WorldWideScience

Sample records for social communication repetitive

  1. Mice Genetically Depleted of Brain Serotonin Display Social Impairments, Communication Deficits and Repetitive Behaviors: Possible Relevance to Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Michael J.; Angoa-Peréz, Mariana; Briggs, Denise I.; Sykes, Catherine E.; Francescutti, Dina M.; Rosenberg, David R; KUHN, DONALD M.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors. A very large number of genes have been linked to autism, many of which encode proteins involved in the development and function of synaptic circuitry. However, the manner in which these mutated genes might participate, either individually or together, to cause autism is not understood. One factor known to exert extremely broad influence on b...

  2. Association between the social and communication impairments and repetitive/restricted interests and behaviours of ASD in a clinical sample: Does the triad still fit?

    OpenAIRE

    Kuenssberg, Renate; McKenzie, Karen; Jones, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a behaviourally defined disorder characterised by impairments in three domains of social interaction, communication, and repetitive/restricted interests and behaviours (DSM-IV-TR; APA, 2000; ICD-10; WHO, 1992). Recent research suggests that this diagnostic triad may no longer fit as the best way to conceptualise ASD. Although not due for publication until 2013, a proposed revision of autistic disorder for DSM-V has merged three do...

  3. SOCIAL NETWORKS AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica GHEORGHIȚĂ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Social networks visible influence people's ability to interact and communicate. Extending social circles by establishing virtual links involves a number of positive aspects such as: instant access to options for interaction, sharing of information to large communities of people, intensification of acts of communication, high levels of feedback and trust with people with whom we communicate. On the other hand, social networks adversely affects communication by decreasing the interaction face to face, by imposing superficial communications experiences, grammatical and spelling erosion of the language. Therefore, the study aims to capture the spread of social networks, their use and impact on interpersonal communication. More specifically, they look for the answer to the question: what is the nature of interpersonal communication that is found on social networking sites: personal, emotional, private or shared, informal, and public?

  4. Passing crisis and emergency risk communications: the effects of communication channel, information type, and repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Newbold, Lex; Titchener, Kirsteen

    2015-05-01

    Three experiments explore several factors which influence information transmission when warning messages are passed from person to person. In Experiment 1, messages were passed down chains of participants using five different modes of communication. Written communication channels resulted in more accurate message transmission than verbal. In addition, some elements of the message endured further down the chain than others. Experiment 2 largely replicated these effects and also demonstrated that simple repetition of a message eliminated differences between written and spoken communication. In a final field experiment, chains of participants passed information however they wanted to, with the proviso that half of the chains could not use telephones. Here, the lack of ability to use a telephone did not affect accuracy, but did slow down the speed of transmission from the recipient of the message to the last person in the chain. Implications of the findings for crisis and emergency risk communication are discussed. PMID:25683552

  5. Repetition and Emotive Communication in Music Versus Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth HellmuthMargulis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Music and speech are often placed alongside one another as comparative cases. Their relative overlaps and disassociations have been well explored (e.g. Patel, 2010. But one key attribute distinguishing these two domains has often been overlooked: the greater preponderance of repetition in music in comparison to speech. Recent fMRI studies have shown that familiarity – achieved through repetition – is a critical component of emotional engagement with music (Pereira et al., 2011. If repetition is fundamental to emotional responses to music, and repetition is a key distinguisher between the domains of music and speech, then close examination of the phenomenon of repetition might help clarify the ways that music elicits emotion differently than speech.

  6. Repetition and Emotive Communication in Music Versus Speech

    OpenAIRE

    Margulis, Elizabeth Hellmuth

    2013-01-01

    Music and speech are often placed alongside one another as comparative cases. Their relative overlaps and disassociations have been well explored (e.g., Patel, 2008). But one key attribute distinguishing these two domains has often been overlooked: the greater preponderance of repetition in music in comparison to speech. Recent fMRI studies have shown that familiarity – achieved through repetition – is a critical component of emotional engagement with music (Pereira et al., 2011). If repetiti...

  7. Repetition and Emotive Communication in Music Versus Speech

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth HellmuthMargulis

    2013-01-01

    Music and speech are often placed alongside one another as comparative cases. Their relative overlaps and disassociations have been well explored (e.g. Patel, 2010). But one key attribute distinguishing these two domains has often been overlooked: the greater preponderance of repetition in music in comparison to speech. Recent fMRI studies have shown that familiarity – achieved through repetition – is a critical component of emotional engagement with music (Pereira et al., 2011). If repetiti...

  8. Communication for Social Change Anthology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumucio-Dagron, Alfonso; Tufte, Thomas

    social change. The book is organised in two parts: the first part being cronological, from 1927-1995, and the second part containing 'the contemporary debate' in communication for social change, organised in 5 sub-themes: 1) Popular Culture, Narrative and Identity, 2) Social Movements & Community...

  9. Corporate Communication and Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Serup, Liv; Laursen, Stine; Sandgreen, Michael; Trougaard, Victor; Lind, Line; Hansen, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    This project aims to explore the changes social media platforms have generated onto corporate communication. Exploring the notion of dialogue in relation to various dialogic theories, social media theory, and corporate communication will provide an answer to this, as the respective theories and concepts provide different perspectives. The analysis is anchored in a case study of Danske Bank and Call me, since they represent two well-established organizations on Facebook. It is concluded tha...

  10. BRAND COMMUNICATION ON SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia-Elena PLATON

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The communication represents a basic element for the marketing activity that helps companies to achieve their objectives. Building long-term relationships between brands and consumers is one of the most important objectives pursued by marketers. This involves brand communication and creating multiple connections with consumers, even in the online environment. From this point of view, social networks proved to be an effective way of linking brands and consumers online. This paper aims to present some aspects involved by the usage of social networks in brand communication by analyzing several examples of online marketing campaigns implemented on Facebook on the occasion of Valentine's Day by six different brands.

  11. BRAND COMMUNICATION ON SOCIAL NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Otilia-Elena PLATON

    2015-01-01

    The communication represents a basic element for the marketing activity that helps companies to achieve their objectives. Building long-term relationships between brands and consumers is one of the most important objectives pursued by marketers. This involves brand communication and creating multiple connections with consumers, even in the online environment. From this point of view, social networks proved to be an effective way of linking brands and consumers online. This paper aims to prese...

  12. Unsolicited Communication in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trzaskowski, Jan

    This article discusses whether commercial communication in social media is covered by the European opt in-model concerning unsolicited electronic mail for direct marketing purposes found in the directive on privacy and electronic communications (2002/58). It is concluded that messages in social...... media – in contrast to news feeds and advertisements – may be characterised as electronic mail. However, the EU provisions on unsolicited electronic mail is found in the regulatory framework for telecommunication which as a starting point does not regulate web-based content such as social media services....... The ban on unsolicited electronic mail does not apply to messaging systems in social media unless the system gives access to sending traditional e-mail. Until 12 June 2013, Member States could – in national law – uphold a broader definition of electronic mail in the light of the minimum harmonisation...

  13. Communicating science in social settings

    OpenAIRE

    Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines the societal dynamics surrounding modern science. It first discusses a number of challenges facing any effort to communicate science in social environments: lay publics with varying levels of preparedness for fully understanding new scientific breakthroughs; the deterioration of traditional media infrastructures; and an increasingly complex set of emerging technologies that are surrounded by a host of ethical, legal, and social considerations. Based on this overview, I dis...

  14. Social Promotion or Grade Repetition: What's Best for the 21st Century Student?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Tutop, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of social promotion and grade repetition. The first section of the literature review examines research from the past 30 to 40 years which looks at the negative and positive effects of grade repetition. Next, recent studies are examined from the late twentieth and the twenty-first century which questions the…

  15. Unsolicited Communication in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trzaskowski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses whether commercial communication in social media is covered by the European opt in-model concerning unsolicited electronic mail for direct marketing purposes found in the directive on privacy and electronic communications (2002/58). It is concluded that messages in social media – in contrast to news feeds and advertisements – may be characterised as electronic mail. However, the EU provisions on unsolicited electronic mail is found in the regulatory framework for telecommunication which as a starting point does not regulate web-based content such as social media services. The ban on unsolicited electronic mail does not apply to messaging systems in social media unless the system gives access to sending traditional e-mail. Until 12 June 2013, Member States could – in national law – uphold a broader definition of electronic mail in the light of the minimum harmonisation found in the distance selling directive (1997/7). Now, the use of electronic mail for direct marketing purposes in social media must be assessed in accordance with the full harmonisation in the unfair commercial practices directive (2005/29). This directive does not contain a ban on »unsolicited« but »unwanted« solicitations by e-mail and other remote media – i.e. an opt-out solution. The development in platforms such as Facebook shows that such social media services are also used by businesses to communicate and interact with their »fans«. This article discusses the application of the European spam-provisions in the context of social media. In that vein it is important to understand both the definition of electronic mail and the scope of application of the regulatory framework for telecommunication in which the ban is found. The Nordic Consumer Ombudsmen approached EU Commissioner John Dalli on 3 May 2012 with a view to encourage discussions on whether the defi nition of electronic mail set out in the directive on privacy and electronic communications1 is up-to-date. The letter was sent in connection to the publishing of a common Nordic position paper on marketing in social media. The preceding discussions among the consumer ombudsmen questioned inter alia whether unsolicited commercial communications sent to users’ news feeds should be considered electronic mail or other un-solicited communications for the purposes of direct marketing. This and other related questions are dealt with in this article.

  16. Communication and Social Regulation in Termites.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bagneres, A. G.; Hanus, Robert

    Cham : Springer, 2015 - (Aquiloni, L.; Tricarico, E.), s. 193-248 ISBN 978-3-319-17598-0 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : termites * communication * chemical communication * pheromones * mechanical communication * social regulation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  17. Perspectives on Communication in Social Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gerald R., Ed.; Simons, Herbert W., Ed.

    This book suggests new approaches to the role played by communication in social conflict situations. In "A Transactional Paradigm of Verbalized Social Conflict," C. David Mortensen calls for a transactional approach to the study of communication and conflict. Fred Jandt's "Communication and the Simulation of Social Conflict" stresses the…

  18. Effectiveness of Interventions to Improve Social Participation, Play, Leisure, and Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in People With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kelly; Hand, Brittany N; O'Toole, Gjyn; Lane, Alison E

    2015-01-01

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) commonly experience difficulties with social participation, play, and leisure along with restricted and repetitive behaviors that can interfere with occupational performance. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate current evidence for interventions within the occupational therapy scope of practice that address these difficulties. Strong evidence was found that social skills groups, the Picture Exchange Communication System, joint attention interventions, and parent-mediated strategies can improve social participation. The findings were less conclusive for interventions to improve play and leisure performance and to decrease restricted and repetitive behaviors, but several strategies showed promise with moderately strong supporting evidence. Occupational therapists should be guided by evidence when considering interventions to improve social participation, play, leisure, and restricted and repetitive behaviors in people with ASD. Additional research using more robust scientific methods is needed for many of the currently available strategies. PMID:26356653

  19. An Examination of the Relationship between Communication and Socialization Deficits in Children with Autism and PDD-NOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattier, Megan A.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2012-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are characterized by pervasive impairments in repetitive behaviors or interests, communication, and socialization. As the onset of these features occurs at a very young age, early detection is of the utmost importance. In an attempt to better clarify the behavioral presentation of communication and socialization…

  20. Professionally Social Using social media for professional research communication

    OpenAIRE

    Lisbeth Klarstrup

    2012-01-01

    In this short article, I will discuss what I consider the important characteristics, opportunities and challenges offered by social media when used for professional communication purposes. The insights – or perhaps rather points of discussion - put forth here are based on my own experiences as practicing social media communicator and Danish research blogger, as well as on my general research into the use of social media for professional communication purposes, by for instance Danish politicia...

  1. Repetitive Microteaching:Learning to Teach Elementary Social Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek L. ANDERSON

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of deliberate practice in the development of performance has been studied extensively in many contexts, such as in athletics. The construct of deliberate practice in the development of teacher performance has been receiving heightened examination lately, though the role of practice in the development of elementary social studies teachers remains essentially unexplored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a repeated practice microteaching model on the teaching behaviors of 64 elementary preservice teachers (PSTs who taught the same social studies lessons to small groups of 4th-grade students four times in succession. PST reflection journals from all PSTs, observational transcripts of 14 teaching pairs, focus group interviews with the PSTs, and informal cooperating teacher interviews revealed that the PSTs’ lessons changed over the four successive teaching episodes. The PSTs became more comfortable and confident after teaching the same social studies lesson multiple times. PSTs also reported that their lessons became better, yet the qualitative data revealed that even though their teaching became more efficient and student work correctness improved, only a few PSTs increased the cognitive demand of their questions and activities. Nonetheless, most PSTs demonstrated increased use of social studies pedagogical content knowledge through their examples and discussions, as well as increased attention to student thinking. Repeated practice field experiences seem to hold potential for elementary PSTs to develop their use ofsocial studies pedagogical content knowledge

  2. CSR communication through online social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Castelló-Martínez, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have become essential channels in business strategies. Corporate Social Responsibility communication faces new challenges in these spaces of the Web 2.0, where companies can interact with users, generate a brand community, increase their visibility, and strengthen their position in the market. This research study aims to analyse the way companies use the major online social media to communicate their Corporate Social Responsibility programmes. The methodology involves the examination of the presence in online social platforms and the online corporate reputation of ten companies/brands. The results show that companies use these spaces as channels for business and advertising communication, but not so much for Corporate Social Responsibility communication, despite these social media offer many possibilities for interaction and dialogue.

  3. How communication events shape social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Ofer

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of communication technology, access to interaction and communication data has increased dramatically. We can now trace communication events such as sending and receiving emails, text messages, and other forms of interaction via ICT. But how can we use this data to understand the structure of social networks and their development?

  4. Communication as social science (and more)

    OpenAIRE

    Calhoun, Craig

    2011-01-01

    As often happens, I submitted my title before I knew what I wanted to talk about. I do want to speak about communication research as a field, but not only as a field of social science. To try to contain communication in actually existing social science would be to reduce it in unfortunate ways. But at the same time, as someone much invested in social science, I harbor hopes that communication research will be deeply and widely integrated into social science more generally. I belie...

  5. Social media in Hotel AVA's marketing communications

    OpenAIRE

    Hartonen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Social media sites and applications have become extensively popular all over the world especially in the past decade. Social networking sites, creating and sharing content as well as reviewing products and services online are all based on the concept of web 2.0 and user generated content that enable the interactive communication online. Social media has been gaining a crucial position also in marketing communications. Its popularity is based on consumers’ changed views in the aspect of ma...

  6. Animal models of restricted repetitive behavior in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Mark H.; Tanimura, Yoko; Lee, Linda W.; Bodfish, James W.

    2006-01-01

    Restricted, repetitive behavior, along with deficits in social reciprocity and communication, is diagnostic of autism. Animal models relevant to this domain generally fall into three classes: repetitive behavior associated with targeted insults to the CNS; repetitive behavior induced by pharmacological agents; and repetitive behavior associated with restricted environments and experience. The extant literature provides potential models of the repetitive behavioral phenotype in autism rather t...

  7. Interactional leader-follower sensorimotor communication strategies during repetitive joint actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candidi, Matteo; Curioni, Arianna; Donnarumma, Francesco; Sacheli, Lucia Maria; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Non-verbal communication is the basis of animal interactions. In dyadic leader-follower interactions, leaders master the ability to carve their motor behaviour in order to 'signal' their future actions and internal plans while these signals influence the behaviour of follower partners, who automatically tend to imitate the leader even in complementary interactions. Despite their usefulness, signalling and imitation have a biomechanical cost, and it is unclear how this cost-benefits trade-off is managed during repetitive dyadic interactions that present learnable regularities. We studied signalling and imitation dynamics (indexed by movement kinematics) in pairs of leaders and followers during a repetitive, rule-based, joint action. Trial-by-trial Bayesian model comparison was used to evaluate the relation between signalling, imitation and pair performance. The different models incorporate different hypotheses concerning the factors (past interactions versus online movements) influencing the leader's signalling (or follower's imitation) kinematics. This approach showed that (i) leaders' signalling strategy improves future couple performance, (ii) leaders used the history of past interactions to shape their signalling, (iii) followers' imitative behaviour is more strongly affected by the online movement of the leader. This study elucidates the ways online sensorimotor communication help individuals align their task representations and ultimately improves joint action performance. PMID:26333815

  8. Bat echolocation calls facilitate social communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten; Nagy, Martina; Metz, Markus; Kalko, Elisabeth

    2012-12-01

    Bat echolocation is primarily used for orientation and foraging but also holds great potential for social communication. The communicative function of echolocation calls is still largely unstudied, especially in the wild. Eavesdropping on vocal signatures encoding social information in echolocation calls has not, to our knowledge, been studied in free-living bats so far. We analysed echolocation calls of the polygynous bat Saccopteryx bilineata and found pronounced vocal signatures encoding sex and individual identity. We showed experimentally that free-living males discriminate approaching male and female conspecifics solely based on their echolocation calls. Males always produced aggressive vocalizations when hearing male echolocation calls and courtship vocalizations when hearing female echolocation calls; hence, they responded with complex social vocalizations in the appropriate social context. Our study demonstrates that social information encoded in bat echolocation calls plays a crucial and hitherto underestimated role for eavesdropping conspecifics and thus facilitates social communication in a highly mobile nocturnal mammal. PMID:23034703

  9. Social media in scholarly communication

    OpenAIRE

    Haustein, Stefanie; Sugimoto, Cassidy R.; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Social media metrics - commonly coined as "altmetrics" - have been heralded as great democratizers of science, providing broader and timelier indicators of impact than citations. These metrics come from a range of sources, including Twitter, blogs, social reference managers, post-publication peer review, and other social media platforms. Social media metrics have begun to be used as indicators of scientific impact, yet the theoretical foundation, empirical validity, and extent of use of platf...

  10. Bat echolocation calls facilitate social communication

    OpenAIRE

    Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten; Nagy, Martina; Metz, Markus; Kalko, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Bat echolocation is primarily used for orientation and foraging but also holds great potential for social communication. The communicative function of echolocation calls is still largely unstudied, especially in the wild. Eavesdropping on vocal signatures encoding social information in echolocation calls has not, to our knowledge, been studied in free-living bats so far. We analysed echolocation calls of the polygynous bat Saccopteryx bilineata and found pronounced vocal signatures encoding s...

  11. Antagonistic control of social versus repetitive self-grooming behaviors by separable amygdala neuronal subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weizhe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Anderson, David J

    2014-09-11

    Animals display a range of innate social behaviors that play essential roles in survival and reproduction. While the medial amygdala (MeA) has been implicated in prototypic social behaviors such as aggression, the circuit-level mechanisms controlling such behaviors are not well understood. Using cell-type-specific functional manipulations, we find that distinct neuronal populations in the MeA control different social and asocial behaviors. A GABAergic subpopulation promotes aggression and two other social behaviors, while neighboring glutamatergic neurons promote repetitive self-grooming, an asocial behavior. Moreover, this glutamatergic subpopulation inhibits social interactions independently of its effect to promote self-grooming, while the GABAergic subpopulation inhibits self-grooming, even in a nonsocial context. These data suggest that social versus repetitive asocial behaviors are controlled in an antagonistic manner by inhibitory versus excitatory amygdala subpopulations, respectively. These findings provide a framework for understanding circuit-level mechanisms underlying opponency between innate behaviors, with implications for their perturbation in psychiatric disorders. PMID:25215491

  12. Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility – Brand management

    OpenAIRE

    Mark-Herbert, Cecilia; von Schantz, Carolina

    2007-01-01

    Corporate action is subject to more scrutiny than ever. An attempt to legitimize the corporate role is seen in corporate social responsibility as a part of a triple bottom line framework. Corporate principles are communicated in various forms to a wide set of stakeholders. Ideally, what is communicated in terms of principles is also seen in business practice. In cases where the principles and actions differ, the platform for creating a brand territory is limited. The communication platf...

  13. The Communications of Corporate Social Responsability

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Bucur; Sorina Moica; Raluca F?rca?

    2011-01-01

    This paper present the role and interaction between communication and Corporate Social Responsibility, strengtheningin the same time that communication it is a key factor to begin and keep a proper Sustainable Development strategy. The importance of communication is essential, taking in consideration the awareness in the interior and in the exterior of organization strategy, ethical, ecological and socio-economical objectives, since information regarding the impact of the company’s activities...

  14. Marketing communication metrics for social media

    OpenAIRE

    Töllinen, Aarne; Karjaluoto, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for measuring the effectiveness of social media marketing communications. Specifically, we study whether the existing marketing communications performance metrics are still valid in the changing digitalised communications landscape, or whether it is time to rethink them, or even to devise entirely new metrics. Recent advances in information technology and marketing bring a need to re-examine measurement models. We combine two im...

  15. Socialization and nonverbal communication in atypically developing infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konst, Matthew J; Matson, Johnny L; Goldin, Rachel L; Williams, Lindsey W

    2014-12-01

    Emphasis on early identification of atypical development has increased as evidence supporting the efficacy of intervention has grown. These increases have also directly affected the availability of funding and providers of early intervention services. A majority of research has focused on interventions specific to an individual's primary diagnoses. For example, interventions for those with cerebral palsy (CP) have traditionally focused on physiological symptoms, while intervention for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) focus on socialization, communication, and restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. However deficits in areas other than those related to their primary diagnoses (e.g., communication, adaptive behaviors, and social skills) are prevalent in atypically developing populations and are significant predictors of quality of life. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine impairments in socialization and nonverbal communication in individuals with Down's syndrome (DS), CP, and those with CP and comorbid ASD. Individuals with comorbid CP and ASD exhibited significantly greater impairments than any diagnostic group alone. However, individuals with CP also exhibited significantly greater impairments than those with DS. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25200676

  16. Psycho-social impacts of virtual communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macura Rajko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of Internet communication has led to changes in social relationships, abuse of the Internet and maladaptive behavior. Among the authors who have studied the impact of these changes there is no consensus, and the results of their research are often contradictory. Some authors conclude that Internet communication strengthens networks of its users, while others believe that such communication leads to reduced participation in real social life. In a number of people, excessive use of the Internet adversely affects the mental health and social life and can lead to obsession at the expense of other aspects of life and creating addiction. The greatest risk of negative impacts of online communication is among children and young people. This paper is meant to indicate, the good sides as well as the negative consequences of excessive and non-functional Internet use

  17. Autopoiesis and socialization: on Luhmann's reconceptualization of communication and socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, R

    2000-09-01

    In 1984, Niklas Luhmann published Soziale Systeme in which he applies the idea of autopoiesis (= self-production) to social systems. Abstracted from its biological connotations, the concept of autopoiesis leads to a sharp distinction between different kinds of autopoietic organization, i.e. between life, consciousness and communication. According to Luhmann, the relationship between social systems and human beings cannot be adequately analysed except by taking into account that they are environments for one another. If this theoretical background is accepted, the concepts and theory of socialization need to be revised. Luhmann takes issues with classical notions such as internalization, inculcation, or 'socialization to the grounds of consensus' (Talcott Parsons). After a historical overview of social systems research and general systems theory, it is indicated how communications trigger further communications and realize the autopoiesis of social systems. In the second part of the article, the distinction between social systems and psychic systems is used to discuss issues crucial to socialization theory. Both a revision of the concept of socialization, and lines for an empirical research programme are proposed in accordance with Luhmann's theory of social systems. PMID:11038137

  18. Déficit social, vision et communication

    OpenAIRE

    Dubal, Stéphanie

    2005-01-01

    Rappel des enjeux et objectifs : Le déficit émotionnel, événement naturel ou bien symptôme en psychopathologie, a des retentissements sur le plan de l'insertion sociale et du fonctionnement perceptivo-cognitif. L' objectif général de ce projet de recherche est l'étude des processus qui concourent à l'émoussement de l'affectivité dans sa dimension sociale par l'intermédiaire de la modalité perceptive visuelle. Pour ce faire, ce projet associe des chercheurs en Sciences humaines, Neurosciences ...

  19. Social networks: communication and change

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Cardoso; Cláudia Lamy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual social networks have brought about the possibility for open and plural debate, where all those with the necessary literacy skills and means are able to participate in the creation and dissemination of information. By pressing political agents and determining the “agenda” of a lot of the media, users demonstrate that we stand at an ideal platform for creating both real social movements and more or less fleeting events, as manifestos or virtual campaigns. Nonetheless, in order to under...

  20. Social network analysis and dual rover communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) refers to the collection of techniques, tools, and methods used in sociometry aiming at the analysis of social networks to investigate decision making, group communication, and the distribution of information. Human factors engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a social network analysis on communication data collected during a 14-day field study operating a dual rover exploration mission to better understand the relationships between certain network groups such as ground control, flight teams, and planetary science. The analysis identified two communication network structures for the continuous communication and Twice-a-Day Communication scenarios as a split network and negotiated network respectfully. The major nodes or groups for the networks' architecture, transmittal status, and information were identified using graphical network mapping, quantitative analysis of subjective impressions, and quantified statistical analysis using Sociometric Statue and Centrality. Post-questionnaire analysis along with interviews revealed advantages and disadvantages of each network structure with team members identifying the need for a more stable continuous communication network, improved robustness of voice loops, and better systems training/capabilities for scientific imagery data and operational data during Twice-a-Day Communications.

  1. Honest and dishonest communication in social Hymenoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinze, J; d'Ettorre, P

    2009-01-01

    Communication in social insects usually serves the good of the whole society and thus increases the inclusive fitness of all individuals. Hence, cheating and dishonesty are not expected when nestmates are to be alarmed or recruited to food sources. However, kin selection predicts a conflict of interest among individuals about the partitioning of reproduction. Dishonest communication may then be advantageous. Workers usually do not lay eggs in the presence of a fertile queen, but in many species ...

  2. Social Stereotypes in Communicative Formulae: Sociometric Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya Zavyalova

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the article is centered on society through the prism of communication. Modern data extraction and information retrieval methods allow building a new vision of communicative process. The article is focused on the example of language idiom representations and omnibus survey, which help concentrate on the most stable human society ways of expression. There is also an attempt to carry out a comparative analysis of social features of the East and the West with the help of on-line nati...

  3. Pisces: Anonymous Communication Using Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Prateek; Wright, Matthew; Borisov, Nikita

    2012-01-01

    The architectures of deployed anonymity systems such as Tor suffer from two key problems that limit user's trust in these systems. First, paths for anonymous communication are built without considering trust relationships between users and relays in the system. Second, the network architecture relies on a set of centralized servers. In this paper, we propose Pisces, a decentralized protocol for anonymous communications that leverages users' social links to build circuits for...

  4. The Communications of Corporate Social Responsability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Bucur

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the role and interaction between communication and Corporate Social Responsibility, strengtheningin the same time that communication it is a key factor to begin and keep a proper Sustainable Development strategy. The importance of communication is essential, taking in consideration the awareness in the interior and in the exterior of organization strategy, ethical, ecological and socio-economical objectives, since information regarding the impact of the company’s activities, products and services as well as regarding the impacts of changes that can supervene in time, can only be provided in this way. Since there are many ways to communicate regarding the actions of CSR, it is important to know what kind of messages and ideas can resonate with a certain audience, considering the stage in which the ISO 26000 standard’s development stands.

  5. Social identity framing: Leader communication for social change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyranian, Viviane

    Social identity framing (SIF) delineates a process of intergroup communication that leaders may engage in to promote a vision of social change. As a step towards social change, social identity may need to be altered to accommodate a new view of the group, its collective goals, and its place alongside other groups. Thus, social identity content may be deconstructed and reconstructed by the leader en route to change. SIF suggests that this may be achieved through a series of 16 communication tactics, which are largely derived from previous research (Seyranian & Bligh, 2008). This research used an experimental design to test the effectiveness of three SIF communication tactics - inclusion, similarity to followers, and positive social identity - on a number of follower outcomes. Students ( N=246) were randomly assigned to read one of eight possible speeches promoting renewable energy on campus that was ostensibly from a student leader. The speeches were varied to include or exclude the three communication tactics. Following the speech, participants completed a dependent measures questionnaire. Results indicated that similarity to followers and positive social identity did not affect follower outcomes. However, students exposed to inclusion were more likely to indicate that renewable energy was ingroup normative; intend to engage in collective action to bring renewable energy to campus; experience positive emotional reactions towards change; feel more confident about the possibility of change; and to view the leader more positively. The combination of inclusion and positive social identity increased perceptions of charismatic leadership. Perceived leader prototypicality and cognitive elaboration of the leader's message resulted in more favorable attitudes towards renewable energy. Perceived leader prototypicality was also directly related to social identification, environmental values, ingroup injunctive norms, and self-stereotypes. Overall, these results support SIF theory by providing evidence that communication that implicates social identity (i.e., inclusion) is an important aspect of the leader-follower influence process and that it can be used to bring about changes such as promoting environmental conservation policies. Avenues of future research on SIF are discussed.

  6. Creativity, social networking and changing business communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Hossain

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews literature on creativity, innovations, and creative organizations. An analytical approach has been undertaken using various articles to identify the need of innovation and creativity in today's world and how the innovation of social networking is changing business activities. Creativity and innovation are crucial factors for the endurance and progression of organizations in today's world. From the macroeconomic perspective, innovation is also related with economic growth, development of living standards and a country's international competiveness. The need for innovation is assisted by Information technology in a range of ways and in this contemporary era it is hard to separate innovation and technology due to its incredible offerings in all kinds of industries and sectors. One such innovation was 'social networking and social media.' In this epoch of social media, businesses are obliged to be extra transparent and more personal. This does not eradicate the need of customary advertising, but social networks allow an innovative form of communication which altered the approach of doing businesses. Businesses must concentrate on developing real and direct connections with customers. Companies which lag behind to change to this new trend and culture will be in damaging situation, as competitors will progressively try to reap the benefits out of it. All in all businesses need to adapt with the growing importance and impact of social networking as a means of communication.

  7. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on clinical, social, and cognitive performance in postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myczkowski ML

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Martin Luiz Myczkowski,1 Álvaro Machado Dias,1,2 Tatiana Luvisotto,1 Debora Arnaut,1 Bianca Boura Bellini,1 Carlos Gustavo Mansur,1 Joel Rennó,1 Gabriel Tortella,1 Philip Leite Ribeiro,1 Marco Antônio Marcolin11Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo, Medical School São Paulo, 2Clinical Neuroscience Laboratory of the Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot study evaluated the impact of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS on clinical, cognitive, and social performance in women suffering with postpartum depression.Methods: Fourteen patients were randomized to receive 20 sessions of sham rTMS or active 5 Hz rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Psychiatric clinical scales and a neuropsychological battery were applied at baseline (pretreatment, week 4 (end of treatment, and week 6 (follow-up, posttreatment week 2.Results: The active rTMS group showed significant improvement 2 weeks after the end of rTMS treatment (week 6 in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (P = 0.020, Global Assessment Scale (P = 0.037, Clinical Global Impression (P = 0.047, and Social Adjustment Scale-Self Report-Work at Home (P = 0.020.Conclusion: This study suggests that rTMS has the potential to improve the clinical condition in postpartum depression, while producing marginal gains in social and cognitive function.Keywords: transcranial magnetic stimulation, postpartum depression, clinical performance, cognitive performance, social performance

  8. Multimodal Aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Daniela Maier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses how the multimodal persuasive strategies of corporate social responsibility communication can highlight a company’s commitment to gender empowerment and environmental protection while advertising simultaneously its products. Drawing on an interdisciplinary methodological framework related to CSR communication, multimodal discourse analysis and gender theory, the article proposes a multimodal analysis model through which it is possible to map and explain the multimodal persuasive strategies employed by Coca-Cola company in their community-related films. By examining the semiotic modes’ interconnectivity and functional differentiation, this analytical endeavour expands the existing research work as the usual textual focus is extended to a multimodal one.

  9. Children chatting- communication between two social settings

    OpenAIRE

    Martinson, Tiina

    2003-01-01

    Chat communication has been investigated within the frames of 5thD (Fifth Dimension). The study is based in field-material from two chat sessions, between children in Ronneby-Barcelona and Ronneby-Denver. During the chats there was plenty of interaction between children and, assistants, which is illustrated with the help of patterns of communication. The analysis of the data shows that chat is more than an interaction between two persons, it even connects two social settings. The thesis also ...

  10. Suppression of NMDA receptor function in mice prenatally exposed to valproic acid improves social deficits and repetitive behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeseung Kang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Animals prenatally exposed to valproic acid (VPA, an antiepileptic agent, have been used as a model for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Previous studies have identified enhanced NMDA receptor (NMDAR function in the brain of VPA rats, and demonstrated that pharmacological suppression of NMDAR function normalizes social deficits in these animals. However, whether repetitive behavior, another key feature of ASDs, can be rescued by NMDAR inhibition remains unknown. We report here that memantine, an NMDAR antagonist, administered to VPA mice rescues both social deficits and repetitive behaviors such as self-grooming and jumping. These results suggest that suppression of elevated NMDAR function in VPA animals normalizes repetitive behaviors in addition to social deficits.

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility : Discourse, Narratives and Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Dobers, Peter; Springett, Delyse

    2010-01-01

    The problematic and contestable nature of discourses on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has driven the commissioning of this special issue on discourses, narratives, and communication about CSR. While CSR may be seen as sharing normative goals with the concept of sustainable development, there are fundamental questions to be asked about the nature and purpose of CSR, how it has been constructed and framed, and whether it promotes the normative goals of sustainable development in order t...

  12. Compression and intelligence: social environments and communication

    OpenAIRE

    Dowe, David L.; Hernández Orallo, José; Das, Paramjit K,

    2011-01-01

    Compression has been advocated as one of the principles which pervades inductive inference and prediction - and, from there, it has also been recurrent in definitions and tests of intelligence. However, this connection is less explicit in new approaches to intelligence. In this paper, we advocate that the notion of compression can appear again in definitions and tests of intelligence through the concepts of `mind-reading¿ and `communication¿ in the context of multi-agent systems and social en...

  13. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on clinical, social, and cognitive performance in postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myczkowski, Martin Luiz; Dias, Álvaro Machado; Luvisotto, Tatiana; Arnaut, Debora; Bellini, Bianca Boura; Mansur, Carlos Gustavo; Rennó, Joel; Tortella, Gabriel; Ribeiro, Philip Leite; Marcolin, Marco Antônio

    2012-01-01

    Background: This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot study evaluated the impact of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on clinical, cognitive, and social performance in women suffering with postpartum depression. Methods: Fourteen patients were randomized to receive 20 sessions of sham rTMS or active 5 Hz rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Psychiatric clinical scales and a neuropsychological battery were applied at baseline (pretreatment), week 4 (end of treatment), and week 6 (follow-up, posttreatment week 2). Results: The active rTMS group showed significant improvement 2 weeks after the end of rTMS treatment (week 6) in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (P = 0.020), Global Assessment Scale (P = 0.037), Clinical Global Impression (P = 0.047), and Social Adjustment Scale-Self Report-Work at Home (P = 0.020). Conclusion: This study suggests that rTMS has the potential to improve the clinical condition in postpartum depression, while producing marginal gains in social and cognitive function. PMID:23118543

  14. Social communication features in children following moderate to severe acquired brain injury: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Lynn M; Clark, Brenda; Scott, Ori; Wilkes, Courtney; Reynolds, Shawn; Ricci, Florencia; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R

    2015-04-01

    We compared the social communication deficits of children with moderate to severe acquired brain injury or autism spectrum disorder, while accounting for the role of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Parents of 20 children aged 6 to 10 years (10 acquired brain injury; 10 autism spectrum disorder) completed the Social Communication Questionnaire, and Conners 3 Parent Short. A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significant differences between groups in Social Communication Questionnaire restricted repetitive behavior scores, but not reciprocal social interaction or social communication. Multiple linear regressions indicated diagnosis did not predict reciprocal social interaction or social communication scores and that Conners 3 Parent Short Form hyperactivity scores were the strongest predictor of Social Communication Questionnaire reciprocal social interaction scores after accounting for age and Intelligence Quotient. The lack of difference in social communication deficits between groups may help in understanding the pathophysiology underlying the behavioral consequences of acquired brain injury. The link between hyperactivity and reciprocal interaction suggests that targeting hyperactivity may improve social outcomes in children following acquired brain injury. PMID:24659736

  15. Interpersonal Communication Relevance to Professional Development, in Social Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoela Popescu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Professional development is a desideratum both the organization and for each employee, in part, and interpersonal communication is the means of safe fulfillment, especially in social systems. No matter what ways of professional development are chosen, organizations (considered as major social systems works on communication processes. Moreover, social systems are at the same time, communication systems. As so, the importance of interpersonal communication in providing professional development is major, proven fact, at least in one sense, by the rich offer of training courses focusing on communication. Moreover, analysis of case studies of interpersonal communication conducted in organizational context indicates that the communication is purpose, means and professional development tool.

  16. Interpersonal Communication Relevance to Professional Development, in Social Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Manoela Popescu

    2013-01-01

    Professional development is a desideratum both the organization and for each employee, in part, and interpersonal communication is the means of safe fulfillment, especially in social systems. No matter what ways of professional development are chosen, organizations (considered as major social systems) works on communication processes. Moreover, social systems are at the same time, communication systems. As so, the importance of interpersonal communication in providing professional development...

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility, Reputation, and Moral Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Friederike

    Conditions and notions of corporate reputation underwent in the last years a fundamental change. Economic and technological processes of globalization, modernization, and rationalization enforced the institutionalization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the corporate world. It is often...... assumed, that CSR positively affects corporate reputation and leads to financial benefits, although empirical evidence and an appropriate conceptualization of reputation are often missing. This chapter discusses the relation between CSR and reputation by taking a meta-perspective: it presents and...... critically discusses insights from instrumental perspectives and from political-normative perspectives (legitimacy, business ethics). It alternatively develops a constructivist communication view on CSR, building on the “communication constitutes organizations” perspective and a non-dualist turn. It argues...

  18. Social Stereotypes in Communicative Formulae: Sociometric Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Zavyalova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the article is centered on society through the prism of communication. Modern data extraction and information retrieval methods allow building a new vision of communicative process. The article is focused on the example of language idiom representations and omnibus survey, which help concentrate on the most stable human society ways of expression. There is also an attempt to carry out a comparative analysis of social features of the East and the West with the help of on-line national languages’ corpuses. Omnibus survey results testify to the fact that low income people are reluctant to admit the influence of idioms on their day-to-day communicative practices, while rich people stress the significance of stable communicative formulae in their life. Societies are described through their attitude to labor, expressed in the idioms with a ‘hand’ component. With the help of electronic linguistic corpuses (Corpus of the Internet and business Chinese, KOTONOHA (Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese, BNC (British National Corpus, COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English the research analyzes labor stereotypes on the basis of idiom frequency indexes. In practice the results of this study can be implemented in a special socio-cultural dictionary, where the most frequent idioms are given as social stereotypes and the most powerful symbolic tools of influence and manipulation. The results of these findings are relevant to multicultural societies, migration adaptation practices and global business development. The research results have been processed into a database, marked with the Rospatent Certificate (No. 2013620397, dated 03/13/2013. Rightholder: Limited Liability Company 'Content-Press' (RU. First Author: Yakovlev Igor Gennadievich (RU. Second Author: Zavyalova Natalya Alekseevna (RU.

  19. Time Horizon and Social Scale in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 our center (CRED) published a first version of The Psychology of Climate Change Communication. In it, we attempted to summarize facts and concepts from psychological research that could help guide communication. While this work focused on climate change, most of the ideas are at least partly applicable for communication about a variety of natural hazards. Of the many examples in this guide, I mention three. Single-action bias is the human tendency to stop considering further actions that might be needed to deal with a given hazard, once a single action has been taken. Another example is the importance of group affiliation in motivating voluntary contributions to joint action. A third concerns the finding that group participation enhances understanding of probabilistic concepts and promotes action in the face of uncertainty. One current research direction, which goes beyond those included in the above publication, focuses on how time horizons arise in the thinking of individuals and groups, and how these time horizons might influence hazard preparedness. On the one hand, individuals sometimes appear impatient, organizations look for immediate results, and officials fail to look beyond the next election cycle. Yet under some laboratory conditions and in some subcultures, a longer time horizon is adopted. We are interested in how time horizon is influenced by group identity and by the very architecture of planning and decision making. Institutional changes, involving long-term contractual relationships among communities, developers, insurers, and governments, could greatly increase resilience in the face of natural hazards. Communication about hazards, in the context of such long-term contractual relationships might look very different from communication that is first initiated by immediate threat. Another new direction concerns the social scale of institutions and of communication about hazards. Traditionally, insurance contracts share risk among a large number of insurees: each contributes a small premium toward a fund that is adequate to cover the large losses that occasionally occur. Participatory processes are needed that extend risk sharing to larger social scales and that reduce adversarial relationships between insurers, insurees, insurance regulators, and governments that intervene or fail to intervene on an ad hoc rather than a contractual basis.

  20. Social referencing and cat-human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, I; Lazzaroni, M; Marshall-Pescini, S; Prato-Previde, E

    2015-05-01

    Cats' (Felis catus) communicative behaviour towards humans was explored using a social referencing paradigm in the presence of a potentially frightening object. One group of cats observed their owner delivering a positive emotional message, whereas another group received a negative emotional message. The aim was to evaluate whether cats use the emotional information provided by their owners about a novel/unfamiliar object to guide their own behaviour towards it. We assessed the presence of social referencing, in terms of referential looking towards the owner (defined as looking to the owner immediately before or after looking at the object), the behavioural regulation based on the owner's emotional (positive vs negative) message (vocal and facial), and the observational conditioning following the owner's actions towards the object. Most cats (79 %) exhibited referential looking between the owner and the object, and also to some extent changed their behaviour in line with the emotional message given by the owner. Results are discussed in relation to social referencing in other species (dogs in particular) and cats' social organization and domestication history. PMID:25573289

  1. INSTRUMENTS FOR COMMUNICATING SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE ACTIVITIES – THE CASE OF SMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEORGETA GRIGORE

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Communicating socially responsible activities is a crucial element in the discussion on social involvement and it is of great interest both to the enterprise and its stakeholders. This paper highlights some of the most interesting elements regarding the communication of socially responsible activities.

  2. Social media in public diplomacy : survey on the social media communication of the Finnish missions abroad

    OpenAIRE

    Nurmi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Today, social media is changing the way people communicate by giving the influence to the hands of the people. For organizations, it means that the issues of stakeholders are the focus of the communication, not the organizations. The question no longer is whether to use social media in public relations, but how to use it. In this research the social media communication of the Finnish missions abroad is studied. The missions have implemented social media as a part of their communication m...

  3. Corporate social responsibility as communicational strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Jorge C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Based on a concrete case, the negotiation of compensation and reparation for environmental damage in the state of Rio de Janeiro, this paper deals with the role of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as main strategic instrument to set up a relationship among state, businesses and the civil society in the process of licensing and deploying gas pipelines. In this kind of process, a few cultural aspects, such as a social pattern based in philanthropy and paternalism, make difficult for any agreement to be reached among the stake holders. As a result, the process of licensing becomes slow and fragile. In some cases, negotiation ends up unsuccessful. This mental model coexists with an imperious need for investments in energy, leading to a hard contradiction between a traditional behavior and the surge of modern consumerism habits. Besides, local legislation and bureaucracy allow for few or no options to solve the conflict. In this context, as will be seen, CSR is a preferential way to establish fruitful dialog. By means of Corporate Social Investments (CSI), it is possible to create a common experience of local development among entrepreneurs, the state and the community, by this breaking communication barriers and providing alternatives to solve the original contradiction. (author)

  4. The social network and communicative complexity: preface to theme issue

    OpenAIRE

    Freeberg, Todd M.; Ord, Terry J.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2012-01-01

    The complex social worlds of many animal species may be linked to complex communicative systems in those species. We now have evidence in diverse taxa and in different communicative modalities suggesting that complexity in social groups can drive complexity in signalling systems. The aim of this theme issue is to develop the theory behind this link between social complexity and communicative complexity, and to provide an overview of the lines of research testing this link.

  5. The Role of Social Media in the Communication of Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Viktil, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores the impact of social media on leadership. For this purpose, it presents a new model for the communication of leaders. This builds on the empirical finding; that leaders must optimize two elements in order to communicate effectively; communication channel and communication style. It then seeks to explore the impact of social media on this model. On a general level, this impact is categorized into five subparts; openness, transparency, personification, power, and control. O...

  6. Transformation of Science Communication in the Age of Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kulczycki, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to discuss several consequences of the Open Science from a perspective of science communication and philosophy of communication. Apart from the purely communicative and philosophical issues, the paper deals with the questions that concern the science popularization process through social media (especially Twitter and blogs). The article consists of three sections: the first one suggests a definition of science communication and social media, the second examin...

  7. Social Desirability as a Predictor of Argumentativeness, Communication Apprehension, and Communication Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Ming

    A study investigated the relationships between social desirability (the tendency to seek socially and culturally approved behaviors) and argumentativeness, communication apprehension, and communication competence. Using R. Strahan and K. C. Gerbasi's Social Desirability Scales, from a pool of 259 undergraduate students, 70 students were identified…

  8. Social/Communication Skills, Cognition, and Vocational Functioning in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Dwight; Bellack, Alan S.; Gold, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Deficits in social/communications skills have been documented in schizophrenia, but it is unclear how these deficits relate to cognitive deficits and to everyday functioning. In the current study, social/communication skills performance was measured in 29 schizophrenia patients with a history of good vocational functioning (GVF) and 26 with a history of poor vocational functioning (PVF) using a role-play–based social skills assessment, the Maryland Assessment of Social Competence (MASC). A ba...

  9. Social cognition and communication skills in Asperger syndrome young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Figueira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare patients with Asperger syndrome (AS and control participants on social cognition tasks and communication skills. Twenty young adults were assessed in three social cognition domains; recognition of basic emotions, recognition of complex emotions and Theory of Mind (ToM. In addition participants completed a self-report questionnaire as a measure of social communication skills. The results indicate that adults with AS perform below neurotypical control participants in emotion processing, ToM and communication skills. There were no significant correlations between the variables of social cognition and communication skills in the group of AS. Taken together, results suggest that people with a diagnosis of AS present a deficit in ToM and emotional processing as well as in communication skills. However, it was not possible to identify a significant association between the variables of social cognition and communication skills.

  10. Social Deficits, Stereotypy, and Early Emergence of Repetitive Behavior in the C58/J Inbred Mouse Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Bryce C.; Young, Nancy B.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; James W. Bodfish; Moy, Sheryl S

    2009-01-01

    Mouse lines with behavioral phenotypes relevant to symptoms in neurodevelopmental disorders may provide models to test hypotheses about disease etiology and to evaluate potential treatments. The present studies were designed to confirm and expand earlier work on the intriguing behavioral profile of the C58/J inbred strain, including low social approach and aberrant repetitive movements. Additional tests were selected to reflect aspects of autism, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder character...

  11. Repetition versus Montage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    Prefabricated industrialized montage building of the 1960's was characterized by REPETITION. Social demands for maximum productivity were fulfilled through production of large series of identical building components, resulting in an architecture of repetition. But repetition also expressed architectural vision: growth, rationality, creation of universal systems as 'neutral' frames for multi-facetted lives. Architectural potential in the concept of repetition was never fully explored. Systems of ...

  12. Leaders and Social Media : Improving HRM through better internal communication

    OpenAIRE

    Westman, Daniel; Lindfors, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to create understanding for how social media affects the relationship between employees and leaders in organizations, and how social media could be used to improve internal communication. We also want to explore how this type of internal communication could be implemented in large organizations. From a theoretical perspective our ambition is to see how our findings relate to the theoretical field of internal communication and human resource management. The empiric...

  13. New Media and Leadership: Social Media and Open Organizational Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Viorica Pau?

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to identify and analyze the extent to which new media have penetrated the Romanian organizations’ internal communication and have influenced the leadership. We intend also to consider how social media becomes a tool for organizational communication and contributes to the creation of a new kind of leadership associated with open communication. We start from the premise that new media and social media can contribute to the leader’s mission to create around him a vision and makes...

  14. How scientists use social media to communicate their research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eperen, Laura; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-01-01

    Millions of people all over the world are constantly sharing an extremely wide range of fascinating, quirky, funny, irrelevant and important content all at once. Even scientists are no strangers to this trend. Social media has enabled them to communicate their research quickly and efficiently throughout each corner of the world. But which social media platforms are they using to communicate this research and how are they using them? One thing is clear: the range of social media platforms that scientists are using is relatively vast and dependent on discipline and sentiment. While the future of social media is unknown, a combination of educated speculation and persuasive fact points to the industry's continual growth and influence. Thus, is that not only are scientists utilizing social media to communicate their research, they must. The ability to communicate to the masses via social media is critical to the distribution of scientific information amongst professionals in the field and to the general population. PMID:22085450

  15. How scientists use social media to communicate their research

    OpenAIRE

    Van Eperen Laura; Marincola Francesco M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Millions of people all over the world are constantly sharing an extremely wide range of fascinating, quirky, funny, irrelevant and important content all at once. Even scientists are no strangers to this trend. Social media has enabled them to communicate their research quickly and efficiently throughout each corner of the world. But which social media platforms are they using to communicate this research and how are they using them? One thing is clear: the range of social media platf...

  16. Social psychological concepts in the context of intercultural communication

    OpenAIRE

    Ethington, Lanaya L.

    2002-01-01

    Increased communication between people of different cultures has led to the development of the field of intercultural studies. The field is interdisciplinary in nature, as it draws from theories by scholars in other fields, one of which is social psychology. This dissertation examines aspects of social psychology that are particularly relevant to intercultural communication, as a greater understanding of certain social psychological concepts may increase the effectiveness of intercultural int...

  17. Social Complexity as a Driver of Communication and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewall, Kendra B

    2015-09-01

    Cognition and communication both can be essential for effectively navigating the social environment and thus, social dynamics could select for enhanced abilities for communication and superior cognition. Additionally, social experience can influence both the ability to communicate effectively and performance in cognitive tasks within an individual's lifetime, consistent with phenotypic plasticity in these traits. Historically, research in animal cognition and animal communication has often addressed these traits independently, despite potential commonalities in social function and underlying mechanisms of the brain. Integrating research on animal communication and cognition will provide a more comprehensive understanding of how the social environment may shape behavior and specializations of the brain for sociality through both evolutionary and developmental processes. This selective review of research on the impacts of social dynamics on cognition and communication in animals aims to highlight areas for future research at both the ultimate and proximate levels. In particular, additional work on the effects of the social environment on cognitive performance over an individual's lifetime, and comparative studies of specialized abilities for communication, should be pursued. PMID:26078368

  18. Brief Report: IQ Split Predicts Social Symptoms and Communication Abilities in High-Functioning Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    David O. Black; Wallace, Gregory L; Sokoloff, Jennifer L.; Kenworthy, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of discrepancies between VIQ and NVIQ (IQ split) to autism symptoms and adaptive behavior in a sample of high-functioning (mean FSIQ = 98.5) school-age children with autism spectrum disorders divided into three groups: discrepantly high VIQ (n = 18); discrepantly high NVIQ (n = 24); and equivalent VIQ and NVIQ (n = 36). Discrepantly high VIQ and NVIQ were associated with autism social symptoms but not communication symptoms or repetitive behaviors. Higher VIQ ...

  19. Language and Social Inclusion: Unexplored Aspects of Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Simon; Bradshaw, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Social inclusion policy in Australia has largely ignored key issues of communication for linguistic minorities, across communities and with the mainstream community. In the (now disbanded) Social Inclusion Board's reports (e.g., Social Inclusion Unit, 2009), the emphasis is on the economic aspects of inclusion, while little attention has been…

  20. Post-Coma Persons with Motor and Communication/Consciousness Impairments Choose among Environmental Stimuli and Request Stimulus Repetitions via Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Colonna, Fabio; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; Oliva, Doretta; Megna, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed whether a program based on microswitch and computer technology would enable three post-coma participants (adults) with motor and communication/consciousness impairments to choose among environmental stimuli and request their repetition whenever they so desired. Within each session, 16 stimuli (12 preferred and 4 non-preferred)…

  1. Autism, Language Disorder, and Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorder: DSM-V and Differential Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Mark D; Jin, Xing Ming

    2015-08-01

    • Based on strong research evidence (1), the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has increased over the past decade, with a 2010 prevalence of 1:68 (1.5%) in children age 8 years. • Based on some research evidence as well as consensus (3), the most recent revision of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V) identifies two core dimensions for the diagnosis of ASD: social (social communication and social interaction) and nonsocial (restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests, or activities). • Based on some research evidence as well as consensus (3) (31) (32) (33) (34), DSM-V identifies social pragmatic communication disorder (SPCD) as a dissociable dimension of language and communication ability that affects how individuals use language for social exchanges. SPCD is often found in children with language impairments and children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other genetic/neurologic conditions. • Based on strong research evidence (2) (26) (27) (28), childhood language disorders affect 7.4% of kindergarteners, and 50% to 80% of these children experience persistent language, academic, and social-emotional difficulties into their adult years, despite having normal nonverbal cognitive abilities. • Based primarily on consensus due to lack of relevant clinical studies, differential diagnosis of autism and language disorders may require a multidisciplinary evaluation that takes into account a child’s overall development, including cognitive, communication, and social abilities. Monitoring the response to appropriate interventions and trajectory of development over time may improve the accuracy of diagnosis, especially in very young children. PMID:26232465

  2. Dyspraxia in autism: association with motor, social, and communicative deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuk, M A; Gidley Larson, J C; Apostu, A; Mahone, E M; Denckla, M B; Mostofsky, S H

    2007-10-01

    Impaired performance of skilled gestures, referred to as dyspraxia, is consistently reported in children with autism; however, its neurological basis is not well understood. Basic motor skill deficits are also observed in children with autism and it is unclear whether dyspraxia observed in children with autism can be accounted for by problems with motor skills. Forty-seven high-functioning children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), autism, or Asperger syndrome (43 males, four females; mean age 10y 7m [SD 1y 10m], mean Full-scale IQ (FSIQ) 99.4 [SD 15.9]), and 47 typically developing (TD) controls (41 males, six females; mean age 10y 6m [SD 1y 5m], mean FSIQ 113.8 [SD 12.3], age range 8-4y) completed: (1) the Physical and Neurological Assessment of Subtle Signs, an examination of basic motor skills standardized for children, and (2) a praxis examination that included gestures to command, to imitation, and with tool-use. Hierarchical regression was used to examine the association between basic motor skill performance (i.e. times to complete repetitive limb movements) and praxis performance (total praxis errors). After controlling for age and IQ, basic motor skill was a significant predictor of performance on praxis examination. Nevertheless, the ASD group continued to show significantly poorer praxis than controls after accounting for basic motor skill. Furthermore, praxis performance was a strong predictor of the defining features of autism, measured using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, and this correlation remained significant after accounting for basic motor skill. Results indicate that dyspraxia in autism cannot be entirely accounted for by impairments in basic motor skills, suggesting the presence of additional contributory factors. Furthermore, praxis in children with autism is strongly correlated with the social, communicative, and behavioral impairments that define the disorder, suggesting that dyspraxia may be a core feature of autism or a marker of the neurological abnormalities underlying the disorder. PMID:17880641

  3. Communicative versus Strategic Rationality: Habermas Theory of Communicative Action and the Social Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Michael,; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael; Denke, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In the philosophical theory of communicative action, rationality refers to interpersonal communication rather than to a knowing subject. Thus, a social view of rationality is suggested. The theory differentiates between two kinds of rationality, the emancipative communicative and the strategic or instrumental reasoning. Using experimental designs in an fMRI setting, recent studies explored similar questions of reasoning in the social world and linked them with a neural network including prefr...

  4. PROBLEMS OF MODERN DOCUMENTAL COMMUNICATION (cultural-and-social aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Petrovich Kushneruk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Some results of the official-and-business texts’ qualities revealed on communication level are presented in this article. The system of axes used for national-and-social evaluations of the business communicative instruments is under analysis. The influences of unstable social-and-cultural conditions on technological and organizational circumstances of document-oriented communication are analyzed. Some results of the out-of-officinal factors origin’ and level’s evaluation in their influence on unified forms and textual peculiarities of communicative acts in the forms of “business papers” are presented.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-44

  5. The social gradient in doctor-patient communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verlinde Evelyn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective In recent years, the importance of social differences in the physician-patient relationship has frequently been the subject of research. A 2002 review synthesised the evidence on this topic. Considering the increasing importance of social inequalities in health care, an actualization of this review seemed appropriate. Methods A systematic search of literature published between 1965 and 2011 on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication. In this review social class was determined by patient's income, education or occupation. Results Twenty original research papers and meta-analyses were included. Social differences in doctor-patient communication were described according to the following classification: verbal behaviour including instrumental and affective behaviour, non-verbal behaviour and patient-centred behaviour. Conclusion This review indicates that the literature on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication that was published in the last decade, addresses new issues and themes. Firstly, most of the found studies emphasize the importance of the reciprocity of communication. Secondly, there seems to be a growing interest in patient's perception of doctor-patient communication. Practice implications By increasing the doctors' awareness of the communicative differences and by empowering patients to express concerns and preferences, a more effective communication could be established.

  6. Visualizing Communication on Social Media: Making Big Data Accessible

    OpenAIRE

    McKelvey, Karissa; Rudnick, Alex; Conover, Michael D.; Menczer, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    The broad adoption of the web as a communication medium has made it possible to study social behavior at a new scale. With social media networks such as Twitter, we can collect large data sets of online discourse. Social science researchers and journalists, however, may not have tools available to make sense of large amounts of data or of the structure of large social networks. In this paper, we describe our recent extensions to Truthy, a system for collecting and analyzing ...

  7. Strategic Communication and Social Media: An MBA Course from a Business Communication Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Social media offers an exciting new area for our discipline to produce research and pedagogy that is in high demand by students, industry constituents, and other disciplines. This article discusses why business communication scholars should focus on social media as an important stream of study and outlines an MBA course in social media strategy…

  8. Strategic Communication and Social Media: An MBA Course from a Business Communication Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Social media offers an exciting new area for our discipline to produce research and pedagogy that is in high demand by students, industry constituents, and other disciplines. This article discusses why business communication scholars should focus on social media as an important stream of study and outlines an MBA course in social media strategy…

  9. Assessment of communication of socially responsible activities in selected companies

    OpenAIRE

    St?íteská, Michaela; Bartáková, Kate?ina

    2012-01-01

    Significance of socially responsible business activities has been growing constantly in recent years, mainly in the context of increasing competitiveness and gaining of goodwill. The companies pay bigger and bigger attention to the area of social responsibility and spend more and more financial funds on it. However, the specialists in theory and practice agree that companies do not know how to communicate these activities efficiently. And communication of CSR activities towards stakeholder...

  10. Communication Strategies via Social Media : The case study of Tomorrowland

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakulova, Yulia; Kuhn, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the past decade, Social Media has been an interesting Internet phenomenon. Social Media has increased the ability for Internet users to communicate and interact with one another, allowing them to overcome boundaries that once made communication difficult and slow. It has become a big part of everyday life and has fundamentally changed the way we send and receive information. This transformation has led to businesses acknowledging the need for a change in the way they communicat...

  11. [Social communication in Agelena consociate D. (Araneida, Labidognatha)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darchen, R J

    1975-09-01

    The aim of the present work is : 1. to discover the communication channels of social spider communities peacefully living, working and hunting in concert; 2. to determine ways of reducing their tendency to congregate; 3. to break their mutual tolerance; 4. likewise to trigger a reciprocal aggressiveness. Finally it is assumed that the anterior tarsi, the palps and the web are the fundamental supports of the social communication system. PMID:813906

  12. Understanding Team Communication Characteristics using Social Network Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important aspect of human behavior in nuclear power plants (NPPs) is team interaction since operating NPPs involves the coordination of several team members among and within workplaces. Since operators in main control room (MCR) get a great deal of information through communication to perform a task, communication is one of the important characteristics for team characteristics. Many researchers have been studying how to understand the characteristics of communication. Social network analysis (SNA) which is considered as an objective and easily applicable method has been already applied in many fields to investigate characteristics of team communication. Henttonen (2010) has struggled to perform the research on the impact of social networks in a team and he found some team communication characteristics could be obtained using some properties of SNA. In this paper, SNA is used to understand communication characteristics within operators in NPPs

  13. Understanding Team Communication Characteristics using Social Network Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ar Ryum; Lee, Seung Woo; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Kyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    An important aspect of human behavior in nuclear power plants (NPPs) is team interaction since operating NPPs involves the coordination of several team members among and within workplaces. Since operators in main control room (MCR) get a great deal of information through communication to perform a task, communication is one of the important characteristics for team characteristics. Many researchers have been studying how to understand the characteristics of communication. Social network analysis (SNA) which is considered as an objective and easily applicable method has been already applied in many fields to investigate characteristics of team communication. Henttonen (2010) has struggled to perform the research on the impact of social networks in a team and he found some team communication characteristics could be obtained using some properties of SNA. In this paper, SNA is used to understand communication characteristics within operators in NPPs

  14. Communication and Education: Social and Psychological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Gavriel

    The purposes of this book are to offer the outlines of a reciprocal-interactionist view of communication and education, to show some of its applications and implications, and to stimulate questions for exploration of the subject. Topics discussed in the seven chapters of the book are (1) the nature of interactions, (2) communication in reciprocal…

  15. Strategies for Teaching Social and Emotional Intelligence in Business Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmar, Lucia Stretcher; Hynes, Geraldine E.; Hill, Kathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating social and emotional skills (EI) training into the business communication curriculum is important for preparing students to function effectively in a global workplace with its complex informal networks, intercultural issues, team emphasis, and participatory leadership. EI skills enhance communication behavior in work groups and…

  16. Future cooperative communication systems driven by social mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blázovics, L.; Varga, C.; Bamford, W.; Zanaty, P.; Fitzek, F.H.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we are underlining the importance of social mobile networks for upcoming cooperative communication systems. The assumption of this work is that future mobile communication systems will incorporate user cooperation, i.e. a combination of cellular access in parallel with ongoing short ...

  17. Social media is an opportunity for local government communications

    OpenAIRE

    Spurrell, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Local governments are increasingly using social media to communicate with citizens. Dean Spurrell argues that this is not simply another channel used to inform, but an effective way to engage people in two-way communication. The only danger posed to local governments is if they do not adapt.

  18. Social Responsibility in Advertising: A Marketing Communications Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Alice; Fullerton, Jami A.; Kim, Yeo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although advertising has played a key role in bringing corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the public agenda on behalf of agency clients, little effort has been made to define what social responsibility means in advertising. A national survey of 1,045 advertising and marketing communications students from 176 colleges and universities were…

  19. Face Scanning Distinguishes Social from Communication Impairments in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck-Ytter, Terje; Fernell, Elisabeth; Gillberg, Christopher; Von Hofsten, Claes

    2010-01-01

    How closely related are the social and communicative impairments in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)? Recent findings in typically developing children suggest that both types of impairment are highly heritable but have only moderate behavioural and genetic overlap. So far, their respective roles in social perception are poorly understood. Here we…

  20. Social Media, Traditional Media and Marketing Communication of Public Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeheian, Datis; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Public relations are undertaking more important role in the marketing communication and advertising. The present paper reports a survey conducted in three Iranian banks’ public relations departments to understand how they use different media in their marketing communications and other related......, Social media and finally Mobile and SMS ads. Findings show that traditional media still play a dominant role in media consumption of public relations, while new Web2.0 media consist of Mobile communications and Social networks, have never ranked better than fifth from eight. Some reasons have been argues...

  1. The expert game -- Cooperation in social communication

    CERN Document Server

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Haerter, Jan O

    2013-01-01

    Large parts of professional human communication proceed in a request-reply fashion, whereby requests contain specifics of the information desired while replies can deliver the required information. However, time limitations often force individuals to prioritize some while neglecting others. This dilemma will inevitably force individuals into defecting against some communication partners to give attention to others. Furthermore, communication entirely breaks down when individuals act purely egoistically as replies would never be issued and quest for desired information would always be prioritized. Here we present an experiment, termed "The expert game", where a number of individuals communicate with one-another through an electronic messaging system. By imposing a strict limit on the number of sent messages, individuals were required to decide between requesting information that is beneficial for themselves or helping others by replying to their requests. In the experiment, individuals were assigned the task t...

  2. Communicative versus strategic rationality: Habermas theory of communicative action and the social brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael; Denke, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In the philosophical theory of communicative action, rationality refers to interpersonal communication rather than to a knowing subject. Thus, a social view of rationality is suggested. The theory differentiates between two kinds of rationality, the emancipative communicative and the strategic or instrumental reasoning. Using experimental designs in an fMRI setting, recent studies explored similar questions of reasoning in the social world and linked them with a neural network including prefrontal and parietal brain regions. Here, we employed an fMRI approach to highlight brain areas associated with strategic and communicative reasoning according to the theory of communicative action. Participants were asked to assess different social scenarios with respect to communicative or strategic rationality. We found a network of brain areas including temporal pole, precuneus, and STS more activated when participants performed communicative reasoning compared with strategic thinking and a control condition. These brain regions have been previously linked to moral sensitivity. In contrast, strategic rationality compared with communicative reasoning and control was associated with less activation in areas known to be related to moral sensitivity, emotional processing, and language control. The results suggest that strategic reasoning is associated with reduced social and emotional cognitions and may use different language related networks. Thus, the results demonstrate experimental support for the assumptions of the theory of communicative action. PMID:23734238

  3. Impacto de la ansiedad social, las habilidades sociales y la cibervictimización en la comunicación online (Impact of Social Anxiety, Social Skills and Cyberbullying on Online Communication)

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Navarro; Santiago Yubero

    2012-01-01

    The present research examined online communication behaviour in a sample of preadolescents (10-12 years, n= 812). In addition, we examined the effect of social anxiety, social skills and experiences of cyberbullying on online communication behaviour. Online communication measures included items related to time online, platforms used, relationships and motives to go online. Social anxiety was assessed using the Social Anxiety Scale of Children Revised, social skills were measured using the Mat...

  4. A multidirectional communication model: implications for social marketing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L

    2009-04-01

    The landscape of sending and receiving information has changed dramatically in the past 25 years. The communication process is changing from being unidirectional to multidirectional as consumers are becoming active participants by creating, seeking, and sharing information using a variety of channels and devices. The purpose of this article is to describe how this shift in the communication process- where gatekeepers control the creation and content of information and consumers are less active recipients to one that reflects a multidirectional and more dynamic process with participative consumers-will affect the social marketing process. This shift in communication does not represent an option for social marketers so much as a necessity. As professionals respond to this evolving communication model, the practice of social marketing can remain vibrant as a relevant consumer-oriented approach to behavior change. PMID:19372278

  5. Social Media and Strategic Market Communications of Festivals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Larson, Mia

    2010-01-01

    Since the emerging omnipresence of social media usage in Western societies, marketers have been eager to harness the strategic communication potential of new media (e.g. blogs, wikis, visual content sharing sites and online communities. This is also apparent in event tourism; for instance music...... challenges. In order to fill a void of empirical studies of managing festival communications, this paper explores how social media is used as a tool for marketing and service innovation. By conducting focus groups and personal interviews with larger music events (Storsjöyran, Way Out West and Roskilde...... social medial mix and (2) dilemmas of crowdsourcing as an institutionalized practice....

  6. Social Communication between Traditional and the New Mass-Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea-Maria Tîrziu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The means of communication, from the most simple and natural ones – such as gestures and voice, to the most complex and developed ones – such as the new electronic media, have constantly brought changes to the society, their own transformation being due to the social environment that generated them. Nowadays, the new media – being in a rapid development unprecedented in the past – is giving new insights of communication and learning to the younger generations which, unlike those formed by elder people, manage to quickly assimilate the changes that occur. The purpose of this article is to provide a framework for public institutions for a better interaction with citizens. It shows the literature that focuses on social media statistics. At the end of our study, it is necessary to refer again to the needs of the organizations in which social communication has its origins, to exit the logic of politics and the media and to completely redefine the relationship between them and the social communication itself. We have treated the terms of the relationship between media and social communication, but it is the case to reiterate the importance of this point. In this context, we have identified the social nature still in embryo of a new relationship between media and educational sector; the more fragile the more difficult it is to overcome the stereotype of the “recreational” media.

  7. Mobile communications re-negotiation of the social sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Diaper, Dan; Pedersen, Per E

    2006-01-01

    This book surveys some of the broader issues associated with the adoption and use of mobile communication, and explores developing areas of inquiry. Mobile communications are looked at in the context of other types of mediated interaction, demonstrating the uniqueness of this form of communication and how it is influencing the renegotiation of the social sphere. The book considers how mobile communication has impacted on society and reflects on how it is used (and sometimes resented) in various public and private spaces. It provides an in-depth analysis of specific areas which complement our u

  8. Nonverbal social communication and gesture control in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sebastian; Stegmayer, Katharina; Sulzbacher, Jeanne; Vanbellingen, Tim; Müri, René; Strik, Werner; Bohlhalter, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia patients are severely impaired in nonverbal communication, including social perception and gesture production. However, the impact of nonverbal social perception on gestural behavior remains unknown, as is the contribution of negative symptoms, working memory, and abnormal motor behavior. Thus, the study tested whether poor nonverbal social perception was related to impaired gesture performance, gestural knowledge, or motor abnormalities. Forty-six patients with schizophrenia (80%), schizophreniform (15%), or schizoaffective disorder (5%) and 44 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and education were included. Participants completed 4 tasks on nonverbal communication including nonverbal social perception, gesture performance, gesture recognition, and tool use. In addition, they underwent comprehensive clinical and motor assessments. Patients presented impaired nonverbal communication in all tasks compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, performance in patients was highly correlated between tasks, not explained by supramodal cognitive deficits such as working memory. Schizophrenia patients with impaired gesture performance also demonstrated poor nonverbal social perception, gestural knowledge, and tool use. Importantly, motor/frontal abnormalities negatively mediated the strong association between nonverbal social perception and gesture performance. The factors negative symptoms and antipsychotic dosage were unrelated to the nonverbal tasks. The study confirmed a generalized nonverbal communication deficit in schizophrenia. Specifically, the findings suggested that nonverbal social perception in schizophrenia has a relevant impact on gestural impairment beyond the negative influence of motor/frontal abnormalities. PMID:25646526

  9. ON-LINE COMMUNICATION BY SOCIALIZATION SITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Socialization online sites have become important landmarks for people all around the world and of all ages, especially for youth. Users of such services can socialize with people they know or with unknown, people located in the vicinity or at different distances, even on different continents. In other words, social online sites help people to interact with others of their kind, to know people who have the same passions as they have. The access to such sites is free and the members can build profiles (which include data on name, age, hobbies or favorite books and movies and can share photos, music or videos with the others. A friend is, in the language of the socialization sites, any user who has a link to his/her profile page. Users can send messages or can leave comments on other profiles. In some cases, people who meet on such sites decide to meet also in the real life.

  10. Online Friendship Formation, Communication Channels, and Social Closeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Talmud

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the quality of online social relationships are divided in their conclusions regarding the strength of social ties. Early conceptualizations described the weakness of electronic media in supporting social ties. By contrast, others have emphasized the compensating character of the Internet for specific social groups. This study investigated differences between adolescents who created online friendships and those who did not, and how far the place where a friend was met (online or face to face was related to the quality of social relationships, namely the perceived strength of social ties. Examining the dyadic friendship structure of a representative sample of Israeli adolescents, the study provides important contributions to the rapidly growing literature on online social relationships in general, and on youth networks in particular. The results support the social compensation approach to the study of online social relationship formation. The motivation for online friendship formation proved to be related to adolescents’ attempts to compensate for a lack of social support by using the Internet for communication. Furthermore, while face-to-face relationships remained highly important, for those adolescents who found in the Internet others with whom they developed intimacy, online ties were strong and meaningful. Additionally, adolescents with strong virtual ties were found to be distinctive in their social background. Our findings call for a qualification of the theoretical approach to online social ties, and imply that it is not the technology per se that obstructs or facilitates the formation of social friendship but the social embeddedness of the ties.

  11. Social Barriers to Effective Communication in Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sanecka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some communication barriers apply particularly to elderly people. The social barriers to effective communication in old age are the barriers caused by stereotypes of old age/elderly people and the barriers arising from limitations in using mass communication by seniors. Stereotypes of old age/elderly people embrace views regarding old people’s communication skills and the ideas about the correct way of communication with them. Therefore the communication problems of old people are correlated with the little and poor communication processes they are participating in. This seems to be a result of impetuses of poor quality sent to seniors by their communication partners. Not only face to face communication but also mass communication is very important for the elderly population. Therefore limitations in using new technologies and new communication channels as well as a limited presence in the mass media of content created by seniors and for seniors have an impact on their life, their well-being, and their interpersonal relationships. These problems are especially important when we faced with the ever growing population of elderly people.

  12. [Social media and health communication: do we need rules?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Social media, online social networks and apps for smartphones and tablets are changing the way to communicate health and health issues to consumers and health professionals. Google, Facebook, Apple, and other companies have launched tools to make easier the doctor-patient communication, to group patients with similar diseases allowing them to share stories, experiences, and opinions, and to remotely track and monitor users health and wellbeing. However several concerns about patients' and consumers' privacy remain. Doctor-patient communication through e-mail and social media also introduces other ethical and privacy issues that were addressed only by few medical societies with appropriate guidelines and policies. In addition, pharmaceutical companies have started to use social media channels to communicate with doctors, patients and consumers. This type of communication has been only partially regulated by the Food and Drug Administration with the recently published guidelines for industries. Similar concerns exist for health and medical applications for smartphones and tablets for which only few agencies (including Food and Drug Administration) are requiring a formal (even if restricted in typology) validation. It's time for Europe and Italy to adopt appropriate guidelines for the use of the new media in health communication. PMID:25621774

  13. Preliminaries to a Social-Semiotic Model of Communicative Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio SANDU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to bring contributions to the elaboration of a social-semiotic model of social constructionism, which will make a synthesis between the theory of communicative action and the theories of social-constructionist semiotic model?, based on the postulation of a social universe in a network of communicative interdependencies developed on levels of reality. The interpretative model we propose comes to conceptualize the particularities of the sociological analysis of the transmodern society, seen as a knowledge-based society, placed at the interference with the postmodern society; that of generalized permissiveness. The model proposed aims at a constructionist-fractalic (al? analysis (of deconstruction-reconstruction type of the interpretative drift of social constructs, under the empire of different constructive instances.

  14. CSR Communication Strategies for Organizational Legitimacy in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Elanor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Organization legitimacy is a general reflection of the relationship between an organization and its environment. By adopting an institutional approach and defining moral legitimacy as “a positive normative evaluation of the organization and its activities”, the goal of this paper is to investigate which corporate communication strategy adopted in online social media is more effective to create convergence between corporations' corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda and stakeholders' social expectations, and thereby, to increase corporate legitimacy. Design/methodology/approach – Using the entire Twitter social graph, a network analysis was carried out to study the structural properties of the CSR community, such as the level of reciprocity, and advanced data mining techniques, i.e. topic and sentiment analysis, were carried out to investigate the communication dynamics. Findings – Evidence was found that neither the engaging nor the information strategies lead to alignment. The assumption of the more the dialog, the more the communality seems to fail to portray the complexity of the communicational dynamics, such as the persistence of different, or simply a dialog without alignment. Empirical findings show that, even when engaging in a dialogue, communication in social media is still conceived as a marketing practice to convey messages about companies. Originality/value – This paper originally investigates organizational legitimacy in the context of social media by applying advanced data-mining techniques that allow the analysis of large amounts of information available online.

  15. An exploration of the strategic implementation of marketing communication within social networking communication context

    OpenAIRE

    Cloete, Ewoudt

    2012-01-01

    Taking into consideration the dramatic changes ushered in by the exponential growth of social networking, marketers are left without a dependable framework on how to implement social networking strategically and in alignment with other modern as well as traditional marketing disciplines. In light of this, the study aims to explore the strategic implementation of social networking within the context of a dependable marketing theoretical model, known as the marketing communications mix. D...

  16. Future cooperative communication systems driven by social mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blázovics, L.; Varga, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we are underlining the importance of social mobile networks for upcoming cooperative communication systems. The assumption of this work is that future mobile communication systems will incorporate user cooperation, i.e. a combination of cellular access in parallel with ongoing short range links to the neighboring devices. It has been shown that user cooperation enables higher data rates, better spectral efficiencies, and reduces the energy consumption of the mobile unit. In this work the social mobile networks are identified to be a fertile ground to facilitate the cooperative use cases. By the example of the Gedda-Headz gaming community, possible links between cooperative mobile communication and social mobile networks are shown.

  17. New Media and Leadership: Social Media and Open Organizational Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Pauș

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify and analyze the extent to which new media have penetrated the Romanian organizations’ internal communication and have influenced the leadership. We intend also to consider how social media becomes a tool for organizational communication and contributes to the creation of a new kind of leadership associated with open communication. We start from the premise that new media and social media can contribute to the leader’s mission to create around him a vision and makes others to share this vision. In terms of open communication, the external image of organization reflects, in part, leadership practices within the organization. It is about the exercise of the shared collective leadership (Don Tapscott, 1996 that should strengthen the organization position.

  18. The Human Face as a Dynamic Tool for Social Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Rachael E; Schyns, Philippe G

    2015-07-20

    As a highly social species, humans frequently exchange social information to support almost all facets of life. One of the richest and most powerful tools in social communication is the face, from which observers can quickly and easily make a number of inferences - about identity, gender, sex, age, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical health, attractiveness, emotional state, personality traits, pain or physical pleasure, deception, and even social status. With the advent of the digital economy, increasing globalization and cultural integration, understanding precisely which face information supports social communication and which produces misunderstanding is central to the evolving needs of modern society (for example, in the design of socially interactive digital avatars and companion robots). Doing so is challenging, however, because the face can be thought of as comprising a high-dimensional, dynamic information space, and this impacts cognitive science and neuroimaging, and their broader applications in the digital economy. New opportunities to address this challenge are arising from the development of new methods and technologies, coupled with the emergence of a modern scientific culture that embraces cross-disciplinary approaches. Here, we briefly review one such approach that combines state-of-the-art computer graphics, psychophysics and vision science, cultural psychology and social cognition, and highlight the main knowledge advances it has generated. In the light of current developments, we provide a vision of the future directions in the field of human facial communication within and across cultures. PMID:26196493

  19. When internal communication becomes multi-vocal. : A study of coworker communication on internal social media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Vibeke ThØis

    The aim of this paper is to present the findings of an exploratory case study of communication on internal social media within the Danish bank, Jyske Bank. The study involved an analysis of staff interaction on internal social media over three months, as well as interviews with 17 of the bank’s employees. The study not only answers questions about who participates in internal social media and the content of their communication, it also shows that when organizational culture and management support coworker communication, internal social media becomes a multi-vocal rhetorical arena where coworkers are likely to converse about how to solve product and customer-related challenges, and to discuss working conditions. In addition, this study shows that coworkers co-construct organizational identity when they discuss questions such as: Who are we as an organization? Which products should we provide for the customers? And how do we distinguish ourselves from the competitors?

  20. Future cooperative communication systems driven by social mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blázovics, L.; Varga, C.; Bamford, W.; Zanaty, P.; Fitzek, F.H.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we are underlining the importance of social mobile networks for upcoming cooperative communication systems. The assumption of this work is that future mobile communication systems will incorporate user cooperation, i.e. a combination of cellular access in parallel with ongoing short range links to the neighboring devices. It has been shown that user cooperation enables higher data rates, better spectral efficiencies, and reduces the energy consumption of the mobile unit. In this wor...

  1. Risk communication and the social amplification of risk

    OpenAIRE

    Renn, Ortwin

    1991-01-01

    Risk communication is a novel concept in the scientific pursuit to understand and analyze risk related decisions and behavior in modem society. But the new term has only changed the focus of attention from a static description of what risk means for different communities to a dynamic analysis on how these communities exchange information about risk and adjust their behavior.The concept of social amplification of risk provides a framework for the analysis of communication as well as other soci...

  2. Scholarly communication and social work in the Google era

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Steyaert

    2011-01-01

    Scholarly communication and social work in the Google era In this text, we outline how new media has an impact on international scholarly communication and focus on how these changes (can) influence the traditional gap between research and practice. We do so by describing the dreams of yesterday, the facts of today and the possible consequences for the near future. The most significant development on the interface between science and information technology is not so much the increase...

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility: The Future of Marketing Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Zidarova, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as a contribution tool to the future practices of corporate marketing communications. Another aim was to discover the current practices of CSR within corporate marketing communications with a specific focus on corporate and stakeholder value creation gained through this merging of two disciplines. Finally, the possibility of creating future competitive advantages through the use of CSR in marketing communicatio...

  4. Entertainment as a Form of Communication: Concepts and Social Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the phenomenon of the entertainment. Entertainment is perceived as one of the effective forms of communication stimulating the socialization of the individual in the society. There are presented the definitions of that phenomenon given by the representatives of different sciences (psychologists, sociologists, and researchers of culture. The variety, the difficulties of its classification and possibilities are also discussed in the article. There are analysed its kinds and peculiarities and disclosed the main social functions (recreational, cognitive, educational, communicational, representative, its role in life of individual and society. 

  5. Analyzing the Dynamics of Communication in Online Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Choudhury, Munmun; Sundaram, Hari; John, Ajita; Seligmann, Doree Duncan

    This chapter deals with the analysis of interpersonal communication dynamics in online social networks and social media. Communication is central to the evolution of social systems. Today, the different online social sites feature variegated interactional affordances, ranging from blogging, micro-blogging, sharing media elements (i.e., image, video) as well as a rich set of social actions such as tagging, voting, commenting and so on. Consequently, these communication tools have begun to redefine the ways in which we exchange information or concepts, and how the media channels impact our online interactional behavior. Our central hypothesis is that such communication dynamics between individuals manifest themselves via two key aspects: the information or concept that is the content of communication, and the channel i.e., the media via which communication takes place. We present computational models and discuss large-scale quantitative observational studies for both these organizing ideas. First, we develop a computational framework to determine the "interestingness" property of conversations cented around rich media. Second, we present user models of diffusion of social actions and study the impact of homophily on the diffusion process. The outcome of this research is twofold. First, extensive empirical studies on datasets from YouTube have indicated that on rich media sites, the conversations that are deemed "interesting" appear to have consequential impact on the properties of the social network they are associated with: in terms of degree of participation of the individuals in future conversations, thematic diffusion as well as emergent cohesiveness in activity among the concerned participants in the network. Second, observational and computational studies on large social media datasets such as Twitter have indicated that diffusion of social actions in a network can be indicative of future information cascades. Besides, given a topic, these cascades are often a function of attribute homophily existent among the participants. We believe that this chapter can make significant contribution into a better understanding of how we communicate online and how it is redefining our collective sociological behavior.

  6. Social Media - A New Way of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talpau A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has a major impact when it comes to marketing tools, providing new opportunities that were not previously available is the traditional marketing environment. Each traditional communication channel has its obvious advantages and organizations must continue to use it, but the Internet is a channel in constant development, enjoying high attention and being currently used by more than a third of the global population. Knowing the different advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and online marketing, a good marketer may be able to make the right decision when developing integrated marketing strategies.

  7. The Double-Edged Effects of Social Media Terror Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Sandro

    This paper connects the effects of social media on terror/anti-terror communication with dynamics and consequences of surveillance. Citizens become via social media more independent from mass media and more interconnected. This is also valid when citizens engage in terror/anti-terror communication....... However, via social media citizens also become targets of the ‘collect-it-all’ surveillance, which was revealed to the global public in 2013. I argue that due to such surveillance some citizens might start to censor themselves and that surveillance inflicts with a number of human rights. I further argue...... that social media contribute to extending surveillance: by being a temptation for intelligence services, by not resisting state authorities and via constructing threat perceptions among populations which in effect deliver security politicians ‘windows of opportunity’ in order to implement ever more...

  8. Influence and Dissemination Of Sentiments in Social Network Communication Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillmann, Robert; Trier, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    sentiments in a quantitative analysis that is based on retrieved textual messages of communication patterns in over 12000 online social networks. Our empirical results suggest a general influence of sentiments on node communication patterns that is evidenced by increased occurrences of subsequent messages......Previous research suggests the existence of sentiments in online social networks. In comparison to real life human interaction, in which sentiments have been shown to have an influence on human behaviour, it is not yet completely understood which mechanisms explain how sentiments influence users in...... that express the same sentiment polarization. We interpret these findings and suggest future research to advance our currently limited theories that assume perceived and generalized social influence to path-dependent social influence models that consider actual behaviour....

  9. Social Networking and Smart Technology: Viable Environmental Communication Tools…?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montain, J.; Byrne, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    To what extent do popular social networking channels represent a viable means for disseminating information regarding environmental change to the general public? Are new forms of communication such as YouTube™, Facebook™, MySpace™ and Twitter™ and smart devices such as iPhone™ and BlackBerry™ useful and effective in terms motivating people into social action and behavioural modification; or do they simply pay ‘lip service’ to these pressing environmental issues? This project will explore the background connections between social networking and environmental communication and education; and outline why such tools might be an appropriate way to connect to a broad audience in an efficient and unconventional manner. Further, research will survey the current prevalence of reliable environmental change information on social networking Internet-based media; and finally, suggestions for improved strategies and new directions will be provided.

  10. Creativity, social networking and changing business communication

    OpenAIRE

    Saif Hossain

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on creativity, innovations, and creative organizations. An analytical approach has been undertaken using various articles to identify the need of innovation and creativity in today's world and how the innovation of social networking is changing business activities. Creativity and innovation are crucial factors for the endurance and progression of organizations in today's world. From the macroeconomic perspective, innovation is also related with economic growth, d...

  11. Understanding social distance in intercultural communication

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén Nieto, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    Desde mediados del siglo XX ha ido creciendo progresivamente el interés por el estudio de la comunicación intercultural desde una perspectiva multidisciplinar. Dicho interés académico se ha visto fortalecido por el proceso de globalización que la sociedad está experimentando hoy en día, así como por el proceso de convergencia entre los países que conforman la Unión Europea y el fenómeno social de la inmigración masiva hacia occidente. La comunicación intercultural aborda el estudio de la int...

  12. The Geospatial Characteristics of a Social Movement Communication Network

    CERN Document Server

    Conover, Michael D; Ferrara, Emilio; McKelvey, Karissa; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Social movements rely in large measure on networked communication technologies to organize and disseminate information relating to the movements' objectives. In this work we seek to understand how the goals and needs of a protest movement are reflected in the geographic patterns of its communication network, and how these patterns differ from those of stable political communication. To this end, we examine an online communication network reconstructed from over 600,000 tweets from a thirty-six week period covering the birth and maturation of the American anticapitalist movement, Occupy Wall Street. We find that, compared to a network of stable domestic political communication, the Occupy Wall Street network exhibits higher levels of locality and a hub and spoke structure, in which the majority of non-local attention is allocated to high-profile locations such as New York, California, and Washington D.C. Moreover, we observe that information flows across state boundaries are more likely to contain framing lang...

  13. Intellectual capital communication: evidence from social and sustainability reporting

    OpenAIRE

    PASSETTI, Emilio; Tenucci, Andrea; Cinquini, Lino; FREY, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the level and quality of intellectual capital information communicated through social and sustainability report for a sample of 37 Italian listed company over two years (2005 and 2006). The study use the resource based theory to explain the relationship between corporate social responsibility and intellectual capital. Content analysis is applied through a multidimensional framework composed by three main disclosure profiles(time orientation, n...

  14. CSR Communication Strategies for Organizational Legitimacy in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Elanor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Organization legitimacy is a general reflection of the relationship between an organization and its environment. By adopting an institutional approach and defining moral legitimacy as “a positive normative evaluation of the organization and its activities”, the goal of this paper is to investigate which corporate communication strategy adopted in online social media is more effective to create convergence between corporations' corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda and stakeholde...

  15. Corporate social responsibility communication in social networking sites: unfinalisable and dialogical processes of legitimation

    OpenAIRE

    Glozer, Sarah Alice

    2015-01-01

    Building upon constitutive models of corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication, which appreciate the role of both organisations and stakeholders in constructing CSR, this thesis suggests that understanding of CSR is on-going and emergent through unfinalisable legitimation processes in social networking sites (SNSs). Constructed upon management research that has examined discursive legitimation processes, this thesis shifts away from CSR communications research into websites, CSR rep...

  16. Music goes social! : music startups' viewpoints on marketing communications, social media and music industry

    OpenAIRE

    Vermasheinä, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies Finnish music industry startups’ viewpoints on marketing communica-tions and social media, as well as their views on the future of the music business. Four Finland based music industry startups were interviewed for the study. Separate chapters deal with the framework of the study: marketing communications, social media and music industry. During the past few years a number of startup companies have been established in Finland with the aim of providing online and digit...

  17. Social argumentation in online synchronous communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiono, Ivan

    In education, argumentation has an increasing importance because it can be used to foster learning in various fields including philosophy, history, sciences, and mathematics. Argumentation is also at the heart of scientific inquiry. Many educational technology researchers have been interested in finding out how technologies can be employed to improve students' learning of argumentation. Therefore, many computer-based tools or argumentation systems have been developed to assist students in their acquisition of argumentation skills. While the argumentation systems incorporating online debating tools present a good resource in formal settings, there is limited research revealing what argumentative skills students are portraying in informal online settings without the presence of a moderator. This dissertation investigates the nature of argumentative practices in a massively multiplayer online game where the system successfully incorporates the authentic use of online synchronous communication tools and the patterns that emerge from the interplay between a number of contextual variables including synchronicity, interest, authenticity, and topical knowledge.

  18. Social and institutional heterogeneity, interculturality, and intercultural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The social experiences that I have studied have demanded me to develop an interculturalanalytical perspective that enlarges the field of applications of the ideas ofinterculturality and intercultural communication. This article discusses that perspective,which main characteristics are that it does not restrict the analysis to casesmarked by ethnic, national or linguistic referents, but it includes others associatedto professional, institutional, and political cultures, as well as that it does not limit itto the study of relationships between social agents, but it also includes relationshipswithin collective and institutional social agents.

  19. Social media in an integrated marketing communication strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez Y Gonzalez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research work is to find out how to integrate social media in Off-Road’s Finnmark marketing communications. One of the aims of this research is to help the case company to increase the usage of social media in their marketing strategy. The next objective is to develop a marketing strategy for Off-Road Finnmark, in order to assist the organization to implement social media. Relevant articles and literature was reviewed in order to have data to develop the litera...

  20. Social media in an integrated marketing communication strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez Y Gonzalez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research work is to find out how to integrate social media in Off-Road’s Finnmark marketing communications. One of the aims of this research is to help the case company to increase the usage of social media in their marketing strategy. The next objective is to develop a marketing strategy for Off-Road Finnmark, in order to assist the organization to implement social media. Relevant articles and literature was reviewed in order to have data to develop the litera...

  1. Involving Parents in Teaching Social Communication Skills to Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Amy L.; Theadore, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on why and how speech-language pathologists and other professionals can encourage the involvement of parents in teaching social communication skills to their young children. Four main topics are explored: (1) the evidence that many of the children with special needs served by speech-language pathologists and other…

  2. From Research to Practice: Communications for Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    What happens when the research inquiry is complete and has determined which reframes will be most successful in improving public understanding of an issue and advancing policy goals? Simple dissemination of research findings is not sufficient to improve the communications capacity of the field. The author explains how cognitive science and social…

  3. CSR Communication Strategies for Organizational Legitimacy in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Elanor

    2013-01-01

    the entire Twitter social graph, a network analysis was carried out to study the structural properties of the CSR community, such as the level of reciprocity, and advanced data mining techniques, i.e. topic and sentiment analysis, were carried out to investigate the communication dynamics. Findings...... data-mining techniques that allow the analysis of large amounts of information available online....

  4. Communication and Social Exchange Processes in Community Theater Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the communication experiences of two volunteer groups involved in the production of community theater musicals. Based on social exchange theory, it examined what group members perceived to be the positive benefits (primarily meeting people and having an opportunity to perform) and the negative costs (primarily disorganization,…

  5. Involving Parents in Teaching Social Communication Skills to Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Amy L.; Theadore, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on why and how speech-language pathologists and other professionals can encourage the involvement of parents in teaching social communication skills to their young children. Four main topics are explored: (1) the evidence that many of the children with special needs served by speech-language pathologists and other…

  6. Educating to Tolerance: Effects of Communicating Social Psychology Research Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco La Barbera

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of communicating social psychology research findings on ingroup bias in a classroom setting has been investigated. Two hundred and twenty one high school students either read or did not read a brief report about three classical social psychological studies, then completed evaluation scales for the ingroup and the outgroup. Participants’ motivation was manipulated, and the messages were different as regards the congruency between the content and participants’ actual intergroup experience. Results showed that communication exerted a significant effect in reducing ingroup bias for participants in the high motivation/high congruency condition, that is, the communication effect was moderated by the individual’s level of motivation and the content of the arguments proposed in the report. Practical implications of results for education work and stereotype change, limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

  7. The Geospatial Characteristics of a Social Movement Communication Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Michael D.; Davis, Clayton; Ferrara, Emilio; McKelvey, Karissa; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Social movements rely in large measure on networked communication technologies to organize and disseminate information relating to the movements’ objectives. In this work we seek to understand how the goals and needs of a protest movement are reflected in the geographic patterns of its communication network, and how these patterns differ from those of stable political communication. To this end, we examine an online communication network reconstructed from over 600,000 tweets from a thirty-six week period covering the birth and maturation of the American anticapitalist movement, Occupy Wall Street. We find that, compared to a network of stable domestic political communication, the Occupy Wall Street network exhibits higher levels of locality and a hub and spoke structure, in which the majority of non-local attention is allocated to high-profile locations such as New York, California, and Washington D.C. Moreover, we observe that information flows across state boundaries are more likely to contain framing language and references to the media, while communication among individuals in the same state is more likely to reference protest action and specific places and times. Tying these results to social movement theory, we propose that these features reflect the movement’s efforts to mobilize resources at the local level and to develop narrative frames that reinforce collective purpose at the national level. PMID:23483885

  8. Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

    2010-01-01

    In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

  9. Visualizing Communication on Social Media: Making Big Data Accessible

    CERN Document Server

    McKelvey, Karissa; Conover, Michael D; Menczer, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    The broad adoption of the web as a communication medium has made it possible to study social behavior at a new scale. With social media networks such as Twitter, we can collect large data sets of online discourse. Social science researchers and journalists, however, may not have tools available to make sense of large amounts of data or of the structure of large social networks. In this paper, we describe our recent extensions to Truthy, a system for collecting and analyzing political discourse on Twitter. We introduce several new analytical perspectives on online discourse with the goal of facilitating collaboration between individuals in the computational and social sciences. The design decisions described in this article are motivated by real-world use cases developed in collaboration with colleagues at the Indiana University School of Journalism.

  10. A Social Science Guide for Communication on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, C.; Marx, S.; Markowitz, E.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers from the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions (CRED) published "The Psychology of Climate Change Communication: A Guide for Scientists, Journalists, Educators, Political Aides, and the Interested Public" in 2009. This landmark guide provided climate change communicators a synthesis of the social science research that was pertinent to understanding how people think about climate change and how the practice could be improved. In the fall of 2014 this guide will be rereleased, with a new title, and in a partnership between CRED and ecoAmerica. The updated guide addresses how and why Americans respond in certain ways to climate change and explains how communicators can apply best practices to their own work. The guide, which includes research from a range of social science fields including psychology, anthropology, communications, and behavioral economics, is designed to be useful for experienced and novice communicators alike. Included in the guide are strategies to boost engagement, common mistakes to avoid, and best practices that organizations around the world have used to meaningfully engage individuals and groups on climate change. The proposed presentation will provide an overview of the main findings and tips from the 2014 climate change communication guide. It will provide a deeper look at a few of the key points that are crucial for increasing audience engagement with climate change including understanding how identity shapes climate change, how to lead with solutions, and how to bring the impacts of climate change close to home. It will highlight tips for motivating positive behavior change that will lead people down the path toward solutions. Finally, it will address the benefits and challenges associated with producing a communication guide and insight into synthesizing social science research findings into a usable format for a variety of audiences.

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility, Reputation, and Moral Communication : A Constructivist View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    Conditions and notions of corporate reputation underwent in the last years a fundamental change. Economic and technological processes of globalization, modernization, and rationalization enforced the institutionalization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the corporate world. It is often assumed, that CSR positively affects corporate reputation and leads to financial benefits, although empirical evidence and an appropriate conceptualization of reputation are often missing. This chapter discusses the relation between CSR and reputation by taking a meta-perspective: it presents and critically discusses insights from instrumental perspectives and from political-normative perspectives (legitimacy, business ethics). It alternatively develops a constructivist communication view on CSR, building on the “communication constitutes organizations” perspective and a non-dualist turn. It argues that CSR is a symbolically mediated, communicative event, which, based on the underlying dynamics of moral communication, does not simply produce reputation, but also result in dysfunctional effects.

  12. Social Media and HIV: A Systematic Review of Uses of Social Media in HIV Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Taggart, Tamara; Grewe, Mary Elisabeth; Conserve, Donaldson F; Gliwa, Catherine; Roman Isler, Malika

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media, including mobile technologies and social networking sites, are being used increasingly as part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and treatment efforts. As an important avenue for communication about HIV, social media use may continue to increase and become more widespread. Objective The objective of this paper is to present a comprehensive systematic review of the current published literature on the design, users, benefits, and limitations of using soci...

  13. Social Identity and Crisis Communication : A Case Study at the U.S. Embassy in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Järvinen, Suvi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to research email crisis communication and its effect on the social identity of an organization’s employees. Social identity is an individual’s sense and knowledge of being part of a group. It is a central paradigm in the social psychological theory known as the “social identity approach.” As crisis communication has never been researched from the viewpoint of social identity, a theory for crisis communication that supports social identity was developed in ...

  14. [Mozambique: communication and transition of socialism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattelart, A

    1979-01-01

    Information played a crucial part in the war of independence in the Mozambique. It was considered from the start as one of the fronts. The Movement for independence counted with the tanzanian radio. However the majority of the population had no access to radios; therefore information was carried in any possible way (posters, caricatures, pictures, pamphlets). The messages were addressed mainly to 3 groups of people: militants of the Frelimo (liberation movement), the people of Mozambique, and the soldiers from the colonial army. For outside propaganda, the liberation movement had a periodical report which was published in French, English and Portuguese. The participation of foreign film producers was very important. Information in the Mozambique is very inefficient. The 2 main reasons for this are the lack of qualified personnel and a certain indifference in some areas towards the importance of information. The principle which lies behind information in the Mozambique is not so much to solve problems, but rather to ask questions. The people must participate largely to the information. There is no television in the Mozambique, although the Portuguese broadcasting set up for military purposes could be extended. For the 1st time in a country of transition to socialism, the possibility of refusing or even differing the installation of television is considered. Television is no longer seen as a tool of democratisation, but more as a danger to provoke a segregation between rural and urban areas. It is difficult to create a national conscience in a country where 6 different languages and as many dialects are spoken. Most medias only use Portuguese; only the radio tries to use national languages. PMID:12261385

  15. Social Media and Strategic Market Communications of Festivals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Larson, Mia

    2010-01-01

    Since the emerging omnipresence of social media usage in Western societies, marketers have been eager to harness the strategic communication potential of new media (e.g. blogs, wikis, visual content sharing sites and online communities. This is also apparent in event tourism; for instance music festivals have proved to be early adopters of Facebook fan sites and Twitter in order to distribute information, campaigns and celebrity rumors to their potential visitors in an inexpensive way. On the other hand, the strategic use of social media has also been hypothesized to be paved with a number of challenges. In order to fill a void of empirical studies of managing festival communications, this paper explores how social media is used as a tool for marketing and service innovation. By conducting focus groups and personal interviews with larger music events (Storsjöyran, Way Out West and Roskilde festival), we investigate current practices, perceived risks and opportunities for revitalizing event communications in general. During the inventory phase of the research project, two distinctive fields of knowledge gaps have been identified, namely (1) the effect and efficiency measurement methods in a social medial mix and (2) dilemmas of crowdsourcing as an institutionalized practice.

  16. Comunicação social e vacinação Social communication and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Maria Vieira da Rocha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available As campanhas de imunização vêm passando, ao longo dos anos, por um processo de aperfeiçoamento, especialmente com o advento dos dias nacionais de vacinação contra a poliomielite, realizados a partir de 1980. Há uma preocupação com o resultado do esforço em convocar pais e responsáveis por crianças menores de cinco anos. Várias estratégias são utilizadas. Foi criada uma marca que simbolizava, inicialmente, o compromisso com a erradicação da poliomielite e, posteriormente, com todas as vacinas previstas para o primeiro ano de vida. Foi o marco da comunicação que buscava dar unidade a esse processo sem perder as características mais localizadas. O Zé Gotinha é, até hoje, símbolo de vacina. Para além da polêmica sobre se campanha educa ou deseduca, fica o saldo positivo de uma experiência e a certeza de que é preciso buscar os motivos, continuar pesquisando, identificando metodologias e técnicas de maior aproximação com a população para que ela perceba a oferta de serviços e ações de saúde como direito de cidadania.Over the years, various efforts have been made to improve immunization campaigns, especially through the 1980 introduction of National Vaccination Days against polio. Concern has been shown over the results of attempts to reach parents and others responsible for children under the age of five, and a variety of strategies have been tried. A trademark was created in Brazil, at first symbolic of the commitment to eradicate polio and, later, linked to all vaccines that should be administered during the first year of a child's life. This use of communication tools represents an endeavor to lend unity to the process without overriding local characteristics. Even today, Zé Gotinha symbolizes vaccines in Brazil. Leaving aside the controversy over whether campaigns inform or disinform, the experience has left its positive mark, clearly showing us it is necessary to explore motivations, advance research, and identify methodologies and techniques that will reach the general public and help people perceive that health services and activities are a citizen's right.

  17. The Influence of Communicative Competence on Perceived Task, Social and Physical Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Robert L.; Kelly, Lynne

    1988-01-01

    Examines whether communicative competence influences perceived task, social, and physical attractiveness. Results indicated that communicative competence accounted for 17 percent, 14 percent and 8 percent of the variance in perceived task, social, and physical attractiveness, respectively. (MM)

  18. PECULIARITIES OF SOCIAL AND COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE OF TEENAGERS WITH DIFFERENT THINKING STYLES

    OpenAIRE

    ????? ????????????? ???????????

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the studying of the peculiarities of social and communicative competence in teenage years. The paper provides the results of the comparative analysis of the peculiarities of social and communicative competence of teenagers with different thinking styles.

  19. Social media as a risk communication tool following Typhoon Haiyan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tiffany Cool

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem: In the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, the World Health Organization (WHO Representative Office in the Philippines had no social media presence to share timely, relevant public health information. Context: Risk communication is essential to emergency management for public health message dissemination. As social media sites, such as Facebook, are popular in the Philippines, these were adopted for risk communication during the response to Haiyan. Action and outcome: The WHO Representative Office in the Philippines established Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts. Thirty days after these social medial channels were established, a gradual increase in followers was observed. Facebook saw the largest increase in followers which occurred as posted content gradually evolved from general public health information to more pro-active public health intervention and preparedness messaging. This included information on key health interventions encouraging followers to adopt protective behaviours to mitigate public health threats that frequently occur after a disaster. Lessons learnt: During the response to Haiyan, creating a social media presence, raising a follower base and developing meaningful messages and content was possible. This event underscored the importance of building a social media strategy in non-emergency times and supported the value of developing public health messages and content that both educates and interests the general public.

  20. Communication, cognition, and social interaction in the Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, K A; Johnston, J; Faircloth, B H; Irish, P; Williams, C A

    1993-04-01

    Persons with Angelman syndrome (AS) have mental retardation, epilepsy, and a characteristic "puppet-like" gait. Behaviorally, they are distinctive because they have no speech and have excessive laughter. A speech and communication evaluation of 7 persons with AS was performed to provide improved understanding of the speech deficit. Assessments included prelanguage and language development, oral motor abilities, and cognitive and social interaction skills. Results indicate that the typical lack of speech may not be due to mental retardation alone. Oral motor dyspraxia, and deficits in social interaction and attention were characteristic of AS and contributed to the lack of speech. PMID:8494032

  1. Social media in marketing communications planning for entrepreneurs

    OpenAIRE

    Paajanen, Jenni

    2011-01-01

    The study consisted of both primary and secondary research. Firstly, the secondary research findings introduce the reader into the topic by explaining the most relevant facts and linking the following three subject areas: Marketing Communications, Entrepreneurship and Social Media. To support the theoretical findings, the primary research achieved the exploratory purpose of the research. The key aim of the primary research was to gain a better understanding of how entrepreneurs use and manage...

  2. Social modulation of associative fear learning by pheromone communication

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy W Bredy; Barad, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Mice communicate through visual, vocal, and olfactory cues that influence innate, nonassociative behavior. We here report that exposure to a recently fear-conditioned familiar mouse impairs acquisition of conditioned fear and facilitates fear extinction, effects mimicked by both an olfactory chemosignal emitted by a recently fear-conditioned familiar mouse and by the putative stress-related anxiogenic pheromone ?-phenylethylamine (?-PEA). Together, these findings suggest social modulation of ...

  3. Internal Communication and Social Dialogue in Knowledge-Based Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Diana-Maria CISMARU; LEOVARIDIS, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge-based organizations are constructed on intangible assets, such as the expertise and the values of the employees. As a consequence, motivation and professional excellence of employees are the main objectives of management teams. For this type of organizations, considered as true “knowledge systems”, the employees represent the most valuable resource that is not motivated only through financial means, but also through internal communication, autonomy or social rewards. The research of...

  4. Emoticons in computer-mediated communication: social motives and social context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Daantje; Bos, Arjan E R; von Grumbkow, Jasper

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the role of emoticons in computer-mediated communication (CMC). The study consisted of an online questionnaire about the social motives for emoticon use and an experimental part in which participants (N = 1,251) had to respond to short Internet chats. In these chats, the interaction partner (friend vs. stranger) and the valence of the context (positive vs. negative) were manipulated. Results showed that emoticons are mostly used to express emotion, to strengthen a message, and to express humor. Furthermore, more emoticons were used in communication with friends than in communication with strangers, and more emoticons were used in a positive context than in a negative context. Participants seem to use emoticons in a way similar to facial behavior in face-to-face communication with respect to social context and interaction partner. PMID:18275321

  5. Social gating of sensory information during ongoing communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Silke; Heussen, Yana; Sprenger, Andreas; Haynes, John-Dylan; Ethofer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social context plays an important role in human communication. Depending on the nature of the source, the same communication signal might be processed in fundamentally different ways. However, the selective modulation (or "gating") of the flow of neural information during communication is not fully understood. Here, we use multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) and multivoxel connectivity analysis (MVCA), a novel technique that allows to analyse context-dependent changes of the strength interregional coupling between ensembles of voxels, to examine how the human brain differentially gates content-specific sensory information during ongoing perception of communication signals. In a simulated electronic communication experiment, participants received two alternative text messages during fMRI ("happy" or "sad") which they believed had been sent either by their real-life friend outside the scanner or by a computer. A region in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) selectively increased its functional coupling with sensory-content encoding regions in the visual cortex when a text message was perceived as being sent by the participant's friend, and decreased its functional coupling with these regions when a text message was perceived as being sent by the computer. Furthermore, the strength of neural encoding of content-specific information of text messages in the dmPFC was modulated by the social tie between the participant and her friend: the more of her spare time a participant reported to spend with her friend the stronger was the neural encoding. This suggests that the human brain selectively gates sensory information into the relevant network for processing the mental states of others, depending on the source of the communication signal. PMID:25315788

  6. 100 Repetitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  7. COMMUNICATION BY MEANS OF THE NEW SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purice Suzana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In our days, the electronic communication media is important because the communication forms based on interactivity lead the participants in the act of sending and receiving information to become more than simply issuers, listeners or viewers, integrating them into a dynamic system. In this approach, the study paper aims to prove the relationship between personal development and that of society determined by the new interactive communication instruments. At the individual level, training, education, health, interpersonal relationships are easier to be acquired and amplified Also, the local communities, companies, educational institutions or non-profit organizations increasingly approach themselves to the citizens, receive their problems and try to solve them efficiently. On the other hand, the expansion of the modern means of communication became possible by the steadily decreasing costs of information and of the appropriate management technologies. Virtual communities may, however, only partially replace the traditional communities and the direct physical interaction between people, because online connections are made between people, not between places. Moreover, a high degree of interconnection involves the spreading of ideas, links and various discoveries or improvements of some already existing equipment and processes. The content of this study paper is created using secondary sources of information – with limited and also limiting feature – in an office research, the areas of analysis being studied separately. The result of the study paper is to evidence the fact that the interest for the interactive electronic communication is increasing. We support the idea that such communication contributes to business development in a particular field, in the social sector, but it is better to be aware of its less desirable effects from which we can notice the loss of privacy, the identity theft, the aggressive promotion etc. In our opinion, in this study paper we only partially achieved to highlight the increasingly strong relationship between communication, interactivity and electronic media and, therefore, we hope that this demarche will be continued in other research.

  8. Problems of social and communicative competence in preschoolers and junior schoolchildren with difficulties in social interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilushkina O.P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the review of foreign and national investigations concerning genesis and specificity of interactions in children with difficulties in social contacts at early stages of ontogenesis. The following aspects of the problem were regarded: specificity of social interaction in children with autism spectrum disorder and mental retardation; peculiarities of child social interaction as depending on ethnic and gender attributes; factors determining the quality of interaction and social interaction in various age groups; the role of early support in normalizing the further child development; positive dynamics of interaction in conditions of inclusive education and so on.The reviewed studies stress the most significant reasons for low level of social interaction: decrease in need for social interaction, isolation (deprivation, lack of socio-communicative skills, difficulties in utilizing symbolic means, unfavorable situation of development, etc. It is shown that in case of specially structured educational environment it is possible to achieve positive dynamics in development of social and communicative competences in children with difficulties in social interaction.

  9. Supporting Social Competence in Children Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Amie M.; Fahsl, Allison J.

    2012-01-01

    Children with complex and severe communication impairments often cannot meet their communication needs with their natural voice and may require the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). There are many communication and learning challenges facing children who use AAC; however, using AAC for social communication is especially…

  10. The Rules Grid: Helping Children with Social Communication and Interaction Needs Manage Social Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Niall

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a new practical visual approach, the Rules Grid, to support children who have social communication and interaction needs. The Rules Grid involves a system whereby behaviours of concern can be broken down into smaller behavioural manifestations which in turn lead not only to problem identification and specification, but…

  11. The Structure of Information Pathways in a Social Communication Network

    CERN Document Server

    Kossinets, Gueorgi; Watts, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Social networks are of interest to researchers in part because they are thought to mediate the flow of information in communities and organizations. Here we study the temporal dynamics of communication using on-line data, including e-mail communication among the faculty and staff of a large university over a two-year period. We formulate a temporal notion of "distance" in the underlying social network by measuring the minimum time required for information to spread from one node to another -- a concept that draws on the notion of vector-clocks from the study of distributed computing systems. We find that such temporal measures provide structural insights that are not apparent from analyses of the pure social network topology. In particular, we define the network backbone to be the subgraph consisting of edges on which information has the potential to flow the quickest. We find that the backbone is a sparse graph with a concentration of both highly embedded edges and long-range bridges -- a finding that sheds ...

  12. Impacto de la ansiedad social, las habilidades sociales y la cibervictimización en la comunicación online (Impact of Social Anxiety, Social Skills and Cyberbullying on Online Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Navarro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research examined online communication behaviour in a sample of preadolescents (10-12 years, n= 812. In addition, we examined the effect of social anxiety, social skills and experiences of cyberbullying on online communication behaviour. Online communication measures included items related to time online, platforms used, relationships and motives to go online. Social anxiety was assessed using the Social Anxiety Scale of Children Revised, social skills were measured using the Matson Questionnaire subscale and cyberbullying using the Victimization Scale via Internet. The results show that the group with high social skills and low levels of anxiety spend more time communicating online and use instant messages to talk to friends. In contrast, the online behaviour of the group with high levels of anxiety and low social skills are more motivated to communicate online by their desire to make new friends. Cybervictims spend more time online, use chat rooms and communicate more with strangers than those who do not suffer cyberbullying. These findings suggest that the Internet offers opportunities to maintain and extend social networks but also exposes young people to online risks.

  13. Time allocation in social networks: correlation between social structure and human communication dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Miritello, Giovanna; Moro, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

  14. Internal Communication and Social Dialogue in Knowledge-Based Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Maria CISMARU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge-based organizations are constructed on intangible assets, such as the expertise and the values of the employees. As a consequence, motivation and professional excellence of employees are the main objectives of management teams. For this type of organizations, considered as true “knowledge systems”, the employees represent the most valuable resource that is not motivated only through financial means, but also through internal communication, autonomy or social rewards. The research of Eurofound shows that knowledge-based organizations have a low number of trade unions, while professional associations are more relevant for them. There is no tradition to defend through negotiation the working conditions of employees, thus it is important for managers to use the best practices, in order to increase the employees’ loyalty. We conducted a qualitative research concerning the quality of professional life of employees in five sectors of knowledge-based services: advertising-marketing, IT, banking and finance, research and development, and higher education; 15-20 employees from each sector were interviewed. Some of the questions referred directly to trade unions and affiliation, and also to internal communication. Although the results showed a different situation in each of the five sectors, there are few common characteristics: descendant communication is more frequent than ascendant communication, trade unions were reported as missing, unrepresentative or not very active, and the greatest part of employees in this sector are not affiliated, facts that limits the possibility of maintaining employees’ motivation on long term.

  15. Post-coma persons with motor and communication/consciousness impairments choose among environmental stimuli and request stimulus repetitions via assistive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Colonna, Fabio; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; Oliva, Doretta; Megna, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed whether a program based on microswitch and computer technology would enable three post-coma participants (adults) with motor and communication/consciousness impairments to choose among environmental stimuli and request their repetition whenever they so desired. Within each session, 16 stimuli (12 preferred and 4 non-preferred) were scheduled for the participants. For each stimulus, a computer system provided a sample of a 3-s duration. During the intervention, participants' responding (e.g., eye blinking and hand closure) in relation to a stimulus sample activated a microswitch and led the computer system to turn on that stimulus for 20 s. Participants' lack of responding led the computer system to pause briefly and then present the next scheduled stimulus sample. When participants responded immediately after (i.e., within 6s from) the end of a stimulus presentation, that stimulus was repeated. Intervention data showed response increases, which were very consistent for two participants and moderate for the third one. All participants asked for the repetition of preferred stimuli and showed minimal responding in relation to non-preferred stimuli. The results were discussed in light of their possible implications for new, person-centered rehabilitation programs for post-coma persons with multiple disabilities. PMID:20206471

  16. Los nuevos medios de comunicación social: las redes sociales / The new media for Social Communication: the social networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pantoja Chaves

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En el intercambio de testigo que están realizando los medios de comunicación tradicionales y las redes sociales no sólo se está produciendo una simple sustitución, ni tan siquiera una transmutuación como comúnmente se está queriendo entender. Como en todo proceso, están surgiendo nuevas propiedades que en el ámbito de la comunicación se relacionan con principios como la deslocalización, la imprevisión, la inmediatez o la interacción. Unas cualidades sobre las que reflexionaremos en el siguiente artículo, con la intención de adecuar su definición en el entorno de los nuevos medios de comunicación social.Abstract: In the exchange of witness being done by traditional media and social networking is not only producing a simple substitution, not even one as commonly transmutuación is trying to understand. As in any process, properties that are emerging in the field of communication principles as they relate to relocation, unpredictability, immediacy or interaction. Qualities on which we reflect in the following article, with the intention to adapt its definition in the setting of new media.

  17. An Investigation of the Relationship between Health Literacy and Social Communication Skills in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Eva Jackson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine connections between health literacy and social communication skills in older adults, a population that experiences chronic health conditions but is reported to have low health literacy and declines in communication skills. Sixty-three older adults were administered the "Social Communication" subtest of the…

  18. Sex Differences in Technical Communication: A Perspective from Social Role Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    This article interprets technical communication research about sex differences according to social role theory, which argues that sex differences are enculturated through experiences associated with social positions in the family and the workplace. It reevaluates technical communication research about sex differences in communicative and…

  19. An Investigation of the Relationship between Health Literacy and Social Communication Skills in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Eva Jackson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine connections between health literacy and social communication skills in older adults, a population that experiences chronic health conditions but is reported to have low health literacy and declines in communication skills. Sixty-three older adults were administered the "Social Communication" subtest of the…

  20. Electronic Word-of-Mouth Communication and Consumer Behaviour : An Exploratory Study of Danish Social Media Communication Influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Tegtmeier; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of social media, along with the easy access to peer information and interactions, has resulted in massive online word-of-mouth communication. These interactions among consumers have an increasing power over the success or failure of companies and brands. Drawing upon word-of-mouth communication and consumer behaviour theories, this paper investigates the use of word-of-mouth communication through social media among a group of Danish consumers. The findings suggest that electronic word-of-mouth communication among friends and peers affect consumer behaviour. Additionally, peer communication is perceived as more objective and therefore found more reliable than companies’ brand communication. Furthermore, negative word-of-mouth is perceived as more trustworthy compared to positive messages, which are often believed to be too subjective. The research findings emphasise the importance one has to assign to social media as a source of reputation for companies and brands, which eventually impact consumers’ choices.

  1. Examining Beliefs about Interpersonal Communication and Relationships across Generations: An Assignment of Social Constructionism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Melissa Wood; Aleman, Carlos Galvan

    2007-01-01

    A basic premise of social approaches to studying communication is that theories of interpersonal communication and personal relationships are reflexively defined, socially constructed, and historically situated. In contrast to the tradition of psychological models of relational processes and message transmission, social approaches encourage…

  2. Coordinated Speed Oscillations in Schooling Killifish Enrich Social Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Daniel T.; Couzin, Iain D.; Leonard, Naomi Ehrich

    2015-10-01

    We examine the spatial dynamics of individuals in small schools of banded killifish ( Fundulus diaphanus) that exhibit rhythmic, oscillating speed, typically with sustained, coordinated, out-of-phase speed oscillations as they move around a shallow water tank. We show that the relative motion among the fish yields a periodically time-varying network of social interactions that enriches visually driven social communication. The oscillations lead to the regular making and breaking of occlusions, which we term "switching." We show that the rate of convergence to consensus (biologically, the capacity for individuals in groups to achieve effective coordinated motion) governed by the switching outperforms static alternatives, and performs as well as the less practical case of every fish sensing every other fish. We show further that the oscillations in speed yield oscillations in relative bearing between fish over a range that includes the angles previously predicted to be optimal for a fish to detect changes in heading and speed of its neighbors. To investigate systematically, we derive and analyze a dynamic model of interacting agents that move with oscillatory speed. We show that coordinated circular motion of the school leads to systematic cycling of spatial ordering of agents and possibilities for enriched spatial density of measurements of the external environment. Our results highlight the potential benefits of dynamic communication topologies in collective animal behavior, and suggest new, useful control laws for the distributed coordination of mobile robotic networks.

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility in Online Social Networks : An Empirical Analysis of Corporate Communication for Brands on the German Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Christian; Brem, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Considering growing public awareness of social, ethical and ecological responsibility, companies have constantly been increasing their efforts in CSR communications. Social Media as tools of brand communication receive increasing attention and it is expected that the marketing sector will experience changes through this phenomenon in the future. This empirical study investigates the types of content that is communicated for different brands and industries in leading Social Media portals on the German market in 2011. It turns out that this kind of CSR communication differs in terms of portals used, as well as in contents. Also, remarkable differences between industries can be observed.

  4. Repetitive Self-Grooming Behavior in the BTBR Mouse Model of Autism is Blocked by the mGluR5 Antagonist MPEP

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Jill L.; Tolu, Seda S.; Barkan, Charlotte L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2009-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) is an inbred mouse strain that shows robust behavioral phenotypes with analogies to all three of the diagnostic symptoms of autism, including well-replicated deficits in reciprocal social interactions and social approach, unusual patterns of ultrasonic vocalization, and high levels of repetitive self-gr...

  5. The structure and neurobiology of repetitive and restricted behavior in the autism spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Mensen, V.T.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pervasive and relatively common childhood disorder. It is currently understood that it is a spectrum of disorder, characterized by a very heterogeneous etiology. One of the core components of ASD is restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs). This is a broad class of behaviors characterized by repetition and rigidity and is separable from social and communication deficits in ASD. A wide variety of instruments are currently being used to measure RRBs and var...

  6. Using social media to communicate during crises: an analytic methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Marjorie

    2011-06-01

    The Emerging Media Integration Team at the Department of the Navy Office of Information (CHINFO) has recently put together a Navy Command Social Media Handbook designed to provide information needed to safely and effectively use social media. While not intended to be a comprehensive guide on command use of social media or to take the place of official policy, the Handbook provides a useful guide for navigating a dynamic communications environment. Social media are changing the way information is diffused and decisions are made, especially for Humanitarian Assistance missions when there is increased emphasis on Navy commands to share critical information with other Navy command sites, government, and official NGO (nongovernmental organization) sites like the American Red Cross. In order to effectively use social media to support such missions, the Handbook suggests creating a centralized location to funnel information. This suggests that as the community of interest (COI) grows during a crisis, it will be important to ensure that information is shared with appropriate organizations for different aspects of the mission such as evacuation procedures, hospital sites, location of seaports and airports, and other topics relevant to the mission. For example, in the first 14 days of the U.S. Southern Command's Haiti HA/DR (Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief) mission, the COI grew to over 1,900 users. In addition, operational conditions vary considerably among incidents, and coordination between different groups is often set up in an ad hoc manner. What is needed is a methodology that will help to find appropriate people with whom to share information for particular aspects of a mission during a wide range of events related to the mission. CNA has developed such a methodology and we would like to test it in a small scale lab experiment.

  7. Elaboration of communicativeness of future social workers through the participation in institute’s volunteerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uliya Galyshinskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to definition of communicativeness structure of future social workers and highlighting its main components. Significant part of the article is played by the definition of the volunteerism role in elaborating communicativeness of students.

  8. Is There a Need for New Marketing Communications Performance Metrics for Social Media?

    OpenAIRE

    Töllinen, Aarne; Karjaluoto, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for measuring the effectiveness of social media marketing communications. With recent advances in information and communications technology, especially in social collaboration technologies, both academics and practitioners rethink whether the existing marketing communications performance metrics are still valid in the changing communications landscape, or is it time to devise entirely new metrics for measuring mar...

  9. New insight for social risk communication of nuclear power towards social consensus for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the construction of effective knowledge base on safety and non-anxiety for nuclear power, a study on new communication system about social risk information has been initiated by noticing the rapid expansion of Internet in the society. By constructing Internet Website communication system on the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, we conducted the experiment of communication for verifying the principles such as that the basic technical knowledge and trust, and social ethics are indispensable in this process to close the perception gap between nuclear specialists and the general public. The cognition structural equation model by means of the variables reduction method of multiple regression analysis and by compiling the significant paths by covariance structure analysis was built based on this experimental data. Moreover, by investigating more detailed public subconscious on the high-level radioactive wastes by 'text mining method' with the special reference to the Public Comment in July 2000 and the literature survey, it was found that the freely discussing ideas based on the environmental ethics such as 'fairness in results' and 'fairness in opportunity' from scratch would gain a potential of enhancing the social receptivity. (author)

  10. Impacto de la ansiedad social, las habilidades sociales y la cibervictimización en la comunicación online / Impact of Social Anxiety, Social Skills and Cyberbullying on online Communication

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Raúl, Navarro; Santiago, Yubero.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio fue diseñado para conocer las conductas de comunicación online en una muestra de preadolescentes (10-12 años, n=812). Se analizó el efecto de la ansiedad social, las habilidades sociales y las experiencias de cibervictimización sobre la comunicación online. La comunicación online [...] comprendía ítems relacionados con el tiempo empleado, las plataformas utilizadas, las personas con las que interactúan y los motivos para conectarse a la red. La ansiedad social fue evaluada mediante la Escala de ansiedad social para niños revisada, las habilidades sociales a través de la subescala del Cuestionario Matson y la cibervictimización mediante la Escala de Victimización a través de Internet. Los resultados mostraron que el grupo con altas habilidades sociales y baja ansiedad emplean más tiempo comunicándose en Internet y utilizan más los mensajes instantáneos para hablar con los amigos. Por el contrario, la conducta online del grupo con alta ansiedad social y bajas habilidades está más motivada por el deseo de hacer amigos. Las víctimas de ciberbullying emplean más tiempo online, utilizan más las salas de chat y se comunican más con desconocidos. Estos hallazgos sugieren que, a pesar de los riesgos, Internet también permite mantener y ampliar la red social existente. Abstract in english The present research examined online communication behaviour in a sample of preadolescents (10-12 years, n= 812). In addition, we examined the effect of social anxiety, social skills and experiences of cyberbullying on online communication behaviour. Online communication measures included items rela [...] ted to time online, platforms used, relationships and motives to go online. Social anxiety was assessed using the Social Anxiety Scale of Children Revised, social skills were measured using the Matson Questionnaire subscale and cyberbullying using the Victimization Scale via Internet. The results show that the group with high social skills and low levels of anxiety spend more time communicating online and use instant messages to talk to friends. In contrast, the online behaviour of the group with high levels of anxiety and low social skills are more motivated to communicate online by their desire to make new friends. Cybervictims spend more time online, use chat rooms and communicate more with strangers than those who do not suffer cyberbullying. These findings suggest that the Internet offers opportunities to maintain and extend social networks but also exposes young people to online risks.

  11. Scholarly communication and social work in the Google era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Steyaert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly communication and social work in the Google era In this text, we outline how new media has an impact on international scholarly communication and focus on how these changes (can influence the traditional gap between research and practice. We do so by describing the dreams of yesterday, the facts of today and the possible consequences for the near future. The most significant development on the interface between science and information technology is not so much the increased computational power but the increased availability of scientific information, be it communication between scientists through virtual libraries or discussion lists, or between scientists and students through electronic learning environments. Through this development of more digital scientific communication and more visibility of that communication in the public realm, the traditional schism between science and practice changes. Combining this with the increasing plea for more applicability of research results, it is time to supplement the science citation index with the Google citation index. Onderzoekscommunicatie in sociaal werk in het Google tijdperk In dit artikel zetten we uiteen hoe de opkomst van nieuwe media van invloed is op communicatie tussen wetenschappers wereldwijd, en hoe deze veranderingen van invloed (kunnen zijn op het traditionele gat tussen wetenschap en praktijk. We doen dit door het beschrijven van de dromen van gisteren, de feiten van vandaag de dag en de mogelijke consequenties daarvan voor de toekomst. De belangrijkste ontwikkeling die zich op het raakvlak van wetenschap en informatietechnologie heeft voorgedaan, is niet zozeer de toename in technische mogelijkheden, maar vooral de toegenomen beschikbaarheid van wetenschappelijke informatie, zij het communicatie tussen wetenschappers binnen de virtuele omgeving van bibliotheken of op discussiefora op het internet, of communicatie tussen wetenschappers en studenten middels een elektronische leeromgeving. Deze toename in communicatie tussen wetenschappers en de toegenomen zichtbaarheid daarvan, heeft gevolgen voor de traditionele afstand tussen wetenschap en praktijk. Een andere ontwikkeling die met deze discussie samenhangt, is een toegenomen vraag naar meer toepasbare onderzoeksresultaten. We stellen daarom dat het tijd is om de Science Citation Index aan te vullen met de Google Citation Index.

