WorldWideScience

Sample records for significant hearing loss

  1. Hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased hearing; Deafness; Loss of hearing; Conductive hearing loss; Sensorineural hearing loss; Presbycusis ... Symptoms of hearing loss may include: Certain sounds seeming too ... conversations when two or more people are talking Difficulty ...

  2. Hearing and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mr. Engelman

    2009-05-27

    How the ear works, and how you can prevent hearing loss! Turn em Down iPod's Popular Earbuds: Hip Or Harmful? How the ear works Common Indoor and Outdoor Noise Levels Article with Decibel Chart for Common Sounds How the ear works How the ear works with images and graphics What is noise-induced hearing loss? ======================== Hearing Loss Simulation Hearing Loss Demo # 1 So, how do you know if LOUD is TOO LOUD? How Loud is Too Loud? Noise Induced Hearing Loss ...

  3. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Significant hearing loss has been reported in approximately 50% of people with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). While not everyone who has OI develops hearing loss, the incidence is much higher than in the ...

  4. Could an underlying hearing loss be a significant factor in the handicap caused by tinnitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, S A B; Jayarajan, V; Bartlett, J

    2009-01-01

    There have been several studies that have demonstrated a link between the hearing loss of subjects and tinnitus. However, there has been no systematic evaluation of the link between perceived tinnitus distress and an underlying hearing loss. The purpose of the current study is to explore this association, and ascertain whether a subject's hearing loss contributes to the handicap caused by tinnitus. A group of 96 adults were evaluated with Pure Tone Audiometry and a questionnaire that included the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI). In 58% of the subjects, the side of the unilateral or worse tinnitus corresponded with the ear with poorer hearing thresholds. A subset of the THI, the Two Question Mean (TQM) that was related to questions with regard to communication, correlated significantly with the hearing thresholds in the better hearing ear ( P TQM scores ( P < 0.01). These results suggested that in tinnitus subjects with impaired hearing, the underlying hearing loss may be a significant factor in the perceived distress. PMID:19602769

  5. What's Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain, allowing you to hear. Continue Types of Hearing Loss There are a few different types of hearing ... and is more difficult to treat. What Causes Hearing Loss? Hearing loss can happen because a person was ...

  6. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program promotes better understanding of hearing loss by reviewing the causes of hearing loss, the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options, as well as tips for coping with hearing impairment. It also describes the anatomy of the outer, middle, and inner ear. This is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: The tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  7. Types of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Types of Hearing Loss Hearing Loss: Type of Hearing Loss | Degree of Hearing Loss | Configuration of Hearing Loss More information on this topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. Hearing loss can be categorized by which part of the ...

  8. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 85—have some hearing problem. It is the fourth most common chronic disease among older adults. Hearing ... and interpret sound. Hearing starts with a sound wave, or vibration. The sound wave travels through the ...

  9. Living with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Living with Hearing Loss Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Fast Facts There are two main types of hearing loss. Permanent hearing loss (called sensorineural) usually involves damage ...

  10. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss has many causes. 50% to 60% of hearing ...

  11. Hearing loss in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Murthy, V.; Krishna, Kirtan

    2011-01-01

    To study hearing loss in healthy pregnant women. Tertiary care hospital. Prospective study. We screened fifty healthy, non-complicated pregnant women (study group) in the third trimester for hearing loss who had no previous history for the same. Fifty healthy, non-pregnant women (control group) were also screened for hearing loss with a normal pure tone audiogram (PTA) for evidence of hearing loss. Thirteen women in the study group had evidence of hearing loss, in the form of absence of disto...

  12. Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss The importance of hearing Hearing allows you to ... surround the soft tissue of the inner ear. Hearing loss occurs when the inner ear is damaged. What ...

  13. Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss can affect a childâ??s ability to develop communication, language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting services, the more likely they are ...

  14. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is hearing loss? Hearing loss is a sudden or gradual decrease in how well you can hear. It is one of ... Top Where can I find additional information about hearing loss and older adults? The NIDCD maintains a directory ...

  15. Intellectual Disabilities and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herer, Gilbert R.

    2012-01-01

    Undetected/untreated hearing loss imposes significant limitations upon individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). It can interfere with cognitive development, impede communicative and social interactions, and limit vocational aspirations. Over the past decade, the hearing of 9961 people with ID was evaluated at Special Olympics sports…

  16. Fluctuant hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, S. K.

    1997-01-01

    122 cases of fluctuant hearing loss were studied. Serous otitis media was commonest followed by Meniere’s disease, Acoustic neuroma, fistula of round and oval window, oto-mandibular syndrome, Congenital cholesteatoma and maxillary sinusitis. Cases of Arachnoid cyst, Multiple sclerosis, abnormalities of base of skull and craniocervical region and cervical rib causing fluctuant hearing loss could not be detected. Aetio pathophysiology of all discussed.

  17. Identifying Babies with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information see the MMWR website . Identifying Infants with Hearing Loss --- United States, 1999--2007 Please note: An erratum ... To view the erratum, please click here . Congenital hearing loss affects two to three infants per 1,000 ...

  18. Ideopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Stokroos, Robert Jan

    1997-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, otologists have reported cases of sudden, unexpected sensorineural hearing loss. Today, in spite of the advancements in medicine, the pathophysiology of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL) has not been elucidated and little can be offered to people struck by the hearing loss. ... Zie: Samenvatting

  19. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sound to people who are profoundly deaf or hard-of-hearing. If your hearing loss is severe, your doctor ... a band playing music. Background noise makes it hard to hear people talk. ... Hearing better is worth the effort. Top What research ...

  20. Sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wormald, R

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the aetiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a paediatric population presenting to the National Centre of Medical Genetics. A retrospective chart review from 1998 to 2006. One hundred and twenty nine children were investigated for SNHL. The average age of diagnosis of hearing loss was 36 months. The degree of hearing loss was mild in 8 children, moderate in 33 children, severe in 31 children and profound in 57 children. Eighty-five children (66%) were diagnosed with a hereditary hearing loss, 11 (8%) children had an acquired hearing loss and no cause found in 33 (26%) children. This is the first report of the causes of hearing loss in Irish children. The mean age of diagnosis in our cohort is high and emphasises the need for a neonatal screening programme. There remains a number of children for whom the cause of hearing loss remains unknown.

  1. Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss Percent of Persons with Hearing Loss[*] Who Have Ever Used Hearing Aids [text version] ... 2010 and 2020. The number of persons with hearing loss is calculated based on National Health and Nutrition ...

  2. Occupational Hearing Loss in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-01-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases ...

  3. Sensorineural hearing loss and prematurity

    OpenAIRE

    Marlow, E.; Hunt, L.; Marlow, N.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To elucidate clinical antecedents of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in very preterm infants.?DESIGN—Case-control study.?SUBJECTS—Fifteen children < 33 weeks' gestation with significant SNHL born between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 1994, detected within 9 months of birth, and 30 matched control children.?METHODOLOGY—Perinatal variables in the two groups were compared using non-parametric tests and conditional logistic regression (EGRET).?RESULT...

  4. Hearing loss due to mumps.

    OpenAIRE

    Garty, B. Z.; Danon, Y. L.; Nitzan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of mumps was considered in 33 children with profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown origin. Fifteen gave a history of mumps, of whom 12 contracted the infection between the last normal and first abnormal hearing tests. