining a high cell mass density in the fermentor, the process was less sensitive to inhibitors affecting growth and to fluctuations in fermentation pH, and in addition the depletion rate of bioconvertible inhibitors was increased. A theoretical ethanol yield and high productivity was obtained in continuous fermentation of spruce hydrolysate when the cell mass concentration was maintained at a high level by applying cell recirculation 164 refs, 16 figs, 5 tabs

Palmqvist, E.

1998-02-01

3

Production of Succinic Acid for Lignocellulosic Hydrolysates  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is to add and test new metabolic activities to existing microbial catalysts for the production of succinic acid from renewables. In particular, they seek to add to the existing organism the ability to utilize xylose efficiently and simultaneously with glucose in mixtures of sugars or to add succinic acid production to another strain and to test the value of this new capability for production of succinic acid from industrial lignocellulosic hydrolyasates. The Contractors and Participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties'. Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering has resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on repliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. The initial target markets include succinic acid itself, succinate salts, esters and other derivatives for use as deicers, solvents and acidulants. The other commodity products from the succinic acid platform include 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Current economic analyses indicate that this platform is competitive with existing petrochemical routes, especially for the succinic acid and derivatives. The report presents the planned CRADA objectives followed by the results. The results section has a combined biocatalysis and fermentation section and a commercialization section. This is a nonproprietary report; additional proprietary information may be made available subject to acceptance of the appropriate proprietary information agreements.

Davison, B.H.; Nghiem, J.

2002-06-01

4

Cultivation of lipid-producing bacteria with lignocellulosic biomass: effects of inhibitory compounds of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass has been recognized as a promising feedstock for the fermentative production of biofuel. However, the pretreatment of lignocellulose generates a number of by-products, such as furfural, 5-hydroxylmethyl furfural (5-HMF), vanillin, vanillic acids and trans-p-coumaric acid (TPCA), which are known to inhibit microbial growth. This research explores the ability of Rhodococcus opacus PD630 to use lignocellulosic biomass for production of triacylglycerols (TAGs), a common lipid raw material for biodiesel production. This study reports that R. opacus PD630 can grow well in R2A broth in the presence of these model inhibitory compounds while accumulating TAGs. Furthermore, strain PD630 can use TPCA, vanillic acid, and vanillin as carbon sources, but can only use TPCA and vanillic acid for TAG accumulation. Strain PD630 can also grow rapidly on the hydrolysates of corn stover, sorghum, and grass to accumulate TAGs, suggesting that strain PD630 is well-suited for bacterial lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:24698742

Wang, Baixin; Rezenom, Yohannes H; Cho, Kun-Ching; Tran, Janessa L; Lee, Do Gyun; Russell, David H; Gill, Jason J; Young, Ryland; Chu, Kung-Hui

2014-06-01

5

Novel isolates for biological detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, two new strians, Issatchenkia occidentalis (Lj-3, CCTCC M 2006097) and Issatchenkia orienalis (S-7, CCTCC M 2006098), isolated from different environments on solid media, were used in the detoxification process of the hemicellulosic hydrolysate of sugarcane bagasse. High-pressure liquid chromatography elution curve of UV-absorption compounds represented by acetic acid, furfural, and guaiacol (toxic compounds found in the hemicellulosic hydrolysate) showed that several chromatographic peaks were evidently diminished for the case of detoxified hydrolysate with isolate strains compared to the high peaks resulted for no detoxified hydrolysate. It was clear that these inhibitors were degraded by the two new isolates during their cultivation process. Fermentation results for the biodetoxified hydrolysate showed an increase in xylitol productivity (Q (p)) by 1.97 and 1.95 times (2.03 and 2.01 g l(-1) h(-1)) and in xylitol yield (Y (p)) by 1.72 and 1.65 times (0.93 and 0.89 g xylitol per gram xylose) for hydrolysate treated with S-7 and Lj-3, respectively, in comparison with no detoxified hydrolysate (1.03 g l(-1) h(-1) and 0.54 g xylitol per gram xylose). This present work demonstrated the importance of Issatchenkia yeast in providing an effective biological detoxification approach to remove inhibitors and improve hydrolysate fermentability, leading to a high xylitol productivity and yield. PMID:18649037

Hou-Rui, Zhang; Xiang-Xiang, Qin; Silva, Silvio S; Sarrouh, Boutros F; Ai-Hua, Cai; Yu-Heng, Zhou; Ke, Jin; Qiu, Xiang

2009-02-01

6

Preparation and evaluation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates for growth by ethanologenic yeasts.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential feedstock for bioethanol production. Biomass hydrolysates, prepared with a procedure including pretreatment and hydrolysis, are considered to be used as fermentation media for microorganisms, such as yeast. During the hydrolysate preparation procedure, toxic compounds are released or formed which may inhibit the growth of the microorganism and thus the product formation. To study the effects of these compounds on fermentation performance, the production of various hydrolysates with diverse inhibitory effects is of importance. A platform of methods that generates hydrolysates through four different ways and tests their inhibitory effects using Bioscreen C Analyzer growth tests is described here. The four methods, based on concentrated acid, dilute acid, mild alkaline and alkaline/oxidative conditions, were used to prepare hydrolysates from six different biomass sources. The resulting 24 hydrolysates showed great diversity on growth rate in Bioscreen C Analyzer growth tests. The approach allows the prediction of a specific hydrolysate's performance and helps to select biomass type and hydrolysate preparation method for a specific production strain, or vice versa. PMID:22144364

Zha, Ying; Slomp, Ronald; van Groenestijn, Johan; Punt, Peter J

2012-01-01

7

Effect of storage conditions on the stability and fermentability of enzymatic lignocellulosic hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

To minimize the change of lignocellulosic hydrolysate composition during storage, the effects of storage conditions (temperature, pH and time) on the composition and fermentability of hydrolysate prepared from AFEX™ (Ammonia Fiber Expansion - a trademark of MBI, Lansing, MI) pretreated corn stover were investigated. Precipitates formed during hydrolysate storage increased with increasing storage pH and time. The precipitate amount was the least when hydrolysate was stored at 4 °C and pH 4.8, accounting for only 0.02% of the total hydrolysate weight after 3-month storage. No significant changes of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) spectra and concentrations of sugars, minerals and heavy metals were observed after storage under this condition. When pH was adjusted higher before fermentation, precipitates also formed, consisting of mostly struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) and brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O). Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation studies and yeast cell growth assays showed no significant difference in fermentability between fresh hydrolysate and stored hydrolysate. PMID:23999256

Jin, Mingjie; Bothfeld, William; Austin, Samantha; Sato, Trey K; La Reau, Alex; Li, Haibo; Foston, Marcus; Gunawan, Christa; LeDuc, Richard D; Quensen, John F; McGee, Mick; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Higbee, Alan; Ranatunga, Ruwan; Donald, Charles W; Bone, Gwen; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tiedje, James M; Noguera, Daniel R; Dale, Bruce E; Zhang, Yaoping; Balan, Venkatesh

2013-11-01

8

Ethanol from lignocellulose : Alkali detoxification of dilute-acid spruce hydrolysates  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Detoxification of dilute-acid lignocellulose hydrolysates by treatment with Ca(OH)2 (overliming) efficiently improves the production of fuel ethanol, but is associated with drawbacks like sugar degradation and CaSO4 precipitation. In factorial designed experiments, in which pH and temperature were varied, dilute-acid spruce hydrolysates were treated with Ca(OH)2, NH4OH or NaOH. The concentrations of sugars and inhibitory compounds were measured before and after the treatments. The fermentabil...

Alriksson, Bjo?rn

2006-01-01

9

[Effect of byproducts in lignocellulose hydrolysates on ethanol fermentation by Issatchenkia orientalis].  

Science.gov (United States)

Byproducts in lignocellulose hydrolysates, namely sodium formate (1 to 5 g/L), sodium acetic (2.5 to 8.0 g/L), furfural (0.2-2 g/L), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 1 to 1.0 g/L) or vanillin (0.5 to 2 g/L) were used to evaluate their effects on ethanol fermentation by Issatchenkia orientalis HN-1 using single factor test and the response surface central composite experiment. Results showed that most of the byproducts had no obvious inhibition on the production of ethanol, except for the addition of 2 g/L vanillin or 1 g/L of 5-HMF, which reduced the ethanol production by 20.38% and 11.2%, respectively. However, high concentration of some byproducts in lignocellulose hydrolysates, such as sodium formate (1 to 5 g/L), sodium acetic (2.5 to 8.0 g/L), furfural (0.2 to 2 g/L) and vanillin (0.5 to 2 g/L) inhibited the growth of I. orientalis HN-1 significantly. Compared with the control, the dry cell weight of I. orientalis HN-1 decreased by 25.04% to 37.02%, 28.83% to 43.82%, 20.06% to 37.60% and 26.39% to 52.64%, respectively, when the above components were added into the fermentation broth and the fermentation lasted for 36 h. No significant interaction effect of the various inhibitors (sodium formate, sodium acetic, furfural and vanillin) except for vanillin single factor on the ethanol production was observed based on the central composite experiments. The concentrations of byproducts in most lignocellulose hydrolysates were below the initial inhibition concentration on ethanol production by Issatchenkia orientalis HN-1, which indicated that Issatchenkia orientalis HN-1 can be used for ethanol production from lignocellulose hydrolysates. PMID:25118399

Wang, Fengqin; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Hui; Song, Andong

2014-05-01

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Pichia stipitis xylose reductase helps detoxifying lignocellulosic hydrolysate by reducing 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (Ps-XR has been used to design Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are able to ferment xylose. One example is the industrial S. cerevisiae xylose-consuming strain TMB3400, which was constructed by expression of P. stipitis xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase and overexpression of endogenous xylulose kinase in the industrial S. cerevisiae strain USM21. Results In this study, we demonstrate that strain TMB3400 not only converts xylose, but also displays higher tolerance to lignocellulosic hydrolysate during anaerobic batch fermentation as well as 3 times higher in vitro HMF and furfural reduction activity than the control strain USM21. Using laboratory strains producing various levels of Ps-XR, we confirm that Ps-XR is able to reduce HMF both in vitro and in vivo. Ps-XR overexpression increases the in vivo HMF conversion rate by approximately 20%, thereby improving yeast tolerance towards HMF. Further purification of Ps-XR shows that HMF is a substrate inhibitor of the enzyme. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that xylose reductase is also able to reduce the furaldehyde compounds that are present in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Possible implications of this newly characterized activity of Ps-XR on lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation are discussed.

Röder Anja

2008-06-01

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Ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by a recombinant xylose- and cellooligosaccharide-assimilating yeast strain  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The sulfuric acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass, such as wood chips, from the forest industry is an important material for fuel bioethanol production. In this study, we constructed a recombinant yeast strain that can ferment xylose and cellooligosaccharides by integrating genes for the intercellular expressions of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis, and xylulokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a gene for displaying ss-glucosidase from Aspergillus acleatus on the cell surface. In the fermentation of the sulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips, xylose and cellooligosaccharides were completely fermented after 36 h by the recombinant strain, and then about 30 g/l ethanol was produced from 73 g/l total sugar added at the beginning. In this case, the ethanol yield of this recombinant yeast was much higher than that of the control yeast. These results demonstrate that the fermentation of the lignocellulose hydrolysate is performed efficiently by the recombinant Saccharomyces strain with abilities for xylose assimilation and cellooligosaccharide degradation. (orig.)

Katahira, Satoshi; Fukuda, Hideki [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Div. of Molecular Science; Mizuike, Atsuko; Kondo, Akihiko [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering

2006-10-15

12

Global regulator engineering significantly improved Escherichia coli tolerances toward inhibitors of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass is regarded as the most viable source of feedstock for industrial biorefinery, but the harmful inhibitors generated from the indispensable pretreatments prior to fermentation remain a daunting technical hurdle. Using an exogenous regulator, irrE, from the radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans, we previously showed that a novel global regulator engineering (GRE) approach significantly enhanced tolerances of Escherichia coli to alcohol and acetate stresses. In this work, an irrE library was subjected to selection under various stresses of furfural, a typical hydrolysate inhibitor. Three furfural tolerant irrE mutants including F1-37 and F2-1 were successfully obtained. The cells containing these mutants reached OD(600) levels of 4- to 16-fold of that for the pMD18T cells in growth assay under 0.2% (v/v) furfural stress. The cells containing irrE F1-37 and F2-1 also showed considerably reduced intracellular oxygen species (ROS) levels under furfural stress. Moreover, these two irrE mutants were subsequently found to confer significant cross tolerances to two other most common inhibitors, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF), vanillin, as well as real lignocellulosic hydrolysates. When evaluated in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium supplemented with corn stover cellulosic hydrolysate (prepared with a solid loading of 30%), the cells containing the mutants exhibited lag phases markedly shortened by 24-44 h in comparison with the control cells. This work thus presents a promising step forward to resolve the inhibitor problem for E. coli. From the view of synthetic biology, irrE can be considered as an evolvable "part" for various stresses. Furthermore, this GRE approach can be extended to exploit other exogenous global regulators from extremophiles, and the native counterparts in E. coli, for eliciting industrially useful phenotypes. PMID:22684885

Wang, Jianqing; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Yilu; Lin, Min; Lin, Zhanglin

2012-12-01

13

Death by a thousand cuts: the challenges and diverse landscape of lignocellulosic hydrolysate inhibitors  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Lignocellulosic hydrolysate (LCH inhibitors are a large class of bioactive molecules that arise from pretreatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation of plant biomass. These diverse compounds reduce lignocellulosic biofuel yields by inhibiting cellular processes and diverting energy into cellular responses. LCH inhibitors present one of the most significant challenges to efficient biofuel production by microbes. Development of new strains that lessen the effects of LCH inhibitors is an economically favorable strategy relative to expensive detoxification methods that also can reduce sugar content in deconstructed biomass. Systems biology analyses and metabolic modeling combined with directed evolution and synthetic biology are successful strategies for biocatalyst development, and methods that leverage state-of-the-art tools are needed to overcome inhibitors more completely. This perspective considers the energetic costs of LCH inhibitors and technologies that can be used to overcome their drain on conversion efficiency. We suggest academic and commercial research groups could benefit by sharing data on LCH inhibitors and implementing “translational biofuel research.”

JeffScottPiotrowski

2014-03-01

14

Effect of lignin-derived and furan compounds found in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on biomethane production.  

Science.gov (United States)

Hydrolysates resulting from the lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment in bioethanol production may be used to produce biogas. Such hydrolysates are rich in xylose but also contain lignin polymers or oligomers as well as phenolic and furan compounds, such as syringaldehyde, vanillin, HMF, furfural. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of these byproducts on biomethane production from xylose. The anaerobic digestion of the byproducts alone was also investigated. No inhibition of the anaerobic digestion of xylose was observed and methane was obtained from furans: 430 mL CH(4)/g of furfural and 450 mL CH(4)/g of HMF; from phenolic compounds: 453 mL CH(4)/g of syringaldehyde and 105 mL CH(4)/g of vanillin; and, to a lesser extent, from lignin polymers: from 14 to 46 mL CH(4)/g MV. The use of different natural polymers (lignosulfonates, organosolv and kraft lignins) and synthetic dehydrogenative polymers showed that higher S/G ratios and lower molecular weights in lignin polymers led to greater methane production. PMID:22100239

Barakat, Abdellatif; Monlau, Florian; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Carrere, Hélène

2012-01-01

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Enhanced bioproduction of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate from wheat straw lignocellulosic hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bioplastics that can replace conventional petroleum-derived products in various applications. One of the major barriers for their widespread introduction in the market is the higher production costs compared with their petrochemical counterparts. In this work, a process was successfully implemented with high productivity based on wheat straw, a cheap and readily available agricultural residue, as raw material. The strain Burkholderia sacchari DSM 17165 which is able to metabolise glucose, xylose and arabinose, the main sugars present in wheat straw hydrolysates (WSHs), was used. Results in shake flask showed that B. sacchari cells accumulated about 70%gpoly(3-hydroxybutyrate)(P(3HB))/g cell dry weight (CDW) with a yield of polymer on sugars (YP/S) of 0.18g/g when grown on a mixture of commercial C6 and C5 sugars (control), while these values reached about 60%gP(3HB)/g CDW and 0.19g/g, respectively, when WSHs were used as carbon source. In fed-batch cultures carried out in 2L stirred-tank reactors (STRs) on WSH, a maximum polymer concentration of 105 g/L was reached after 61 hours of cultivation corresponding to an accumulation of 72% of CDW. Polymer yield and productivity were 0.22 gP(3HB)/g total sugar consumed and 1.6g/L hour, respectively. The selected feeding strategy successfully overcame the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) phenomenon observed with sugar mixtures containing hexoses and pentoses. This is the first work describing fed-batch cultivations aiming at PHA production using real lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Additionally, the P(3HB) volumetric productivities attained are by far the highest ever achieved on agricultural waste hydrolysates. PMID:24157713

Cesário, M Teresa; Raposo, Rodrigo S; de Almeida, M Catarina M D; van Keulen, Frederik; Ferreira, Bruno S; da Fonseca, M Manuela R

2014-01-25

16

Novel strategies to improve co-fermentation of pentoses with D-glucose by recombinant yeast strains in lignocellulosic hydrolysates  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Economically feasible production of second-generation biofuels requires efficient co-fermentation of pentose and hexose sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates under very harsh conditions. Baker’s yeast is an excellent, traditionally used ethanol producer but is naturally not able to utilize pentoses. This is due to the lack of pentose-specific transporter proteins and enzymatic reactions. Thus, natural yeast strains must be modified by genetic engineering. Although the construction of vario...

Oreb, Igor-mislav; Dietz, Heiko; Farwick, Alexander; Boles, Eckhard

2012-01-01

17

Rapid analysis of mono-saccharides and oligo-saccharides in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass by HPLC.  

Science.gov (United States)

HPLC using pre-column derivatization with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) was used to analyse mono-saccharides and oligo-saccharides in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass. PMP derivatives, including those of mannose, rhamnose, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and arabinose, were separated within 14 min with detection at 254 nm. The method was also suitable for xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS): PMP derivatives of xylohexaose, xylopentaose, xylotetraose, xylotriose and xylobiose were well separated under the same conditions. The method was used to determine the mono-saccharide composition of Miscanthus and evaluate the production of XOS from enzymatic hydrolysis of crude xylan. PMID:23690036

Li, Hailong; Long, Chuannan; Zhou, Juan; Liu, Jian; Wu, Xiaobing; Long, Minnan

2013-09-01

18

Chloroplast-derived enzyme cocktails hydrolyse lignocellulosic biomass and release fermentable sugars  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

It is widely recognized that biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials is limited by inadequate technology to efficiently and economically release fermentable sugars from the complex multi-polymeric raw materials. Therefore, endoglucanases, exoglucanase, pectate lyases, cutinase, swollenin, xylanase, acetyl xylan esterase, beta glucosidase and lipase genes from bacteria or fungi were expressed in E. coli or tobacco chloroplasts. A PCR based method was used to clone genes without intro...

Verma, Dheeraj; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.; Daniell, Henry

2010-01-01

19

Development of a D-xylose fermenting and inhibitor tolerant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with high performance in lignocellulose hydrolysates using metabolic and evolutionary engineering  

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Background: The production of bioethanol from lignocellulose hydrolysates requires a robust, D-xylose-fermenting and inhibitor-tolerant microorganism as catalyst. The purpose of the present work was to develop such a strain from a prime industrial yeast strain, Ethanol Red, used for bioethanol production. Results: An expression cassette containing 13 genes including Clostridium phytofermentans XylA, encoding D-xylose isomerase (XI), and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway was inserted...

Demeke, Mekonnen M.; Dietz, Heiko; Li, Yingying; Foulquie?-moreno, Mari?a R.; Mutturi, Sarma; Deprez, Sylvie; Abt, Tom Den; Bonini, Beatriz M.; Liden, Gunnar; Dumortier, Franc?oise; Verplaetse, Alex; Boles, Eckhard; Thevelein, Johan M.

2013-01-01

20

Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover.  

Science.gov (United States)

The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

Parreiras, Lucas S; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B; Bice, Benjamin D; Bonfert, Brandi L; Pinhancos, Rebeca C; Balloon, Allison J; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T; Simmons, Blake A; Hodge, David B; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
21

Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science.gov (United States)

The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

Parreiras, Lucas S.; Breuer, Rebecca J.; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J.; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M.; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Hodge, David B.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P.; Sato, Trey K.

2014-01-01

22

Development of a yeast strain for xylitol production without hydrolysate detoxification as part of the integration of co-product generation within the lignocellulosic ethanol process.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study verified an applicable technology of xylitol bioconversion as part of the integration of co-product generation within second-generation bioethanol processes. A newly isolated yeast strain, Candida tropicalis JH030, was shown to have a capacity for xylitol production from hemicellulosic hydrolysate without detoxification. The yeast gives a promising xylitol yield of 0.71 g(p) g(s)(-1) from non-detoxified rice straw hydrolysate that had been prepared by the dilute acid pretreatment under severe conditions. The yeast's capacity was also found to be practicable with various other raw materials, such as sugarcane bagasse, silvergrass, napiergrass and pineapple peel. The lack of a need to hydrolysate detoxification enhances the potential of this newly isolated yeast for xylitol production and this, in turn, has the capacity to improve economics of lignocellulosic ethanol production. PMID:21095119

Huang, Chiung-Fang; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

2011-02-01

23

Enzymatic hydrolysis of brewers' spent grain proteins and technofunctional properties of the resulting hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Brewers' spent grain (BSG) is the insoluble residue of barley malt resulting from the manufacture of wort. Although it is the main byproduct of the brewing industry, it has received little attention as a marketable commodity and is mainly used as animal feed. Our work focuses on one of the main constituents of BSG, i.e., the proteins. The lack of solubility of BSG proteins is one of the limitations for their more extensive use in food processing. We therefore aimed to generate BSG protein hydrolysates with improved technofunctional properties. BSG protein concentrate (BPC) was prepared by alkaline extraction of BSG and subsequent acid precipitation. BPC was enzymatically hydrolyzed in a pH-stat setup by several commercially available proteases (Alcalase, Flavourzyme, and Pepsin) for different times and/or with different enzyme concentrations in order to obtain hydrolysates with different degrees of hydrolysis (DH). Physicochemical properties, such as molecular weight (MW) distribution and hydrophobicity, as well as technofunctional properties, such as solubility, color, and emulsifying and foaming properties, were determined. Enzymatic hydrolysis of BPC improved emulsion and/or foam-forming properties. However, for the hydrolysates prepared with Alcalase and Pepsin, an increasing DH generally decreased emulsifying and foam-forming capacities. Moreover, the type of enzyme impacted the resulting technofunctional properties. Hydrolysates prepared with Flavourzyme showed good technofunctional properties, independent of the DH. Physicochemical characterization of the hydrolysates indicated the importance of protein fragments with relatively high MW (exceeding 14.5 k) and high surface hydrophobicity for favorable technofunctional properties. PMID:17896813

Celus, Inge; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

2007-10-17

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Chloroplast-derived enzyme cocktails hydrolyse lignocellulosic biomass and release fermentable sugars.  

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It is widely recognized that biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials is limited by inadequate technology to efficiently and economically release fermentable sugars from the complex multi-polymeric raw materials. Therefore, endoglucanases, exoglucanase, pectate lyases, cutinase, swollenin, xylanase, acetyl xylan esterase, beta glucosidase and lipase genes from bacteria or fungi were expressed in Escherichia coli or tobacco chloroplasts. A PCR-based method was used to clone genes without introns from Trichoderma reesei genomic DNA. Homoplasmic transplastomic lines showed normal phenotype and were fertile. Based on observed expression levels, up to 49, 64 and 10, 751 million units of pectate lyases or endoglucanase can be produced annually, per acre of tobacco. Plant production cost of endoglucanase is 3100-fold, and pectate lyase is 1057 or 1480-fold lower than the same recombinant enzymes sold commercially, produced via fermentation. Chloroplast-derived enzymes had higher temperature stability and wider pH optima than enzymes expressed in E. coli. Plant crude-extracts showed higher enzyme activity than E. coli with increasing protein concentration, demonstrating their direct utility without purification. Addition of E. coli extracts to the chloroplast-derived enzymes significantly decreased their activity. Chloroplast-derived crude-extract enzyme cocktails yielded more (up to 3625%) glucose from filter paper, pine wood or citrus peel than commercial cocktails. Furthermore, pectate lyase transplastomic plants showed enhanced resistance to Erwina soft rot. This is the first report of using plant-derived enzyme cocktails for production of fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Limitations of higher cost and lower production capacity of fermentation systems are addressed by chloroplast-derived enzyme cocktails. PMID:20070870

Verma, Dheeraj; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Daniell, Henry

2010-04-01

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Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213.  

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A novel Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L(-1) butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH), corn stover (CSH), rice hull (RHH), and switchgrass (SGH). Results indicated that 50% WSH with a Clostridia medium (Ct) produced the most butyric acid (8.06 g L(-1), 0.46 g/g glucose), followed by 50% SGH with Ct (6.01 g L(-1), 0.44 g/g glucose), however, 50% CSH Ct showed growth inhibition. RPT-4213 was then used in pH-controlled bioreactor fermentations using 60% WSH and SGH, with a dilute (0.5×) Ct medium, resulting 9.87 g L(-1) butyric acid in WSH (yield 0.44 g/g) and 7.05 g L(-1) butyric acid in SGH (yield 0.42 g/g). The titer and productivity could be improved through process engineering. PMID:23811065

Liu, Siqing; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Leathers, Timothy D; Qureshi, Nasib; Rich, Joseph O; Hughes, Stephen R

2013-09-01

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Co-expression of TAL1 and ADH1 in recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of furfural.  

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Lignocellulosic biomass dedicated to bioethanol production usually contains pentoses and inhibitory compounds such as furfural that are not well tolerated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, S. cerevisiae strains with the capability of utilizing both glucose and xylose in the presence of inhibitors such as furfural are very important in industrial ethanol production. Under the synergistic conditions of transaldolase (TAL) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) overexpression, S. cerevisiae MT8-1X/TAL-ADH was able to produce 1.3-fold and 2.3-fold more ethanol in the presence of 70 mM furfural than a TAL-expressing strain and a control strain, respectively. We also tested the strains' ability by mimicking industrial ethanol production from hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing fermentation inhibitors, and ethanol production was further improved by 16% when using MT8-1X/TAL-ADH compared to the control strain. Transcript analysis further revealed that besides the pentose phosphate pathway genes TKL1 and TAL1, ADH7 was also upregulated in response to furfural stress, which resulted in higher ethanol production compared to the TAL-expressing strain. The improved capability of our modified strain was based on its capacity to more quickly reduce furfural in situ resulting in higher ethanol production. The co-expression of TAL/ADH genes is one crucial strategy to fully utilize undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate, leading to cost-competitive ethanol production. PMID:23916856

Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Nambu, Yumiko; Kondo, Akihiko

2014-02-01

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Biorefining of lignocellulose : Detoxification of inhibitory hydrolysates and potential utilization of residual streams for production of enzymes  

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Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable resource that can be utilized for the production of biofuels, chemicals, and bio-based materials. Biochemical conversion of lignocellulose to advanced biofuels, such as cellulosic ethanol, is generally performed through microbial fermentation of sugars generated by thermochemical pretreatment of the biomass followed by an enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose. The aims of the research presented in this thesis were to address problems associated with pret...

Cavka, Adnan

2013-01-01

28

Ethanol Production from Nondetoxified Dilute-Acid Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate by Cocultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5 and Pichia stipitis CBS6054.  

Science.gov (United States)

Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5 (CGMCC no. 2660) and Issatchenkia orientalis Y4 (CGMCC no. 2159) were combined individually with Pichia stipitis CBS6054 to establish the cocultures of Y5 + CBS6054 and Y4 + CBS6054. The coculture Y5 + CBS6054 effectively metabolized furfural and HMF and converted xylose and glucose mixture to ethanol with ethanol concentration of 16.6?g/L and ethanol yield of 0.46?g ethanol/g sugar, corresponding to 91.2% of the maximal theoretical value in synthetic medium. Accordingly, the nondetoxified dilute-acid hydrolysate was used to produce ethanol by co-culture Y5 + CBS6054. The co-culture consumed glucose along with furfural and HMF completely in 12?h, and all xylose within 96?h, resulting in a final ethanol concentration of 27.4?g/L and ethanol yield of 0.43?g ethanol/g sugar, corresponding to 85.1% of the maximal theoretical value. The results indicated that the co-culture of Y5 + CBS6054 was a satisfying combination for ethanol production from non-detoxified dilute-acid lignocellulosic hydrolysates. This co-culture showed a promising prospect for industrial application. PMID:22792472

Wan, Ping; Zhai, Dongmei; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiushan; Tian, Shen

2012-01-01

29

Re-assessment of YAP1 and MCR1 contributions to inhibitor tolerance in robust engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate.  

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Development of robust yeast strains that can efficiently ferment lignocellulose-based feedstocks is one of the requirements for achieving economically feasible bioethanol production processes. With this goal, several genes have been identified as promising candidates to confer improved tolerance to S. cerevisiae. In most of the cases, however, the evaluation of the genetic modification was performed only in laboratory strains, that is, in strains that are known to be quite sensitive to various types of stresses. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of overexpressing genes encoding the transcription factor (YAP1) and the mitochondrial NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (MCR1), either alone or in combination, in an already robust and xylose-consuming industrial strain of S. cerevisiae and evaluated the effect during the fermentation of undiluted and undetoxified spruce hydrolysate. Overexpression of either gene resulted in faster hexose catabolism, but no cumulative effect was observed with the simultaneous overexpression. The improved phenotype of MCR1 overexpression appeared to be related, at least in part, to a faster furaldehyde reduction capacity, indicating that this reductase may have a wider substrate range than previously reported. Unexpectedly a decreased xylose fermentation rate was also observed in YAP1 overexpressing strains and possible reasons behind this phenotype are discussed. PMID:25147754

Wallace-Salinas, Valeria; Signori, Lorenzo; Li, Ying-Ying; Ask, Magnus; Bettiga, Maurizio; Porro, Danilo; Thevelein, Johan M; Branduardi, Paola; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie

2014-01-01

30

Re-assessment of YAP1 and MCR1 contributions to inhibitor tolerance in robust engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate  

Science.gov (United States)

Development of robust yeast strains that can efficiently ferment lignocellulose-based feedstocks is one of the requirements for achieving economically feasible bioethanol production processes. With this goal, several genes have been identified as promising candidates to confer improved tolerance to S. cerevisiae. In most of the cases, however, the evaluation of the genetic modification was performed only in laboratory strains, that is, in strains that are known to be quite sensitive to various types of stresses. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of overexpressing genes encoding the transcription factor (YAP1) and the mitochondrial NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (MCR1), either alone or in combination, in an already robust and xylose-consuming industrial strain of S. cerevisiae and evaluated the effect during the fermentation of undiluted and undetoxified spruce hydrolysate. Overexpression of either gene resulted in faster hexose catabolism, but no cumulative effect was observed with the simultaneous overexpression. The improved phenotype of MCR1 overexpression appeared to be related, at least in part, to a faster furaldehyde reduction capacity, indicating that this reductase may have a wider substrate range than previously reported. Unexpectedly a decreased xylose fermentation rate was also observed in YAP1 overexpressing strains and possible reasons behind this phenotype are discussed. PMID:25147754

2014-01-01

31

The chemical nature of phenolic compounds determines their toxicity and induces distinct physiological responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in lignocellulose hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

We investigated the severity of the inhibitory effects of 13 phenolic compounds usually found in spruce hydrolysates (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde, homovanilyl alcohol, vanillin, syringic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, dihydroferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, hydroquinone, ferulic acid, homovanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and vanillylidenacetone). The effects of the selected compounds on cell growth, biomass yield and ethanol yield were studied and the toxic concentration threshold was defined for each compound. Using Ethanol Red, the popular industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found the most toxic compound to be 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde which inhibited growth at a concentration of 1.8 mM. We also observed that toxicity did not generally follow a trend based on the aldehyde, acid, ketone or alcohol classification of phenolic compounds, but rather that other structural properties such as additional functional groups attached to the compound may determine its toxicity. Three distinctive growth patterns that effectively clustered all the compounds involved in the screening into three categories. We suggest that the compounds have different cellular targets, and that. We suggest that the compounds have different cellular targets and inhibitory mechanisms in the cells, also compounds who share similar pattern on cell growth may have similar inhibitory effect and mechanisms of inhibition. PMID:24949277

Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Bettiga, Maurizio; Olsson, Lisbeth

2014-01-01

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Brewers' spent grain (BSG) protein hydrolysates decrease hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and concanavalin-A (con-A) stimulated IFN-? production in cell culture.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study investigated the bioactivity of protein hydrolysates and fractionated hydrolysates prepared from brewers' spent grain (BSG) using proteases, including Alcalase 2.4L, Flavourzyme and Corolase PP. Hydrolysates were designated K-Y, including fractionated hydrolysates with molecular weight (m.w.) 5 kDa. Where computable, IC50 values were lower in U937 (1.38-9.78%) than Jurkat T cells (1.15-13.82%). Hydrolysates L, Q and R and fractionated hydrolysates of U and W (5 kDa) significantly (P 5 kDa, V, V > 5 kDa, W, W > 5 kDa significantly (P 5 kDa) possess anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24113874

McCarthy, Aoife L; O'Callaghan, Yvonne C; Connolly, Alan; Piggott, Charles O; FitzGerald, Richard J; O'Brien, Nora M

2013-11-01

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Enzymatic pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes to improve biogas production.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effect of enzymatic pretreatment of sugar beet pulp and spent hops prior to methane fermentation was determined in this study. These industrial residues were subjected to enzymatic digestion before anaerobic fermentation because of high fiber content (of 85.1% dry matter (DM) and 57.7% DM in sugar beet pulp and spent hops, respectively). Their 24h hydrolysis with a mix of enzymatic preparations Celustar XL and Agropect pomace (3:1, v/v), with endoglucanase, xylanase and pectinase activities, was most effective. Reducing sugars concentrations in hydrolysates of sugar beet pulp and spent hops were by 88.9% and 59.4% higher compared to undigested materials. The highest yield of biogas was obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysate of sugar beet pulp (183.39 mL/d from 1g COD at fermenter loading with organic matter of 5.43 g COD/L × d). Fermentation of sugar beet pulp gave 19% less biogas. Methane fermentation of spent hops hydrolysate yielded 121.47 mL/d biogas from 1g COD (at 6.02 g COD/L × d, 13% more than from spent hops). These results provide evidence that suitable enzymatic pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes improve biogas yield from anaerobic fermentation. PMID:22342637

Ziemi?ski, K; Romanowska, I; Kowalska, M

2012-06-01

34

Monitoring on-line desalted lignocellulosic hydrolysates by microdialysis sampling micro-high performance anion exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed electrochemical detection/mass spectrometry.  

Science.gov (United States)

An on-line system based on microdialysis sampling (MD), micro-high performance anion exchange chromatography (micro-HPAEC), integrated pulsed electrochemical detection (IPED), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) for the monitoring of on-line desalted enzymatic hydrolysates is presented. Continuous monitoring of the enzymatic degradation of dissolving pulp from Eucalyptus grandis as well as degradation of sugar cane bagasse in a 5-mL reaction vessel was achieved up to 24 h without any additional sample handling steps. Combining MD with micro-HPAEC-IPED/MS and on-line desalting of hydrolysates enabled injection (5 microL) of at least 23 samples in a study of the sequential action of hydrolytic enzymes in an unmodified environment where the enzymes and substrate were not depleted due to the perm-selectivity of the MD membrane (30 kDa cut-off). Xylanase, phenolic acid esterase and a combination of endoglucanase (EG II) with cellobiohydrolase (CBH I) resulted in the production of DP 1 after the addition of esterase, DP 2 and DP 3 after the addition of EG II and CBH I, from the dissolving pulp substrate. Similar sequential enzyme addition to sugar cane bagasse resulted in DP 1 production after the addition of esterase and DP 1, DP 2 and DP 3 production after the addition of the EG II and CBH I mixture. Combining MS on-line with micro-HPAEC-IPED proved to be a versatile and necessary tool for such a study compared to conventional methods. The mass selectivity of MS revealed complementary information, including the co-elution of saccharides as well as the presence of more than one type of DP 2 in the case of dissolving pulp and several types of DP 2 and DP 3 for sugar cane bagasse. This study demonstrates the limitation of the use of retention time alone for confirmation of the identity of saccharides especially when dealing with complex enzymatic hydrolysates. In situ sampling and sample clean-up combined with on-line desalting of the chromatographic effluent, provides a generic approach to achieve real time monitoring of enzymatic hydrolysates when they are detected by a combination of IPED and MS. PMID:12001175

Rumbold, Karl; Okatch, Harriet; Torto, Nelson; Siika-Aho, Matti; Gübitz, Georg; Robra, Karl-Heinz; Prior, Bernard

2002-06-30

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Dried Spent Yeast and Its Hydrolysate as Nitrogen Supplements for Single Batch and Repeated-Batch Ethanol Fermentation from Sweet Sorghum Juice  

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Full Text Available Dried spent yeast (DSY and its hydrolysate (DSYH were used as low-cost nitrogen supplements to improve ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NP01 under very high gravity (VHG fermentation (280 g·L?1 of total sugar conditions. The supplemented DSY and DSYH concentrations were 11, 16 and 21 g·L?1, corresponding to a yeast extract nitrogen content of 6, 9 and 12 g·L?1, respectively. The initial yeast cell concentration for ethanol fermentation was approximately 5 × 107 cells·mL?1. The fermentation was carried out in single batch mode at 30 °C in 1-L air-locked bottles with an agitation rate of 100 rpm. Ethanol production from the juice with and without yeast extract (9 g·L?1 was also performed as control treatments. The results showed that DSY at 21 g·L?1gave the highest ethanol concentration (PE, 107 g·L?1 and yield (Yp/s, 0.47 g·g?1. The use of DSYH at the same DSY concentration improved ethanol productivity (Qp, but not PE and Yp/s. The ethanol production efficiencies of the juice under DSY and DSYH supplementations were markedly higher than those without nutrient supplementation. However, the PE and Qp values of the juice containing 21 g·L?1 of DSY was approximately 7 g·L?1 and 0.62 g·L?1·h?1 lower than those under the presence of yeast extract (9 g·L?1, respectively. At the end of the single batch fermentation under the optimum DSY concentration, the sugar consumption was approximately 80%. Therefore in the repeated-batch fermentation, the initial total sugar was reduced to 240 g·L?1. The results showed that the system could be carried out at least 20 successive batches with the average PE, Yp/s and Qp of 95 g·L?1, 0.46 g·g?1 and 1.45 g·L?1·h?1, respectively.

Pattana Laopaiboon

2013-03-01

36

Grass Lignocellulose  

Science.gov (United States)

Grass lignocelluloses are limited in bioconversion by aromatic constituents, which include both lignins and phenolic acids esters. Histochemistry, ultraviolet absorption microspectrophotometry, and response to microorganisms and specific enzymes have been used to determine the significance of aromatics toward recalcitrance. Coniferyl lignin appears to be the most effective limitation to biodegradation, existing in xylem cells of vascular tissues; cell walls with syringyl lignin, for example, leaf sclerenchyma, are less recalcitrant. Esterified phenolic acids, i.e., ferulic and p-coumaric acids, often constitute a major chemical limitation in nonlignified cell walls to biodegradation in grasses, especially warm-season species. Methods to improve biodegradability through modification of aromatics include: plant breeding, use of lignin-degrading white-rot fungi, and addition of esterases. Plant breeding for new cultivars has been especially effective for nutritionally improved forages, for example, bermudagrasses. In laboratory studies, selective white-rot fungi that lack cellulases delignified the lignocellulosic materials and improved fermentation of residual carbohydrates. Phenolic acid esterases released p-coumaric and ferulic acids for potential coproducts, improved the available sugars for fermentation, and improved biodegradation. The separation and removal of the aromatic components for coproducts, while enhancing the availability of sugars for bioconversion, could improve the economics of bioconversion.

Akin, Danny E.

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Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues by Agrocybe cylindracea and Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom fungi--assessment of their effect on the final product and spent substrate properties.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nine agro-industrial and forestry by-products were subjected to solid-state fermentation by Agrocybe cylindracea and Pleurotus ostreatus, and the process and end-products were comparatively evaluated. Grape marc waste plus cotton gin trash was the best performing medium for both fungi, while substrate composition had a marked effect on most cultivation parameters. Biological efficiency was positively correlated with nitrogen, lignin and ash, and negatively with hemicelluloses and carbohydrate content of substrates. Spent substrates demonstrated high reductions in hemicelluloses and cellulose in contrast to lignin; fibre fractions were correlated with nitrogen, fat and ash content of initial materials, while residual mycelial biomass was affected by mushroom productivity. Mushroom proximate analysis revealed significant variations of constituents depending on the substrate. Crude protein and fat were correlated with substrates nitrogen for both species. Alternative cultivation substrates of high potential are proposed, while spent material could be exploited as animal feed due to its upgraded properties. PMID:24837930

Koutrotsios, Georgios; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Zervakis, Georgios I

2014-10-15

38

Egg protein hydrolysates  

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The present invention provides egg-protein hydrolysates with DPP-IV inhibitory activity which are particularly suited for the treatment of diabetes. Particularly advantageous is to use hydrolysate of lysozyme for the treatment of diabetes.

Amerongen, A.; Beelen, M. J. C.; Wolbers, L. A. M.; Gilst, W. H.; Buikema, J. H.; Nelissen, J. W. P. M.

2009-01-01

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Thermophilic lactic acid production on hemicellulose hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lactic acid has many applications. It can be utilised as road-deicing agent, in the food industry or--after polymerisation--as a biodegradable plastic. The use of lignocellulose biomass will significantly increase the competitiveness of lactic acid-based polymers compared to conventional petroleum based plastics. The Institute for Agrobiotechnology in Tulln (IFA-Tulln) developed a process to apply renewable resources as cheap feedstock for production of lactic acid. The utilisation of thermophiles combined with a suitable pretreatment method enables a fermentation under non sterile conditions with detoxified hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This paper presents growth toxicity tests and batch experiments with bagasse hydrolysate, which were conducted to determine the fermentability of thermophilic wild type strains. PMID:15954612

Thomasser, C; Danner, H; Neureiter, M; Saidi, B; Braun, R

2001-01-01

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Selective suppression of bacterial contaminants by process conditions during lignocellulose based yeast fermentations  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of bacteria in large-scale yeast fermentations is a serious problem and a threat to the development of successful biofuel production plants. Huge research efforts have been spent in order to solve this problem, but additional ways must still be found to keep bacterial contaminants from thriving in these environments. The aim of this project was to develop process conditions that would inhibit bacterial growth while giving yeast a competitive advantage. Results Lactic acid bacteria are usually considered to be the most common contaminants in industrial yeast fermentations. Our observations support this view but also suggest that acetic acid bacteria, although not so numerous, could be a much more problematic obstacle to overcome. Acetic acid bacteria showed a capacity to drastically reduce the viability of yeast. In addition, they consumed the previously formed ethanol. Lactic acid bacteria did not show this detrimental effect on yeast viability. It was possible to combat both types of bacteria by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol to the wood hydrolysate medium used. As a result of NaCl + ethanol additions the amount of viable bacteria decreased and yeast viability was enhanced concomitantly with an increase in ethanol concentration. The successful result obtained via addition of NaCl and ethanol was also confirmed in a real industrial ethanol production plant with its natural inherent yeast/bacterial community. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the number of bacteria and offer a selective advantage to yeast by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol when cultivated in lignocellulosic medium such as wood hydrolysate. However, for optimal results, the concentrations of NaCl + ethanol must be adjusted to suit the challenges offered by each hydrolysate.

Albers Eva

2011-12-01

 
 
 
 
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A comparative study of the hydrolysis of gamma irradiated lignocelluloses  

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Full Text Available The effect of high-dose irradiation as a pretreatment method on two common lignocellulosic materials; hardwood (Khaya senegalensis and softwood (Triplochiton scleroxylon were investigated by assessing the potential of cellulase enzyme derived from Aspergillus flavus Linn isolate NSPR 101 to hydrolyse the materials. The irradiation strongly affected the materials, causing the enzymatic hydrolysis to increase by more than 3 fold. Maximum digestibility occurred in softwood at 40kGy dosage of irradiation, while in hardwood it was at 90kGy dosage. The results also showed that, at the same dosage levels (p < 0.05, hardwood was hydrolysed significantly better compared to the softwood.

E. Betiku

2009-06-01

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Cofactor Dependence in Furan Reduction by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Fermentation of Acid-Hydrolyzed Lignocellulose  

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A decreased fermentation rate due to inhibition is a significant problem for economic conversion of acid-pretreated lignocellulose hydrolysates to ethanol, since the inhibition gives rise to a requirement for separate detoxification steps. Together with acetic acid, the sugar degradation products furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural are the inhibiting compounds found at the highest concentrations in hydrolysates. These aldehydes have been shown to affect both the specific growth rate and the...

Nilsson, Anneli; Gorwa-grauslund, Marie F.; Hahn-ha?gerdal, Ba?rbel; Lide?n, Gunnar

2005-01-01

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Electricity generation by microbial fuel cells fuelled with wheat straw hydrolysate  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Electricity production from microbial fuel cells fueled with hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw can achieve both energy production and domestic wastewater purification. The hydrolysate contained mainly xylan, carboxylic acids, and phenolic compounds. Power generation and substrate utilization from the hydrolysate was compared with the ones obtained by defined synthetic substrates. The power density increased from 47 mW m?2 to 148 mW m?2 with the hydrolysate:wastewater ratio (RHW in m3 m?3) increasing from 0 to 0.06 (corresponding to 0–0.7 g dm?3 of carbohydrates). The power density with the hydrolysate was higher than the one with only xylan (120 mW m?2) and carboxylic acids as fuel. The higher power density can be caused by the presence of phenolic compounds in the hydrolysates, which could mediate electron transport. Electricity generation with the hydrolysate resulted in 95% degradation of the xylan and glucan. The study demonstrates that lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be used for co-treatment with domestic wastewater for power generation in microbial fuel cells. -- Highlights: ? Electricity production in microbial fuel cells. ? Hydrolysate from hydrothermal treated wheat straw as fuel. ? Larger electricity production than with simple compounds as fuel. ? No need for detoxification and nutrients to the hydrolysate. ? Effective (95%) microbial utilization of the polymeric carbohydrates.

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Ethanol production from lignocellulose  

Science.gov (United States)

This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01

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Glucose content in the liquid hydrolysate after dilute acid pretreatment is affected by the starch content in rice straw.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass, such as rice straw, is often utilized as a bioresource after being hydrolyzed using dilute acid and separated into liquid hydrolysate and acid-insoluble residue. However, the biomass component that determines the distribution between liquid hydrolysate and acid-insoluble residue has not yet been clarified. In this study, the glucose content in the liquid hydrolysate and weight of acid-insoluble residue of 13 rice cultivars were analyzed. Starch content was positively correlated with glucose content in the liquid hydrolysate, and negatively correlated with acid-insoluble residue weight. These results indicate that the glucose in the liquid hydrolysate is mainly liberated from starch rather than cellulose in the rice straw. These observations suggest that starch content is a good indicator of the glucose distribution between the liquid hydrolysate and insoluble residue. PMID:24140898

Teramura, Hiroshi; Oshima, Tomoko; Matsuda, Fumio; Sasaki, Kengo; Ogino, Chiaki; Yamasaki, Masanori; Kondo, Akihiko

2013-12-01

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Production of Ethanol from Sugars and Lignocellulosic Biomass by Thermoanaerobacter J1 Isolated from a Hot Spring in Iceland  

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Thermophilic bacteria have gained increased attention as candidates for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. This study investigated ethanol production by Thermoanaerobacter strain J1 from hydrolysates made from lignocellulosic biomass in batch cultures. The effect of increased initial glucose concentration and the partial pressure of hydrogen on end product formation were examined. The strain showed a broad substrate spectrum, and high ethanol yields were observed on glucose (...

Jan Eric Jessen 1988; Johann Orlygsson

2012-01-01

47

Electricity generation by microbial fuel cells fuelled with wheat straw hydrolysate  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Electricity production from microbial fuel cells fueled with hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw can achieve both energy production and domestic wastewater purification. The hydrolysate contained mainly xylan, carboxylic acids, and phenolic compounds. Power generation and substrate utilization from the hydrolysate was compared with the ones obtained by defined synthetic substrates. The power density increased from 47 mW m?2 to 148 mW m?2 with the hydrolysate:wastewater ratio (RHW in m3 m?3) increasing from 0 to 0.06 (corresponding to 0–0.7 g dm?3 of carbohydrates). The power density with the hydrolysate was higher than the one with only xylan (120 mW m?2) and carboxylic acids as fuel. The higher power density can be caused by the presence of phenolic compounds in the hydrolysates, which could mediate electron transport. Electricity generation with the hydrolysate resulted in 95% degradation of the xylan and glucan. The study demonstrates that lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be used for co-treatment with domestic wastewater for power generation in microbial fuel cells.

Thygesen, Anders; Poulsen, Finn Willy

2011-01-01

48

Feasibility of filamentous fungi for biofuel production using hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipids produced from filamentous fungi show great promise for biofuel production, but a major limiting factor is the high production cost attributed to feedstock. Lignocellulosic biomass is a suitable feedstock for biofuel production due to its abundance and low value. However, very limited study has been performed on lipid production by culturing oleaginous fungi with lignocellulosic materials. Thus, identification of filamentous fungal strains capable of utilizing lignocellulosic hydrolysates for lipid accumulation is critical to improve the process and reduce the production cost. Results The growth performances of eleven filamentous fungi were investigated when cultured on glucose and xylose. Their dry cell weights, lipid contents and fatty acid profiles were determined. Six fungal strains with high lipid contents were selected to culture with the hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw. The results showed that all the selected fungal strains were able to grow on both detoxified liquid hydrolysate (DLH and non-detoxified liquid hydrolysate (NDLH. The highest lipid content of 39.4% was obtained by Mortierella isabellina on NDLH. In addition, NDLH with some precipitate could help M. isabellina form pellets with an average diameter of 0.11?mm. Conclusion This study demonstrated the possibility of fungal lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass. M. isabellina was the best lipid producer grown on lignocellulosic hydrolysates among the tested filamentous fungi, because it could not only accumulate oils with a high content by directly utilizing NDLH to simplify the fermentation process, but also form proper pellets to benefit the downstream harvesting. Considering the yield and cost, fungal lipids from lignocellulosic biomass are promising alternative sources for biodiesel production.

Zheng Yubin

2012-07-01

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Exometabolomics Approaches in Studying the Application of Lignocellulosic Biomass as Fermentation Feedstock  

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Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is the future feedstock for the production of biofuel and bio-based chemicals. The pretreatment-hydrolysis product of biomass, so-called hydrolysate, contains not only fermentable sugars, but also compounds that inhibit its fermentability by microbes. To reduce the toxicity of hydrolysates as fermentation media, knowledge of the identity of inhibitors and their dynamics in hydrolysates need to be obtained. In the past decade, various studies have applied targeted metabolomics approaches to examine the composition of biomass hydrolysates. In these studies, analytical methods like HPLC, RP-HPLC, CE, GC-MS and LC-MS/MS were used to detect and quantify small carboxylic acids, furans and phenols. Through applying targeted metabolomics approaches, inhibitors were identified in hydrolysates and their dynamics in fermentation processes were monitored. However, to reveal the overall composition of different hydrolysates and to investigate its influence on hydrolysate fermentation performance, a non-targeted metabolomics study needs to be conducted. In this review, a non-targeted and generic metabolomics approach is introduced to explore inhibitor identification in biomass hydrolysates, and other similar metabolomics questions.

Peter J. Punt

2013-02-01

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Sugar production from lignocellulosic materials by gamma photolysis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Lignocellulosic plant materials were treated with swelling agent and exposed to gamma radiation from Cobalt 60 or Cesium 137. The swelling agents include NaOH, KOH, NH4OH, Benzyle trimethyl ammonium hydroxide, ZnCl2, CaCO3, H3PO4, and H2SO4. At 50 Mrads or above the lignocellulosic materials were extensively solubilized and formed a thick paste or liquid, depending upon the amount of liquid used. The brownish dark hydrolysate had a sweet molasses like odor. Complete solubilization has been acheived for samples such as sugarcane bagasse, newspaper, cotton linter, cotton clothes, saw dust, and alpha cellulose powder. About 40% total sugar and 7% reducing sugar per dry weight of sugarcane bagasse was obtained. The majority of the soluble carbohydrate seemed to be disaccharides or larger molecules. Solubilization of cellulose was dosage dependent, and the rate was facilitated by alkali. However, the released sugar was further decomposed by the alkali

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Lipid production by Cryptococcus curvatus on hydrolysates derived from corn fiber and sweet sorghum bagasse following dilute acid pretreatment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Corn fiber and sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB) are both pre-processed lignocellulosic materials that can be used to produce liquid biofuels. Pretreatment using dilute sulfuric acid at a severity factor of 1.06 and 1.02 released 83.2 and 86.5 % of theoretically available sugars out of corn fiber and SSB, respectively. The resulting hydrolysates derived from pretreatment of SSB at SF of 1.02 supported growth of Cryptococcus curvatus well. In 6 days, the dry cell density reached 10.8 g/l with a lipid content of 40 % (w/w). Hydrolysates from corn fiber, however, did not lead to any significant cell growth even with addition of nutrients. In addition to consuming glucose, xylose, and arabinose, C. curvatus also utilized formic acid, acetic acid, 4-hydroxymethylfurfural, and levulinic acid for growth. Thus, C. curvatus appeared to be an excellent yeast strain for producing lipids from hydrolysates developed from lignocellulosic feedstocks. PMID:24928546

Liang, Yanna; Jarosz, Kimberly; Wardlow, Ashley T; Zhang, Ji; Cui, Yi

2014-08-01

52

Elucidating and alleviating impacts of lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors on Clostridium beijerinckii during fermentation of Miscanthus giganteus to butanol.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fermentation of liquid hot water (LHW) pretreated Miscanthus giganteus (MG) by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was investigated towards understanding the toxicity of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors to solventogenic Clostridium species vis-à-vis butanol production. While C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 did not grow in undiluted MG hydrolysate-based fermentation medium, supplementation of this medium with Calcium carbonate enabled the growth of C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and production of butanol. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and spectrophotometric assays, LHW-pretreated MG was found to contain lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds; some of which were transformed by exponentially growing C. beijerinckii to less inhibitory compounds during fermentation. Contrary to all expectations, the reduction product of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, inhibited butanol production by C. beijerinckii by more than 16 %. Collectively, these results provide new insights into why lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates are recalcitrant to fermentation to biofuels and chemicals. PMID:25085743

Zhang, Yan; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

2014-10-01

53

Conversion of acid hydrolysate of oil palm empty fruit bunch to L-lactic acid by newly isolated Bacillus coagulans JI12.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cost-effective conversion of lignocellulose hydrolysate to optically pure lactic acid is commercially attractive but very challenging. Bacillus coagulans JI12 was isolated from natural environment and used to produce L-lactic acid (optical purity?>?99.5 %) from lignocellulose sugars and acid hydrolysate of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) at 50 °C and pH 6.0 without sterilization of the medium. In fed-batch fermentation with 85 g/L initial xylose and 55 g/L xylose added after 7.5 h, 137.5 g/L lactic acid was produced with a yield of 98 % and a productivity of 4.4 g/L?h. In batch fermentation of a sugar mixture containing 8.5 % xylose, 1 % glucose, and 1 % L-arabinose, the lactic acid yield and productivity reached 98 % and 4.8 g/L?h, respectively. When EFB hydrolysate was used, 59.2 g/L of lactic acid was produced within 9.5 h at a yield of 97 % and a productivity of 6.2 g/L?h, which are the highest among those ever reported from lignocellulose hydrolysates. These results indicate that B. coagulans JI12 is a promising strain for industrial production of L-lactic acid from lignocellulose hydrolysate. PMID:23504058

Ye, Lidan; Hudari, Mohammad Sufian Bin; Zhou, Xingding; Zhang, Dongxu; Li, Zhi; Wu, Jin Chuan

2013-06-01

54

Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition  

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Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

Manninen Anssi H

2009-09-01

55

Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition  

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Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole) proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance ...

Manninen Anssi H

2009-01-01

56

Butanol production from lignocellulosics.  

Science.gov (United States)

Clostridium spp. produce n-butanol in the acetone/butanol/ethanol process. For sustainable industrial scale butanol production, a number of obstacles need to be addressed including choice of feedstock, the low product yield, toxicity to production strain, multiple-end products and downstream processing of alcohol mixtures. This review describes the use of lignocellulosic feedstocks, bioprocess and metabolic engineering, downstream processing and catalytic refining of n-butanol. PMID:22526420

Jurgens, German; Survase, Shrikant; Berezina, Oxana; Sklavounos, Evangelos; Linnekoski, Juha; Kurkijärvi, Antti; Väkevä, Minna; van Heiningen, Adriaan; Granström, Tom

2012-08-01

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21 CFR 102.22 - Protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protein hydrolysates. 102.22 Section 102.22...Nonstandardized Foods § 102.22 Protein hydrolysates. The common or usual name of a protein hydrolysate shall be specific to the...

2010-04-01

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Evaluation of lignocellulosic wastes for production of edible mushrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

The degradation of lignocellulosic wastes such as paddy straw, sorghum stalk, and banana pseudostem was investigated during solid-state fermentation by edible mushrooms Pleurotus eous and Lentinus connotus. Biological efficiency of 55-65% was observed in paddy straw followed by sorghum stalk (45%) and banana pseudostem (33%) for both fungal species. The activity of extracellular enzymes, namely cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, and laccase, together with the content of cellulose, lignin, and phenols, was studied in spent substrates on seventh, 17th, and 27th days of spawning, and these values were used as indicators of the extent of lignocellulosic degradation by mushroom. Both the mushroom species proved to be efficient degraders of lignocellulosic biomass of paddy straw and sorghum stalk, and the extent of cellulose degradation was 63-72% of dry weight (d.w.), and lignin degradation was 23-30% of the d.w. In banana pseudostem, the extent of the degradation was observed to be only 15-22% of the d.w. for both lignin and cellulose. Preferential removal of cellulose during initial growth period and delayed degradation of lignin were observed in all three substrates. This is associated with decrease in activity of cellulase and polyphenol oxidase and increase in laccase activity with spawn aging in spent substrates. Thus, bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass by P. eous and L. connotus offers a promising way to convert low-quality biomass into an improved human food. PMID:18327544

Rani, P; Kalyani, N; Prathiba, K

2008-12-01

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Fungal delignification of lignocellulosic biomass improves the saccharification of cellulosics.  

Science.gov (United States)

The biological delignification of lignocellulosic feedstocks, Prosopis juliflora and Lantana camara was carried out with Pycnoporus cinnabarinus, a white rot fungus, at different scales under solid-state fermentation (SSF) and the fungal treated substrates were evaluated for their acid and enzymatic saccharification. The fungal fermentation at 10.0 g substrate level optimally delignified the P. juliflora by 11.89% and L. camara by 8.36%, and enriched their holocellulose content by 3.32 and 4.87%, respectively, after 15 days. The fungal delignification when scaled up from 10.0 g to 75.0, 200.0 and 500.0 g substrate level, the fungus degraded about 7.69-10.08% lignin in P. juliflora and 6.89-7.31% in L. camara, and eventually enhanced the holocellulose content by 2.90-3.97 and 4.25-4.61%, respectively. Furthermore, when the fungal fermented L. camara and P. juliflora was hydrolysed with dilute sulphuric acid, the sugar release was increased by 21.4-42.4% and the phenolics content in hydrolysate was decreased by 18.46 and 19.88%, as compared to the unfermented substrate acid hydrolysis, respectively. The reduction of phenolics in acid hydrolysates of fungal treated substrates decreased the amount of detoxifying material (activated charcoal) by 25.0-33.0% as compared to the amount required to reduce almost the same level of phenolics from unfermented substrate hydrolysates. Moreover, an increment of 21.1-25.1% sugar release was obtained when fungal treated substrates were enzymatically hydrolysed as compared to the hydrolysis of unfermented substrates. This study clearly shows that fungal delignification holds potential in utilizing plant residues for the production of sugars and biofuels. PMID:20711746

Gupta, Rishi; Mehta, Girija; Khasa, Yogender Pal; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

2011-07-01

60

Isolation of oleaginous yeast (Rhodosporidium toruloides) mutants tolerant of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate.  

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Rhodosporidium toruloides is a lipid-producing yeast, the growth of which is severely suppressed when hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass are used as carbon source. This is probably due to the toxic substances, such as organic acids, furans, and phenolic compounds produced during the preparation of the hydrolysates. In order to solve this problem, R. toruloides cultures were subjected to atmospheric room-temperature plasma mutagenesis, resulting in the isolation of mutants showing tolerance to sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate (SBH). Three mutant strains, M11, M13, and M18, were found to grow with producing lipids with SBH as carbon source. M11 in particular appeared to accumulate higher levels (up to 60% of dry cell weight) of intracellular lipids. Further, all three mutant strains showed tolerance of vanillin, furfural, and acetic acid, with different spectra, suggesting that different genetic determinants are involved in SBH tolerance. PMID:25036690

Kitahara, Yuki; Yin, Tie; Zhao, Xuebing; Wachi, Masaaki; Du, Wei; Liu, Dehua

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Co-hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass for microbial lipid accumulation.  

Science.gov (United States)

The herbaceous perennial energy crops miscanthus, giant reed, and switchgrass, along with the annual crop residue corn stover, were evaluated for their bioconversion potential. A co-hydrolysis process, which applied dilute acid pretreatment, directly followed by enzymatic saccharification without detoxification and liquid-solid separation between these two steps was implemented to convert lignocellulose into monomeric sugars (glucose and xylose). A factorial experiment in a randomized block design was employed to optimize the co-hydrolysis process. Under the optimal reaction conditions, corn stover exhibited the greatest total sugar yield (glucose?+?xylose) at 0.545 g g(-1) dry biomass at 83.3% of the theoretical yield, followed by switch grass (0.44 g g(-1) dry biomass, 65.8% of theoretical yield), giant reed (0.355 g g(-1) dry biomass, 64.7% of theoretical yield), and miscanthus (0.349 g g(-1) dry biomass, 58.1% of theoretical yield). The influence of combined severity factor on the susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic hydrolysis was clearly discernible, showing that co-hydrolysis is a technically feasible approach to release sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. The oleaginous fungus Mortierella isabellina was selected and applied to the co-hydrolysate mediums to accumulate fungal lipids due to its capability of utilizing both C5 and C6 sugars. Fungal cultivations grown on the co-hydrolysates exhibited comparable cell mass and lipid production to the synthetic medium with pure glucose and xylose. These results elucidated that combining fungal fermentation and co-hydrolysis to accumulate lipids could have the potential to enhance the utilization efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass for advanced biofuels production. PMID:23124976

Ruan, Zhenhua; Zanotti, Michael; Zhong, Yuan; Liao, Wei; Ducey, Chad; Liu, Yan

2013-04-01

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Mutants of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus tolerant to hardwood spent sulfite liquor and acetic acid.  

Science.gov (United States)

A strain development program was initiated to improve the tolerance of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Several rounds of UV mutagenesis followed by screening were used to select for mutants of P. tannophilus NRRL Y2460 with improved tolerance to hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HW SSL) and acetic acid in separate selection lines. The wild type (WT) strain grew in 50 % (v/v) HW SSL while third round HW SSL mutants (designated UHW301, UHW302 and UHW303) grew in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL, with two of these isolates (UHW302 and UHW303) being viable and growing, respectively, in 70 % (v/v) HW SSL. In defined liquid media containing acetic acid, the WT strain grew in 0.70 % (w/v) acetic acid, while third round acetic acid mutants (designated UAA301, UAA302 and UAA303) grew in 0.80 % (w/v) acetic acid, with one isolate (UAA302) growing in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid. Cross-tolerance of HW SSL-tolerant mutants to acetic acid and vice versa was observed with UHW303 able to grow in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid and UAA302 growing in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL. The UV-induced mutants retained the ability to ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol in defined media. These mutants of P. tannophilus are of considerable interest for bioconversion of the sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol. PMID:24122119

Harner, Nicole K; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Habash, Marc B; Trevors, Jack T; Austin, Glen D; Lee, Hung

2014-01-01

63

Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification  

Science.gov (United States)

Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass), phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(P)H, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation, whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts. PMID:25177315

Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Ong, Irene M.; McIlwain, Sean; Morales, Eduardo H.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Tremaine, Mary; Bothfeld, William; Higbee, Alan; Ulbrich, Arne; Balloon, Allison J.; Westphall, Michael S.; Aldrich, Josh; Lipton, Mary S.; Kim, Joonhoon; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Coon, Joshua J.; Kiley, Patricia J.; Bates, Donna M.; Landick, Robert

2014-01-01

64

Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass, phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(PH, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts.

DonnaMBates

2014-08-01

65

Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification.  

Science.gov (United States)

Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass), phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(P)H, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation, whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts. PMID:25177315

Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Ong, Irene M; McIlwain, Sean; Morales, Eduardo H; Grass, Jeffrey A; Tremaine, Mary; Bothfeld, William; Higbee, Alan; Ulbrich, Arne; Balloon, Allison J; Westphall, Michael S; Aldrich, Josh; Lipton, Mary S; Kim, Joonhoon; Moskvin, Oleg V; Bukhman, Yury V; Coon, Joshua J; Kiley, Patricia J; Bates, Donna M; Landick, Robert

2014-01-01

66

Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in spanish El etanol es un combustible líquido que debido a la experiencia de producción existente se ha convertido en una importante alternativa para sustituir el uso de gasolina. Es posible mezclarlo en diferentes proporciones con gasolina, los motores no requieren de mayores cambios para su empleo y para su [...] distribución es posible emplear la infraestructura existente para la gasolina. El uso de lignocelulosas como biomasa parece promisoria para la producción de etanol, aun cuando debería aun se analizado cuidadosamente con el propósito holístico que incluya todas la tecnologías actuales y sus posibles implicancias. En este artículo se revisa el conocimiento de las características y fuentes de biomasa de origen vegetal, como también el desarrollo, características y posibilidades de obtener etanol de fuentes lignocelulósicas. Abstract in english Ethanol is the liquid combustible that has become the most promising alternative substitute for gasoline because of the experience gained in its production, the possibility of mixing it with gasoline in different proportions, the possibility of using the existing gasoline distribution infrastructure [...] , and the fact that major changes in engines are not required for its use. Lignocelluloses offer great potential as a biomass source for ethanol production, although their use still requires in-depth analysis with an objective and holistic focus that includes present and future technologic implications. The present article reviews current knowledge about the characteristics and sources of vegetable biomass, as well as the development and possibilities for obtaining ethanol from lignocelluloses sources.

Diana, Abril; Alejandro, Abril.

67

Ethanol production from wood hydrolysate using genetically engineered Zymomonas mobilis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An ethanologenic microorganism capable of fermenting all of the sugars released from lignocellulosic biomass through a saccharification process is essential for secondary bioethanol production. We therefore genetically engineered the ethanologenic bacterium Zymomonas mobilis such that it efficiently produced bioethanol from the hydrolysate of wood biomass containing glucose, mannose, and xylose as major sugar components. This was accomplished by introducing genes encoding mannose and xylose catabolic enzymes from Escherichia coli. Integration of E. coli manA into Z. mobilis chromosomal DNA conferred the ability to co-ferment mannose and glucose, producing 91 % of the theoretical yield of ethanol within 36 h. Then, by introducing a recombinant plasmid harboring the genes encoding E. coli xylA, xylB, tal, and tktA, we broadened the range of fermentable sugar substrates for Z. mobilis to include mannose and xylose as well as glucose. The resultant strain was able to ferment a mixture of 20 g/l glucose, 20 g/l mannose, and 20 g/l xylose as major sugar components of wood hydrolysate within 72 h, producing 89.8 % of the theoretical yield. The recombinant Z. mobilis also efficiently fermented actual acid hydrolysate prepared from cellulosic feedstock containing glucose, mannose, and xylose. Moreover, a reactor packed with the strain continuously produced ethanol from acid hydrolysate of wood biomass from coniferous trees for 10 days without accumulation of residual sugars. Ethanol productivity was at 10.27 g/l h at a dilution rate of 0.25 h{sup -1}. (orig.)

Yanase, Hideshi; Miyawaki, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Mitsugu; Kawakami, Akinori; Matsumoto, Mari; Haga, Kenji; Kojima, Motoki; Okamoto, Kenji [Tottori Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry and Biotechnology

2012-06-15

68

Lignosulfonate-mediated cellulase adsorption: enhanced enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulose through weakening nonproductive binding to lignin  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulose is crucial to bioconversion in the fields of biorefinery and biofuels. However, the enzyme inhibitors in pretreatment hydrolysate make solid substrate washing and hydrolysate detoxification indispensable prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. Sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL) is a relatively new process, but has demonstrated robust performance for sugar and biofuel production from woody biomass in terms of yield and energy efficiency. This study demonstrated the advantage of SPORL pretreatment whereby the presentation of lignosulfonate (LS) renders the hydrolysate non-inhibitory to cellulase (Cel) due to the formation of lignosulfonate-cellulase complexes (LCCs) which can mediate the Cel adsorption between lignin and cellulose, contrary to the conventional belief that pretreatment hydrolysate inhibits the enzymatic hydrolysis unless detoxified. Results Particular emphasis was made on the formation mechanisms and stability phase of LCCs, the electrostatic interaction between LCCs and lignin, and the redistributed Cel adsorption between lignin and cellulose. The study found that LS, the byproduct of SPORL pretreatment, behaves as a polyelectrolyte to form LCCs with Cel by associating to the oppositely charged groups of protein. Compared to Cel, the zeta potential of LCCs is more negative and adjustable by altering the molar ratio of LS to Cel, and thereby LCCs have the ability to mitigate the nonproductive binding of Cel to lignin because of the enlarged electrostatic repulsion. Experimental results showed that the benefit from the reduced nonproductive binding outweighed the detrimental effects from the inhibitors in pretreatment hydrolysate. Specifically, the glucan conversions of solid substrate from poplar and lodgepole pine were greatly elevated by 25.9% and 31.8%, respectively, with the complete addition of the corresponding hydrolysate. This contradicts the well-acknowledged concept in the fields of biofuels and biorefinery that the pretreatment hydrolysate is inhibitory to enzymes. Conclusions The results reported in this study also suggest significant advantages of SPORL pretreatment in terms of water consumption and process integration, that is, it should abolish the steps of solid substrate washing and pretreatment hydrolysate detoxification for direct simultaneous saccharification and combined fermentation (SSCombF) of enzymatic and pretreatment hydrolysate, thereby facilitating bioprocess consolidation. Furthermore, this study not only has practical significance to biorefinery and bioenergy, but it also provides scientific importance to the molecular design of composite enzyme-polyelectrolyte systems, such as immobilized enzymes and enzyme activators, as well as to the design of enzyme separation processes using water-soluble polyelectrolytes. PMID:24188090

2013-01-01

69

Oleaginous fungal lipid fermentation on combined acid- and alkali-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate for advanced biofuel production.  

Science.gov (United States)

A combined hydrolysis process, which first mixed dilute acid- and alkali-pretreated corn stover at a 1:1 (w/w) ratio, directly followed by enzymatic saccharification without pH adjustment, has been developed in this study in order to minimize the need of neutralization, detoxification, and washing during the process of lignocellulosic biofuel production. The oleaginous fungus Mortierella isabellina was selected and applied to the combined hydrolysate as well as a synthetic medium to compare fungal lipid accumulation and biodiesel production in both shake flask and 7.5L fermentor. Fungal cultivation on combined hydrolysate exhibited comparable cell mass and lipid yield with those from synthetic medium, indicating that the integration of combined hydrolysis with oleaginous fungal lipid fermentation has great potential to improve performance of advanced lignocellulosic biofuel production. PMID:24768942

Ruan, Zhenhua; Zanotti, Michael; Archer, Steven; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

2014-07-01

70

LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

2011-01-01

71

Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials  

Science.gov (United States)

The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microorganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

Vlasenko, Elena (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA); Xu, Feng (Davis, CA)

2011-05-17

72

Efficient hydrogen production from the lignocellulosic energy crop Miscanthus by the extreme thermophilic bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentation is one of the routes that can contribute to a future sustainable hydrogen economy. Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive feedstock because of its abundance, low production costs and high polysaccharide content. Batch cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana produced hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetic acid as the main products from soluble saccharides in Miscanthus hydrolysate. The presence of fermen...

Vrije, G. J.; Bakker, R. R.; Budde, M. A. W.; Lai, M. H.; Mars, A. E.; Claassen, P. A. M.

2009-01-01

73

Pervaporation behavior and integrated process for concentrating lignocellulosic ethanol through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of by-products from ethanol fermentation and hydrolysates of lignocelluloses on ethanol diffusion through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes with/without silicalite-1 were investigated. A pervaporation process was integrated with lignocellulosic fermentation to concentrate bioethanol using bare PDMS membranes. Results showed that yeasts, solid particles, and salts increased ethanol flux and selectivity through the membranes (PDMS with/without silicalite-1), whereas glucose exerted negative effects on the performance. On bare PDMS membrane, the performance was not obviously affected by the existence of aliphatic acids. However, on PDMS-silicalite-1 membrane, a remarkable decrease in ethanol selectivity and a rapid growth of total flux in the presence of aliphatic acids were observed. These phenomena were due to the interaction of acids with silanol (Si-OH) groups to break the dense membrane surface. On the PDMS membranes with/without silicalite-1, degradation products of lignocellulosic hydrolysates such as furfural and hydroxyacetone slightly influenced separation performance. These results revealed that an integrated process can effectively eliminate product inhibition, improve ethanol productivity, and enhance the glucose conversion rate. PMID:23732286

Chen, Jingwen; Zhang, Hongman; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Huang, He

2014-02-01

74

High solids enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic materials with a powerful stirrer concept.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, we present a powerful stirred tank reactor system that can efficiently hydrolyse lignocellulosic material at high solid content to produce hydrolysates with glucose concentration > 100 g/kg. As lignocellulosic substrates alkaline-pretreated wheat straw and organosolv-pretreated beech wood were used. The developed vertical reactor was equipped with a segmented helical stirrer, which was specially designed for high biomass hydrolysis. The stirrer was characterised according to mixing behaviour and power input. To minimise the cellulase dosage, a response surface plan was used. With the empirical relationship between glucose yield, cellulase loading and solid content, the minimal cellulase dosage was calculated to reach at least 70% yield at high glucose and high substrate concentrations within 48 h. The optimisation resulted in a minimal enzyme dosage of 30 FPU/g dry matter (DM) for the hydrolysis of wheat straw and 20 FPU/g DM for the hydrolysis of beech wood. By transferring the hydrolysis reaction from shaking flasks to the stirred tank reactor, the glucose yields could be increased. Using the developed stirred tank reactor system, alkaline-pretreated wheat straw could be converted to 110 g/kg glucose (76%) at a solid content of 20% (w/w) after 48 h. Organosolv-pretreated beech wood could be efficiently hydrolysed even at 30% (w/w) DM, giving 150 g/kg glucose (72%). PMID:24242162

Ludwig, Daniel; Michael, Buchmann; Hirth, Thomas; Rupp, Steffen; Zibek, Susanne

2014-02-01

75

Production of Bioethanol From Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacteria  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Bioethanol (ethanol produced from biomass) as a motor fuel is an attractive renewable fully sustainable energy sources as a means of lowering dependence on fossil fuels and air pollution towards greenhouse gasses, particularly CO2. Bioethanol, unlike gasoline, is an oxygenated fuel, which burns cleaner and thus lowers emissions of CO, NOx and unburned hydrocarbons pollutants, which are constituents in ground level ozone and particulate matter pollution (smog). In addition, bioethanol can replace currently used gasoline octane booster MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), which causes serious environment and public health problems. Increasing demand of bioethanol for transportation sector and higher bioethanol prices than gasoline require utilization of cheap and unlimited raw materials in order to become bioethanol economically competitive with gasoline. Such alternative raw materials are residual lignocellulose (wastes) created from forest industries or from agricultural food crops (wheat straw, corn stover, rice straw). The lignocellulose contains lignin, which binds carbohydrate polymers (cellulose and hemicellulose) forming together a rather resistant structure. In this regards, a pre-treatment step is required in order to separate the lignin from polysaccharides. Once separated, the cellulose and hemicellulose fibres must be hydrolysed to monomeric sugars by enzymatic hydrolysis or dilute acid hydrolysis before being converted into ethanol. However, during the pretreatment and hydrolysis steps, various inhibitors towards microbial fermentation are generated along with the monomeric sugars. The inhibitors can be removed by various detoxification methods but the inclusion of this extra process step increases significantly the ethanol production cost. Compared with glucose, which can be readily fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bacterial strains of Zymomonas mobilis, xylose is more difficult to ferment because of a lack of industrially suitable microorganism able to rapidly and efficiently produce high concentrations of ethanol from xylose. In order to keep ethanol production cost at a minimum, the major sugars in lignocellulosic biomass (glucose and xylose) must be converted into ethanol due to high raw material cost, typically about 40% of the total ethanol production cost. The need for a microorganism able to utilize both glucose and xylose and to tolerate the inhibitory compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is therefore apparent. Several thermophilic anaerobic xylan degrading bacteria from our culture collection (EMB group at BioCentrum-DTU) have been screened for a potential ethanol producer from hemicellulose hydrolysates, and out of the screening test, one particular strain (A10) was selected for the best performance. The strain was morphologically and physiologically characterized as Thermoanaerobacter mathranii strain A10. Unlike other thermophilic anaerobic bacteria, the wild-type strain Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A10 was able to tolerate exogenously added ethanol of 5% (v/v) at 70oC in batch fermentation. To verify the potential of thermophilic anaerobe as an alternative ethanol producer from lignocellulose, ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance of lactate dehydrogenase deficient mutant strain Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 was further studied. The experiments were carried out in a continuous immobilized reactor system (a fluidized bed reactor), which is likely to be the process design configuration for xylose fermentation in a Danish biorefinery concept for production of fuel ethanol. The immobilization of the fermenting organism inside the reactor and a long-term strain adaptation to high ethanol concentrations enhance significantly organism tolerance to ethanol (>8.3% v/v) and improve its fermentation capability when exposed at 5% (v/v) ethanol required in practice. The use of this reactor system enables high xylose conversion, effective glucose/xylose co-fermentation, and ethanol productivity of 1 g/l/h required for an economically viable bioethanol

Georgieva, Tania I.

2006-01-01

76

Oil production by oleaginous yeasts using the hydrolysate from pretreatment of wheat straw with dilute sulfuric acid.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explores the use of the hydrolysate from the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw for microbial oil production. The resulting hydrolysate was composed of pentoses (24.3g/L) and hexoses (4.9 g/L), along with some other degradation products, such as acetic acid, furfural, and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Five oleaginous yeast strains, Cryptococcus curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Rhodosporidium toruloides, Lipomyces starkeyi, and Yarrowia lipolytica, were evaluated by using this hydrolysate as substrates. The results showed that all of these strains could use the detoxified hydrolysate to produce lipids while except R. toruloides non-detoxified hydrolysate could also be used for the growth of all of the selective yeast strains. C. curvatus showed the highest lipid concentrations in medium on both the detoxified (4.2g/L) and non-detoxified (5.8 g/L) hydrolysates. And the inhibitory effect studies on C. curvatus indicated HMF had insignificant impacts at a concentration of up to 3g/L while furfural inhibited cell growth and lipid content by 72.0% and 62.0% at 1g/L, respectively. Our work demonstrates that lipid production is a promising alternative to utilize hemicellulosic sugars obtained during pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials. PMID:21463940

Yu, Xiaochen; Zheng, Yubin; Dorgan, Kathleen M; Chen, Shulin

2011-05-01

77

Genetic engineering of Enterobacter asburiae strain JDR-1 for efficient D(--) lactic acid production from hemicellulose hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulose, xylose substituted with alpha-1,2-methylglucuronate is released as methylglucuronoxylose (MeGAX), which cannot be fermented by biocatalysts currently used to produce biofuels and chemicals. Enterobacter asburiae JDR-1, isolated from colonized wood, efficiently fermented both MeGAX and xylose in acid hydrolysates of sweetgum xylan. Deletion of pflB and als genes in this bacterium modified the native mixed acid fermentation pathways to one for homolactate production. The resulting strain, Enterobacter asburiae L1, completely utilized both xylose and MeGAX in a dilute acid hydrolysate of sweetgum xylan and produced lactate approximating 100% of the theoretical maximum yield. Enterobacter asburiae JDR-1 offers a platform to develop efficient biocatalysts for production of fuels and chemicals from hemicellulose hydrolysates of hardwood and agricultural residues. PMID:19504045

Bi, C; Zhang, X; Rice, J D; Ingram, L O; Preston, J F

2009-10-01

78

Efficient production of 2,3-butanediol from corn stover hydrolysate by using a thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis strain.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, a thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis strain X10 was newly isolated for 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Strain X10 could utilize glucose and xylose simultaneously without carbon catabolite repression. In addition, strain X10 possesses high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors including furfural, vanillin, formic acid, and acetic acid. In a fed-batch fermentation, 74.0g/L of 2,3-BD was obtained from corn stover hydrolysate, with a productivity of 2.1g/Lh and a yield of 94.6%. Thus, this thermophilic B. licheniformis strain is a candidate for the development of efficient industrial production of 2,3-BD from corn stover hydrolysate. PMID:25151068

Li, Lixiang; Li, Kun; Wang, Kai; Chen, Chao; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

2014-10-01

79

21 CFR 102.22 - Protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

...2010-04-01 false Protein hydrolysates. 102...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Foods § 102.22 Protein hydrolysates. The...names. “Hydrolyzed casein” is also an example...whereas “hydrolyzed milk protein” is not an...

2010-04-01

80

21 CFR 102.22 - Protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

...2010-04-01 false Protein hydrolysates. 102...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Foods § 102.22 Protein hydrolysates. The... (a) “Hydrolyzed wheat gluten,” “hydrolyzed soy protein,” and “autolyzed yeast...names “hydrolyzed vegetable protein” and...

2010-04-01

 
 
 
 
81

Protein Hydrolysates/Peptides in Animal Nutrition  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of protein hydrolysates as an important nutrient for growth and maintenance has been increasing in animal nutrition. Although animal proteins and protein hydrolysates are widely used however, recently vegetable protein hydrolysates are gaining importance. This chapter reviews the use of protein hydrolysates developed by enzyme hydrolysis and by solid state fermentation process in animal nutrition especially for piglets and compares it with the standard products such as plasma and fishmeal.

McCalla, Jeff; Waugh, Terry; Lohry, Eric

82

Lignosulfonate and elevated pH can enhance enzymatic saccharification of lignocelluloses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonspecific (nonproductive binding (adsorption of cellulase by lignin has been identified as a key barrier to reduce cellulase loading for economical sugar and biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL is a relatively new process, but demonstrated robust performance for sugar and biofuel production from woody biomass especially softwoods in terms of yields and energy efficiencies. This study demonstrated the role of lignin sulfonation in enhancing enzymatic saccharification of lignocelluloses – lignosulfonate from SPORL can improve enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses, contrary to the conventional belief that lignin inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis due to nonspecific binding of cellulase. Results The study found that lignosulfonate from SPORL pretreatment and from a commercial source inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulosic substrates at low concentrations due to nonspecific binding of cellulase. Surprisingly, the reduction in enzymatic saccharification efficiency of a lignocellulosic substrate was fully recovered as the concentrations of these two lignosulfonates increased. We hypothesize that lignosulfonate serves as a surfactant to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis at higher concentrations and that this enhancement offsets its inhibitive effect from nonspecific binding of cellulase, when lignosulfonate is applied to lignocellulosic solid substrates. Lignosulfonate can block nonspecific binding of cellulase by bound lignin on the solid substrates, in the same manner as a nonionic surfactant, to significantly enhance enzymatic saccharification. This enhancement is linearly proportional to the amount of lignosulfonate applied which is very important to practical applications. For a SPORL-pretreated lodgepole pine solid, 90% cellulose saccharification was achieved at cellulase loading of 13 FPU/g glucan with the application of its corresponding pretreatment hydrolysate coupled with increasing hydrolysis pH to above 5.5 compared with only 51% for the control run without lignosulfonate at pH 5.0. The pH-induced lignin surface modification at pH 5.5 further reduced nonspecific binding of cellulase by lignosulfonate. Conclusions The results reported in this study suggest significant advantages for SPORL-pretreatment in terms of reducing water usage and enzyme dosage, and simplifying process integration, i.e., it should eliminate washing of SPORL solid fraction for direct simultaneous enzymatic saccharification and combined fermentation of enzymatic and pretreatment hydrolysates (SSCombF. Elevated pH 5.5 or higher, rather than the commonly believed optimal and widely practiced pH 4.8-5.0, should be used in conducting enzymatic saccharification of lignocelluloses.

Wang ZJ

2013-01-01

83

L-lactate production from seaweed hydrolysate of Laminaria japonica using metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.  

Science.gov (United States)

Renewable and carbon neutral, marine algal biomass could be an attractive alternative substrate for the production of biofuel and various biorefinery products. Thus, the feasibility of brown seaweed (Laminaria japonica) hydrolysate as a carbon source was investigated here for L-lactate production. This work reports the homofermentative route for L-lactate production by introducing Streptococcus bovis/equinus L-lactate dehydrogenase in an engineered Escherichia coli strain where synthesis of the competing by-product was blocked. The engineered strain utilized both glucose and mannitol present in the hydrolysate under microaerobic condition and produced 37.7 g/L of high optical purity L-lactate at 80 % of the maximum theoretical value. The result shown in this study implies that algal biomass would be as competitive with lignocellulosic biomass in terms of lactic acid production and that brown seaweed can be used as a feedstock for the industrial production of other chemicals. PMID:24297185

Mazumdar, Suman; Bang, Junho; Oh, Min-Kyu

2014-02-01

84

Planting and cultivating annual lignocelluloses  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Crop yields for 1982 indicate that topinambur, sunflower and sorghum could be of economic interest as suppliers of biomass provided that, along with the lignocellulose mass, the tuber and seed yields are also utilized, and that for sorghum the sugar instead of the lignin is used or at least part of the plants are used as fodder. The production processes described here could pose interesting production alternatives for today's agriculture of yields/ha continue to increase and lignocellulose utilization is improved (=higher prices).

Kahnt, G.; Leible, L.

1983-01-01

85

Bioconversion of corncob acid hydrolysate into microbial oil by the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi.  

Science.gov (United States)

For the first time, corncob acid hydrolysate was used for microbial oil production by the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi. After hydrolysis by dilute sulfuric acid, corncob could turn into an acid hydrolysate with a sugar concentration of about 42.3 g/L. Detoxified by overliming and absorption with activated carbon, the corncob hydrolysate could be used by L. starkeyi efficiently that a total biomass of 17.2 g/L with a lipid content of 47.0 % (corresponding to a lipid yield of 8.1 g/L) and a lipid coefficient of 20.9 could be obtained after cultivation on the corncob hydrolysate for 8 days. Therefore, L. starkeyi is a promising strain for microbial oil production from lignocellulosic biomass. Glucose and xylose were used by L. starkeyi simultaneously during lipid fermentation while arabinose could not be utilized by it. Besides, the lipid composition of L. starkeyi was similar to that of vegetable oils; thus, it is a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. PMID:24343368

Huang, Chao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Xiong, Lian; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Juan; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xin-De

2014-02-01

86

Sugar cane bagasse as feedstock for second generation ethanol production: Part II: Hemicellulose hydrolysate fermentability  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english Sugar cane bagasse is produced in Brazil as waste of the sugar and ethanol industries. This lignocellulosic material is a potential source for second-generation ethanol production; however a pretreatment stage is essential, which aims at removing the hemicellulose component by disorganizing the lign [...] ocellulosic complex. In this work sugar cane bagasse was pretreated by diluted acid hydrolysis resulting in xylose-rich hydrolysates, which could be fermented to ethanol by a strain of the yeast Pichia stipitis. Statistical approach was used to investigate the effects of factors associated with the diluted acid hydrolysis process (acid concentration, solid:liquid ratio and time of exposure) on the fermentability of different hydrolysates. The statistical analysis was useful for determining the effects of the individual factors and their interactions on the response variables. An acid concentration of 1.09% (v/v), a solid:liquid ratio of 1:2.8 (g:ml), and an exposure time of 27 min were established and validated as the optimum pretreatment conditions for ethanol production from hemicellulose hydrolysates of sugar cane bagasse. Under these conditions, a hydrolysate with 50 g/l of xylose, 6.04 g/l of acetic acid, 0.55 g/l of hydroxylmethylfurfural and 0.09 g/l of furfural was obtained and its fermentation yielded roughly 20 g/l of ethanol in 40 hrs.

Gabriel J. Vargas, Betancur; Nei, Pereira Jr.

2010-09-15

87

Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Wastes to Improve Ethanol and Biogas Production: A Review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Lignocelluloses are often a major or sometimes the sole components of different waste streams from various industries, forestry, agriculture and municipalities. Hydrolysis of these materials is the first step for either digestion to biogas (methane or fermentation to ethanol. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses with no pretreatment is usually not so effective because of high stability of the materials to enzymatic or bacterial attacks. The present work is dedicated to reviewing the methods that have been studied for pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes for conversion to ethanol or biogas. Effective parameters in pretreatment of lignocelluloses, such as crystallinity, accessible surface area, and protection by lignin and hemicellulose are described first. Then, several pretreatment methods are discussed and their effects on improvement in ethanol and/or biogas production are described. They include milling, irradiation, microwave, steam explosion, ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX, supercritical CO2 and its explosion, alkaline hydrolysis, liquid hot-water pretreatment, organosolv processes, wet oxidation, ozonolysis, dilute- and concentrated-acid hydrolyses, and biological pretreatments.

Keikhosro Karimi

2008-09-01

88

Pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes to improve ethanol and biogas production: a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocelluloses are often a major or sometimes the sole components of different waste streams from various industries, forestry, agriculture and municipalities. Hydrolysis of these materials is the first step for either digestion to biogas (methane) or fermentation to ethanol. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses with no pretreatment is usually not so effective because of high stability of the materials to enzymatic or bacterial attacks. The present work is dedicated to reviewing the methods that have been studied for pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes for conversion to ethanol or biogas. Effective parameters in pretreatment of lignocelluloses, such as crystallinity, accessible surface area, and protection by lignin and hemicellulose are described first. Then, several pretreatment methods are discussed and their effects on improvement in ethanol and/or biogas production are described. They include milling, irradiation, microwave, steam explosion, ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX), supercritical CO(2) and its explosion, alkaline hydrolysis, liquid hot-water pretreatment, organosolv processes, wet oxidation, ozonolysis, dilute-and concentrated-acid hydrolyses, and biological pretreatments. PMID:19325822

Taherzadeh, Mohammad J; Karimi, Keikhosro

2008-09-01

89

Trends and challenges in the microbial production of lignocellulosic bioalcohol fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Bioalcohols produced by microorganisms from renewable materials are promising substitutes for traditional fuels derived from fossil sources. For several years already ethanol is produced in large amounts from feedstocks such as cereals or sugar cane and used as a blend for gasoline or even as a pure biofuel. However, alcohols with longer carbon chains like butanol have even more suitable properties and would better fit with the current fuel distribution infrastructure. Moreover, ethical concerns contradict the use of food and feed products as a biofuel source. Lignocellulosic biomass, especially when considered as a waste material offers an attractive alternative. However, the recalcitrance of these materials and the inability of microorganisms to efficiently ferment lignocellulosic hydrolysates still prevent the production of bioalcohols from these plentiful sources. Obviously, no known organism exist which combines all the properties necessary to be a sustainable bioalcohol producer. Therefore, breeding technologies, genetic engineering and the search for undiscovered species are promising means to provide a microorganism exhibiting high alcohol productivities and yields, converting all lignocellulosic sugars or are even able to use carbon dioxide or monoxide, and thereby being highly resistant to inhibitors and fermentation products, and easy to cultivate in huge bioreactors. In this review, we compare the properties of various microorganisms, bacteria and yeasts, as well as current research efforts to develop a reliable lignocellulosic bioalcohol producing organism. (orig.)

Weber, Christian; Farwick, Alexander; Benisch, Feline; Brat, Dawid; Dietz, Heiko; Subtil, Thorsten; Boles, Eckhard [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. of Molecular Biosciences

2010-07-15

90

SO{sub 2}-ethanol-water (SEW) fractionation of lignocellulosics  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This study deals with SO{sub 2}-ethanol-water (SEW) fractionation as a potential method for a Lignocellulosic Biorefinery to achieve high yield separation of the three important components of biomass; cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. Representatives of all principal biomass species were successfully treated by SEW fractionation at similar rates. The kinetics of delignification, polysaccharides removal and cellulose hydrolysis at different temperatures and SO{sub 2} concentrations are described and interpreted from the viewpoint of acid-catalysed degradation of the biomass polymers. The fractionation pattern is compared to that of commercial acid sulfite cooking. The kinetics of delignification, hemicelluloses removal and cellulose hydrolysis during SEW fractionation each follow a two phase behaviour. The delignification is first order in lignin and SO{sub 2}. The observed lignin sulfonation and delignification patterns can be explained using Haegglund's consecutive fast sulfonation-slow hydrolysis scheme. During the initial phase of fractionation, the hemicelluloses removal and cellulose hydrolysis rates are related to the delignification rate, while in the following bulk phase the former two processes proceed independently from the latter. It is proposed that during the initial phase the hemicelluloses are removed together with lignin in the form of lignocarbohydrate complexes, while cellulose is protected by lignin from hydrolytic attack leading to a lower hydrolysis rate. Most hemicellulose side units as well as acetyl groups are cleaved during the first phase, while the glucomannan and xylan backbone polymers are removed at a considerably lower rate in the second (bulk) phase following first order kinetics in the residual polysaccharides. The observed polysaccharides dissolution behaviour can be interpreted in terms of low glucomannan stabilisation by crystallisation on cellulose at the applied conditions. Minimal cellulose dissolution occurs during fractionation, but the cellulose degree of polymerisation decreases by hydrolysis following zero-order kinetics. The products include cellulosic fibres and a spent liquor containing lignin and hydrolysed hemicellulose sugars, the latter present up to 50% in monomeric form. The investigated overall and carbohydrate material balances show no carbohydrate losses as further supported by very low amounts of formed oxidation and dehydration products. The properties of the fibre products are evaluated and their potential applications are discussed. The amount of sulfur bound to lignin is 2-3 times lower than that in acid sulfite cooking, and accounts for less than 1.1% on wood. The rest of SO{sub 2} (95-97%) can be fully recovered by distillation. (orig.)

Iakovlev, M.

2011-10-15

91

Quantification of glucose, xylose, arabinose, furfural, and HMF in corncob hydrolysate by HPLC-PDA-ELSD.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulose and other carbohydrates are being studied extensively as potential renewable carbon sources for liquid biofuels and other valuable chemicals. In the present study, a simple, sensitive, selective, and reliable HPLC method using a photodiode array (PDA) detector and an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was developed for the simultaneous determination of important sugars (D(+)-cellobiose, glucose, xylose, and arabinose), furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in lignocellulose hydrolysate. The analysis was carried out on an Aminex HPX-87H column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 ?m particle size). Ultra-pure water with 0.00035 M H(2)SO(4) was used as the mobile phase with a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. The temperature of the ELSD drift tube was kept at 50 °C, the carrier gas pressure was 350 kPa, and the gain was set at 7. Furfural and 5-HMF were quantified on a PDA detector at 275 nm and 284 nm, respectively. The sugar concentrations were determined by ELSD. This method was validated for accuracy and precision. The regression equation revealed a good linear relationship (r(2) = 0.9986 ± 0.0012) within the test ranges. The method showed good reproducibility for the quantification of six analytes in corncob hydrolysate, with intra- and inter-day variations less than 1.12%. This method is also convenient because it allows the rapid analysis of the primary products of biomass hydrolysis and carbohydrate degradation. PMID:22516168

Liu, Xuejun; Ai, Ning; Zhang, Haiyan; Lu, Meizhen; Ji, Dengxiang; Yu, Fengwen; Ji, Jianbing

2012-05-15

92

LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of copper sulfides in the lignocellulosic matrix were investigated. The modification with a system of 2 components: cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4. 5H2O and sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O for wood fibers is preferred. Optimal parameters were established for the process: 40 % of the reduction system; hydromodule M=1:6; and ratio of cupric sulfate pentahydrate:sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate = 1:2. The coordinative connection of copper ions with oxygen atoms of cellulose OH groups and aromatic nucleus in lignin macromolecule was observed.

Sanchi Nenkova

2011-04-01

93

Fructooligosaccharides and ?-fructofuranosidase production by Aspergillus japonicus immobilized on lignocellulosic materials  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This work describes the fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and ?-fructofuranosidase (FFase) production from sucrose (200 g/l) by Aspergillus japonicus ATCC 20236 immobilized on different lignocellulosic materials including brewer's spent grain, wheat straw, corn cobs, coffee husks, cork oak, and loofa sponge. Transfructosylating (Ut) and hydrolyzing (Uh) activities of FFase were also determined. The FOS production and FFase activity ranged from 128.35 to 138.73 g/l, and 26.83 to 44.81 U/ml, respec...

Mussatto, Solange I.; Aguilar Gonzalez, Cristobal Noe?; Rodrigues, L. R.; Teixeira, J. A.

2009-01-01

94

Ethanol from lignocellulose - Fermentation inhibitors, detoxification and genetic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced resistance  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Ethanol can be produced from lignocellulose by first hydrolysing the material to sugars, and then fermenting the hydrolysate with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hydrolysis using dilute sulphuric acid has advantages over other methods, however, compounds which inhibit fermentation are generated during this kind of hydrolysis. The inhibitory effect of aliphatic acids, furans, and phenolic compounds was investigated. The generation of inhibitors during hydrolysis was studied using Norway spruce as raw material. It was concluded that the decrease in the fermentability coincided with increasing harshness of the hydrolysis conditions. The decrease in fermentability was not correlated solely to the content of aliphatic acids or furan derivatives. To increase the fermentability, detoxification is often employed. Twelve detoxification methods were compared with respect to the chemical composition of the hydrolysate and the fermentability after treatment. The most efficient detoxification methods were anion-exchange at pH 10.0, overliming and enzymatic detoxification with the phenol-oxidase laccase. Detailed analyses of ion exchange revealed that anion exchange and unspecific hydrophobic interactions greatly contributed to the detoxification effect, while cation exchange did not. The comparison of detoxification methods also showed that phenolic compounds are very important fermentation inhibitors, as their selective removal with laccase had a major positive effect on the fermentability. Selected compounds; aliphatic acids, furans and phenolic compounds, were characterised with respect to their inhibitory effect on ethanolic fermentation by S. cerevisiae. When aliphatic acids or furans were compared, the inhibitory effects were found to be in the same range, but the phenolic compounds displayed widely different inhibitory effects. The possibility of genetically engineering S. cerevisiae to achieve increased inhibitor resistance was explored by heterologous expression of laccase from Trametes versicolor and by homologous overexpression of phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase. Both procedures resulted in S. cerevisiae transformants displaying increased resistance towards lignocellulose-derived aromatic compounds.

Larsson, Simona

2000-07-01

95

Sugars metabolism and ethanol production by different yeast strains from coffee industry wastes hydrolysates  

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Significant amounts of wastes are generated by the coffee industry, among of which, coffee silverskin (CS) and spent coffee grounds (SCG) are the most abundantly generated during the beans roasting and instant coffee preparation, respectively. This study evaluated the sugars metabolism and production of ethanol by three different yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia stipitis and Kluyveromyces fragilis) when cultivated in sugar rich hydrolysates produced by acid hydrolysis of CS and...

Mussatto, Solange I.; Machado, Erci?lia M. S.; Carneiro, Li?via M.; Teixeira, J. A.

2012-01-01

96

Harnessing genetic diversity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for fermentation of xylose in hydrolysates of alkaline hydrogen peroxide-pretreated biomass.  

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The fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars, particularly xylose, into ethanol by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to be inhibited by compounds produced during feedstock pretreatment. We devised a strategy that combined chemical profiling of pretreated feedstocks, high-throughput phenotyping of genetically diverse S. cerevisiae strains isolated from a range of ecological niches, and directed engineering and evolution against identified inhibitors to produce strains with improved fermentation properties. We identified and quantified for the first time the major inhibitory compounds in alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)-pretreated lignocellulosic hydrolysates, including Na(+), acetate, and p-coumaric (pCA) and ferulic (FA) acids. By phenotyping these yeast strains for their abilities to grow in the presence of these AHP inhibitors, one heterozygous diploid strain tolerant to all four inhibitors was selected, engineered for xylose metabolism, and then allowed to evolve on xylose with increasing amounts of pCA and FA. After only 149 generations, one evolved isolate, GLBRCY87, exhibited faster xylose uptake rates in both laboratory media and AHP switchgrass hydrolysate than its ancestral GLBRCY73 strain and completely converted 115 g/liter of total sugars in undetoxified AHP hydrolysate into more than 40 g/liter ethanol. Strikingly, genome sequencing revealed that during the evolution from GLBRCY73, the GLBRCY87 strain acquired the conversion of heterozygous to homozygous alleles in chromosome VII and amplification of chromosome XIV. Our approach highlights that simultaneous selection on xylose and pCA or FA with a wild S. cerevisiae strain containing inherent tolerance to AHP pretreatment inhibitors has potential for rapid evolution of robust properties in lignocellulosic biofuel production. PMID:24212571

Sato, Trey K; Liu, Tongjun; Parreiras, Lucas S; Williams, Daniel L; Wohlbach, Dana J; Bice, Benjamin D; Ong, Irene M; Breuer, Rebecca J; Qin, Li; Busalacchi, Donald; Deshpande, Shweta; Daum, Chris; Gasch, Audrey P; Hodge, David B

2014-01-01

97

Sunflower protein hydrolysates reduce cholesterol micellar solubility.  

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Plant protein hydrolysates are a source of bioactive peptides. There are peptides that decrease the micellar cholesterol solubility from bile acids and therefore may reduce in vivo cholesterol absorption. The presence of these peptides in sunflower protein hydrolysates has been studied. Sunflower protein hydrolysates produced with alcalase plus flavourzyme or with pepsin plus pancreatin inhibited in some degree the cholesterol incorporation to micelles. Protein hydrolysates generated after 30 min of hydrolysis with alcalase, and after 30 min of hydrolysis with pepsin, were the inhibitoriest of the cholesterol incorporation to micelles. The average amino acid hydrophobicity of inhibitory peptides in cholesterol micelles was higher than the observed in the corresponding protein hydrolysates. This high hydrophobicity probably favours their inclusion in the lipid micelles. In vivo, this inhibition may translate in a decrease of cholesterol absorption. Reported results show that a combination of different characteristics such as peptide size or hydrophobicity may be responsible of the inhibitory activity of generated peptides. PMID:19205886

Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Del Mar Yust, María; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Millán, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

2009-06-01

98

Improving the bioconversion yield of carbohydrates and ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass  

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Improving the efficiency of lignocellulosic ethanol production is of the utmost importance if cellulosic bioethanol is to be competitive with fossil fuels and first generation bioethanol from starch and sucrose. Improvements in individual processes (pretreatment, saccharification, fermentation) have been ongoing, but few researchers have considered the effect that the incoming raw biomass can have on the process. It is important to understand how biomass can be altered to provide the maximum yield of hydrolysable and fermentable sugars from whatever is available. Since the moisture content is highly variable and easily altered, the effect of drying and rewetting on bioconversion was studied on switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse and hybrid poplar. For switchgrass and sugarcane bagasse, the ethanol yield after simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was improved 18-24% by increasing the moisture content by soaking prior to pretreatment. It was also found that soaking had no effect when the samples were not catalyzed with SO2 confirming that the effect of moisture content is directly related to SO2 uptake and diffusion into the biomass. In hybrid poplar, the results were similar to herbaceous biomass for chips with less than 2% absorbed SO2. However, when the SO2 uptake was increased to 3% even the air dried chips exhibited high digestibility, indicating that increased SO2 uptake can overcome the poor diffusion in dried biomass. Alongside controlling the biomass moisture content, improving knowledge and control of the processes can also increase efficiency and product yields. By monitoring reactions continuously with accurate, robust, on-line sensors, operators can detect when reactions deviate from the norm, and when they are complete. Avoiding process upsets and contamination could be the difference between an economically viable biorefinery and one that struggles to compete. Real time, continuous Raman spectroscopy was used to continuously monitor both a synthetic glucose and a lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation and measure glucose and ethanol. Models developed using offline HPLC validation samples had extremely high correlation between predicted and observed values for ethanol in both fermentations (R2 = 0.98 and 0.94 for synthetic and hydrolysate, respectively) while glucose proved more difficult to detect in the hydrolysate fermentation (R2 = 0.92 and 0.51). This work showed that it is possible to monitor the ethanol and glucose in a hydrolysate with a high fluorescent background.

Ewanick, Shannon M.

99

Lime pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass  

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Lignocellulose is a valuable alternative energy source. The susceptibility of lignocellulosic biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis is constrained due to its structural features, so pretreatment is essential to enhance enzymatic digestibility. Of the chemicals used as pretreatment agents, it has been reported that alkalis improve biomass digestibility significantly. In comparison with other alkalis such as NaOH and ammonia, lime (calcium hydroxide) has many advantages; it is very inexpensive, is safe, and can be recovered by carbonating wash water. The effects of lime pretreatment were explored on switchgrass and poplar wood, representing herbaceous and woody biomass, respectively. The effects of pretreatment conditions (time, temperature, lime loading, water loading, particle size, and oxygen pressure) have been systematically studies. Lime alone enhances the digestibility of switchgrass significantly; under the recommended conditions, the 3-d total sugar (glucose + xylose) yields of lime-treated switchgrass were 7 times that of untreated sample. When treating poplar wood, lime must be combined with oxygen to achieve high digestibility; oxidative lime pretreatment increased the 3-d total sugar yield of poplar wood to 12 times that of untreated sample. In a fundamental study, to determine why lime pretreatment is effective, the effects of three structural features on enzymatic digestibility were studied: lignin content, acetyl content, and crystallinity index (CrI). Poplar wood was treated with peracetic acid, potassium hydroxide, and ball milling to produce model lignocelluloses with a broad spectrum of lignin contents, acetyl contents, and CrI, respectively. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed on the model lignocelluloses to determine the digestibility. Correlations between lignin/carbohydrate ratio, acetyl/carbohydrate ratio, CrI and digestibility were developed. The 95% prediction intervals show that the correlations predict the 1-h and 3-d total sugar conversions of a biomass sample within a precision of 5% and 20%, respectively. The digestibility of a variety of lime-treated biomass and ball-milled alpha-cellulose was compared to the correlations determined from the model compounds. The agreement between the measured and predicted values shows that the correlations are satisfactory and the three structural features---lignin content, acetyl content, and CrI---are the major factors that determine enzymatic digestibility.

Chang, Shushien

100

Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required to foster tolerance towards industrial wheat straw hydrolysates.  

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The presence of toxic compounds derived from biomass pre-treatment in fermentation media represents an important drawback in second-generation bio-ethanol production technology and overcoming this inhibitory effect is one of the fundamental challenges to its industrial production. The aim of this study was to systematically identify, in industrial medium and at a genomic scale, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for simultaneous and maximal tolerance to key inhibitors of lignocellulosic fermentations. Based on the screening of EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection, 242 and 216 determinants of tolerance to inhibitory compounds present in industrial wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) and in inhibitor-supplemented synthetic hydrolysate were identified, respectively. Genes associated to vitamin metabolism, mitochondrial and peroxisomal functions, ribosome biogenesis and microtubule biogenesis and dynamics are among the newly found determinants of WSH resistance. Moreover, PRS3, VMA8, ERG2, RAV1 and RPB4 were confirmed as key genes on yeast tolerance and fermentation of industrial WSH. PMID:25287021

Pereira, Francisco B; Teixeira, Miguel C; Mira, Nuno P; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Domingues, Lucília

2014-12-01

 
 
 
 
101

[Recycle of spent cells from anaerobic succinate fermentation].  

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Spent cells recovered from anaerobic fermentation by Actinobacillus succinogenes were used as nitrogen source for succinic acid production. Three methods were investigated for cell wall-breaking. The results showed that enzymatic hydrolysis was more effective for higher succinic acid yield. When the enzymatic hydrolysate of spent cells was added to reach a total nitrogen concentration 1.11 g/L (equivalent to 10 g/L yeast extract), the succinic acid concentration was 42.0 g/L, but it increased slightly when enhancing the level of enzymatic hydrolysate. However, when 5 g/L yeast extract was supplemented with the enzymatic hydrolysate of spent cells, the succinic acid concentration reached 75.5 g/L after 36 hours and, the succinic acid productivity was 2.10 g/(L x h), which increased by 66.7% compared with the fermentation using 10 g/L yeast extract. Therefore, enzymatic hydrolysate of spent cells could replace 50% yeast extract in the original medium for succinic acid production. PMID:21141119

Bai, Xuefei; Chen, Kequan; Ye, Guizi; Huang, Xiumei; Li, Jian; Jiang, Min

2010-09-01

102

A feasibility study on the multistage process for the oxalic acid pretreatment of a lignocellulosic biomass using electrodialysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study investigated the feasibility of the recovery and reuse oxalic acid in a multistage process for the pretreatment of a lignocellulosic biomass. Electrodialysis (ED), an electrochemical process using ion exchange membranes, was used to recover and reuse oxalic acid in the multistage process. The ED optimal condition for recover oxalic acid was potential of 10V and pH 2.2 in synthetic solutions. The recovery efficiency of oxalic acid from hydrolysates reached 100% at potential of 10V. The power consumption to treat 1mol of oxalic acid was estimated to be 41.0wh. At the same time, ethanol production increased up to 19g/L in the ED-treated hydrolysate, corresponding to ethanol productivity of 0.27g/L/h. It was clearly shown that bioethanol fermentation efficiency increased using the ED process, due to a small loss of fermentable sugar and a significantly high removal of inhibitory chemicals. PMID:23306131

Lee, Hong-Joo; Ahn, Sung Ju; Seo, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Won

2013-02-01

103

Food engineering residues: amino acid composition of hydrolysates and application for the decontamination of metal polluted soils  

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Several residues of the brewing industry and slaughtering offals were investigated in order to evaluate their potential as raw materials for the hydrolytic preparation of amino acid containing solutions, applicable as extractants in amelioration processes for metal polluted soils. The residues were hydrolysed with 6 mol/L hydrochloric acid and the hydrolysates were analysed for their total nitrogen, TOC, amino acid and heavy metal contents. Then, the leaching capacities of the hydrolysates were examined in a series of batch tests with a contaminated soil. High amino acid yields in relation to the weight of the air-dried raw materials were achieved with blood meal (72.5%) and poultry feather meal (56.6%). The portion of the detected amino acids of the total organic carbon content of the hydrolysates ranged from 38.9% (brewer's spent grain) to 93.6% (blood meal). In extraction tests with hydrolysates adjusted to a total amino acid concentration of 60 mmol/L and to a pH value of 7.0, maximum extraction yields of 50.3% for copper (soil content 279 mg kg[sup -1]) and 38.7% for nickel (soil content 54 mg kg[sup -1]) were reached. An increase of the hydrolysate concentration and of the pH of an amino acid mixture resulted in higher solubilisation of the metals. (orig.)

Fischer, K. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany) TU Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany)); Riemschneider, P. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany)); Bieniek, D. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany)); Kettrup, A. (GSF-Forschungszentrum, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany) TU Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany))

1994-11-01

104

Biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose to platform chemicals.  

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Naturally occurring lignocellulose can be used as a renewable resource for the sustainable production of platform chemicals that can in turn be converted to valuable fine chemicals, polymers, and fuels. The biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose is a very promising approach due to its high selectivity, mild conditions, and low exergy loss. However, such biocatalytic processes are still seldom applied at the industrial scale since the single conversion steps (pretreatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation) may exhibit low conversion rates, low efficiencies, or high costs. The biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose to platform chemicals is reviewed in this work. Structures and production rates of lignocellulose are described, and platform chemicals that may be produced from lignocellulose are summarized. Biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose is distinguished from conventional non-selective approaches. All essential conversion steps used in biocatalytic approaches (pretreatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation) are reviewed in detail. Finally, potential interactions between these conversion steps are highlighted and the advantages as well as disadvantages of integrated process configurations are elucidated. In conclusion, a comprehensive understanding of the biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulose is provided in this review. PMID:22829529

Jäger, Gernot; Büchs, Jochen

2012-09-01

105

Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates as Natural Antibacterial Agents  

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Full Text Available Actinopyga lecanora, a type of sea cucumber commonly known as stone fish with relatively high protein content, was explored as raw material for bioactive peptides production. Six proteolytic enzymes, namely alcalase, papain, pepsin, trypsin, bromelain and flavourzyme were used to hydrolyze A. lecanora at different times and their respective degrees of hydrolysis (DH were calculated. Subsequently, antibacterial activity of the A. lecanora hydrolysates, against some common pathogenic Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas sp. were evaluated. Papain hydrolysis showed the highest DH value (89.44%, followed by alcalase hydrolysis (83.35%. Bromelain hydrolysate after one and seven hours of hydrolysis exhibited the highest antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 51.85%, 30.07% and 30.45%, respectively compared to the other hydrolysates. Protein hydrolysate generated by papain after 8 h hydrolysis showed maximum antibacterial activity against S. aureus at 20.19%. The potent hydrolysates were further fractionated using RP-HPLC and antibacterial activity of the collected fractions from each hydrolysate were evaluated, wherein among them only three fractions from the bromelain hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 24%, 25.5% and 27.1%, respectively and one fraction of papain hydrolysate showed antibacterial activity of 33.1% against S. aureus. The evaluation of the relationship between DH and antibacterial activities of papain and bromelain hydrolysates revealed a meaningful correlation of four and six order functions.

Raheleh Ghanbari

2012-12-01

106

Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates as Natural Antibacterial Agents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Actinopyga lecanora, a type of sea cucumber commonly known as stone fish with relatively high protein content, was explored as raw material for bioactive peptides production. Six proteolytic enzymes, namely alcalase, papain, pepsin, trypsin, bromelain and flavourzyme were used to hydrolyze A. lecanora at different times and their respective degrees of hydrolysis (DH) were calculated. Subsequently, antibacterial activity of the A. lecanora hydrolysates, against some common pathogenic Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas sp.) were evaluated. Papain hydrolysis showed the highest DH value (89.44%), followed by alcalase hydrolysis (83.35%). Bromelain hydrolysate after one and seven hours of hydrolysis exhibited the highest antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 51.85%, 30.07% and 30.45%, respectively compared to the other hydrolysates. Protein hydrolysate generated by papain after 8 h hydrolysis showed maximum antibacterial activity against S. aureus at 20.19%. The potent hydrolysates were further fractionated using RP-HPLC and antibacterial activity of the collected fractions from each hydrolysate were evaluated, wherein among them only three fractions from the bromelain hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 24%, 25.5% and 27.1%, respectively and one fraction of papain hydrolysate showed antibacterial activity of 33.1% against S. aureus. The evaluation of the relationship between DH and antibacterial activities of papain and bromelain hydrolysates revealed a meaningful correlation of four and six order functions. PMID:23222684

Ghanbari, Raheleh; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

2012-01-01

107

The NILE Project - Advances in the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Materials into Ethanol  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

NILE ('New Improvements for Lignocellulosic Ethanol') was an integrated European project (2005-2010) devoted to the conversion of lignocellulosic raw materials to ethanol. The main objectives were to design novel enzymes suitable for the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose and new yeast strains able to efficiently converting all the sugars present in lignocellulose into ethanol. The project also included testing these new developments in an integrated pilot plant and evaluating the environmental and socio-economic impacts of implementing lignocellulosic ethanol on a large scale. Two model raw materials - spruce and wheat straw - both preconditioned with similar pretreatments, were used. Several approaches were explored to improve the saccharification of these pretreated raw materials such as searching for new efficient enzymes and enzyme engineering. Various genetic engineering methods were applied to obtain stable xylose- and arabinose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that tolerate the toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The pilot plant was able to treat 2 tons of dry matter per day, and hydrolysis and fermentation could be run successively or simultaneously. A global model integrating the supply chain was used to assess the performance of lignocellulosic ethanol from an economical and environmental perspective. It was found that directed evolution of a specific enzyme of the cellulolytic cocktail produced by the industrial fungus, Trichoderma reesei, and modification of the composition of this cocktail led to improvements of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated raw material. These results, however, were difficult to reproduce at a large scale. A substantial increase in the ethanol conversion yield and in specific ethanol productivity was obtained through a combination of metabolic engineering of yeast strains and fermentation process development. Pilot trials confirmed the good behaviour of the yeast strains in industrial conditions as well as the suitability of lignin residues as fuels. The ethanol cost and the greenhouse gas emissions were highly dependent on the supply chain but the best performing supply chains showed environmental and economic benefits. From a global standpoint, the results showed the necessity for an optimal integration of the process to co-develop all the steps of the process and to test the improvements in a flexible pilot plant, thus allowing the comparison of various configurations and their economic and environmental impacts to be determined. (authors)

108

Applications of Protein Hydrolysates in Biotechnology  

Science.gov (United States)

By definition, protein hydrolysates are the products that are obtained after the hydrolysis of proteins and this can be achieved by enzymes, acid or alkali. This broad definition encompasses all the products of protein hydrolysis - peptides, amino acids and minerals present in the protein and acid/alkali used to adjust pH (Pasupuleti 2006). Protein hydrolysates contain variable side chains depending on the enzymes used. These side chains could be carboxyl, amino, imidazole, sulfhydryl, etc. and they may exert specific physiological roles in animal, microbial, insect and plant cells. This introductory chapter reviews the applications of protein hydrolysates in biotechnology. The word biotechnology is so broad and for the purpose of this book, we define it as a set of technologies such as cell culture technology, bioprocessing technology that includes fermentations, genetic engineering technology, microbiology, and so on. This chapter provides introduction and leads to other chapters on manufacturing and applications of protein hydrolysates in biotechnology.

Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Holmes, Chris; Demain, Arnold L.

109

Membrane Extraction for Detoxification of Biomass Hydrolysates  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Membrane extraction was used for the removal of sulfuric acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural and furfural from corn stover hydrolyzed with dilute sulfuric acid. Microporous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes were used. The organic extractant consisted of 15% Alamine 336 in: octanol, a 50:50 mixture of oleyl alcohol:octanol or oleyl alcohol. Rapid removal of sulfuric acid, 5-hydroxymethyl and furfural was observed. The rate of acetic acid removal decreased as the pH of the hydrolysate increased. Regeneration of the organic extractant was achieved by back extraction into an aqueous phase containing NaOH and ethanol. A cleaning protocol consisting of flushing the hydrolysate compartment with NaOH and the organic phase compartment with pure organic phase enabled regeneration and reuse of the module. Ethanol yields from hydrolysates detoxified by membrane extraction using 15% Alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol were about 10% higher than those from hydrolysates detoxified using ammonium hydroxide treatment.

Grzenia, D. L.; Schell, D. J.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2012-05-01

110

21 CFR 102.22 - Protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

...USUAL NAME FOR NONSTANDARDIZED FOODS Requirements for Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.22 Protein hydrolysates...include the identity of the food source from which the protein...derived. (a) “Hydrolyzed wheat gluten,” “hydrolyzed soy...

2010-04-01

111

ARE LIGNOCELLULOSIC RESOURCES TOO VALUABLE TO BURN?  

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Full Text Available Lignocellulosic matter often can be counted as a renewable resource, since it is produced by photosynthesis. But there are limits to how much biomass our society can use in a sustainable manner. People can debate whether or not it makes sense to use a substantial portion of lignocellulosic materials as a source of liquid fuel. This essay gives a qualified affirmative answer to the question in its title. However, combustion of lignocellulosic resources can be considered as wasteful and uneconomical, in the long run, if it is inefficient, if it fails to displace the combustion of fossil fuels, or if it displaces a higher-end use, for which there are available customers. In particular, it seems unlikely that combustion of fuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass can, by itself, solve problems that stem from society’s excessive thirst for motor fuels.

Martin A. Hubbe

2008-05-01

112

Ectoine production from lignocellulosic biomass-derived sugars by engineered Halomonas elongata.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, the water-retaining cyclic amino acid ectoine was produced from a variety of sugars, including glucose, xylose, cellobiose, and glucose/xylose mixture using engineered Halomonas elongata. When grown on xylose as the sole carbon source, H. elongata produced 333 mmol/kg fresh cell weight (FW) of ectoine, which was 1.4-fold higher than that produced from glucose. To improve ectoine production, an ectD deficient H. elongata mutant was constructed. The engineered H. elongata produced 377 mmol/kg FW of ectoine from a glucose/xylose mixture. Ectoine was also produced from rice straw hydrolysate. These results show that H. elongata can produce ectoine from a variety of sugars derived from lignocellulosic biomass and thus has tremendous potential as a host for producing useful compounds from biomass resources. PMID:23765002

Tanimura, Kosuke; Nakayama, Hideki; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

2013-08-01

113

Co-production of bioethanol, lactic acid, electricity and heat from lignocellulosic biomass  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Large-scale CO2 abatement is a very important issue in our society. Many options are open to reach this goal including the bioconversion of biomass into either energy carriers or bulk chemicals. In this respect, bioethanol and lactic acid are excellent candidates as liquid fuel and bulk chemical, respectively. As for the biomass to be used as feedstock, potential interference with human consumption should be avoided. Hence, lignocellulosic biomass is the preferred option for future large scale processes. Bioethanol can be applied directly or in the form of ETBE in blends with petrol; lactic acid is a renewable alternative for petrochemical solvents and for production of polylactic acid (PLA) to replace petrochemical packaging materials and other synthetic materials. The preparation of fermentable sugars from lignocellulose is a major challenge for both bioethanol and lactic acid production and requires integral optimization of the trajectory from feedstock through fermentation to product recovery. The above issues have been addressed in the Netherlands in a 4.5-year R and D project (2002-2006) by a consortium of industries and R and D institutes in the framework of the EET-program. The overall project objective was to develop and evaluate technologies for the use of lignocellulose as feedstock for bioethanol and lactic acid production. Wheat straw was selected as the model feedstock. Major R and D themes in the project were: Physical/chemical pretreatment for mobilization of (hemi)cellulose from the lignocellulose matrix. Both mild acid pressurized hot water and mild alkaline pretreatment were studied; Optimization of enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis with commercially available enzymes; Use of lignocellulose hydrolysates for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation including optimization of the fermentation process setup and process conditions; Combined Heat and Power (CHP) generation from fermentation residues including evaluation of the potential utilisation of ashes as secondary building material or fertilizer; System modelling and evaluation and integral plant design including economic evaluation; Ecologic evaluation in the form of a screening LCA; Specification and formulation of bioethanol in blends with petrol.

Reith, J.H.; De Bont, J.A.M. (eds.) [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, Petten (Netherlands)

2007-09-15

114

State of the Art Manufacturing of Protein Hydrolysates  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of protein hydrolysates in microbiological media has been in existence for several decades and the basic manufacturing process of protein hydrolysates has remained the same. However, with increasing use of protein hydrolysates in specialized applications such as animal cell culture processes, the manufacturing of protein hydrolysates has dramatically improved and is still in its infancy to uncover the specific peptide, peptides and combination of individual amino acids that produce intended effects for that application. This will change as the protein hydrolysate manufacturers and end-users exchange information and work towards the common goal of developing the best protein hydrolysates for specific applications. This chapter will review the generic manufacturing of protein hydrolysates describing individual unit operations, problems faced by manufacturers and suggestions for obtaining consistent product and guidelines for the end-users in getting regulatory support and setting up reliable specifications. Finally the chapter concludes with future trends of protein hydrolysates.

Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Braun, Steven

115

Pretreatments to enhance the digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass  

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Lignocellulosic biomass represents a rather unused source for biogas and ethanol production. Many factors, like lignin content, crystallinity of cellulose, and particle size, limit the digestibility of the hemicellulose and cellulose present in the lignocellulosic biomass. Pretreatments have as a goal to improve the digestibility of the lignocellulosic biomass. Each pretreatment has its own effect(s) on the cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin; the three main components of lignocellulosic biom...

Hendriks, A. T. W. M.; Zeeman, G.

2009-01-01

116

Protein hydrolysate components attractive to tephritids  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Volatiles from protein hydrolysates have for a long time been known to attract tephritids. Many volatiles from protein hydrolysates have previously been identified, but no highly attractive materials have been determined. There have been few studies on the very low boiling components, other than ammonia. Because protein hydrolysate is more attractive to tephritids at alkaline rather than at slightly acidic conditions, vapours from Nu-Lure insect bait (NLIB) at pH4.5 and pH8.5 were examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Compounds identified by GC/MS did not evoke very high responses, therefore attention was focused on ammonia. Because ammonia is a gas at ambient temperatures and at atmospheric pressure, a slow release system was devised. Ammonia was tested with walnut husk flies in California and was found to be primarily attractive to the female flies. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs

117

Peat Hydrolysate Medium Optimization for Pullulan Production  

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Peat hydrolysate, a diluted acid-autoclaved extract of peat, was used as a substrate for the production of the extracellular polysaccharide pullulan by three strains of Aureobasidium pullulans, 140B, 142, and 2552. It was found that the addition of (NH4)2SO4 and K2HPO4 as sources of nitrogen and phosphate, respectively, is not necessary for the polysaccharide production. The economically optimized culture medium for large-scale production of pullulan contains peat hydrolysate, 0.05% NaCl, 0.0...

Boa, Jacques M.; Leduy, Anh

1984-01-01

118

Bioconversion of lignocellulose-derived sugars to ethanol by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass from agricultural and agro-industrial residues represents one of the most important renewable resources that can be utilized for the biological production of ethanol. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for the commercial production of bioethanol from sucrose or starch-derived glucose. While glucose and other hexose sugars like galactose and mannose can be fermented to ethanol by S. cerevisiae, the major pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose remain unutilized. Nevertheless, D-xylulose, the keto isomer of xylose, can be fermented slowly by the yeast and thus, the incorporation of functional routes for the conversion of xylose and arabinose to xylulose or xylulose-5-phosphate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can help to improve the ethanol productivity and make the fermentation process more cost-effective. Other crucial bottlenecks in pentose fermentation include low activity of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and competitive inhibition of xylose and arabinose transport into the cell cytoplasm by glucose and other hexose sugars. Along with a brief introduction of the pretreatment of lignocellulose and detoxification of the hydrolysate, this review provides an updated overview of (a) the key steps involved in the uptake and metabolism of the hexose sugars: glucose, galactose, and mannose, together with the pentose sugars: xylose and arabinose, (b) various factors that play a major role in the efficient fermentation of pentose sugars along with hexose sugars, and (c) the approaches used to overcome the metabolic constraints in the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose-derived sugars by developing recombinant S. cerevisiae strains. PMID:21204601

Madhavan, Anjali; Srivastava, Aradhana; Kondo, Akihiko; Bisaria, Virendra S

2012-03-01

119

Biochemical and functional characterisation of casein and whey protein hydrolysates.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Whey protein and sodium caseinate were hydrolysed with commercially available enzyme preparations. The resulting hydrolysates were characterised using several analytical characterisation methods and by determination of several functional properties. Subsequently, correlations between the biochemical characteristics themselves and between biochemical and functional properties were studied using multivariate regression analysis.Biochemical characteristics of hydrolysates were determined using u...

Ven, C.

2002-01-01

120

Physicochemical and bitterness properties of enzymatic pea protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of different proteolytic treatments on the physiochemical and bitterness properties of pea protein hydrolysates were investigated. A commercial pea protein isolate was digested using each of 5 different proteases to produce protein hydrolysates with varying properties. After 4 h of enzyme digestion, samples were clarified by centrifugation followed by desalting of the supernatant with a 1000 Da membrane; the retentates were then freeze-dried. Alcalase and Flavourzymetrade mark produced protein hydrolysates with significantly higher (P proteases. Flavourzyme, papain, and alcalase produced hydrolysates that contained the highest levels of aromatic amino acids, while trypsin hydrolysate had the highest levels of lysine and arginine. Papain hydrolysate contained high molecular weight peptides (10 to 178 kDa) while hydrolysates from the other 4 proteases contained predominantly low molecular weight peptides (Flavourzyme hydrolysate was significantly (P enzyme (ACE) activity was significantly higher (P Flavourzyme hydrolysate had the least inhibitory activity. Sensory analysis showed that the alcalase hydrolysate was the most bitter while papain and alpha-chymotrypsin hydrolysates were the least. Among the 5 enzymes used in this study, papain and alpha-chymotrypsin appear to be the most desirable for producing high quality pea protein hydrolysates because of the low bitterness scores combined with a high level of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and moderate free radical scavenging activity. PMID:17995627

Humiski, L M; Aluko, R E

2007-10-01

 
 
 
 
121

Degradation of Lignocellulosic Materials and Its Prevention  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulose-based materials, such as wood, have long been used for structural applications, but their inherent susceptibility to biological and physical degradation sometimes limits their use and leads to early replacement. Concerns about the contributions about the environmental impacts of all materials have sparked renewed interest in using renewable materials in structural applications. An important aspect of any increased use of these materials will be enhancing their durability. This review examines the inherent susceptibility of lignocellulose-based materials to degradation, using wood as the primary example, and then it outlines the research underway to improve these properties.

Morrell, Jeffrey J.

2014-04-01

122

Mineral and vitamin content of beef, chicken, and turkey hydrolysates mineral and vitamin content of protein hydrolysates  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The purpose of this study was to assess the concentration of vitamins and minerals in meat protein hydrolysates. Calcium, phosphorus and iron were analyzed by inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry; vitamin C was analyzed by the reduction of cupric ions and vitamins B1 and B2 by fluorescence. Regarding minerals, the beef hydrolysate (BH) had more iron than the turkey hydrolysate (TH) and the chicken hydrolysate (CH); TH had a little more phosphorus. BH had the largest am...

Silva, Maria Elisabeth Machado Pinto E.; Ive Paton; Marlene Trigo; Von Atzingen, Maria Carolina B. C.; Kira, Carmem S.; Inomata, Emiko I.; Lamardo, Leda C. A.

2008-01-01

123

GENETICALLY MODIFIED LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feed-stocks is of growing interest worldwide in recent years. However, we are currently still facing significant technical challenges to make it economically feasible on an industrial scale. Genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass has provided a potential alternative to address such challenges. Some studies have shown that genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass can increase its yield, decreasing its enzymatic hydrolysis cost and altering its composition and structure for ethanol production. Moreover, the modified lignocellulosic biomass also makes it possible to simplify the ethanol production procedures from lignocellulosic feed-stocks.

Qijun Wang

2010-02-01

124

Ethanol Production from Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw Hydrolysate by Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a Continuous Immobilized Reactor  

Science.gov (United States)

Thermophilic ethanol fermentation of wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in a continuous immobilized reactor system. The experiments were carried out in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) at 70°C. Undetoxified wheat straw hydrolysate was used (3-12% dry matter), corresponding to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/1. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/1) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate was not detoxified, ethanol yield in a range of 0.39-0.42 g/g was obtained. Overall, sugar efficiency to ethanol was 68-76%. The reactor was operated continuously for approximately 143 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. The tested microorganism has considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol. The work reported here also demonstrates that the use of FBR configuration might be a viable approach for thermophilic anaerobic ethanol fermentation.

Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

125

Ethanol production from wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate by thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a continuous immobilized reactor  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Thermophilic ethanol fermentation of wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in a continuous immobilized reactor system. The experiments were carried out in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) at 70C. Undetoxified wheat straw hydrolysate was used (3-12% dry matter), corresponding to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/l. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/l) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate was not detoxified, ethanol yield in a range of 0.39-0.42 g/g was obtained. Overall, sugar efficiency to ethanol was 68-76%. The reactor was operated continuously for approximately 143 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. The tested microorganism has considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol. The work reported here also demonstrates that the use of FBR configuration might be a viable approach for thermophilic anaerobic ethanol fermentation.

Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

2008-01-01

126

Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.  

Science.gov (United States)

Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality. PMID:24801125

Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-10-20

127

Evaluation of the activated charcoals and adsorption conditions used in the treatment of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate for xylitol production  

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Full Text Available Xylitol has sweetening, anticariogenic and clinical properties that have attracted the attention of the food and pharmaceutical industries. The conversion of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass into xylitol by D-xylose-fermenting yeast represents an alternative to the chemical process for producing this polyol. A good source of D-xylose is sugarcane bagasse, which can be hydrolyzed with dilute acid. However, acetic acid, which is toxic to the yeast, also appears in the hydrolysate, inhibiting microbe metabolism. Xylitol production depends on the initial D-xylose concentration, which can be increased by concentrating the hydrolysate by vacuum evaporation. However, with this procedure the amount of acetic acid is also increased, aggravating the problem of cell inhibition. Hydrolysate treatment with powdered activated charcoal is used to remove or decrease the concentration of this inhibitor, improving xylitol productivity as a consequence. Our work was an attempt to improve the fermentation of Candida guilliermondii yeast in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by treating the medium with seven types of commercial powdered activated charcoals (Synth, Carbon Delta A, Carbon Delta G, Carbon 117, Carbon 118L, Carbon 147 and Carvorite, each with its own unique physicochemical properties. Various adsorption conditions were established for the variables temperature, contact time, shaking, pH and charcoal concentration. The experiments were based on multivariate statistical concepts, with the application of fractional factorial design techniques to identify the variables that are important in the process. Subsequently, the levels of these variables were quantified by overlaying the level curves, which permitted the establishment of the best adsorption conditions for attaining high levels of xylitol volumetric productivity and D-xylose-to-xylitol conversion. This procedure consisted in increasing the original pH of the hydrolysate to 7.0 with CaO and reducing it to 5.5 with H3PO4. Next, the hydrolysate was treated under adsorption conditions employing CDA powdered activated charcoal (1% for 30 min at 60ºC, 100 rpm and pH 2.5. The optimized xylitol volumetric productivity (0.50 g/L h corresponded to a D-xylose-to-xylitol conversion of 0.66 g/g.

J. M. Marton

2006-03-01

128

40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement...Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the...Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae on all food...

2010-07-01

129

Hydrogen Production from Paper Sludge Hydrolysate  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The main objective of this study was to develop a system for the production of “renewable” hydrogen. Paper sludge is a solid industrial waste yielding mainly cellulose, which can be used, after hydrolysis, as a feedstock in anaerobic fermentation by (hyper)thermophilic organisms, such as Thermotoga elfii and Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus. Tests on different medium compositions showed that both bacteria were able to produce hydrogen from paper sludge hydrolysate, but the amount of produced hydrogen and the requirement for other components differed. Hydrogen production by T. elfii strongly depended on the presence of yeast extract and salts. By contrast, C. saccharolyticus was less dependent on medium components but seemed to be inhibited by a component present in the sludge hydrolysate. Utilization of xylose was preferred over glucose by C. saccharolyticus.

Kádár, Zsófia; de Vrije, Truus

2003-01-01

130

The NILE Project — Advances in the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Materials into Ethanol Le projet NILE et la conversion des matériaux lignocellulosiques en éthanol  

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Full Text Available NILE ("New Improvements for Lignocellulosic Ethanol" was an integrated European project (2005-2010 devoted to the conversion of lignocellulosic raw materials to ethanol. The main objectives were to design novel enzymes suitable for the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose and new yeast strains able to efficiently converting all the sugars present in lignocellulose into ethanol. The project also included testing these new developments in an integrated pilot plant and evaluating the environmental and socio-economic impacts of implementing lignocellulosic ethanol on a large scale. Two model raw materials – spruce and wheat straw – both preconditioned with similar pretreatments, were used. Several approaches were explored to improve the saccharification of these pretreated raw materials such as searching for new efficient enzymes and enzyme engineering. Various genetic engineering methods were applied to obtain stable xylose- and arabinose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that tolerate the toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The pilot plant was able to treat 2 tons of dry matter per day, and hydrolysis and fermentation could be run successively or simultaneously. A global model integrating the supply chain was used to assess the performance of lignocellulosic ethanol from an economical and environmental perspective. It was found that directed evolution of a specific enzyme of the cellulolytic cocktail produced by the industrial fungus, Trichoderma reesei, and modification of the composition of this cocktail led to improvements of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated raw material. These results, however, were difficult to reproduce at a large scale. A substantial increase in the ethanol conversion yield and in specific ethanol productivity was obtained through a combination of metabolic engineering of yeast strains and fermentation process development. Pilot trials confirmed the good behaviour of the yeast strains in industrial conditions as well as the suitability of lignin residues as fuels. The ethanol cost and the greenhouse gas emissions were highly dependent on the supply chain but the best performing supply chains showed environmental and economic benefits. From a global standpoint, the results showed the necessity for an optimal integration of the process to co-develop all the steps of the process and to test the improvements in a flexible pilot plant, thus allowing the comparison of various configurations and their economic and environmental impacts to be determined. Le projet NILE, acronyme de "New Improvements for Lignocellulosic Ethanol", était un projet européen (2005-2010 consacré à la conversion des matières premières lignocellulosiques en éthanol. Ses principaux objectifs étaient de concevoir de nouvelles enzymes adaptées à l’hydrolyse de la cellulose en glucose et de nouvelles souches de levure capables de convertir efficacement tous les sucres présents dans la lignocellulose en éthanol. Une autre partie du projet consistait à tester ces nouveaux systèmes dans une installation pilote et à évaluer les impacts environnementaux et socio-économiques de la production et utilisation à grande échelle d’éthanol lignocellulosique. Deux matières premières modèles (l’épicéa et la paille de blé prétraitées de façon semblable, ont été étudiées. Différentes approches ont été tentées pour améliorer la saccharification de ces matières premières, par exemple, la recherche de nouvelles enzymes efficaces ou l’ingénierie d’enzymes. Plusieurs stratégies d’ingénierie génétique ont été utilisées pour obtenir des souches stables de Saccharomyces cerevisiae capables de fermenter le xylose et l’arabinose, et de tolérer les composés toxiques présents dans les hydrolysats lignocellulosiques. L’installation pilote pouvait traiter 2 tonnes de matières sèches par jour, et l’hydrolyse et la fermentation pouvaient être menées successivement ou simultanément. Un modèle global intégrant la chaîne d’approvisionn

Monot F.

2013-08-01

131

Evaluation of oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentability employing Pichia stipitis  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate obtained by diluted acid hydrolysis was employed as fermentation medium for Pichia stipitis cultivation. A comparison between the use of treated hydrolysate with 1% activated charcoal to reduce the toxic compounds generated during the hydrolysis process and untrea [...] ted hydrolysate as a control was conducted. In the cultures using treated hydrolysate the total consumption of glucose, low xylose consumption and ethanol and glycerol formation were observed. The medium formulated with untreated hydrolysate showed morphological cell modifications with consequently cell death, no ethanol formation and formation of glycerol as byproduct of fermentative process, probably as a response to stressful conditions to yeast due to presence of high concentration of toxic compounds. Thus, further studies are suggested in order to determine the best conditions for hydrolysis and detoxification of the hydrolysate to improve the fermentative performance of P. stipitis.

Luciana Cristina Silveira, Chaud; Débora Danielle Virgínio da, Silva; Rafael Taino de, Mattos; Maria das Graças de Almeida, Felipe.

132

Evaluation of oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentability employing Pichia stipitis  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate obtained by diluted acid hydrolysis was employed as fermentation medium for Pichia stipitis cultivation. A comparison between the use of treated hydrolysate with 1% activated charcoal to reduce the toxic compounds generated during the hydrolysis process and untrea [...] ted hydrolysate as a control was conducted. In the cultures using treated hydrolysate the total consumption of glucose, low xylose consumption and ethanol and glycerol formation were observed. The medium formulated with untreated hydrolysate showed morphological cell modifications with consequently cell death, no ethanol formation and formation of glycerol as byproduct of fermentative process, probably as a response to stressful conditions to yeast due to presence of high concentration of toxic compounds. Thus, further studies are suggested in order to determine the best conditions for hydrolysis and detoxification of the hydrolysate to improve the fermentative performance of P. stipitis.

Luciana Cristina Silveira, Chaud; Débora Danielle Virgínio da, Silva; Rafael Taino de, Mattos; Maria das Graças de Almeida, Felipe.

2012-10-01

133

Evaluation of oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentability employing Pichia stipitis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Oat hull hemicellulosic hydrolysate obtained by diluted acid hydrolysis was employed as fermentation medium for Pichia stipitis cultivation. A comparison between the use of treated hydrolysate with 1% activated charcoal to reduce the toxic compounds generated during the hydrolysis process and untreated hydrolysate as a control was conducted. In the cultures using treated hydrolysate the total consumption of glucose, low xylose consumption and ethanol and glycerol formation were observed. The medium formulated with untreated hydrolysate showed morphological cell modifications with consequently cell death, no ethanol formation and formation of glycerol as byproduct of fermentative process, probably as a response to stressful conditions to yeast due to presence of high concentration of toxic compounds. Thus, further studies are suggested in order to determine the best conditions for hydrolysis and detoxification of the hydrolysate to improve the fermentative performance of P. stipitis.

Luciana Cristina Silveira Chaud

2012-10-01

134

GENETICALLY MODIFIED LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feed-stocks is of growing interest worldwide in recent years. However, we are currently still facing significant technical challenges to make it economically feasible on an industrial scale. Genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass has provided a potential alternative to address such challenges. Some studies have shown that genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass can increase its yield, decreasing its enzymatic hydrolysis cost and altering i...

Qijun Wang; Shengdong Zhu

2010-01-01

135

PROTEIN HYDROLYSATES IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE: A BRIEF REVIEW  

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Protein can be hydrolyzed, producing small chains of amino acids called peptides. Several studies have shown that protein hydrolysates containing mostly di- and tripeptides are absorbed more rapidly than free form amino acids and much more rapidly than intact proteins. In addition, there is recent evidence that protein hydrolysate ingestion has strong insulinotropic effect. Thus, recovery sports drinks containing protein hydrolysates may be of great value

Manninen, Anssi H.

2004-01-01

136

PROTEIN HYDROLYSATES IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE: A BRIEF REVIEW  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Protein can be hydrolyzed, producing small chains of amino acids called peptides. Several studies have shown that protein hydrolysates containing mostly di- and tripeptides are absorbed more rapidly than free form amino acids and much more rapidly than intact proteins. In addition, there is recent evidence that protein hydrolysate ingestion has strong insulinotropic effect. Thus, recovery sports drinks containing protein hydrolysates may be of great value

Anssi H. Manninen

2004-06-01

137

Torrefaction of non-lignocellulose biomass waste  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

There have been major socio-economic and environmental impacts from the world's urban population overtaking the rural population in numbers. One of the impacts is that disposal of waste from densely populated urban areas has become a major concern. Sewage in urban centers must be collected centrally and disposed of appropriately. This disposal process must be ecologically sound and energy efficient. This paper presents the torrefaction of some non-lignocellulose biomass waste that was done to ascertain if this process could be as beneficial with such materials as it is with conventional lignocellulose biomass. Tests were conducted on digested and undigested sludge and on chicken litter from a municipality in Canada. The effects of the torrefaction process parameters, temperature and residence time, on torrefaction yield were analyzed. Under the same identical conditions, torrefaction of three lignocellulose biomasses, i.e. switch grass, coffee husk and wood pellet, was also carried out for reference purposes. This study uncovered a potential option for the production of composite waste pellets.

Dhungana, A. [Dalhousie University (Canada); Dutta, A. [University of Guelph (Canada); Basu, P. [Greenfield Research Incorporated (Canada)

2012-02-15

138

The road to commercial lignocellulosic ethanol  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The transportation sector is the second largest energy user and the largest oil user. It has been estimated that by 2050, there will be 2.3 billion additional cars worldwide, of which 1.9 billion will be in developing countries. Global ethanol production is set to grow 12-fold between 2006 and 2030. Novozymes is a world leader in industrial enzymes and microorganisms. This presentation highlighted their commitment to the ethanol industry, with particular reference to its expertise in starch-based ethanol enzymes. The company works on various feedstocks and technologies with different partners in the United States, China, Brazil and Europe in order to enable the ethanol industry to commercialize lignocellulosic ethanol through cost efficient bioconversion. Novozymes processes are developed and integrated to make sustainable lignocellulosic ethanol production competitive with gasoline in the near term. Examples of Novozymes work on enzyme improvements were presented along with process developments. Full cost modeling demonstrated how these developments help bring down the cost of lignocellulosic ethanol to a cost competitive level. tabs., figs.

Fuglsang, C.C. [Novozymes Inc., Davis, CA (United States); Smith, M.T. [Novozymes North America, Franklinton, NC (United States); Mogensen, J. [Novozymes A/S, Bagsvaerd (Denmark); Lauridsen, C. [Novozymes China, Beijing (China)

2009-07-01

139

Can lignocellulosic hydrocarbon liquids rival lignocellulose-derived ethanol as a future transport fuel?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Although transport fuels are currently obtained mainly from petroleum, alternative fuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass (LB have drawn much attention in recent years in light of the limited reserves of crude oil and the associated environmental issues. Lignocellulosic ethanol (LE and lignocellulosic hydrocarbons (LH are two typical representatives of the LB-derived transport fuels. This editorial systematically compares LE and LB from production to their application in transport fuels. It can be demonstrated that LH has many advantages over LE relative to such uses. However, most recent studies on the production of the LB-derived transport fuels have focused on LE production. Hence, it is strongly recommended that more research should be aimed at developing an efficient and economically viable process for industrial LH production.

Yao Ding

2012-11-01

140

Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ? 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
141

Effect of various factors on ethanol yields from lignocellulosic biomass by Thermoanaerobacterium AK??.  

Science.gov (United States)

The ethanol production capacity from sugars and lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates (HL) by Thermoanaerobacterium strain AK(17) was studied in batch cultures. The strain converts various carbohydrates to, acetate, ethanol, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Ethanol yields on glucose and xylose were 1.5 and 1.1 mol/mol sugars, respectively. Increased initial glucose concentration inhibited glucose degradation and end product formation leveled off at 30 mM concentrations. Ethanol production from 5 g L(-1) of complex biomass HL (grass, hemp, wheat straw, newspaper, and cellulose) (Whatman paper) pretreated with acid (0.50% H(2) SO(4)), base (0.50% NaOH), and without acid/base (control) and the enzymes Celluclast and Novozyme 188 (0.1 mL g(-1) dw; 70 and 25 U g(-1) of Celluclast and Novozyme 188, respectively) was investigated. Highest ethanol yields (43.0 mM) were obtained on cellulose but lowest on hemp leafs (3.6 mM). Chemical pretreatment increased ethanol yields substantially from lignocellulosic biomass but not from cellulose. The influence of various factors (HL, enzyme, and acid/alkaline concentrations) on end-product formation from 5 g L(-1) of grass and cellulose was further studied to optimize ethanol production. Highest ethanol yields (5.5 and 8.6 mM ethanol g(-1) grass and cellulose, respectively) were obtained at very low HL concentrations (2.5 g L(-1)); with 0.25% acid/alkali (v/v) and 0.1 mL g(-1) enzyme concentrations. Inhibitory effects of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural during glucose fermentation, revealed a total inhibition in end product formation from glucose at 4 and 6 g L(-1), respectively. PMID:22012653

Almarsdottir, Arnheidur Ran; Sigurbjornsdottir, Margret Audur; Orlygsson, Johann

2012-03-01

142

Quantification of solubilized hemicellulose from pretreated lignocellulose by acid hydrolysis and high-performance liquid chromatography  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An investigation of the acid hydrolysis and HPLC analysis have been carried out in order to optimise the quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose fraction from wheat straw lignocellulose after pretreatment. Different acid hydrolyses have been performed to identify which conditions (concentrations of acid and hydrolysis time) gave the maximal quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose (measured as monosaccharides). Four different sugars were identified: xylose, arabinose, glucose and galactose. Some hydrolyses were carried out on aqueous samples and some using freeze-dried samples. The best overall hydrolysis was obtained by treatment of an aqueous sample with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. These conditions were not optimal for the determination of glucose, which was estimated by using a correction factor. A purification step was needed following the acid hydrolysis, and included a sulfate precipitation by barium hydroxide and elimination of remaining ions by mixed-bed ion exchange. The level of barium hydroxide addition significantly reduced the recovery of the sugars. Thus, lower than equivalent amounts of barium hydroxide were added in the purification step. For monosaccharide analysis two different HPLC columns, i.e. Aminex HPX-87P and HPX-87H with different resin ionic forms, lead (Pb{sup 2+}) and hydrogen (H{sup +}), respectively. The lead column (HPX-87P) separated all four sugars in the acid hydrolyzates, but sample purification required the removal of all interfering impurities, which resulted in poor reproducibility and a sugar recovery below 50%. The hydrogen column (HPX-87H) separated only glucose, xylose and arabinose, whereas galactose was not separated from xylose; however, the column was less sensitive towards impurities and gave improved recovery and reproducibility. Therefore, the hydrogen column (HPX-87H) was chosen for routine quantification of the hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. (au) 11 tabs., 8 ills., 19 refs.

Bjerre, A.B.; Ploeger, A.; Simonsen, T.; Woidemann, A.; Schmidt, A.S.

1996-11-01

143

Antioxidant Activity of Protein Hydrolysates of Fish and Chicken Bones  

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Argentine croaker (Umbrina canosai) and chicken (Gallus domesticus) bones were hydrolyzed with different proteases (Flavourzyme, ?-Chymotrypsin and Trypsin) in order to obtain peptides whit antioxidant activity. The hydrolysates showed different degrees of hydrolysis and antioxidant activity. The antioxidant power of the hydrolysates was evaluated through inhibition of the peroxidation of linoleic acid, hydroxyl radical scavenging, DPPH free radical scavenging, ABTS free radical scavenging a...

Centenaro, G. S.; Mellado, M. S.; Prentice-herna?ndez, C.

2011-01-01

144

TESTING OF THE EFFICIENCY OF SOME ENZYMATIC MIXTURES, CONCERNING THE CONVERSION OF SEVERAL LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS’ SOURSES, TO REDUCING SUGARS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Three lignocelluloses substrates have been used, as following: Mischantus, Maize stalk and Wheat bran, in order to obtain fermentescible sugars, which will be transformed into bioethanol. The substrates were hydrolysed using commercial enzymes: MethaPlus (b-glucanase, xylanase, cellulase, Veron 191 (xylanase, Hep C (cellulase. The hydrolysis was performed at 550 C, for 20 h, at pH = 5,5. The best results were obtained by using MethaPlus enzyme. The efficiency of hydrolysis was 110.80 % for Miscanthus, 126.15 % for maize stalk and 118.76 % for wheat bran, reported to the control. The most enhanced quantities of reducing sugars were obtained in maize stalk, namely: 126.15 % using MethaPlus, 112.07 % using Veron 191 and 113.52 % using Hep C. The wheat bran was hydrolysed with enzymatic mixtures, for emphasizing the reducing sugars’ grow, coming from residual starch’s content (flour. In comparison to the control, the efficiency of hydrolysis was of: 181.004 % for MethaPlus-Veron M4 mixture, 168.83 % for MethaPlus-Veron 393 mixture, 205.86 % for MethaPlus-BG a-malt mixture and of 176.57 % for MethaPlus-Veron MX mixture. The enzymatic mixture which contains BG a-malt was the most productive, the hydrolysis efficiency being superior to all other variants.

RADIANA TAMBA-BEREHOIU

2013-12-01

145

Antioxidant Activity of Protein Hydrolysates of Fish and Chicken Bones  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Argentine croaker (Umbrina canosai and chicken (Gallus domesticus bones were hydrolyzed with different proteases (Flavourzyme, ?-Chymotrypsin and Trypsin in order to obtain peptides whit antioxidant activity. The hydrolysates showed different degrees of hydrolysis and antioxidant activity. The antioxidant power of the hydrolysates was evaluated through inhibition of the peroxidation of linoleic acid, hydroxyl radical scavenging, DPPH free radical scavenging, ABTS free radical scavenging and reducing power. The hydrolysates of the fish (FF and chicken (CF bones produced with Flavourzyme had high activity of lipid peroxidation inhibition (77.3 and 61.6%, respectively and moderate DPPH free radical scavenging, ABTS scavenging and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. The fraction <3000 Da was the main constituent of the six hydrolysates followed by the fraction <1000 Da. The results of this study suggest that protein hydrolysates of fish and chicken bones are good sources of natural antioxidants. FF showed better performance e can be used as antioxidant substance.

G.S. Centenaro

2011-08-01

146

SOIL FUNGI: POTENTIAL MYCOREMEDIATORS OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC WASTE  

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Full Text Available The continual expansion of urbanization and industrial activity has led to the accumulation of a large quantity of lignocellulosic residues throughout the world. In particular, large quantities of paper and bagasse are largely produced in Visakhapatnam. In this work we present the study of the degradability of these substrates with fungi. Three cultures of soil fungi were screened for their ability to degrade cellulose. Aspergillus flavus degraded the most, as shown by the highest CO2 release. Further, Aspergillus flavus was tested with the standard fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium for cellulose degradation, which showed nearly equivalent potential.

Y. Avasn Maruthi

2010-05-01

147

Affinity purification of copper chelating peptides from chickpea protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Chickpea protein hydrolysates obtained with alcalase and flavourzyme were used for purification of copper chelating peptides by affinity chromatography using copper immobilized on solid supports. The chelating activity of purified peptides was indirectly measured by the inhibition of beta-carotene oxidation in the presence of copper. Two protein hydrolysates, obtained after 10 and 100 min of hydrolysis, were the most inhibitory of beta-carotene oxidation. Purified copper chelating peptides from these protein hydrolysates contained 19.7 and 35.1% histidine, respectively, in comparison to 2.7 and 2.6% in the protein hydrolysates. Chelating peptides from hydrolysate obtained after 10 min of hydrolysis were the most antioxidative being 8.3 times more antioxidative than the hydrolysate, while chelating peptides purified from protein hydrolysate obtained after 100 min were 3.1 times more antioxidative than its hydrolysate. However, the histidine content was higher in peptides derived from the 100 min hydrolysate (19.7 against 35.1% in 10 min hydrolysate), indicating that this amino acid is not the only factor involved in the antioxidative activity, and other factors such as peptide size or amino acid sequence are also determinant. This manuscript shows that affinity chromatography is a useful procedure for purification of copper chelating peptides. This method can be extended to other metals of interest in nutrition, such as calcium, iron, or zinc. Purified chelating peptides, in addition to their antioxidative properties, may also be useful in food mineral fortification for increasing the bioavailability of these metals. PMID:17428066

Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, Maria M; Girón-Calle, Julio; Alaiz, Manuel; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

2007-05-16

148

Mineral and vitamin content of beef, chicken, and turkey hydrolysates mineral and vitamin content of protein hydrolysates  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the concentration of vitamins and minerals in meat protein hydrolysates. Calcium, phosphorus and iron were analyzed by inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry; vitamin C was analyzed by the reduction of cupric ions and vitamins B1 and B2 by fluorescence. Regarding minerals, the beef hydrolysate (BH had more iron than the turkey hydrolysate (TH and the chicken hydrolysate (CH; TH had a little more phosphorus. BH had the largest amount of vitamin C, and similar amounts of vitamins B1 and B2. The amount of these nutrients found in the hydrolysates suggests that it is possible to use them to enrich special dietary formulations.

Maria Elisabeth Machado Pinto e Silva

2008-01-01

149

Mineral and vitamin content of beef, chicken, and turkey hydrolysates mineral and vitamin content of protein hydrolysates  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The purpose of this study was to assess the concentration of vitamins and minerals in meat protein hydrolysates. Calcium, phosphorus and iron were analyzed by inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry; vitamin C was analyzed by the reduction of cupric ions and vitamins B1 and B2 b [...] y fluorescence. Regarding minerals, the beef hydrolysate (BH) had more iron than the turkey hydrolysate (TH) and the chicken hydrolysate (CH); TH had a little more phosphorus. BH had the largest amount of vitamin C, and similar amounts of vitamins B1 and B2. The amount of these nutrients found in the hydrolysates suggests that it is possible to use them to enrich special dietary formulations.

Maria Elisabeth Machado, Pinto e Silva; Ive, Paton; Marlene, Trigo; Maria Carolina B. C., von Atzingen; Carmem S., Kira; Emiko I., Inomata; Leda C. A., Lamardo.

150

Grass lignocellulose: strategies to overcome recalcitrance.  

Science.gov (United States)

Grass lignocelluloses are limited in bioconversion by aromatic constituents, which include both lignins and phenolic acids esters. Histochemistry, ultraviolet absorption microspectrophotometry, and response to microorganisms and specific enzymes have been used to determine the significance of aromatics toward recalcitrance. Coniferyl lignin appears to be the most effective limitation to biodegradation, existing in xylem cells of vascular tissues; cell walls with syringyl lignin, for example, leaf sclerenchyma, are less recalcitrant. Esterified phenolic acids, i.e., ferulic and p-coumaric acids, often constitute a major chemical limitation in nonlignified cell walls to biodegradation in grasses, especially warm-season species. Methods to improve biodegradation in grasses, especially warm-season species. Methods to improve biodegradability through modification of aromatics include: plant breeding, use of lignin-degrading white-rot fungi, and addition of esterases. Plant breeding for new cultivars has been especially effective for nutritionally improved forages, for example, bermudagrasses. In laboratory studies, selective white-rot fungi that lack cellulases delignified the lignocellulosic materials and improved fermentation of residual carbohydrates. Phenolic acid esterases released p-coumaric and ferulic acids for potential coproducts, improved the available sugars for fermentation, and improved biodegradation. The separation and removal of the aromatic components for coproducts, while enhancing the availability of sugars for bioconversion, could improve the economics of bioconversion. PMID:18478372

Akin, Danny E

2007-04-01

151

Enzymic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials: I. Models for the hydrolysis process--a theoretical study.  

Science.gov (United States)

At the end of an enzymic hydrolysis process involving a solid lignocellulosic substrate, enzymes are found both in solution and absorbed to the substrate residue. Removal of residue from the system will result in loss of some of the enzymes, the extent of which will depend on the design of the process. To minimize enzyme loss, a study has been conducted in which six process models have been formulated and an enzyme loss function derived for each model based on the total amount of enzymes lost through residue removal. Model 1 is a reference model, characterized by an uninterrupted hydrolysis throughout the entire hydrolysis period. The residue is then washed in order to recover both sugar and adsorbed enzymes before the residue is discarded. Models 2-6 are all characterized by the removal of hydrolysate three times during the process, recirculation of dissolved and adsorbed enzymes to various points in the process and selection of a stage at which the residue is removed. The following conclusions could be drawn from the derived enzyme loss functions: Increased enzyme adsorption leads to increased enzyme loss.The enzyme loss decreases if the solid residue is removed late in the process.Both adsorbed and dissolved enzymes should be introduced at the starting point of the process. This is particularly important for dissolved enzymes. Three models were chosen for experimental studies, which are reported in a second, accompanying article. The experimental results obtained are compared with the theoretical study reported here. PMID:18600743

Vallander, L; Eriksson, K E

1991-06-20

152

Engineering furfural tolerance in Escherichia coli improves the fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars into renewable chemicals.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pretreatments such as dilute acid at elevated temperature are effective for the hydrolysis of pentose polymers in hemicellulose and also increase the access of enzymes to cellulose fibers. However, the fermentation of resulting syrups is hindered by minor reaction products such as furfural from pentose dehydration. To mitigate this problem, four genetic traits have been identified that increase furfural tolerance in ethanol-producing Escherichia coli LY180 (strain W derivative): increased expression of fucO, ucpA, or pntAB and deletion of yqhD. Plasmids and integrated strains were used to characterize epistatic interactions among traits and to identify the most effective combinations. Furfural resistance traits were subsequently integrated into the chromosome of LY180 to construct strain XW129 (LY180 ?yqhD ackA::PyadC'fucO-ucpA) for ethanol. This same combination of traits was also constructed in succinate biocatalysts (Escherichia coli strain C derivatives) and found to increase furfural tolerance. Strains engineered for resistance to furfural were also more resistant to the mixture of inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysates, confirming the importance of furfural as an inhibitory component. With resistant biocatalysts, product yields (ethanol and succinate) from hemicellulose syrups were equal to control fermentations in laboratory media without inhibitors. The combination of genetic traits identified for the production of ethanol (strain W derivative) and succinate (strain C derivative) may prove useful for other renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. PMID:23431191

Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Lee, James Y; York, Sean W; Zheng, Huabao; Mullinnix, Michael T; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, Lonnie O

2013-03-01

153

A novel fermentation strategy for removing the key inhibitor acetic acid and efficiently utilizing the mixed sugars from lignocellulosic hydrolysates  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As part of preliminary research efforts, we have completed several experiments which demonstrate 'proof of concept.' These experiments addressed the following three questions: (1) Can a synthetic mixed sugar solution of glucose and xylose be efficiently consumed using the multi-organism approach? (2) Can this approach be used to accumulate a model product? (3) Can this approach be applied to the removal of an inhibitor, acetate, selectively from mixtures of xylose and glucose? To answer the question of whether this multi-organism approach can effectively consume synthetic mixed sugar solutions, we first tested substrate-selective uptake using two strains, one unable to consume glucose and one unable to consume xylose. The xylose-selective strain ALS998 has mutations in the three genes involved in glucose uptake, rendering it unable to consume glucose: ptsG codes for the Enzyme IICB{sup Glc} of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for carbohydrate transport (Postma et al., 1993), manZ codes for the IID{sup Man} domain of the mannose PTS permease (Huber, 1996), glk codes for glucokinase (Curtis and Epstein 1975) We also constructed strain ALS1008 which has a knockout in the xylA gene encoding for xylose isomerase, rendering ALS1008 unable to consume xylose. Two batch experiments and one continuous bioprocess were completed. In the first experiment, each strain was grown separately in a defined medium of 8 g/L xylose and 15 g/L glucose which represented xylose and glucose concentrations that can be generated by actual biomass. In the second experiment, the two strains were grown together in batch in the same defined, mixed-sugar medium. In a third experiment, we grew the strains continuously in a 'chemostat', except that we shifted the concentrations of glucose and xylose periodically to observe how the system would respond. (For example, we shifted the glucose concentration suddenly from 15 g/L to 30 g/L in the feed).

Mark A. Eiteman PHD; Elliot Altman Phd

2009-02-11

154

Production of Ethanol from Cocoa Pod Hydrolysate  

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Full Text Available Cocoa pod (Theobroma cacao L. hydrolysate was hydrolyzed into glucose using hydrochloric, sulphuric and nitric acids, respectively. The concentration of each acid was set at 0.25 M, 0.50 M, 0.75 M, 1.00 M and 1.25 M. They were treated under two different temperatures and time at 75?C and 90?C for 2 h and 4 h, respectively. The results showed that hydrolysis in 1.00 M of hydrochloric acid at 75?C for 4 h had produced the highest glucose content of 30.7% w/v compared to all others acids treated under similar conditions. The pod’s hydolysate was then fermented in batch culture using Saccharomyces cerevisiae for 48 h at 30?C. A maximum ethanol production of 17.3%v/v was achieved after 26 h of fermentation time.

Othman Abd Samah

2011-07-01

155

Correlations between biochemical characteristics and foam-forming and -stabilizing ability of whey and casein hydrolysates  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Whey protein and casein were hydrolyzed with 11 commercially available enzymes. Foam properties of 44 samples were measured and were related to biochemical properties of the hydrolysates using statistical data analysis. All casein hydrolysates formed high initial foam levels, whereas whey hydrolysates differed in their foam-forming abilities. Regression analysis using the molecular weight distribution of whey hydrolysates as predictors showed that the hydrolysate fraction containing peptides ...

Ven, C.; Bont, D. B. A.; Voragen, A. G. J.

2002-01-01

156

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

Science.gov (United States)

An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

1999-01-01

157

3-year midterm results following hydrolyserTM thrombolysis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Purpose: Data of a three-year follow-up after mechanical thrombolysis with the Hydrolyser catheter were evaluated. Patients have otherwise been treated by local thrombolysis. Method: 35 patients were treated by thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty, aspiration, local thrombolysis, and stent placement, if necessary. Morphological results following Hydrolyser treatment and additional treatment were evaluated. Results: Following Hydrolyser treatment a significant reduction of the degree and length of the occlusion was observed. Primary clinical success was 80%. Patency rate after 3 years was 0.5. 23% of all patients died in the follow-up period. Conclusion: The Hydrolyser treatment is a relevant alternative to local thrombolysis. This method reduces the time of treatment. The authors favor the lateral opening of the catheter to remove mural thrombus. (orig.)

158

Lignocellulose-degrading enzymes from termites and their symbiotic microbiota.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulose-the dry matter of plants, or "plant biomass"-digestion is of increasing interest in organismal metabolism research, specifically the conversion of biomass into biofuels. Termites efficiently decompose lignocelluloses, and studies on lignocellulolytic systems may elucidate mechanisms of efficient lignocellulose degradation in termites as well as offer novel enzyme sources, findings which have significant potential industrial applications. Recent progress in metagenomic and metatranscriptomic research has illuminated the diversity of lignocellulolytic enzymes within the termite gut. Here, we review state-of-the-art research on lignocellulose-degrading systems in termites, specifically cellulases, xylanases, and lignin modification enzymes produced by termites and their symbiotic microbiota. We also discuss recent investigations into heterologous overexpression of lignocellulolytic enzymes from termites and their symbionts. PMID:23623853

Ni, Jinfeng; Tokuda, Gaku

2013-11-01

159

Efficacy of a Fish Protein Hydrolysate in Malnourished Children  

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Protein hydrolysates are good nutritional supplements as their bioactive ingredients can be easily absorbed and utilized for various metabolic activities. A fish protein hydrolysate (Amizate), prepared by a unique process of hydrolysis has the advantage of high di/tri peptide content (<10 kDa) along with essential and non essential amino acids, micronutrients and vitamins. The effect of Amizate on malnourished children (6–8 years, a total of 438) of Grade I and II (Gomez’s classificatio...

Nesse, Knut Olav; Nagalakshmi, A. P.; Marimuthu, P.; Singh, Mamta

2011-01-01

160

Processing Lignocellulosic Biomass into Ethanol - Implications of High Solid Loadings  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Fuel ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to provide a sustainable replacement for traditional oil-based fuels. This dissertation assesses the processing of three different lignocellulosic materials – spruce, wheat straw and giant reed – at industrially relevant solid loadings. The work is divided into two main parts. The first part deals with the degradation of biomass to sugars, focusing on the complex rheological behavior of biomass slurries and the connection to mixi...

Palmqvist, Benny

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Antioxidant Effect and Water-Holding Capacity of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Seed Protein Hydrolysates  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in-vitro pepsin and pancreatin digestion of proteins extracted from Roselle seed on the production of bioactive peptides. Defatted Roselle seed flour was used to extract different protein fractions namely globulin, albumin and glutelin. The proteins were digested using pepsin (1 h followed by pancreatin (1 h in order to produce hydrolysates with good antioxidant activity. The prepared hydrolysates were as effective as antioxidants in model systems, in scavenging of free radicals and acting as reducing agents. This effect was concentration-dependent and was also influenced by the type of protein fraction. The albumin fraction hydrolysates prepared showed the highest antioxidant activity followed by Glutelin and Globulin hydrolysates respectively (Albumin hydrolysates>Glutelin hydrolysates>Globulin hydrolysates. All of the prepared hydrolysates were also found to be effective in enhancing water-holding capacity and cooking yield in a meat model system. Albumin hydrolysates showed the highest improved meat cooking ability followed by Glutelin and Globulin respectively (Albumin hydrolysates>Glutelin hydrolysates>Globulin hydrolysates. The molecular weight distribution analysis of the hydrolysates was determined and most of the peptides were found between 1000 Da and below. The study findings suggest that Roselle seed protein hydrolysates can be applied as functional food ingredients and that their composition determines their functional properties thus their potential application in the food and feed industries.

Fatoumata Tounkara

2013-06-01

162

Collagen hydrolysate inhibits zymosan-induced inflammation.  

Science.gov (United States)

During the past years, evidence accumulated showing that glycine comprises anti-inflammatory activities. These effects occur, at least in part, via the activation of glycine-gated chloride channels (GlyR). Glycine is one of the major structural units of collagen, making up about 30% of the amino acids. This study aims to investigate the anti-inflammatory potential of collagen hydrolysate (CH) using the zymosan-induced ear-skin inflammation mouse model. After oral intake of 12.5, 25 or 50 mg CH the plasma levels of glycine increased in a concentration-dependent manner. CH was able to counteract zymosan-induced ear-skin inflammation locally (ear swelling) as well as systemically (IL-6 production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood cells). The LPS-stimulated IL-6 production in whole blood correlated positively with the ear swelling response. This correlation was abolished by strychnine (a glycine receptor antagonist), indicating the involvement of GlyR. Collectively, these data show that CH is able to modulate inflammatory responses both locally as well as systemically. This effect might be constituted by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production via GlyR. PMID:23788175

Hartog, Anita; Cozijnsen, Miranda; de Vrij, Gerrit; Garssen, Johan

2013-07-01

163

Pork fat hydrolysed by Staphylococcus xylosus  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Staphylococcus xylosus is used as a starter culture in the production of fermented sausages. Its ability to hydrolyse pork fat was investigated. Within 15 days of incubation an interaction of bacterial growth, lipase production and lipase activity in a pork fat containing medium caused liberation of fatty acids. The free fatty acids were determined both qualitatively and quantitatively. The effects of incubtion temperature and pH were studied using Response Surface Methodology. Within the area of interest for the producion of fermented sausages, no local maximum or minimum liberation of fatty acids was found. A rise in pH increased the amount of free fatty acids. Below pH 5.0, the amount of liberated fatty acids was insignificant although the viable count was >10+6 cell/ g emulsion. Of the two factors, pH was most influential in affecting the amount of free fatty acids. A rise in temperaure only slightly increased the amount of free fatty acids and hydrolysis took place at all temperatures from 14°C to 27°C. The strain liberates the fatty acids in a nonspecific way, in about the same proportions as those in which they occur in the pork fat.

Stahnke, Louise Heller; Zeuthen, Peter

1993-01-01

164

BIOCONVERSION OF WATER HYACINTH HYDROLYSATE INTO ETHANOL  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The fast growing aquatic weed water hyacinth, which is available almost year-round in the tropics and subtropics, was utilized as the chief source of cellulose for production of fuel ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. Fungal cellulases produced on-site by utilizing acid-alkali pretreated water hyacinth as the substrate were used as the crude enzyme source for hydrolysis of identically pretreated biomass. Four different modes of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation were trialed in the present study for optimization of the yield of ethanol. Two common yeasts viz., Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pachysolen tannophilus, were used for fermentation of hexose and pentose sugars in the hydrolysate. Significant enhancement of concentration (8.3 g/L and yield (0.21 g/g of ethanol was obtained through a prefermentation hydrolysis-simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (PH-SSF process, over the other three processes viz., separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF, and single batch bioconversion (SBB by utilizing fungal culture broth with and without filtration as crude enzyme source.

Sunita Bandopadhyay Mukhopadhyay

2010-04-01

165

Sustainable Process Design of Lignocellulose based Biofuel  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Worldwide energy demand has increased steadily as the world population has grown and more countries have become industrialized. The major energy sources of the world still depend on fossil fuels, which are also the main sources for carbon dioxide emission. As the fossil fuels always pass through a combustion processing step, carbondioxide and other important greenhouse gases are released. This is considered non-renewable and non-sustainable energy and may be one of the major causes of global warming and therefore, climate change concerns coupled with high oil prices. This isdriving efforts to increase the production and use of alternative and sustainable energy sources as rapidly as possible. Biofuel is a type of alternative energy that can be produced from many sources including sugar substances (such as sugarcane juice and molasses), starchy materials (such as corn and cassava), and lignocellulosic materials such as agricultural residual, straw and wood chips, the residual from wood industry. However, thosesugar and starchy materials can be used not only to make biofuels but they are also food sources. Thus, lignocellulosic materials are interesting feed-stocls as they are inexpensive, abundantly available, and are also non-food crops. In this respect, Cassava rhizome has several characteristics that make it a potential feedstock for fuel ethanol production. It has high content of cellulose and hemicelluloses . The objective of this paper is to present a study focused on the sustainable process design of bioethanol production from cassava rhizome using various computer aided tools through a systematic and effiicient work-flow, The study includes process simulation, sustainability analysis, economic evaluation and life cycle assessment (LCA) according to a well-defined workflow that guarantees the deermination of sustainable process options, if they exist. . The paper will highlight an improved alternative process design compared to a base case (published) design in terms of production cost, waste, energy usage and environmental impacts, criteria that are asociated with sustainable process design. The final process design includes 39 unit operations, has a capacity of 150,000 L/day and produces dry ethanol (approximately 13.0% of cassava rhizome is converted to ethanol)

Gani, Rafiqul

166

40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...  

Science.gov (United States)

...2010-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces...Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces...biochemical pesticide Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces...used for the management of plant diseases. [69 FR...

2010-07-01

167

40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...  

Science.gov (United States)

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces...Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces...for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from...

2010-07-01

168

Amylase binding to starch granules under hydrolysing and non-hydrolysing conditions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although considerable information is available about amylolysis rate, extent and pattern of granular starches, the underlying mechanisms of enzyme action and interactions are not fully understood, partly due to the lack of direct visualisation of enzyme binding and subsequent hydrolysis of starch granules. In the present study, ?-amylase (AA) from porcine pancreas was labelled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC) fluorescent dye with maintenance of significant enzyme activity. The binding of FITC/TRITC-AA conjugate to the surface and interior of granules was studied under both non-hydrolysing (0°C) and hydrolysing (37°C) conditions with confocal microscopy. It was observed that enzyme binding to maize starch granules under both conditions was more homogenous compared with potato starch. Enzyme molecules appear to preferentially bind to the granules or part of granules that are more susceptible to enzymic degradation. The specificity is such that fresh enzyme added after a certain time of incubation binds at the same location as previously bound enzyme. By visualising the enzyme location during binding and hydrolysis, detailed information is provided regarding the heterogeneity of granular starch digestion. PMID:25256464

Dhital, Sushil; Warren, Frederick J; Zhang, Bin; Gidley, Michael J

2014-11-26

169

Preprocessing Moist Lignocellulosic Biomass for Biorefinery Feedstocks  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Biomass preprocessing is one of the primary operations in the feedstock assembly system of a lignocellulosic biorefinery. Preprocessing is generally accomplished using industrial grinders to format biomass materials into a suitable biorefinery feedstock for conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Many factors affect machine efficiency and the physical characteristics of preprocessed biomass. For example, moisture content of the biomass as received from the point of production has a significant impact on overall system efficiency and can significantly affect the characteristics (particle size distribution, flowability, storability, etc.) of the size-reduced biomass. Many different grinder configurations are available on the market, each with advantages under specific conditions. Ultimately, the capacity and/or efficiency of the grinding process can be enhanced by selecting the grinder configuration that optimizes grinder performance based on moisture content and screen size. This paper discusses the relationships of biomass moisture with respect to preprocessing system performance and product physical characteristics and compares data obtained on corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw as model feedstocks during Vermeer HG 200 grinder testing. During the tests, grinder screen configuration and biomass moisture content were varied and tested to provide a better understanding of their relative impact on machine performance and the resulting feedstock physical characteristics and uniformity relative to each crop tested.

Neal Yancey; Christopher T. Wright; Craig Conner; J. Richard Hess

2009-06-01

170

Spent fuel cask  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In a spent fuel cask, buffer members having an earthquake proof performance are disposed at the lower surface of a support structural members. In addition, buffer members having an earthquake proof performance are disposed between a basket support and a cask main body. Further, a spring support mechanism is disposed in the inside of the basket. Alternatively, a damper having viscous resistance is disposed. Since the acceleration exerted on spent fuels in the main body of the spent fuel cask and spent fuels in the cask is reduced during earthquakes or during transportation, the collision of the spent fuels and the basket is prevented, or even if they should collide, the colliding force is moderated. Upon occurrence of earthquakes or during transportation of spent fuel cask and operation of a crane for the spent fuel cask, the collision of the spent fuels contained in the spent fuel cask and the basket can be prevented, or the colliding force by the collision can be moderated, to improve the integrity. (N.H.)

171

Spent fuel integral experiments  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A series of parallel spent fuel integral experiments are underway at Battelle-Columbus. These experiments are operational in the Battelle hot cell facility and are designed to provide information on effects of cladding degradation on the release of radionuclides from spent fuel waste forms and on combined effects interactions between spent fuel waste forms, the waste package, and the surrounding repository environment. To accomplish these objectives, the integral experiments have been designed the emulate characteristics of repository environments for spent fuel materials in deep-mined repositories in tuff, basalt, and granite media

172

Desalting Fish Skin Protein Hydrolysates Using Macroporous Adsorption Resin  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Macroporous Adsorption Resin (MAR DA 201-C was used to desalt different Fish Skin Protein Hydrolysates (FSPHs. The FSPHs were obtained by hydrolysis of fish skin using Alcalase in a batch reactor a 60°C and pH 8.25. The ash was removed by adsorbing FSPHs onto MAR. Desorption was achieved by washing with alcohol at different concentrations. Ash content of the FSPHs was reduced from 4.69-5.57 to 1.07-2.48% range. The protein content was enriched from 89.07-90.82 to 94.89-96.38% range. MAR has good hydrolysate recoveries. The use of MAR showed promising results in decolourization and fishy flavour reduction. Nile tilapia and Nile perch skin protein hydrolysates were moderately bitter compared to Grass carp skin protein hydrolysates. The bitter taste in FSPHs was reduced to slightly detectable levels by our sensor panel. The hydrolysates had relatively low molecular weight. The process of applying MAR to desalt and debitter FSPHs is feasible.

Joseph Wasswa

2007-01-01

173

Physiological Importance and Mechanisms of Protein Hydrolysate Absorption  

Science.gov (United States)

Understanding opportunities to maximize the efficient digestion and assimilation by production animals of plant- and animal-derived protein products is critical for farmers, nutritionists, and feed manufacturers to sustain and expand the affordable production of high quality animal products for human consumption. The challenge to nutritionists is to match gastrointestinal tract load to existing or ­inducible digestive and absorptive capacities. The challenge to feed manufacturers is to develop products that are efficient substrates for digestion, absorption, and/or both events. Ultimately, the efficient absorption of digesta proteins depends on the mediated passage (transport) of protein hydrosylate products as dipeptides and unbound amino acids across the lumen- and blood-facing membranes of intestinal absorptive cells. Data testing the relative efficiency of supplying protein as hydrolysates or specific dipeptides versus as free amino acids, and the response of animals in several physiological states to feeding of protein hydrolysates, are presented and reviewed in this chapter. Next, data describing the transport mechanisms responsible for absorbing protein hydrolysate digestion products, and the known and putative regulation of these mechanisms by their substrates (small peptides) and hormones are presented and reviewed. Several conclusions are drawn regarding the efficient use of protein hydrolysate-based diets for particular physiological states, the economically-practical application of which likely will depend on technological advances in the manufacture of protein hydrolysate products.

Zhanghi, Brian M.; Matthews, James C.

174

Lupine protein hydrolysates inhibit enzymes involved in the inflammatory pathway.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lupine protein hydrolysates (LPHs) were obtained from a lupine protein isolate (LPI) by enzymatic hydrolysis using two proteases, Izyme AL and Alcalase 2.4 L, and their potential anti-inflammatory capacities were studied by determining their in vitro inhibition of the following enzymes that are involved in the inflammatory process: phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), thrombin, and transglutaminase (TG). The strongest inhibitory activities toward PLA2 and TG were found in the hydrolysates obtained by hydrolysis with Izyme and subsequently with Alcalase, with more than 70% inhibition obtained in some cases. All of the hydrolysates tested inhibited more than 60% of the COX-2 activity. In no case did the percentage of thrombin activity inhibition exceed 40%. The best inhibitory activities were found in the LPH obtained after 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase and in the LPH obtained after 60 min of hydrolysis with Izyme followed by 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase. Enzyme kinetic analyses were conducted to determine the Km and Vmax parameters of these two hydrolysates using the Lineweaver-Burk equation. Both hydrolysates competitively inhibited the thrombin and PLA2 activities. In the case of COX-2 and TG, the inhibition appeared to be the mixed type. PMID:24423513

Millán-Linares, María del Carmen; Yust, María del Mar; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

2014-05-15

175

Effect of collagen hydrolysate on chondrocyte-seeded agarose constructs.  

Science.gov (United States)

The mechanical properties of engineered cartilage are strongly dependent on collagen content, but the collagen to glycosaminoglycan ratio in engineered cartilage is often much lower than that of the native tissue. Therefore culture medium supplements which increase collagen production by chondrocytes are of interest. It had previously been reported that collagen hydrolysate stimulated type II collagen biosynthesis in short-term, high density monolayer chondrocyte cultures. It was hypothesized that collagen hydrolysate added to the culture medium of three dimensional chondrocyte-agarose constructs would enhance their mechanical properties. Porcine articular chondrocytes were embedded in 2% agarose and cultured for up to 6 weeks with and without 1 mg/ml collagen hydrolysate. The instantaneous compressive modulus and equilibrium compressive modulus were significantly lower in the collagen hydrolysate-treated constructs, consistent with the finding of lower collagen and GAG content. Contrary to our hypothesis, our results indicate that 1 mg/ml collagen hydrolysate may actually inhibit macromolecule biosynthesis and be detrimental to the mechanical properties of long term chondrocyte-agarose constructs. PMID:20231793

Elder, Steven H; Borazjani, Ali

2009-01-01

176

Identification of candidate genes for yeast engineering to improve bioethanol production in very high gravity and lignocellulosic biomass industrial fermentations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimization of industrial bioethanol production will depend on the rational design and manipulation of industrial strains to improve their robustness against the many stress factors affecting their performance during very high gravity (VHG or lignocellulosic fermentations. In this study, a set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes found, through genome-wide screenings, to confer resistance to the simultaneous presence of different relevant stresses were identified as required for maximal fermentation performance under industrial conditions. Results Chemogenomics data were used to identify eight genes whose expression confers simultaneous resistance to high concentrations of glucose, acetic acid and ethanol, chemical stresses relevant for VHG fermentations; and eleven genes conferring simultaneous resistance to stresses relevant during lignocellulosic fermentations. These eleven genes were identified based on two different sets: one with five genes granting simultaneous resistance to ethanol, acetic acid and furfural, and the other with six genes providing simultaneous resistance to ethanol, acetic acid and vanillin. The expression of Bud31 and Hpr1 was found to lead to the increase of both ethanol yield and fermentation rate, while Pho85, Vrp1 and Ygl024w expression is required for maximal ethanol production in VHG fermentations. Five genes, Erg2, Prs3, Rav1, Rpb4 and Vma8, were found to contribute to the maintenance of cell viability in wheat straw hydrolysate and/or the maximal fermentation rate of this substrate. Conclusions The identified genes stand as preferential targets for genetic engineering manipulation in order to generate more robust industrial strains, able to cope with the most significant fermentation stresses and, thus, to increase ethanol production rate and final ethanol titers.

Pereira Francisco B

2011-12-01

177

Pretreatment of lignocellulosic material with fungi capable of higher lignin degradation and lower carbohydrate degradation improves substrate acid hydrolysis and the eventual conversion to ethanol  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant energy resource in the world and is a potential source of carbon substrate for the production of ethanol via fermentation. However, the presence of lignin restricts access to holocellulose. It is necessary to break or remove the lignin in plant residues prior to their hydrolysis. Pretreatment is needed to liberate cellulose and hemicellulose from the lignins. This paper discussed a biological delignification method that avoided the use of toxic and corrosive chemicals. The in situ microbial delignification process used white rot fungi as a basidiomycetes for biological pretreatment. The study examined the capability of 4 basidiomycetes fungi, notably: (1) Phanerochaete chrysosporium; (2) Pycnoporus cinnabarinus; (3) fungal isolate RCK-1; and (4) fungal isolate RCK-3. The fungi were used to delignify wheat straw and improve hydrolysis procedures. Attempts were also made to ferment the acid hydrolysates from fungal-pretreated lignocellulosic materials. Results of the experiment showed that higher yields of ethanol were obtained using selective lignin-degrading fungi as a pretreatment method. 39 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

Kuhar, S.; Nair, L.M.; Kuhad, R.C. [Delhi Univ., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Microbiology, Lignocellulose Biotechnology Laboratory

2008-04-15

178

Production of enzymatic protein hydrolysates from freshwater catfish (Clarias batrachus)  

Science.gov (United States)

Fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) was prepared from freshwater catfish (Clarias batrachus) by using Alcalase® 2.4L and Papain. The effect of hydrolysis time (30, 60, 120, 180 min) with enzyme concentration of 1% (v/w substrate); pH = 8.0, 7.0 was studied to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH), peptide content, proximate composition and amino acid profile. Results showed that the highest DH of Alcalase and Papain FPH were 58.79% and 53.48% after 180 min at 55°C incubation respectively. The peptide content of both FPH increased as hydrolysis time increases. FPH showed higher crude protein content and lower fat, moisture and ash content compared to raw catfish. The major amino acids of both hydrolysates were Glu, Lys and Asp. Content of essential amino acids of Alcalase and Papain hydrolysates were 44.05% and 43.31% respectively.

Seniman, Maizatul Sarah Md; Yusop, Salma Mohamad; Babji, Abdul Salam

2014-09-01

179

Impedance of nickel/cadmium cells with nylon separator hydrolysate  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In sealed nickel/cadmium cells, degradation of the nylon separator leads to decrease in the electrolyte and, eventually, to shorting of the cells. To understand this effect further, a study of the influence of nylon hydrolysis on the impedance of nickel/cadmium cells has been undertaken. Measurements have been made of the impedance of a positive-limited nickel/cadmium cell (flooded type) with and without nylon hydrolysate. The nylon hydrolysate was expected to affect the double-layer impedance of the nickel oxide electrode around a cell voltage of 0.4 V. Unfortunately, the results show only small changes in the cell impedance due to nylon hydrolysate and these are not considered to be significant. It appears, therefore, that the impedance technique does not provide unequivocal information about nylon hydrolysis. (orig.)

Suresh, M.S. (Battery Div., ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India))

1994-07-01

180

Emulsifying and emulsion-stabilizing properties of gluten hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Gluten is produced as a coproduct of the wheat starch isolation process. In this study, gluten was hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-6-10 and 1-2-3 with alcalase and trypsin, respectively. These peptidases have a clearly distinct substrate specificity. Corn oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt % oil) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization at pH 7.5. Gluten peptides with DH 3 proved to be the most effective in producing peptides displaying emulsifying properties. Higher levels of alcalase hydrolysates (2.0 wt %) than of trypsin hydrolysates (1.0 wt %) were required to produce stable emulsions with small droplet sizes, which is attributed to differences in the nature of the peptides formed. The emulsions had small mean droplet diameters (d32 gluten hydrolysates in food and beverage products. PMID:24571632

Joye, Iris J; McClements, David J

2014-03-26

 
 
 
 
181

Sensory analysis of hydrolysed meat preparations Análise sensorial de preparações com hidrolisados de carne  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The use of hydrolysed meat in diets contributes to the improvement of protein, vitamin and mineral supply. This work aims at checking the acceptance pattern in meat hydrolysates. Four preparations have been developed with three types of hydrolysates in domestic-like conditions. Acceptance was verified by means of sensory analysis using the nine-point hedonic scale. Sensory tests have been carried out in three sessions (according to the kind of hydrolysates). In the evaluation file, informatio...

Silva, Maria Elisabeth Machado Pinto E.; Maria Carolina von Atzingen

2010-01-01

182

Optimisation of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition by whey protein hydrolysates using response surface methodology  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Protein hydrolysates inhibiting the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro, are potentially interesting constituents for blood pressure decreasing products. To minimise the amount of hydrolysate needed, the ACE inhibitory activity should be maximised. The total peptide composition of a hydrolysate determines its ACE inhibitory ability and depends on the specificity of the proteolytic enzyme and the process conditions used for the production of the hydrolysate. In the present research, t...

Ven, C.; Gruppen, H.; Bont, D. B. A.; Voragen, A. G. J.

2002-01-01

183

FTIR spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates in relation to their functional properties  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Mid-infrared spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates were recorded using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis techniques were used to investigate the capacity of FTIR spectra to classify hydrolysates and to study the ability of the spectra to predict bitterness, solubility, emulsifying, and foaming properties of hydrolysates. Principal component analysis revealed that hydrolysates prepared from different protein sources or with different classes of proteo...

Ven, C.; Muresan, S.; Gruppen, H.; Bont, D. B. A.; Merck, K. B.; Voragen, A. G. J.

2002-01-01

184

Factors affecting antioxidant activity of soybean meal and caseine protein hydrolysates  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Antioxidative activity of protein hydrolysates was dependent on the raw material, condition of hydrolysis and lipid substrate used in model systems. Soybean meal hydrolysate was more active in lard and in linoleic acid emulsion than caseine hydrolysate, whereas caseine was more active in vegetable oils. Antioxidant activity of evaluated protein hydrolysates in all lipid systems, with or without oxidation catalysts, suggests them as natural food additives for lipid stabilization, thus for improvement of its nutritional value and sensory properties

185

Advanced anaerobic bioconversion of lignocellulosic waste for the melissa life support system  

Science.gov (United States)

The feasibility of nearly-complete conversion of lignocellulosic waste (70% food crops, 20% faecal matter and 10% green algae) into biogas was investigated in the context of the MELiSSA loop (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative). The treatment comprised a series of processes, i.e. a mesophilic laboratory scale CSTR (continuously stirred tank reactor), an upflow biofilm reactor, a fiber liquefaction reactor employing the rumen bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes and a hydrothermolysis system in near-critical water. By the one-stage CSTR, a biogas yield of 75% with a specific biogas production of 0.37 l biogas g-1 VSS (volatile suspended solids) added at a RT (hydraulic retention time) of 20-25 d was obtained. Biogas yields could not be increased considerably at higher RT, indicating the depletion of readily available substrate after 25 d. The solids present in the CSTR-effluent were subsequently treated in two ways. Hydrothermal treatment (T ˜ 310-350C, p ˜ 240 bar) resulted in effective carbon liquefaction (50-60% without and 83% with carbon dioxide saturation) and complete sanitation of the residue. Application of the cellulolytic Fibrobacter succinogenes converted remaining cellulose contained in the CSTR-effluent into acetate and propionate mainly. Subsequent anaerobic digestion of the hydrothermolysis and the Fibrobacter hydrolysates allowed conversion of 48-60% and 30%, respectively. Thus, the total process yielded biogas corresponding with conversions up to 90% of the original organic matter. It appears that particularly mesophilic digestion in conjunction with hydrothermolysis offers interesting features for (nearly) the MELiSSA system. The described additional technologies show that complete and hygienic carbon and energy recovery from human waste within MELiSSA is technically feasible, provided that the extra energy needed for the thermal treatment is guaranteed.

Lissens, G.; Verstraete, W.; Albrecht, T.; Brunner, G.; Creuly, C.; Dussap, G.; Kube, J.; Maerkl, H.; Lasseur, C.

186

Concentration of lignocellulosic hydrolyzates by solar membrane distillation.  

Science.gov (United States)

A small solar energy collector was run to heat lignocellulosic hydrolyzates through an exchanger, and the heated hydrolyzate was concentrated by vacuum membrane distillation (VMD). Under optimal conditions of velocity of 1.0m/s and 65°C, glucose rejection was 99.5% and the flux was 8.46Lm(-2)h(-1). Fermentation of the concentrated hydrolyzate produced 2.64 times the amount of ethanol as fermentation using the original hydrolyzate. The results of this work indicated the possibility to decrease the thermal energy consumption of lignocellulosic ethanol through using VMD. PMID:22940345

Zhang, Lin; Wang, Yafei; Cheng, Li-Hua; Xu, Xinhua; Chen, Huanlin

2012-11-01

187

Microbial Activity on the Degradation of Lignocellulosic Polysaccharides  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In present world there is an increase in demand for organic waste disposal to minimize pollution and maximize resource recovery. Several workers from various parts of the world have reported successful conversion of waste materials to useful compost. Lignocellulose comprises three different polymer types: lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic material through microbial enzyme to produce fermentable sugars has been given serious consideration and continuous research and development activities has been carried out in laboratories around the world. This article highlights the significant research findings and reviews the state of the art in this very important area of biotechnology.

Zakaria Ahmed

2001-01-01

188

Integration of Lignocellulosic Biomass into Renewable Energy Generation Concepts  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In all European countries various lignocellulosic biomasses such as agricultural residues (straw, strawcontaining dung or fractions from municipal solid waste are available in large amounts, but currently hardly any of thispotential is being used for energy generation. This paper reviews the different options for including lignocellulosicbiomass into renewable energy generation schemes. Not all wastes are suitable to be treated by principally availabletechniques such as anaerobic digestion, ethanol production or thermal valorisation. The present paper gives an overviewof utilisation options for lignocellulosic biomass to either produce biofuels or to integrate such biomass into anaerobicdigestion. Biorefinery concepts are discussed as well.