  12. Social media marketing communications plan for a B2B company

    OpenAIRE

    Puumala, Tero; Heliste, Paavo

    2014-01-01

    The commissioner of this thesis, ebrand Suomi Oy, is a digital media agency possessing significant ability and knowledge of social media but they have trouble communicating this value for the customers even though they have a good presence in social media. The objective of this thesis is to develop a proper social media marketing communications plan for ebrand Suomi Oy, which could eventually be turned into a product package that the commissioner could offer to customers. Even though social m...

  13. ROLE OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN HEALTH COMMUNICATION: CURRENT PRACTICES IN THE WORLD AND TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ba?ak MEND?

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health communication discipline has gained importance and health communication studies and strategies have been emphasized in recent years in Turkey. Health promotion is one of the main topics in the field of health communication. Health promotion, which has grown in importance especially with the increase in prevalence of chronic diseases, requires interdisciplinary studies. Communication studies have a crucial role in planning and practising health promotion strategies. With the developments in new communication technologies, use of social media tools in heatlh communication has increased recently. Use of social media enables users active participation and offers new opportunities to improve public health outcomes. For this reason, it’s essential to carry out studies evaluating the effects of social media on society and the role of social media in health promotion practices. This paper examines the role of social media as an effective tool in health promotion practices and action plans, within the context of different countries and strategies.

  14. Inferring Social Status and Rich Club Effects in Enterprise Communication Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuxiao; Tang, Jie; Chawla, Nitesh V.; Lou, Tiancheng; YANG Yang; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Social status, defined as the relative rank or position that an individual holds in a social hierarchy, is known to be among the most important motivating forces in social behaviors. In this paper, we consider the notion of status from the perspective of a position or title held by a person in an enterprise. We study the intersection of social status and social networks in an enterprise. We study whether enterprise communication logs can help reveal how social interactions a...

  15. Informational Coupling in Social Interaction as a Goodness of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Hidaka

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available I.\tINTRODUCTION How do two interacting agents couple their activity? Some forms of human collaborative and coordinated behavior (such as maintaining a conversation, or jointly solving a complex problem appear to happen effortlessly as if the participants can read each other’s mind and understand each other’s communicative intent (Baron-cohen, 1995, Tomasello, 1986. However, very little is known about the real-time dynamics of these behaviors in social interactions nor about how they may be related to higher-order functions such as making inferences about the goals and intentions of other. This topic is critical to better understand fundamental aspects of human-human communication in the behavioral science and also to build better and smoother human-robot interactions in the robotics field. Children learn various kinds of knowledge from their everyday social interaction with their caregivers. In such social interaction, children do not just passively perceive information. Instead, they are active learners who can not only actively select information in their environment through their own bodily actions but also direct their social partner’s attention by using their gaze, pointing and speech to ask the social partner’s to provide right information at right moments for the learner’s internal learning device (Smith, Yu, Pereira, 2011. Coupled actions and joint attention between children and caregivers through various kinds of bodily cues would reflect their quality of communication and learning, because two people jointly control the dynamics so that they can construct the contextual ground of their mutual understanding. The key idea of the present study is to apply information theoretic measures to understand the structure in the sensorimotor dynamics of the interaction. To this end, we conceptualize multimodal information flows between children and parents as those between senders and receivers in artificial communication systems (Shannon, 1948. More specifically, the child and the parent communicate with each other using multiple communication channels such as gaze, pointing, speech, and hand movements. The specific goal of this study is to understand how information theoretic measures might be used to analyze the information flows and information exchange within each participant and between participants. For example, within individual, do behaviors such as looking “send” information to the hands, in the sense of signalling a reach? Across individuals, does a hand action by one participant send information to the gaze of the other? And, if we can measure information flow in these ways, can we also measure how it might change at different points in the interaction, for example, when an object is being named? II.\tEXPERIMENT & METHOD Toward our research goal, this study used a multimodal dataset collected from a free-flow interaction experiment in which a child and his caregiver naturally interacted with each other by playing with a set of toy objects. All the visual objects were composed of novel artificial shapes with novel names and parents were taught the names prior to the experiment. In the experiment, there were no constraints on what parents (or the children had to say or what they had to do. Parents were told to engage their child with objects, to use the names we supplied if they named them, and that we were interested in the dynamics of parent-child play with toys. Thus, the main experimental task was unconstrained in which toddlers and parents handed objects back and forth, engaged in joint actions with the objects, took turns and dynamically shifted their attention. In the experiment used in the present paper, children were potentially exposed to as many as 6 unique toys and names. There were 4 playing trials in total, each lasting about 90 seconds. Parents and children were asked to play with a set of three objects in each trial and in total each object set was used twice in the total of 4 trials (e.g. A B A B or B A B A. More details on our experimental designed can be found i

  16. Social Amplification of Risk and Crisis Communication Planing - Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciugelu, I.; Frunzaru, V.; Armas, I.; Duntzer, A.; Stan, S.

    2012-04-01

    Risk management has become a dominant concern of public policy and the ability of government to anticipate the strength and focus of public concerns remains weak. The Social Amplification of Risk Framework (SARF) was designed to assist in this endeavor. It aims to facilitate a greater understanding of the social processes that can mediate between a hazard event and its consequences. SARF identifies categories of mediator/moderator that intervene between risk event and its consequences and suggests a causal and temporal sequence in which they act. Information flows first through various sources and then channels, triggering social stations of amplification, initiating individual station of amplification and precipitating behavioral reactions. The International Risk Governance Council Framework is an interdisciplinary and multilevel approach, linking risk management and risk assessment sphere through communication. This study aims to identify categories of mediator/moderator that intervene between the risk event and its consequences, using a survey on earthquake risk perception addressing population of Bucharest city. Romania has a unique seismic profile in Europe, being the country with the biggest surface affected in case of a serious earthquake. Considering the development of the urban area that took place in the last two decades and the growing number of inhabitants, Bucharest is the largest city in Romania and is exposed to extensive damages in case of an earthquake. The sociological survey has been conducted in December 2009 on a representative sample of the Bucharest population aged 18 and over (N=1376) using one stage sampling design. We used a stratified sample method shearing the investigated populations in six layers according to the six sectors of Bucharest. The respondents were selected using random digit dialling method (RDD) and the questionnaires were administered by research staff with computer assisted telephone interviewing method (CATI). The results of the field inquiries are used in developing risk/crisis communication plans. The survey has been made during the project Multihazard and vulnerability in the seismic context of the Bucharest Municipality. The research project has been financed by Romania National Authority of Scientific Research.

  17. Is sociality required for the evolution of communicative complexity? Evidence weighed against alternative hypotheses in diverse taxonomic groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ord, Terry J.; Garcia-Porta, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Complex social communication is expected to evolve whenever animals engage in many and varied social interactions; that is, sociality should promote communicative complexity. Yet, informal comparisons among phylogenetically independent taxonomic groups seem to cast doubt on the putative role of social factors in the evolution of complex communication. Here, we provide a formal test of the sociality hypothesis alongside alternative explanations for the evolution of communicative complexity. We...

  18. Children's Play Behaviour and Social Communication in Integrated Special Day-Care Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Eira; Nislin, Mari A.; Alijoki, Alisa; Sajaniemi, Nina K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate children's social communication abilities and play to reveal possible changes during a one year period in the context of Finnish early childhood special education. The data we collected during 2012-2013 consisted of assessments of play behaviour (Preschool Play Behavior Scale) and social communication…

  19. The Effect of Communication Skills and Interpersonal Problem Solving Skills on Social Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erozkan, Atilgan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine communication skills, interpersonal problem solving skills, and social self-efficacy perception of adolescents and the predictive role of communication skills and interpersonal problem solving skills on social self-efficacy. This study is a quantitative and relational study aimed at examining the…

  20. Deferred Imitation and Social Communication in Speaking and Nonspeaking Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strid, Karin; Heimann, Mikael; Gillberg, Christopher; Smith, Lars; Tjus, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Deferred imitation and early social communication skills were compared among speaking and nonspeaking children with autism and children developing typically. Overall, the children with autism showed a lower frequency on measures of deferred imitation and social communication compared with typically developing children. Deferred imitation was…

  1. Teaching Students How to Integrate and Assess Social Networking Tools in Marketing Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Harich, Katrin R.

    2013-01-01

    This research is based on two studies that focus on teaching students how to integrate and assess social networking tools in marketing communications. Study 1 examines how students in marketing classes utilize social networking tools and explores their attitudes regarding the use of such tools for marketing communications. Study 2 focuses on an…

  2. The Developmental Sequence of Social-Communicative Skills in Young Children with Autism: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Chin; Chiang, Chung-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    To explore the different developmental trajectories of social-communicative skills in children with autism and typically developing infants, two longitudinal studies were conducted. In Study 1, we examined the developmental sequence of social-communicative skills in 26 typically developing infants when they were 9 months old and reexamined them…

  3. Social Network Sites and Student-Lecturer Communication: An Academic Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joanna; Gaffney-Rhys, Ruth; Jones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a synthesis of existing ideas relating to the use of social network sites by faculty within higher education institutions (HEIs) to communicate with the student body. As previous research has been from a student-centric perspective, importantly this study explores the use of social networks for student-faculty communication…

  4. Social and Communicational Skills in Upper Secondary Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisanen, Anu; Rakkolainen, Mari

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the methodology used by the Finnish Education Evaluation Council in the national evaluation of social and communication skills in vocational education and training. The evaluation concentrates on key competences such as learning-to-learn skills, communication skills, social skills and entrepreneurship (Implementation of…

  5. Teaching Students How to Integrate and Assess Social Networking Tools in Marketing Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Harich, Katrin R.

    2013-01-01

    This research is based on two studies that focus on teaching students how to integrate and assess social networking tools in marketing communications. Study 1 examines how students in marketing classes utilize social networking tools and explores their attitudes regarding the use of such tools for marketing communications. Study 2 focuses on an…

  6. The Social Communication Assessment for Toddlers with Autism (SCATA): An Instrument to Measure the Frequency, Form and Function of Communication in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Auriol; Baird, Gillian; Taylor, Emma; Milne, Elizabeth; Charman, Tony

    2007-01-01

    The Social Communication Assessment for Toddlers with Autism (SCATA) was designed to measure non-verbal communication, including early and atypical communication, in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Each communicative act is scored according to its form, function, role and complexity. The SCATA was used to measure communicative…

  7. Mobile communications re-negotiation of the social sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Surveying the issues associated with the adoption and use of mobile communication, this book explores developing areas of inquiry. It provides an analysis of specific areas, including: the psychological dimensions of mobile communication; the linguistics of mobile communication; and the understanding of mobile communication's commercialisation.

  8. Arresting Social Insecurity in Nigeria: The Imperative of Indigenous Communication Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Leo O.N. Edegoh; Kenechukwu S. A; Ezekiel S. Asemah

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the role of indigenous communication systems in ensuring social security in Nigeria. It posits that the best approach to arrest social insecurity in Nigeria is to restore the cherished value system of the various ethnic nationalities that make up Nigeria. In doing this, emphasis should be on the use of a communication approach that has many things in common with the value system of the people. Hence, the choice of indigenous communication systems and among the different f...

  9. Social media in employer brand communication: Focus on SMEs in Finland. Case study: Smarp Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Thinh

    2015-01-01

    In today’s business environment, due to the lack of highly skilled employees, employer brand communication has been a necessity for organizations in all industries. Despite various tools produced to alleviate the employer brand communication, social media has been selected as highly effective tool for employer brand communication due to its significant benefits. Given that enhancing employee engagement in social media is a new challenge for brand marketers nowadays, this thesis aims at descri...

  10. "Social Media has Opened a World of 'Open communication:'" experiences of Adults with Cerebral Palsy who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice

    2016-03-01

    An online focus group was used to investigate the experiences of nine individuals with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and social media. Information was gathered related to (a) advantages of social media, (b) disadvantages of social media, (c) barriers to successful use, (d) supports to successful use, and (e) recommendations for other individuals using AAC, support personnel, policy makers, and technology developers. Participants primarily chose to focus on social media as a beneficial tool and viewed it as an important form of communication. The participants did describe barriers to social media use (e.g., technology). Despite barriers, all the participants in this study took an active role in learning to use social media. The results are discussed as they relate to themes and with reference to published literature. PMID:26056722

  11. The Role of Communication in Enhancing Employees’ Organizational Commitment : Exploring the Relationship between Social-emotional-oriented Communication, Work-oriented Communication and Organizational Commitment in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yan WANG

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the roles of social-emotional-oriented communication and work-oriented communication in enhancing organizational commitment in the context of the People’s Republic of China. Literature regarding the functions of different types of communication was reviewed and the human relations theory was applied as the main guidance of the current research. The study utilized the statistical method to analyze the data collected from questionnaires. A total of 69 emp...

  12. enREDando y conectando: Comunicacion y redes sociales / Tangling and Connecting: Communication and Social Networks

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ilia E., López Jiménez.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available En esta publicación se propone el análisis de las redes sociales desde una perspectiva comunicacional: por su contenido o temática; por su composición (cerrada o abierta), por la interacción (interna o externa) existente; por su difusión y alcance (local o internacional). Se han seleccionado tres si [...] tios de la web que presentan características diversas: una red de autogestión comunitaria, una red académica y una red socio-política. Abstract in english This article is intended to make an analysis of social networks from a communicational point of view: based on their contents and topics; based on their components (closed or open); based on their existing interaction (internal or external); based on their kind of release and scope (local or interna [...] tional). Three websites showing several characteristics have been selected: a community self-management network, an academic network, and a sociopolitical network.

  13. Ética empresarial, responsabilidad social y bienes comunicativos / Bussiness ethics, social responsibility and Communication Goods

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Patrici, Calvo.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde su irrupción en el panorama económico, la responsabilidad social se ha conceptualizado de muy distintas formas. Algunas relacionadas con la filantropía, el mecenazgo, la estrategia o el marketing empresarial. Este estudio pretende mostrar que la empresa necesita gestionar debidamente aquellos [...] bienes comunicativos que, como la confianza, la reputación o la reciprocidad, están implicados en el correcto desarrollo de su actividad y, por consiguiente, en la maximización del beneficio económico. Pero para ello, es preciso implementar una responsabilidad social a la altura de las expectativas en juego; es decir, que tenga en cuenta la dimensión ética que le subyace. Abstract in english Since its beginnings, the conceptualisation of social responsibility has taken many forms, some of them related to philanthropy, patronage, strategy or business marketing among others. This paper defends the thesis that economic organization needs to manage those communicative goods, such as trust, [...] reputation or reciprocity, evolved in the right development of their business activity and, therefore, on economic profit maximization. But for this, economic organization should implement a social responsibility to live up to expectations at stake; that is, to take into account the ethical dimension that underlies it.

  14. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Repetitive Stress Injuries Print ... t had any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that ...

  15. Integrating Social Media into the Marketing Communication Strategy : The Case of ID24

    OpenAIRE

    Amerian, Irsa; Pisareva, Natallia

    2012-01-01

    Problem:  Integration of social media tools in marketing practice of B2B companies is not a widespread phenomenon yet. However, particular patterns of involvement already exist. Companies get connected through social media and they use Web 2.0 tools to engage the customers in communication and to interact and build relationships with them.   Purpose: The overall purpose of this thesis is to deepen and broaden the knowledge of the application of social media into the communication strategy of ...

  16. Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeville, KL; M Harris; Thomas, HL; Chow, Y; Seng, C

    2014-01-01

    Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here...

  17. Use of social media in managing customer relationships in a Chinese SME - A communication perspective

    OpenAIRE

    wei, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study: The objective of this study was to investigate the use of social media as a means to communicate with customers in an SME context. Two particular aspects were analyzed in this study. First, the role of social media was to be identified. Second, the study focused on the most important characteristics of social media in meeting the challenges in managing customer relationships. International business creates challenges for international business communication. I...

  18. Using Social Media to Communicate Child Health Information to Low-Income Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Stroever, Stephanie J.; Mackert, Michael S.; McAlister, Alfred L; Hoelscher, Deanna M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the value of using social media to communicate child health information to low-income parents. We evaluated qualitative data obtained through focus groups with low-income, predominantly Hispanic parents. Results were mixed; lack of time and credibility were the primary objections parents cited in using social media to obtain information about their children's health. Social media has value as part of an overall communication strategy, but more work...

  19. Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeville, Kate L; Harris, Matthew; Thomas, H. Lucy; Chow, Yimmy; Seng, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here...

  20. Communication in social networks: Effects of kinship, network size, and emotional closeness

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, SGB (Roberts, Sam George Bradley)[ 2,4 ; Dunbar, RIM

    2011-01-01

    Communication is important in preventing social relationships from decaying over time. This study examined the effects of social network size, emotional closeness, and type of relationship (kinship vs. friendship) on communication patterns in the social networks of 251 women. Participants with large kin networks had longer times to last contact to both kin and friends. Participants with high levels of emotional closeness in their networks had shorter times to last contact. The effect of emoti...

  1. Developing a social media communication plan: case: the Quicker Steps project

    OpenAIRE

    Nazari, Ahdia

    2012-01-01

    Social media is accepted as an effective communications and promotion tool. Social media tools such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, blogging and podcasting are leveraged by different organizations for creating profiles, establishing communication, interaction and launching promotional activities. However, promoters might encounter certain challenges in targeting potential audiences and maintaining interest and the interaction of the audience in their social media profiles. The Quicker St...

  2. Social change communication in the service of the sustainability education movement in BC

    OpenAIRE

    Le Roy, Candace Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This project studied the communication challenges of the BC Sustainability Education Movement and formulated a communications framework and guideBlog to address these challenges. Designed to assist movement members in developing holistic and comprehensive communication plans for advancing movement goals, the framework and guideBlog were developed by applying current social change communications theory and community capital models to the challenges and barriers presented at the “How Sustainabi...

  3. Usage Patterns of Communication Interfaces for Social Support among At-Risk Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passig, David

    2014-01-01

    Social and interpersonal support has mostly been carried out face-to-face. However, the internet was able, in the last couple of decades, to facilitate social interactions through a range of computer-mediated communication (CMC) interfaces--from email applications, chat-rooms, forums, instant messages (IM), short text messages (SMS), social…

  4. Analysing ESL Students’ Perceptions towards Oral Communication for Social and Occupational Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzilah Md Husain

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental principles of public speaking and appropriate organisational structure of ideas for occupational and social communication are vital aspects for undergraduates as a pathway to overcome employers’ grievances on graduates’ lack of communication skills (Malaysia Education Blueprint, 2015. This study was undertaken to explore the perceptions of a group of ten students at a tertiary institution in Malaysia to see how they utlise the theories and practice of effective communication skills beyond their course entitled “Oral Communication for Social and Occupational Purposes”. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participants. The study found that these students gained knowledge about effective communication for social and occupational purposes. The findings also indicate that students have benefitted in relation to communication in a formal way especially to higher authorities, and sharpening their communication and presentation skills. However, there were shortcomings that need to be addressed, particularly related to methods of teaching Oral Communication for Social and Occupational Purposes, time constraint in preparing for the tutorial sessions and producing a good quality video.Keywords: Social and Occupational, Communication, Oral skills, Theories and Practice

  5. Social Networking: Changing the way we communicate and do business.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the value of social networking and the impact it can have on small and large businesses. The paper also reviews the Social Networking Business Plan and the power of recommender networks. Examples are given of inbound and outbound marketing techniques. Social Networking is an integral part of inbound marketing. A synopsis of the evolving demographic of social networkers is presented to add clarity and show potential for social networking websites and tools.

  6. Inferring social status and rich club effects in enterprise communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Yuxiao; Chawla, Nitesh; Lou, Tiancheng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Bai

    2014-01-01

    Social status, referred to as the relative rank or position that an individual holds in a social hierarchy, is known to be one of the most important motivating forces in social behaviors. However, we have limited knowledge of how social status drives human behaviors in society, which have dynamic effects on promotion or demotion of individual status. The communication logs in enterprises provide us a great potential to reveal how social interactions and individual status manifest themselves in social networks. Herein, we use two enterprise datasets with three communication channels - voice call, short message, and email - to demonstrate the social behavioral differences between individuals with different status. On the individual level high-status users are more likely to be spanned as structural holes by linking to people in parts of the enterprise networks that are otherwise not well connected to one another. On the community level the principle of homophily, social balance and clique theory generally indic...

  7. Repetition reduction: Lexical repetition in the absence of referent repetition

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence compared to words that are new to a discourse. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and lexical items simultaneously. Therefore, repetition reduction could be due to repeated mention of a referent, or repetition of a word or referring expressi...

  8. The Effectiveness of Social Media as a Marketing Communication Tactic : Case Gina Tricot Ltd

    OpenAIRE

    Kallio, Kira

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to discover whether social media is an effective marketing communication tactic for Gina Tricot or not. The objective was to find out how customers experience Gina Tricot’s marketing and social media activities and whether social media accounts are able to serve customers as aimed. The case company Gina Tricot is presented in the introduction chapter. The theoretical study focuses on social media marketing and on the transition from traditional outbound marketing to...

  9. Social complexity as a proximate and ultimate factor in communicative complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeberg, Todd M; Dunbar, Robin I M; Ord, Terry J

    2012-07-01

    The 'social complexity hypothesis' for communication posits that groups with complex social systems require more complex communicative systems to regulate interactions and relations among group members. Complex social systems, compared with simple social systems, are those in which individuals frequently interact in many different contexts with many different individuals, and often repeatedly interact with many of the same individuals in networks over time. Complex communicative systems, compared with simple communicative systems, are those that contain a large number of structurally and functionally distinct elements or possess a high amount of bits of information. Here, we describe some of the historical arguments that led to the social complexity hypothesis, and review evidence in support of the hypothesis. We discuss social complexity as a driver of communication and possible causal factor in human language origins. Finally, we discuss some of the key current limitations to the social complexity hypothesis-the lack of tests against alternative hypotheses for communicative complexity and evidence corroborating the hypothesis from modalities other than the vocal signalling channel. PMID:22641818

  10. Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, Kate L; Harris, Matthew; Thomas, H Lucy; Chow, Yimmy; Seng, Claude

    2014-04-01

    Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here a case from local level health protection where the friend of an individual with meningococcal septicaemia used a social networking site to notify potential contacts. PMID:24688599

  11. PECULIARITIES OF PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION OF A SOCIAL PEDAGOGUE WITH A FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flyura Al’tafovna Mustaeva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The professional communication of a social pedagogue with a family is an actual problem of modern science. The object of the research is a Russian family, the subject – the communication of a social pedagogue with a family. The purpose of the research is the revealing of peculiarities of professional communication of a social pedagogue with a family, the account of which in practical professional work of an expert will promote the perfection of his work and the improvement of the quality of social-pedagogical services to a family.During the research the following methods were used: analysis of references, questioning methods, analysis of documents, pedagogical supervision. On the basis of the sociological researches: social problems of a Russian family were revealed, subjects of social-pedagogical work with a family were named, the necessity of the introduction of an institute of social pedagogues helping families was proved. The concept of self-determination of a family was introduced, the necessity of the transition of a family to self-determination while deciding its problems and realizing its educational function was proved. The peculiarities of professional communication of a social pedagogue with different types of families were revealed. The professional communication of a social pedagogue with a family is a complex process demanding the competent organization of interpersonal interaction, the usage of personal potential to create favorable psychological background and an atmosphere of trust, the knowledge of social problems and social-psychological peculiarities of a family, the differentiated approach in social-pedagogical work with a family.The results of the research can be used in practical activities of social pedagogues, in vocational training of experts.

  12. Transformation of Traditional Marketing Communications in to Paradigms of Social Media Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, T R Gopalakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Effective Communication for marketing is a vital field in business organizations, which is used to convey the details about their products and services to the market segments and subsequently to build long lasting customer relationships. This paper focuses on an emerging component of the integrated marketing communication, ie. social media networking, as it is increasingly becoming the trend. In 21st century, the marketing communication platforms show a tendency to shift towards innovative technology bound people networking which is becoming an acceptable domain of interaction. Though the traditional channels like TV, print media etc. are still active and prominent in marketing communication, the presences of the Internet and more specifically the Social Media Networking, has started influencing the way individuals and business enterprises communicate. It has become evident that more individuals and business enterprises are engaging the social media networking sites either to accelerate the sales of their pro...

  13. Heartcore Business? A study of the challenges social enterprises experience when communicating their corporate identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmeltz, Line

    The aim of this paper is thus to investigate social businesses’ communication of identity in their corporate communication. Institutional theory (e.g. DiMaggio & Powel, 1983), and especially the notion of legitimacy (Deephouse and Carter, 2005; Meyer and Rowan, 1977; Suchman, 1995), provides the...... frame for understanding and exploring the enterprises’ communication in an organizational context. Hence, through a value-theoretical framework, the study seeks to identify the extent to which these enterprises manage to create alignment between their corporate identity values and their social...... responsibility values, or if they are working with two, or even more, different value systems. Accordingly, the assumption put forward by this paper is that a high degree of alignment between identity and social responsibility in the enterprise’s corporate communication will enable the enterprises to communicate...

  14. Heartcore Business? A study of the challenges social enterprises experience when communicating their corporate identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmeltz, Line

    The aim of this paper is thus to investigate social businesses’ communication of identity in their corporate communication. Institutional theory (e.g. DiMaggio & Powel, 1983), and especially the notion of legitimacy (Deephouse and Carter, 2005; Meyer and Rowan, 1977; Suchman, 1995), provides the frame for understanding and exploring the enterprises’ communication in an organizational context. Hence, through a value-theoretical framework, the study seeks to identify the extent to which these enterprises manage to create alignment between their corporate identity values and their social responsibility values, or if they are working with two, or even more, different value systems. Accordingly, the assumption put forward by this paper is that a high degree of alignment between identity and social responsibility in the enterprise’s corporate communication will enable the enterprises to communicate a clear identity and consequently increase their legitimacy.

  15. Online Friendship Formation, Communication Channels, and Social Closeness

    OpenAIRE

    Ilan Talmud; Mesch, Gustavo S.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of the quality of online social relationships are divided in their conclusions regarding the strength of social ties. Early conceptualizations described the weakness of electronic media in supporting social ties. By contrast, others have emphasized the compensating character of the Internet for specific social groups. This study investigated differences between adolescents who created online friendships and those who did not, and how far the place where a friend was met (online or ...

  16. Arresting Social Insecurity in Nigeria: The Imperative of Indigenous Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo O.N. Edegoh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of indigenous communication systems in ensuring social security in Nigeria. It posits that the best approach to arrest social insecurity in Nigeria is to restore the cherished value system of the various ethnic nationalities that make up Nigeria. In doing this, emphasis should be on the use of a communication approach that has many things in common with the value system of the people. Hence, the choice of indigenous communication systems and among the different forms of these communication systems, the institutional form is unique in prosecuting a campaign for social change, including the one being examined. Thus, the role of endogenous institutional media like traditional rulers, age groups, masquerade institutions and religious institutions, among others, in achieving social security in Nigeria are examined.

  17. Collaborating with Your Clients Using Social Media & Mobile Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typhina, Eli; Bardon, Robert E.; Gharis, Laurie W.

    2015-01-01

    Many Extension educators are still learning how to effectively integrate social media into their programs. By using the right social media platforms and mobile applications to create engaged, online communities, Extension educators can collaborate with clients to produce and to share information expanding and enhancing their social media and…

  18. Deferred Imitation and Social Communication in Speaking and Nonspeaking Children With Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Strid, Karin; Heimann, Mikael; Smith, Lars; Gillberg, Christopher; Tjus, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Deferred imitation and early social communication skills were compared among speaking and nonspeaking children with autism and children developing typically. Overall, the children with autism showed a lower frequency on measures of deferred imitation and social communication compared with typically developing children. Deferred imitation was observed at a significantly lower level among the speaking and nonspeaking groups of children with autism. However, when comparing the speaking autism gr...

  19. Utilizing Social Network Services for Enhanced Communication with Elderly Living at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses whether social network services, like Facebook and Twitter, may be used by elderly living in their own homes to enhance communication with their relatives and friends. It introduces a prototype solution based on the iRobot Roomba 560, iRobot, USA, robot vacuum cleaner, which has been enhanced with Facebook and Twitter communication capabilities. The paper points out a number of other relevant applications where the use of social network services may provide better communicat...

  20. Monitoring of social networks and their links with the external communication plan of Cofrentes NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, new communication models are being established in the society. Companies, as part of society and as socially responsible entities should be part of these changes and, therefore, adapt themselves to these new models of communication. In one approach and study of this new model, some experiences obtained by Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant are studied, a SWOT analysis of the situation is made and are raised the three main objectives Cofrentes NPP should pursue if it enters in the social networks field. (Author)

  1. Stakeholder perceptions of communication of corporate social responsibility: case Lappset Group

    OpenAIRE

    Kiviluoma, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Stakeholder Perceptions of Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: Case Lappset Group Objective of the Study The objective of the study was to explore the stakeholder perceptions concerning communication of corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the case company, Lappset Group Ltd. The target stakeholder group consisted of architects, landscape architects and landscape designers (referred to as architects), who are considered by the case company as important opinion leader...

  2. Second Life: A Strong Communication Tool in Social Networking and Business

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Gajendra; Wenjun Sun; Qiang Ye

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present different communication methods in Second Life virtual world, its implication on social networking, business and future scope. The current study is a review of various literatures relating to social networking, virtual community, virtual reality and online business in Second Life. The study has shown the strong and competitive advantages of Second Life among other virtual worlds and the contributions it has made on real life through communication and ...

  3. Social-Communicative Innovations in Anti-Corruption Activities (Regional Aspect)

    OpenAIRE

    Ludmila Stanislavovna Leontieva; Tatiana Viktorovna Khalilova; Liliana Faybergovna Gaynullina; Alexander Igorevich Khalilov

    2015-01-01

    The essence and character of implementation of social communications technologies in the process ofanti-corruption activities of organs of power and civil society have been analyzed. The authors based theirresearch on the social communications approach and the “Corruption formula” determined by R.Klitgaard.Based on the analysis of the results opinion surveys, dissatisfaction of the population with the outcomes ofanti-corruption policy carried out by the government, demand for transition from ...

  4. Fast, Broad, and Frequent: Campus Crisis Communications Today Demand Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, Billy

    2012-01-01

    The importance of communication during a school crisis has not changed in the 21st century. What has changed--and quite dramatically since 1999--is the way people communicate. Social media tools are now used in some form by 100 percent of all four-year universities in the United States as a way to reach students, according to a 2011 University of…

  5. Face to Facebook: Social Media and the Learning and Teaching Potential of Symmetrical, Synchronous Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDoorn, George; Eklund, Antoinette A.

    2013-01-01

    Social networking offers teachers and learners exciting opportunities to communicate. Web 2.0 and its synchronous communications platforms provide new avenues for teachers to deliver curriculum and facilitate learning. Further, they provide new avenues for students to engage and intensify their own learning. Being able to chat in real-time with a…

  6. Logging On, Bouncing Back: An Experimental Investigation of Online Communication following Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elisheva F.

    2009-01-01

    A majority of U.S. adolescents at least occasionally communicate on the Internet with unknown peers. This study tested the hypothesis that online communication with an unknown peer facilitates recovery from the acute aversive effects of social exclusion and examined whether this benefit may be greater for adolescents compared with young adults. A…

  7. Communication Disorders in the School: Perspectives on Academic and Social Success an Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Karen L.; Fletcher, Kathryn; Decker, Blair

    2008-01-01

    The critical role of communication in schools cannot be understated. Communication skills are a necessity both in the academic and social atmosphere of the school environment. Unfortunately, there are a large number of children in the schools today identified with speech and language disorders. This special edition of "Psychology in the Schools"…

  8. Product communication strategy driven by social network profiles : an experimental teaching module

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, J.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of an experimental teaching module on product communication strategy. The study aims to answer the question of how new social platforms such as Facebook can help in developing new strategies for product communication. Developing links between a product and consumer preferences. In this experimental learning module, students of the New Media Production course developed new strategies for product communication, identifying possible active archety...

  9. Making Global Publics? Communication and Knowledge Production in the World Social Forum Process

    OpenAIRE

    Stephansen, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    This thesis provides an in-depth empirical analysis of the character and significance of media and communication in the World Social Forum (WSF), focusing on their relationship to processes of knowledge production. Using the concept of publics as a theoretical tool, it explores how, through mediated communication, forum organisers and communication activists seek to extend the WSF in time and space and thereby make it public. Engaging critically with the idea of the WSF as a global process, t...

  10. Towards a Technology of Nonverbal Communication: Vocal Behavior in Social and Affective Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Vinciarelli, Alessandro; Mohammadi, Gelareh

    2010-01-01

    Nonverbal communication is the main channel through which we experience inner life of others, including their emotions, feelings, moods, social attitudes, etc. This attracts the interest of the computing community because nonverbal communication is based on cues like facial expressions, vocalizations, gestures, postures, etc. that we can perceive with our senses and can be (and often are) detected, analyzed and synthesized with automatic approaches. In other words, nonverbal communication can...

  11. Transformation of Traditional Marketing Communications in to Paradigms of Social Media Networking

    OpenAIRE

    nair, T. R. GopalaKrishnan; Subramaniam, Kumarashvari

    2012-01-01

    Effective Communication for marketing is a vital field in business organizations, which is used to convey the details about their products and services to the market segments and subsequently to build long lasting customer relationships. This paper focuses on an emerging component of the integrated marketing communication, ie. social media networking, as it is increasingly becoming the trend. In 21st century, the marketing communication platforms show a tendency to shift tow...

  12. Analysing ESL Students’ Perceptions towards Oral Communication for Social and Occupational Purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzilah Md Husain; Malini Ganapathy; Akmar Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental principles of public speaking and appropriate organisational structure of ideas for occupational and social communication are vital aspects for undergraduates as a pathway to overcome employers’ grievances on graduates’ lack of communication skills (Malaysia Education Blueprint, 2015). This study was undertaken to explore the perceptions of a group of ten students at a tertiary institution in Malaysia to see how they utlise the theories and practice of effective communication skil...

  13. Le langage dans les communications sociales quotidiennes: quelques perspectives actuelles (Language Use in Daily Social Communications: Some Current Perspectives).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Christian

    1980-01-01

    Common language usage is considered from four perspectives: "situational" linguistics and language, "natural language," linguistic interdisciplinarity with the social sciences, and common language as a "social technology," or subject of pedagogy. (MSE)

  14. Following Gandhi: Social Entrepreneurship as A Non-Violent Way of Communicating Sustainability Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ziegler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the Rio Earth Summit numerous international regimes, national policies and organizational guidelines have appeared that help translate the normative demands of sustainable development into political reality. The implementation of these instruments, however, often runs into difficulties or fails entirely. An example is the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD, a progressive approach for the conservation of freshwater that is very unlikely to be implemented by 2015, the target year. We examine in this paper how a recent variation of Gandhian non-violent communication within social entrepreneurship suggests one way to deal with this challenge. Non-violent communication, rooted in Gandhian social action, has long been part of environmental politics. It has undergone a new variation as a mode of communication in the hands of social entrepreneurship initiatives that address urgent social and environmental issues with new, practical ideas. In the conceptual part of this paper, we outline our approach to sustainability, non-violent communication and social entrepreneurship. In a further part, we present data from a trans-disciplinary experiment to illustrate and critically discuss social entrepreneurship as a mode of sustainability communication. The experiment looked at, which is based on French social entrepreneur Roberto Epple’s idea of a Big Jump, is a collaborative campaign that invites young people to take action for water conservation in the context of the WFD.

  15. Online Company-stakeholder Communication : Lessons from Vattenfall’s Social Media Campaign on Climate Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rikke Augustinus; Morsing, Mette

    Based on a systematic data collection we study one of the first pioneering company-stakeholder communication campaigns in social media: the case of energy company Vattenfall A/S’s pan-European campaign ‘The Climate Manifesto’. Our findings challenge the general assumption, that stakeholder interaction and dialogue on CSR issues is advanced in social media. Rather, our data shows how representatives from the corporate sector and civil society organizations repeat and reinforce their arguments with no amendments during the campaign. The analysis shows that constructive dialogue and interaction lacked between the company and stakeholders. Vattenfall was accused of green-washing, resulting in a communications crisis. Negative stakeholder reactions consisted of prejudiced and non-negotiable argumentation indicating that social media imposes new managerial challenges since communication processes are scaled up and bring on autonomous and legitimate sources of information, providing stakeholders with more power in terms of co-production of ‘the truth’, and more complex routes to corporate legitimacy compared to offline communication. We discuss assumptions about improved dialogue via social technologies and we question to what extent social media serve the enhancement of improved understandings across corporate and civil society on CSR issues. This paper suggests that managers face a risk of the “double-edge of stakeholder communication” when incorporating social media into their CSR strategies: companies need to expose themselves and engage in social media to improve stakeholder engagement, while they by this action also attract higher level of criticism.

  16. Being social when crisis knocks : Why and how companies use social media to communicate in a time of crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Wi?ckowska, Natalia Joanna; Danila, Roxana Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Over the past years communication patterns have been changing continuously due toincreased public demand for information and knowledge. Numerous social networks andwebsites have escalated and gained the attention of the academics and practitioners, as wellas the business society. Previously scholars researched this field of interest from differentperspectives. Thus it could be stated that the emphasis was put on the impact of the certainsocial media networks in terms of communication strategy...

  17. The persistence of social signatures in human communication

    CERN Document Server

    Saramaki, J; Lopez, E; Roberts, S G B; Reed-Tsochas, F; Dunbar, R I M

    2012-01-01

    The social brain hypothesis has suggested that social network size (and structure) is constrained by a combination of cognitive processes and the time required to service social relationships. We test this hypothesis in humans using a unique 18-month mobile phone dataset by examining changes in the structure of social networks across a major change in subjects' social and geographical circumstances. Our analysis reveals that the time allocation patterns of call frequency by participants to network members have a distinctive overall shape, where a small number of top-ranked network members received a disproportionately large fraction of calls, with some individual variation. However, importantly, whilst there was a large turnover of individual network members, these changes have little effect on the time allocation patterns of each individual: individuals thus displayed a distinctive "social signature" that was both persistent over time and independent of the identities of the network members. This provides th...

  18. Communication on Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development in France

    OpenAIRE

    Lassaad Ben Mahjoub; Khmaoussi Halioui

    2012-01-01

    France is located at the crossroads of major European cultural currents, between Northern Europe and the Mediterranean, his attention to the preservation of corporate social responsibility and sustainable development has evolved in recent years by taking several attempts and measures. Many studies were interested to evaluate the scope of social and environmental disclosure by using different measures; these criteria do not cover all features which can reflect all social and environmental conc...

  19. Attention on Weak Ties in Social and Communication Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Lilian; Karsai, Márton; Perra, Nicola; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Granovetter's weak tie theory of social networks is built around two central hypotheses. The first states that strong social ties carry the large majority of interaction events; the second maintains that weak social ties, although less active, are often relevant for the exchange of especially important information (e.g., about potential new jobs in Granovetter's work). While several empirical studies have provided support for the first hypothesis, the second has been the obj...

  20. School Communications 2.0: A Social Media Strategy for K-12 Principals and Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel Dean

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, multiple-case study was two-fold: 1) to describe, analyze, and interpret the experiences of school principals and superintendents who use multiple social media tools such as blogs, microblogs, social networking sites, podcasts, and online videos with stakeholders as part of their comprehensive communications…

  1. Connecting Content, Context, and Communication in a Sixth-Grade Social Studies Class through Political Cartoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavan, Nancy P.; Webster-Smith, Angela; Dean, Sheila S.

    2012-01-01

    Sixth-grade students are challenged in understanding social studies content relevant to particular contexts, then connecting the content and context to their contemporary lives while communicating new knowledge to peers and teachers. Using political cartoons published after September 11, 2001, one sixth-grade social studies teacher designed…

  2. Social Networks, Communication Styles, and Learning Performance in a CSCL Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hichang; Gay, Geri; Davidson, Barry; Ingraffea, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to empirically investigate the relationships between communication styles, social networks, and learning performance in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community. Using social network analysis (SNA) and longitudinal survey data, we analyzed how 31 distributed learners developed collaborative learning…

  3. The Impact of Modern Information and Communication Technologies on Social Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczny, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have empowered non-state social actors, notably, social movements. They were quick to seize ICTs in the past (printing presses, television, fax machines), which was a major factor in their successes. Mass email campaigns, blogs, their audio- and video- variants (the podcasts and the videocasts),…

  4. A Review of Information and Communication Technology Enhanced Social Work Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chitat; Holosko, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Information and communications technology (ICT) has impacted almost all human service disciplines and currently is evolving in social work. This study provides a systematic review of ICT-enhanced social work interventions, with particular reference to their intervention fidelity (IF), validity, and the role of ICT in the helping…

  5. Abordagem clínica e psicossocial das Lesões por Esforços Repetitivos LER / DORT / Clinical and psycho-social perspective of repetitive strain injuries RSI / WRMD

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Heleodório Honorato dos, Santos.

    Full Text Available Revisão bibliográfica, com abordagem clínica, psicológica e social dos problemas causados pelas Lesões por Esforços Repetitivos - LER, hoje melhor definidas como Distúrbio Osteomusculares Relacionados ao Trabalho - DORT. São discutidos neste texto, a sinonímia utilizada em toda a literatura pesquisa [...] da, alguns dados epidemiológicos, em nível mundial e nacional, quanto à distribuição da doença segundo algumas varáveis tais como: sexo, idade, tipo de atividade, tempo e localização anatômica das queixas, afastamento do trabalho etc. Além desses pontos, são enfocados estudos sobre fatores etiológicos e fisiopatológicos das LER / DORT. Por fim, buscou-se uma correlação entre todos estes fatores anteriormente citados e o psicossocial, pontuando os elementos que influenciam diretamente no aparecimento e/ou manutenção desta enfermidade multifatorial, salientado a importância da organização do trabalho na sua prevenção. Abstract in english This is a bibliographical revision work involving clinical, psychological and social disorders that are caused by the commonly known repetitive strain injuries (RSI) and better defined nowadays as Work-Related Musculo-skeletal Disease (WRMD). The synonymy used throughout the researched literature is [...] discussed in this text, together with some national and world-level epidemiological data concerning the distribution of the disease, listed in relation to some variables, such as: sex, age, type of activity, duration and location of anatomical complaints, absence from work, etc. Besides the above, studies were focused on the etiological and physio-pathological factors of RSI / WRMD, furthermore, efforts were made to establish a correlation between the aforementioned factors and psycho-social factors, pointing out the elements that directly influence the manifestation and / or maintenance of this multi-factorial infirmity, and the importance that work organization has in relation to its prevention.

  6. Social media and language learning: enhancing intercultural communicative competence

    OpenAIRE

    Le Baron-Earle, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have established that cultural openness is essential in language teaching. Indeed, it is believed that languages cannot be appropriately understood without appreciating the culture in which they are developed, and empathising with the people who communicate through them. However questions have been raised as to how to enhance awareness of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) most effectively. Teachers have implemented a number of educational methods with the aim to promote...

  7. Communication Learning in Social Networks: Finite Population and the Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Jianqing; Tong, Xin; Zeng, Yao

    2012-01-01

    Following the Bayesian communication learning paradigm, we propose a finite population learning concept to capture the level of information aggregation in any given network, where agents are allowed to communicate with neighbors repeatedly before making a single decision. This concept helps determine the occurrence of effective information aggregation in a finite network and reveals explicit interplays among parameters. It also enables meaningful comparative statics regardin...

  8. Second language social networks and communication-related acculturative stress: the role of interconnectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucerain, Marina M.; Varnaamkhaasti, Raheleh S.; Segalowitz, Norman; Ryder, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Although a substantial amount of cross-cultural psychology research has investigated acculturative stress in general, little attention has been devoted specifically to communication-related acculturative stress (CRAS). In line with the view that cross-cultural adaptation and second language (L2) learning are social and interpersonal phenomena, the present study examines the hypothesis that migrants’ L2 social network size and interconnectedness predict CRAS. The main idea underlying this hypothesis is that L2 social networks play an important role in fostering social and cultural aspects of communicative competence. Specifically, higher interconnectedness may reflect greater access to unmodified natural cultural representations and L2 communication practices, thus fostering communicative competence through observational learning. As such, structural aspects of migrants’ L2 social networks may be protective against acculturative stress arising from chronic communication difficulties. Results from a study of first generation migrant students (N = 100) support this idea by showing that both inclusiveness and density of the participants’ L2 network account for unique variance in CRAS but not in general acculturative stress. These results support the idea that research on cross-cultural adaptation would benefit from disentangling the various facets of acculturative stress and that the structure of migrants’ L2 network matters for language related outcomes. Finally, this study contributes to an emerging body of work that attempts to integrate cultural/cross-cultural research on acculturation and research on intercultural communication and second language learning. PMID:26300809

  9. Second language social networks and communication-related acculturative stress: the role of interconnectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucerain, Marina M; Varnaamkhaasti, Raheleh S; Segalowitz, Norman; Ryder, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Although a substantial amount of cross-cultural psychology research has investigated acculturative stress in general, little attention has been devoted specifically to communication-related acculturative stress (CRAS). In line with the view that cross-cultural adaptation and second language (L2) learning are social and interpersonal phenomena, the present study examines the hypothesis that migrants' L2 social network size and interconnectedness predict CRAS. The main idea underlying this hypothesis is that L2 social networks play an important role in fostering social and cultural aspects of communicative competence. Specifically, higher interconnectedness may reflect greater access to unmodified natural cultural representations and L2 communication practices, thus fostering communicative competence through observational learning. As such, structural aspects of migrants' L2 social networks may be protective against acculturative stress arising from chronic communication difficulties. Results from a study of first generation migrant students (N = 100) support this idea by showing that both inclusiveness and density of the participants' L2 network account for unique variance in CRAS but not in general acculturative stress. These results support the idea that research on cross-cultural adaptation would benefit from disentangling the various facets of acculturative stress and that the structure of migrants' L2 network matters for language related outcomes. Finally, this study contributes to an emerging body of work that attempts to integrate cultural/cross-cultural research on acculturation and research on intercultural communication and second language learning. PMID:26300809

  10. Social Media for School Communication. Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    It's easy to dismiss social media as a fascination of young people but to do so minimizes one of the fastest growing trends in technology. The Pew Internet and American Life Project recently found that over 71% of teens have a Facebook profile and 75% of adults have one too. Social media tools have become the way for a school or business to…

  11. Communicating Social Support to Grieving Clients: The Veterinarians' View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgram, Mary D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines veterinarians' perceptions of how they offer social support to grieving clients. Because many clients cannot find the social support they would like from other sources when grieving the death of a pet, the role of the vet in offering support becomes increasingly important. The results indicate that vets perceive…

  12. Communication on Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassaad Ben Mahjoub

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available France is located at the crossroads of major European cultural currents, between Northern Europe and the Mediterranean, his attention to the preservation of corporate social responsibility and sustainable development has evolved in recent years by taking several attempts and measures. Many studies were interested to evaluate the scope of social and environmental disclosure by using different measures; these criteria do not cover all features which can reflect all social and environmental concerns.We attempt to determine the level of corporate social responsibility disclosure in France by a new measure; it takes the form of an index; for this, we use a content analysis of annual reports in order to evaluate the items which describe the impact of firm activity on environment and community.Our findings show an acceptable level of social and environmental disclosure, in French companies, compared to others studies.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.61.3.1393

  13. Identical or Just Compatible? The Utility of Corporate Identity Values in Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmeltz, Line

    2014-01-01

    This study explores whether companies embracing a corporate social responsibility agenda have a strategic focus on adapting and aligning their value systems to reflect such commitment. The analysis is based on empirical data and a conceptual model juxtaposing corporate values, corporate social responsibility values, and implementation to capture how the different configurations of these aspects may impact the communication carried out by corporations. The findings indicate that the companies in the data sample operate with two markedly different value systems. The coexistence of two value systems is discussed in relation to the reported difficulties that companies experience when facing the new and complex challenge of communicating corporate social responsibility.

  14. Using social media to communicate child health information to low-income parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroever, Stephanie J; Mackert, Michael S; McAlister, Alfred L; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the value of using social media to communicate child health information to low-income parents. We evaluated qualitative data obtained through focus groups with low-income, predominantly Hispanic parents. Results were mixed; lack of time and credibility were the primary objections parents cited in using social media to obtain information about their children's health. Social media has value as part of an overall communication strategy, but more work is needed to determine the most effective way to use this channel in low-income populations. PMID:22005641

  15. Web 2.0 and Network Society : -PR and Communication: The Challenge of Online Social Networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Tandefelt, Max

    2008-01-01

    Abstract As online social network services are becoming one of the dominant media channels the importance of disseminating messages through them is of high importance for governments, organizations, companies etc. The online social network services are several and changes rapidly as they grow and evolve. Being networks, the services give the user the tools to send, as well as receive text and information. This proposes us with yet another obstacle in communication via online social network se...

  16. The Impact of Social Interaction and Communications on Innovation in the Architectural Design Studio

    OpenAIRE

    Bhzad Sidawi

    2012-01-01

    Design is a social phenomenon and researchers suggest that social interaction, negotiations and communication between designers are essential to initiate creativity. Within the design studio environment, a number of factors affect the healthy social interaction and design negotiations, such as the teaching style of tutors and the culture that governs a design studio’s environment. This may in turn affect the utilization of the outcome of negotiations in the design project. Design studio stude...

  17. Engaging Action : A Systemic Approach to Communication Design of Social Marketing Campaigns for Behaviour Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Rebecca; Metanchuk, Larysa; Marshall, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Shifting towards sustainability in environmental, social and economic systems is an urgent concern for society today. In order to contribute to this, the thesis focuses on behaviour orientated social marketing campaigns, which can complement the broader changes required. This study adds knowledge to communication design for social marketing campaigns to improve the conversion of information to action helping move society towards a more sustainable future. Results, drawn from the literature, c...

  18. Analysis of Retailers’Communication Approaches in Sustainability and Social Responsibility Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Mejri, Mohamed; De Wolf, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Following the emergence of stakeholders’ societal awareness, retailers adopted different types of social actions and have recently begun to publish social reports to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and social responsibility in order to be perceived as good corporate citizens.The purpose of this paper is to analyze and to discuss approaches adopted by retailers in communicating about their societal commitment through their non-financial reports.Using a qualitative methodology, w...

  19. Unpacking Social Media’s Role in Resource Provision: Variations across Relational and Communicative Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Vitak

    2014-01-01

    New information and communication technologies (ICTs) challenge existing beliefs regarding the exchange of social resources within a network. The present study examines individuals’ perceived access to social, emotional, and instrumental resources by analyzing relational and Facebook-specific characteristics of dyadic relationships. Results suggest that the social and technical affordances of the site—including visibility of content and connections, as well as streamlined processes for intera...

  20. Social Function and Communication in Optimal Outcome Children and Adolescents with an Autism History on Structured Test Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orinstein, Alyssa J.; Suh, Joyce; Porter, Kaitlyn; De Yoe, Kaitlin A.; Tyson, Katherine E.; Troyb, Eva; Barton, Marianne L.; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Stevens, Michael C.; Fein, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Youth who lose their ASD diagnosis may have subtle social and communication difficulties. We examined social and communication functioning in 44 high-functioning autism (HFA), 34 optimal outcome (OO) and 34 typically developing (TD) youth. Results indicated that OO participants had no autism communication symptoms, no pragmatic language deficits,…

  1. Transformations of the Political Communication in Social Media Era – from Mediatization to Decentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T?nase Tasente

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The political communication in media era performs on two dimensions: the horizontal dimension – between political actors and journalists – and on vertical dimension – the media product is decentralized to the consumer public. In Social Media Era, the horizontal dimension completely disappears and the communication is routed by the online opinion leaders in the social groups. Thus, in the new public space, the main communication actors are not journalists and politicians, but publicreceptor, which plays the role of opinion leaders. In Social Media, we can talk a lot about “the power of the receptor”, that is decentralizing, without intermediaries, the political message to discuss it in the social groups to which they belong.

  2. Gestures and social-emotional communicative development in chimpanzee infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Kim A; Dunbar, Sophie; Maguire-Herring, Vanessa; Veira, Yvette; Hayes, Kathryn G; McDonald, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Communicative skills of chimpanzees are of significant interest across many domains, such as developmental psychology (how does communication emerge in prelinguistic beings?), evolution (e.g., did human language evolve from primate gestures?), and in comparative psychology (how does the nonverbal communication of chimpanzees and humans compare?). Here we ask about how gestures develop in chimpanzee infants (n = 16) that were raised in an interactive program designed to study skill development. Data on socio-communicative development were collected following 4 hr of daily interaction with each infant, longitudinally from birth through the first year of life. A consistent and significant developmental pattern was found across the contexts of tickle play, grooming, and chase play: Infant chimpanzees first engaged in interactions initiated by others, then they initiated interactions, and finally, they requested others to join them in the interaction. Gestures were documented for initiating and requesting tickle play, for initiating and requesting grooming, and for initiating and requesting chase play. Gestural requests emerged significantly later than gestural initiations, but the age at which gestures emerged was significantly different across contexts. Those gestures related to hierarchical rank relations, that is, gestures used by subordinates in interaction with more dominant individuals, such as wrist presenting and rump presenting, did not emerge in the same manner as the other gestures. This study offers a new view on the development of gestures, specifically that many develop through interaction and communicate socio-emotional desires, but that not all gestures emerge in the same manner. PMID:24038115

  3. Pro-social 50-kHz ultrasonic communication in rats: post-weaning but not post-adolescent social isolation leads to social impairments—phenotypic rescue by re-socialization

    OpenAIRE

    Seffer, Dominik; Rippberger, Henrike; Schwarting, Rainer K.W.; Wöhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rats are highly social animals and social play during adolescence has an important role for social development, hence post-weaning social isolation is widely used to study the adverse effects of juvenile social deprivation and to induce behavioral phenotypes relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia. Communication is an important component of the rat's social behavior repertoire, with ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) serving as situation-dependent affective signals. High-freque...

  4. Improving the Social Communication Competence of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    A repeated measures design was used to investigate the effect of group intervention on the teaching of partner-focused questions to people who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and the perceived communicative competence before and after intervention of the AAC users. Six participants who had severe speech impairments…

  5. Inferring social status and rich club effects in enterprise communication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuxiao; Tang, Jie; Chawla, Nitesh V; Lou, Tiancheng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Social status, defined as the relative rank or position that an individual holds in a social hierarchy, is known to be among the most important motivating forces in social behaviors. In this paper, we consider the notion of status from the perspective of a position or title held by a person in an enterprise. We study the intersection of social status and social networks in an enterprise. We study whether enterprise communication logs can help reveal how social interactions and individual status manifest themselves in social networks. To that end, we use two enterprise datasets with three communication channels--voice call, short message, and email--to demonstrate the social-behavioral differences among individuals with different status. We have several interesting findings and based on these findings we also develop a model to predict social status. On the individual level, high-status individuals are more likely to be spanned as structural holes by linking to people in parts of the enterprise networks that are otherwise not well connected to one another. On the community level, the principle of homophily, social balance and clique theory generally indicate a "rich club" maintained by high-status individuals, in the sense that this community is much more connected, balanced and dense. Our model can predict social status of individuals with 93% accuracy. PMID:25822343

  6. Communication Learning in Social Networks: Finite Population and the Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Jianqing; Zeng, Yao

    2012-01-01

    Following the Bayesian communication learning paradigm, we propose a finite population learning concept to capture the level of information aggregation in any given network, where agents are allowed to communicate with neighbors repeatedly before making a single decision. This concept helps determine the occurrence of effective information aggregation in a finite network and reveals explicit interplays among parameters. It also enables meaningful comparative statics regarding the effectiveness of information aggregation in networks. Moreover, it offers a solid foundation to address, with a new perfect learning concept, long run dynamics of learning behavior and the associated learning rates as population diverges. Our conditions for the occurrence of finite population learning and perfect learning in communication networks are very tractable and transparent.

  7. STor: Social Network based Anonymous Communication in Tor

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Peng; Chen, Ang; Chang, Rocky K C

    2011-01-01

    Anonymity networks hide user identities with the help of relayed anonymity routers. However, the state-of-the-art anonymity networks do not provide an effective trust model. As a result, users cannot circumvent malicious or vulnerable routers, thus making them susceptible to malicious router based attacks (e.g., correlation attacks). In this paper, we propose a novel social network based trust model to help anonymity networks circumvent malicious routers and obtain secure anonymity. In particular, we design an input independent fuzzy model to determine trust relationships between friends based on qualitative and quantitative social attributes, both of which can be readily obtained from existing social networks. Moreover, we design an algorithm for propagating trust over an anonymity network. We integrate these two components in STor, a novel social network based Tor. We have implemented STor by modifying the Tor's source code and conducted experiments on PlanetLab to evaluate the effectiveness of STor. Both s...

  8. Attention on Weak Ties in Social and Communication Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Lilian; Perra, Nicola; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Granovetter's weak tie theory of social networks is built around two central hypotheses. The first states that strong social ties carry the large majority of interaction events; the second maintains that weak social ties, although less active, are often relevant for the exchange of especially important information (e.g., about potential new jobs in Granovetter's work). While several empirical studies have provided support for the first hypothesis, the second has been the object of far less scrutiny. A possible reason is that it involves notions relative to the nature and importance of the information that are hard to quantify and measure, especially in large scale studies. Here, we search for empirical validation of both Granovetter's hypotheses. We find clear empirical support for the first. We also provide empirical evidence and a quantitative interpretation for the second. We show that attention, measured as the fraction of interactions devoted to a particular social connection, is high on weak ties --- po...

  9. Teaching Social Communication Skills Using a Cool versus Not Cool Procedure plus Role-Playing and a Social Skills Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Taubman, Mitchell; Milne, Christine; Dale, Stephanie; Leaf, Jeremy; Townley-Cochran, Donna; Tsuji, Kathleen; Kassardjian, Alyne; Alcalay, Aditt; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing to teach social communication skills to three individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing consisted of the researcher randomly demonstrating the behavior correctly (cool) two times and the behavior incorrectly (not cool) two…

  10. Ethics, Social Media and Mass Self-Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Vaagan, Robert Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Un modèle révisé de l’éthique en matière d’information est présenté. Il peut s’avérer utile dans l’analyse des défis éthiques, dans ce que Manuel Castells décrit comme un système émergent d’"auto-communication de masse" dans lequel les media sociaux jouent un rôle-clé. Le modèle identifie trois sources ou spécificités de notre ère de l’information qui débouchent sur cinq problèmes éthiques liés à cinq droits individuels. Alors que le système d’auto-communication de masse est envisag...

  11. Communicative participation restrictions in multiple sclerosis: Associated variables and correlation with social functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Baylor, Carolyn; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) are at risk for communication problems that may restrict their ability to take participation in important life roles such as maintenance of relationships, work, or household management. The aim of this project is to examine selected demographic and symptom-related variables that may contribute to participation restrictions. This examination is intended to aid clinicians in predicting who might be at risk for such restrictions and what variables may be targeted in interventions. Community-dwelling adults with MS (n = 216) completed a survey either online or using paper forms. The survey included the 46-item version of the Communicative Participation Item Bank, demographics (age, sex, living situation, employment status, education, and time since onset of diagnosis of MS), and self-reported symptom-related variables (physical activity, emotional problems, fatigue, pain, speech severity, and cognitive/communication skills). In order to identify predictors of restrictions in communicative participation, these variables were entered into a backwards stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Five variables (cognitive/communication skills, speech severity, speech usage, physical activity, and education) were statistically significant predictors of communication participation. In order to examine the relationship of communicative participation and social role variables, bivariate Spearman correlations were conducted. Results suggest only a fair to moderate relationship between communicative participation and measures of social roles. Communicative participation is a complex construct associated with a number of self-reported variables. Clinicians should be alert to risk factors for reduced communicative participation including reduced cognitive and speech skills, lower levels of speech usage, limitations in physical activities and higher levels of education. Learning outcomes The reader will be able to: (a) describe the factors that may restrict participation in individuals with multiple sclerosis; (b) list measures of social functioning that may be pertinent in adults with multiple sclerosis; (c) discuss factors that can be used to predict communicative participation in multiple sclerosis. PMID:24947986

  12. A Comparison between the Occurrence of Pauses, Repetitions and Recasts under Conditions of Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Communication: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaroglu, Nese; Basaran, Suleyman; Roberts, Jon

    2010-01-01

    This study compares pauses, repetitions and recasts in matched task interactions under face-to-face and computer-mediated conditions. Six first-year English undergraduates at a Turkish University took part in Skype-based voice chat with a native speaker and face-to-face with their instructor. Preliminary quantitative analysis of transcripts showed…

  13. Social Media as a strategic tool for Corporate Communication/ Los Medios Sociales como una herramienta estratégica para la Comunicación Corporativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivette Soto Velez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Companies around the globe are embracing and adapting social media for many differentintentions: customer service, marketing, internal communications, public relations orcorporate social responsibility, etc. It is now a reality that social media is channging the waystakeholders and companies communicate daily, providing opportunities for collaboration,participation, interactivity, and engagement. Therefore, social media is conceived today inthe corporate world as a strategic communication partner, driving new and uniquepossibilities for organizations to engage stakeholders in conversations. We are witnesses of anew digital era where consumers are becoming active users rather than passive individuals,changing dramatically how society operates. But these useful technological tools areemployed widely and precisely by corporations in order to facilitate and improvecommunications? This research aims to discover the usage of different social mediaplatforms by Puerto Rican companies. A content analysis was performed to the Facebookand Twitter official profiles of the top 400 locally owned Puerto Rican companies of 2009.The principal objective was to find if social media sites were mainly used as a strategic toolfor corporate communication that can enhance stakeholder participation and engagement.Results showed that Puerto Rican companies are not employing social media platforms forimproving communications with different stakeholders, failing to take advantage of theenormous possibilities that social media has for communication./Compañías alrededor del mundo están utilizando los medios sociales para diferentespropósitos: servicio al cliente, mercadeo, comunicaciones internas, relaciones públicas oresponsabilidad social corporativa, etc. Hoy en día es una realidad que los medios socialesestán cambiando la manera en que se comunican las compañías con los distintos públicos deinterés, trayendo consigo oportunidades para la colaboración, el intercambio de ideas, laparticipación y el compromiso. En la actualidad los medios sociales son concebidos en elmundo corporativo como un socio estratégico comunicativo, brindando oportunidadesnuevas y únicas para el fomento de un diálogo efectivo con diferentes públicos. Somostestigos de una nueva era digital donde los consumidores se están convirtiendo en usuariosactivos en vez de permanecer como individuos pasivos, cambiando así dramáticamentecómo la sociedad opera. Pero, ¿son los medios sociales utilizados ampliamente por lasempresas con el fin de facilitar y mejorar las comunicaciones? Esta investigación pretendedescubrir el uso que las empresas puertorriqueñas le dan a las distintas plataformas demedios sociales. Un análisis de contenido fue realizado a las páginas oficiales de Facebook yTwitter de las 400 mejores empresas locales de Puerto Rico del año 2009. El objetivoprincipal fue descubrir si los medios sociales son utilizados principalmente como unaherramienta estratégica para la comunicación corporativa, fomentando así la participaciónde distintos públicos en conversaciones. Los resultados encontrados indican que lascompañías puertorriqueñas no utilizan los medios sociales para el fomento de lacomunicación con sus distintos públicos de interés, fallando en tomar ventaja de losenormes beneficios que los medios sociales ofrecen para la comunicación.

  14. The Communication Process Mediated by Information Technologies. Advantages and Disadvantages in Various Spheres of Social Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Molina Gómez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Communication has marked human evolution over time. Human beings have always felt the need to search, find, and have access to the information generated, expressed and transmitted by others. Generation, search and acquisition of information are thus essential to human nature. Perhaps for this reason, the great evolutionary leaps of mankind have as milestone the introduction of a new communication tool. This process has been marked in the last hundred years by large and profound technological changes, which open up endless communication possibilities and influence social life in a decisive manner. The behavior of social groups and their attitudes are not currently conceived without the existence of the modern media, which has brought the people of the world together. Consequently, it is understandable that the technological revolution in communications influence people’s behavior. This paper aims to analyze the communication process mediated by technologies in different spheres of social life, based on the premise that technologies have changed the modes of communication between humans and therefore their social life.

  15. Beyond ATS-6: Social Uses of Communications Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Douglass

    A panel discussion was held to examine the efficacy of the Applications Technology Satellites, powerful communication satellites designed to send quality signals to low-cost ground terminals. The satellites have been used on an experimental basis in rural America, Canada, and India. While the panel generally agreed on the great potential of the…

  16. Students' Orientation towards Interpersonal Communication in Online Social Networking Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayode, Bakare Kazeem; Zamzami, Ikhlas F.; Olowolayemo, Akeem

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As computer-mediated communication has diffused, successive technological variations raise new questions about interpersonal impressions and several standardized instruments have been advanced in literature to asses various aspect of interpersonal attraction phenomena. The purpose of this paper is to examine the claims for reliability and…

  17. Critical Communicative Methodology: Informing Real Social Transformation through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Aitor; Puigvert, Lidia; Flecha, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    The critical communicative methodology (CCM) is a methodological response to the dialogic turn of societies and sciences that has already had an important impact in transforming situations of inequality and exclusion. Research conducted with the CCM implies continuous and egalitarian dialogue among researchers and the people involved in the…

  18. Social Modulation of Associative Fear Learning by Pheromone Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredy, Timothy W.; Barad, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Mice communicate through visual, vocal, and olfactory cues that influence innate, nonassociative behavior. We here report that exposure to a recently fear-conditioned familiar mouse impairs acquisition of conditioned fear and facilitates fear extinction, effects mimicked by both an olfactory chemosignal emitted by a recently fear-conditioned…

  19. Semiochemicals of Social Insects: From Communication to Defence.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valterová, Irena

    Seoul : The Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry, 2012, s. 84-86. [2012 International Symposium and Annual Meeting of the KSABC. Gwangju (KR), 08.11.2012-10.11.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : insect communication * insect defence * pheromones Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  20. MARKETING COMMUNICATION IN ONLINE SOCIAL PROGRAMS: OHANIAN MODEL OF SOURCE CREDIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serban Corina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of the Internet as a medium for interaction with customers has resulted in many changes regarding the promotion of organizations. Online marketing is nowadays used not only to sell a product on the market, but also requires ideas and behavioral change. Non-profit organizations active in online communication are based on the quality of their provided information. Crediblity, attractiveness and usefullness are the key elements that provide effective online social programs. This paper aims to extend the scope of research in the field of social marketing by studying the Ohanian model in the online environment. The goal is to highlight the important theories and social models intrinsic to the online non-profit organizations’ communication. The results show that the efficiency of social programs depends on the level of incorporated elements of social theories in the design, content and structure of the website.

  1. Repetition Reduction: Lexical Repetition in the Absence of Referent Repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to words that are new to a discourse, repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because, in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and…

  2. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Drew P. Cingel; Alexis R. Lauricella; Ellen Wartella; Annie Conway

    2014-01-01

    Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive com-munication practices on Fa...

  3. De l'imparfait du subjonctif aux methodes communicatives (The Move from the Imperfect Subjunctive to Communicative Methods).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debyser, Francis

    1985-01-01

    The communicative approach has brought second language instruction a long way from strict grammar-oriented pedagogy, carrying with it a return to meaning, less repetition, emphasis on the learner, and attention to the social and pragmatic aspects of communication. (MSE)

  4. Communicating invasion: understanding social anxieties around mobile species

    OpenAIRE

    Ernwein, Marion; Juliet J. Fall

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how discourses of threat concerning invasive alien species emerge and how ordinary citizens understand, receive and appropriate them. It explores the ambivalence of scientists and policy-makers using emotive or highly charged terms and vocabulary, arguing that many make strategic yet cautious use of fear to raise awareness. Based both on in-depth interviews of scientists and/or expert policy-makers involved in communicating with the public about invasive species, as well...

  5. Optimizing employee engagement with internal communication: A social exchange perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Karanges, Emma Ruth; Beatson, Amanda; Johnston, Kim; Lings, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Employee engagement is linked to higher productivity, lower attrition, and improved organizational reputations resulting in increased focus and resourcing by managers to foster an engaged workforce. While drivers of employee engagement have been identified as perceived support, job characteristics, and value congruence, internal communication is theoretically suggested to be a key influence in both the process and maintenance of employee engagement efforts. However, understanding the mechanis...

  6. Using Social Media Sentiment Analysis to Understand Audiences : A New Skill for Technical Communicators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, Mark; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Social media communication is changing the opportunities for technical communicators to really understand audiences when these audiences are active about issues on social media platforms. Through applying ad-hoc corpus building processes to create word lists relevant to specific organizational projects, technical communicators can listen to their external users and identify areas of importance with greater accuracy. While other methods of sentiment analysis look for a solution that leads to artificial intelligence in the program, this paper identifies the present needs of a human interaction approach for contextually understanding social media posts. The human interaction step in ad-hoc corpus analysis is central to this methodology as it provides a means to ask critical questions of the content curated through the ad-hoc corpus directly. Results of ad-hoc corpus analysis from this critical lens can build upon organizational knowledge about ways in which their technologies are received and users perceive theorganization.

  7. Good Communication: The Other Social Network for Successful IT Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubitt, Lisa; Overholtzer, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Social networks of the electronic variety have become thoroughly embedded in contemporary culture. People have woven these networks into their daily routines, using Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, online gaming environments, and other tools to build and maintain complex webs of professional and personal relationships. Chief Information Officers…

  8. Intencionalidade comunicativa: teorias e implicações para a cognição social infantil / Communicative intentionality: theories and implications for infant social cognition

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fabíola de Sousa Braz, Aquino; Nádia Maria Ribeiro, Salomão.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Esse artigo explora a questão da intencionalidade comunicativa dos bebês e a aquisição dessa habilidade no primeiro ano de vida. Apresenta pontos de vista teóricos acerca dessa temática, pesquisas que assinalam a dimensão sociocomunicativa da linguagem, suas contribuições para a cognição social infa [...] ntil, e o papel do adulto na coconstrução dessa habilidade. Destaca, ainda, a relação estreita entre intenção comunicativa e contextos triádicos, os diferentes pontos de vista acerca do momento evolutivo em que surgem tais habilidades e as nuances na investigação dos atos comunicativos infantis, principalmente quando tais atos incorporam o elemento intencional. Abstract in english This paper explores babies' communicative intentionality and the acquisition of this ability in the first year of life. It presents a theoretical discussion of this theme, looking at research that points to the social-communicative dimension of language and its relevance to the child's social cognit [...] ion, as well as the adult's role in developing this ability. It also emphasizes the narrow relationship between triadic contexts and communicative intention, the different points of view on the evolutional moments in which this ability emerges and the nuances of the investigation into the infant's acts of communication, mainly when such acts incorporate the intentional element.

  9. A South African university-practitioner partnership to strengthen capacity in social and behaviour change communication

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola J. Christofides; Sara Nieuwoudt; Shereen Usdin; Susan Goldstein; Sharon Fonn

    2013-01-01

    Globally, communication plays an integral role in public health strategies, from infectious diseases to diseases related to lifestyles. The evolution of the field of social and behaviour change communication (SBCC), combined with the need for evidence based practice and multi-level interventions to promote health, and human resource gaps in sub-Saharan Africa have led to the imperative to standardise and formalise the field. Moreover, current practitioners come from different disciplinary bac...

  10. DiscoverFriends: Secure Social Network Communication in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eric,; Joy, Joshua; Gerla, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a secure communication application called DiscoverFriends. Its purpose is to communicate to a group of online friends while bypassing their respective social networking servers under a mobile ad hoc network environment. DiscoverFriends leverages Bloom filters and a hybrid encryption technique with a self-organized public-key management scheme to securely identify friends and provide authentication. Firstly, Bloom filters provide a space-efficient means of security for frie...

  11. Communication and Social Deficits in Relatives of Individuals with SLI and Relatives of Individuals with ASD

    OpenAIRE

    Pickles, Andrew; St Clair, Michelle C.; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate two aspects of the autism triad, communication and social difficulties, in relatives of specific language impairment (SLI) probands (with and without additional autistic symptomatology) as compared to relatives of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Down’s syndrome (DS) probands. Findings involving 726 first degree relatives of 85 SLI, 99 ASD and 36 DS probands revealed a higher rate of communication difficulties in relatives of both subgroups of SLI probands compared to ASD and...

  12. Assessing the marketing potential of communicating corporate social responsibility of a supply chain: method and application

    OpenAIRE

    Verhees, F.J.H.M.; Kuipers, A.; M.T.G Meulenberg

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This article provides a method to assess the marketing potential of communicating corporate social responsibility of (agricultural) supply chains. The willingness of small firms in agricultural supply chains to make available information about certain dimensions of CSR is measured and combined with the dimensions of CSR that are important for consumers. This will identify the CSR dimensions that are easiest to communicate and which are most needed by consumers. Moreover, small firms...

  13. Communication strategies for corporate social responsibility of luxury brands :how to create harmony in a paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Kathuria, Vaishali Lara

    2013-01-01

    The research question of this master thesis is how luxury brands can communicate their corporate social responsibility. The assumption that this thesis relies upon is that communication of CSR in the luxury industry is more challenging compared to other industries, because of the conflicting core values of the two. To situate this current study in a context, the literature review includes a chapter on CSR and on luxury respectively. In order to answer the research question at hand, I identify...

  14. Social Communication of Children Younger School Age in the Digital Era

    OpenAIRE

    Supsakova, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    The Internet, a new phenomenon of the global information infrastructure and access to information, was born in the seventies of the last century and began to affect significantly the way we communicate, collect and share information. Nowadays, it penetrated to new dimensions of its development, as developing multimedia technologies and content (Web 2.0), as well as new phenomenal contacts: mobile communications (mobile phones, smart phones, tablets) and social networks (Facebook, Twitter and ...

  15. New Tech, New Ties: : How mobile communication is reshaping social cohesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ling, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The message of this book is simple: the mobile phone strengthens social bonds among family and friends. With a traditional land-line telephone, we place calls to a location and ask hopefully if someone is "there"; with a mobile phone, we have instant and perpetual access to friends and family regardless of where they are. But when we are engaged in these intimate conversations with absent friends, what happens to our relationship with the people who are actually in the same room with us? In New Tech, New Ties, Rich Ling examines how the mobile telephone affects both kinds of interactions—those mediated by mobile communication and those that are face to face. Ling finds that through the use of various social rituals the mobile telephone strengthens social ties within the circle of friends and family—sometimes at the expense of interaction with those who are physically present—and creates what he calls "bounded solidarity." Ling argues that mobile communication helps to engender and develop social cohesion within the family and the peer group. Drawing on the work of Emile Durkheim, Erving Goffman, and Randall Collins, Ling shows that ritual interaction is a catalyst for the development of social bonding. From this perspective, he examines how mobile communication affects face-to-face ritual situations and how ritual is used in interaction mediated by mobile communication. He looks at the evidence, including interviews and observations from around the world, that documents the effect of mobile communication on social bonding and also examines some of the other possibly problematic issues raised by tighter social cohesion in small groups.

  16. Second Life: A Strong Communication Tool in Social Networking and Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Gajendra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to present different communication methods in Second Life virtual world, its implication on social networking, business and future scope. The current study is a review of various literatures relating to social networking, virtual community, virtual reality and online business in Second Life. The study has shown the strong and competitive advantages of Second Life among other virtual worlds and the contributions it has made on real life through communication and its impact on social networking and online business opportunities in virtual environment. The outcome of the findings have real world implication and useful to policy makers, managers and leaders for sharing information and decision making. The Second Life virtual environment based on web 2.0 technology has opened a wide platform on social, behavioral and information system research.

  17. Social Pressures and Mobile Communication Technology: Preliminary Understanding of Two Factor Analyses over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sutanto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from social perspectives, this proposed study reports factor analyses and regression results from two sample sets collected over time, and seeks to shed light on how social forces might affect the adoption behavior of rapidly growing mobile communication technology. On the one hand, similarities of those factor analyses suggest that a call for attention to social factors that are commonly lacking in the existing body of IT adoption literature is needed. On the other hand, disparities between regression results imply that adoption behavior over time might be more complicated than what was previously understood or anticipated. However, further evidence is needed to validate such assertion that was not concluded in indecisive regression results. As mobile communication technology penetrates the global knowledge economy, further understanding of how social factors influence user adoption behavior could help contribute to the greater IT business and research practice worldwide.

  18. STor: Social Network based Anonymous Communication in Tor

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU, Peng; Luo, Xiapu; Chen, Ang; Rocky K. C. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Anonymity networks hide user identities with the help of relayed anonymity routers. However, the state-of-the-art anonymity networks do not provide an effective trust model. As a result, users cannot circumvent malicious or vulnerable routers, thus making them susceptible to malicious router based attacks (e.g., correlation attacks). In this paper, we propose a novel social network based trust model to help anonymity networks circumvent malicious routers and obtain secure anonymity. In partic...

  19. Social Media: a way of activism in digital marketing communication

    OpenAIRE

    Irene García Medina; Pedro Alvaro Pereira Correia

    2012-01-01

    Hoje, as mídias sociais são a nova forma de ativismo em comunicação de marketing digital. As empresas não são mais os donos exclusivos da relação dos consumidores com seus produtos / serviços; em vez disso, a sobrevivência das organizações depende da utilização efetiva dos meios de comunicação social. Os consumidores confiam nas outras pessoas para fornecer recomendações sobre produtos e serviços de uma forma muito ativa, e é importante saber como e porque as mídias sociais influenciam as org...

  20. Information and Communication Technologies, the public library and social exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Dutch, Martin; Muddiman, Dave

    2000-01-01

    This paper seeks to locate public library efforts to address social exclusion within the wider debate about the transition to an “information” society and UK public policy responses to this. It notes, first of all, that utopian perspectives on information societies have little basis in reality and serve only to obscure a widening “digital divide”. It is suggested that UK government policy, whilst to some degree recognising this problem, has focussed on labour market led responses to it, based...

  1. Social Action through Educational Strategies: Ethics and the Election of Communication Etudies in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep-Lluís del OLMO-ARRIAGA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of social action through educational strategies inspires the weight of ethic factors to choose Communication studies. It allows aprioristic data about the ethics in the future journalists and mass media professionals. It also collaborates in the marketing strategies. In our study we analyze the impact of ethics and values in the students’ choice of Communication studies in the Spanish University. We analyze the impact degree of ethics and Christian values in the selection process. We observe a high influence of ethics (humanistic and holistic ethics in the training, religious orientation as a factor considered to select the Communication studies.

  2. Modeling self-organization of communication and topology in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rosvall, M

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a model of self-organization between communication and topology in social networks, with a feedback between different communication habits and the topology. To study this feedback, we let agents communicate to build a perception of a network and use this information to create strategic links. We observe a narrow distribution of links when the communication is low and a system with a broad distribution of links when the communication is high. We also analyze the outcome of chatting, cheating, and lying, as strategies to get better access to information in the network. Chatting, although only adopted by a few agents, gives a global gain in the system. Contrary, a global loss is inevitable in a system with too many liars

  3. Signaling and Reciprocity: Robust Decentralized Information Flows in Social, Communication, and Computer Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Galuba, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Complex networks exist for a number of purposes. The neural, metabolic and food networks ensure our survival, while the social, economic, transportation and communication networks allow us to prosper. Independently of the purposes and particularities of the physical embodiment of the networks, one of their fundamental functions is the delivery of information from one part of the network to another. Gossip and diseases diffuse in the social networks, ...

  4. Latent Sentiment Detection in Online Social Networks: A Communications-oriented View

    OpenAIRE

    Negi, Rohit; Prabhu, Vinay Uday; Rodrigues, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of latent sentiment detection in Online Social Networks such as Twitter. We demonstrate the benefits of using the underlying social network as an Ising prior to perform network aided sentiment detection. We show that the use of the underlying network results in substantially lower detection error rates compared to strictly features-based detection. In doing so, we introduce a novel communications-oriented framework for characterizing th...

  5. Use of social media for corporate communications by research-funding organisations in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Carim, L.; Warwick, C.

    2013-01-01

    Existing literature on the corporate use of social media did not appear to examine the activity of organisations that fund academic research, nor to explore the variety of implications for an organisation’s business functions of adopting these channels. This study sought to shed light on these areas through primary research involving a survey and focus groups. Findings showed that most UK-based research-funding organisations have adopted social media channels for corporate communications p...

  6. Intelligently Connecting People - Facilitating Socially Appropriate communication in Mobile and Office Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Danninger, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The mobile phone has fundamentally changed our basic mechanics of social life. The research presented in this thesis will try to shed light on most important design trade-offs and strategies when negotiating between desirable communication and unwanted interruption, and has a significant contribution to make to the discussion of how technology can and should facilitate future mobile phone interactions: both by pushing the state of the art technologically and in socially intelligent design.

  7. A Digital Platform for Marketing Communications in the Mobile and Social Media Space

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovic, Otto

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a digital platform for marketing communications developed during the last years. Functionalities of the platform are described according to different categories and by means of case studies together with related results. Also further development strategies are discussed, e.g. the planned enlargement of the platform in the field of social media will include three new modules. A browsing module will enable multidimensional browsing in selected social media. The measurement m...

  8. The Greens of Finland in social media: Facebook as a communication forum

    OpenAIRE

    Leskinen, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The Greens of Finland is a Finnish political party which is actively involved in social media in general, and on Facebook in particular. The objectives of this thesis were to assess Facebook as a communication tool for the Greens and to improve the party’s social media strategy. The research was made during the period from February 2011 till January 2012. The research methods used were mainly qualitative – content analysis was made on all data. Furthermore, typology and quantification were us...

  9. An evaluation of keyword extraction from online communication for the characterisation of social relations

    OpenAIRE

    Hauffa, Jan; Lichtenberg, Tobias; Groh, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The set of interpersonal relationships on a social network service or a similar online community is usually highly heterogenous. The concept of tie strength captures only one aspect of this heterogeneity. Since the unstructured text content of online communication artefacts is a salient source of information about a social relationship, we investigate the utility of keywords extracted from the message body as a representation of the relationship's characteristics as reflecte...

  10. Exploring the communication relationship between corporate donors and social development NPO recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Fourie, Lynnette Mitizi; Van Dyk, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The complexities in the social development setting in South African are clearly evident from unemployment and poverty statistics, low levels of literacy and education and lacking government response to social ills (CASE 2003). Added to the complex environment in which South African non-profit organisations (NPOs) operate, is the communication relationship between NPOs and their corporate donors (as stakeholders of one another). This relationship is important for the survival and financial sus...

  11. A Computational Model of the Belief System Under the Scope of Social Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Signes Pont, María Teresa; Mora Mora, Higinio; Miguel Casado, Gregorio de; Gil Méndez, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the belief system based on a computational framework in three levels: first, the logic level with the definition of binary local rules, second, the arithmetic level with the definition of recursive functions and finally the behavioural level with the definition of a recursive construction pattern. Social communication is achieved when different beliefs are expressed, modified, propagated and shared through social nets. This approach is useful to mimic the be...

  12. A comparative study on communication structures of Chinese journals in the social sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ping; Su, Xinning; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the communication structures in the Chinese social sciences have not yet been sufficiently reformed. Citation patterns among Chinese domestic journals in three subject areas -- political science and marxism, library and information science, and economics -- are compared with their counterparts internationally. Like their colleagues in the natural and life sciences, Chinese scholars in the social sciences provide fewer references to journal publications than the...

  13. Networked communication and the Arab Spring: linking broadcast and social media

    OpenAIRE

    Hänska-Ahy, Maximillian

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of media platforms were involved in communicating recent protests across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), though it remains unclear exactly how these interacted. This qualitative article, based primarily on interviews with British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) newsworkers, explores the networked linkages between social and broadcast media, asking how social media content moved into broadcast news, which standards shaped the interface between the two and how these standards...

  14. Identical or Just Compatible? The Utility of Corporate Identity Values in Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmeltz, Line

    2014-01-01

    This study explores whether companies embracing a corporate social responsibility agenda have a strategic focus on adapting and aligning their value systems to reflect such commitment. The analysis is based on empirical data and a conceptual model juxtaposing corporate values, corporate social responsibility values, and implementation to capture how the different configurations of these aspects may impact the communication carried out by corporations. The findings indicate that the companies in ...

  15. Communication perspectives on social networking and citizen journalism challenges to traditional newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Communication perspectives are presented on the challenges posed to traditional newspapers by social media and citizen journalism, with special reference to the United States. This is an important topic given the critical role investigative reporting, long the domain of newspapers, plays in fostering democratic practices. New Media and social networking technology are evaluated in terms of their impact on the newspaper enterprise. Alternative scenarios for future developments are examined as ...