KUSCH Sigrid

2009-08-01

189

Evaluation of the biomass potential for the production of lignocellulosic bioethanol from various agricultural residues in Austria and Worldwide  

Science.gov (United States)

Due to the fact that the resources of fossil fuels are steadily decreasing, researchers have been trying to find alternatives over the past few years. As bioethanol of the first generation is based on potential food, its production has become an increasingly controversial topic. Therefore the focus of research currently is on the production of bioethanol of the second generation, which is made from cellulosic and lignocellulosic materials. However, for the production of bioethanol of the second generation the fibres have to be pre-treated. In this work the mass balances of various agricultural residues available in Austria were generated and examined in lab scale experiments for their bioethanol potential. The residues were pretreatment by means of state of the art technology (steam explosion), enzymatically hydrolysed and fermented with yeast to produce ethanol. Special attention was paid the mass balance of the overall process. Due to the pretreatment the proportion of cellulose increases with the duration of the pre-treatment, whereby the amount of hemicellulose decreases greatly. However, the total losses were increasing with the duration of the pre-treatment, and the losses largely consist of hemicellulose. The ethanol yield varied depending on the cellulose content of the substrates. So rye straw 200 °C 20 min reaches an ethanol yield of 169 kg/t, by far the largest yield. As result on the basis of the annual straw yield in Austria, approximately 210 000 t of bioethanol (266 million litres) could be produced from the straw of wheat (Triticum vulgare), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa) and corn (Zea mays) as well as elephant grass (Miscanthus sinensis) using appropriate pre-treatment. So the greenhouse gas emissions produced by burning fossil fuels could be reduced significantly. About 1.8 million tons of motor gasoline are consumed in Austria every year. The needed quantity for a transition to E10 biofuels could thus be easily provided by bioethanol from straw. We also evaluated the production of world's most important grains (wheat, corn, rice, sugar cain) and we calculated the worldwide production of the relevant lignocellulosic residues. On the basis of our labs scale experiments on bioethanol production, the possible lignocellulosic bioethanol production word wide was determined.

Kahr, Heike; Steindl, Daniel; Wimberger, Julia; Schürz, Daniel; Jäger, Alexander

2013-04-01

190

Spent nuclear fuel storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

191

Biohydrogen production from wheat straw hydrolysate using Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus followed by biogas production in a two-step uncoupled process  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

A two-step, un-coupled process producing hydrogen (H2) from wheat straw using Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus in a ‘Continuously stirred tank reactor’ (CSTR) followed by anaerobic digestion of its effluent to produce methane (CH4) was investigated. C. saccharolyticus was able to convert wheat straw hydrolysate to hydrogen at maximum production rate of approximately 5.2 L H2/L/Day. The organic compounds in the effluent collected from the CSTR were successfully converted to CH4 through anaerobic digestion performed in an ‘Up-flow anaerobic sludge bioreactor’ (UASB) reactor at a maximum production rate of 2.6 L CH4/L/day. The maximum energy output of the process (10.9 kJ/g of straw) was about 57% of the total energy, and 67% of the energy contributed by the sugar fraction, contained in the wheat straw. Sparging the hydrogenogenic CSTR with the flue gas of the UASB reactor ((60% v/v) CH4 and (40% v/v) CO2) decreased the H2 production rate by 44%, which was due to the significant presence of CO2. The presenceof CH4 alone, like N2, was indifferent to growth and H2 production by C. saccharolyticus. Hence, sparging with upgraded CH4 would guarantee successful hydrogen production from lignocellulosic biomass prior to anaerobic digestion and thus, reasonably high conversion efficiency can be achieved.

Pawar, Sudhanshu S.; Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem

2013-01-01

192

Biogeochemical cycling of lignocellulosic carbon in marine and freshwater ecosystems: relative contributions of procaryotes and eucaryotes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The relative contributions of procaryotes and eucaryotes to the degradation of the lignin and polysaccharide components of lignocellulosic detritus in two marine and two freshwater wetland ecosystems were determined. Two independent methods - physical separation of bacteria from fungi and other eucaryotes by size fractionation, and antibiotic treatments - were used to estimate procaryotic and eucaryotic contributions to the degradation of [14C-lignin]lignocelluloses and [13C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses in samples of water and decaying plant material from each environment. Both methods yielded similar results; bacteria were the predominant degraders of lignocellulose in each of the aquatic ecosystems. These results indicate a basic difference between the microbial degradation of lignocellulosic material in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Fungi have long been considered the predominant degraders of lignocellulose in terrestrial systems; our results indicate that in aquatic systems bacteria are the predominant degraders of lignocellulose

193

Radiation hydrolysate of tuna cooking juice with enhanced antioxidant properties  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Tuna protein hydrolysates are of increasing interest because of their potential application as a source of bioactive peptides. Large amounts of tuna cooking juice with proteins and extracts are produced during the process of tuna canning, and these cooking juice wastes cause environmental problems. Therefore, in this study, cooking juice proteins were hydrolyzed by irradiation for their utilization as functional additives. The degree of hydrolysis of tuna cooking juice protein increased from 0% to 15.1% at the absorbed doses of 50 kGy. To investigate the antioxidant activity of the hydrolysate, it was performed the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, and the lipid peroxidation inhibitory and superoxide radical scavenging activities were measured. The FRAP values increased from 1470 ?M to 1930 ?M and IC50 on superoxide anion was decreased from 3.91 ?g/mL to 1.29 ?g/mL at 50 kGy. All of the antioxidant activities were increased in the hydrolysate, suggesting that radiation hydrolysis, which is a simple process that does not require an additive catalysts or an inactivation step, is a promising method for food and environmental industries. - Highlights: ? Radiation was applied for the hydrolysis of tuna cooking juice protein. ? The degree of hydrolysis were increased by irradiation and the antioxidant activity of hydrolysate was higher than protein. ? This result suggest that radiation is useful method for the hydrolysis of protein.he hydrolysis of protein.

194

[Enzymatic hydrolysate of soy protein isolate. Preparation and characterization].  

Science.gov (United States)

Soy protein isolate has been hydrolysed using one- or two-stage scheme. Two-stage scheme of soy protein isolate hydrolysis by Flavourzyme followed by Pancreatin provided 97% of the initial protein in soluble form. The structures with molecular weights over than 28 kD were eliminated, as determined by size-exclusion chromatography. PMID:16739601

Zorin, S N; Baiarzhgal, M; Burdza, E A; Mazo, V K

2006-01-01

195

Lignocellulose Biomass: Constitutive Polymers. Biological Processes of Lignin Degradation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The structure of the lignocellulosic materials and the chemical composition of their main constitutive polymers, cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are described. The most promising transformation processes according to the type of biomass considered: hardwood, softwood an herbaceous and the perspectives of biotechnological processes for bio pulping, bio bleaching and effluents decolorisation in the paper pulp industry are also discussed. (Author) 7 refs

196

Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to nanocellulose: structure and chemical process.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate's application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein. PMID:25247208

Lee, H V; Hamid, S B A; Zain, S K

2014-01-01

197

EXTRACTING LIGNOCELLULOSE AND SYNTHESIZING SILICA NANOPARTICLES FROM RICE HUSKS  

Science.gov (United States)

At the end of this project, we will have the demonstration package including lignocellulose fibers and silica nanoparticles (with microscope images), and a chart illustrating the optimized process. We will also submit a conference abstract and a journal manuscript for national...

198

Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Nanocellulose: Structure and Chemical Process  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate's application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein. PMID:25247208

Lee, H. V.; Hamid, S. B. A.; Zain, S. K.

2014-01-01

199

Spent fuel workshop'2002  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document gathers the transparencies of the presentations given at the 2002 spent fuel workshop: Session 1 - Research Projects: Overview on the IN CAN PROCESSES European project (M. Cowper), Overview on the SPENT FUEL STABILITY European project (C. Poinssot), Overview on the French R and D project on spent fuel long term evolution, PRECCI (C. Poinssot); Session 2 - Spent Fuel Oxidation: Oxidation of uranium dioxide single crystals (F. Garrido), Experimental results on SF oxidation and new modeling approach (L. Desgranges), LWR spent fuel oxidation - effects of burn-up and humidity (B. Hanson), An approach to modeling CANDU fuel oxidation under dry storage conditions (P. Taylor); Session 3 - Spent Fuel Dissolution Experiments: Overview on high burnup spent fuel dissolution studies at FZK/INE (A. Loida), Results on the influence of hydrogen on spent fuel leaching (K. Spahiu), Leaching of spent UO2 fuel under inert and reducing conditions (Y. Albinsson), Fuel corrosion investigation by electrochemical techniques (D. Wegen), A reanalysis of LWR spent fuel flow through dissolution tests (B. Hanson), U-bearing secondary phases formed during fuel corrosion (R. Finch), The near-field chemical conditions and spent fuel leaching (D. Cui), The release of radionuclides from spent fuel in bentonite block (S.S. Kim), Trace actinide behavior in altered spent fuel (E. Buck, B. Hanson); Session 4 - Radiolysis Issues: The effect of radiolysis on UO2 dissolution determined from electrochemical experiments with 238Pu doped UO2 M. Stroess-Gascoyne (F. King, J.S. Betteridge, F. Garisto), doped UO2 studies (V. Rondinella), Preliminary results of static and dynamic dissolution tests with ? doped UO2 in Boom clay conditions (K. Lemmens), Studies of the behavior of UO2 / water interfaces under He2+ beam (C. Corbel), Alpha and gamma radiolysis effects on UO2 alteration in water (C. Jegou), Behavior of Pu-doped pellets in brines (M. Kelm), On the potential catalytic behavior of UO2(s): experimental approach and preliminary results on uranium oxide - water interface (J. Devoy), Preliminary results on studies on radiolysis effects on dissolution of UO2 (E. Ekeroth, M. Jonnson); Session 5 - Modeling of the Spent Fuel Dissolution: tUO2 dissolution and the effect of radiolysis (T. Lundstrom), Prediction of the effect of radiolysis (F. King), Experimental determination and chemical modeling of radiolytic processes at the spent fuel / water interface (E. Cera, J. Bruno, T. Eriksen, M. Grive, L. Duro); Session 6 - Influence of the Potential Evolution prior to the Water Access on IRF: Potential occurrence of ? self-irradiation enhanced-diffusion (H.J. Matzke, T. Petit), Are grain boundaries a stable microstructure? (Y. Guerin), Modeling RN instant release fractions from spent nuclear fuel under repository conditions (C.Poinssot, L. Johnson, P. Lovera). (J.S.)

200

Enzyme Hydrolysates from Stichopus horrens as a New Source for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides.  

Science.gov (United States)

Stichopus horrens flesh was explored as a potential source for generating peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacity using 6 proteases, namely alcalase, flavourzyme, trypsin, papain, bromelain, and protamex. Degree of hydrolysis (DH) and peptide profiling (SDS-PAGE) of Stichopus horrens hydrolysates (SHHs) was also assessed. Alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest DH value (39.8%) followed by flavourzyme hydrolysate (32.7%). Overall, alcalase hydrolysate exhibited the highest ACE inhibitory activity (IC(50) value of 0.41?mg/mL) followed by flavourzyme hydrolysate (IC(50) value of 2.24?mg/mL), trypsin hydrolysate (IC(50) value of 2.28?mg/mL), papain hydrolysate (IC(50) value of 2.48?mg/mL), bromelain hydrolysate (IC(50) value of 4.21?mg/mL), and protamex hydrolysate (IC(50) value of 6.38?mg/mL). The SDS-PAGE results showed that alcalase hydrolysate represented a unique pattern compared to others, which yielded potent ACE inhibitory peptides with molecular weight distribution lower than 20?kDa. The evaluation of the relationship between DH and IC(50) values of alcalase and flavourzyme hydrolysates revealed that the trend between those parameters was related to the type of the protease used. We concluded that the tested SHHs would be used as a potential source of functional ACE inhibitory peptides for physiological benefits. PMID:22927875

Forghani, Bita; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Jamilah; Abdul Hamid, Azizah; Hassan, Zaiton; Saari, Nazamid

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate using Pichia stipitis.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the ethanol production from the sugars contained in the sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate with the yeast Pichia stipitis DSM 3651. The fermentations were carried out in 250-mL Erlenmeyers with 100 mL of medium incubated at 200 rpm and 30 degrees C for 120 h. The medium was composed by raw (non-detoxified) hydrolysate or by hydrolysates detoxified by pH alteration followed by active charcoal adsorption or by adsorption into ion-exchange resins, all of them supplemented with yeast extract (3 g/L), malt extract (3 g/L), and peptone (5 g/L). The initial concentration of cells was 3 g/L. According to the results, the detoxification procedures removed inhibitory compounds from the hemicellulosic hydrolysate and, thus, improved the bioconversion of the sugars into ethanol. The fermentation using the non-detoxified hydrolysate led to 4.9 g/L ethanol in 120 h, with a yield of 0.20 g/g and a productivity of 0.04 g L(-1) h(-1). The detoxification by pH alteration and active charcoal adsorption led to 6.1 g/L ethanol in 48 h, with a yield of 0.30 g/g and a productivity of 0.13 g L(-1) h(-1). The detoxification by adsorption into ion-exchange resins, in turn, provided 7.5 g/L ethanol in 48 h, with a yield of 0.30 g/g and a productivity of 0.16 g L(-1) h(-1). PMID:19802721

Canilha, Larissa; Carvalho, Walter; Felipe, Maria das Graças de Almeida; Silva, João Batista de Almeida e; Giulietti, Marco

2010-05-01

202

Effect of Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Effect of Fish Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells Carlo G. Ossum1, Lisa Lystbæk Andersen2, Henrik Hauch Nielsen2, Else K. Hoffmann1, and Flemming Jessen2 1University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology, Denmark, 2Technical University of Denmark (DTU), National Food Institute, Denmark Corresponding author: Carlo G. Ossum (cgossum@gmail.com) A large number of bioactive peptides have been identified in and isolated from various food sources. Milk seems to be a particularly rich source but also different fish species have been found to yield bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides, usually consisting of 3 to 20 amino acids, can be released from proteins upon degradation by proteolytic enzymes, e.g. in the intestinal tract. The numerous described bioactivities include antihypertensive, anticancerous, antimicrobial, and immunomodulating effects. Here, we investigate the effect of fish protein hydrolysates obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis on cancer cell proliferation. Skin and belly flap muscle from trout were hydrolysed with the unspecific proteases Alcalase, Neutrase, or UE1 (all from Novozymes, Bagsværd, Denmark) to a hydrolysis degree of 1-15%. The hydrolysates were tested for biological activities affecting cell proliferation and ability to modulate caspase activity in pancreatic cancer cells COLO357 and BxPC-3 in vitro. A number of the hydrolysates showed caspase promoting activity; in particular products containing muscle tissue, i.e. belly flap, were able to stimulate caspase activity. Selected hydrolysis products were further fractionated by ultrafiltration into molecular sizes above and below 5 kDa and their activity and dose-dependence was tested.

Ossum, Carlo G.; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk

203

Production of Lupinus angustifolius protein hydrolysates with improved functional properties  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Protein hydrolysates wer e obtained from lupin flour and from the purified globulin α -conglutin, and their functional properties were studied. Hydrolysis with alcalase for 60 minutes yielded degrees of hydrolysis ranging from 4 % to 11 % for lupin flour, and from 4 % to 13% for α -conglutin. Protein solubility, oil absorption, foam capacity and stability, emulsifying activity, and emulsion stability of hydrolysates with 6% degree of hydrolysis were determined and compared with the properties of the original flour. The protein hydrolysates showed better functional properties than the original proteins. Most importantly, the solubility of the α -conglutin and L. angustifolius flour hydrolysates was increased by 43 % and 52 %, respectively. Thus, lupin seed protein hydrolysates have improved functional properties and could be used in the elaboration of a variety of products such as breads, cakes, and salad dressings.Se obtuvieron hidrolizados proteicos de la harina del altramuz y de la globulina α - conglutina purificada y se estudiaron sus propiedades funcionales. La hidrólisis con alcalasa durante 60 minutos produjo hidrolizados con grados de hidrólisis entre el 4 % y el 11 % para la harina y entre el 4 % y el 13 % para la α - conglutina. Se estudió en un hidrolizado con un 6 % de grado de hidrólisis la solubilidad proteica, absorción de aceite, capacidad y estabilidad espumante y actividad y estabilidad emulsificante. Los hidrolizados proteicos mostraron mejores propiedades funcionales que las proteínas originales. Más aún, la solubilidad de los hidrolizados de α - conglutina y la harina se incrementó en un 43 % y 52 % respectivamente. Así pues, hidrolizados de proteínas de semilla de lupino presentan mejores propiedades funcionales y podrían usarse en la elaboración de productos como pan, dulces, salsas o cremas.

Millán, Francisco

2005-06-01

204

Protein Hydrolysates as Hypoallergenic, Flavors and Palatants for Companion Animals  

Science.gov (United States)

Early civilizations have relied upon their good sense and experience to develop and improve their food quality. The discovery of soy sauce centuries ago can now be considered one of the earliest protein hydrolysates made by man to improve palatability of foods. Now, it is well known that such savory systems are not just sources for enjoyment but complex semiotic systems that direct the humans to satisfy the body's protein need for their sustenance. Recent developments have resulted in a wide range of cost effective savory flavorings, the best known of which are autolyzed yeast extracts and hydrolyzed vegetable proteins. New technologies have helped researchers to improve the savory characteristics of yeast extracts through the application of Maillard reaction and by generating specific flavor enhancers through the use of enzymes. An interesting parallel exists in the pet food industry, where a similar approach is taken in using animal protein hydrolysates to create palatability enhancers via Maillard reaction scheme. Protein hydrolysates are also utilized extensively as a source of nutrition to the elderly, young children and immuno-compromised patient population. These hydrolysates have an added advantage in having peptides small enough to avoid any chance of an allergenic reaction which sometimes occur with the consumption of larger sized peptides or proteins. Accordingly, protein hydrolysates are required to have an average molecular weight distribution in the range 800-1,500 Da to make them non-allergenic. The technical challenge for scientists involved in food and feed manufacture is to use an appropriate combination of enzymes within the existing economic constraints and other physical factors/limitations, such as heat, pH, and time, to create highly palatable, yet still nutritious and hypoallergenic food formulations.

Nagodawithana, Tilak W.; Nelles, Lynn; Trivedi, Nayan B.

205

Enzymatic hydrolysis of spent coffee ground.  

Science.gov (United States)

Spent coffee ground (SCG) is the main residue generated during the production of instant coffee by thermal water extraction from roasted coffee beans. This waste is composed mainly of polysaccharides such as cellulose and galactomannans that are not solubilised during the extraction process, thus remaining as unextractable, insoluble solids. In this context, the application of an enzyme cocktail (mannanase, endoglucanase, exoglucanase, xylanase and pectinase) with more than one component that acts synergistically with each other is regarded as a promising strategy to solubilise/hydrolyse remaining solids, either to increase the soluble solids yield of instant coffee or for use as raw material in the production of bioethanol and food additives (mannitol). Wild fungi were isolated from both SCG and coffee beans and screened for enzyme production. The enzymes produced from the selected wild fungi and recombinant fungi were then evaluated for enzymatic hydrolysis of SCG, in comparison to commercial enzyme preparations. Out of the enzymes evaluated on SCG, the application of mannanase enzymes gave better yields than when only cellulase or xylanase was utilised for hydrolysis. The recombinant mannanase (Man1) provided the highest increments in soluble solids yield (17 %), even when compared with commercial preparations at the same protein concentration (0.5 mg/g SCG). The combination of Man1 with other enzyme activities revealed an additive effect on the hydrolysis yield, but not synergistic interaction, suggesting that the highest soluble solid yields was mainly due to the hydrolysis action of mannanase. PMID:23436225

Jooste, T; García-Aparicio, M P; Brienzo, M; van Zyl, W H; Görgens, J F

2013-04-01

206

The bioactivity and fractionation of peptide hydrolysates in cultures of CHO cells.  

Science.gov (United States)

Peptide hydrolysate supplements in mammalian cell cultures provide enhanced growth and productivity. The objective of this study was to compare the bioactivity of ten different commercially available hydrolysates from plant, microbial, and animal sources. The peptide hydrolysates were tested as supplements to cultures of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that produce human beta interferon (?-IFN). A soy hydrolysate was shown to support high cell growth but not protein productivity compared to an animal component hydrolysate (Primatone RL). On the other hand, a yeast hydrolysate showed lower cell growth, but comparable productivity of the recombinant protein. Glycosylation analysis showed that the glycan profile of ?-IFN produced in yeast hydrolysate supplemented cultures was equivalent to that from Primatone RL-supplemented cultures. Fractionation of the yeast hydrolysate and Primatone RL produced a similar protein-assayed pattern except for one extra peak at around 1 kDa in the Primatone RL profile. A fraction taken at a molecular weight range of 1.5-1.7 kDa showed the highest growth promoting activity in both samples. However, four other fractions in yeast hydrolysate and two in Primatone RL at lower molecular weights showed some growth promoting activity. In conclusion, the yeast hydrolysates provided a good alternative to the animal sourced Primatone RL for high productivity of ?-IFN from CHO cells with equivalent glycosylation. PMID:24846804

Spearman, Maureen; Lodewyks, Carly; Richmond, Meika; Butler, Michael

2014-01-01

207

FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

2002-10-01

208

Decolorization of hair dye by lignocellulosic waste materials from contaminated waters  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Basic yellow 57 (BY57 was chosen as a model hair dye due to its prevalence in cosmetics wastewaters. This study proposes the use of lignocellulosic materials like spent tea leaves of peppermint (PM, chai tea (CT and chamomile (CM as raw adsorbents for the removal of BY57 from contaminated solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out at room temperature to achieve the maximum adsorption capacity. Results indicate that the highest removal is achieved at pH 6 – 8, with a minimum adsorbent mass of 75 mg and in the absence of salinity, crowding agents and heavy metals. Adsorption equilibria were modeled according to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm theories and reported the following trend: PM>CT>CM, reaching qmax values of 105, 80, and 38 mg of dye per gram of adsorbent, respectively. Desorption experiments showed that diluted solution of HCl is able to desorb the up to 80% of the dye and recover the adsorbent to be used in consecutive cycles. Finally, the adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy, indicating that the adsorbents have a porous and heterogeneous surface, showing pockets and protrusions that are potential adsorption sites for the dye.

AbelEnriqueNavarro

2014-07-01

209

Spent fuel pyroprocessing demonstration  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A major element of the shutdown of the US liquid metal reactor development program is managing the sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II to meet US environmental laws. Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for treating the spent fuel by a high-temperature electrochemical process commonly called pyroprocessing. Four products will be produced for storage and disposal. Two high-level waste forms will be produced and qualified for disposal of the fission and activation products. Uranium and transuranium alloys will be produced for storage pending a decision by the US Department of Energy on the fate of its plutonium and enriched uranium. Together these activities will demonstrate a unique electrochemical treatment technology for spent nuclear fuel. This technology potentially has significant economic and technical advantages over either conventional reprocessing or direct disposal as a high-level waste option

210

Spent fuel pyroprocessing demonstration  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A major element of the shutdown of the US liquid metal reactor development program is managing the sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II to meet US environmental laws. Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for treating the spent fuel by a high-temperature electrochemical process commonly called pyroprocessing. Four products will be produced for storage and disposal. Two high-level waste forms will be produced and qualified for disposal of the fission and activation products. Uranium and transuranium alloys will be produced for storage pending a decision by the US Department of Energy on the fate of its plutonium and enriched uranium. Together these activities will demonstrate a unique electrochemical treatment technology for spent nuclear fuel. This technology potentially has significant economic and technical advantages over either conventional reprocessing or direct disposal as a high-level waste option.

McFarlane, L.F.; Lineberry, M.J.

1995-05-01

211

Use of Protein Hydrolysates in Industrial Starter Culture Fermentations  

Science.gov (United States)

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used as starter cultures for fermenting foods long before the importance of microorganisms were recognized. The most important group of LAB are the lactococci, lactobacilli, streptococci, and pediococci. Additionally, bifidobacteria have been included as a probiotic, providing added value to the product. Since the genera involved are so diverse, the nutritional requirements (energy, carbon and nitrogen sources) differ significantly between and within species. Designing an optimum fermentation medium for production of active and vigorous LAB starter cultures and probiotics requires selecting the right raw ingredients, especially protein hydrolysates that can provide adequate nutrients for growth and viability. This chapter attempts to describe the application of various commercial protein hydrolysates used for production of dairy and meat starter cultures, with special emphasis on meeting the nitrogen requirements of industrially important LAB species.

Ummadi, Madhavi (Soni); Curic-Bawden, Mirjana

212

Biodegradable packing materials from hydrolysates of collagen waste proteins.  

Science.gov (United States)

Enzymatic hydrolysates of waste collagen proteins (H), from current industrial manufacture (leather, edible meat product casings, etc.) of mean molecular mass 20-30 kDa by a reaction with dialdehyde starch (DAS), produces hydrogels applicable as biodegradable (or even edible) packaging materials for food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Thermo-reversibility of prepared hydrogels is given by concentrations of H and DAS in a reaction mixture. At concentrations of H 25-30% (w/w) and that of DAS 15-20% (related to weight of hydrolysate), thermo-reversible hydrogels arise, which can be processed into packaging materials by a technique similar to that of soft gelatin capsules (SGC). Exceeding the limit of 20% DAS leads to hydrogels that are thermo-reversible only in part, a further increase in DAS concentration then leads to thermo-irreversible gels whose processing into biodegradable packaging materials necessitates employment of other procedures. PMID:17376664

Langmaier, F; Mokrejs, P; Kolomaznik, K; Mladek, M

2008-01-01

213

Hydrolyses of calcium phosphates-allografts composite in physiological solutions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Hydrolysis of calcium phosphates cement- allografts composite in calf serum and that in saline were examined in comparison with those of the calcium phosphates cement in both the solutions. The calcium phosphates cement consists of alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP), tetracalcium phosphate (TetCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and hydroxyapatite (HAP), which is clinically used as Biopex. In the hydrolyses of Biopex-allografts composite in both the solutions, the calcium phosphates cement was transformed into HAP. On the other hand, in the hydrolyses of Biopex, HAP was formed after 1 day and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) was gradually formed after 7 days. In the presence of allografts, plate-like crystals were deposited and in the absence of allografts, needle-like crystals were deposited in both the solutions. By the addition of allografts, the hydrolysis process of the calcium phosphates cement was significantly changed. PMID:16617417

Nomoto, Takuya; Haraguchi, Keiji; Yamaguchi, Shunro; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Nakayama, Hirokazu; Sekino, Tohru; Niihara, Koichi

2006-04-01

214

Spent fuel leach tests  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This presentation is divided into two parts, pre-WISAP and WISAP. The pre-WISAP leach tests were started before WISAP sponsorship and do not give data directly applicable to the spent fuel release modeling studies being done in WISAP Task 2. However, the general leaching trends have suggested the general approach to some mechanistic studies. The WISAP portion of this presentation was started under WISAP sponsorship and is designed to fulfill the requirement of obtaining radionuclide release rates from spent fuel and understanding the radionuclide release process under simulated geologic storage conditions

215

Hydrolysed wheat based oral rehydration solution for acute diarrhoea.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A randomised three cell study was carried out in 78 children with acute diarrhoea to evaluate the relative efficacy of oral rehydration solution (ORS) made from partially hydrolysed wheat grain, cooked rice powder, or glucose. Twenty six patients with comparable age, body weight, duration of diarrhoea, and degree of dehydration were studied in each of the three groups. Initial rehydration was carried out by using intravenous Dhaka solution within one to two hours followed by administration of...

Alam, A. N.; Sarker, S. A.; Molla, A. M.; Rahaman, M. M.; Greenough, W. B.

1987-01-01

216

Effect of Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Effect of Fish Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells Carlo G. Ossum1, Lisa Lystbæk Andersen2, Henrik Hauch Nielsen2, Else K. Hoffmann1, and Flemming Jessen2 1University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology, Denmark, 2Technical University of Denmark (DTU), National Food Institute, Denmark Corresponding author: Carlo G. Ossum (cgossum@gmail.com) A large number of bioactive peptides have been identified in and isolated from various food sources. Milk seems to be a parti...

Ossum, Carlo G.; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Hoffmann, Else K.; Jessen, Flemming

2010-01-01

217

Evaluation of Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Peanut Protein Hydrolysate  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Peanut protein and its hydrolysate were compared with a view to their use as food additives. The effects of pH, temperature and protein concentration on some of their key physicochemical properties were investigated. Compared with peanut protein, peanut peptides exhibited a significantly higher solubility and significantly lower turbidity at pH values 2–12 and temperature between 30 and 80°C. Peanut peptide showed better emulsifying capacity, foam capacity and foam stability, but had lower...

Tang, Lin; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Hui Cui; Zhang, Chu Shu; Yu, Li Na; Bi, Jie; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Shao Fang; Yang, Qing Li

2012-01-01

218

Selection of lactic acid bacteria able to ferment inulin hydrolysates  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Eight homofermentative lactic acid bacteria isolates were tested for lactic acid production using chicory and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate as substrate. The pH, lactic acid yield and productivity were used to select the best homolactic bacteria for lactic acid production. The selected strains produced lactic acid at maximum yield after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was greater at 24 hours of fermentation. From all studied strains, Lb1 and Lb2 showed the best results regardi...

Baston, Octavian; Constantin, Oana Emilia

2012-01-01

219

Biological activities of lignin hydrolysate-related compounds  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Lignin hydrolysates contain many different chemical species,including ferulic acid, coumaric acid, vanillic acid, vanillin,syringaldehyde and furfural. From the perspective of biofuels,these compounds are problematic and can cause downstreamloss of product if not removed prior to beginning the fermentativeprocess. In contrast, a search for these compounds withinthe literature turns up many papers where the same compoundshave beneficial properties pertaining to human health,including as antiox...

Siseon Lee; Ajay Kalanjana Monnappa; Mitchell, Robert J.

2012-01-01

220

Thermophysical Properties of Lignocellulose: A Cell-scale Study down to 41K  

CERN Document Server

Thermal energy transport is of great importance in lignocellulose pyrolysis for bio-fuels. The thermophysical properties of lignocellulose significantly affect the overall properties of bio-composites and the related thermal transport. In this work, cell-scale lignocellulose (mono-layer plant cells) is prepared to characterize their thermal properties from room temperature down to 41 K. The thermal conductivities of cell-scale lignocellulose along different directions show a little anisotropy due to the cell structure anisotropy. It is found that with temperature going down, the volumetric specific heat of the lignocellulose shows a slower decreasing trend against temperature than that of microcrystalline cellulose, and its value is always higher than that of microcrystalline cellulose. The thermal conductivity of lignocellulose decreases with temperature from 243 K to 317 K due to increasing phonon-phonon scatterings. From 41 K to 243 K, the thermal conductivity rises with temperature and its change mainly d...

Cheng, Zhe; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xinwei

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Polyols and polyurethanes from the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.  

Science.gov (United States)

Polyurethanes (PUs), produced from the condensation polymerizations between polyols and isocyanates, are one of the most versatile polymer families. Currently, both polyols and isocyanates are largely petroleum derived. Recently, there have been extensive research interests in developing bio-based polyols and PUs from renewable resources. As the world's most abundant renewable biomass, lignocellulosic biomass is rich in hydroxyl groups and has potential as a feedstock to produce bio-based polyols and PUs. Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted to liquid polyols for PU applications through acid- or base-catalyzed atmospheric liquefaction processes using polyhydric alcohols as liquefaction solvents. Biomass liquefaction-derived polyols can be used to prepare various PU products, such as foams, films and adhesives. The properties of biomass liquefaction-derived polyols and PUs depend on various factors, such as feedstock characteristics, liquefaction conditions, and PU formulations. PMID:24357542

Hu, Shengjun; Luo, Xiaolan; Li, Yebo

2014-01-01

222

Biodegradation of lignocellulosic materials: Present status and future prospects  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The biodegradation of lignocellulosic material depends on the source and prior treatment of the substrate. As the composition of the substrate influences the mode of degradation, a resume of the structure of cell wall components is given. This shows the relationship between cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and the other non-carbohydrate components and how they are arranged within the wall architecture. A summary is given of the different types of enzymes which can attack lignocellulosics, some limitations on their use, and how they can be influenced by other methods of pretreatment. The role of different types of microorganisms is discussed and the paper concludes with some results from work by the authors. (author). 37 refs, 4 figs

223

Canonical correlations between chemical and energetic characteristics of lignocellulosic wastes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Canonical correlation analysis is a statistical multivariate procedure that allows analyzing linear correlation that may exist between two groups or sets of variables (X and Y. This paper aimed to provide canonical correlation analysis between a group comprised of lignin and total extractives contents and higher heating value (HHV with a group of elemental components (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur for lignocellulosic wastes. The following wastes were used: eucalyptus shavings; pine shavings; red cedar shavings; sugar cane bagasse; residual bamboo cellulose pulp; coffee husk and parchment; maize harvesting wastes; and rice husk. Only the first canonical function was significant, but it presented a low canonical R². High carbon, hydrogen and sulfur contents and low nitrogen contents seem to be related to high total extractives contents of the lignocellulosic wastes. The preliminary results found in this paper indicate that the canonical correlations were not efficient to explain the correlations between the chemical elemental components and lignin contents and higher heating values.

Thiago de Paula Protásio

2012-09-01

224

The Use of Protein Hydrolysates for Weed Control  

Science.gov (United States)

Corn gluten meal, the protein fraction of corn (Zea mays L.) grain, is commercially used as a natural weed control agent and nitrogen source in horticultural crops and in the turf and ornamental markets. Corn gluten hydrolysate, a water soluble form of gluten meal, has also been proposed for the same purpose, although it could be sprayed on the soil rather than applied in the granular form. Five depeptides, glutaminyl-glutamine (Gln-Gln), glycinyl-alanine (Gly-Ala), alanyl-­glutamine (Ala-Glu), alanyl-asparagine (Ala-Asp), and alaninyl-alanine (Ala-Ala) and a pentapeptide leucine-serine-proline-alanine-glutamine (Leu-Ser-Pro-Ala-Gln) were identified as the active components of the hydrolysate. Microscopic analysis revealed that Ala-Ala acted on some metabolic process rather than directly on the mitotic apparatus. Similar to the chloracetamides and sulfonyl-urea hebicides, Ala-Ala inhibits cell division rather than disrupting of cell division processes. Cellular ultrastructure changes caused by exposure to Ala-Ala implicate Ala-Ala as having membrane-disrupting characteristics similar to several synthetic herbicides. The potential use of the hydrolysate and the peptides as weed controls is discussed.

Christians, Nick; Liu, Dianna; Unruh, Jay Bryan

225

Radiation hydrolysate of tuna cooking juice with enhanced antioxidant properties  

Science.gov (United States)

Tuna protein hydrolysates are of increasing interest because of their potential application as a source of bioactive peptides. Large amounts of tuna cooking juice with proteins and extracts are produced during the process of tuna canning, and these cooking juice wastes cause environmental problems. Therefore, in this study, cooking juice proteins were hydrolyzed by irradiation for their utilization as functional additives. The degree of hydrolysis of tuna cooking juice protein increased from 0% to 15.1% at the absorbed doses of 50 kGy. To investigate the antioxidant activity of the hydrolysate, it was performed the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, and the lipid peroxidation inhibitory and superoxide radical scavenging activities were measured. The FRAP values increased from 1470 ?M to 1930 ?M and IC50 on superoxide anion was decreased from 3.91 ?g/mL to 1.29 ?g/mL at 50 kGy. All of the antioxidant activities were increased in the hydrolysate, suggesting that radiation hydrolysis, which is a simple process that does not require an additive catalysts or an inactivation step, is a promising method for food and environmental industries.

Choi, Jong-il; Sung, Nak-Yun; Lee, Ju-Woon

2012-08-01

226

Antioxidant properties of Australian canola meal protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Antioxidant activities of canola protein hydrolysates (CPHs) and peptide fractions prepared using five proteases and ultrafiltration membranes (1, 3, 5, and 10kDa) were investigated. CPHs had similar and adequate quantities of essential amino acids. The effective concentration that scavenged 50% (EC50) of the ABTS(+) was greatest for the pancreatin fraction at 10.1?g/ml. CPHs and peptide fractions scavenged DPPH(+) with most of the EC50 values being <1.0mg/ml. Scavenging of superoxide radical was generally weak, except for the <1kDa pepsin peptide fraction that had a value of 51%. All CPHs inhibited linoleic acid oxidation with greater efficiency observed for pepsin hydrolysates. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity of Alcalase, chymotrypsin and pepsin hydrolysates was found to be better than that of glutathione (GSH) (p<0.05). These results show that CPHs have the potential to be used as bioactive ingredients in the formulation of functional foods against oxidative stress. PMID:24176374

Alashi, Adeola M; Blanchard, Christopher L; Mailer, Rodney J; Agboola, Samson O; Mawson, A John; He, Rong; Girgih, Abraham; Aluko, Rotimi E

2014-03-01

227

Canonical correlations between chemical and energetic characteristics of lignocellulosic wastes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Canonical correlation analysis is a statistical multivariate procedure that allows analyzing linear correlation that may exist between two groups or sets of variables (X and Y). This paper aimed to provide canonical correlation analysis between a group comprised of lignin and total extractives contents and higher heating value (HHV) with a group of elemental components (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur) for lignocellulosic wastes. The following wastes were used: eucalyptus shavings; pine...

Thiago de Paula Protásio; Gustavo Henrique Denzin Tonoli; Mário Guimarães Júnior; Lina Bufalino; Allan Motta Couto; Paulo Fernando Trugilho

2012-01-01

228

Screening of Fungi Capable of Degrading Lignocellulose from Plantation Forests  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In an effort to prevent forest fires after the clear cutting of plantation forests, fungi capable of degrading lignocelluloses were isolated to make a fertilizer from the logging waste. Seventy five fungal species were isolated from fruiting bodies and mycelia in plantation forests of South and North Sumatera, Indonesia. Sixty three of the fungi were identified based on the appearance and morphological characteristics of their fruiting bodies and mycelia, as Pycnoporus sanguineus, D...

Djarwanto; Tachibana, S.

2009-01-01

229

Integration of Lignocellulosic Biomass into Renewable Energy Generation Concepts  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In all European countries various lignocellulosic biomasses such as agricultural residues (straw, strawcontaining dung) or fractions from municipal solid waste are available in large amounts, but currently hardly any of thispotential is being used for energy generation. This paper reviews the different options for including lignocellulosicbiomass into renewable energy generation schemes. Not all wastes are suitable to be treated by principally availabletechniques such as anaerobic digestion, ...

Kusch, Sigrid; Morar, Maria V.

2009-01-01

230

Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production Potential and Regional Transportation Fuel Demand  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Road traffic dominates in domestic Swedish transportation and is highly dependent on fossil fuels, petrol and diesel. Currently, the use of renewable fuels in transportation accounts for less than 6% of the total energy use in transport. The demand for bioethanol to fuel transportation is growing and cannot be met through current domestic production alone. Lignocellulosic ethanol derived from agricultural crop residues may be a feasible alternative source of ethanol for securing a consistent ...

Daianova, Lilia

2011-01-01

231

Membrane separations in ionic liquid assisted processing of lignocellulosic biomass  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

2nd generation biofuels currently hold a significant market share. With increasing impact of biofuel its production routes have to be optimized in terms of CO2 emissions, competition with the food chain and utilization of the whole plant. The cluster of excellence "Tailor-made Fuels from Biomass" investigates processing of lignocellulosic biomass to next generation biofuels. Complete utilization of the raw material is achieved by initial separation of its constituents cellulose, hemicellulose...

Abels, Christian

2013-01-01

232

Anaerobic Biodegradation of the Lignin and Polysaccharide Components of Lignocellulose and Synthetic Lignin by Sediment Microflora  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Specifically radiolabeled [14C-lignin]lignocelluloses and [14C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses were prepared from a variety of marine and freshwater wetland plants including a grass, a sedge, a rush, and a hardwood. These [14C]lignocellulose preparations and synthetic [14C]lignin were incubated anaerobically with anoxic sediments collected from a salt marsh, a freshwater marsh, and a mangrove swamp. During long-term incubations lasting up to 300 days, the lignin and polysaccharide components o...

Benner, Ronald; Maccubbin, A. E.; Hodson, Robert E.

1984-01-01

233

VALORIZATION AND BIODECOLORIZATION OF DYE ADSORBED ON LIGNOCELLULOSICS USING WHITE ROT FUNGI  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Biosorption of dyes by lignocelluloses may be an effective method for removing dyes from textile effluents. However, the resulting dye-adsorbed lignocellulosic materials may constitute another pollution problem. An integrated method can solve this problem. Here, various lignocelluloses were tested for their Astrazon Black and Astrazon Blue dyes removal activities. The dye adsorbed after 30 min contact time was 90% (45 mg/L), 70% (35 mg/L), and 98% (49 mg/L) for wheat bran, pine cone, and cott...

Nesrin Ozmen,; Ozfer Yesilada

2012-01-01

234

The NILE Project — Advances in the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Materials into Ethanol  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

NILE ("New Improvements for Lignocellulosic Ethanol") was an integrated European project (2005-2010) devoted to the conversion of ligno-cellulosic raw materials to ethanol. The main objectives were to design novel enzymes suitable for the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose and new yeast strains able to efficiently converting all the sugars present in lignocellulose into ethanol. The project also included testing these new developments in an integrated pilot plant and evaluating the environmen...

Monot, F.; Margeot, A.; Hahn-ha?gerdal, B.; Lindstedt, J.; Slade, R.

2013-01-01

235

SELF-ASSEMBLED LIGNOCELLULOSE MICELLES: A NEW GENERATION OF VALUE-ADDED FUNCTIONAL NANOSTRUCTURES  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Lignocellulose-based self-assembled micelles have emerged as a new generation of value-added functional nanostructures that show promise to address issues concerning the depletion of non-renewable resources; also these materials may contribute to the growing enthusiasm of utilizing biomass resources. Lignocellulose micelles can be conveniently prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic lignocellulose derivatives in aqueous solution. They show great potential for applications in disparate fields...

Xiaohui Wang Mail; Runcang Sun,

2011-01-01

236

Purification and identification of antioxidant peptides from walnut (Juglans regia L.) protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Walnut proteins were hydrolyzed separately using three different proteases to obtain antioxidant peptides. The antioxidant activities of the hydrolysates were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Among hydrolysates, pepsin hydrolysate obtained by 3h exhibited the highest antioxidant activities, which could also quench the hydroxyl radical, chelate ferrous ion, exhibit reducing power and inhibit the lipid peroxidation. Then, 3-h pepsin hydrolysates were purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration and RP-HPLC. The sequence of the peptide with the highest antioxidative activity was identified to be Ala-Asp-Ala-Phe (423.23 Da) using RP-HPLC-ESI-MS, which was identified for the first time from walnut protein hydrolysates. Last, the inhibition of the peptide on lipid peroxidation was similar with that of reduced glutathione (GSH). These results indicate that the protein hydrolysates and/or its isolated peptides may be effectively used as food additives. PMID:23022588

Chen, Ning; Yang, Hongmei; Sun, Yi; Niu, Jun; Liu, Shuying

2012-12-01

237

FTIR spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates in relation to their functional properties.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mid-infrared spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates were recorded using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis techniques were used to investigate the capacity of FTIR spectra to classify hydrolysates and to study the ability of the spectra to predict bitterness, solubility, emulsifying, and foaming properties of hydrolysates. Principal component analysis revealed that hydrolysates prepared from different protein sources or with different classes of proteolytic enzymes are distinguished effectively on basis of their FTIR spectra. Moreover, multivariate regression analysis showed satisfactory to good prediction of functional parameters; the coefficient of determination (R(2)) varied from 0.60 to 0.92. The accurate prediction of bitterness and emulsion forming ability of hydrolysates by using only one uncomplicated and rapid analytical method has not been reported before. FTIR spectra in combination with multivariate data analysis proved to be valuable in protein hydrolysate fingerprinting and can be used as an alternative for laborious functionality measurements. PMID:12428941

Van Der Ven, Cornelly; Muresan, Sorel; Gruppen, Harry; De Bont, Dries B A; Merck, Karin B; Voragen, Alphons G J

2002-11-20

238

Recent advances in production of succinic acid from lignocellulosic biomass.  

Science.gov (United States)

Production of succinic acid via separate enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) are alternatives and are environmentally friendly processes. These processes have attained considerable positions in the industry with their own share of challenges and problems. The high-value succinic acid is extensively used in chemical, food, pharmaceutical, leather and textile industries and can be efficiently produced via several methods. Previously, succinic acid production via chemical synthesis from petrochemical or refined sugar has been the focus of interest of most reviewers. However, these expensive substrates have been recently replaced by alternative sustainable raw materials such as lignocellulosic biomass, which is cheap and abundantly available. Thus, this review focuses on succinic acid production utilizing lignocellulosic material as a potential substrate for SSF and SHF. SSF is an economical single-step process which can be a substitute for SHF - a two-step process where biomass is hydrolyzed in the first step and fermented in the second step. SSF of lignocellulosic biomass under optimum temperature and pH conditions results in the controlled release of sugar and simultaneous conversion into succinic acid by specific microorganisms, reducing reaction time and costs and increasing productivity. In addition, main process parameters which influence SHF and SSF processes such as batch and fed-batch fermentation conditions using different microbial strains are discussed in detail. PMID:24292125

Akhtar, Junaid; Idris, Ani; Abd Aziz, Ramlan

2014-02-01

239

Study of Lignocellulose/Epoxy Composites for Carbon-neutral Insulation Materials  

Science.gov (United States)

Carbon-neutral materials, which do not affect the density of CO2 in the atmosphere even if they burn, have attracted much attention form the viewpoint of environmental friendliness. In this study, lignocellulose/epoxy composites were newly prepared as carbon-neutral insulation materials, and their properties were evaluated. Hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose, which is composed of lignin and crystalline cellulose, was prepared by a treatment of corncob under high-pressure hot water at 190°C, 1.8 MPa for 10min. The 13C-NMR spectra showed that the amounts of non-crystalline cellulose in the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose were less than those of non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. Moreover, hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose was obtained by a reaction of maleic anhydride and glycidyl ether with the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose had lower water absorption and viscosity than those of the epoxy resin containing the non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose with SiO2 fillers showed an insulation breakdown strength as same as conventional material (an epoxy resin containing SiO2 fillers). In addition, mechanical and thermal properties of the epoxy-based composite were also comparable with a conventional material. Therefore, the epoxy-based composite seems to be a candidate as practical carbon neutral insulation materials.

Komiya, Gen; Hayami, Tokusuke; Murayama, Kiyoko; Sato, Junichi; Kinoshita, Susumu; Todo, Yoko; Amano, Yoshihiko

240

Research on the formation mechanism of composites from lignocelluloses and CaCO3.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this work is to explore the formation mechanism of lignocellulose composites in ionic liquids, which is very important for the potential applications of lignocellulose composites. In this study, the lignocellulose/CaCO3 composites have been synthesized using different concentrations of CaCO3 by a rapid and green microwave-ionic liquid method. In view of the experimental results and literature, the formation mechanism of the composites from lignocelluloses and CaCO3 was proposed. It is suggested that lignocelluloses accumulated Ca(2+) ions due to the complexation of the Ca(2+) ions and the highly anionic polysaccharide groups of lignocelluloses, and CaCO3 was obtained by the strong electrostatic interactions between carbonate anions and calcium cations. When the content of CaCO3 reached a certain level, the activity of CaCO3 in the composites was mainly as aggregation. Using lignocelluloses instead of cellulose as a template to synthesize the organic-inorganic composites was a facile method, which does not need to separate the lignocelluloses and can utilize all the main components of lignocelluloses. PMID:25280699

Fu, Lian-Hua; Ma, Ming-Guo; Bian, Jing; Deng, Fu; Du, Xuan

2014-11-01

 
 
 
 
241

Reprocessing of spent plasma  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This invention relates to a process for removing helium and other impurities from a mixture containing deuterium and tritium, a deuterium/tritium mixture when purified in accordance with such a process and, more particularly, to a process for the reprocessing of spent plasma removed from a thermofusion reactor. (U.K.)

242

Protein Hydrolysates from Agricultural Crops—Bioactivity and Potential for Functional Food Development  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

There has been an unprecedented demand for inexpensive plant-derived protein hydrolysates in recent years, owing to their potential nutritional applications. This review examines existing evidence regarding protein hydrolysates from agricultural crops such as wheat, soy, rapeseed, sunflower and barley. The bioactivity of these protein hydrolysates, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capabilities are discussed. In addition to evidence regarding their potential to enhance human nutriti...

Callaghan, Yvonne C. O.; Brien, Nora M. O.; Mccarthy, Aoife L.