  16. The evolution of honest communication: integrating social and physiological costs of ornamentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Elizabeth A

    2014-10-01

    Much research on animal communication has addressed how costs such as social costs or physiological costs favor the accuracy of signals. Previous work has largely considered these costs separately, but we may be missing essential connections by studying costs in isolation. After all, social interactions produce rapid changes in hormone titers which can then affect individual behavior and physiology. As a result, social costs are likely to have widespread physiological consequences. Here, I present a new perspective on the factors that maintain honest signals by describing how the interplay between social costs and physiological costs may maintain an accurate link between an animal's abilities and ornament elaboration. I outline three specific mechanisms by which the interaction between social behavior and hormones could favor honest signals and present specific predictions for each of the three models. Then, I review how ornaments alter agonistic behavior, agonistic behavior influences hormones, and how these hormonal effects influence fitness. I also describe the few previous studies that have directly tested how ornaments influence hormones. Finally, opportunities for future work are discussed. Considering the interaction between social behavior and physiology may address some challenges associated with both social and physiological models of costs. Understanding the dynamic feedbacks between physiology and social costs has potential to transform our understanding of the stability of animals' communication systems. PMID:24944118

  17. Teaching scientific concepts through simple models and social communication techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For science education, it is important to demonstrate to students the relevance of scientific concepts in every-day life experiences. Although there are methods available for achieving this goal, it is more effective if cultural flavor is also added to the teaching techniques and thereby the teacher and students can easily relate the subject matter to their surroundings. Furthermore, this would bridge the gap between science and day-to-day experiences in an effective manner. It could also help students to use science as a tool to solve problems faced by them and consequently they would feel science is a part of their lives. In this paper, it has been described how simple models and cultural communication techniques can be used effectively in demonstrating important scientific concepts to the students of secondary and higher secondary levels by using two consecutive activities carried out at the Institute of Fundamental Studies (IFS), Sri Lanka. (author)

  18. Social Media: a way of activism in digital marketing communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene García Medina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hoje, as mídias sociais são a nova forma de ativismo em comunicação de marketing digital. As empresas não são mais os donos exclusivos da relação dos consumidores com seus produtos / serviços; em vez disso, a sobrevivência das organizações depende da utilização efetiva dos meios de comunicação social. Os consumidores confiam nas outras pessoas para fornecer recomendações sobre produtos e serviços de uma forma muito ativa, e é importante saber como e porque as mídias sociais influenciam as organizações. Este estudo analisa através de uma revisão da literatura a importância do ativismo através da mídia social para comunicação de marketing digital e propõe um modelo de negócio para as estratégias de marketing de sucesso.

  19. Metodologia comunicativa crítica, transformació i inclusió social Communicative critical research, transformation and social inclusion Metodología comunicativa crítica, transformación e inclusión social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Latorre Beltrán

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El caràcter cada cop més dialògic i complex de la societat fa necessària la utilització d’una metodologia que respongui a aquesta realitat. La metodologia comunicativa crítica respon a aquesta realitat, contribueix a la superació de desigualtats socials i educatives fomentant la inclusió i transformació social. En aquest article presentem les principals característiques d’aquesta metodologia, diferenciant-la clarament d’anterior propostes metodològiques, així com l’impacte social i polític que s’està aconseguint mitjançant el projecte INCLUD-ED, que utilitza la metodologia comunicativa crítica per aconseguir els seus objectius de recerca. ____________________________________________ Le caractère de plus en plus dialogique et complexe de la société rend nécessaire l’utilisation d’une méthodologie qui réponde à cette réalité. La méthodologie communicative critique répond à cette realité, contribue au dépassement des inégalités sociales et éducatives tout en développant l’inclusion et la transformation sociales. Dans cet article, nous résentons les principales caractéristiques de cette méthodologie, tout en la différenciant clairement despropositions méthodologiques antérieures, de même que l’impact social et politique obtenu avec le projet INCLUD-ED, qui utilise la méthodologie communicative critique pour atteindre ses objectifs de recherche.The nature of society is increasingly dialogical and complex. Consequently, the research methods that are used should reflect this situation. Communicative critical research does just this. It contributes to reducing social and educational inequalities and fosters inclusion and social transformation. In this paper, we present the main characteristics of this method, and clearly differentiate it from previous methodological proposals. We also discuss the social and political impact of the INCLUD-ED project, which uses communicative critical research to attain its objectives.El carácter cada vez más dialógico y complejo de la sociedad hace necesaria la utilización de una metodología que responda a esta realidad. La metodología comunicativa críticaresponde a esa realidad, contribuye a la superación de desigualdades sociales y educativas fomentando la inclusión y transformación social. En este artículo presentamos las principales características de esta metodología, diferenciándola claramente de anteriores propuestas metodológicas, así como el impacto social y político que se está consiguiendo a través del proyecto INCLUD-ED, que utiliza la metodología comunicativa crítica para alcanzar sus objetivos de investigación.

  20. Adolescent Peer Relationships and Behavior Problems Predict Young Adults' Communication on Social Networking Websites

    OpenAIRE

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Szwedo, David E.; Allen, Joseph P.; Evans, Meredyth A.; Hare, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined online communication on social networking web pages in a longitudinal sample of 92 youths (39 male, 53 female). Participants' social and behavioral adjustment was assessed when they were ages 13–14 years and again at ages 20–22 years. At ages 20–22 years, participants' social networking website use and indicators of friendship quality on their web pages were coded by observers. Results suggested that youths who had been better adjusted at ages 13–14 years were more likely ...

  1. Emotional Intelligence, Communication Competence, and Student Perceptions of Team Social Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troth, Ashlea C.; Jordan, Peter J.; Lawrence, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Students generally report poor experiences of group work in university settings. This study examines whether individual student perceptions of team social cohesion are determined by their level of emotional intelligence (EI) and whether this relationship is mediated by their communication skills. Business students (N = 273) completed the 16-item…

  2. Effect of Alternative and Augmentative Communication on Language and Social Behavior of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Rubina

    2010-01-01

    Teaching children with autism is a challenging task for educators and parents, as the children display marked deficits in language and social behaviors. One of the major goals of an intervention program for children with autism is to provide them a method of functional communication and ample opportunities to practice these skills. For some…

  3. Social Interactions of Students with Disabilities Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Carter, Erik W.; Sisco, Lynn G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the naturally occurring social interactions for students with disabilities who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in general education classrooms. We observed 16 students who used AAC and received services under the categories of autism or intellectual disability. Participants primarily…

  4. Communication Privacy Disclosure Management: An Empirical Study of Socialization Support in a Pseudo-Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Misook

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the boundaries of online learners' information disclosure, relationship building, interpersonal integration, and motivation by drawing upon the theoretical frameworks of the social information processing and communication privacy management theories and the hyperpersonal model. A total of 103 students from a higher…

  5. Communication and Social Deficits in Relatives of Individuals with SLI and Relatives of Individuals with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Andrew; St Clair, Michelle C.; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2013-01-01

    We investigate two aspects of the autism triad, communication and social difficulties, in relatives of specific language impairment (SLI) probands (with and without additional autistic symptomatology) as compared to relatives of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Down's syndrome (DS) probands. Findings involving 726 first degree relatives of 85…

  6. Social media as a new channel for company communication on the example of clothing company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Widawska-Stanisz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of marketing orientations, issues of company and market communication are submitted in the article. The role of social media and its using by companies and their customers are pointed. The author of this article has presented the results of the research conducted with young citizens of Silesia Voivodeship.

  7. The Invisible Helping Hand: The Role of Communication in the Health and Social Service Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Teresa L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses communication research in the health and social service professions. Comments on the quality of that research and provides suggestions for areas that are in need of study and for methods that could profitably be used. Includes an extensive bibliography. (PD)

  8. Effects of Communication Competence and Social Network Centralities on Learner Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Hyun; Kang, Stephanie; Yoon, Meehyun

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative learning has become a dominant learning apparatus for higher level learning objectives. Much of the psychological and social mechanisms operating under this complex group activity, however, is not yet well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of college students' communication competence and…

  9. Social Media Use to Enhance Internal Communication: Course Design for Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amy M.; Hinesly, Mary D.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly using social media to improve their internal communication. When successfully implemented, such initiatives can have a dramatic impact on internal efficiency, team collaboration, innovation, organizational alignment, and cultural transformation. This article describes a course offered by the Ross School of Business,…

  10. Social Networking and Pedagogical Variations: An Integrated Approach for Effective Interpersonal and Group Communications Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim

    2012-01-01

    Electronic communication and social networking are effective and useful tools in the process of teaching and learning and have increasingly improved the quality of students' learning outcomes in higher education in recent years. The system encourages and supports students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities and…

  11. The Swedish Version of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO-10). Psychometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Gudrun; Hagberg, Bibbi; Billstedt, Eva; Skoglund, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Johansson, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Psychometric properties of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders schedule (DISCO) have only been studied in the UK. The authorised Swedish translation of the tenth version of the DISCO (DISCO-10) was used in interviews with close relatives of 91 Swedish patients referred for neuropsychiatrical assessment. Validity…

  12. Communication and Social Presence: The Impact on Adult Learners' Emotions in Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, Christina; Mavroidis, Ilias

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to examine the role of communication and social presence in distance learning environments and their impact on the emotions of adult learners. A study was conducted at the Hellenic Open University (HOU), using a questionnaire that was completed by 94 undergraduate and postgraduate students. More than 94% of the students…

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Social Communication Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Lee, Chi-Mei; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Huang, Ya-Fen; Kao, Jen-Der; Wu, Yu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ). We assessed 736 participants (male, 80.1%) aged 2-18, who were clinically diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) including autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, or pervasive developmental disorders, not…

  14. Social Media Use to Enhance Internal Communication: Course Design for Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amy M.; Hinesly, Mary D.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly using social media to improve their internal communication. When successfully implemented, such initiatives can have a dramatic impact on internal efficiency, team collaboration, innovation, organizational alignment, and cultural transformation. This article describes a course offered by the Ross School of Business,…

  15. Emotional Intelligence, Communication Competence, and Student Perceptions of Team Social Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troth, Ashlea C.; Jordan, Peter J.; Lawrence, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Students generally report poor experiences of group work in university settings. This study examines whether individual student perceptions of team social cohesion are determined by their level of emotional intelligence (EI) and whether this relationship is mediated by their communication skills. Business students (N = 273) completed the 16-item…

  16. Exploring the Potential of Social Network Sites in Relation to Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Anouk

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a project which used a social network site to support students on a year abroad and foster informal learning, particularly in the area of intercultural communication. The project employed a peer-mentoring structure to solve the problem of role conflict, in which users of these sites may feel some tension as…

  17. Social Media, Traditional Media and Marketing Communication of Public Relations : A Study of Banking Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeheian, Datis; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Public relations are undertaking more important role in the marketing communication and advertising. The present paper reports a survey conducted in three Iranian banks’ public relations departments to understand how they use different media in their marketing communications and other related functions. A classification of public relations functions including fourteen functions in three categories has taken as research framework and by using a questionnaire, eight media have been asked to rank for each function, includes Television, Radio, Newspaper, Magazine, Classified Ads, Internet Websites, Social media and finally Mobile and SMS ads. Findings show that traditional media still play a dominant role in media consumption of public relations, while new Web2.0 media consist of Mobile communications and Social networks, have never ranked better than fifth from eight. Some reasons have been argues in conclusion.

  18. Promoting social communication through music therapy in children with autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika

    In this book, a PhD study is presented that investigates if and how music therapy may help to promote social communication in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study examined several dimensions of this complex field, and includes four articles: (i) a systematic review (Cochrane...... review) synthesising research evidence on overall effects of music therapy for individuals with ASD; (ii) a study protocol specifying the design of TIME-A, a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills in children with ASD aged 4 to...... ways to combine clinical relevance and rigorous research methodology without compromising either, and to integrate scientific findings in the clinical application of a highly individualised approach. Through enhancing communication and knowledge transfer between research and clinical practice in music...

  19. Developing a Schedule to Identify Social Communication Difficulties and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Young Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absoud, Michael; Parr, Jeremy R.; Salt, Alison; Dale, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Available observational tools used in the identification of social communication difficulties and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) rely partly on visual behaviours and therefore may not be valid in children with visual impairment. A pilot observational instrument, the Visual Impairment and Social Communication Schedule (VISS), was…

  20. The Impact of the Advancing Social-Communication and Play (ASAP) Intervention on Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Jessica R.; Boyd, Brian A.; Watson, Linda R.; Crais, Elizabeth R.; Baranek, Grace T.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates an intervention targeting social-communication and play skills (Advancing Social-communication and Play; ASAP) implemented by school staff in a public preschool setting. With increases in enrollment of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in school systems, establishing the effectiveness and feasibility of…

  1. Audiovisual communication and therapeutic jurisprudence: Cognitive and social psychological dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenson, Neal

    2010-01-01

    The effects of audiovisual communications on the emotional and psychological well-being of participants in the legal system have not been previously examined. Using as a framework for analysis what Slobogin (1996) calls internal balancing (of therapeutic versus antitherapeutic effects) and external balancing (of therapeutic jurisprudence [TJ] effects versus effects on other legal values), this brief paper discusses three examples that suggest the complexity of evaluating courtroom audiovisuals in TJ terms. In each instance, audiovisual displays that are admissible based on their arguable probative or explanatory value - day-in-the-life movies, victim impact videos, and computer simulations of litigated events - might well reduce stress and thus improve the psychological well-being of personal injury plaintiffs, survivors, and jurors, respectively. In each situation, however, other emotional and cognitive effects may prove antitherapeutic for the target or other participants, and/or may undermine other important values including outcome accuracy, fairness, and even the conception of the legal decision maker as a moral actor. PMID:20920823

  2. Impairment of social behavior and communication in mice lacking the Uba6-dependent ubiquitin activation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Kwak, Minseok; Lee, Peter C W

    2015-03-15

    The Uba6-Use1 ubiquitin enzyme cascade is a poorly understood arm of the ubiquitin-proteasome system required for mouse development. Recently, we reported that Uba6 brain-specific knockout (termed NKO) mice display abnormal social behavior and neuronal development due to a decreased spine density and accumulation of Ube3a and Shank3. To better characterize a potential role for NKO mice in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), we performed a comprehensive behavioral characterization of the social behavior and communication of NKO mice. Our behavioral results confirmed that NKO mice display social impairments, as indicated by fewer vocalizations and decreased social interaction. We conclude that UBA6 NKO mice represent a novel ASD mouse model of anti-social and less verbal behavioral symptoms. PMID:25523030

  3. Unpacking Social Media’s Role in Resource Provision: Variations across Relational and Communicative Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Vitak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available New information and communication technologies (ICTs challenge existing beliefs regarding the exchange of social resources within a network. The present study examines individuals’ perceived access to social, emotional, and instrumental resources by analyzing relational and Facebook-specific characteristics of dyadic relationships. Results suggest that the social and technical affordances of the site—including visibility of content and connections, as well as streamlined processes for interacting with a large audience—may augment existing perceptions of resource access for some ties while providing a major (or sole outlet to interact and exchange resources with others. Specifically, weaker ties appear to benefit more than strong ties from engagement in directed communication and relationship maintenance strategies, while additional variations were observed across relationship category, dyad composition, and geographic proximity. In summary, these findings provide new evidence for how positive relational gains may be derived from site use.

  4. Parents' Adoption of Social Communication Intervention Strategies: Families Including Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Who Are Minimally Verbal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Y.; Goods, Kelly; Shih, Wendy; Distefano, Charlotte; Kaiser, Ann; Wright, Courtney; Mathy, Pamela; Landa, Rebecca; Kasari, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Notably absent from the intervention literature are parent training programs targeting school-aged children with autism who have limited communication skills (Tager-Flusberg and Kasari in "Autism Res" 6:468-478, 2013). Sixty-one children with autism age 5-8 with minimal spontaneous communication received a 6-month social communication…

  5. On building socially responsible printing: an Organizational Communication Based Study Carried out on Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Luiz Paula

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is to analyze how organizational communication tools are used to manage printing, from both internal and external audiences, in what regards social responsibility in three Higher Education Institutions from Pernambuco (UFPE, FAFIRE, ASCES. In order to build our theoretical framework, we have used concepts from Printing Management, Corporate Social Responsibility, Stakeholder Theory, Organi-zational Communication, Organizational Culture and Organizational Structure. With respect to culture, a system of representations and shared values emerges, according to Fischer’s Model (1996. This system influences and is influenced by the organizational structure. We present an overview of Higher Education Institutions and their role on building society, according to the argument presented by Calderón (2010. In this work we discuss the creation of socially responsible printing, through communication with the interested audien-ces, as suggested by the model proposed by Mitchell, Agle and Wood (1997. The methodology chosen in this research work is a multiple case study. To this end, we have chosen three institutions, two located in Recife and one in Caruaru, cities in the state of Pernambuco. We have carried out a qualitative investigation. Thus, we have performed a field study with semi-structured interviews, document analysis, direct observations within the institutions in question, as well as indirect observation of photographs and videos. Amongst the results found, the actions performed were shown to be consistent with the management model and culture. The participants of the study have shown us that they are aware of the social role of Higher Education institutions, and have identified the students, professors, workers, students parents, associations, consumers and public service as the main stakeholders involved. Amongst the most commonly used strategies to build a socially responsible strategy, we can highlight exemplification and organizational pro-motion. Higher Education Institutions have shown consistency between Corporate Social Respon-sibility and their cultures and identities, insofar as they tend to communicate only what becomes practice. Our expectation is that this work can bring about knowledge that is relevant both to academia, in what regards the application and verification of theoretical models, as well as to communication and social responsibility managers, when they provide information about the social practices undertaken, as well as the printing management process that contributes to the image of a socially responsible Corporation.

  6. In times of war, adolescents do not fall silent: Teacher-student social network communication in wartime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophir, Yaakov; Rosenberg, Hananel; Asterhan, Christa S C; Schwarz, Baruch B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to war is associated with psychological disturbances, but ongoing communication between adolescents and teachers may contribute to adolescents' resilience. This study examined the extent and nature of teacher-student communication on Social Network Sites (SNS) during the 2014 Israel-Gaza war. Israeli adolescents (N = 208, 13-18 yrs) completed information about SNS communication. A subset of these (N = 145) completed questionnaires on social rejection and distress sharing on SNS. More than a half (56%) of the respondents communicated with teachers via SNS. The main content category was 'emotional support'. Adolescents' perceived benefits from SNS communication with teachers were associated with distress sharing. Social rejection was negatively associated with emotional support and perceived benefits from SNS communication. We conclude that SNS communication between teachers and students may provide students with easy access to human connections and emotional support, which is likely to contribute to adolescents' resilience in times of war. PMID:26684659

  7. Communication, Opponents, and Clan Performance in Online Games: A Social Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Joo; Choi, Jaewon; Park, Sung Joo; Gloor, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Online gamers form clans voluntarily to play together and to discuss their real and virtual lives. Although these clans have diverse goals, they seek to increase their rank in the game community by winning more battles. Communications among clan members and battles with other clans may influence the performance of a clan. In this study, we compared the effects of communication structure inside a clan, and battle networks among clans, with the performance of the clans. We collected battle histories, posts, and comments on clan pages from a Korean online game, and measured social network indices for communication and battle networks. Communication structures in terms of density and group degree centralization index had no significant association with clan performance. However, the centrality of clans in the battle network was positively related to the performance of the clan. If a clan had many battle opponents, the performance of the clan improved. PMID:23745617

  8. Modelos de determinação social das doenças crônicas não-transmissíveis Models of social determination of chronic non-communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomar Almeida-Filho

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este ensaio revisa criticamente marcos referenciais e modelos teóricos de determinação social das chamadas Doenças Crônicas Não-Transmissíveis. A sociologia funcionalista gerou modelos socioculturais de saúde que influenciaram o campo de investigação epidemiológica da chamada "nova morbidade" (basicamente enfermidades crônicas e degenerativas, posteriormente agrupados sob o rótulo genérico de Teoria do Estresse. Analisam-se abordagens neodurkheimianas das desigualdades sociais, baseadas no conceito de capital social, criticando especialmente os usos quase-teóricos da noção de "estilo de vida" no campo da saúde. Discutem-se ainda alguns modelos derivados do materialismo dialético que se tornaram bastante influentes na epidemiologia social latino-americana, com base nos conceitos de trabalho e classe social. Finalmente, considerando lacunas teóricas e conceituais dessas teorias parciais no que diz respeito ao espaço simbólico da vida social, apresentam-se as bases conceituais de um enfoque teórico alternativo - a "teoria do modo de vida e saúde". Tomada como síntese possível dos modelos objeto desta revisão crítica, considera-se esta teoria como especialmente indicada para a elaboração de modelos epidemiológicos de determinação social de doenças crônicas não-transmissíveis.This essay critically revises theoretical frameworks and models of social determination of chronic non-communicable diseases. Functionalist sociology generated sociocultural models of health that influenced the field of epidemiologic investigation of so-called "new morbidity" (basically chronic and degenerative illnesses, later contained under the generic label of stress theory. Neo-durkheimian approaches of social inequalities, based on the social capital concept, are analyzed and theoretical uses of the lifestyle notion in the health field are criticized. Models derived from the dialectical materialism, grounded on the concepts of labor and social class, are also discussed as they have turned quite influential in Latin-American social epidemiology. Finally, considering theoretical and conceptual gaps of such partial theories in what concerns the symbolic space of the social life, the conceptual bases of an alternative theoretical focus: the theory of mode of life and health. As a possible synthesis of the models object of this critical review, it is considered as especially suitable for the elaboration of epidemiologic models of social determination of non-transmissible chronic diseases.

  9. Study on Communication System of Social Risk Information on Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a new risk communication method for the construction of effective knowledge bases about 'safety and non-anxiety for nuclear energy', a study on new communication method of social risk information by means of electronic communication has been started, by noticing rapid expansion of internet usage in the society. The purpose of this research is to enhance the public acceptance to nuclear power in Japan by the following two aspects. The first is to develop the mutual communication system among the working persons involved in both the operation and maintenance activities for nuclear power plant, by which they will exchange their daily experiences to improve the safety conscious activities to foster 'safety culture' attitude. The other is the development of an effective risk communication system between nuclear society and the general publics about the hot issues of 'what are the concerned involved in the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste?' and 'what should we do to have social consensus to deal with this issue in future'. The authors' research plan for the above purpose is summarized as shown in Table 1. As the first step of the authors' three year research project which started from August 2003, social investigation by questionnaires by internet and postal mail, have been just recently conducted on their risk perception for the nuclear power for the people engaged in nuclear business and women in the metropolitan area, respectively, in order to obtain the relevant information on how and what should be considered for constructing effective risk communication methods of social risk information between the people within nuclear industries and the general public in society. Although there need to be discussed, the contrasting risk images as shown in Fig.1, can be depicted between the nuclear people and general public these days in Japan, from the results of the social investigation. As the conclusion of the authors' study thus far conducted, the contrasting risk perceptions by both the nuclear people and the general public which are shown in Fig. 1, will contribute to the authors' development of two risk communication systems as the next step of this research project, the one for 'Community network system to foster safety culture among nuclear workers', while the other for 'Affective risk communication network open to society'. (authors)

  10. Towards a Renaissance in Communication for Social Change Redefining the discipline and practice in the post ‘Arab Spring’ era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, we have experienced a resurgence in practices of bottom-up communication for social change, a plethora of agency in which voice, citizenship and collective action have centre stage as core values, principles and practices. This resurgence sparks a series of questions; How are these new calls for social change and their principles and communicative practices influencing and informing the thinking and practice of institutionalized communication for development and social change? And what are the underlying conceptual differences in the notions of action, participation and social change which inform the new generation of social movements, on one side, and the established field of communication for social change, on the other? These are the questions that drive this chapter.

  11. Social function and communication in optimal outcome children and adolescents with an autism history on structured test measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orinstein, A.; Suh, J.; Porter, K.; de Yoe, K.A; Tyson, K.; Troyb, E.; Barton, M.; Eigsti, I.M.; Stevens, M.C.; Fein, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Youth who lose their ASD diagnosis may have subtle social and communication difficulties. We examined social and communication functioning in 44 high-functioning autism (HFA), 34 optimal outcome (OO) and 34 typically developing (TD) youth. Results indicated that OO participants had no autism communication symptoms, no pragmatic language deficits, and were judged as likable as TD peers. Some group differences were found: OO youth had less insight into social relationships and poorer friendship descriptions than TD youth. OO participants had attention, self-control, and immaturity difficulties that may impact social abilities. However, OO participants were most engaged, friendliest, warmest, and most approachable. Overall, OO participants had no social and communicative impairments, although some exhibited mild social difficulties that often accompany attentional problems. PMID:25758821

  12. Augmentative and Alternative Communication System (AAC) for Social Inclusion of People With Complex Communication Needs in the Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Simone; Berberian, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion of people with special needs in the labor market has been increasing in some regions of Brazil as a result of the Articles 6 and 7 of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Brazil and the Quota Law (No. 8.213/91, Art. 93) which entitle people with disabilities to work in order to improve their social condition. To support persons with complex communication needs in the workplace, 40 graphic symbols termed "symbols of industrial expressions" were developed within the framework of the COMMUNIS package. The symbols were developed for a company of the food sector in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba, Brazil. Individual interviews were held with the human resources professionals, as well as with employees with complex communication needs in order to identify problems, assess requirements, and generate a list of specific symbols to develop. The symbols were then validated with regard to their ease of recognition. Only five symbols needed revision. The results suggest that it is possible to develop a set of symbols for the workplace that are judged to be iconic by human resources professionals and employees with complex communication needs. PMID:26132354

  13. Social strategy games in communicating trade-offs between mitigation and adaptation in cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhola, Sirkku; Driscoll, Patrick Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Cities are becoming the locus of climate change policy and planning, both for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change. These actions involve a number of trade-offs, including densification of the urban structure, concerns over social equity and the proper use of green infrastructure for adaptation. Many of these impacts are difficult to quantify and their interdependencies are often challenging to comprehend and communicate. There are a number of outstanding gaps in knowledge both in research and in practice in relation to how decisions are made between adaptation and mitigation strategies and what kinds of negative and positive synergies can be identified between them. This paper explores how social games can help people to communicate the trade-offs between mitigation and adaptation measures in an urban environment and examines the possibilities of using social gaming as a research method. Data was collected from Denmark, Finland and the US through organized gaming sessions. The conclusion of the study is that social games, although methodologically challenging, are a promising method to communicate complex planning problems.

  14. Evidence-Based, Parent-Mediated Interventions for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Case of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors represent a core symptom of autism spectrum disorders. While there has been an increase in research into this domain in recent years, compared to social-communication impairments experienced by children with autism spectrum disorders, much less is known about their development, etiology, and management.…

  15. Communicative Competencies and the Structuration of Expectations: The creative tension between Habermas' critical theory and Luhmann's social systems theory

    OpenAIRE

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    I elaborate on the tension between Luhmann's social systems theory and Habermas' theory of communicative action, and argue that this tension can be resolved by focusing on language as the interhuman medium of the communication which enables us to develop symbolically generalized media of communication such as truth, love, power, etc. Following Luhmann, the layers of self-organization among the differently codified subsystems of communication versus organization of meaning at contingent interf...

  16. How Peer Communication and Engagement Motivations Influence Social Media Shopping Behavior: Evidence from China and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sidharth; Men, Linjuan Rita

    2015-10-01

    Based on consumer socialization theory, this study proposes and tests a conceptual model of social media shopping behavior, which links the antecedents of user motivations of engagement and peer communication about products to shopping behavior through social media. A cross-cultural survey was conducted with social media users in two culturally distinct markets with the largest Internet population: China (n?=?304) and the United States (n?=?328). Findings showed that social interaction, information, and remuneration were positive antecedents of peer communication for users from both countries. Peer communication positively impacted social media shopping behavior, and cultural differences were observed, with social interaction being important to Chinese users' shopping behavior, while remuneration was more important to American users. Implications are discussed. PMID:26376370

  17. CONSUMER OPINIONS TOWARDS ONLINE MARKETING COMMUNICATION AND ADVERTISING ON SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE ORZAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available On the Internet, a medium that has already proven its effectiveness in marketing activities, changes take place with astonishing speed. The recent explosion of social networking applications and their number of users has captured the marketers’ attention. Companies have started to rethink their relationships with consumers and adapt to the new online world. In this virtual world of social networks the public is the key element. Consumers perceive the social network as a personal space where they control the content. They decide on their own what they want to see and share with others. Thus, in order to manage marketing communications effectively, marketers must know the consumers’ opinions towards their presence in social networks.

  18. Culture and Social Relationship as Factors of Affecting Communicative Non-Verbal Behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipi, Afia Akhter; Nakano, Yukiko

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to link a bridge between social relationship and cultural variation to predict conversants' non-verbal behaviors. This idea serves as a basis of establishing a parameter based socio-cultural model, which determines non-verbal expressive parameters that specify the shapes of agent's non-verbal behaviors in HAI. As the first step, a comparative corpus analysis is done for two cultures in two specific social relationships. Next, by integrating the cultural and social parameters factors with the empirical data from corpus analysis, we establish a model that predicts posture. The predictions from our model successfully demonstrate that both cultural background and social relationship moderate communicative non-verbal behaviors.

  19. CONSUMER OPINIONS TOWARDS ONLINE MARKETING COMMUNICATION AND ADVERTISING ON SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe ORZAN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available On the Internet, a medium that has already proven its effectiveness in marketing activities, changes take place with astonishing speed. The recent explosion of social networking applications and their number of users has captured the marketers’ attention. Companies have started to rethink their relationships with consumers and adapt to the new online world. In this virtual world of social networks the public is the key element. Consumers perceive the social network as a personal space where they control the content. They decide on their own what they want to see and share with others. Thus, in order to manage marketing communications effectively, marketers must know the consumers’ opinions towards their presence in social networks.

  20. A comparative study on communication structures of Chinese journals in the social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ping; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the communication structures in the Chinese social sciences have not yet been sufficiently reformed. Citation patterns among Chinese domestic journals in three subject areas -- political science and marxism, library and information science, and economics -- are compared with their counterparts internationally. Like their colleagues in the natural and life sciences, Chinese scholars in the social sciences provide fewer references to journal publications than their international counterparts; like their international colleagues, social scientists provide fewer references than natural sciences. The resulting citation networks, therefore, are sparse. Nevertheless, the citation structures clearly suggest that the Chinese social sciences are far less specialized in terms of disciplinary delineations than their international counterparts. Marxism studies are more established than political science in China. In terms of the impact of the Chinese political system on academic fields, disciplines closely r...

  1. Culture and Social Relationship as Factors of Affecting Communicative Non-verbal Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter Lipi, Afia; Nakano, Yukiko; Rehm, Mathias

    The goal of this paper is to link a bridge between social relationship and cultural variation to predict conversants' non-verbal behaviors. This idea serves as a basis of establishing a parameter based socio-cultural model, which determines non-verbal expressive parameters that specify the shapes of agent's nonverbal behaviors in HAI. As the first step, a comparative corpus analysis is done for two cultures in two specific social relationships. Next, by integrating the cultural and social parameters factors with the empirical data from corpus analysis, we establish a model that predicts posture. The predictions from our model successfully demonstrate that both cultural background and social relationship moderate communicative non-verbal behaviors.

  2. Social marketing communication in a multicultural environment: Practical issues and theoretical contributions from cross-cultural marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Noble.; Michael Camit

    2005-01-01

    Social marketing communication (social marcom) campaign production can be more challenging when the audience includes individuals from ‘culturally and linguistically diverse’ (CALD) communities. Additional issues such as culturally related values, practices, and attitudes need consideration. Normally, social marcoms campaigns for CALD audiences involve directly translating mainstream campaign material into various ethnic groups’ languages. However, little is understood about the issues beyond...

  3. Frazzled by Facebook? An Exploratory Study of Gender Differences in Social Network Communication among Undergraduate Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; Lougheed, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although a majority of young adults are members of at least one social networking site, peer reviewed research examining gender differences in social networking communication is sparse. This study examined gender differences in social networking, particularly for Facebook use, among undergraduates. A survey was distributed to 268 college students…

  4. Frazzled by Facebook? An Exploratory Study of Gender Differences in Social Network Communication among Undergraduate Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; Lougheed, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although a majority of young adults are members of at least one social networking site, peer reviewed research examining gender differences in social networking communication is sparse. This study examined gender differences in social networking, particularly for Facebook use, among undergraduates. A survey was distributed to 268 college students…

  5. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew P. Cingel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive communication practices on Facebook compared to males. Additionally, adolescents who own smartphones engage in more constructive online communication practices than those who share regular cell phones or those who do not have access to a cell phone. Overall, results imply that ownership of mobile technologies, such as smartphones and iPads, may be more predictive of social networking site use and online communication practices than general ownership of technology.

  6. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew P. Cingel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive com-munication practices on Facebook compared to males. Additionally, adolescents who own smartphones engage in more constructive online communication practices than those who share regular cell phones or those who do not have access to a cell phone. Overall, results imply that ownership of mobile technologies, such as smartphones and iPads, may be more predictive of social networking site use and online communication practices than general ownership of technology.

  7. Making sense of social media communications with chaos theory : beyond metaphors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Larson, Mia

    Introduction Social scientists have long been inspired by chaos theory to describe the complexities of organisational change (Wheatley, 1993; Burnes, 2004), entrepreneurship (Steyaert, 2007) or urban development (Batty & Xie, 1999) arguing that firms or regions are dynamic and unpredictable systems analogous to ecological systems in nature. The notions of phase shifts, feedback loops, strange attractors and bifurcations were borrowed as exotic metaphors to describe contingencies in social and business contexts without further ontological reflection. A similar pattern is observable in tourism research, offering a few conceptual papers which adopt complexity theories to describe destination development patterns (Russel & Faulkner, 2000, 2004; Zahra & Ryan 2007). The purpose of this paper is to discuss the validity of chaos theory in the context of strategic communications, where new (social) media has changed the marketing landscape beyond recognition. The exponential growth of social media platforms has led to weakened marketer control (and greater consumer sovereignty) over information about organisations and their products. In this new communications paradigm (Muniz & Schau 2007), information is neither stable, controllable commodity nor a content that can be streamlined and circulated in strategically selected promotional mix channels. Borrowing a latourian term, information is a dynamic actant, a key source of structuration of cultural images of organisations and destinations. Marketers are horrified by the prospect of rumours roaming about and running loose in cyberspace (Meredith 2010), creating chaos and noise around neatly streamlined campaigns and brand messages. However, only a handful of such rumours grow to be significant to influence a great number of customers or spill over into mass media channels. Social media users serve as gatekeepers, opting for which fluctuations to pay attention to, which to ignore. The challenge is then to establish a framework of unfolding communication patterns on social media which can eventually explain the collective behaviour of bloggers, twitters and tripadvisors. Method The paper will analyse seemingly random and chaotic communication practices on social media by viewing them as complex adaptive systems described by Stacey (2003). CASs consist of a large number of agents or nodes, each triggered by their own principles and motives. They are also self-organising, as the pattern of behaviour in the system evolves or emerges from the local interaction and adjustments between the agents. Instead of channelled flow of information, the nodes of this network transmit information in all directions simultaneously. Our goal is model the patterns of sense-making in the interactions among community members as well as marketers, by tracking how single postings are weaved and developed into complex, collective stories. The empirical data collection will restrict itself on social media of performative festivals in Scandinavia, including blogs, fansites and other interactive platforms related to Way Out West (Gothenburg) and Roskilde Festival. We will adopt a systematic logging technique following netnographic observation methods (Kozinets, 2010). Findings/Discussion The discussion will critically review the basic assumptions and conceptual justification of analogies derived from chaos theory and attempts to establish a more operational framework in the light of the empirical findings. A model of nonlinear sensemaking processes is offered, based on our analysis of social media communications as complex adaptive systems. This is followed by an examination of the implications of the model for strategic communication and marketers in general. Conclusion The paper concludes that, the adoption of chaos theory approach may have significant benefits for the social sciences of tourism, however, we need to move forward from metaphorical illustrations to more rigorous empirical investigations to understand the complexity of new media communications. Key References Burnes. B. (2005). Complexity theory

  8. Using the blog and media resources for the expansion of forms of communication and social engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes of the use of media and interactive resources for the empowerment of individuals in vulnerable situations to expand their possibilities of communication and social participation, starting from the report of the experience of a university extension program, which proposed the development and use of a blog among other media resources, in workshops activities, Dynamics and Projects that integrate an intervention of social occupational therapy with the poor youth. This experience allowed the expansion of the repertoire of activities of the youth, promoting awareness of concepts, techniques and equipment, previously little available, accessible and used. The records of the contents of the blog were done in a participatory manner, generating reflection on roles and identities. Being and doing in virtual space allowed actions and real productions of adolescents and youths to be empowered when “virtualized”, providing a dimension that is not always possible to achieve in the “real” context. The blog posts resulted in a self-valorization of the population, creating places of belonging for particular social subjects, with the right to culture, communication and technology. Consequently, there was the empowerment of subjects, from the increasing social participation and achievement of the new media, which expanded their sociocultural boundaries. Moreover, it offered an expansion of the scope of resources for action on social occupational therapy, opening spaces, real and virtual, for collective experiences, for sociability and the understanding and transformation of meanings about life and about the reality in which we live.

  9. Self-Censorship on Internal Social Media : Coworker Communication Behavior in a Danish Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Vibeke ThØis

    Jyske Bank, the third largest bank in Denmark, won a prize in 2014 for best internal communication in Europe. Their coworkers communicate about products, coworker themes and organizational issues on internal social media, ISM (Madsen, 2015). The communication inform top managers about what happens in the organization, and helps the bank respond to changes in customer needs and the banking sector, address internal issues, and correct problems before they escalate. This kind of communication can have tremendous implications for an organization’s performance and even its survival (Morrison, 2011), and it is a way for coworkers to express employee voice and identify with the organization, which is crucial to employee engagement (Ruck and Welch, 2012). Coworkers are therefore increasingly valued as active agents in an organization (Heide and Simonsson, 2011; Kim and Rhee, 2011 and Mazzei, 2010). However far from all coworkers feel comfortable about entering the communication arena of ISM, even if coworker voice isencouraged (Morrison, 2011; Detert and Edmondson, 2011; Liu, Zhu and Yang, 2010). So far very little is known about coworker self-censorship on ISM and an explorative case-study in Jyske Bank was conducted in 2014/15 to shed light on the following research question: How does self-censorship affect coworker’s communication on ISM?

  10. Scientific Story Telling & Social Media The role of social media in effectively communicating science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkhuis, D.; Peart, L.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discourse generally takes place in appropriate journals, using the language and conventions of science. That's fine, as long as the discourse remains in scientific circles. It is only outside those circles that the rules and techniques of engaging social media tools gain importance. A young generation of scientists are eager to share their experiences by using social media, but is this effective? And how can we better integrate all outreach & media channels to engage general audiences? How can Facebook, Twitter, Skype and YouTube be used as synergy tools in scientific story telling? Case: during IODP Expedtion 342 (June-July 2012) onboard the scientific drillship JOIDES Resolution an onboard educator and videographer worked non-stop fort two months on an integrated outreach plan that tried and tested the limits of all social media tools available to interact with an international public while at sea. The results are spectacular!

  11. Suicide Communication on Social Media and Its Psychological Mechanisms: An Examination of Chinese Microblog Users

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Q.; Kwok, CL; Zhu, T; Guan, L; Yip, PSF

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to examine the characteristics of people who talk about suicide on Chinese microblogs (referred to as Weibo suicide communication (WSC)), and the psychological antecedents of such behaviors. Methods: An online survey was conducted on Weibo users. Differences in psychological and social demographic characteristics between those who exhibited WSC and those who did not were examined. Three theoretical models were proposed to explain the psychological mechanisms of WSC...

  12. Affective Speech for Social Communication: Implementation Challenges in Text-to-Speech for Short Messages

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, A.K.; J. Wang(Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing)

    2006-01-01

    The flexibility to choose from different modal content presentation will be an important feature in future ubiquitous application. Currently, short messages (e.g. SMS/MMS) are only available in visual form. However, in certain situations, users may like to have these messages presented in audio form. We explored the alternative of presenting short messages in affective synthetic text-to-speech form special for social communications between teens. Evaluation of this alternative presentation re...

  13. The reach and impact of social marketing and reproductive health communication campaigns in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meekers Dominique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like many sub-Saharan African countries, Zambia is dealing with major health issues, including HIV/AIDS, family planning, and reproductive health. To address reproductive health problems and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, several social marketing and health communication programs focusing on reproductive and HIV/AIDS prevention programs are being implemented. This paper describes the reach of these programs and assesses their impact on condom use. Methods This paper assesses the reach of selected radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS and of communications about the socially marketed Maximum condoms in Zambia, as well as their impact on condom use, using data from the 2001–2002 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey. To control for self-selection and endogeneity, we use a two-stage regression model to estimate the effect of program exposure on the behavioural outcomes. Results Those who were exposed to radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS were more likely to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.16 for men and 1.06 for women. Men highly exposed to Maximum condoms social marketing communication were more likely than those with low exposure to the program to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.48, and to have used a condom at their last sexual intercourse (OR = 1.23. Conclusion Findings suggest that the reproductive health and social marketing campaigns in Zambia reached a large portion of the population and had a significant impact on condom use. The results suggest that future reproductive health communication campaigns that invest in radio programming may be more effective than those investing in television programming, and that future campaigns should seek to increase their impact among women, perhaps by focusing on the specific constrains that prevent females from using condoms.

  14. The reach and impact of social marketing and reproductive health communication campaigns in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rossem, Ronan; Meekers, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Background Like many sub-Saharan African countries, Zambia is dealing with major health issues, including HIV/AIDS, family planning, and reproductive health. To address reproductive health problems and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, several social marketing and health communication programs focusing on reproductive and HIV/AIDS prevention programs are being implemented. This paper describes the reach of these programs and assesses their impact on condom use. Methods This paper assesses the reach of selected radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS and of communications about the socially marketed Maximum condoms in Zambia, as well as their impact on condom use, using data from the 2001–2002 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey. To control for self-selection and endogeneity, we use a two-stage regression model to estimate the effect of program exposure on the behavioural outcomes. Results Those who were exposed to radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS were more likely to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.16 for men and 1.06 for women). Men highly exposed to Maximum condoms social marketing communication were more likely than those with low exposure to the program to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.48), and to have used a condom at their last sexual intercourse (OR = 1.23). Conclusion Findings suggest that the reproductive health and social marketing campaigns in Zambia reached a large portion of the population and had a significant impact on condom use. The results suggest that future reproductive health communication campaigns that invest in radio programming may be more effective than those investing in television programming, and that future campaigns should seek to increase their impact among women, perhaps by focusing on the specific constrains that prevent females from using condoms. PMID:18088437

  15. The reach and impact of social marketing and reproductive health communication campaigns in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Meekers Dominique; Van Rossem Ronan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Like many sub-Saharan African countries, Zambia is dealing with major health issues, including HIV/AIDS, family planning, and reproductive health. To address reproductive health problems and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, several social marketing and health communication programs focusing on reproductive and HIV/AIDS prevention programs are being implemented. This paper describes the reach of these programs and assesses their impact on condom use. Methods This paper asse...

  16. Comparing the efficiency of advergames vs. social networks when communicating with children

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Clara Gil Leite

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze and compare the efficiency of two digital media – a social network and an advergame – and gather which is the most efficient regarding communication with children. The efficiency of both media was measured by comparing the impact on brand awareness, purchase intention and brand preference. We also analyzed the mediating role of gender on the engagement the two media. Our sample comprised of 220 children. Our results suggest both media are ...

  17. Communication Inequalities, Social Determinants, and Intermittent Smoking in the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerson, Leland K.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Intermittent smokers account for a large proportion of all smokers, and this trend is increasing. Social and communication inequalities may account for disparities in intermittent smoking status. Methods: Data for this study came from 2,641 ever-smokers from a 2003 nationally representative cross-sectional survey. Independent variables of interest included race/ethnicity, sex, household income, education, health media attention, and cancer-related beliefs. The outcome of interes...

  18. Exploring a Model of Symbolic Social Communication: The Case of ‘Magic’ Johnson

    OpenAIRE

    FLORA, JUNE A.; SCHOOLER, CAROLINE; Mays, Vickie M.; Cochran, Susan D.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a model of symbolic social communication to explain the process whereby sociocultural identity mediates relationships among receivers, sources and messages to shape message effects. This exploratory study examines how two at-risk groups of African American men responded to various HIV prevention messages delivered by celebrity and professional sources. We interviewed 47 men from a homeless shelter and 50 male college students. Members of both groups were likely to select Johnson as...

  19. Information and communication technology as a tool for improving physical and social activity of the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Blažun, Helena; Saranto, Kaija; Kokol, Peter; Vošner, Janez

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT) can enrich elderly people’s lives in various ways. The objective of this interventional quasi-experimental research study among elderly people in Slovenia and Finland is to present associations and relations between computer/Internet use, physical activity and social inclusion before and after a ICT interaction. The first study (before interaction) included 58 (M=72,41) and the second study (after interaction) 45 (M=72,96) elderly people. The r...

  20. Information and Communication Technology in Teacher Education : Thinking and learning in computer?supported social practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mukama, Evode

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate how new knowledge can be developed in computer-supported social practice. Participants were selected from newly qualified secondary school teachers and student teachers at a higher education institution in Rwanda. The thesis consists of four empirical case studies, the findings of which were analysed from a sociocultural perspective. In the first study, it has been shown that novice teachers are motivated to acquire information and communication techno...

  1. Socially Responsible Corporate Communications in Mexico: Evidence of the Large Companies by Their Operational Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Teodoro Rafael Wendlandt Amezaga; Hai Yan He; Angel Alberto Valdés Cuervo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to know the general condition of business communications regarding Corporate SocialResponsibility (CSR) in large Mexican companies, and identify the significant differences in terms of a set ofindicators and in comparison with three different operational levels. Specifically, based in a relevant previousresearch work by Maignan and Ralston (2002) and analyzing the content of 150 Mexican business websites as asample frame, the study evaluates the differences in a set o...

  2. Integrating E-Commerce and Social Engineering Perspectives on Trust in Online Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Thomas; Kauer, Michaela; Bruder, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Currently, interpersonal trust in computer-mediated communication is a research topic for e-commerce as well as usable security researchers. While the e-commerce researchers focus on gaining warranted trust, usable security researchers focus on preventing misplaced trust, in order to protect users from social engineering attacks. In this paper an approach to integrate findings and theories from both fields is proposed in order to create a complete model for predicti...

  3. Carlsberg's Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting: Communicating by using tools to minimise scepticism

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Kelly; Pattiiha, Sippora Louise Angela; Tobiasz, Klaudia; Stensborg, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    In this project we have tried to see how Carlsberg - as our case company - addresses the challenges that contribute to scepticism in communicating Corporate Social Responsibility activities to consumers and the general public. In order to do it, we have identified the tools that cope with minimising sceptical reception. Hereafter, have we used these tools to look at our data - the company’s 2013 CSR Report. The purpose of this process was to investigate whether these tools could be identified...

  4. The role of socializing agents in communicating healthy eating to adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Grønhøj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2011-01-01

    A survey was conducted of 386 Danish and Hong Kong adolescents aged 11 to 16. Results showed that the consumption of relatively unhealthy food was common among respondents. Looking at socializing agents, respondents claimed that parents asked them to eat healthy food more often than the government publicity, teachers or friends. Parents were also perceived as being the most effective source in encouraging them to eat healthy food. Respondents considered news and fear appeals for communicating he...

  5. [Mobile communication and health of population: estimation of danger, social and ethical problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Grigor'ev, O A

    2011-01-01

    Population lives under new electromagnetic conditions: constant round-the-clock compulsory chronic exposure of all groups of population to modulated wide spectrum of EMF RF during the work of base stations of mobile communication; daily and lifelong (from childhood) exposure of the brain to EMF RF of the mobile phone. Effects of exposure to EMF RF of low levels are presented. Results of research into chronic EMF RF exposure are absent. International recommendations and domestic guidelines do not take into account the changing conditions of EMF RF influence on the population: the brain has become a critical body, and children have been included in the risk group. Population actively continues to use mobile communication. In this situation estimation of the risks from mobile communication has become a social and ethical problem. PMID:21866836

  6. The social support networks of university students with social communication difficulties: The role of educational support workers and the implications for retention and progression

    OpenAIRE

    Hinchcliffe, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    This study has utilised multiple methods that incorporate the use of ‘innovative’ communicative technology to provide an extensive exploration of students with social communication difficulties’ (SCD) social support networks whilst attending university. Ten semistructured online interviews were carried out with educational support workers (ESWs). Their analysis provides original and valuable insights into student disability support and the views of ESWs are further pursued in a series of seve...

  7. Social Support Quality in Internet Based Information and Communication: From "Digital Divide" to "Voice Divide"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available National and international studies demonstrate that the number of teenagers using the inter-net increases. But even though they actually do have access from different places to the in-formation and communication pool of the internet, there is evidence that the ways in which teenagers use the net - regarding the scope and frequency in which services are used as well as the preferences for different contents of these services - differ significantly in relation to socio-economic status, education, and gender. The results of the regarding empirical studies may be summarised as such: teenager with low (formal education especially use internet services embracing 'entertainment, play and fun' while higher educated teenagers (also prefer intellectually more demanding and particularly services supplying a greater variety of communicative and informative activities. More generally, pedagogical and sociological studies investigating "digital divide" in a dif-ferentiated and sophisticated way - i.e. not only in terms of differences between those who do have access to the Internet and those who do not - suggest that the internet is no space beyond 'social reality' (e.g. DiMaggio & Hargittai 2001, 2003; Vogelgesang, 2002; Welling, 2003. Different modes of utilisation, that structure the internet as a social space are primarily a specific contextualisation of the latter - and thus, the opportunities and constraints in virtual world of the internet are not less than those in the 'real world' related to unequal distribu-tions of material, social and cultural resources as well as social embeddings of the actors involved. This fact of inequality is also true regarding the outcomes of using the internet. Empirical and theoretical results concerning forms and processes of networking and commu-nity building - i.e. sociability in the internet, as well as the social embeddings of the users which are mediated through the internet - suggest that net based communication and infor-mation processes may entail the resource 'social support'. Thus, with reference to social work and the task of compensating the reproduction of social disadvantages - whether they are medial or not - the ways in which teenagers get access to and utilize net based social sup-port are to be analysed.

  8. Racial Differences in Communication Apprehension and Interprofessional Socialization in Fourth-Year Doctor of Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinski, Aryn C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine racial differences in communication apprehension and interprofessional socialization in fourth-year PharmD students and to investigate the relationship between the two constructs. Methods. Two measures with reliability and validity psychometric evidence were administered to fourth-year pharmacy students at a single historically black university with a large racial minority population. The Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (PRCA-24) measures level of fear or anxiety associated with communication. The Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale (ISVS) measures beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors towards interprofessional collaborative practice. Results. One hundred fourteen students completed the survey. This produced a 77.4% response rate and 45.6% of the participants were African American. There were significant differences between races (ie, White, African-American, and Asian) on both measures. The PCRA-24 and ISVS were significantly correlated in each racial group. Conclusion. As pharmacy education moves to more interprofessional collaborations, the racial differences need to be considered and further explored. Pharmacy curricula can be structured to promote students’ comfort when communicating interprofessionally across racial groups. Understanding of culture and early education in cultural competence may need to be emphasized to navigate racial or cultural differences. PMID:26941434

  9. Training experience in gestures affects the display of social gaze in baboons' communication with a human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjade, Marie; Canteloup, Charlotte; Meguerditchian, Adrien; Vauclair, Jacques; Gaunet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Gaze behaviour, notably the alternation of gaze between distal objects and social partners that accompanies primates' gestural communication is considered a standard indicator of intentionality. However, the developmental precursors of gaze behaviour in primates' communication are not well understood. Here, we capitalized on the training in gestures dispensed to olive baboons (Papio anubis) as a way of manipulating individual communicative experience with humans. We aimed to delineate the effects of such a training experience on gaze behaviour displayed by the monkeys in relation with gestural requests. Using a food-requesting paradigm, we compared subjects trained in requesting gestures (i.e. trained subjects) to naïve subjects (i.e. control subjects) for their occurrences of (1) gaze behaviour, (2) requesting gestures and (3) temporal combination of gaze alternation with gestures. We found that training did not affect the frequencies of looking at the human's face, looking at food or alternating gaze. Hence, social gaze behaviour occurs independently from the amount of communicative experience with humans. However, trained baboons-gesturing more than control subjects-exhibited most gaze alternation combined with gestures, whereas control baboons did not. By reinforcing the display of gaze alternation along with gestures, we suggest that training may have served to enhance the communicative function of hand gestures. Finally, this study brings the first quantitative report of monkeys producing requesting gestures without explicit training by humans (controls). These results may open a window on the developmental mechanisms (i.e. incidental learning vs. training) underpinning gestural intentional communication in primates. PMID:25138999

  10. EarthScope's Education, Outreach, and Communications: Using Social Media from Continental to Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, W.; Frus, R.; Arrowsmith, R.; Fouch, M. J.; Garnero, E. J.; Semken, S. C.; Taylor, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Social media has emerged as a popular and effective form of communication among all age groups, with nearly half of Internet users belonging to a social network or using another form of social media on a regular basis. This phenomenon creates an excellent opportunity for earth science organizations to use the wide reach, functionality and informal environment of social media platforms to disseminate important scientific information, create brand recognition, and establish trust with users. Further, social media systems can be utilized for missions of education, outreach, and communicating important timely information (e.g., news agencies are common users). They are eminently scaleable (thus serving from a few to millions of users with no cost and no performance problem), searchable (people are turning to them more frequently as conduits for information), and user friendly (thanks to the massive resources poured into the underlying technology and design, these systems are easy to use and have been widely adopted). They can be used, therefore, to engage the public interactively with the EarthScope facilities, experiments, and discoveries, and continue the cycle of discussions, experiments, analysis and conclusions that typify scientific advancement. The EarthScope National Office (ESNO) is launching an effort to utilize social media to broaden its impact as a conduit between scientists, facilities, educators, and the public. The ESNO will use the opportunities that social media affords to offer high quality science content in a variety of formats that appeal to social media users of various age groups, including blogs (popular with users 18-29), Facebook and Twitter updates (popular with users ages 18-50), email updates (popular with older adults), and video clips (popular with all age groups). We will monitor the number of "fans" and "friends" on social media and networking pages in order to gauge the increase in the percentage of the user population visiting the site. We will also use existing tools available on social media sites to track the relationships between users who visit or "friend" the site to determine how knowledge of the site is transferred amongst various social, educational or geographic groups. Finally, we will use this information to iteratively improve the variety of content and media on the site to increase our user pool, improve EarthScope recognition, and provide appropriate and user-specific Earth science information, especially for time sensitive events of wide interest such as natural disasters.

  11. Social perception deficits after traumatic brain injury: interaction between emotion recognition, mentalizing ability, and social communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Skye; Flanagan, Sharon

    2004-07-01

    Thirty-four adults with severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and 34 matched control participants were asked to interpret videotaped conversational exchanges. Study participants were asked to judge the speakers' emotions, the speakers' beliefs (first-order theory of mind), what the speakers intended their conversational partners to believe (second-order theory of mind), and what they meant by remarks that were sincere or literally untrue (i.e., a lie or sarcastic retort). The TBI group had marked difficulty judging most facets of social information. They could recognize speaker beliefs only when this information was explicitly provided. In general, emotion recognition and first-order theory of mind judgments were not related to the ability to understand social (conversational) inference, whereas second-order theory of mind judgments were related to that ability. PMID:15291735

  12. Social Media and the Social Good: How Nonprofits Use Facebook to Communicate with the Public

    CERN Document Server

    Saxton, Gregory D; Chiu, I-Hsuan; Feng, Bo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine the social networking practices of the 100 largest nonprofit organizations in the United States. More specifically, we develop a comprehensive classification scheme to delineate these organizations' use of Facebook as a stakeholder engagement tool. We find that there are 5 primary categories of Facebook "statuses", which can be aggregated into three key dimensions - "information", "community", and "action". Our analysis reveals that, though the "informational" use of Facebook is still significant, nonprofit organizations are better at using Facebook to strategically engage their stakeholders via "dialogic" and "community-building" practices than they have been with traditional websites. The adoption of social media seems to have engendered new paradigms of public engagement.

  13. Por uma nova abordagem de mudança social: a comunicação do compromisso / For a new approach of social change: committing communication

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Robert Vincent, Joule; Françoise, Bernard.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Os limites das ações de comunicação que repousam sobre a informação e a persuasão são conhecidos. Se elas permitem modificar as atitudes e os saberes, elas não permitem, entretanto, modificar os comportamentos efetivos, porque boas atitudes não são suficientes para ter bons comportamentos. O objetiv [...] o deste artigo é propor uma nova abordagem de mudança social à luz da teoria do compromisso. Três estudos são relatados, mostrando sua eficácia para promover os comportamentos de cidadania desejados (participação eleitoral, proteção do meio-ambiente e economia de energia). Esta abordagem, chamada "comunicação do compromisso", apóia-se sobre os atos preparatórios e os atos de comprometimento que convém obter das pessoas enfocadas. Abstract in english We already know the limits of communication actions based on information and persuasion. If that type of actions can lead to changing attitudes and knowledge, they hardly allow modifying the effective behaviours, simply because having the right attitudes is usually not enough to have the right behav [...] iour. The goal of this article is to propose a new approach of social change in the light of the commitment theory. Three studies are reported, which show this theory efficiency to promote required citizenship behaviours: electoral participation, environmental protection and saving energy. This approach, called "committing communication", is based on preparatory acts and acts of commitment which are necessary to obtain from target subjects.

  14. Social Media and the Social Good: How Nonprofits Use Facebook to Communicate with the Public

    OpenAIRE

    Saxton, Gregory D.; Guo, Chao; Chiu, I-Hsuan; Feng, Bo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine the social networking practices of the 100 largest nonprofit organizations in the United States. More specifically, we develop a comprehensive classification scheme to delineate these organizations' use of Facebook as a stakeholder engagement tool. We find that there are 5 primary categories of Facebook "statuses", which can be aggregated into three key dimensions - "information", "community", and "action". Our analysis reveals that, though the "inf...

  15. What does Big Data tell? Sampling the social network by communication channels

    CERN Document Server

    Török, János; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kertész, János; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    Big Data has become the primary source of understanding the structure and dynamics of the society at large scale. The network of social interactions can be considered as a multiplex, where each layer corresponds to one communication channel and the aggregate of all them constitutes the entire social network. However, usually one has information only about one of the channels, which should be considered as a sample of the whole. Here we show by simulations and analytical methods that this sampling may lead to bias. For example, while it is expected that the degree distribution of the whole social network has a maximum at a value larger than one, we get with reasonable assumptions about the sampling process a monotonously decreasing distribution as observed in empirical studies of single channel data. Also we find, that assortativity may occur or get strengthened due to the sampling process. We analyze the far-reaching consequences of our findings.

  16. The value and use of social media as communication tool in the plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterrieder, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Social media now complements many parts of our lives. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and many other social networking sites allow users to share and interact with online content and to connect with like-minded people. Its strengths - rapid dissemination and amplification of content and the ability to lead informal conversations - make it a powerful tool to use in a professional context. This commentary explains the overall concept of social media and offers suggestions on usage and possible types of scientific content. It advises researchers on the potential benefits and how to take a strategic approach towards building a social media presence. It also presents examples of effective social media use within the plant science community. Common reasons for scientists to not engage with social media include the fear of appearing unprofessional, posting something wrong or being misunderstood, or a lack of confidence in their computer skills. With the rapid changes in academic publishing, dissemination and science communication, as well as the rise of 'altmetrics' to track online engagement with scientific content, digital literacy will become an essential skill in a scientist's tool kit. PMID:23845168

  17. Applying social marketing in health care: communicating evidence to change consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; McCormack, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    Social marketing uses commercial marketing strategies to change individual and organizational behavior and policies. It has been effective on a population level across a wide range of public health and health care domains. There is limited evidence of the effectiveness of social marketing in changing health care consumer behavior through its impact on patient-provider interaction or provider behavior. Social marketers need to identify translatable strategies (e.g., competition analysis, branding, and tailored messages) that can be applied to health care provider and consumer behavior. Three case studies from social marketing illustrate potential strategies to change provider and consumer behavior. Countermarketing is a rapidly growing social marketing strategy that has been effective in tobacco control and may be effective in countering pharmaceutical marketing using specific message strategies. Informed decision making is a useful strategy when there is medical uncertainty, such as in prostate cancer screening and treatment. Pharmaceutical industry marketing practices offer valuable lessons for developing competing messages to reach providers and consumers. Social marketing is an effective population-based behavior change strategy that can be applied in individual clinical settings and as a complement to reinforce messages communicated on a population level. There is a need for more research on message strategies that work in health care and population-level effectiveness studies. PMID:18556638

  18. The Negative Repetition Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  19. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  20. Comunicação como Ciência Social (e mais) / Communication as a Social Science (and more) / La comunicación como una ciencia social (y más)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Craig, Calhoun.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A Comunicação é o campo mais importante para o estudo de muitas dimensões-chave de mudanças sociais. Esta é a premissa básica deste texto apresentado na conferência de abertura do congresso anual da International Communication Association, em 2011. Ele traz reflexões sobre uma série de questões de i [...] dentidade, metodologias, fronteiras e caminhos para os estudos e práticas no campo. Fazendo um paralelo com outras disciplinas que passaram pelo mesmo processo, a conclusão é que o campo da Comunicação precisa mais preservar a riqueza de sua interdisciplinaridade do que buscar respostas em uma aparente e, às vezes, falsa autonomia científica. Abstract in spanish La Comunicación es el campo más importante para el estudio de muchos aspectos fundamentales del cambio social. Esta es la premisa básica de este trabajo presentado en la apertura del congreso anual de la International Communication Association, en 2011. Él trae una serie de reflexiones sobre las cue [...] stiones de identidad, las metodologías, las fronteras y caminos para el estudio y la práctica en el campo. Haciendo un paralelismo con otras disciplinas que han pasado por el mismo proceso, la conclusión es que el campo de la comunicación ya la necesidad de preservar la riqueza de su interdisciplinario de buscar respuestas en una autonomía científica aparente y falsa a veces. Abstract in english Communication is the most important field for the study of many key dimensions of social change. This is the basic premise of this text presented at the opening of the annual conference of International Communication Association in 2011. The subject brings a lot of reflections about a series of issu [...] es on identity, methodologies, borders and paths for studies and practices in the field. Making a parallel with other disciplines that have gone through the same process, the conclusion is that the field of Communication longer needs to preserve the richness of its interdisciplinary than to search for answers in an apparent, and sometimes false, scientific autonomy.

  1. Collective Review: Catalyzing Sustainable Social Change through Public Communication, Radio for Development, and Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Manda, Levi Zeleza

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews three recent books by four authors (two single, one joint) from Australia and Africa. The three books are related in that they all discuss the need to acknowledge the role of dialogic communication and popular participation as catalysts for sustainable social development in the developing world. Specifically, "Public Relations, Activism and Social Change" proposes that public relations (PR) needs to transform itself into public communication (PC), where people are made to...

  2. Information and Communication in a Networked Infosphere - a Review of Concepts and Application in Social Branding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Manuel Santos Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This paper aims at providing a contribution to the comprehensive review of the impact of information and communication, and their supporting technologies, in the current transformation of human life in the infosphere. The paper also offers an example of the power of new social approaches to the use of information and communication technologies to foster new working models in organizations by presenting the main outcomes of a research project on social branding. A discussion about some trends of the future impact of new information and communication technologies in the infosphere is also included.Resumen:Este artículo tiene como objetivo proporcionar una contribución a la revisión global del impacto de la información y la comunicación, y sus tecnologías de apoyo, en la actual transformación de la vida humana en la infosfera. El artículo también ofrece un ejemplo del poder de los nuevos enfoques sociales sobre el uso de las tecnologías de información y comunicación para fomentar nuevos modelos de trabajo en las organizaciones mediante la presentación de los principales resultados de un proyecto de investigación sobre desarrollo social de marca. Una discusión sobre algunas de las tendencias del futuro impacto de las nuevas tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en la infosfera también se incluye. 

  3. Integration of social aspects in radiation protection. The AIRP Work group on communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection has never been confined just to its scientific and quantitative aspects as it also incorporates a real and proper social factor. In most developed countries, considerations on the social and ethical issues of radiation protection and discussions on the approaches to stakeholder involvement are in a state of positive turmoil. Scientific and practical experts are identifying and promoting dialogue procedures, embracing ethical and social aspects, and are moving together to add to their experience in new and improved practices for the decision-making process. In early 2006, the Italian Radiation Protection Association (AIRP) set up a workgroup for the purpose of: 1-) Promoting dialogue among RP experts, experts in other disciplines, national and local authorities and the public, in relation to social awareness issues in the fields of ionising and non-ionising radiation protection; 2-) Promoting reflection on the mutual interactions between radiation protection and society; 3-) Contributing to the development and diffusion in the RP community of the culture of stakeholder engagement in the decision-making process. Aiming at promoting continual dialogue between the radiation protection community and society, an initial meeting was held in June 2006 on the fundamentals and objectives of RP communication, by focusing on issues such as: the credibility of information sources, the role of the mass media and institutions in risk communication. A workshop was held in November 2006 on the social aspects of radiation protection: experts in scientific journalism, sociology and medical physics, representatives of consumer associations, participants in a Government task commission, local authorities and representatives of the leading local and national institutions involved in RP, were given the opportunity of communicating and discussing the main socially-sensitive aspects of RP. The work of the AIRP group continued in 2007 with two events related on the ethical, social and legal aspects of radioactive waste management. In 2008, we intend to support the growth of RP culture in society by organizing an event concerning the various aspects of radiation protection education and information for non professionals. To invite suggestions and obtain new points of view, the group has opened a website and prepared a basic questionnaire. The AIRP workgroup is constantly creating the conditions and opportunities for extending knowledge about radiation protection and involving society as a whole in extensive debate concerning risk management. (author)

  4. Energy saving, social and government communication; Ahorrro de energia, sociedad y comunicacion gubernamental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales Camarena, Francisco [Comision Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The actions for the energy efficiency and the utilization of renewable energies are multiple and dispersed, in each one of the energy consumption points of the country. For this reason, two important factors to foment these actions are to promote the social participation and the effective government communication towards the society: energy saving and social participation. One of the main faculties of the National Commission of Energy Saving (CONAE) is to foment the efficiency in the energy use, through actions coordinated with the different agencies and organizations of the Federal Public Administration, with the governments of the federal entities and the municipalities and, through coordinated operations, with the private and social sectors. The CONAE has established mechanisms of coordination and cooperation with the private and social sectors, having fomented programs, projects and actions whose purpose is the energy efficiency, outstanding: 1) Committees and work groups; 2) Cooperation Agreements; 3) the Advisory Council for the Foment of Renewable Energy. [Spanish] Las acciones para la eficiencia energetica y el aprovechamiento de las energias renovables son multiples y dispersas, en cada uno de los puntos de consumo de energia del pais. Por ello, dos factores importantes para fomentar estas acciones son promover la participacion social y la comunicacion gubernamental eficaz hacia la sociedad: Ahorro de energia y participacion social. Una de las principales facultades de la Comision Nacional de Ahorro de Energia es fomentar la eficiencia en el uso de energia, a traves de acciones coordinadas con las diversas dependencias y entidades de la Administracion Publica Federal, con los gobiernos de las entidades federativas y de los municipios y, a traves de acciones concertadas, con los sectores social y privado. La CONAE ha establecido mecanismos de coordinacion y de cooperacion con los sectores privado y social, fomentando programas, proyectos y acciones cuyo proposito es la eficiencia energetica, destacado: 1) Comites y grupos de trabajo; 2) Convenios de Cooperacion; 3) el Consejo Consultivo de Fomento de la Energia Renovables.

  5. Integrating Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Peer Support for Students with Disabilities: A Social-Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kimberly Wolowiec; Shogren, Karrie A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the degree to which augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention research included students with disabilities and their peers as part of the intervention. Given the shift in the field toward a social-ecological framework of disability, incorporating natural communication partners into…

  6. Integrating Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Peer Support for Students with Disabilities: A Social-Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kimberly Wolowiec; Shogren, Karrie A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the degree to which augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention research included students with disabilities and their peers as part of the intervention. Given the shift in the field toward a social-ecological framework of disability, incorporating natural communication partners into…

  7. Relationship Between Emotional Intelligence and Communication Skills Among High School Students in Hamadan Based on the Theory of Social Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Nouri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: There has been growing interest in adolescents’ emotional intelligence and strengthening their various skills including effective and efficient communication. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence and communication skills of high school students in Hamadan, Iran based on the theory of social support. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was conducted in 2014. Multistage sampling was performed to select 497 students from high schools of Hamadan. The subjects completed a questionnaire containing items on communication skills, emotional intelligence, and social support. The collected data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation test, Spearman’s correlation test, t-test, and analysis of variance in SPSS-18. Results: There was a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and communication skills of the participants. The students had a moderate level of communication skills. In general, girls enjoyed higher levels of communication skills, emotional intelligence, and social support (except appraisal support compared to boys. Moreover, constructs of social support were significantly related with emotional intelligence and communication skills. Conclusion: According to our findings, educational interventions and training packages for students, parents, and schoolteachers are required to improve the students’ emotional intelligence and communication skills.

  8. The Social Communication Intervention Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effectiveness of Speech and Language Therapy for School-Age Children Who Have Pragmatic and Social Communication Problems with or without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine; Lockton, Elaine; Freed, Jenny; Gaile, Jacqueline; Earl, Gillian; McBean, Kirsty; Nash, Marysia; Green, Jonathan; Vail, Andy; Law, James

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children who show disproportionate difficulty with the pragmatic as compared with the structural aspects of language are described as having pragmatic language impairment (PLI) or social communication disorder (SCD). Some children who have PLI also show mild social impairments associated with high-functioning autism or autism spectrum…

  9. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  10. Linguistic Coding of Social Information and Mechanism by which social categories affect the communication process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nilu Choudhary

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In many communities, two or more varieties of the same language are used by some speakers in different conditions. Perhaps the most familiar example is the use of the standard language and regional dialect when many speakers speak their local dialect at home or among family or friend of the same dialect area but use the standard language in communicating with speakers of other dialects on public occasions. Charles A. Ferguson (1964 in his famous work on ‘Diglossia’finds that in all the defining languages the speakers regard superposed variety as superior to regional dialects in number of respects. Sometimes the feeling is so strong that the superposed variety alone is regarded as real and the regional dialect is reported ‘not to exist’. This attitude cannot be called deliberate attempt to deceive the questioner, but seems almost a self-deception. Even the feeling of the reality and superiority of the superposed variety is not so strong there is usually a belief that this variety is somehow more beautiful, more logical, better able to express important thoughts, and the like. And this belief is held also by speakers whose command of the said variety is quite limited.

  11. How repetitive are genomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Wiehe Thomas; Haubold Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome sequences vary strongly in their repetitiveness and the causes for this are still debated. Here we propose a novel measure of genome repetitiveness, the index of repetitiveness, Ir, which can be computed in time proportional to the length of the sequences analyzed. We apply it to 336 genomes from all three domains of life. Results The expected value of Ir is zero for random sequences of any G/C content and greater than zero for sequences with excess repeats. We find...

  12. Development and Analyses of Privacy Management Models in Online Social Networks Based on Communication Privacy Management Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Jung

    2013-01-01

    Online social networks (OSNs), while serving as an emerging means of communication, promote various issues of privacy. Users of OSNs encounter diverse occasions that lead to invasion of their privacy, e.g., published conversation, public revelation of their personally identifiable information, and open boundary of distinct social groups within…

  13. A sense of change: media designers and artists communicating about complexity in social-ecological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost M. Vervoort

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To take on the current and future challenges of global environmental change, fostering a widespread societal understanding of and engagement with the complex dynamics that characterize interacting human and natural systems is essential. Current science communication methods struggle with a number of specific challenges associated with communicating about complex systems. In this study we report on two collaborative processes, a short workshop and longer course, that aimed to harness the insights of interactive media designers and artists to overcome these challenges. The two processes resulted in 86 new interactive media concepts which were selected by the participants and organizers using set criteria and then evaluated using the same criteria by a panel of communication and media design experts and a panel of complex systems scientists using the same criteria. The top eight concepts are discussed in this paper. These concepts fell into the categories of serious games, group interaction concepts, and social media storytelling. The serious games focused directly on complex systems characteristics and were evaluated to be intuitive and engaging designs that combined transparency and complexity well. The group interaction concepts focused mostly on feedbacks and nonlinearity but were fully developed and tested in the workshops, and evaluated as engaging, accessible, and easy to implement in workshops and educational settings. The social media storytelling concepts involved less direct interactions with system dynamics but were seen as highly accessible to large scale audiences. The results of this study show the potential of interdisciplinary collaboration between complex systems scientists, designers, and artists. The results and process discussed in this paper show the value of more structural engagement of interactive media designers and artist communities in the development of communication tools about human and natural systems change.

  14. Communication, social-emotional development and parenting stress in Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarimski, K

    1997-02-01

    Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome is a dysmorphogenic disorder characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities, and in most cases, severe cognitive limitations. Parents of 27 children with Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome completed psychological questionnaires concerning communicative and social-emotional behaviours, and reported on their parenting stress. Only four children were able to use speech, but most of the older children expressed needs through non-verbal means. Feeding problems, over-activity, irritability and stereotyped behaviours were characteristic for the majority of the group. Self-injurious behaviours occur in more than 40%. Parenting stress is very high, especially in parents of older children. PMID:9089461

  15. The role of socializing agents in communicating healthy eating to adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Grønhøj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    A survey was conducted of 386 Danish and Hong Kong adolescents aged 11 to 16. Looking at socializing agents, respondents claimed that parents asked them to eat healthy food more often than the government publicity, teachers or friends. Parents were also perceived as being the most effective source...... in encouraging them to eat healthy food. Respondents considered news and fear appeals for communicating healthy eating the most effective, while popularity and achievement appeals were considered less effective. Respondents with higher collectivism scores showed a higher liking and perceived...

  16. The role of socializing agents in communicating healthy eating to adolescents : A cross cultural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard

    A survey was conducted of 386 Danish and Hong Kong adolescents aged 11 to 16. Looking at socializing agents, respondents claimed that parents asked them to eat healthy food more often than the government publicity, teachers or friends. Parents were also perceived as being the most effective source in encouraging them to eat healthy food. Respondents considered news and fear appeals for communicating healthy eating the most effective, while popularity and achievement appeals were considered less effective. Respondents with higher collectivism scores showed a higher liking and perceived effectiveness of all five advertising appeals.

  17. Fiction as a Medium of Social Communication in 19th Century France

    OpenAIRE

    Sabina Pstrocki-Sehovic

    2014-01-01

    This article will present the extent to which literature could be viewed as means of social communication – i.e. informing and influencing society – in 19thcentury France, by analysing the appearance of three authors at different points:  the beginning, the middle and the end of the century. The first is the case of Balzac at the beginning of the 19th Century who becomes the most successful novelist of the century in France and who, in his prolific expression and rich vocabulary, portrays soc...

  18. Account planning: applying an advertising discipline to health communication and social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael

    2012-01-01

    As health marketers seek new models to design campaigns, the advertising discipline of account planning offers an approach that can improve campaign development. The underlying principle of account planning is to bring the consumer perspective to all phases of campaign development, primarily through qualitative formative research. Account planners design the overall communication strategy and contribute to creative development of individual executions. The creative brief, a primary tool of account planning, is especially useful in conceptualizing campaigns. This report discusses the history and approach of account planning, followed by an example of account planning in the design of a social marketing campaign. PMID:22905947

  19. Cacophony or Empowerment? Analysing the Impact of New Information Communication Technologies and New Social Media in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Jason P. Abbott

    2012-01-01

    The capabilities, tools and websites we associate with new information communication technologies and social media are now ubiquitous. Moreover tools that were designed to facilitate innocuous conversation and social interaction have had unforeseen political impacts. Nowhere was this more visible than during the 2011 uprisings across the Arab World. From Tunis to Cairo, and Tripoli to Damascus protest movements against authoritarian rule openly utilized social networking and file sharing tool...

  20. Estratégia como prática social e teoria da ação comunicativa: possíveis aproximações teóricas / Strategy as social practice and theory of communicative action: possible theoretical approaches

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Elisa, Zwick; Isabel Cristina da, Silva; Mozar José de, Brito.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo visa a discutir as possíveis aproximações teóricas entre a estratégia como prática social (EPS) e a teoria da ação comunicativa (TAC), instituída por Jürgen Habermas. Almejou-se construir um diálogo analítico, destacando as interfaces que podem ser estabelecidas entre esses construtos. E [...] specificamente, buscou-se: (i) descrever o arcabouço teórico da estratégia como prática social; (ii) discutir os aspectos conceituais da teoria da ação comunicativa; e (iii) apresentar as possíveis aproximações teóricas entre a estratégia como prática social e a teoria da ação comunicativa. Argumenta-se que a TAC tem elementos interessantes a contribuir com a estratégia como prática e que, por esse motivo, é necessário explorar as aproximações teóricas. Desse modo, este artigo contribui singularmente para associar o pensamento habermasiano às perspectivas teóricas da estratégia como prática social, especialmente em seus elementos razão e verdade, entendimento e consenso, que ensejam contribuições substanciais da racionalidade comunicativa para a estratégia como prática social. Abstract in english This article aims to discuss the possible theoretical approaches between strategy as social practice (SSP) and the theory of communicative action (TCA), established by Jürgen Habermas. We intended to construct an analytical dialogue, highlighting the interfaces that may be established between these [...] constructs. Specifically, we sought to: (i) describe the theoretical framework of strategy as social practice; (ii) discuss the conceptual aspects of the theory of communicative action; and (iii) introduce the possible theoretical approaches between strategy as social practice and the theory of communicative action. It is argued that TCA has interesting elements contributing to strategy as a practice and that, for this reason, there is a need to explore the theoretical approaches. So, this article contributes in a unique way to associate Habermas' thought with the theoretical perspectives of strategy as social practice, especially concerning their elements reason and truth, understanding and consensus, which give rise to significant contributions of communicative rationality to strategy as social practice.

  1. Social Media and Its Dual Use in Biopreparedness: Communication and Visualization Tools in an Animal Bioterrorism Incident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, Elisabeth; Barker, Gary C.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on social media and interactive challenges for emergency organizations during a bioterrorism or agroterrorism incident, and it outlines the dual-use dilemma of social media. Attackers or terrorists can use social media as their modus of operandi, and defenders, including emergency organizations in law enforcement and public and animal health, can use it for peaceful purposes. To get a better understanding of the uses of social media in these situations, a workshop was arranged in Stockholm, Sweden, to raise awareness about social media and animal bioterrorism threats. Fifty-six experts and crisis communicators from international and national organizations participated. As a result of the workshop, it was concluded that emergency organizations can collect valuable information and monitor social media before, during, and after an outbreak. In order to make use of interactive communication to obtain collective intelligence from the public, emergency organizations must adapt to social networking technologies, requiring multidisciplinary knowledge in the fields of information, communication, IT, and biopreparedness. Social network messaging during a disease outbreak can be visualized in stream graphs and networks showing clusters of Twitter and Facebook users. The visualization of social media can be an important preparedness tool in the response to bioterrorism and agroterrorism.

  2. Evaluación de la competencia comunicativa y social en foros virtuales. [Evaluation of communicative and social competence in virtual forums].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios, Santiago

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to carry out an approach to the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the content in the virtual forums used as a complement to the university lessons. After defining the base criteria of the assessment process, the forums developed in three subjects (215 students are analyzed. The results show the need to distinguish between quantitative and qualitative results in relation to their impact on assessing the level of competence; they also suggest the importance of the didactic design of the subject in the evolution of the communicative and social competences of the students’ participations. El objeto de esta investigación es realizar una aproximación al análisis cuantitativo y cualitativo del contenido de los foros virtuales de debate utilizados como complemento de la docencia universitaria presencial. Tras definir los criterios-base del proceso de evaluación, se analizan los foros desarrollados en tres asignaturas (215 estudiantes. Los resultados muestran la necesidad de distinguir entre los resultados cuantitativos y los cualitativos en relación a su impacto en la evaluación del nivel de competencia; también sugieren la importancia del diseño didáctico de la asignatura en la evolución de la competencia comunicativa y social de las intervenciones de los estudiantes.

  3. Social Communication and Theory of Mind in Boys with Autism and Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MollyLosh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Impairments in the social use of language, or pragmatics, constitute a core characteristic of autism. Problems with pragmatic language have also been documented in fragile X syndrome, a monogenic condition that is the most common known genetic cause of autism. Evidence suggests that social cognitive ability, or theory of mind, may also be impaired in both conditions, and in autism, may importantly relate to pragmatic language ability. Given the substantial overlap observed in autism and FXS, this study aimed to better define those social-communicative phenotypes that overlap in these two conditions by comparing pragmatic language ability and theory of mind in children with idiopathic autism and children with FXS, with and without autism, as well as children with Down syndrome and typically developing controls. We further examined correlations between these cognitive-behavioral phenotypes and molecular genetic variation related to FMR1 in the FXS group. Results indicated that children with idiopathic autism and those with FXS and autism performed comparably on direct-assessment measures of pragmatic language and theory of mind, whereas those with FXS only did not differ from controls. Theory of mind was related to pragmatic language ability in all groups. Pragmatic language and theory of mind also correlated with genetic variation at the FMR1 locus (CGG repeats and percent methylation. These results point towards substantial overlap in the social and language phenotypes in autism and FXS and suggest a molecular genetic basis to these phenotypic profiles.

  4. Communication of emergency public warnings: A social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileti, D.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Sorensen, J.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    More than 200 studies of warning systems and warning response were reviewed for this social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment of communication of emergency public warnings. The major findings are as follows. First, variations in the nature and content of warnings have a large impact on whether or not the public heeds the warning. Relevant factors include the warning source; warning channel; the consistency, credibility, accuracy, and understandability of the message; and the warning frequency. Second, characteristics of the population receiving the warning affect warning response. These include social characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age, social setting characteristics such as stage of life or family context, psychological characteristics such as fatalism or risk perception, and knowledge characteristics such as experience or training. Third, many current myths about public response to emergency warning are at odds with knowledge derived from field investigations. Some of these myths include the keep it simple'' notion, the cry wolf'' syndrome, public panic and hysteria, and those concerning public willingness to respond to warnings. Finally, different methods of warning the public are not equally effective at providing an alert and notification in different physical and social settings. Most systems can provide a warning given three or more hours of available warning time. Special systems such as tone-alert radios are needed to provide rapid warning. 235 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Mobile communication and ethics: implications of everyday actions on social order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Ling

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Of the many opportunities and affordances that mobile technologies bring to our day-to-day lives, the ability to cheat physical separation and remain accessible to each other—in an instant—also brings pressure to bear on well-established social conventions as to how we should act when we are engaged with others in shared spaces. In this paper we explore some ethical dimensions of mobile communication by considering the manner in which individuals in everyday contexts balance interpretations of emergent social conventions with personal desires to connect in the moment. As we later discuss, the decisions made in response to a ringing mobile phone or flashing text message emerge from consequential versus deontological ethical frames used to determine what to do versus what we ought to do. This is particularly true in western and North American cultural contexts from which our data are collected. Using Goffman's dramaturgy, we suggest that these conflicts occurring on an individual level provide evidence of social structure, and are simultaneously entwined with our less obvious ruminations on the maintenance of social order.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v4i2.1760

  6. Learning to Use the Internet and Online Social Media: What Is the Effectiveness of Home-Based Intervention for Youth with Complex Communication Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Emma; Raghavendra, Parimala; Newman, Lareen; Wood, Denise; Connell, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Youth with complex communication needs (CCN) face increased barriers to their social participation due to limited communication abilities and opportunities. Youth today use the internet as a social tool and youth with CCN may also benefit from internet use to increase their social participation. Five youth between the ages of 10-18 with CCN who…

  7. A South African university-practitioner partnership to strengthen capacity in social and behaviour change communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Christofides

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, communication plays an integral role in public health strategies, from infectious diseases to diseases related to lifestyles. The evolution of the field of social and behaviour change communication (SBCC, combined with the need for evidence based practice and multi-level interventions to promote health, and human resource gaps in sub-Saharan Africa have led to the imperative to standardise and formalise the field. Moreover, current practitioners come from different disciplinary backgrounds underlining the need to define common core skills and competencies. This paper describes the partnership between the Wits School of Public Health and the Soul City Institute for Health and Development Communication and how the partners responded to this need. It highlights the factors influencing sustainable institutional capacity to provide quality assured, accredited training. We describe an unexpected positive response from a number of practitioner organisations that have chosen to send multiple staff members for training, specifically to build a critical mass within their organisations. Finally, we note the interest from (mostly southern-based academic institutions in setting up similar programmes and postulate that south–south collaborations can contribute to building sustainable context specific and evidence-informed SBCC programmes in the global south.