2013-01-01

243

Effect of peptide distribution on the fractionation of whey protein hydrolysates by nanofiltration membranes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The fractionation of tryptic and chymotryptic hydrolysates of whey proteins by nanofiltration (NF) membranes has been investigated. Enzymatic hydrolysates were prepared by tryptic (TH) or chymotryptic (CH) hydrolysis of a commercial whey protein isolate followed by UF-treatment using a 10 000 g.mol$^{-1}$ MWCO in order to remove the enzyme and non-hydrolyzed material from the reaction mixture. Both hydrolysates were further fractionated using a SG13 (Osmonics) cellulose acetate NF membrane wi...

Pouliot, Yves; Gauthier, Sylvie; L Heureux, Jose?e

2000-01-01

244

Comparative study of the physiological properties of collagen, gelatin and collagen hydrolysate as cosmetic materials.  

Science.gov (United States)

The cell biological properties of collagen, gelatin and collagen hydrolysate (collagen had significant effects on cell attachment and proliferation, but the results of cells cultured on gelatin and collagen hydrolysate showed the rates of adhesion and proliferation were similar to those of cells cultured on plastic as a control. It is concluded that collagen has better physiological effects than those of gelatin and collagen hydrolysate as skin-care cosmetic materials. PMID:18492159

Li, G Y; Fukunaga, S; Takenouchi, K; Nakamura, F

2005-04-01

245

Antioxidant activity of hydrolysates and peptide fractions derived from porcine hemoglobin  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Porcine hemoglobin hydrolysate (PHH) was prepared with 6 different proteases (flavourzyme, papain, A.S.1398, alcalase, pepsin and trypsin). There was no correlation between extent of hydrolysis and antioxidant activity (p?>?0.05). The peptic hydrolysate prepared at 60 min possessed the strongest antioxidant potential (67.0?±?1.84%) among different hydrolysates, which was fractionated into 4 major types by ultrafiltration membranes with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO), PHH-...

Sun, Qian; Shen, Huixing; Luo, Yongkang

2011-01-01

246

Ecological concepts in recent polymer technology. Ecomaterials from lignocellulosics; Kankyo ni koryoshita kobunshigijutsu. Lignocellulosics no ecomaterial ka  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Lignocellulose is composed of cellulose and lignin as the main constituents. Ligneous materials that are left unused or incinerated annually in Japan amount to 27 million m{sup 3}. This paper explains contents of the study on utilization of the unused lignocellulose from the standpoint of recycling resources and solving environmental problems. If such chemical modifications as esterification and etherification are performed by utilizing reactivity of hydroxyl groups commonly present in ligneous materials, thermal fluidity may be provided. In particular, benzylic wood is known as a forming material with excellent mechanical properties. More industrially, acetyl cellulose blending is executed in place of benzyl blending. Furthermore, addition or copolymerization of polycaprolactone improves the melting point and strength. Otherwise, solubilization and liquefaction of wood materials may be possible under presence of phenols and polyalcohol. Verification is made in different ways on their biodegradibility, which would draw strong attentions. 11 refs., 2 figs.

Shiraishi, N. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

1997-06-01

247

Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks.  

Science.gov (United States)

Developing feedstock-independent biomass pretreatment would be vital to second generation biorefineries that would fully utilize diverse non-food lignocellulosic biomass resources, decrease transportation costs of low energy density feedstock, and conserve natural biodiversity. Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation (COSLIF) was applied to a variety of feedstocks, including Miscanthus, poplar, their mixture, bagasse, wheat straw, and rice straw. Although non-pretreated biomass samples exhibited a large variation in enzymatic digestibility, the COSLIF-pretreated biomass samples exhibited similar high enzymatic glucan digestibilities and fast hydrolysis rates. Glucan digestibilities of most pretreated feedstocks were ?93% at five filter paper units per gram of glucan. The overall glucose and xylose yields for the Miscanthus:poplar mixture at a weight ratio of 1:2 were 93% and 85%, respectively. These results suggested that COSLIF could be regarded as a feedstock-independent pretreatment suitable for processing diverse feedstocks by adjusting pretreatment residence time only. PMID:22613899

Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Zhu, Zhiguang; Zhang, Y-H Percival

2012-08-01

248

Spent fuel management in Argentina  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The general program on Argentinian Spent Fuel Management has been informed in previous meetings and IAEA publications. This presentation includes an updating of the programs and a short description of the dry storage of Embalse NPP spent fuel. (author)

249

Xylitol production from corn fiber and sugarcane bagasse hydrolysates by Candida tropicalis.  

Science.gov (United States)

A natural isolate, Candida tropicalis was tested for xylitol production from corn fiber and sugarcane bagasse hydrolysates. Fermentation of corn fiber and sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate showed xylose uptake and xylitol production, though these were very low, even after hydrolysate neutralization and treatments with activated charcoal and ion exchange resins. Initial xylitol production was found to be 0.43 g/g and 0.45 g/g of xylose utilised with corn fiber and sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate respectively. One of the critical factors for low xylitol production was the presence of inhibitors in these hydrolysates. To simulate influence of hemicellulosic sugar composition on xylitol yield, three different combinations of mixed sugar control experiments, without the presence of any inhibitors, have been performed and the strain produced 0.63 g/g, 0.68 g/g and 0.72 g/g of xylose respectively. To improve yeast growth and xylitol production with these hydrolysates, which contain inhibitors, the cells were adapted by sub culturing in the hydrolysate containing medium for 25 cycles. After adaptation the organism produced more xylitol 0.58 g/g and 0.65 g/g of xylose with corn fiber hydrolysate and sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate respectively. PMID:16242318

Rao, R Sreenivas; Jyothi, Ch Pavana; Prakasham, R S; Sarma, P N; Rao, L Venkateswar

2006-10-01

250

Protein Hydrolysates from Agricultural Crops—Bioactivity and Potential for Functional Food Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available There has been an unprecedented demand for inexpensive plant-derived protein hydrolysates in recent years, owing to their potential nutritional applications. This review examines existing evidence regarding protein hydrolysates from agricultural crops such as wheat, soy, rapeseed, sunflower and barley. The bioactivity of these protein hydrolysates, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capabilities are discussed. In addition to evidence regarding their potential to enhance human nutrition, the effect of the hydrolysates on the techno-functional properties of foods will be reviewed.

Yvonne C. O'Callaghan

2013-02-01

251

Antioxidative efficacy of alkali-treated tilapia protein hydrolysates: a comparative study of five enzymes.  

Science.gov (United States)

The antioxidant activities of alkali-treated tilapia protein hydrolysates were determined by their ability to inhibit the formation of lipid hydroperoxides (PV) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in a washed muscle model system and by their ability to inhibit DPPH free radicals and chelate ferrous ion in an aqueous solution. Protein isolates were prepared from tilapia white muscle using alkali solubilization at pH 11.0 and reprecipitation at pH 5.5. Protein hydrolysates were prepared by hydrolyzing the isolates using five different enzymes, Cryotin F, Protease A Amano, Protease N Amano, Flavourzyme, and Neutrase, to 7.5, 15, and 25% degrees of hydrolysis (DH). All of the protein hydrolysates significantly (penzymes. The ability of different enzyme-catalyzed protein hydrolysates to scavenge DPPH radicals was not reflected in their ability to inhibit oxidation in a washed tilapia model system. In a washed muscle model system, the hydrolysates prepared using Cryotin F were most effective and the hydrolysates prepared using Flavourzyme and Neutrase were least effective in inhibiting the development of TBARS and PV, whereas in an aqueous solution, hydrolysates prepared using Flavourzyme were most effective in scavenging DPPH radicals and chelating ferrous ions. Enzymatic hydrolysis decreased the size of tilapia protein hydrolysates and, in general, tilapia protein hydrolysates with low molecular weights were better antioxidants than those with high molecular weights. PMID:18247531

Raghavan, Sivakumar; Kristinsson, Hordur G

2008-02-27

252

Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass: biochemical and molecular perspectives.  

Science.gov (United States)

In view of rising prices of crude oil due to increasing fuel demands, the need for alternative sources of bioenergy is expected to increase sharply in the coming years. Among potential alternative bioenergy resources, lignocellulosics have been identified as the prime source of biofuels and other value-added products. Lignocelluloses as agricultural, industrial and forest residuals account for the majority of the total biomass present in the world. To initiate the production of industrially important products from cellulosic biomass, bioconversion of the cellulosic components into fermentable sugars is necessary. A variety of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi may have the ability to degrade the cellulosic biomass to glucose monomers. Bacterial cellulases exist as discrete multi-enzyme complexes, called cellulosomes that consist of multiple subunits. Cellulolytic enzyme systems from the filamentous fungi, especially Trichoderma reesei, contain two exoglucanases or cellobiohydrolases (CBH1 and CBH2), at least four endoglucanases (EG1, EG2, EG3, EG5), and one beta-glucosidase. These enzymes act synergistically to catalyse the hydrolysis of cellulose. Different physical parameters such as pH, temperature, adsorption, chemical factors like nitrogen, phosphorus, presence of phenolic compounds and other inhibitors can critically influence the bioconversion of lignocellulose. The production of cellulases by microbial cells is governed by genetic and biochemical controls including induction, catabolite repression, or end product inhibition. Several efforts have been made to increase the production of cellulases through strain improvement by mutagenesis. Various physical and chemical methods have been used to develop bacterial and fungal strains producing higher amounts of cellulase, all with limited success. Cellulosic bioconversion is a complex process and requires the synergistic action of the three enzymatic components consisting of endoglucanases, exoglucanases and beta-glucosidases. The co-cultivation of microbes in fermentation can increase the quantity of the desirable components of the cellulase complex. An understanding of the molecular mechanism leading to biodegradation of lignocelluloses and the development of the bioprocessing potential of cellulolytic microorganisms might effectively be accomplished with recombinant DNA technology. For instance, cloning and sequencing of the various cellulolytic genes could economize the cellulase production process. Apart from that, metabolic engineering and genomics approaches have great potential for enhancing our understanding of the molecular mechanism of bioconversion of lignocelluloses to value added economically significant products in the future. PMID:18338189

Kumar, Raj; Singh, Sompal; Singh, Om V

2008-05-01

253

3-year midterm results following hydrolyser{sup TM} thrombolysis; Langzeit-Ergebnisse nach Hydrolyser-unterstuetzter Angioplastie - eine prospektive Studie  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Purpose: Data of a three-year follow-up after mechanical thrombolysis with the Hydrolyser catheter were evaluated. Patients have otherwise been treated by local thrombolysis. Method: 35 patients were treated by thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty, aspiration, local thrombolysis, and stent placement, if necessary. Morphological results following Hydrolyser treatment and additional treatment were evaluated. Results: Following Hydrolyser treatment a significant reduction of the degree and length of the occlusion was observed. Primary clinical success was 80%. Patency rate after 3 years was 0.5. 23% of all patients died in the follow-up period. Conclusion: The Hydrolyser treatment is a relevant alternative to local thrombolysis. This method reduces the time of treatment. The authors favor the lateral opening of the catheter to remove mural thrombus. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Auswertung der Nachkontrollen von Patienten, die anstelle einer lokalen Lyse mit dem Hydrolyser {sup trademark} -Thrombektomiekatheter (HT), Ballondilatation (PTA), Aspirationsthrombektomie (PAT) oder Stent behandelt wurden. Methode: 35 Patienten wurden behandelt und ueber drei Jahre nachbeobachtet. Alle Patienten hatten thromotische/thrombembolische Verschluesse der unteren Extremitaet. Die Laesionen wurden alle mit dem Hydrolyser {sup trademark} -Katheter behandelt. Abhaengig von der Art der Laesion wurden die unterschiedlichen Zusatzverfahren eingesetzt. Das morphologische Resultat wurde sowohl nach dem Einsatz des Hydrolysers {sup trademark} als auch nach der sekundaeren Therapie beurteilt. Ergebnis: Nach Verwendung des Hydrolysers konnte in 21 Faellen eine weitgehende Rekanalisation erreicht werden. Nach sekundaerer Angioplastie wurde in 31 Faellen ein zufrieden-stellendes Resultat (keine relevante Reststenose) erzielt. Die primaere klinische Erfolgsrate lag bei 28/35 (80%). Die Offenheitsrate nach drei Jahren betrug 0,5. 8 Patienten (23%) waren verstorben. Schlussfolgerung: Das System verkuerzt oder ersetzt die lokale Lyse. Vergleichbar ist der Hydrolyser {sup trademark} nur mit dem SET-Thrombektomiesystem {sup trademark}, wobei den Autoren die laterale Absaugoeffnung guenstiger erscheint, um murale Thromben zu entfernen. (orig.)

Beyer-Enke, S.A.; Deichen, J.; Zeitler, E. [Staedtisches Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie

1999-08-01

254

Radical scavenging and reducing ability of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) protein hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Enzymatically hydrolyzed fish protein hydrolysates could be used as a source of antioxidative nutraceuticals. In our current work, we have investigated alkali-solubilized tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus) protein hydrolysates for their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and for their reducing power. Tilapia protein isolate was prepared by an alkaline solubilization technique and used as a substrate for enzyme hydrolysis. Cryotin, protease A 'Amano' 2, protease N 'Amano', Neutrase and Flavourzyme, were used separately to determine their effectiveness in hydrolyzing tilapia protein isolate. ROS scavenging ability was quantified using an isoluminol enhanced chemiluminescent assay in the presence of a) hydrogen peroxide or b) mononuclear cells isolated from human blood. Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of the hydrolysates using 2, 2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) or 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), were also investigated. Results showed that, in general, the TEAC, FRAP values and ROS scavenging ability of the hydrolysates increased with an increase in the degree of hydrolysis. Among the different hydrolysates, those prepared using Cryotin were most effective and Amano A2 hydrolysates were least effective in scavenging ABTS*(+) and ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide. However, FRAP assay showed that hydrolysates prepared using Flavourzyme were most effective, and Amano N and Neutrase hydrolysates were least effective in reducing ferric ions. No significant difference was observed among the hydrolysates produced with different enzymes in their ability to scavenge ROS generated by phorbol myristate acetate stimulated mononuclear cells. These results shed light on the in vitro ROS scavenging ability of alkali solubilized tilapia protein hydrolysates, as well as potential nutraceutical use of these hydrolysates. PMID:18828605

Raghavan, Sivakumar; Kristinsson, Hordur G; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

2008-11-12

255

Scintillator spent fuel monitor  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A monitor for rapidly measuring the gross gamma-ray flux immediately above spent fuel assemblies in underwater storage racks has been developed. It consists of a plastic scintillator, photomultiplier, collimator, and a small battery-powered electronics package. The crosstalk from an isolated fuel assembly to an adjacent void is only about 2%. The mean difference between the measured gamma-ray flux and the flux estimated from the declared burnup and cooling time with a simple formula is 22%.

Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.; Bernard, W.

1980-01-01

256

Encapsulating spent nuclear fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A system is described for encapsulating spent nuclear fuel discharged from nuclear reactors in the form of rods or multi-rod assemblies. The rods are completely and contiguously enclosed in concrete in which metallic fibres are incorporated to increase thermal conductivity and polymers to decrease fluid permeability. This technique provides the advantage of acceptable long-term stability for storage over the conventional underwater storage method. Examples are given of suitable concrete compositions. (UK)

257

Microbial biomass production from rice straw hydrolysate in airlift bioreactors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Rice straw is a by-product of rice production, and a great bioresource as raw biomass material for manufacturing value-adding protein for animal feedstock, which has been paid more and more attention. In the present work, utilizing rice straw hydrolysate as a substrate for microbial biomass production in 11.5L external-loop airlift bioreactors was investigated. Rice straw hydrolysate obtained through acid-hydrolyzing rice straw was used for the culture of yeast Candida arborea AS1.257. The influences of gas flow rate, initial liquid volume, hole diameter of gas sparger and numbers of sieve plates on microbial biomass production were examined. The best results in the external-loop airlift bioreactor were obtained under 9.0 L initial liquid volume, 1.1 (v/v)/min gas flow rate during culture time of 0-24 h and 1.4 (v/v)/min gas flow rate of 24-48 h at 29+/-1 degrees C. The addition of the sieve plates in the riser of the external-loop airlift bioreactor increased productivity. After 48 h, under optimized operation conditions, crude protein productivity with one sieve and two sieves were 13.6 mg/mL and 13.7 mg/mL, respectively, comparing 12.7 mg/mL without sieves in the airlift bioreactor and 11.7 mg/mL in the in the 10-L mechanically stirred tank bioreactor. It is feasible to operate the external-loop airlift bioreactors and possible to reduce the production cost for microbial biomass production from the rice straw hydrolysate. PMID:15978690

Zheng, Yu-Guo; Chen, Xiao-Long; Wang, Zhao

2005-09-10

258

Debittering of Protein Hydrolysates by Lactobacillus LBL-4 Aminopeptidase  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Yoghurt strain Lactobacillus LBL-4 cultivated for 8–10?h at pH ~6.0 was investigated as a considerable food-grade source of intracellular aminopeptidase. Cell-free extract manifesting >200?AP U/l was obtained from cells harvested from 1?L culture media. Subtilisin-induced hydrolysates of casein, soybean isolate, and Scenedesmus cell protein with degree of hydrolysis 20–22% incubated at 45°C for 10?h by 10 AP?U/g peptides caused an enlarging of DH up to 40–42%, 46–48%, and 3...

Tchorbanov, Bozhidar; Marinova, Margarita; Grozeva, Lydia

2011-01-01

259

Desalting Fish Skin Protein Hydrolysates Using Macroporous Adsorption Resin  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Macroporous Adsorption Resin (MAR) DA 201-C was used to desalt different Fish Skin Protein Hydrolysates (FSPHs). The FSPHs were obtained by hydrolysis of fish skin using Alcalase in a batch reactor a 60°C and pH 8.25. The ash was removed by adsorbing FSPHs onto MAR. Desorption was achieved by washing with alcohol at different concentrations. Ash content of the FSPHs was reduced from 4.69-5.57 to 1.07-2.48% range. The protein content was enriched from 89.07-90.82 to 94.89-96.38% range. MAR ha...

Joseph Wasswa; Jian Tang; Xiao-Hong Gu

2007-01-01

260

Production of Defatted Palm Kernel Cake Protein Hydrolysate as a Valuable Source of Natural Antioxidants  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to produce a valuable protein hydrolysate from palm kernel cake (PKC for the development of natural antioxidants. Extracted PKC protein was hydrolyzed using different proteases (alcalase, chymotrypsin, papain, pepsin, trypsin, flavourzyme, and bromelain. Subsequently, antioxidant activity and degree of hydrolysis (DH of each hydrolysate were evaluated using DPPH• radical scavenging activity and O-phthaldialdehyde spectrophotometric assay, respectively. The results revealed a strong correlation between DH and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates, where among these, protein hydrolysates produced by papain after 38 h hydrolysis exhibited the highest DH (91 ± 0.1% and DPPH• radical scavenging activity (73.5 ± 0.25% compared to the other hydrolysates. In addition, fractionation of the most effective (potent hydrolysate by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated a direct association between hydrophobicity and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates. Isoelectric focusing tests also revealed that protein hydrolysates with basic and neutral isoelectric point (pI have the highest radical scavenging activity, although few fractions in the acidic range also exhibited good antioxidant potential.

Mohammad Zarei

2012-06-01

 
 
 
 
261

Production of defatted palm kernel cake protein hydrolysate as a valuable source of natural antioxidants.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to produce a valuable protein hydrolysate from palm kernel cake (PKC) for the development of natural antioxidants. Extracted PKC protein was hydrolyzed using different proteases (alcalase, chymotrypsin, papain, pepsin, trypsin, flavourzyme, and bromelain). Subsequently, antioxidant activity and degree of hydrolysis (DH) of each hydrolysate were evaluated using DPPH• radical scavenging activity and O-phthaldialdehyde spectrophotometric assay, respectively. The results revealed a strong correlation between DH and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates, where among these, protein hydrolysates produced by papain after 38 h hydrolysis exhibited the highest DH (91 ± 0.1%) and DPPH• radical scavenging activity (73.5 ± 0.25%) compared to the other hydrolysates. In addition, fractionation of the most effective (potent) hydrolysate by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated a direct association between hydrophobicity and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates. Isoelectric focusing tests also revealed that protein hydrolysates with basic and neutral isoelectric point (pI) have the highest radical scavenging activity, although few fractions in the acidic range also exhibited good antioxidant potential. PMID:22942692

Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Anwar, Farooq; Saari, Nazamid

2012-01-01

262

Nutritional evaluation of caseins and whey proteins and their hydrolysates from Protamex*  

Science.gov (United States)

Whey protein concentrate (WPC 80) and sodium caseinate were hydrolyzed by Protamex to 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% degree of hydrolysis (DH). WPC 80, sodium caseinate and their hydrolysates were then analyzed, compared and evaluated for their nutritional qualities. Their chemical composition, protein solubility, amino acid composition, essential amino acid index (EAA index), biological value (BV), nutritional index (NI), chemical score, enzymic protein efficiency ratio (E-PER) and in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) were determined. The results indicated that the enzymatic hydrolysis of WPC 80 and sodium caseinate by Protamex improved the solubility and IVPD of their hydrolysates. WPC 80, sodium caseinate and their hydrolysates were high-quality proteins and had a surplus of essential amino acids compared with the FAO/WHO/UNU (1985) reference standard. The nutritive value of WPC 80 and its hydrolysates was superior to that of sodium caseinate and its hydrolysates as indicated by some nutritional parameters such as the amino acid composition, chemical score, EAA index and predicted BV. However, the E-PER was lower for the WPC hydrolysates as compared to unhydrolyzed WPC 80 but sodium caseinate and its hydrolysates did not differ significantly. The nutritional qualities of WPC 80, sodium caseinate and their hydrolysates were good and make them appropriate for food formulations or as nutritional supplements. PMID:16421963

Sindayikengera, Severin; Xia, Wen-shui

2006-01-01

263

Study on Hydrolysis Conditions of Flavourzyme in Soybean Polypeptide Alcalase Hydrolysate and Soybean Polypeptide Refining Process  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Soybean protein Alcalase hydrolysate was further hydrolyzed by adopting Flavourzyme as hydrolytic enzyme. The optimal hydrolysis conditions of Flavourzyme was that pH was 7.0 at temperature 50°C and E/S(ratio of enzyme and substrate was 20LAPU/g. Bitterness value was reduced to 2 after Flavourzyme hydrolysis reaction in optimal hydrolysis conditions. The change of molecular weight distribution range from Alcalase hydrolysate to Flavourzyme hydrolysate was not obvious. DH (Degree of hydrolysis of soybean protein hydrolysate was increased to 24.2% which was improved 3.5% than Alcalase hydrolysate. Protein recovery proportion was increased to 73.2% which was improved 0.8% than Alcalase hydrolysate. Soybean polypeptide Flavourzyme hydrolysate was decolorized with activated carbon which optimal dosage was 1.2% solution amount (w/w. Anion/cation exchange process was used in the desalination processing of soybean polypeptide. Ratio of anion resin and cation resin was 2:3(V/V. The volume of hydrolysate processed was 5 times as the volume of anion resin. Ash content of soybean peptide solution reduced to 2.11% (dry basis, salinity decreased by 86% after desalination processing.

Yongsheng Ma

2014-10-01

264

Enzymatic hydrolysis of recovered protein from frozen small croaker and functional properties of its hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fish protein isolate were recovered from frozen small croaker using pH shift. The partial enzymatic hydrolysates were fractionated as soluble and insoluble parts. They were dried using the drum dryer and their functional properties were examined. The total nitrogen content of the enzymatic hydrolysates ranged from 12.9% to 13.7%. The degree of hydrolysis of precipitates was 18.2% and 12.2% for croaker hydrolysates treated with Protamex 1.5 MG (Bacilllus protease complex) and Flavourzyme 500 MG (endoproteases and exoproteases, Aspergillus oryzae), respectively. The TCA supernatant, after centrifugation of hydrolysates, contained numerous peptides ranging from 100 to 4000 daltons. The solubility of the supernatants was higher than that of the precipitates at 0% to 3% NaCl and pH 2 to 10. The precipitate of Flavourzyme- and Protamex-treated hydrolysates showed a high emulsion activity index value compared to egg white and bovine plasma protein. In addition, the highest emulsion stability was observed for Protamex-treated precipitate hydrolysates. Emulsion stability of Protamex-treated precipitate hydrolysates was comparable to those of protein additives (egg white, bovine plasma protein, and soy protein concentrate). Water and fat binding capacity of precipitates were higher than those of supernatant. The results indicate that precipitate hydrolysate from undersized croaker can be used in processed muscle foods as a functional and nutritional ingredient. PMID:19200081

Choi, Yeung Joon; Hur, Sungik; Choi, Byeong-Dae; Konno, Kunihiko; Park, Jae W

2009-01-01

265

Comparative environmental performance of lignocellulosic ethanol from different feedstocks  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A renewable biofuel economy is projected as a pathway to decrease dependence on fossil fuels as well as to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions. Ethanol produced on large-scale from lignocellulosic raw materials is considered the most potential next generation automotive fuel. In this paper, a Life Cycle Assessment model was developed to evaluate the environmental implications of the production of ethanol from five lignocellulosic materials: alfalfa stems, poplar, Ethiopian mustard, flax shives and hemp hurds and its use in passenger cars. Two ethanol-based fuel applications, E10 (a mixture of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline by volume) and E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) were assessed and the results were compared to those of conventional gasoline (CG) in an equivalent car. The environmental performance was assessed in terms of fossil fuels requirements, global warming, photochemical oxidant formation, acidification and eutrophication by means of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology in order to identify the best environmental friendly lignocellulosic source. The results show that, compared to CG, life cycle greenhouse gases emissions are lower for etanol blends, specifically up to 145% lower for E85-fueled car derived from Ethiopian mustard. This crop is also the best option in terms of eutrophying emissions regardless the ratio of ethanol in the blend. In the remaining impact categories, other feedstocks are considered beneficial, that is, poplar in the case of photochemical oxidants formation and flax shives for acidification. Concerning fossil fuels requirements, decreases up to 10% and 63% for E10 and E85 derived from hemp hurds and Ethiopian mustard, respectively, were obtained. According to the results, the study clearly demonstrates the importance of using low intensive energy and high biomass yield crops. LCA procedure helps to identify the key areas in the ethanol production life cycle where the researchers and technicians need to work to improve the environmental performance. Technological development could help in lowering both the environmental impact and the prices of the ethanol fuels. (author)

266

Comparative environmental performance of lignocellulosic ethanol from different feedstocks  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A renewable biofuel economy is projected as a pathway to decrease dependence on fossil fuels as well as to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions. Ethanol produced on large-scale from lignocellulosic raw materials is considered the most potential next generation automotive fuel. In this paper, a Life Cycle Assessment model was developed to evaluate the environmental implications of the production of ethanol from five lignocellulosic materials: alfalfa stems, poplar, Ethiopian mustard, flax shives and hemp hurds and its use in passenger cars. Two ethanol-based fuel applications, E10 (a mixture of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline by volume) and E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) were assessed and the results were compared to those of conventional gasoline (CG) in an equivalent car. The environmental performance was assessed in terms of fossil fuels requirements, global warming, photochemical oxidant formation, acidification and eutrophication by means of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology in order to identify the best environmental friendly lignocellulosic source. The results show that, compared to CG, life cycle greenhouse gases emissions are lower for etanol blends, specifically up to 145% lower for E85-fueled car derived from Ethiopian mustard. This crop is also the best option in terms of eutrophying emissions regardless the ratio of ethanol in the blend. In the remaining impact categories, other feedstocks are considered beneficial, that is, poplar in the case of photochemical oxidants formation and flax shives for acidification. Concerning fossil fuels requirements, decreases up to 10% and 63% for E10 and E85 derived from hemp hurds and Ethiopian mustard, respectively, were obtained. According to the results, the study clearly demonstrates the importance of using low intensive energy and high biomass yield crops. LCA procedure helps to identify the key areas in the ethanol production life cycle where the researchers and technicians need to work to improve the environmental performance. Technological development could help in lowering both the environmental impact and the prices of the ethanol fuels. (author)

Gonzalez-Garcia, Sara; Moreira, M. Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2010-09-15

267

Advanced anaerobic bioconversion of lignocellulosic waste for bioregenerative life support following thermal water treatment and biodegradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes.  

Science.gov (United States)

The feasibility of nearly-complete conversion of lignocellulosic waste (70% food crops, 20% faecal matter and 10% green algae) into biogas was investigated in the context of a life support project. The treatment comprised a series of processes, i.e., a mesophilic laboratory scale CSTR (continuously stirred tank reactor), an upflow biofilm reactor, a fiber liquefaction reactor employing the rumen bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes and a hydrothermolysis system in near-critical water. By the one-stage CSTR, a biogas yield of 75% with a specific biogas production of 0.37 l biogas g(-1) VSS (volatile suspended solids) added at a RT (hydraulic retention time) of 20-25 d was obtained. Biogas yields could not be increased considerably at higher RT, indicating the depletion of readily available substrate after 25 d. The solids present in the CSTR-effluent were subsequently treated in two ways. Hydrothermal treatment (T approximately 310-350 degrees C, p approximately 240 bar) resulted in effective carbon liquefaction (50-60% without and 83% with carbon dioxide saturation) and complete sanitation of the residue. Application of the cellulolytic Fibrobacter succinogenes converted remaining cellulose contained in the CSTR-effluent into acetate and propionate mainly. Subsequent anaerobic digestion of the hydrothermolysis and the Fibrobacter hydrolysates allowed conversion of 48-60% and 30%, respectively. Thus, the total process yielded biogas corresponding with conversions up to 90% of the original organic matter. It appears that particularly mesophilic digestion in conjunction with hydrothermolysis at near-critical conditions offers interesting features for (nearly) complete and hygienic carbon and energy recovery from human waste in a bioregenerative life support context. PMID:15228075

Lissens, Geert; Verstraete, Willy; Albrecht, Tobias; Brunner, Gerd; Creuly, Catherine; Seon, Jerome; Dussap, Gilles; Lasseur, Christophe

2004-06-01

268

A comparative study of the hydrolysis of gamma irradiated lignocelluloses  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The effect of high-dose irradiation as a pretreatment method on two common lignocellulosic materials; hardwood (Khaya senegalensis) and softwood (Triplochiton scleroxylon) were investigated by assessing the potential of cellulase enzyme derived from Aspergillus flavus Linn isolate NSPR 101 to hydrol [...] yse the materials. The irradiation strongly affected the materials, causing the enzymatic hydrolysis to increase by more than 3 fold. Maximum digestibility occurred in softwood at 40kGy dosage of irradiation, while in hardwood it was at 90kGy dosage. The results also showed that, at the same dosage levels (p

E., Betiku; O. A., Adetunji; T. V., Ojumu; B. O., Solomon.

269

Chemical imaging of lignocellulosic biomass by CARS microscopy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Chemical and structural composition of wood biomass is studied by label-free and chemically specific Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy. A concept developed for assignment and semi-quantitative imaging of sample components; cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin; by multiplex CARS microspectroscopy and subsequent data analysis is presented. Specific imaging without fluorescence backround is achieved an order of magnitude faster compared with conventional Raman microscopy. Laser polarization control yield information on molecular arrangement in wood fibers. Narrowband CARS excitation of single vibrations allows for three-dimensional volume imaging. Thus, CARS microscopy has potential as an important instrument for characterization of lignocellulosic materials. PMID:23836627

Pohling, Christoph; Brackmann, Christian; Duarte, Alex; Buckup, Tiago; Enejder, Annika; Motzkus, Marcus

2014-01-01

270

Recent developments in fast pyrolysis of ligno-cellulosic materials.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pyrolysis is a thermochemical process to convert ligno-cellulosic materials into bio-char and pyrolysis oil. This oil can be further upgraded or refined for electricity, transportation fuels and chemicals production. At the time of writing, several demonstration factories are considered worldwide aiming at maturing the technology. Research is focusing on understanding the underlying processes at all relevant scales, ranging from the chemistry of cell wall deconstruction to optimization of pyrolysis factories, in order to produce better quality oils for targeted uses. Among the several bio-oil applications that are currently investigated the production and fermentation of pyrolytic sugars explores the promising interface between thermochemistry and biotechnology. PMID:23664704

Kersten, Sascha; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

2013-06-01

271

Study of lignocellulose components for production of lactic acid  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Lactic acid promises to be an important chemical feedstock in the future for the production of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers. About half of the current US consumption is imported to meet the escalating demand from both the food and chemical industries. The potential future market for polylactide products would further stress the domestic capacity of lactic acid production. Renewable resources such as lignocellulosic crops and wastes are abundant and could be utilized for the production of important fuels and chemicals. This would not only reduce our dependence on limited reserves of fossil fuels but also alleviate the environmental burden of waste accumulation and disposal.

Padukone, N.; Schmidt, S.L.; Goodman, B.J.; Wyman, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-12-31

272

Adhesion improvement of lignocellulosic products by enzymatic pre-treatment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Enzymatic bonding methods, based on laccase or peroxidase enzymes, for lignocellulosic products such as medium-density fiberboard and particleboard are discussed with reference to the increasing costs of presently used petroleum-based adhesives and the health concerns associated with formaldehyde emissions from current composite products. One approach is to improve the self-bonding properties of the particles by oxidation of their surface lignin before they are fabricated into boards. Another method involves using enzymatically pre-treated lignins as adhesives for boards and laminates. The application of this technology to achieve wet strength characteristics in paper is also reviewed. PMID:18502077

Widsten, Petri; Kandelbauer, Andreas

2008-01-01

273

A comparative study of the hydrolysis of gamma irradiated lignocelluloses  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The effect of high-dose irradiation as a pretreatment method on two common lignocellulosic materials; hardwood (Khaya senegalensis) and softwood (Triplochiton scleroxylon) were investigated by assessing the potential of cellulase enzyme derived from Aspergillus flavus Linn isolate NSPR 101 to hydrol [...] yse the materials. The irradiation strongly affected the materials, causing the enzymatic hydrolysis to increase by more than 3 fold. Maximum digestibility occurred in softwood at 40kGy dosage of irradiation, while in hardwood it was at 90kGy dosage. The results also showed that, at the same dosage levels (p

E., Betiku; O. A., Adetunji; T. V., Ojumu; B. O., Solomon.

2009-06-01

274

Mixed Enzyme Systems for Delignification of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The application of enzymes such as laccase and xylanase for the preparation of cellulose from lignocellulosic material is an option for those industries seeking to reduce the use of chlorine-containing bleach agents, thus minimizing the environmental impact of their processes. Mixed hydrolytic and oxidative enzyme systems have been well described in the context of biopulping, and thus provide good precedent regarding effectiveness, despite the susceptibility of xylanase to inactivation by laccase-generated oxidants. This paper examines the progress towards development of sequential and simultaneous mixed enzyme systems to accomplish delignification.

Elisa M. Woolridge

2014-01-01

275

Characterization of structural and functional properties of fish protein hydrolysates from surimi processing by-products.  

Science.gov (United States)

Structural and functional properties of fish protein hydrolysates with different degrees of hydrolysis (DH) from surimi processing by-products, prepared by Protamex and Alcalase, were evaluated. As the DH increased, the zeta potentials of the hydrolysates increased (p>0.05). The surface hydrophobicity of the hydrolysates was significantly affected by DH (phydrolysate with DH 10%, prepared by Protamex, contained more large protein molecules than did the others. Hydrolysis by both enzymes increased solubility to more than 65% over a wide pH range (pH 2-10). The interfacial activities of hydrolysates decreased with increasing DH (phydrolysate with DH 10%, prepared by Protamex, exhibited the best interfacial properties among all of the samples. Thermal properties were also affected by the hydrolysis. The results reveal that structures and functionalities of the hydrolysates were determined both by DH and enzyme type employed. PMID:24423557

Liu, Yongle; Li, Xianghong; Chen, Zhijun; Yu, Jian; Wang, Faxiang; Wang, Jianhui

2014-05-15

276

Positron lifetime reveals the nano level packing in complex polysaccharide-rich hydrolysate matrixes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to quantify the free volume and molecular packing in hydrolysate and hemicellulose-based barriers films, derived from process streams during wood processing operations. These hydrolysate films, comprising a fair share of lignin coexisting with poly- and oligo-saccharides, have very low but variable oxygen permeability but differ among themselves with respect to barrier performance as well as molecular weight, degree of branching, and monosaccharide residue main chain composition. From PALS measurements on hydrolysates, the free volume hole radius (r(h)), radius distributions (n(r(h))), volume-weighted hole sizes ((v)), and hole volume distributions (g(v(h))) were calculated showing that the hydrolysate matrixes are very densely packed with small holes. The results show a clear relationship between hydrolysate molecular architecture and composition, the nanolevel molecular packing, and the ability of suppressing the diffusion of oxygen through the film. PMID:22455471

Edlund, Ulrica; Yu, Yang; Ryberg, Yingzhi Zhu; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

2012-04-17

277

Efficient production of pullulan using rice hull hydrolysate by adaptive laboratory evolution of Aureobasidium pullulans.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pullulan production by Aureobasidium pullulans CCTCC M 2012259 using rice hull hydrolysate as the carbon source was conducted. The acetic acid in the hydrolysate was demonstrated to exert a negative effect on pullulan biosynthesis. Instead of employing expensive methods to remove acetic acid from the hydrolysate, a mutant A. pullulans ARH-1 was isolated following 20 cycles of adaptive laboratory evolution of the parental strain on medium containing acetic acid. The maximum pullulan production achieved by the adapted mutant at 48 h using the hydrolysate of untreated rice hull was 22.2 g L(-1), while that obtained by the parental strain at 60 h was 15.6 g L(-1). The assay of key enzymes associated with pullulan biosynthesis revealed that acetic acid inhibited enzyme activity rather than suppressing enzyme synthesis. These results demonstrated that adaptive evolution highly improved the efficiency of pullulan production by A. pullulans using the hydrolysate of untreated rice hull. PMID:24835913

Wang, Dahui; Ju, Xiaomin; Zhou, Donghai; Wei, Gongyuan

2014-07-01

278

In vitro binding capacity of bile acids by defatted corn protein hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capacity. Peptides from Flavourzyme defatted corn hydrolysate exhibited significantly (p Flavourzyme hydrolysate was almost preserved after gastrointestinal proteases digestion. The molecular weight of Flavourzyme hydrolysate was determined and most of the peptides were found between 500-180 Da. The results showed that Flavourzyme hydrolysate may be used as a potential cholesterol-reducing agent. PMID:21541043

Kongo-Dia-Moukala, Jauricque Ursulla; Zhang, Hui; Irakoze, Pierre Claver

2011-01-01

279

In Vitro Binding Capacity of Bile Acids by Defatted Corn Protein Hydrolysate  

Science.gov (United States)

Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capacity. Peptides from Flavourzyme defatted corn hydrolysate exhibited significantly (p Flavourzyme hydrolysate was almost preserved after gastrointestinal proteases digestion. The molecular weight of Flavourzyme hydrolysate was determined and most of the peptides were found between 500–180 Da. The results showed that Flavourzyme hydrolysate may be used as a potential cholesterol-reducing agent. PMID:21541043

Kongo-Dia-Moukala, Jauricque Ursulla; Zhang, Hui; Irakoze, Pierre Claver

2011-01-01

280

Antioxidative, DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting peptides from fish protein hydrolysed with intestinal proteases  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Proteins from fish tissue could be a promising source of peptides with a nutritional and pharmaceutical value, e.g. as treatment of type 2 diabetes with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibiting peptides, and could be used in health and functional foods and thereby increasing the value of secondary marine products. The approach in this study is to hydrolyse skin and belly flap tissue from Salmon with the use of mammalian digestive proteases from pancreas and intestinal mucosa and test hydrolysates for antioxidative capacity, intestinal DPP-IV and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting properties. 10kDa dialysis bags containing 10ml water were added to homogenized fish tissues, which were subsequently hydrolysed for 24 hours at 37?C and pH 8 with intestinal mucosa extract and/or pancreatin solution from pig. Dialysis bags were then removed and content were analyzed for free amino groups, antioxidative capacity by ABTS (2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonicacid)), DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity. Degree of hydrolysis (DH) of hydrolysates was approximately 13% and 10% for belly flap and skin respectively. No clear difference was observed in DH between pancreatin and pancreatin + mucosa hydrolysates. No DH was obtained for tissues hydrolysed with only intestinal mucosa extract. Preliminary results showed antioxidant activity and intestinal DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity in 10 kDa fraction from both belly flap and skin hydrolysates but with a higher antioxidative capacity in belly flap hydrolysates. No difference between hydrolysates with pancreatin and pancreatin+mucosa was observed. Hydrolysates will be further fractionated by gelfiltration. Fractions will be analyzed for the three bioactivities and also presented.

Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

 
 
 
 
281

Enzymatic preparation of immunomodulating hydrolysates from soy proteins.  

Science.gov (United States)

Soy protein hydrolysates with lower molecular weight were enzymatically prepared by several commercially available proteases (Alcalase 2.4L, Flavourzyme, Trypsin, Papain, Protease A and Peptidase R) with protein recovery varied from 42.59% to 79.87%. Relative content of positively charged peptides was determined on SP Sephadex C-25 using gradient sodium chloride solution as eluents. Immunomodulating properties were evaluated by measuring their effect on in vitro proliferation of murine spleen lymphocytes and phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages. The results showed that soy protein hydrolysates (SPHs) prepared with Alcalase and insoluble soy protein (InSP), preferable to other enzymes and soy proteins, have the highest immunomodulating activity and the optimum conditions were determined as follows: E/S=2% (Alcalase), 60 degrees C, pH 8.0, InSP concentration 6% and 225min. Positive correlations were obtained between the immunomodulating activity and content of positively charged peptides. The results suggested that lower molecular weight and positively charged peptides released from soy protein were effective in stimulating immunomodulating activity, thus provided insights into the preparation of potent immunomodulating products. PMID:18524579

Kong, Xiangzhen; Guo, Mingming; Hua, Yufei; Cao, Dong; Zhang, Caimeng

2008-12-01

282

Spent fuel shipping cask  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The invention discloses a shipping cask for spent or failed nuclear fuel assemblies, having a generally cylindrical stainless steel enclosure with a thick stainless steel slab welded to one end, a thick stainless steel closure removably sealed to the other end, a sheath of lead surrounding the cylindrical wall, separate tanks for neutron absorbing liquid surrounding the lead sheath and balsa wood impact absorbers on the exterior of the cask. The cask is also provided with pressure relief and drain valves housed in cavities in the steel for protection and trunnions specially arranged to facilitate handling

283

Synergism of Glycoside Hydrolase Secretomes from Two Thermophilic Bacteria Cocultivated on Lignocellulose  

Science.gov (United States)

Two cellulolytic thermophilic bacterial strains, CS-3-2 and CS-4-4, were isolated from decayed cornstalk by the addition of growth-supporting factors to the medium. According to 16S rRNA gene-sequencing results, these strains belonged to the genus Clostridium and showed 98.87% and 98.86% identity with Clostridium stercorarium subsp. leptospartum ATCC 35414T and Clostridium cellulosi AS 1.1777T, respectively. The endoglucanase and exoglucanase activities of strain CS-4-4 were approximately 3 to 5 times those of strain CS-3-2, whereas the ?-glucosidase activity of strain CS-3-2 was 18 times higher than that of strain CS-4-4. The xylanase activity of strain CS-3-2 was 9 times that of strain CS-4-4, whereas the ?-xylosidase activity of strain CS-4-4 was 27 times that of strain CS-3-2. The enzyme activities in spent cultures following cocultivation of the two strains with cornstalk as the substrate were much greater than those in pure cultures or an artificial mixture of samples, indicating synergism of glycoside hydrolase secretomes between the two strains. Quantitative measurement of the two strains in the cocultivation system indicated that strain CS-3-2 grew robustly during the initial stages, whereas strain CS-4-4 dominated the system in the late-exponential phase. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of protein bands appearing in the native zymograms showed that ORF3880 and ORF3883 from strain CS-4-4 played key roles in the lignocellulose degradation process. Both these open reading frames (ORFs) exhibited endoglucanase and xylanase activities, but ORF3880 showed tighter adhesion to insoluble substrates at 4, 25, and 60°C owing to its five carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). PMID:24532065

Zhang, Kundi; Chen, Xiaohua; Schwarz, Wolfgang H.

2014-01-01

284

Ethanol Production from Lignocellulose by the Dimorphic Fungus Mucor Indicus  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Ethanol production from dilute-acid lignocellulosic hydrolyzate by the dimorphic fungus Mucor indicus was investigated. A mixture of different forest wood chips dominated by spruce was hydrolyzed with 0.5 g/L sulfuric acid at 15 bar for 10 min, yielding different sugars including galactose, glucose, mannose, and xylose, but also different fermentation inhibitors such as acetic acid, furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), and phenolic compounds. We induced different morphological growth of M. indicus from purely filamentous, mostly filamentous, mostly yeast-like to purely yeast-like. The different forms were then used to ferment the hydrolyzate. They tolerated the presence of the inhibitors under anaerobic batch cultivation well and the ethanol yield was 430-440 g/kg consumed sugars. The ethanol productivity depended on the morphology. Judging from these results, we conclude that M. indicus, is useful for ethanol production from toxic substrates independent of its morphology. Keywords: bio-ethanol, lignocellulosic materials, dilute acid hydrolysis, Mucor indicus, dimorphic fungi

Lennartsson, P.R.; Taherzadeh, M.J. (School of Engineering, Univ. of Boraas, SE-50190, Boraas (Sweden)). e-mail: Patrik.Lennartsson@hb.se; Karimi, K. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan Univ. of Technology, 84156-83111, Isfahan (IR)); Edebo, L. (Dept. of Clinical Bacteriology, Univ. of Goeteborg, SE-41346, Goeteborg (Sweden))

2008-10-15

285

The potential of lignocellulosic ethanol production in the Mediterranean Basin  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This review provides an overview of the potential of bioethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic residues in the Mediterranean Basin. Residues from cereal crops, olive trees, and tomato and grape processing are abundant lignocellulosic wastes in France, Italy, Spain, Turkey and Egypt, where their use as raw materials for ethanol production could give rise to a potential production capacity of 13 Mtoe of ethanol. Due to the lack of sufficient amounts of agricultural residues in all of the other Mediterranean countries, use of the cellulosic content of municipal solid waste (MSW) as feedstock for ethanol fuel production is also proposed. A maximum potential production capacity of 30 Mtoe of ethanol could be achieved from 50% of the 180 million tons of waste currently produced annually in the Mediterranean Basin, the management of which has become a subject of serious concern. However, to make large-scale ethanol production from agricultural residues and MSW a medium-term feasible goal in the Mediterranean Basin, huge efforts are needed to achieve the required progress in cellulose ethanol technologies and to overcome several foreseeable constraints. (author)

Faraco, Vincenza [Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Naples ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy); School of Biotechnological Sciences, University of Naples ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy); Hadar, Yitzhak [Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)

2011-01-15

286

Features of promising technologies for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cellulosic plant material represents an as-of-yet untapped source of fermentable sugars for significant industrial use. Many physio-chemical structural and compositional factors hinder the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass. The goal of any pretreatment technology is to alter or remove structural and compositional impediments to hydrolysis in order to improve the rate of enzyme hydrolysis and increase yields of fermentable sugars from cellulose or hemicellulose. These methods cause physical and/or chemical changes in the plant biomass in order to achieve this result. Experimental investigation of physical changes and chemical reactions that occur during pretreatment is required for the development of effective and mechanistic models that can be used for the rational design of pretreatment processes. Furthermore, pretreatment processing conditions must be tailored to the specific chemical and structural composition of the various, and variable, sources of lignocellulosic biomass. This paper reviews process parameters and their fundamental modes of action for promising pretreatment methods. PMID:15588770

Mosier, Nathan; Wyman, Charles; Dale, Bruce; Elander, Richard; Lee, Y Y; Holtzapple, Mark; Ladisch, Michael

2005-04-01

287

Lignocellulose pretreatment severity – relating pH to biomatrix opening  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In cellulose-to-ethanol processes a physico-chemical pretreatment of the lignocellulosic feedstock is a critical prerequisite for increasing the amenability of the cellulose to enzymatic attack. Currently published pretreatment strategies span over a wide range of reaction conditions involving different pH values, temperatures, types of catalysts, and holding times. The consequences of the pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass are described with special emphasis on the chemical alterations of the biomass during pretreatment, especially highlighting the significance of the pretreatment pH. We present a new illustration of the pretreatment effects encompassing the differential responses to the pH and temperature. A detailed evaluation of the use of severity factor calculations for pretreatment comparisons signifies that the multiple effects of different pretreatment factors on the subsequent monosaccharide yields after enzymatic hydrolysis cannot be reliably compared by a one-dimensional severity factor, evenwithin the same type of pretreatment strategy. However, a quantitative comparison of published data for wheat straw pretreatment illustrates that there is some correlation between the hydrolysis yields (glucose, xylose) and the pretreatment pH, but no correlation with the pretreatment temperature (90–200 °C). A better recognition and understanding of the factors affecting biomatrix opening, and use of more standardized evaluation protocols, will allow for the identification of new pretreatment strategies that improve biomass utilization and permit rational enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose.

Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S.

2010-01-01

288

Analysing method of spent fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Object: To measure neutrons released from a spent fuel to thereby effect quantitative analysis of formation quantity of Cm-242 and Cm-244 in the form of nondestructive transuranium element. Structure: In the quantitative analysis of formation quantity of transuranium element formed within spent fuel, neutrons released from the spent fuel so that difference of half life of the transuranium released from the neutrons may be utilized to determine the formation quantity of curium-242 and curium-244. (Kawakami, Y.)

289

SO{sub 2}-ethanol-water fractionation of lignocellulose and pilot scale production of isopropanol-butanol-ethanol solvent mixture with advanced column technology - SEWIBE  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

To demonstrate at the pilot scale level the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass using the omnivorous SO{sub 2}- ethanol-water (SEW) fractionation process and advanced column fermentation technology. A monomeric hemicellulose sugar solution will be produced by conditioning the spent fractionation liquor and a glucose solution by subsequent hydrolysis of the liberated cellulosic fibers. The combined monomeric sugars streams containing hexoses and pentoses will be fermented to a mixture of isopropanol, n-butanol and ethanol (IBE solvents) using genetically modified Clostridia bacteria. The recovery yields of the cooking chemicals, i.e. ethanol and unreacted SO{sub 2} from the spent fractionation liquor by evaporation and steam stripping will be established. Soluble and precipitated lignin fractions of the spent liquor combined with the organic residue remaining after solvent-solvent extraction of the IBE solvents will be studied experimentally with the objective to establish processability into commercial products and biofuels, and the total sulphur recovery yield of these biomass fractions.

Granstrom, T. [Aalto University, Espoo (Finland)], email: tom.granstrom@aalto.fi

2012-07-01

290

Biological detoxification of different hemicellulosic hydrolysates using Issatchenkia occidentalis CCTCC M 206097 yeast.  

Science.gov (United States)

This work had as its main objective to contribute to the development of a biological detoxification of hemicellulose hydrolysates obtained from different biomass plants using Issatchenkia occidentalis CCTCC M 206097 yeast. Tests with hemicellulosic hydrolysate of sugarcane bagasse in different concentrations were carried out to evaluate the influence of the hydrolysate concentration on the inhibitory compounds removal from the sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate, without reduction of sugar concentration. The highest reduction values of inhibitors concentration and less sugar losses were observed when the fivefold concentrated hydrolysate was treated by the evaluated yeast. In these experiments it was found that the high sugar concentrations favored lower sugar consumption by the yeast. The highest concentration reduction of syringaldehyde (66.67%), ferulic acid (73.33%), furfural (62%), and 5-HMF (85%) was observed when the concentrated hydrolysate was detoxified by using this yeast strain after 24 h of experimentation. The results obtained in this work showed the potential of the yeast Issatchenkia occidentalis CCTCC M 206097 as detoxification agent of hemicellulosic hydrolysate of different biomass plants. PMID:20844925

Fonseca, Bruno Guedes; Moutta, Rondinele de Oliveira; Ferraz, Flavio de Oliveira; Vieira, Emílio Rosa; Nogueira, Andrei Santini; Baratella, Bruno Fernandes; Rodrigues, Luiz Carlos; Hou-Rui, Zhang; da Silva, Sílvio Silvério

2011-01-01

291

Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of lecithin free egg yolk protein preparation hydrolysates obtained with digestive enzymes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Several biological activities have now been associated with egg protein- derived peptides, including antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anticancer and antioxidantactivities, highlighting the importance of these biopeptides in human health, and disease prevention and treatment. Special attention has been given to peptides with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities as a new source of natural preservatives in food industry. In this study, the antioxidant properties of the egg-yolk protein by-product (YP hydrolysates were evaluated based on their radical scavenging capacity (DPPH, Fe2+chelating effect and ferric reducing power (FRAP. Furthermore, antimicrobial properties of obtained hydrolysates against Bacillus species were studied. The degrees (DHs of hydrolysis for 4h hydrolysates were: 19.1%, 13.5% and 13.0%, for pepsin, chymotrypsin and trypsin, respectively. Pepsin was the most effective in producing the free amino groups (1410.3 ?molGly/g. The RP-HPLC profiles of the protein hydrolysates showed differences in the hydrophobicity of the generated peptides.Trypsin hydrolysate obtained after 4h reaction demonstrated the strongest DPPH free radical scavenging activity (0.85 µmol Troloxeq/mg. Trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysates obtained after 4h reaction exhibited 4 times higher ferric reducing capacity than those treated bypepsin. The hydrolysis products obtained from YP exhibited significant chelating activity. The 4h trypsin hydrolysate exhibited weak antimicrobial activity against B. subtilis B3; B. cereus B512; B. cereus B 3p and B. laterosporum B6.

Aleksandra Zambrowicz

2012-12-01

292

Uses of mechanically separated chicken meat for production from protein hydrolysates different proteolytic enzymes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The use of hydrolyzed protein, derived from animal and vegetable sources, in specific formulations, is an area of growing interest. The aim of this study was to develop different powder hydrolysates with high protein value, from the enzymatic hydrolysis of mechanically deboned meat (MDM, a byproduct of the poultry industry, which can be a low-cost source for the production of these hydrolysates. The raw material used was frozen poultry mechanically deboned meat (MDM purchased from an abattoir in southern Brazil, before use it was thawed under refrigeration and homogenized in a processor by 2 minutes. Three commercial enzymes were used, Papain, Protamex® and Flavourzyme®. The hydrolysis occurred in a thermostatized bath with temperature, time and pH controlled. Proximal composition of the raw material and lyophilized hydrolysates, control analysis such as hydrolysis degree of hydrolysis, protein, total solids, ash and amino acid characterization of the hydrolysates were performed. The results were evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey’s averages test. The hydrolyzed obtained from the papain enzyme showed the best behavior, followed by Protamex and Flavourzyme. The hydrolysates from papain enzyme had higher protein content, soluble solids and lower ash content compared to other hydrolysates. The amino acid composition showed that the hydrolyzate from papain has a closer composition to what is recommended by the control organs. It was concluded that the protein hydrolysates obtained from mechanically deboned chicken had high protein content characterizing them as a promising raw material in the formulation of special diets.

Mari Silvia Rodrigues de Oliveira

2014-02-01

293

Antioxidant activities of red tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) protein hydrolysates as influenced by thermolysin and alcalase  

Science.gov (United States)

The hydrolysis process was performed on fish meat from Red Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by enzymes thermolysin and alcalase under optimum conditions. The hydrolysis was performed from 0 - 4 hours at 37°C. Hydrolysates after 2 hours incubation with thermolysin and alcalase had degree of hydrolysis of 76.29 % and 63.49 %, respectively. The freeze dried protein hydrolysate was tested for peptide content and characterized with respect to amino acid composition. The result of increased peptide content in Red Tilapia (O. Niloticus) hydrolysates obtained was directly proportional to the increase activities of different proteolytic enzymes. The result of amino acid composition showed that the sample used contained abundant Gly, Ala, Asp, Glu, Lys and Leu in residues or peptide sequences. Both enzymatic hydrolysates were tested for anti-oxidant activity with DPPH and ABTS assay. Alcalase yielded higher anti-oxidative activity than Thermolysin hydrolysates after 1 hour incubation, but both enzymes hydrolysates showed a significant decrease of anti-oxidant activity after 2 hours of incubation. Hydrolysates from Red Tilapia may contribute as a health promoting ingredient in functional foods to reduce oxidation stress caused by accumulated free radicals.

Daud, Nur'Aliah; Babji, Abdul Salam; Yusop, Salma Mohamad

2013-11-01

294

Ethanol Production from Nondetoxified Dilute-Acid Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate by Cocultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5 and Pichia stipitis CBS6054  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5 (CGMCC no. 2660) and Issatchenkia orientalis Y4 (CGMCC no. 2159) were combined individually with Pichia stipitis CBS6054 to establish the cocultures of Y5 + CBS6054 and Y4 + CBS6054. The coculture Y5 + CBS6054 effectively metabolized furfural and HMF and converted xylose and glucose mixture to ethanol with ethanol concentration of 16.6?g/L and ethanol yield of 0.46?g ethanol/g sugar, corresponding to 91.2% of the maximal theoretical value in synthetic medium. A...

Ping Wan; Dongmei Zhai; Zhen Wang; Xiushan Yang; Shen Tian

2012-01-01

295

Collagen metabolism of human osteoarthritic articular cartilage as modulated by bovine collagen hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Destruction of articular cartilage is a characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA). Collagen hydrolysates are mixtures of collagen peptides and have gained huge public attention as nutriceuticals used for prophylaxis of OA. Here, we evaluated for the first time whether different bovine collagen hydrolysate preparations indeed modulate the metabolism of collagen and proteoglycans from human OA cartilage explants and determined the chemical composition of oligopeptides representing collagen fragments. Using biophysical techniques, like MALDI-TOF-MS, AFM, and NMR, the molecular weight distribution and aggregation behavior of collagen hydrolysates from bovine origin (CH-Alpha®, Peptan™ B 5000, Peptan™ B 2000) were determined. To investigate the metabolism of human femoral OA cartilage, explants were obtained during knee replacement surgery. Collagen synthesis of explants as modulated by 0-10 mg/ml collagen hydrolysates was determined using a novel dual radiolabeling procedure. Proteoglycans, NO, PGE(2), MMP-1, -3, -13, TIMP-1, collagen type II, and cell viability were determined in explant cultures. Groups of data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Friedman test (n?=?5-12). The significance was set to p?0.05. We found that collagen hydrolysates obtained from different sources varied with respect to the width of molecular weight distribution, average molecular weight, and aggregation behavior. None of the collagen hydrolysates tested stimulated the biosynthesis of collagen. Peptan™ B 5000 elevated NO and PGE(2) levels significantly but had no effect on collagen or proteoglycan loss. All collagen hydrolysates tested proved not to be cytotoxic. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that various collagen hydrolysates differ with respect to their chemical composition of collagen fragments as well as by their pharmacological efficacy on human chondrocytes. Our study underscores the importance that each collagen hydrolysate preparation should first demonstrate its pharmacological potential both in vitro and in vivo before being used for both regenerative medicine and prophylaxis of OA. PMID:23342047

Schadow, Saskia; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Lochnit, Günter; Kordelle, Jens; Rickert, Markus; Steinmeyer, Jürgen

2013-01-01

296

Effect of reactor configuration on biogas production from wheat straw hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

The potential of wheat straw hydrolysate for biogas production was investigated in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. The hydrolysate originated as a side stream from a pilot plant pretreating wheat straw hydrothermally (195 degrees C for 10-12 min) for producing 2nd generation bioethanol [Kaparaju, P., Serrano, M., Thomsen, A.B., Kongjan, P., Angelidaki, I., 2009. Bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas production from wheat straw in a biorefinery concept. Bioresource Technology 100 (9), 2562-2568]. Results from batch assays showed that hydrolysate had a methane potential of 384 ml/g-volatile solids (VS)(added). Process performance in CTSR and UASB reactors was investigated by varying hydrolysate concentration and/or organic loading rate (OLR). In CSTR, methane yields increased with increase in hydrolysate concentration and maximum yield of 297 ml/g-COD was obtained at an OLR of 1.9 g-COD/l d and 100% (v/v) hydrolysate. On the other hand, process performance and methane yields in UASB were affected by OLR and/or substrate concentration. Maximum methane yields of 267 ml/g-COD (COD removal of 72%) was obtained in UASB reactor when operated at an OLR of 2.8 g-COD/l d but with only 10% (v/v) hydrolysate. However, co-digestion of hydrolysate with pig manure (1:3 v/v ratio) improved the process performance and resulted in methane yield of 219 ml/g-COD (COD removal of 72%). Thus, anaerobic digestion of hydrolysate for biogas production was feasible in both CSTR and UASB reactor types. However, biogas process was affected by the reactor type and operating conditions. PMID:19647428

Kaparaju, Prasad; Serrano, María; Angelidaki, Irini

2009-12-01

297

Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass by irradiation: use of high-performance liquid chromatography for study  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Irradiation of lignocellulosic material is under investigation as one means of converting biomass to useful chemical feedstocks and/or fermentable substrates. High-energy gamma radiation in combination with various chemical treatments effects degradation of lignocellulosic and cellulosic materials. The composition of the generated products has been monitored for carbohydrates and organic acids by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Comparisons of the extent and products of decomposition of the cellulose component of the lignocellulosic materials are presented. 15 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

298

The conversion of lignocellulosics to fermentable sugars - A survey of current research and applications to CELSS  

Science.gov (United States)

This report provides an overview options for converting lignocellulosics into fermentable sugars in CELSS. A requirement for pretreatment is shown. Physical-chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis processes for producing fermentable sugars are discussed. At present physical-chemical methods are the simplest and best characterized options, but enzymatic processes will be the likely method of choice in the future. The use of pentose sugars by microorganisms to produce edibles is possible. The use of mycelial food production on pretreated but not hydrolyzed lignocellulosics is also possible. Simple trade-off analyses to regenerate waste lignocellulosics for two pathways are made, one of which is compared to complete oxidation.

Petersen, Gene R.; Baresi, Larry

1990-01-01

299

Identification of bitter peptides in whey protein hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

Bitterness of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) can negatively affect product quality and limit utilization in food and pharmaceutical applications. Four main bitter peptides were identified in a commercial WPH by means of sensory-guided fractionation techniques that included ultrafiltration and offline two-dimensional reverse phase chromatography. LC-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed the amino acid sequences of the bitter peptides were YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN that originated from ?-lactalbumin, ?-lactoglobulin, serum albumin, and ?-casein, respectively. Quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis reported the concentrations of YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN to be 0.66, 0.58, 1.33, and 2.64 g/kg powder, respectively. Taste recombination analysis of an aqueous model consisting of all four peptides was reported to explain 88% of the bitterness intensity of the 10% WPH solution. PMID:23998904

Liu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Deshou; Peterson, Devin G

2014-06-25

300

[Short peptide fragments with antiulcer activity from a collagen hydrolysate].  

Science.gov (United States)

A peptide acidic hydrolysate of collagen (PHC) was obtained under conditions (4 N HCl) ensuring the predominant formation of short peptides, glyprolines. They were separated and their antiulcer activity was studied. Thirty individual peptides with molecular masses of 174-420 amu were isolated from the PHC by HPLC. The PHC was shown to predominantly contain 2- to 4-aa peptides, including PG, GP, and PGP. Experiments on rats demonstrated that, on intragastric administration at a dose of 1 mg/kg, PHC enhances the stability of the gastric mucosa to the action of ulcerogenic factors, such as ethanol and stress, and exhibits a protecting antiulcer effect. Even a lesser dose (0.1 mg/kg), which reduced ulcer area twofold, was effective in the stress model of ulcer formation. The intraperitoneal and intragastric administration of PHC at a dose of 1 mg/kg was found to exhibit a therapeutic effect in the acetate model of ulcer formation. PMID:16637291

Zolotarev, Iu A; Badmaeva, K E; Bakaeva, Z V; Samonina, G E; Kopylova, G N; Dadaian, A K; Zverkov, Iu B; Garanin, S K; Vas'kovski?, B V; Ashmarin, I P; Miasoedov, N F

2006-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

System and method for conditioning a hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A system and method for hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate conditioning includes a first evaporator receives a hardwood mix extract and outputting a quantity of vapor and extract. A hydrolysis unit receives the extract, hyrolyzes and outputs to a lignin separation device, which separates and recovers a quantity of lignin. A neutralization device receives extract from the lignin separation device and a neutralizing agent, producing a mixture of solid precipitate and a fifth extract. The solid precipitate is removed from the fifth extract. A second evaporator removes a quantity of acid from the fifth extract in a vapor form. This vapor may be recycled to improve total acid recovery or discarded. A desalination device receives the diluted extract, separates out some of the acid and salt and outputs a desalinated solution.

Waite, Darrell M; Arnold, Richard; St. Pierre, James; Pendse, Hemant P; Ceckler, William H

2013-12-17

302

Spent fuel management in Japan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Japan 52 commercial nuclear power units are now operated, and the total power generation capacity is about 45 GWe. The cumulative amount of spent fuel arising is about 13,500 tU as of March 1997. Spent fuel is reprocessed, and recovered nuclear materials are to be recycled in LWRs and FBRs. In February 1997 short-term policy measures were announced by the Atomic Energy Commission, which addressed promotion of reprocessing programme in Rokkasho, plutonium utilization in LWRs, spent fuel management, backend measures and FBR development. With regard to the spent fuel management, the policy measures included expansion of spent fuel storage capacity at reactor sites and a study on spent fuel storage away from reactor sites, considering the increasing amount of spent fuel arising. Research and development on spent fuel storage has been carried out, particularly on dry storage technology. Fundamental studies are also conducted to implement the burnup credit into the criticality safety design of storage and transportation casks. Rokkasho reprocessing plant is being constructed towards its commencement in 2003, and Pu utilization in LWRs will be started in 1999. Research and development of future recycling technology are also continued for the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle based on FBRs and LWRs. (author)

303

Reusing of spent radiation sources  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper presents a proposal for re utilization of spent sealed radiation sources. A facility for handling spent sealed sources is under construction at Brazilian Center for Nuclear Technology - CDTN where the sources will be examined for verification of leakages and activity evaluation in order to be used by radioisotope users under reduced prices and with quality certificates awarded

304

Development of a commercial enzymes system for lignocellulosic biomass saccharification  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

DSM Innovation Inc., in its four year effort was able to evaluate and develop its in-house DSM fungal cellulolytic enzymes system to reach enzyme efficiency mandates set by DoE Biomass program MYPP goals. DSM enzyme cocktail is uniquely active at high temperature and acidic pH, offering many benefits and product differentiation in 2G bioethanol production. Under this project, strain and process development, ratio optimization of enzymes, protein and genetic engineering has led to multitudes of improvement in productivity and efficiency making development of a commercial enzyme system for lignocellulosic biomass saccharification viable. DSM is continuing further improvement by additional biodiversity screening, protein engineering and overexpression of enzymes to continue to further lower the cost of enzymes for saccharification of biomass.

Kumar, Manoj

2012-12-20

305

Lignocellulosic ethanol production at high-gravity: challenges and perspectives.  

Science.gov (United States)

In brewing and ethanol-based biofuel industries, high-gravity fermentation produces 10-15% (v/v) ethanol, resulting in improved overall productivity, reduced capital cost, and reduced energy input compared to processing at normal gravity. High-gravity technology ensures a successful implementation of cellulose to ethanol conversion as a cost-competitive process. Implementation of such technologies is possible if all process steps can be performed at high biomass concentrations. This review focuses on challenges and technological efforts in processing at high-gravity conditions and how these conditions influence the physiology and metabolism of fermenting microorganisms, the action of enzymes, and other process-related factors. Lignocellulosic materials add challenges compared to implemented processes due to high inhibitors content and the physical properties of these materials at high gravity. PMID:24231155

Koppram, Rakesh; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Xiros, Charilaos; Olsson, Lisbeth

2014-01-01

306

Lab-scale Technology for Biogas Production from Lignocellulose Wastes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Currently-operating biogas plants are based on the treatment of lignocellulose biomass, which is included in materials such as agriculture and forestry wastes, municipal solid wastes, waste paper, wood and herbaceous energy crops. Lab-scale biogas technology was specially developed for evaluating the anaerobic biodegrability and the specific methane yields of solid organic substrates. This technology falls into two main categories – pretreatment equipments, and fermentation equipments. Pretreatment units use physical principles based on mechanical comminution (ball mills, macerator orhydrothermal treatment (liquid hot water pretreatment technology. The biochemical methane potential test is used to evaluate the specific methane yields of treated or non-treated organic substrates. This test can be performed both by lab testing units and by lab fermenter.

Lukáš Krátký

2012-01-01

307

Microbial tolerance engineering toward biochemical production: from lignocellulose to products.  

Science.gov (United States)

Microbial metabolic engineering has been extensively studied for valuable chemicals synthesis, generating numerous laboratory-scale successes, and has demonstrated its potential to serve as a platform that enables large-scale manufacturing of many chemicals that are currently derived via chemical synthesis. However, the commercialization potential of microbial chemical production frequently suffers from low productivity and yields, where one key limiting factor is the inherently low tolerance of host cells against toxic compounds that are present and/or generated during biological processing. Consequently, various microbial engineering strategies have been devised to endow producer microbes with tolerance phenotypes that would be required for economically viable production of the desired chemicals. In this review, we discuss key microbial engineering strategies, devised primarily based on rational and evolutionary methodologies, that have been effective in improving cellular tolerance against fermentation inhibitors, metabolic intermediates, and valuable end-products derived from lignocellulose bioprocessing. PMID:24743028

Ling, Hua; Teo, Weisuong; Chen, Binbin; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook

2014-10-01

308

Thermogravimetric-mass spectrometric analysis on combustion of lignocellulosic biomass.  

Science.gov (United States)

Combustion characteristics of biomass main components and three lignocellulosic biomass (fir wood, eucalyptus wood and pine bark) were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The combustion of biomass was divided into two main steps, devolatilization and char oxidation stage. Heating rate effect was also studied. Generally, the higher the heating rate, the higher the decomposition temperature. Furthermore, the weight loss rate decreased due to particle temperature gradients. Combustion kinetics were studied. Models based on reaction order (Oi), nucleation (Ni) and diffusion (Di) achieved the best fitting to the experimental data. Cellulose oxidation presented the highest activation energies. CO, CO2 and H2O were the main components evolved from combustion. Additionally, light hydrocarbons (CH4 and C2H5) were also present. Finally, nitrogen compounds were in a higher proportion than sulfur compounds being released as primary amines and NOx. PMID:23835261

López-González, D; Fernandez-Lopez, M; Valverde, J L; Sanchez-Silva, L

2013-09-01

309

TPS/LDPE blends reinforced with lignocellulose fibers  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Because of their abundance, availability, low abrasiveness and mechanical properties, cellulose fibers have been frequently chosen as reinforcing fillers in composites. Castor bean cake, the residue from biodiesel production, is rich in lignocellulose fibers and proteins. One of these proteins is ricin, a toxin protein. In this work, ricin was denatured by heat treatment in water at 90 deg C for 4 h. Thermoplastic starch (TPS), low density polyethylene (LDPE), maleated polyethylene (used as the compatibilizing agent), and an organophilic clay were processed in the presence of different contents of heat treated castor bean cake. Processing was carried out in a single-screw extruder, at 400 rpm, with heat zones at 130 deg C, 135 deg C, 135 deg C and 130 deg C (from feed zone to die end). The structural and mechanical properties of the resulting polymeric composites were investigated, and revealed the reinforcing effect of the partially purified cellulose fibers. (author)

310

Bioethanol from lignocellulose - pretreatment, enzyme immobilization and hydrolysis kinetics  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis are two of the processes involved in the production of cellulosic ethanol. Several pretreatment methods were proposed, however new pretreatment strategies to increase enzymetic hydrolysis efficiency are still under investigation. For enzymatic hydrolysis, the cost of enzyme is still the bottle neck, re-using the enzyme is apossible way to reduce the input of enzyme in the process. In the point view of engineering, the prediction of enzymatic hydrolysis kinetics under different substrate loading, enzyme combination is usful for process design. Therefore, several kinetic models were proposed previously. In view of the connetions between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. The hypotheses and objective of this PhD study consists of three parts: (1) Pretreatment of barley straw by 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]Ac), which was done during 2009. Ionic liquid had been reported to be able to dissolve lignocellulose. However, as our knowledge, in all published researches, the concentration of lignocellulose in ionic liquid were low (5~10%). Besides, pretreatment time were long (from 1 hr to 1 day). Based on the hypothesis that the amount of ionic liquid and pretreatment time can be reduced, the influence of substrate concentration, pretreatment time and temperature were investigated and optimized. Pretreatment of barley straw by [EMIM]Ac, correlative models were constructed using 3 different pretreatment parameters (temperature, time, concentration of barley straw substrate) and sugar recoveries obtained following enzymatic hydrolysis. Elevated pretreatmenttemperature and longer pretreatment time favoured hydrolysis. However intensive pretreatment at high temperature also causes degradation of cellulose. In addition, [EMIM]Ac pretreated lignocellulose was found to stabilize and protect the enzymes at elevated temperatures. Therefore lower levels of enzymes were required to obtain similar hydrolytic efficiencies. Optimal pretreatment condition was found with the aid of models based on multiple linear regression. Consider the balanced against economic considerations, barley straw can be pretreated under 150°C for 50 min with dry matter of 20% (w/w). Glucose yield can be up to 70% after enzymatic hydrolysis. (2) Immobilization of ß-glucosidase (BG), which was done during 2010. One of the major bottlenecks in production of ethanol from lignocellulose is the required high cellulase enzyme dosages that increase the processing costs. One method to decrease the enzyme dosage is to re-use BG, which hydrolyze the soluble substrate cellobiose. Based on the hypothesis that immobilized BG can be re-used, how many times the enzyme could be recycled and how coupling with glutaraldehyde affected enzyme recovery after immobilization were investigated. Glutaraldehyde cross-linkedBG aggregates were entrapped in 3.75% calcium alginate. Glutaraldehyde inactivate enzyme activity but also reduce the leakage of enzyme from calcium alginate. Findings showed that more than 60% of enzymatic activity could be maintained under optimized immobilization condition. In order to evaluate stability, the immobilized enzymes were reused for the hydrolysis of Avicel. No significant loss of activity was observed up to 20th round. Similar glucose yields were obtained following enzymatic hydrolysis of hot water pretreated barley straw by immobilized and free BG. Finally, this is the first time that BG aggregates in a calcium alginate were visualized by confocallaser scanning microscope. The images prove that more BG aggregates were entrapped in the matrix when the enzyme was cross-linked by glutaraldehyde. (3) Validation and modification of a semimechanistic model, which was done during 2010 ~ 2012. A number of cellulosic hydrolysis kinetic models were proposed. Among the models, a simple and usful mathamatical model proposed by Kadam et al. (2004) has potential for supporting process design. However, like the other models, it was not validated intensivly, especially under high glucose concentration background and hi

Tsai, Chien Tai

2012-01-01

311

Experimental modelling of a pilot lignocellulosic pellets stove plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Small-scale stoves, producing heat and hot water, are suited for domestic purposes. In order to optimise their efficiency when using lignocellulosic pellets, an important task is to do research on their real performance. The general behaviour depends on many operational factors (air flow and humidity, pressure, etc), dimension and pellet characteristics (moisture, size, raw material, density, friability, etc). In this paper, the first results and general performance of a 24 kW pellet fixed bed stove pilot plant are presented. The plant has been designed to study pellet combustion in the laboratory. The main targets are to reduce emissions of pollutants and to improve energy efficiency. Different situations can be simulated and tested due to its flexible design. Temperatures, pressures, flows and emissions are measured and analysed. An extensive study of different load conditions is presented through the application of both an experiment design technique and the later statistical analysis of the results. Fuel characterisation is also presented. (Author)

312

Functionalized Polymers from Lignocellulosic Biomass: State of the Art  

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Full Text Available Since the realization that global sustainability depends on renewable sources of materials and energy, there has been an ever-increasing need to develop bio-based polymers that are able to replace petroleum-based polymers. Research in this field has shown strong potential in generating high-performance functionalized polymers from plant biomass. With the anticipated large-scale production of lignocellulosic biomass, lignin, cellulose and hemicellulosic polysaccharides will be abundantly available renewable feedstocks for biopolymers and biocomposites with physico-chemical properties that match or exceed those of petroleum-based compounds. This review examines the state of the art regarding advances and challenges in synthesis and applications of specialty polymers and composites derived from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, ending with a brief assessment of genetic modification as a route to tailor crop plants for specific applications.

Wilfred Vermerris

2013-05-01

313

Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials were explored by 3-cm and 2-mm ESR spectroscopy. Background (intrinsic) singlet signals at g=2.003 from wood pulp and lignin and those arising during reaction of lignocellulose materials with acids and chlorine were attributed to radicals with conjugated C--C bonds. The 2-mm ESR signal with 3D anisotropy of g-factor from o-semiquinone radical ions formed in reaction of lignin with NaOH was recorded for the first time. The singlet signals derived from cellulose {gamma}-irradiated at 77 K and marked out during post-thermal reactions were assigned to radicals with conjugated bonds. In wetted cellulose, a triplet signal with {alpha}{sub {beta}}{sup H}{approx_equal}2.7 mT and imposed quadruplet structure (0.5-0.7 mT) from three {gamma}-protons was detected at 300 K and attributed to S{sub 4}-radicals. The triplet signals derived from S{sub 2}- and S{sub 3}-radicals in pyranose cycles of cellulose exhibited higher values of {alpha}{sub {beta}}{sup H} (3.0-3.2 mT) and lower thermal stability (up to 250 K). In radiolyzed cotton pulp, detected were ESR signals derived from formyl radicals formed upon rupture of the S{sub 5}--S{sub 6} bond in pyranose cycles. Heating up irradiated samples under O{sub 2} was accompanied by formation of peroxide radicals. Photoinduced recombination of trapped electrons with S{sub 1}-radicals was found to proceed as a chain reaction with a kinetic length of about 25 units. Photolysis ({lambda}{>=}360 nm) of radiolyzed cellulose enhanced the disclosure of pyranose cycles and, as a result, the evolution of CO{sub 2} by a factor of 2-2.5.

Kuzina, Svetlana I. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Semenova 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Shilova, Irina A., E-mail: ishil@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Semenova 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, Al' fa I. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Semenova 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation)

2011-09-15

314

Simultaneous uptake of lignocellulose-based monosaccharides by Escherichia coli.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic waste is a naturally abundant biomass and is therefore an attractive material to use in second generation biorefineries. Microbial growth on the monosaccharides present in hydrolyzed lignocellulose is however associated with several obstacles whereof one is the lack of simultaneous uptake of the sugars. We have studied the aerobic growth of Escherichia coli on D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose and for simultaneous uptake to occur, both the carbon catabolite repression mechanism (CCR) and the AraC repression of xylose uptake and metabolism had to be removed. The strain AF1000 is a MC4100 derivative that is only able to assimilate arabinose after a considerable lag phase, which is unsuitable for commercial production. This strain was successfully adapted to growth on L-arabinose and this led to simultaneous uptake of arabinose and xylose in a diauxic growth mode following glucose consumption. In this strain, a deletion in the phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase system (PTS) for glucose uptake, the ptsG mutation, was introduced. The resulting strain, PPA652ara simultaneously consumed all three monosaccharides at a maximum specific growth rate of 0.59?h(-1) , 55% higher than for the ptsG mutant alone. Also, no residual sugar was present in the cultivation medium. The potential of PPA652ara is further acknowledged by the performance of AF1000 during fed-batch processing on a mixture of D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose. The conclusion is that without the removal of both layers of carbon uptake control, this process results in accumulation of pentoses and leads to a reduction of the specific growth rate by 30%. PMID:24382675

Jarmander, Johan; Hallström, Björn M; Larsson, Gen

2014-06-01

315

Enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis: Improved cellulase productivity by insoluble solids recycling  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background It is necessary to develop efficient methods to produce renewable fuels from lignocellulosic biomass. One of the main challenges to the industrialization of lignocellulose conversion processes is the large amount of cellulase enzymes used for the hydrolysis of cellulose. One method for decreasing the amount of enzyme used is to recycle the enzymes. In this study, the recycle of enzymes associated with the insoluble solid fraction after the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was investigated for pretreated corn stover under a variety of recycling conditions. Results It was found that a significant amount of cellulase activity could be recovered by recycling the insoluble biomass fraction, and the enzyme dosage could be decreased by 30% to achieve the same glucose yields under the most favorable conditions. Enzyme productivity (g glucose produced/g enzyme applied increased between 30 and 50% by the recycling, depending on the reaction conditions. While increasing the amount of solids recycled increased process performance, the methods applicability was limited by its positive correlation with increasing total solids concentrations, reaction volumes, and lignin content of the insoluble residue. However, increasing amounts of lignin rich residue during the recycle did not negatively impact glucose yields. Conclusions To take advantage of this effect, the amount of solids recycled should be maximized, based on a given processes ability to deal with higher solids concentrations and volumes. Recycling of enzymes by recycling the insoluble solids fraction was thus shown to be an effective method to decrease enzyme usage, and research should be continued for its industrial application.

Weiss Noah

2013-01-01

316

Environmentally-friendly sonochemistry synthesis of hybrids from lignocelluloses and silver.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to explore a green strategy about the high value-added applications of biomass. Hybrids from lignocelluloses and silver have been successfully prepared using NaBH4 as reducing reagent by an environmentally-friendly sonochemistry method. The phase, microstructure, and morphology of the hybrids were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The influences of the various reaction parameters including reaction time, lignocelluloses concentration, and types of reducing reagents on the products were investigated in detail. Silver particles can be better dispersed on the lignocelluloses matrix by adjusting reaction parameters. These hybrids may be a promising antimicrobial material for their applications in the biomedical field. This environmentally-friendly synthetic strategy reported here opens a new window to the high value-added applications of lignocelluloses. PMID:24507304

Dong, Yan-Yan; Li, Shu-Ming; Ma, Ming-Guo; Zhao, Jin-Jin; Sun, Run-Cang; Wang, Shan-Peng

2014-02-15

317

SELF-ASSEMBLED LIGNOCELLULOSE MICELLES: A NEW GENERATION OF VALUE-ADDED FUNCTIONAL NANOSTRUCTURES  

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Full Text Available Lignocellulose-based self-assembled micelles have emerged as a new generation of value-added functional nanostructures that show promise to address issues concerning the depletion of non-renewable resources; also these materials may contribute to the growing enthusiasm of utilizing biomass resources. Lignocellulose micelles can be conveniently prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic lignocellulose derivatives in aqueous solution. They show great potential for applications in disparate fields, e.g. drug delivery, bioimaging diagnosis, sensing, nanoreacting, and so on. However, as a new research topic, a lot of research work would be needed to find out the critical structural factors that correlate with the formation, stability, morphology, and flexibility of lignocellulose micelles.

Xiaohui Wang Mail

2011-01-01

318

In vitro antioxidant properties of chicken skin enzymatic protein hydrolysates and membrane fractions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Chicken thigh and breast skin proteins were hydrolysed using alcalase or a combination of pepsin and pancreatin (PP), each at concentrations of 1-4%. The chicken skin protein hydrolysates (CSPHs) were then fractionated by membrane ultrafiltration into different molecular weight peptides (hydrolysates had significantly higher DPPH scavenging activity than the chicken thigh skin hydrolysates. DPPH scavenging and metal ion chelation increased significantly (p<0.05) from 29-40% to 86-89%, respectively with increasing proteolytic enzyme concentration. In contrast, the antioxidant properties decreased as peptide size increased. We conclude that CSPHs and their peptide fractions may be used as ingredients in the formulation of functional foods and nutraceuticals for the control and management of oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:24360464

Onuh, John O; Girgih, Abraham T; Aluko, Rotimi E; Aliani, Michel

2014-05-01

319

New protein hydrolysates from collagen wastes used as peptone for bacterial growth.  

Science.gov (United States)

A simple and low-cost procedure was developed for the effective processing of native calf skin and blood wastes to produce protein hydrolysates. The method includes extraction of high-molecular-weight protein from the raw material, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the extracted residue. The enzymatic hydrolysis was performed by inexpensive commercial subtilisin DY, produced by Bacillus subtilis strain DY possessing high specific activity. The contents of protein, nitrogen, ash, and amino acids of the obtained hydrolysates were determined and compared with those of the commonly used commercial casein hydrolysate (Fluka Biochemica, Switzerland). The newly obtained calf skin hydrolysate, called Eladin, was found to be suitable as a low-cost alternative peptone in growth media of different microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella dublin, and Staphylococcus aureus. The method allows utilization of waste materials by converting them into valuable protein products that could find widespread application in microbiologic practice. PMID:17171464

Vasileva-Tonkova, E; Nustorova, M; Gushterova, A

2007-01-01

320

Ethanol production from marine algal hydrolysates using Escherichia coli KO11.  

Science.gov (United States)

Algae biomass is a potential raw material for the production of biofuels and other chemicals. In this study, biomass of the marine algae, Ulva lactuca, Gelidium amansii,Laminaria japonica, and Sargassum fulvellum, was treated with acid and commercially available hydrolytic enzymes. The hydrolysates contained glucose, mannose, galactose, and mannitol, among other sugars, at different ratios. The Laminaria japonica hydrolysate contained up to 30.5% mannitol and 6.98% glucose in the hydrolysate solids. Ethanogenic recombinant Escherichia coli KO11 was able to utilize both mannitol and glucose and produced 0.4g ethanol per g of carbohydrate when cultured in L. japonica hydrolysate supplemented with Luria-Bertani medium and hydrolytic enzymes. The strategy of acid hydrolysis followed by simultaneous enzyme treatment and inoculation with E. coli KO11 could be a viable strategy to produce ethanol from marine alga biomass. PMID:21640583

Kim, Nag-Jong; Li, Hui; Jung, Kwonsu; Chang, Ho Nam; Lee, Pyung Cheon

2011-08-01

 
 
 
 
321

THE EFFECT OF ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS ON THE PROPERTIES OF PROTEIN HYDROLYSATE FROM PADDY MUSHROOM  

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Full Text Available Protein hydrolysate was prepared from Paddy (Volvariella volvaceae mushroom. Hydrolysis uses commercially protease available Protamex ™ with enzyme concentration of 0.1% (w/w. Hydrolysis was performed at three different temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, and 50 °C with different incubation periods (60, 90, and 120 minutes. Enzyme inactivation was done in 90 °C for 3 minutes. Yield and degree of hydrolysis ranged from 94.76% to 99.55% and 19.06% to 24.59%. Protein solubility was about 89–11,8%. The longer time of hydrolysis, the darker the color of protein hydrolysate. Protein hydrolysate which has hydrolysis at 50 °C for 120 minutes has the highest protein yield and the best sensory properties: 4.76 (taste liking, 3.68 (aroma liking, and 4.56 (overall liking. However, this protein hydrolysate has the potential for application as an ingredient in formulated diets.

Tamtarini

2010-11-01

322

The Effect of Shrimp Waste Hydrolysate on Broiler’s Tibia Weight, Calcium and Phosphorous Content  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An experiment was conducted with 80 unsexed broilers of Arbor Acress CP 707 strain to determine the effect of shrimp waste hydrolysate on tibia bone weight, calcium and phosphorus content. This study involved a Completely Randomized Design (CRD with 4 treatments (0, 4, 8 and 12% of shrimp waste hydrolysate and 5 replicates for each treatment. Diets were isonitrogenous (22% of crude protein and isocaloric (2900 kcal/kg diet. Measured variables were weight of tibia bone, calcium and phosphorus content of tibia bone. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance for CRD. Result shown that increasing of shrimp waste hydrolysate levels in diet had no effect (p>0.05 on tibia bone weight and calcium content, but decreasing of phosphorous content (p<0.01. In conclusion, the utilization of shrimp waste hydrolysate up to 12% in broiler diet had no affected on weight and calcium of tibia bone but decreased phosphorous content.

Maria Endo Mahata

2012-01-01

323

Gross and true ileal digestible amino acid contents of several animal body proteins and their hydrolysates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Amino acid compositions of ovine muscle, ovine myofibrillar protein, ovine spleen, ovine liver, bovine blood plasma, bovine blood globulins and bovine serum albumin and the amino acid compositions and in vivo (laboratory rat) true ileal amino acid digestibilities of hydrolysates (sequential hydrolysis with Neutrase, Alcalase and Flavourzyme) of these protein sources were determined. True ileal amino acid digestibility differed (P<0.05) among the seven protein hydrolysates. The ovine myofibrillar protein and liver hydrolysates were the most digestible, with a mean true ileal digestibility across all amino acids of 99%. The least digestible protein hydrolysate was bovine serum albumin with a comparable mean true ileal digestibility of 93%. When the digestible amino acid contents were expressed as proportions relative to lysine, considerable differences, across the diverse protein sources, were found in the pattern of predicted absorbed amino acids. PMID:23567135

Cui, J; Chong, B; Rutherfurd, S M; Wilkinson, B; Singh, H; Moughan, P J

2013-07-01

324

An integrated detoxification process with electrodialysis and adsorption from the hemicellulose hydrolysates of yellow poplars.  

Science.gov (United States)

An integrated detoxification process with electrodialysis (ED) followed by adsorption was performed to remove fermentation inhibitors from hemicellulose hydrolysates. The hydrolysates were prepared by oxalic acid pretreatment of yellow poplars at different temperatures. Of fermentation inhibitors, acetic acid showed high removal efficiency of about 90% and high transport rate during the ED process without membrane fouling. The integration of the detoxification processes increased up to the ethanol yield of 0.33g/g sugar, the ethanol production of about 9g/L, and the productivity of 0.12g/Lh, while the fermentation of non-detoxified hydrolysates did not produce bioethanol. The influence of inhibitor concentration on the fermentability showed that HMF had the highest inhibition effect. The results clearly showed that an integrated detoxification process with ED followed by adsorption removed fermentation inhibitors with high efficiency and increased the fermentability of the oxalic acid pretreated hemicellulose hydrolysates. PMID:24713602

Trinh, Ly Thi Phi; Kundu, Chandan; Lee, Jae-Won; Lee, Hong-Joo

2014-06-01

325

Disposal of spent nuclear fuel  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

1979-12-01

326

Spent fuel treatment in Japan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Japan, 52 nuclear power reactors are operating with a total power generation capacity of 45 GWe. The cumulative amount of spent fuel arising, as of March 1998, is about 14,700 W. Spent fuel is reprocessed and recovered nuclear materials are to be recycled in LWRs and FBRs. Pu utilization in LWRs will commence in 1999. In January 1997, short-term policy measures were announced by the Atomic Energy Commission, which addressed promotion of the reprocessing programme in Rokkasho, plutonium utilization in LWRs, spent fuel management, back-end measures and FBR development. With regard to the spent fuel management, the policy measures included expansion of spent fuel storage capacity at reactor sites and a study on spent fuel storage away-from-reactor sites, considering the increasing amount of spent fuel arising. Valuable experience was been accumulated at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), from the start of hot operation in 1977 up to now. The role of the TRP will be changed from an operation-oriented to a more R and D oriented facility, when PNC is reorganized into the new organization JNC. The Rokkasho reprocessing plant is under construction and is expected to commence operation in 2003. R and D of future recycling technologies is also continued for the establishment of a nuclear fuel cycle based on FBRs and LWRs. (author)

327

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01

328

Cellulolytic enzymes on lignocellulosic substrates in solid state fermentation by Aspergillus niger  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The production of cellulolytic enzymes by Aspergillus niger on lignocellulosic substrates groundnut fodder, wheat bran, rice bran and sawdust in solid state fermentation in a laboratory scale was compared. Czapek Dox liquid broth amended with cellulose (0.5%) was used to moisten lignocellulosic solid supports for cultivation of Aspergillus niger. The production of filter paperase, carboxymethyl cellulase and -glucosidase were monitored at daily intervals for 5 days. The peak production of the...

Chandra, M. Subhosh; Viswanath, Buddolla; Reddy, B. Rajasekhar

2007-01-01

329

Adaptation of a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to lignocellulosic inhibitors by cell recycle batch fermentation  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks is considered a promising strategy to increase global production of biofuels without impacting food supplies. However, some compounds released during the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials are toxic for the microbial metabolism, causing low ethanol yield and productivity during the fermentation. As an attempt to overcome this problem, the present study evaluated the adaptation of a flocculent strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NRRL ...

Landaeta, R.; Aroca, G.; Acevedo, F.; Teixeira, J. A.; Mussatto, Solange I.

2013-01-01

330

Adaptation and reutilization of Candida guilliermondii cells for xylitol production in bagasse hydrolysate.  

Science.gov (United States)

The xylitol productivity increased by about 15% with the use of cells of Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 previously recycled through four consecutive batch cultures and adapted to the sugar cane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate. Furthermore, the more concentrated the hydrolysate, the more necessary was the adaptation of the cells, owing to the presence of toxic substances at high concentration which inhibited the xylose-xylitol conversion by the yeast. PMID:9542108

Sene, L; Felipe, M G; Vitolo, M; Silva, S S; Mancilha, I M

1998-01-01

331

Amino Acid Composition, Molecular Weight Distribution and Antioxidant Stability of Shrimp Processing Byproduct Hydrolysate  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Protein hydrolysate have many practical applications in a various of industries due to the bioactive peptides related to their amino acid composition, sequence and molecular weight. The amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and antioxidant stability of alcalase hydrolysate were investigated in this study. The hydrolysate was separated into five fractions by ultra filtration system with different molecular weight cutoff with 10, 5, 3 and 1 kDa, respectively. The protein content, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and molecular weight of each fraction were determined. In addition, the antioxidant stability of the hydrolysate under several operating conditions was studied. The results showed that the hydrolysate was composed with high amounts of hydrophobic amino acids (40.4% which might contribute to the high antioxidant activity. The fraction with molecular weight lower than 1 kDa exhibited the highest antioxidative activity among the five fractions. The antioxidant stability experiments showed that the hydrolysate was stable when it was heated up to 100C and the relative antioxidative activity could be maintained nearly 70% at very low pH of 2.0. Glucose and sucrose had negative effects on the antioxidative activity, in which the relative activity of about 80% was retained. Sodium chloride and sodium benzoate had little or no effects on the antioxidative activity of the hydrolysate. The effects of Zn2+ and Cu2+ on the antioxidative activity were significant and dependent on metal concentration. The shrimp processing byproduct hydrolysate may be a potential natural food antioxidant in the future.

J.X. Jiang

2011-01-01

332

Optimization of the Preparation of Fish Protein Anti-Obesity Hydrolysates Using Response Surface Methodology  

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The enzymatic condition for producing the anti-obesity hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was optimized with the aid of response surface methodology, which also derived a statistical model for experimental validation. Compared with neutral protease, papain and protamex, the porcine pancreas lipase inhibitory rate of hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was higher with alkaline protease. Results showed that the model terms were significant, the terms of lack of fit were not s...

Jinju Wang; Chen Peng; Yanping Wang

2013-01-01

333

Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and ß-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, ¿-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates obtained was studied as a function of pH. At neutral pH, all soy-derived protein hydrolysates, particularly those from glycinin, obtained by hydrolysis with subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, bro...

Kuipers, B. J. H.; Alting, A. C.; Gruppen, H.

2007-01-01

334

WPC Hydrolysates Obtained by the Action of a Pancreatin: Preparation, Analysis and Phenylalanine Removal  

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The aim of this work was to use a pancreatin to obtain Whey Protein Concentrate (WPC) hydrolysates with high degree of hydrolysis, appropriate peptide profiles from the nutritional point of view as well as with reduced Phenylalanine (Phe) content. Six hydrolysates were prepared by varying the enzyme: Substrate ratio and the substrate concentration. The degree of hydrolysis was calculated by the ratio between a-amino and total nitrogen. The analysis of peptide profile involved the fractionatio...

Amorin, Larissa L.; Silva, Mauro R.; Silva, Viviane D. M.; Silva, Maite C.; Silvestre, Marialice P. C.

2011-01-01

335

Antioxidant Effect and Water-Holding Capacity of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) Seed Protein Hydrolysates  

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The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in-vitro pepsin and pancreatin digestion of proteins extracted from Roselle seed on the production of bioactive peptides. Defatted Roselle seed flour was used to extract different protein fractions namely globulin, albumin and glutelin. The proteins were digested using pepsin (1 h) followed by pancreatin (1 h) in order to produce hydrolysates with good antioxidant activity. The prepared hydrolysates were as effective as antioxidants in mo...

Fatoumata Tounkara; Bernard Sodio; Tidjani Amza; Guo-Wei Le; Yong-Hui Shi

2013-01-01

336

Effect of Adsorption Medium, Hydrolytic Parameters and Ultrafiltration on the Phenylalanine Removal from Pancreatic Whey Hydrolysates  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

With the aim of producing dietary supplements for phenylketonurics, using whey hydrolysates as protein sources, the effect of some procedures over phenylalanine (Phe) removal was evaluated. Twelve whey hydrolysates were prepared by the action of a pancreatin, in three enzyme:substrate (E:S) ratios and two temperatures. Half of the samples were submitted to the ultrafiltration (UF) through 10,000 Da cut-off membranes. The activated carbon and the polymeric adsorbent XAD-4 were used for removin...