  8. An SCA-based Approach for Social and Pervasive Communications in Home Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rouvoy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In home environments, the customization of applications according to inhabitant's information requires the integration of heterogenous event sources and services. To do that, the events have to be collected and processed, and the volatile services identified and used. The information collection and service access have to be done considering the identity of users in order to avoid unexpected behaviors in the customized applications or unauthorized accesses. However, although the event flow, service mobility and user identity are key issues in the customization of applications, existing solutions fail to deal with them in a simple and flexible way. Therefore, in this paper we propose to face these issues by combining the SCA (Service Component Architecture standard, micro-blogging services and discovery technologies. In particular, we benefit from the SCA extensibility to introduce support for social communications enabling asynchronous event exchange (via Twitter, and for pervasive communications to deal with mobility (by means of standard discovery protocols such as UPnP. Furthermore, we exploit the intents from SCA in order to allow user identification in home environments. We bring the new communications and user identity support into the FraSCAti, a platform for SCA applications. We illustrate our work with a smart home scenario requiring the integration of heterogeneous technologies.

  9. "Bill is now singing": joint engagement and the emergence of social communication of three young children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiouli, Potheini; Grimmet, Kharon; Ruich, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Young children with autism spectrum disorder meet significant challenges in joint attention skills and in social communication. A child-centered, improvisational, music therapy intervention model was implemented to promote engagement in three young children with autism in a kindergarten classroom. A multiple baseline design compared the children's performance through three phases of intervention: focus on faces, response to joint attention, and initiation of joint attention. A complimentary qualitative analysis of teacher and parent experiences allowed for an in-depth understanding of the role of social environment in supporting emerging social communication skills among three children. As all children showed improvement in joint attention and actions of social engagement, this study bears evidence on the potential of music therapy as a promising intervention for promoting social skills of young children with autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24254638

  10. [Social media and medical apps: how they can change health communication, education and care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio

    2013-05-01

    Social media and medical apps for smartphones and tablets are changing health communication, education and care. This change involves physicians and other health care professionals which for their education, training and updating have started to follow public pages and profiles opened by medical journals and professional societies on the online social networking sites (such as Facebook, Twitter and Google+), to access scientific content (videos, images, slides) available on user-generated contents sites (such as SlideShare, Pinterest and YouTube) or on health professional online communities such as Sermo, and to use medical and health apps on their smartphones and tablets. As shown by a number of experiences conducted in US by health institutions such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Atlanta and hospitals such a the Mayo Clinic, these tools are also transforming the way to make health promotion activities and communication, promote healthy habits and lifestyles, and prevent chronic diseases. Finally this change involves patients which are starting to use medical and health apps on their smartphones and tablets to monitor their diseases, and tools such as Patients Like Me (an online patients' community), Facebook and Twitter to share with others the same disease experience, to learn about the disease and treatments, and to find opinions on physicians, hospitals and medical centers. These new communication tools allow users to move to a kind of collaborative education and updating where news and contents (such as public health recommendations, results of the most recent clinical researches or medical guidelines) may be shared and discussed. PMID:23748682

  11. Social media and mobile communications adoption patterns of South African civil society organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiru Pillay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The resurgence of civil society has largely been attributed to the sector’s ability to exploit new interactive technologies and its ability to adapt its communication and mobilisation strategies.Objectives: This study focuses on how South African civil society organisations (CSOs deploy Web 2.0 services and technologies for social advocacy and the context of this technology use.Whilst the literature points to many studies relating to the use of the Internet for advocacy, it also suggests that the role and impact of emerging technologies have not been studied in any detail in CSOs. Such studies have the potential to provide new perspectives to current theoretical frameworks and also to add to the discourse around the use of emerging technologies for advocacy.Method: A survey of South African CSOs explored the level of knowledge of social media services and revealed which services in particular were being adopted.Results: The key findings that emerged were that the sector has a low level of knowledge of social media services and an accompanying low level of adoption. These are partly explained by factors such as macro-economic policies and low levels of Internet penetration and ICT readiness.Conclusion: Further research to determine why certain social media services have been embraced more willingly than others and an analysis of the patterns of adoption to determine any underlying significance or relationships is necessary. An analysis of how CSOs build their advocacy capabilities by appropriating social media and how they thus provide alternate discourses and agendas would be instructive.

  12. Social media and mobile communications adoption patterns of South African civil society organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiru Pillay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The resurgence of civil society has largely been attributed to the sector’s ability to exploit new interactive technologies and its ability to adapt its communication and mobilisation strategies.Objectives: This study focuses on how South African civil society organisations (CSOs deploy Web 2.0 services and technologies for social advocacy and the context of this technology use.Whilst the literature points to many studies relating to the use of the Internet for advocacy, it also suggests that the role and impact of emerging technologies have not been studied in any detail in CSOs. Such studies have the potential to provide new perspectives to current theoretical frameworks and also to add to the discourse around the use of emerging technologies for advocacy.Method: A survey of South African CSOs explored the level of knowledge of social media services and revealed which services in particular were being adopted.Results: The key findings that emerged were that the sector has a low level of knowledge of social media services and an accompanying low level of adoption. These are partly explained by factors such as macro-economic policies and low levels of Internet penetration and ICT readiness.Conclusion: Further research to determine why certain social media services have been embraced more willingly than others and an analysis of the patterns of adoption to determine any underlying significance or relationships is necessary. An analysis of how CSOs build their advocacy capabilities by appropriating social media and how they thus provide alternate discourses and agendas would be instructive.

  13. Social media and mobile communications adoption patterns of South African civil society organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiru Pillay

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The resurgence of civil society has largely been attributed to the sector’s ability to exploit new interactive technologies and its ability to adapt its communication and mobilisation strategies. Objectives: This study focuses on how South African civil society organisations (CSOs deploy Web 2.0 services and technologies for social advocacy and the context of this technology use. Whilst the literature points to many studies relating to the use of the Internet for advocacy, it also suggests that the role and impact of emerging technologies have not been studied in any detail in CSOs. Such studies have the potential to provide new perspectives to current theoretical frameworks and also to add to the discourse around the use of emerging technologies for advocacy. Method: A survey of South African CSOs explored the level of knowledge of social media services and revealed which services in particular were being adopted. Results: The key findings that emerged were that the sector has a low level of knowledge of social media services and an accompanying low level of adoption. These are partly explained by factors such as macro-economic policies and low levels of Internet penetration and ICT readiness. Conclusion: Further research to determine why certain social media services have been embraced more willingly than others and an analysis of the patterns of adoption to determine any underlying significance or relationships is necessary. An analysis of how CSOs build their advocacy capabilities by appropriating social media and how they thus provide alternate discourses and agendas would be instructive.

  14. Correlatos entre o perfil comunicativo e adaptação sócio-comunicativa no espectro autístico / Correlates between communicative profile and social communicative adaptation in the autistic spectrum

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Priscilla Faria, Sousa-Morato; Fernanda Dreux Miranda, Fernandes.

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar se há correlações significativas entre os dados referentes ao perfil funcional da comunicação e os dados da adaptação sócio-comunicativa obtidos por meio de entrevistas individuais com os pais e as terapeutas de crianças com Distúrbios do Espectro Autístico. MÉTODOS: foram sujeit [...] os deste estudo 48 crianças, com diagnóstico clínico incluído no espectro autístico com os quais foram coletados os dados para a determinação do perfil funcional da comunicação por meio de situação lúdica, buscando a espontaneidade comunicativa. Participaram ainda, os responsáveis, legais e pelo atendimento fonoaudiológico especializado, das 48 crianças, ou seja, 46 mães e dois pais e 15 terapeutas, respondendo individualmente a um questionário sobre o relacionamento social das crianças citadas. RESULTADOS: pode-se observar que os resultados referentes à adaptação sócio-comunicativa obtida a partir de entrevistas com terapeutas e pais apresentaram correlações significativas com o perfil funcional da comunicação. De forma geral, o estudo das correlações entre os aspectos do perfil comunicativo e da adaptação sócio-comunicativa não apresentou um grande número de correlações, sendo este número ainda menor quando os pais foram os informantes, demonstrando a interdependência das áreas estudas. CONCLUSÃO: uma das maiores evidências deste trabalho é que mesmo que as crianças do espectro autístico apresentem um desenvolvimento deficitário das habilidades de linguagem, cognição e socialização, ainda assim elas são capazes de extrair pistas lingüísticas e não-lingüísticas do meio comunicativo, e utilizá-las de forma contextual em sua vida social, associando-as com os ganhos na linguagem e no desempenho sócio-cognitivo. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to check if there are any significant correlations among the data on the functional communicative profile and social-communicative adaptation obtained in individual interviews with parents and therapists of children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). METHODS: subjects were: 48 children [...] with psychiatric diagnosis within the autistic spectrum whose functional communicative profile was obtained in play sessions with a language therapist; 48 parents (46 mothers and 2 fathers) and 15 language therapists that answered individually to questionnaires about the children's social performance. RESULTS: it could be observed that the results referring to the social communicative adaptation obtained with the therapists and parents of children with autistic spectrum disorders showed significant correlations with the functional communicative profile. Data on social communicative performance provided by the therapists showed more significant correlations with the functional communicative profile than those obtained with the parents. The number of correlations was generically smaller when the parents provided data on social communicative performance. CONCLUSION: one of the most important results of this study is the evidence that even though ASD children present important deficits in language development, cognition and social abilities, they can be able to extract linguistic and non-linguistic clues from the communicative environment and use them in their social live along with linguistic and social-cognitive improvements.

  15. Pro-social 50-kHz ultrasonic communication in rats: Post-weaning but not post-adolescent social isolation leads to social impairments – phenotypic rescue by re-socialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Seffer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rats are highly social animals and social play during adolescence has an important role for social development, hence post-weaning social isolation is widely used to study the adverse effects of juvenile social deprivation and to induce behavioral phenotypes relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia. Communication is an important component of the rat’s social behavior repertoire, with ultrasonic vocalizations (USV serving as situation-dependent affective signals. High-frequency 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations and induce approach behavior, supporting the notion that they serve as social contact calls; however, post-weaning isolation effects on the behavioral changes displayed by the receiver in response to USV have yet to be studied. We therefore investigated the impact of post-weaning isolation on socio-affective information processing as assessed by means of our established 50-kHz USV radial maze playback paradigm. We showed that post-weaning social isolation specifically affected the behavioral response to playback of pro-social 50-kHz but not alarm 22-kHz USV. While group-housed rats showed the expected preference, i.e. approach, towards 50-kHz USV, the response was even stronger in short-term isolated rats (i.e. 1 day, possibly due to a higher level of social motivation. In contrast, no approach was observed in long-term isolated rats (i.e. 4 weeks. Importantly, deficits in approach were reversed by peer-mediated re-socialization and could not be observed after post-adolescent social isolation, indicating a critical period for social development during adolescence. Together, these results highlight the importance of social experience for affiliative behavior, suggesting a critical involvement of play behavior on socio-affective information processing in rats.

  16. Cereal Couture Meets Social Networks : A case study on me&goji using Social Networks as a marketing tool to communicate their Value Proposition

    OpenAIRE

    af Ekenstam, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The cereal couture company, [me] & goji, is the dream of three young entrepreneurs. They were the first online company ever to provide the U.S market with customized cereal mix. This case study finds that online companies with an innovative product such as [me] & goji may benefit from using Social Networks as a marketing channel to communicate their Value Proposition. Supported by Roger's Adoption theory, selected theories on, Value Proposition, Social Networks, and qualitative data g...

  17. SRP meeting: social and political implications of communicating radiation risk, Daresbury, Warrington, 20 June 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SRP held a very interesting meeting in June at the Daresbury Laboratory in Warrington on the social and political implications of communicating radiation risk. In today's risk-aware society, effective communication is just as important as the control measures introduced to prevent or restrict exposure. In relation to radiation protection, risk communicators had a hard job because of: Public dread Likelihood of risk intensification Perceived inequitable distribution of risks. The higher the uncertainty, the more wary people were likely to be. Julie cited the International Nuclear Events Scale (INES) as a possible tool for promoting a consistent message across all publics. This was because it aimed to put events into proper perspective and provide a common understanding amongst the nuclear community, the media and the public. Julie summed up by saying that the risk communication was not just any form of communication and the issue of communicating radiation risks involved special consideration. Further research established that the more information given to the local population, the more likely that they would deny that there was a problem. Denial could moderate beliefs or emotional reactions to a situation. This then affected their dose as they were more likely to adopt risky behaviour by eating contaminated food and entering contaminated areas. Avoiding the need to undertake safe behaviour reduced stress levels. Furthermore, people adopted beliefs to suit their situation. For example, some inhabitants of the affected areas became adapted to the radiation and actually felt worse outside the contaminated area. There was strong pressure for the maintenance of a situation which actually prevented appropriate precautions being taken. Peter concluded that there was often confusion over the details of technical information that sometimes might not help to prevent a course of action being taken. However on a positive note the research did find credence and positive regard given to peer-provided information. In addition, the information on good practice developed by local focus groups in the area was actually used to limit personal dose. The conclusion was that key information should concentrate on what people needed to know in order to deal with everyday life. My personal conclusion for the day was that it could take time to set in motion partnerships for the future, but that should not stop us from laying down foundations on which to develop stakeholder dialogue for radiation protection. The future of radiation protection is likely to continue to evolve and we need to engage in active debate to help to secure a sustainable decision-making process

  18. Three experimental approaches to measure the social context dependence of prejudice communication and discriminatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Heiko; Liebe, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Empirical research on discrimination is faced with crucial problems stemming from the specific character of its object of study. In democratic societies the communication of prejudices and other forms of discriminatory behavior is considered socially undesirable and depends on situational factors such as whether a situation is considered private or whether a discriminatory consensus can be assumed. Regular surveys thus can only offer a blurred picture of the phenomenon. But also survey experiments intended to decrease the social desirability bias (SDB) so far failed in systematically implementing situational variables. This paper introduces three experimental approaches to improve the study of discrimination and other topics of social (un-)desirability. First, we argue in favor of cognitive context framing in surveys in order to operationalize the salience of situational norms. Second, factorial surveys offer a way to take situational contexts and substitute behavior into account. And third, choice experiments - a rather new method in sociology - offer a more valid method of measuring behavioral characteristics compared to simple items in surveys. All three approaches - which may be combined - are easy to implement in large-scale surveys. Results of empirical studies demonstrate the fruitfulness of each of these approaches. PMID:25432623

  19. Passive, Noiseless, Intensity Amplification of Repetitive Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Maram, R; Li, M; Azaña, J

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of signal intensity is essential for initiating physical processes, diagnostics, sensing, communications, and scientific measurement. During traditional amplification, the signal is amplified by multiplying the signal carriers through an active gain process using an external power source. However, for repetitive waveforms, sufficient energy for amplification often resides in the signal itself. In such cases, the unneeded external power is wasted, and the signal is additionally degraded by noise and distortions that accompany active gain processes. We show noiseless, intensity amplification of repetitive optical pulse waveforms with a gain from 2 to ~20 without using active gain, by recycling energy already stored in the input repetitive signal. This "green" method uses dispersion-induced self-imaging (Talbot) effects to precisely re-distribute the original signal energy into fewer replica waveforms. This approach simply requires a suitable manipulation of the input signal's phase profile along t...

  20. The Persuasive Effect of Social Network Feedback on Mediated Communication: A Case Study in a Real Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotto, Alessandra; Gamberini, Luciano; Spagnolli, Anna; Martino, Francesco; Giovannardi, Isabella

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on social feedback, namely on information on the outcome of users' online activity indirectly generated by other users, and investigates in a real setting whether it can affect subsequent activity and, if so, whether participants are aware of that. SkyPas, an application that calculates, transmits, and displays social feedback, was embedded in a common instant messaging service (Skype(™)) and used during a 7-week trial by 24 office workers at a large business organization. The trial followed an ABA scheme in which the B phase was the feedback provision phase. Results show that social feedback affects users' communication activity (participation, inward communication, outward communication, and reciprocity), sometimes even after the feedback provision phase. At the same time, users were poorly aware of this effect, showing a discrepancy between self-reported and observational measures. These results are then discussed in terms of design transparency and task compatibility. PMID:26985780

  1. INTERACTIVE FORMS OF EDUCATION AS A CONDITION AND MEANS OF FORMING THE COGNITIVE AND SOCIAL-COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Nikolaevich Pustovoytov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Experience in the sphere of independent cognitive activity - cognitive competence - and the experience of communication and awareness of the significance of its activity in some field - social-communicative competence are important quality of modern man. Article considers the problem of forming the informative and social-communicative competences of students. It is shown that these competencies are key personal meta- and cross-competencies. Psycho-pedagogical strategies supporting their formation can be designed and implemented as a unified process. Effective medium formation of experience in the field of self-regulated learning, communicative experience and awareness of the personal importance of cognitive activity is learning academic subjects, and the condition and means - interactive forms of learning. The implementation of group-differentiated form of organization of students is analyzed in this context. Results of the study outlined in this article, have contributed to the problems of implementing competence-based approach to learning. 

  2. Initial steps in extending crisis communication theory towards social media crisis dialogue: revisiting situational crisis communication framework

    OpenAIRE

    Laisi, Suvi

    2013-01-01

    Research Summary The main focus of this research is on the study of stakeholders' naturally occurring reactions to corporate crisis and crisis communication. The literature review aimed to combine situational crisis communication framework (SCCT) with the strategic public relations management theory to establish an idea of strategic two-way crisis communication. The case study evidence is drawn from the Toyota USA Facebook site in relation to the Toyota recall crisis in 2009-2011 and studi...

  3. Comunicação para mudança social: projeto Canal*Motoboy / Communications for social change: project Canal*Motoboy / Comunicación para el cambio social: proyecto Canal*Motoboy

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria das Graças, Targino; Alisson Dias, Gomes.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Na atualidade, a mídia de referência enfrenta a propagação dos meios alternativos dirigidos à democratização das informações geradas por cidadãos comuns. O Canal*Motoboy constitui exemplo desta modalidade de comunicação. Sua proposta é consolidar uma estrutura aberta para dar voz ao coletivo de moto [...] boys de São Paulo (SP), Brasil. Devidamente treinados e recorrendo ao celular multimídia, registram seu dia a dia no website Canal*Motoboy. Este artigo analisa o projeto, a partir da concepção da comunicação para mudança social, uma vez que o direito à liberdade de expressão, historicamente, tem sido expropriado dos cidadãos por conta da expansão vertiginosa dos conglomerados comunicacionais. Além da revisão de literatura, o objeto de estudo segue perspectiva qualitativa mediante uso das técnicas de observação e de entrevista em profundidade para obtenção de informações complementares junto aos atores do coletivo. Abstract in spanish En la actualidad, los medios de comunicación de referencia se contraponen a la propagación de los medios alternativos dirigidos a la democratización de informaciones, generadas por ciudadanos comunes. El Canal*Motoboy constituye un ejemplo de esa modalidad de comunicación. Su propuesta es consolidar [...] una estructura abierta para dar voz al colectivo de motoboys de São Paulo (SP), Brasil. Debidamente entrenados y recurriendo al teléfono móvil multimedia, registran su día-a-día en el website Canal*Motoboy. Este artículo analiza este proyecto, a partir de la concepción de la comunicación para el cambio social, una vez que el derecho a la libertad de expresión, históricamente, ha sido expropiado de los ciudadanos por cuenta de la expansión de los conglomerados comunicacionales. Además de la revisión de literatura, el objeto de estudio se ha abordado desde una perspectiva cualitativa a través de la técnica de observación y de entrevista en profundidad para las informaciones de actores del colectivo. Abstract in english Nowadays, reference media faces the alternative media propagation, which uses different means and it is based on the work of independent producers who target the information democratization in every possible format at no cost and created by "common citizens". The Canal*Motoboy, a project by the Cata [...] lan Antoni Abad, is an example of this kind of communication. He aims to consolidate an open structure in order to give voice to motoboys¹ from São Paulo (SP), Brazil. After being properly trained and by using their multimedia cell phones, they register their routine on Canal*Motoboy website. This article analyzes the progress of this project, based on the communication for social change, once the right to freedom of expression, historically, has been expropriated from citizens on account of the expansion of communication conglomerates. The methodological approach will consist of observation and deep interview technique, as well as literature review.

  4. Maximal repetitions in strings

    OpenAIRE

    Crochemore, Maxime; Ilie, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The cornerstone of any algorithm computing all repetitions in strings of length n in O(n) time is the fact that the number of maximal repetitions (runs) is linear. Therefore, the most important part of the analysis of the running time of such algorithms is counting the number of runs. Kolpakov and Kucherov [FOCS'99] proved it to be cn but could not provide any value for c. Recently, Rytter [STACS'06] proved that c ? 5. His analysis has been improved by Puglisi et al. to obtain 3.48 and by Ryt...

  5. Clinical Social Networking—A New Revolution in Provider Communication and Delivery of Clinical Information across Providers of Care?

    OpenAIRE

    Kolowitz, Brian J.; Lauro, Gonzalo Romero; Venturella, James; Georgiev, Veliyan; Barone, Michael; Deible, Christopher; Shrestha, Rasu

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of social media technologies appears to enhance clinical outcomes through improved communications as reported by Bacigalupe (Fam Syst Heal 29(1):1-14, 2011). The ability of providers to more effectively, directly, and rapidly communicate among themselves as well as with patients should strengthen collaboration and treatment as reported by Bacigalupe (Fam Syst Heal 29(1):1-14, 2011). This paper is a case study in one organization's development of an internally designed and develop...

  6. Unpacking the Blockers: Understanding Perceptions and Social Constraints of Health Communication in Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) Susceptibility Families

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, June A; Kenen, Regina; Hoskins, Lindsey M; KOEHLY, LAURA M.; Graubard, Barry; Loud, Jennifer T.; Greene, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Family communication is essential for accurate cancer risk assessment and counseling; family blockers play a role in this communication process. This qualitative analysis of social exchanges is an extension of earlier work characterizing those who are perceived by study participants as health information gatherers, disseminators, and blockers within families with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) susceptibility. Eighty-nine women, ages 23–56 years, enrolled in a Breast Imaging Study...

  7. Communication, Interventions, and Scientific Advances in Autism: A Commentary

    OpenAIRE

    Llaneza, Danielle C.; DeLuke, Susan V.; Batista, Myra; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Christodulu, Kristin V.; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect approximately 1 in 150 children across the U.S., and are characterized by abnormal social actions, language difficulties, repetitive or restrictive behaviors, and special interests. ASD include autism (autistic disorder), Asperger syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS or atypical autism). High-functioning individuals may communicate with moderate-to-high language skills, although difficulties in social skills may...

  8. Effects of social environment and personality on communication in male Siamese fighting fish in an artificial network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matessi, Giuliano; Matos, Ricardo Jorge Santa Clara; Peake, Tom M.; McGregor, Peter K.; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    individuals surrounding it within a network. We investigated the effects of a change of local social environment on two behavioural types, ‘persistent' versus ‘sporadic' signaller, in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. Males visually interacted for 1 day in a communication network of seven fish in tanks...... time spent in the inner front part of their tank, from which they could observe but not interact with the neighbours. Social instability (i.e. number of changed neighbours) raised the signalling levels of individuals independently of their behavioural types. We discuss the relationship between...... information gathering in a communication network and network composition in terms of behavioural types of its members....

  9. Additive effects of social and non-social attention during infancy relate to later autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bedford, Rachael; Pickles, Andrew; Gliga, Teodora; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Charman, Tony; JOHNSON, MARK H.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging findings from studies with infants at familial high risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), owing to an older sibling with a diagnosis, suggest that those who go on to develop ASD show early impairments in the processing of stimuli with both social and non-social content. Although ASD is defined by social-communication impairments and restricted and repetitive behaviours, the majority of cognitive theories of ASD posit a single underlying factor, which over development has secondary...

  10. Investigating the Effect of Humor Communication Skills Training on Pro-Social and Anti-Social Humor Styles, Cognitive Learning, Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Humor Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    Humor is an important aspect of interpersonal interactions as it is linked to the development and maintenance of relationships (Merolla, 2006). The purpose of this dissertation was to test the effect of a humor communication skills training program on the ability to minimize anti-social humor (i.e., aggressive, self-defeating) and enhance…

  11. Effects of Peer Assisted Communication Application Training on the Communicative and Social Behaviors of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasberger, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Non-verbal children with autism are candidates for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). One type of AAC device is a voice output communication aid (VOCA). The primary drawbacks of past VOCAs were their expense and portability. Newer iPod-based VOCAs alleviate these concerns. This dissertation sought to extend the iPod-based VOCA…

  12. Writing consumer identities through the iPod : The Good Guide application's role in communicating knowledge about Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    How do web 2.0 and mobile technologies affect the available means for interaction between consumers and corporations? What are the implications for communicating corporate social responsibility? Gee (1996:6) states that “When we write or read, speak or listen, we coordinate and are coordinated by specific identities, specific ways of using language, various objects, tools, technologies, sites and institutions, as well as other people’s minds and bodies.” Using Gee’s focus on the connection between language use, technology and context as part of identities in interaction, this paper explores the potential and implications of mobile technologies for the communication of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The Good Guide iPod application is a mini third party database of product rankings in terms of social responsibility towards consumer health, environmental impact and social effects of production. It offers a space for examining the potential impacts of a technology mediated interaction between consumers and corporations.

  13. The Double-Edged Effects of Social Media Terror Communication : Interconnection and Independence vs. Surveillance and Human Rights Calamities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    This paper connects the effects of social media on terror/anti-terror communication with dynamics and consequences of surveillance. Citizens become via social media more independent from mass media and more interconnected. This is also valid when citizens engage in terror/anti-terror communication. However, via social media citizens also become targets of the ‘collect-it-all’ surveillance, which was revealed to the global public in 2013. I argue that due to such surveillance some citizens might start to censor themselves and that surveillance inflicts with a number of human rights. I further argue that social media contribute to extending surveillance: by being a temptation for intelligence services, by not resisting state authorities and via constructing threat perceptions among populations which in effect deliver security politicians ‘windows of opportunity’ in order to implement ever more surveillance.

  14. Social Media and Oncology: The Past, Present, and Future of Electronic Communication Between Physician and Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark A; Dicker, Adam P

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from e-mail and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual. PMID:26433557

  15. The role of socializing agents in communicating healthy eating to adolescents :  A cross cultural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    A survey was conducted of 386 Danish and Hong Kong adolescents aged 11 to 16. Results showed that the consumption of relatively unhealthy food was common among respondents. Looking at socializing agents, respondents claimed that parents asked them to eat healthy food more often than the government publicity, teachers or friends. Parents were also perceived as being the most effective source in encouraging them to eat healthy food. Respondents considered news and fear appeals for communicating healthy eating the most effective, while popularity and achievement appeals were considered less effective. There were some gender and age differences in the liking and perceived effectiveness of five advertising appeals. Respondents with higher collectivism scores showed a higher liking and perceived effectiveness of advertising appeals.

  16. Winning Facebook - and the Rest of the World? : How and when do candidate communication on social media make a difference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Jens Villiam; Hansen, Kasper MØller

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study of nine leading candidates’ communication on Facebook during the parliament election campaign in Denmark in fall 2011. It relates their communication to the historical use of social media in Denmark by politicians, to Danish candidate campaign communication in general and to survey data about media use during the election campaign. Analysis of the content of 612 status updates and their likes and comments reveal that the most popular content are content which center on politics, not election campaign activities or private life. Media references are used extensively. We conclude that certain types of content may win Facebook, but the election itself is still largely won through TV.

  17. A conceptual framework to study the role of communication through social software for coordination in globally-distributed software teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuffrida, Rosalba; Dittrich, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Background In Global Software Development (GSD) the lack of face-to-face communication is a major challenge and effective computer-mediated practices are necessary to mitigate the effect of physical distance. Communication through Social Software (SoSo) supports team coordination, helping to deal...... with geographical distance; however, in Software Engineering literature, there is a lack of suitable theoretical concepts to analyze and describe everyday practices of globally-distributed software development teams and to study the role of communication through SoSo. Objective The paper proposes a...... theoretical framework for analyzing how communicative and coordinative practices are constituted and maintained in globally-distributed teams. Method The framework is based on the concepts of communicative genres and coordination mechanisms; it is motivated and explicated through examples from two qualitative...

  18. The effect of social media marketing, on brand marketing and communication strategy: the case of Visit Denmark.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This thesis seeks to provide insight into the integration of social media marketing communications and brand strategy from the perspective of the destination marketing organization. Method: Qualitative case study methodology generated understanding of the approach to DMOs’ marketing. Interview allows exploration of how online marketing strategies with the practice of social media used in destination branding processes and content analysis to analyze audience engageme...

  19. Social Robotic Experience and Media Communication Practices: An Exploration on the Emotional and Ritualized Human-technology-relations

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Linke

    2013-01-01

    This article approaches the subject of social robots by focusing on the emotional relations people establish with media and information and communication technology (ICTs) in their everyday life. It examines human-technology-relation from a social studies point of view, seeking to raise questions that enable us to make a connection between the research on human relationships and the topic of human-technology relation, especially human-humanoid-relation. In order to explore the human-technolog...

  20. Communication activity in a social network: relation between long-term correlations and inter-event clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Rybski; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Shlomo Havlin; Fredrik Liljeros; Makse, Hernán A.

    2012-01-01

    Human communication in social networks is dominated by emergent statistical laws such as non-trivial correlations and temporal clustering. Recently, we found long-term correlations in the user's activity in social communities. Here, we extend this work to study the collective behavior of the whole community with the goal of understanding the origin of clustering and long-term persistence. At the individual level, we find that the correlations in activity are a byproduct of the clustering expr...

  1. Communication, advice exchange and job satisfaction of nursing staff: a social network analyses of 35 long-term care units

    OpenAIRE

    Frijters Dinnus HM; Spreeuwenberg Peter PM; Wagner Cordula; van Beek Adriana PA; Ribbe Miel W; Groenewegen Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The behaviour of individuals is affected by the social networks in which they are embedded. Networks are also important for the diffusion of information and the influence of employees in organisations. Yet, at the moment little is known about the social networks of nursing staff in healthcare settings. This is the first study that investigates informal communication and advice networks of nursing staff in long-term care. We examine the structure of the networks, how they a...

  2. The Effect of Information Communication Technology Interventions on Reducing Social Isolation in the Elderly: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Ru Regina; Schulz, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aging of the population is an inexorable change that challenges governments and societies in every developed country. Based on clinical and empirical data, social isolation is found to be prevalent among elderly people, and it has negative consequences on the elderly’s psychological and physical health. Targeting social isolation has become a focus area for policy and practice. Evidence indicates that contemporary information and communication technologies (ICT) have the potent...

  3. Repetition Priming in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance…

  4. The evolution of self-organizing communication networks in high-risk social-ecological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Berardo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently published research shows that members of regional communication networks form links based on how risky their exchanges with others may be: low-risk situations favor the creation of bridging structures that solve coordination problems, whereas high-risk situations lead to the establishment of bonding structures that make detection and punishment of defection more likely. This basic expectation has been tested in low-risk regional arenas, where indeed more bridging structures formed in time (Berardo and Scholz 2010. However, no empirical evidence on the formation of networks has been produced yet in high-risk social-ecological systems (HRSES. In this article, I study the network of communication among stakeholders in a small river basin in Argentina that has been subject to high levels of environmental stress over the last decades and empirically test whether more bonding structures tend to form in this high-risk SE system. Findings show that actors in the network have a tendency to create more triadic bonding structures, as expected. However, complementary results offer a more nuanced picture of how networks look like in highly-risky regional settings and caution against an overly optimistic view linking bonding in networks to the solution of collective action problems of a regional scale. 

  5. The longitudinal curriculum "social and communicative competencies" within Bologna-reformed undergraduate medical education in Basel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Claudia; Langewitz, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Background: Within the Bologna reform, a longitudinal curriculum of “social and communicative competencies” (SOKO) was implemented into the new Bachelor-Master structure of undergraduate medical education in Basel (Switzerland). Project description: The aim of the SOKO curriculum is to enable students to use techniques of patient-centred communication to elicit and provide information to patients in order to involve them as informed partners in decision making processes. The SOKO curriculum consists of 57 lessons for the individual student from the first bachelor year to the first master year. Teaching encompasses lectures and small group learning. Didactic methods include role play, video feedback, and consultations with simulated and real patients. Summative assessment takes place in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE). Conclusion: In Basel, a longitudinal SOKO curriculum based on students’ cumulative learning was successfully implemented. Goals and contents were coordinated with the remaining curriculum and are regularly assessed in OSCEs. At present, most of the workload rests on the shoulders of the department of psychosomatic medicine at the university hospital. For the curriculum to be successful in the long-term, sustainable structures need to be instituted at the medical faculty and the university hospital to guarantee high quality teaching and assessment. PMID:24062811

  6. Study on risk communication by using web system for the social consensus toward HLW final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The web site that has illustrated characters to navigate information pertaining to unfamiliar issue such as high-level radioactive waste geological disposal is an effective method. However, since the information was provided mainly from a pro-nuclear power generation group, it resulted in frustration for the web site user because viewpoints outside the group were not considered nor the explanations were based on only rational aspects, the persuasive explanation based on technical viewpoints in other words. To close this communication gap, this research aims to enhance a better sense of involvement and social collaboration by creating an interactive communication model promoting emotional acceptance and independent thinking with Web system. This purpose was accomplished by the dialog-mode explanation and the scenarios with norm activation theory supported by facial expressions of the illustrated navigators to stimulate the emotional involvement of viewers and the specialists' reliable response on the electrical bulletin board system, then we conducted preparatory experiments concerning its effects and assessed its affectiveness by making this model available over the Internet. (author)

  7. Autism and exergaming: effects on repetitive behaviors and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson-Hanley C; Tureck K; Schneiderman RL

    2011-01-01

    Cay Anderson-Hanley, Kimberly Tureck, Robyn L Schneiderman Department of Psychology, Union College, Schenectady, NY, USA Abstract: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that leads to impairment in social skills and delay in language development, and results in repetitive behaviors and restricted interests that impede academic and social involvement. Physical exercise has been shown to decrease repetitive behaviors in autistic children and improve cognitive function across the life-span. Exe...

  8. Novel porcine repetitive elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonneman Dan J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repetitive elements comprise ~45% of mammalian genomes and are increasingly known to impact genomic function by contributing to the genomic architecture, by direct regulation of gene expression and by affecting genomic size, diversity and evolution. The ubiquity and increasingly understood importance of repetitive elements contribute to the need to identify and annotate them. We set out to identify previously uncharacterized repetitive DNA in the porcine genome. Once found, we characterized the prevalence of these repeats in other mammals. Results We discovered 27 repetitive elements in 220 BACs covering 1% of the porcine genome (Comparative Vertebrate Sequencing Initiative; CVSI. These repeats varied in length from 55 to 1059 nucleotides. To estimate copy numbers, we went to an independent source of data, the BAC-end sequences (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, covering approximately 15% of the porcine genome. Copy numbers in BAC-ends were less than one hundred for 6 repeat elements, between 100 and 1000 for 16 and between 1,000 and 10,000 for 5. Several of the repeat elements were found in the bovine genome and we have identified two with orthologous sites, indicating that these elements were present in their common ancestor. None of the repeat elements were found in primate, rodent or dog genomes. We were unable to identify any of the replication machinery common to active transposable elements in these newly identified repeats. Conclusion The presence of both orthologous and non-orthologous sites indicates that some sites existed prior to speciation and some were generated later. The identification of low to moderate copy number repetitive DNA that is specific to artiodactyls will be critical in the assembly of livestock genomes and studies of comparative genomics.

  9. The Impact of Social Media-Focused Information & Communication Technologies on Business Performance via Mediating Mechanisms: An Exploratory Study on Communication and Advertising Agencies in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Gecti; Ikram Dastan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of social media-focused information & communicationtechnologies on business performance via some mediating variables. These mediating variables aremarketing-based outputs and costs. In this context, a survey was conducted on 152 communication &advertising agencies operating in Turkey that were selected through convenience sampling method. A researchmodel was developed and the proposed relationships were tested using structural eq...

  10. Web Data Mining and Social Media Analysis for better Communication in Food Safety Crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H. Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although much effort is made to prevent risks arising from food, food-borne diseases are an ever-present threat to the consumers’ health. The consumption of fresh food that is contaminated with pathogens like fungi, viruses or bacteria can cause food poisoning that leads to severe health damages or even death. The outbreak of Shiga Toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC in Germany and neighbouring countries in 2011 has shown this dramatically. Nearly 4.000 people were reported of being affected and more than 50 people died during the so called EHEC-crisis. As a result the consumers’ trust in the safety of fruits and vegetables decreased sharply.In situations like that quick decisions and reaction from public authorities as well as from privately owned companies are important: Food crisis managers have to identify and track back contaminated products and they have to withdraw them from the market. At the same time they have to inform the stakeholders about potential threats and recent developments. This is a particularly challenging task, because when an outbreak is just detected, information about the actual scope is sparse and the demand for information is high. Thus, ineffective communication among crisis managers and towards the public can result in inefficient crisis management, health damages and a major loss of trust in the food system. This is why crisis communication is a crucial part of successful crisis management, whereas the quality of crisis communication largely depends on the availability of and the access to relevant information.In order to improve the availability of information, we have explored how information from public accessible internet sources like Twitter or Wikipedia can be harnessed for food crisis communication. In this paper we are going to report on some initial insight from a web mining and social media analysis approach to monitor health and food related issues that can develop into a potential crisis. We have chosen Twitter and Wikipedia as data sources for our study since they’re publicly accessible and reveal what people state about certain topics and what they are looking for in order to answer their questions.

  11. "Bill Is Now Singing": Joint Engagement and the Emergence of Social Communication of Three Young Children with Autism

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    Vaiouli, Potheini; Grimmet, Kharon; Ruich, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Young children with autism spectrum disorder meet significant challenges in joint attention skills and in social communication. A child-centered, improvisational, music therapy intervention model was implemented to promote engagement in three young children with autism in a kindergarten classroom. A multiple baseline design compared the…

  12. The Association between Therapeutic Horseback Riding and the Social Communication and Sensory Reactions of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sandra C.; Whalon, Kelly; Rusnak, Katrina; Wendell, Kimberly; Paschall, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the association between therapeutic riding (TR) and the social communication and sensory processing skills of 21 elementary students with autism attending TR as part of a school group. An interrupted treatment design was employed to determine whether children were able to maintain treatment effects following the removal of…

  13. Journalism and Social Thought in Chicago: The Case for Symbolic Interactionism in the Study of Communications in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiling, Albert; Sims, Norman

    The emergence and development of symbolic interactionism, and its implications for the study of social phenomena, journalism, and mass communication, are examined in this paper. The introductory section discusses the emergence of symbolic interactionism in the midst of the rapid rise of industrial institutions in the late nineteenth century,…

  14. Are You An ELF? The Relevance of ELF as an Equitable Social Category in Online Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the different social categories that are made relevant when geographically dispersed speakers of English as an additional language communicate in chat rooms. Although the literature characterizes these interactions as English as a lingua franca, this paper explores to what extent interactants see themselves as lingua franca…

  15. Social communication impairments in children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome: Slow response time and the impact of prompting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaland, Nils; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Smith, Lars

    2011-01-01

    understanding intentions. The participants in the AS group showed significant impairments in social communication. They needed significantly longer response times to solve the tasks and required significantly more prompt questions than the control persons. When analyzing the AS participants' performances before...

  16. The Impact of Social Scripts and Visual Cues on Verbal Communication in Three Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Kaylor, Maria; Bourgeois, Bethany; Hadden, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Social script and visual cue use with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were examined. A multiple baseline design across activities with embedded withdrawal was used to measure student acquisition of verbal communication skills. Three children with ASD, two boys and one girl, were taught a series of scripts and were shown a "quiet"…

  17. Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  18. Communication, advice exchange and job satisfaction of nursing staff: a social network analyses of 35 long-term care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frijters Dinnus HM

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behaviour of individuals is affected by the social networks in which they are embedded. Networks are also important for the diffusion of information and the influence of employees in organisations. Yet, at the moment little is known about the social networks of nursing staff in healthcare settings. This is the first study that investigates informal communication and advice networks of nursing staff in long-term care. We examine the structure of the networks, how they are related to the size of units and characteristics of nursing staff, and their relationship with job satisfaction. Methods We collected social network data of 380 nursing staff of 35 units in group projects and psychogeriatric units in nursing homes and residential homes in the Netherlands. Communication and advice networks were analyzed in a social network application (UCINET, focusing on the number of contacts (density between nursing staff on the units. We then studied the correlation between the density of networks, size of the units and characteristics of nursing staff. We used multilevel analyses to investigate the relationship between social networks and job satisfaction of nursing staff, taking characteristics of units and nursing staff into account. Results Both communication and advice networks were negatively related to the number of residents and the number of nursing staff of the units. Communication and advice networks were more dense when more staff worked part-time. Furthermore, density of communication networks was positively related to the age of nursing staff of the units. Multilevel analyses showed that job satisfaction differed significantly between individual staff members and units and was influenced by the number of nursing staff of the units. However, this relationship disappeared when density of communication networks was added to the model. Conclusions Overall, communication and advice networks of nursing staff in long-term care are relatively dense. This fits with the high level of cooperation that is needed to provide good care to residents. Social networks are more dense in small units and are also shaped by characteristics of staff members. The results furthermore show that communication networks are important for staff's job satisfaction.

  19. Teaching multi-step requesting and social communication to two children with autism spectrum disorders with three AAC options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Larah; Kagohara, Debora; Roche, Laura; Sutherland, Dean; Balandin, Susan; Green, Vanessa A; O'Reilly, Mark F; Lancioni, Giulio E; Marschik, Peter B; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The present study involved comparing the acquisition of multi-step requesting and social communication across three AAC options: manual signing (MS), picture exchange (PE), and speech-generating devices (SGDs). Preference for each option was also assessed. The participants were two children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who had previously been taught to use each option to request preferred items. Intervention was implemented in an alternating-treatments design. During baseline, participants demonstrated low levels of correct communicative responding. With intervention, both participants learned the target responses (two- and three-step requesting responses, greetings, answering questions, and social etiquette responses) to varying levels of proficiency with each communication option. One participant demonstrated a preference for using the SGD and the other preferred PE. The importance of examining preferences for using one AAC option over others is discussed. PMID:23879660

  20. Does Gender Influence Core Deficits in ASD? An Investigation into Social-Communication and Play of Girls and Boys with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Clare; Shire, Stephanie; Gulsrud, Amanda; Chang, Ya-Chih; Ishijima, Eric; Lawton, Kathy; Kasari, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Due to the predominance of boys diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), girls are rarely studied independently. Research specifically focusing on play and social-communication in girls with ASD is extremely varied. We were interested in whether girls with ASD demonstrated equivalent social-communication and play skills in early childhood…