Delvivo, Fernanda M.; Vieira, Claudia R.; Biasutti, Eliza A. R.; Michely Capobiango; Silva, Viviane D. M.; Afonso, Wendel O.; Silvestre, Marialice P. C.

2006-01-01

337

Production of Lupinus angustifolius protein hydrolysates with improved functional properties  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Protein hydrolysates wer e obtained from lupin flour and from the purified globulin α -conglutin, and their functional properties were studied. Hydrolysis with alcalase for 60 minutes yielded degrees of hydrolysis ranging from 4 % to 11 % for lupin flour, and from 4 % to 13% for α -conglutin. Protein solubility, oil absorption, foam capacity and stability, emulsifying activity, and emulsion stability of hydrolysates with 6% degree of hydrolysis were determined and compar...

Mill N, Francisco; Vioque, Javier; Gir N-calle, Julio; Pedroche, Justo; Lqari, Hassane

2005-01-01

338

Systematic Investigation of Antioxidant Activity of Egg White Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Pepsin  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Antioxidative activity of protein hydrolysates from egg white hydrolyzed by Pepsin with different Degrees of Hydrolysis (DHs) was investigated. As the DH increased from 6.47 to 18.22%, the antioxidative activity of Egg White Protein Hydrolysates (EWPHs) first increased and then decreased, except for the reducing power of EWPHs. The EWPHs with DH 16.93% showed higher DPPH radical scavenging activity (96.07±3.84%), hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (36.82±1.46%), superoxide anion scavengin...

Shuguo Sun; Meihu Ma; Qinlu Lin; Tao Yang; Huihui Niu

2013-01-01

339

Determination of optimal regimes in obtaining kilka protein hydrolysates for sturgeon starter diets  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of this study was to determine the optimal regimes of obtaining hydrolysates of minced fish (Clupeonella sp., kilka) with a predictable output of water-soluble protein and non-protein nitrogen compounds in them. The technological process has been studied by two types of raw material: whole fish and fish without head and entrails. Studying the process of obtaining kilka hydrolysates for sturgeon starter diets showed that the most rational way of hydrolysis in this case is enzymatic-aci...

Alamdari Hojatollah; Dolganova Natalia Vadimovna; Ponomarev Sergey Vladimirovich

2013-01-01

340

Industrial scale chromatographic separation of valuable compounds from biomass hydrolysates and side streams  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Carbohydrates are composed of a number of various monosaccharides, glucose being the most abundant. Some of the monosaccharides are valuable compounds used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. They can be separated from biomass hydrolysates e.g. by chromatographic methods. In this thesis, chromatographic separation of valuable compounds using ion exchange resins was studied on an industrial scale. Of special interest were rare monosaccharides in biomass hydrolysates. A novel chroma...

Saari, Pia

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

Production of Defatted Palm Kernel Cake Protein Hydrolysate as a Valuable Source of Natural Antioxidants  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of this study was to produce a valuable protein hydrolysate from palm kernel cake (PKC) for the development of natural antioxidants. Extracted PKC protein was hydrolyzed using different proteases (alcalase, chymotrypsin, papain, pepsin, trypsin, flavourzyme, and bromelain). Subsequently, antioxidant activity and degree of hydrolysis (DH) of each hydrolysate were evaluated using DPPH• radical scavenging activity and O-phthaldialdehyde spectrophotometric assay, re...

Mohammad Zarei; Afshin Ebrahimpour; Azizah Abdul-Hamid; Farooq Anwar; Nazamid Saari

2012-01-01

342

In Vitro Binding Capacity of Bile Acids by Defatted Corn Protein Hydrolysate  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capacity. Peptides from Flavourzyme defatted corn hydrolysate exhibited significantly (p

Pierre Claver Irakoze

2011-02-01

343

Preparation and Characteristic of Iron-Binding Peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards Hydrolysates  

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The aim of this study was focused on preparation of iron-binding peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards (SPD) hydrolysate using response surface methodology (RSM) and characteristic of the iron-peptides complex. Six kinds of protease (tyrpsin, pepsin, protmex, flavourzyme, neutrase and alcalase) were used to hydrolysis the SPD protein and the trypsin hydrolysate showed the highest iron-binding activity. The factorial design experiments showed that pH, trypsin concentration and hydrolysis ti...

Zhang-yan Ren; Guang-rong Huang; Jia-xin Jiang; Wen-wei Chen

2011-01-01

344

Assessment of spent fuel cooling  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The paper presents the methodology, the findings, and the conclusions of a study that was done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) on loss of spent fuel pool cooling. The study involved an examination of spent fuel pool designs, operating experience, operating practices, and procedures. AEOD's work was augmented in the area of statistics and probabilistic risk assessment by experts from the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. Operating experience was integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment to gain insight on the risks from spent fuel pools

345

Decomposition of [14C]lignocelluloses of Spartina alterniflora and a comparison with field experiments  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Decomposition of lignocelluloses from Spartina alterniflora in salt-marsh sediments was measured by using 14C-labeled compounds. Rates of decomposition were fastest in the first 4 days of incubation and declined later. Lignins labeled in side chains were mineralized slightly faster than uniformly labeled lignins; 12% of the [side chain-14C]lignin-labeled lignocellulose was mineralized after 816 h of incubation, whereas only 8% of the [U-14C]lignin-labeled lignocelluloses were degraded during this period. The carbohydrate moiety within the lignocellulose complex was degraded about four times faster than the lignin moiety; after 816 h of incubation, 29 to 37% of the carbohydrate moiety had been mineralized. Changes in concentration of lignin and cellulose in litter of S. alterniflora were followed over 2 years of decay. Cellulose disappeared from litter more rapidly than lignin; 50% of the initial content of cellulose was lost after 130 days, whereas lignin required 330 to 380 days for 50% loss. The slow loss of lignin compared with other litter components resulted in a progressive enrichment of litter in lignin content. The rates of mineralization of [14C]lignocelluloses in marsh sediments were similar to the rates of lignocellulose decomposition in litter on the marsh

346

Quantitative proteomic analysis of lignocellulolytic enzymes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium on different lignocellulosic biomass.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lignocellulosic biomass from agricultural crop residues and forest waste represents an abundant renewable resource for bioenergy and future biofuel. The current bottleneck of lignocellulosic biofuel production is the hydrolysis of biomass to sugar. To understand the enzymatic hydrolysis of complex biomasses, in this report, lignocellulolytic enzymes secretion by Phanerochaete chrysosporium cultivated in different natural lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover, hay, sawdust, sugarcane baggase, wheat bran and wood chips were quantitatively analyzed with the iTRAQ technique using LC-MS/MS. A diverse groups of enzymes, including cellulases, glycoside hydrolases, hemicellulases, lignin degrading enzymes, peroxidases, esterases, lipases, chitinases, peptidases, protein translocating transporter and hypothetical proteins were quantified, of which several were novel lignocellulosic biomass hydrolyzing enzymes. The quantitative expression and regulation of lignocellulolytic enzymes by P. chrysosporium were dependent on the nature and complexity of lignocellulosic biomass as well as physical size of the biomass. The iTRAQ data revealed oxidative and hydrolytic lignin degrading mechanism of P. chrysosporium. Numerous proteins presumed to be involved in natural lignocellulosic biomass transformation and degradation were expressed and produced in variable quantities in response to different agricultural and forest wastes. PMID:22146477

Adav, Sunil S; Ravindran, Anita; Sze, Siu Kwan

2012-02-16

347

Antioxidative and functional properties of protein hydrolysate from defatted skipjack (Katsuwonous pelamis) roe.  

Science.gov (United States)

Antioxidative and functional properties of protein hydrolysate from defatted skipjack (Katsuwonous pelamis) roe, hydrolysed by Alcalase 2.4 L (RPH) with different degrees of hydrolysis (DH) at various concentrations were examined. As DH increased, the reduction of DPPH, ABTS radicals scavenging activities and reducing power were noticeable (p<0.05). The increases in metal chelating activity and superoxide scavenging activity were attained with increasing DH (p<0.05). However, chelating activity gradually decreased at DH above 30%. All activities except superoxide anion radical scavenging activity increased as the concentration of hydrolysate increased (p<0.05). Hydrolysis using Alcalase could increase protein solubility to above 80% over a wide pH range (2-10). The highest emulsion ability index (EAI) and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were observed at low DH (5%) (p<0.05). Concentrations of hydrolysates determined interfacial properties differently, depending on DH. The molecular weight distribution of RPH with 5%DH (RPH5) was determined using Sephadex G-75 column. Two major peaks with the molecular weight of 57.8 and 5.5kDa were obtained. Fraction with MW of 5.5 had the strongest metal chelating activity and ABTS radical scavenging activity. The results reveal that protein hydrolysates from defatted skipjack roe could be used as food additives possessing both antioxidant activity and functional properties. PMID:22980906

Intarasirisawat, Rossawan; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Wu, Jianping

2012-12-15

348

Production of Lactic Acid by a Local Isolate of Lactobacillus plantarum Using Cheap Starchy Material Hydrolysates  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Some cheap starchy materials like sorghum grains and wheat bran were degraded by crude glucoamylase of a local isolate of Mucor sp., then Lactic Acid (LA was produced by a local isolate of L. plantarum using sorghum flour hydrolysate, sorghum starch hydrolysate, soluble starch hydrolysate, wheat bran hydrolysate and date syrup with 10% reducing sugars. The yield of LA increased to 37.2 g/100 reducing sugars by using sorghum flour hydrolysate as a basal medium supplemented with (0.6+0.6% yeast extract+(NH42HPO4 and 0.06% MgSO4.7H2O, reducing sugars was 5%. The fermentation temperature was 30°C/96 h. Results indicated that using hydrolysates mixtures of sorghum flour and wheat bran improved LA fermentation. The yield of LA was 92.5 g by using sorghum flour and 50% wheat bran. Paper chromatography indicated that LA was the unique organic acid in the fermented broth.

Amal Kadhim G. Al-Asady

2012-01-01

349

Improvement of the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates by detoxification using electrodialysis and adsorption.  

Science.gov (United States)

A two-step detoxification process consisting of electrodialysis and adsorption was performed to improve the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates. The constituents of the hydrolysate differed significantly between mixed hardwood and softwood. Acetic acid and furfural concentrations were high in the mixed hardwood, whereas 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration was relatively low compared with that of the mixed softwood. The removal efficiency of acetic acid reached 100% by electrodialysis (ED) process in both hydrolysates, while those of furfural and HMF showed very low, due to non-ionizable properties. Most of the remaining inhibitors were removed by XAD-4 resin. In the mixed hardwood hydrolysate without removal of the inhibitors, ethanol fermentation was not completed. Meanwhile, both ED-treated hydrolysates successfully produced ethanol with 0.08 and 0.15 g/Lh ethanol productivity, respectively. The maximum ethanol productivity was attained after fermentation with 0.27 and 0.35 g/Lh of detoxified hydrolysates, which were treated by ED, followed by XAD-4 resin. PMID:24321607

Jeong, So-Yeon; Trinh, Ly Thi Phi; Lee, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Won

2014-01-01

350

Intermodal transportation of spent fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate

351

Spent fuel management in Canada  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The current status of the Canadian spent fuel storage is presented. This includes wet and dry interim storage. Extension of wet interim storage facilities is nor planned, as dry technologies have found wide acceptance. The Canadian nuclear program is sustained by commercial Ontario Hydro CANDU type reactors, since 1971, representing 13600 MW(e) of installed capacity, able to produce 9200 spent fuel bundles (1800 tU) every year, and Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick CANDU reactors each producing 685 MW(e) and about 100 tU of spent fuel annually. The implementation of various interim (wt and dry) storage technologies resulted in simple, dense and low cost systems. Economical factors determined that the open cycle option be adopted for the CANDU type reactors rather that recycling the spent fuel. Research and development activities for immobilization and final disposal of nuclear waste are being undertaken in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

352

Effects of Pro-Hyp, a collagen hydrolysate-derived peptide, on hyaluronic acid synthesis using in vitro cultured synovium cells and oral ingestion of collagen hydrolysates in a guinea pig model of osteoarthritis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Proline-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) stimulated hyaluronic acid production in cultured synovium cells. It was detected in guinea pig blood after oral ingestion of collagen hydrolysates. Oral administration of collagen hydrolysates increased the amount of proteoglycans in the epiphyses. It also reduced the morphological changes associated with osteoarthritic cartilage destruction of the knee joint. The results suggest that collagen hydrolysates have therapeutic potential for treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:20944430

Ohara, Hiroki; Iida, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kyoko; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nomura, Yoshihiro

2010-01-01

353

Transportation of spent MTR fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper gives an overview of the various aspects of MTR spent fuel transportation and provides in particular information about the on-going shipment of 4 spent fuel casks to the United States. Transnucleaire is a transport and Engineering Company created in 1963 at the request of the French Atomic Energy Commission. The company followed the growth of the world nuclear industry and has now six subsidiaries and affiliated companies established in countries with major nuclear programs.

Raisonnier, D.

1997-08-01

354

Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

355

Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities of protein hydrolysate from muscle of barbel (barbus callensis)  

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The present study investigated angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of barbel muscle protein hydrolysate prepared with Alcalase. The barbel muscle protein hydrolysate displayed a high ACE inhibitory activity (C I 50 = 0.92 mg/mL). The antioxidant activities of protein hydrolysate at different concentrations were evaluated using various in vitro antioxidant assays, including 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical method and reducing power assay. The...

Assaad Sila; Anissa Haddar; Oscar Martinez-Alvarez; Ali Bougatef

2013-01-01

356

Preparation of Low-phenylalanine Whey Hydrolysates, Using Papain and Pancreatin Immobilized on Activated Carbon and Alumina  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study involves the preparation of whey hydrolysates with low phenylalanine (Phe) content aiming the treatment of phenylketonuria. For hydrolysing the proteins, two enzymes were used, papain and pancreatin, in an immobilized form, on Activated Carbon (AC) and alumina (AL) and three enzyme: substrate ratios (E:S) were tested for each enzyme. Activated carbon was used to remove Phe from hydrolysates. The second order spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the efficiency of Phe removal as we...

Silva, Viviane D. M.; Marco, Leticia M.; Afonso, Wendel O.; Lopes, Daniella C. F.; JoseN. Januario; Aguiar, Marcos J. B.; Starling, Ana Lucia P.; Silvestre, Marialice P. C.

2007-01-01

357

Chicken collagen hydrolysate protects rats from hypertension and cardiovascular damage.  

Science.gov (United States)

We previously reported that chicken collagen hydrolysate (CCH) has strong angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and antihypertensive effects on spontaneously hypertensive rats. Here, we investigated the chronic therapy effects of CCH on blood pressure and vascular relaxation in a cardiovascular damage model of Wistar-Kyoto rats induced by N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Following co-treatment with CCH for 4 weeks, the increment of systolic blood pressure was suppressed significantly. At 8 weeks, the vasorelaxation of thoracic aorta increased significantly, and cardiovascular damage was ameliorated. The concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in blood was reduced significantly by long-term administration of CCH, whereas the nitric oxide concentration was increased significantly at 1 hour post-treatment. The results suggest that beneficial effects of CCH result from antihypertensive function, but also from inhibition of cardiovascular damage to the endothelial cells via its ACE inhibitory activity and regulation of nitric oxide and ICAM-1, which suggests that CCH may be useful as a medicinal food for patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:20170381

Zhang, Youzuo; Kouguchi, Tomomi; Shimizu, Muneshige; Ohmori, Takashi; Takahata, Yoshihisa; Morimatsu, Fumiki

2010-04-01

358

ACID- AND BASE-CATALIZED HYDROLYSES OF CORN STALK  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nowadays agricultural wastes represent an alternative source of renewable raw materials. Different processes can be applied to these alternative materials to separate their components and obtain chemical products with high added value, such as bioethanol, organic acids, monomers, and biopolymers. The main objective of this work is to study the extraction of hemicelluloses from corn stalks using different reagents [H2SO4, HNO3, HCL, CH3COOH, CF3COOH, Ca(OH2, NaOH]. The raw material was characterized and fractionated with autoclave hydrolysis processes (121 ºC, 1:20 solid/liquid ratio, 60 min, pH = 4 or 8. Monomeric sugars concentration, TDS, MO, MI, density, and final pH of the hydrolysate were determined. Hemicelluloses were precipitated and analyzed by different techniques (FTIR, TGA and GPC. The highest yield of hemicelluloses extraction was achieved by sulphuric acid (0.98 g/L total sugar content and the less effective reagent was Ca(OH2 (0.52 g/L total sugar content.

Cristina Sánchez

2011-04-01

359

Ab initio and DFT studies on hydrolyses of phosphorus halides.  

Science.gov (United States)

Hydrolyses of phosphorus halides, (RO)(2)POX where R = H or Me and X = F or Cl, in the gas phase and in the reaction field have been investigated theoretically with ab initio and the density functional theory (DFT). The free energy of activation in the reaction field was also estimated using the Onsager method with a correction of entropy change and basis set superposition error (BSSE). The reaction of (MeO)(2)POF proceeds through a path with bifunctional catalysis regardless of the medium, but the reaction of (MeO)(2)POCl proceeds through bifunctional and general base catalysis in the gas phase and in water, respectively. The estimated free energy barrier of 23 kcal/mol for the hydrolysis of (MeO)(2)POF is in good agreement with the experimental values of 24 kcal/mol, and relative barrier of 3 kcal/mol to the (MeO)(2)POCl is also in good agreement with the experimental values of 5 kcal/mol of diisopropyl phosphorus halides ((Pr(i)O)(2)POX, X = F and Cl). PMID:15362131

Lee, Oh-Seuk; Yang, Kiyull; Kang, Keum Duck; Koo, In Sun; Kim, Chan-Kyung; Lee, Ikchoon

2004-11-15

360

Adapting wood hydrolysate barriers to high humidity conditions.  

Science.gov (United States)

The incorporation of layered silicates in bio-based barrier films resulted in lower water vapor permeability, and significantly lowered oxygen permeability at a relative humidity (RH) as high as 80%, with reduced moisture sensitivity of the wood hydrolysate (WH) based films. The applicability of WH based films was accordingly extended over a wider relative humidity condition range. Crude aqueous process liquor, the WH, was extracted from hardwood and utilized as a feed-stock for films without any upgrading pretreatment, yet producing superior oxygen barrier performance compared to partially upgraded WH and highly purified hemicelluloses. Films composed of crude WH and either one of two types of naturally occurring layered silicates, montmorillonite (MMT) or talc, as mineral additives, were evaluated with respect to oxygen and water vapor permeability, morphological, tensile and dynamic thermo-mechanical properties. Films with an oxygen permeability as low as 1.5 (cm(3)?m)/(m(2)daykPa) at 80% RH was achieved. PMID:24188847

Yaich, Anas Ibn; Edlund, Ulrica; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

2014-01-16

 
 
 
 
361

Biostimulant action of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate produced through enzymatic hydrolysis  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the biostimulant action (hormone like activity, nitrogen uptake, and growth stimulation) of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate by means of two laboratory bioassays: a corn (Zea mays L.) coleoptile elongation rate test (Experiment 1), a rooting test on tomato cuttings (Experiment 2); and two greenhouse experiments: a dwarf pea (Pisum sativum L.) growth test (Experiment 3), and a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) nitrogen uptake trial (Experiment 4). Protein hydrolysate treatments of corn caused an increase in coleoptile elongation rate when compared to the control, in a dose-dependent fashion, with no significant differences between the concentrations 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L, and inodole-3-acetic acid treatment. The auxin-like effect of the protein hydrolysate on corn has been also observed in the rooting experiment of tomato cuttings. The shoot, root dry weight, root length, and root area were significantly higher by 21, 35, 24, and 26%, respectively, in tomato treated plants with the protein hydrolysate at 6 ml/L than untreated plants. In Experiment 3, the application of the protein hydrolysate at all doses (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L) significantly increased the shoot length of the gibberellin-deficient dwarf pea plants by an average value of 33% in comparison with the control treatment. Increasing the concentration of the protein hydrolysate from 0 to 10 ml/L increased the total dry biomass, SPAD index, and leaf nitrogen content by 20.5, 15, and 21.5%, respectively. Thus the application of plant-derived protein hydrolysate containing amino acids and small peptides elicited a hormone-like activity, enhanced nitrogen uptake and consequently crop performances. PMID:25250039

Colla, Giuseppe; Rouphael, Youssef; Canaguier, Renaud; Svecova, Eva; Cardarelli, Mariateresa

2014-01-01

362

Biostimulant action of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate produced through enzymatic hydrolysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the biostimulant action (hormone like activity, nitrogen uptake, and growth stimulation) of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate by means of two laboratory bioassays: a corn (Zea mays L.) coleoptile elongation rate test (Experiment 1), a rooting test on tomato cuttings (Experiment 2); and two greenhouse experiments: a dwarf pea (Pisum sativum L.) growth test (Experiment 3), and a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) nitrogen uptake trial (Experiment 4). Protein hydrolysate treatments of corn caused an increase in coleoptile elongation rate when compared to the control, in a dose-dependent fashion, with no significant differences between the concentrations 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L, and inodole-3-acetic acid treatment. The auxin-like effect of the protein hydrolysate on corn has been also observed in the rooting experiment of tomato cuttings. The shoot, root dry weight, root length, and root area were significantly higher by 21, 35, 24, and 26%, respectively, in tomato treated plants with the protein hydrolysate at 6 ml/L than untreated plants. In Experiment 3, the application of the protein hydrolysate at all doses (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L) significantly increased the shoot length of the gibberellin-deficient dwarf pea plants by an average value of 33% in comparison with the control treatment. Increasing the concentration of the protein hydrolysate from 0 to 10 ml/L increased the total dry biomass, SPAD index, and leaf nitrogen content by 20.5, 15, and 21.5%, respectively. Thus the application of plant-derived protein hydrolysate containing amino acids and small peptides elicited a hormone-like activity, enhanced nitrogen uptake and consequently crop performances. PMID:25250039

Colla, Giuseppe; Rouphael, Youssef; Canaguier, Renaud; Svecova, Eva; Cardarelli, Mariateresa

2014-01-01

363

Development of spent fuel remote handling technology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Since the nation`s policy on spent fuel management is not finalized, the technical items commonly required for safe management and recycling of spent fuel - remote technologies of transportation, inspection, maintenance, and disassembly of spent fuel - are selected and pursued. In this regards, the following R and D activities are carried out : collision free transportation of spent fuel assembly, mechanical disassembly of spent nuclear fuel and graphical simulation of fuel handling / disassembly process. (author). 36 refs., 16 tabs., 77 figs

Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, B. S.; Park, Y. S.; Oh, S. C.; Kim, S. H.; Cho, M. W.; Hong, D. H

1997-12-01

364

Characterization of a microbial consortium capable of degrading lignocellulose.  

Science.gov (United States)

A microbial consortium, designated WCS-6, was established by successive subcultivation in the presence of rice straw under static conditions. The degradation efficiencies of WSC-6 for 0.5 g filter paper, cotton and rice straw after 3 days of cultivation were 99.0±0.7%, 76.9±1.5% and 81.3±0.8%, respectively as determined by gravimetrical methods. Nine bacterial isolates were obtained from WCS-6 plated under aerobic conditions, and sequencing of their 16S rDNA indicated that these bacteria were related to Bacillus thermoamylovorans BTa, Paenibacillus barengoltzii SAFN-016, Proteobacterium S072, Pseudoxanthomonas taiwanensis CB-226, Rhizobiaceae str. M100, Bacillus sp. E53-10, Beta proteobacterium HMD444, Petrobacter succinimandens 4BON, and Tepidiphilus margaritifer N2-214. DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and sequencing of 16S rDNA sequences amplified from total consortium DNA revealed the presence of sequences related to those of Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, uncultured bacterium clone GC3, uncultured Clostridium sp. clone A1-3, Clostridium thermobutyricum, and Clostridium thermosuccinogenes in addition to the sequences identified from the cultured bacteria. The microbial community identified herein is a potential candidate consortium for the degradation of waste lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:21831630

Wang, Weidong; Yan, Lei; Cui, Zongjun; Gao, Yamei; Wang, Yanjie; Jing, Ruiyong

2011-10-01

365

Environmental impacts of a lignocellulose feedstock biorefinery system: An assessment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Biomass is a sustainable alternative to fossil energy carriers which are used to produce fuels, electricity, chemicals, and other goods. At the moment, the main biobased products are obtained by the conversion of biomass to basic products like starch, oil, and cellulose. In addition, some single chemicals and fuels are produced. Presently, concepts of biorefineries which will produce a multitude of biomass-derived products are discussed. Biorefineries are supposed to contribute to a more sustainable resource supply and to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, biobased products and fuels may also be associated with environmental disadvantages due to, e.g. land use or eutrophication of water. We performed a Life Cycle Assessment of a lignocellulose feedstock biorefinery system and compared it to conventional product alternatives. The biorefinery was found to have the greatest environmental impacts in the three categories: fossil fuel use, respiratory effects, and carcinogenics. The environmental impacts predominantly result from the provision of hydrochloric acid and to a smaller extent also from the provision of process heat. As the final configuration of the biorefinery cannot be determined yet, various variants of the biorefinery system were analysed. The optimum variant (acid and heat recoveries) yields better results than the fossil alternatives, with the total environmental impacts being approx. 41% lower than those of the fossil counterparts. For most biorefinery variants analysed, the environmental performance in some impact categories is better than that of the fossil counterparts while disadvantages can be seen in other categories.

366

Fed-batch cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on lignocellulosic hydrolyzate.  

Science.gov (United States)

Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows very poorly in dilute acid lignocellulosic hydrolyzate during the anaerobic fermentation for fuel ethanol production. However, yeast cells grown aerobically on the hydrolyzate have increased tolerance for the hydrolyzate. Cultivation of yeast on part of the hydrolyzate has therefore the potential of enabling increased ethanol productivity in the fermentation of the hydrolyzate. To evaluate the ability of the yeast to grow in the hydrolyzate, fed-batch cultivations were run using the ethanol concentration as input variable to control the feed-rate. The yeast then grew in an undetoxified hydrolyzate with a specific growth rate of 0.19 h(-1) by controlling the ethanol concentration at a low level during the cultivation. However, the biomass yield was lower for the cultivation on hydrolyzate compared to synthetic media: with an ethanol set-point of 0.25 g/l the yield was 0.46 g/g on the hydrolyzate, compared to 0.52 g/g for synthetic media. The main reason for the difference was not the ethanol production per se, but a significant production of glycerol at a high specific growth rate. The glycerol production may be attributed to an insufficient respiratory capacity. PMID:17091372

Petersson, Anneli; Lidén, Gunnar

2007-02-01

367

White-rot fungal growth on sugarcane lignocellulosic residue  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Twelve white-rot fungi were grown in solid state culture on sugarcane chips previously fermented by yeast employing the EX-FERM process. The lignocellulosic sugarcane residue had 12.5% permanganate lignin and 81.3% holocellulose. After 5 to 6 weeks at 20/sup 0/C, all fungi produced a solid residue which had a lower in vitro dry matter enzymatic digestibility than the original bagasse, with the exception of Coriolus versicolor which showed a slight increase of 0.6 units. Four fungi produced a residue with higher soluble solids that the original sample. Lignin losses were rather similar for all fungi tested, an average value of 38.64% of the original value was obtained. About the same amount of hemicellulose was degreaded, 32.22%. Most fungi showed a preference for hemicellulose hydrolysis over cellulose degradation. The two fungi that showed greater cellulolytic activity were Sporotrichum pulverulentum and Dichomitus squalens. No appreciable dry matter losses were detected for Agrocybe aergerita and Flammulina velutipes.

Rolz, C.; Leon, R. de; Arriola, M.C. de; Cabrera, S. de

1987-03-01

368

Psychrophilic anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass: a characterization study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Psychrophilic (20°C) specific methane (CH4) yield from cellulose (C), xylan (X), cellulose/xylan mixture (CX), cow feces (CF), and wheat straw (WS) achieved (Nl CH4 kg(-1)VS) of 338.5 ± 14.3 (C), 310.5 ± 3.4 (X), 305.5 ± 29.6 (CX mixture), and 235.3 ± 22.7 (WS) during 56 days, and 237.6 ± 17.7 (CF) during 70 days. These yields corresponded to COD recovery of 73.3 ± 3.1% (C)=69.1 ± 0.76% (X)=67.3 ± 5.8% (CX mixture)>52.9 ± 2.6% (CF)>46.5 ± 2.7% (WS). Cellulose-fed culture had a lower and statistically different initial CH4 production rate from those calculated for cultures fed X, CX mixture, CF and WS. It seemed that the presence of hemicellulose in complex substrate such as wheat straw and cow feces supported the higher initial CH4 rate compared to cellulose. Biomethanation of the pure and complex lignocellulosic substrates tested is feasible at psychrophilic conditions given that a well-adapted inoculum is used; however, hydrolysis was the rate limiting step. PMID:23796576

Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

2013-08-01

369

CONVERSION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC MATERIAL TO CHEMICALS AND FUELS  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A direct conversion of cellulosic wastes, including resin-bonded furniture and building waste, to levulinate esters is being investigated with the view to producing fuels, solvents, and chemical intermediates as well as other useful by-products in an inexpensive process. The acid-catalyzed reaction of cellulosic materials with ethanol or methanol at 200 C gives good yields of levulinate and formate esters, as well as useful by-products, such as a solid residue (charcoal) and a resinous lignin residue. An initial plant design showed reasonable rates of return for production of purified ethyl levulinate and by-products. In this project, investigations have been performed to identify and develop reactions that utilize esters of levulinic acid produced during the acid-catalyzed ethanolysis reaction. We wish to develop uses for levulinate esters that allow their marketing at prices comparable to inexpensive polymer intermediates. These prices will allow a sufficient rate of return to justify building plants for utilizing the waste lignocellulosics. If need is demonstrated for purified levulinate, the initial plant design work may be adequate, at least until further pilot-scale work on the process is performed.

Edwin S. Olson

2001-06-30

370

CONVERSION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC MATERIAL TO CHEMICALS AND FUELS; TOPICAL  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A direct conversion of cellulosic wastes, including resin-bonded furniture and building waste, to levulinate esters is being investigated with the view to producing fuels, solvents, and chemical intermediates as well as other useful by-products in an inexpensive process. The acid-catalyzed reaction of cellulosic materials with ethanol or methanol at 200 C gives good yields of levulinate and formate esters, as well as useful by-products, such as a solid residue (charcoal) and a resinous lignin residue. An initial plant design showed reasonable rates of return for production of purified ethyl levulinate and by-products. In this project, investigations have been performed to identify and develop reactions that utilize esters of levulinic acid produced during the acid-catalyzed ethanolysis reaction. We wish to develop uses for levulinate esters that allow their marketing at prices comparable to inexpensive polymer intermediates. These prices will allow a sufficient rate of return to justify building plants for utilizing the waste lignocellulosics. If need is demonstrated for purified levulinate, the initial plant design work may be adequate, at least until further pilot-scale work on the process is performed

371

EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT APPROACHES FOR THE DRYING OF LIGNOCELLULOSE RESIDUES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to evaluate three methodological approaches for the drying (air drying, solar drying, and hot-air drying of three lignocelluloses residues in Costa Rica, namely the empty fruit bunches of oil palm (EFB, pineapple plant leaves (PL with different treatments on this leaf, and sawdust from Gmelina arborea (GAD. The initial moisture content (MCi, the drying times, and the variation of moisture content (MC with time were determined. A mathematical model of the relation between MC and drying time was also established. The results showed that the MCi was the highest in PL (over 79%, followed by EFB (over 47%, and GAD (lower than 47%. Drying times were higher for air drying, followed by solar drying, and finally hot-air drying. PL showed the longest drying times, followed by GAD and EFB. However, it can be reduced by shortening strands, application of grooves in the cuticle, or crushing the leaf. The MC variation model revealed that the function was Y = ax3 + bx2 + cx + d for all three drying techniques, and the weather conditions where the drying was tested. This model presents high coefficients of determination (over 0.97 and low percentage of errors (1.85-4.73%.

Carolina Tenorio,

2012-06-01

372

Production of butyl solvents from lignocellulose: An economic analysis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A process is described that produces butyl solvents, butanol, isopropanol, and ethanol from wood or other lignocellulosic feedstock. Two new elements of technology introduced are the processing batch reactor developed at SERI that produces high yields of fermentable sugars (hexoses and pentoses) at the appropriate concentration for the butyl solvents fermentation and a novel method of separating products using liquid-liquid extraction, which reduces the separation energy required to about 30% of energy required in the conventional batch method. Economic analysis suggests that the project is attractive at a feedstock capacity of 400,000 dry MTA or larger (178 million lb/yr solvents). There are, however, uncertainties associated with the project because of the relatively early stage of development of the key elements of the process technology and the sensitivity of the DCFIROR to estimated capital cost. A further conclusion is that the process economics would benefit greatly from reduced capital cost of the fermentation section. This could perhaps be accomplished by developing a continuous fermentation process. Such fermentation technology has been demonstrated on laboratory scale, but as far as is known, has not been developed to pilot scale. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Wright, J D; Daling, R; Sandel, R L; Fitzpatrick, S W

1986-11-01

373

New products made with lignocellulosic nanofibers from Brazilian amazon forest  

Science.gov (United States)

The biodiversity of the Amazon forest is undoubtedly rich; hence there is considerable variety of plant fibers regarding their morphological, chemical and structural properties. The legal exploration of the Brazilian Amazon is based on sustainable management techniques, but the generation of a relevant amount of plant wastes still cant be avoided. The correct destination of such materials is a challenge that Brazilian companies have to face. In this context, the National Council of Science and Technology (CNPq) promoted the creation of investigation nets on sustainability of Brazilian agribusiness. The Brazilian Net on Lignocellulosic Composites and Nanocomposites was then created, with partnership between several national and international research institutions. Until the moment, the results showed that Amazon plant fibers that are discarded as residues have great potential to nanofiber production. Nanopapers with considerable high mechanical and physical strength, proper opacity and great crystalline index were produced by using a clean and simple mechanical method. Those materials are candidates to several uses such as packaging, substrates transparent conductive films, gas barrier films, solar cells and e-papers.

Bufalino, L.; Mendes, L. M.; Tonoli, G. H. D.; Rodrigues, A.; Fonseca, A.; Cunha, P. I.; Marconcini, J. M.

2014-08-01

374

Screening of Fungi Capable of Degrading Lignocellulose from Plantation Forests  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In an effort to prevent forest fires after the clear cutting of plantation forests, fungi capable of degrading lignocelluloses were isolated to make a fertilizer from the logging waste. Seventy five fungal species were isolated from fruiting bodies and mycelia in plantation forests of South and North Sumatera, Indonesia. Sixty three of the fungi were identified based on the appearance and morphological characteristics of their fruiting bodies and mycelia, as Pycnoporus sanguineus, Dacryopinax spathularia, Schizophyllum commune, Polyporus sp. and Trametes sp. Twenty fungi were categorized as white-rot fungi and 12 as brown-rot fungi. Moreover, isolates 371, 368, 265, 346, 345 and 338 were selected using indicators and tested for the ability to degrade lignin and holo-cellulose in mangium wood meal over 1 to 4 weeks. Results showed that the 6 fungi could degrade lignin and holo-cellulose in wood meal. An increase in incubation time tended to decrease the amounts of lignin and holo-cellulose. Isolate 371 was found to be best at degrading lignin and holo-cellulose in mangium wood meal.

Djarwanto

2009-01-01

375

Screening of fungi capable of degrading lignocellulose from plantation forests.  

Science.gov (United States)

In an effort to prevent forest fires after the clear cutting of plantation forests, fungi capable of degrading lignocelluloses were isolated to make a fertilizer from the logging waste. Seventy five fungal species were isolated from fruiting bodies and mycelia in plantation forests of South and North Sumatera, Indonesia. Sixty three of the fungi were identified based on the appearance and morphological characteristics of their fruiting bodies and mycelia, as Pycnoporus sanguineus, Dacryopinax spathularia, Schizophyllum commune, Polyporus sp. and Trametes sp. Twenty fungi were categorized as white-rot fungi and 12 as brown-rot fungi. Moreover, isolates 371, 368, 265, 346, 345 and 338 were selected using indicators and tested for the ability to degrade lignin and holo-cellulose in mangium wood meal over 1 to 4 weeks. Results showed that the 6 fungi could degrade lignin and holo-cellulose in wood meal. An increase in incubation time tended to decrease the amounts of lignin and holo-cellulose. Isolate 371 was found to be best at degrading lignin and holo-cellulose in mangium wood meal. PMID:19634469

Djarwanto; Tachibana, S

2009-05-01

376

Zinc-binding capacity of yak casein hydrolysate and the zinc-releasing characteristics of casein hydrolysate-zinc complexes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many factors affect the bioavailability of dietary Zn, which leads to its low availability in some food systems and Zn nutrient deficiency. However, some proteins or peptides can form complexes with Zn and increase its absorption and bioavailability in intestinal conditions. The purpose of this work was to determine the Zn-binding activity of yak casein hydrolysate (YCH) and examine its stability, solubility, and dialyzability in a simulated intestinal environment. The Zn-binding activity of YCH, prepared using alcalase, pepsin, trypsin, Flavozyme (Novo Nordisk Biochem Inc., Franklinton, NC), or papain, was investigated. Evidence for the formation of complexes between Zn and YCH also were detected by UV-visible spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results were that YCH prepared with alcalase and trypsin possessed the highest Zn-binding capacity compared with YCH prepared with pepsin, Flavozyme, or papain. The 6-h YCH obtained with alcalase showed the highest Zn-binding capacity. Compared with native yak casein, the Zn-binding activity of YCH was significantly lower, but its solubility and dialyzability were markedly higher under intestinal basic pH ranges. This is important because high solubility and dialyzability is associated with better bioavailability. Both UV-visible spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra indicated that some sites of YCH can bind with Zn ions and form complexes that make Zn more soluble and dialyzable under simulated intestinal conditions. Therefore, YCH-Zn complexes may have potential to improve Zn bioavailability. PMID:21605742

Wang, X; Zhou, J; Tong, P S; Mao, X Y

2011-06-01

377

Intermodal transfer of spent fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

As a result of the international standardization of containerized cargo handling in ports around the world, maritime shipment handling is particularly uniform. Thus, handier exposure parameters will be relatively constant for ship-truck and ship-rail transfers at ports throughout the world. Inspectors' doses are expected to vary because of jurisdictional considerations. The results of this study should be applicable to truck-to-rail transfers. A study of the movement of spent fuel casks through ports, including the loading and unloading of containers from cargo vessels, afforded an opportunity to estimate the radiation doses to those individuals handling the spent fuels with doses to the public along subsequent transportation routes of the fuel. A number of states require redundant inspections and for escorts over long distances on highways; thus handlers, inspectors, escort personnel, and others who are not normally classified as radiation workers may sustain doses high enough to warrant concern about occupational safety. This paper addresses the question of radiation safety for these workers. Data were obtained during, observation of the offloading of reactor spent fuel (research reactor spent fuel, in this instance) which included estimates of exposure times and distances for handlers, inspectors and other workers during offloading and overnight storage. Exposure times and distance were also for other workers, including crane operators, scale operators, security pene operators, scale operators, security personnel and truck drivers. RADTRAN calculational models and parameter values then facilitated estimation of the dose to workers during incident-free ship-to-truck transfer of spent fuel

378

Towards an Understanding of How Protein Hydrolysates Stimulate More Efficient Biosynthesis in Cultured Cells  

Science.gov (United States)

In the light of the growing demand for high quality plant-derived hydrolysates (i.e., HyPep™ and UltraPep™ series), Sheffield Bio-Science has developed a new hydrolysate platform that addresses the need for animal-free cell culture medium supplements while also minimizing variability concerns. The platform is based upon a novel approach to enzymatic digestion and more refined processing. At the heart of the platform is a rationally designed animal component-free (ACF) enzyme cocktail that includes both proteases and non-proteolytic enzymes (hydrolases) whose activities can also liberate primary components of the polymerized non-protein portion of the raw material. This enzyme system is added during a highly optimized process step that targets specific enzyme-substrate reactions to expand the range of beneficial nutritional factors made available to cells in culture. Such factors are fundamental to improving the bio-performance of the culture system, as they provide not merely growth-promoting peptides and amino acids, but also key carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, and vitamins that improve both rate and quality of protein expression, and serve to improve culture life due to osmo-protectant and anti-apoptotic properties. Also of significant note is that, compared to typical hydrolysates, the production process is greatly reduced and requires fewer steps, intrinsically yielding a better-controlled and therefore more reproducible product. Finally, the more sophisticated approach to enzymatic digestion renders hydrolysates more amenable to sterile filtration, allowing hydrolysate end users to experience streamlined media preparation and bioreactor supplementation activities. Current and future development activities will evolve from a better understanding of the complex interactions within a handful of key biochemical pathways that impact the growth and productivity of industrially relevant organisms. Presented in this chapter are some examples of the efforts that have been made so far to elucidate the mechanisms for the often dramatic benefits that hydrolysates can impart on cell culture processes. Given the variety of roles that hydrolysates likely play in each cell type, close collaboration between protein hydrolysate manufacturers and biopharmaceutical developers will continue to be critical to expanding the industry's knowledge and retaining hydrolysates as a tool for enhancing media formulations.

Siemensma, André; Babcock, James; Wilcox, Chris; Huttinga, Hans

379

Sonochemistry: what potential for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into platform chemicals?  

Science.gov (United States)

This Review focuses on the use of ultrasound to produce chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. However, the question about the potential of sonochemistry for valorization/conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into added-value chemicals is rather conceptual. Until now, this technology has been mainly used for the production of low-value chemicals such as biodiesel or as simple method for pretreatment or extraction. According to preliminary studies reported in literature, access to added-value chemicals can be easily and sometimes solely obtained by the use of ultrasound. The design of sonochemical parameters offers many opportunities to develop new eco-friendly and efficient processes. The goal of this Review is to understand why the use of ultrasound is focused rather on pretreatment or extraction of lignocellulosic biomass rather than on the production of chemicals and to understand, through the reported examples, which directions need to be followed to favor strategies based on ultrasound-assisted production of chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. We believe that ultrasound-assisted processes represent an innovative approach and will create a growing interest in academia but also in the industry in the near future. Based on the examples reported in the literature, we critically discuss how sonochemistry could offer new strategies and give rise to new results in lignocellulosic biomass valorization. PMID:25146583

Chatel, Gregory; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Jérôme, François

2014-10-01

380

Higher heating value prediction of lignocellulosic crop based on their content of main components [abstract  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The efficiency of the energy recovery potential of lignocellulosic crops as solid biofuel depends on various characteristics. One of the main characteristics in this field is the higher heating value. It is defined as the amount of heat emitted by the combustion of a fuel, including the heat coming from the condensation of the water vapor. Its value depends on the content of main components of the lignocellulosic crops. Two models predicting the higher heating value have been built based on the content of main components of the following lignocellulosic crops: miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus J.M.Greef & Deuter ex Hodk. & Renvoize, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L., Jerusalem artichoke (aerial part (Helianthus tuberosus L., fiber sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench, fiber corn (Zea mays L. and hemp (Cannabis sativa L. [trials made at Libramont (Belgium in 2007 and 2008]. The first model predicts the higher heating value of the lignocellulosic crops based on sum of the products between the higher heating value of each component and its amount. The second model predicts the higher heating value of the lignocellulosic crop based on a multiple linear regression using step by step least mean squares.

Godin, B.

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

VALORIZATION AND BIODECOLORIZATION OF DYE ADSORBED ON LIGNOCELLULOSICS USING WHITE ROT FUNGI  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Biosorption of dyes by lignocelluloses may be an effective method for removing dyes from textile effluents. However, the resulting dye-adsorbed lignocellulosic materials may constitute another pollution problem. An integrated method can solve this problem. Here, various lignocelluloses were tested for their Astrazon Black and Astrazon Blue dyes removal activities. The dye adsorbed after 30 min contact time was 90% (45 mg/L, 70% (35 mg/L, and 98% (49 mg/L for wheat bran, pine cone, and cotton stalk, respectively. These dye-adsorbed lignocellulosic wastes then were used as solid substrates to produce laccase enzyme with Funalia trogii and Trametes versicolor under solid state fermentation (SSF. Among the lignocellulosic substrates, the dye-adsorbed wheat bran served as the best solid substrate for laccase production under SSF. Therefore, it was also tested as a solid source for laccase production under submerged fermentation. During solid state fermentation, these two fungi were able to highly decolorize these dyes. While F. trogii decolorized 80% of Astrazon Black dye adsorbed onto wheat bran, T. versicolor decolorized 86%. On the other hand, the decolorization values for Astrazon Blue dye were 69% and 84%, respectively.

Nesrin Ozmen,

2012-02-01

382

Amino acid composition and antioxidant activities of hydrolysates and peptide fractions from porcine collagen.  

Science.gov (United States)

The amino acid composition and antioxidant activities of different hydrolysates from porcine collagen were analyzed. The gelatin was hydrolyzed for antioxidative peptides with various proteases, namely papain, protease from bovine pancreas, protease from Streptomyces, and cocktail mixture of protease from bovine pancreas and protease from Streptomyces. The hydrolysates were assessed using methods of DPPH radical-scavenging ability, metal-chelating ability and lipid peroxidation inhibition activity. It was found that the collagen hydrolysates by different protease treatments had different amino acid compositions and antioxidant properties. However, the contents of Hyp and Pro were improved and the content of Gly was decreased in each collagen hydrolysate compared with collagen. The hydrolysate prepared with the cocktail mixture of proteases, which exhibited the highest antioxidant activity, was separated into 6 fractions by gel filtration chromatography. Fraction 2 was further separated by ion exchange chromatography. Fraction 2b with abundant basic amino acids and Fraction 2d which was slightly acidic fractions had higher radical-scavenging and metal-chelating activities, and both Fraction 2b and 2d contained more hydrophobic amino acids. The results confirmed that the antioxidative peptides were rich in Hyp, Pro and Gly, which accounted for half of amino acid composition. This article added further support to the preparation of natural antioxidative peptides from porcine skin collagen. PMID:23064526

Ao, Jing; Li, Bo

2012-10-01

383

Amino acid composition and functional properties of giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) collagen hydrolysates  

Science.gov (United States)

Giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) is an under-utilized species due to its high tendency to autolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of collagen hydrolysates from this species. The degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE, emulsion activity index (EAI), emulsion stability index (ESI), foam expansion (FE), and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were investigated. The effects of pH on the EAI, ESI FE and FS of hydrolysates were also investigated. The results indicated that the ? and ? 1 chains of the collagen were effectively hydrolyzed by trypsin at 50°c with an Enzyme/Substrate (E/S) ration of 1:20 (w:w). The DH of collagen was up to 17.3% after 3 h hydrolysis with trypsin. The hydrolysates had a molecular weight distribution of 1.1-17 kDa, and were abundant in glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), glutamic acid (Glu), alanine (Ala) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) residues. The hydrolysates were fractionated into three fractions ( 10 kDa), and the fraction of 3-10 kDa exhibited a higher EAI value than the fraction of > 10 kDa ( P 10 kDa had higher FE and FS values than other fractions ( P 10 kDa showed higher FE value, respectively. They are hoped to be utilized as functional ingredients in food and nutraceutical industries.

Liu, Zunying; Su, Yicheng; Zeng, Mingyong

2011-03-01

384

Almond protein hydrolysate fraction modulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in activated macrophages.  

Science.gov (United States)

Simulated gastrointestinal treatment of almond proteins with pepsin and pancreatic proteases resulting in 16.6% degree of hydrolysis or 1.33 milliequivalent leucine per g protein yielded a hydrolysate that modulated excessive nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 macrophages. After fractionation, a resulting fraction of molecular size > 5 kDa retained the nitric oxide modulatory effect observed initially in the crude hydrolysate. The high molecular size fraction was found to modulate levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1?, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-? in the activated cells. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that the hydrolysate fraction decreased the expression levels of inflammatory enzyme indicators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in the activated cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that treatment of the activated cells with the hydrolysate fraction resulted in the inhibition of relative gene expressions of proinflammatory IL-6, IL-1?, TNF-?, iNOS and COX-2. These results indicate a potential application of almond protein hydrolysates against inflammatory conditions, and will contribute to delineating the possible contributions of proteins to health benefits attributed to almond consumption. PMID:23575976

Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Je, Jae-Young; Cho, Young-Sook; Yada, Rickey Y

2013-04-30</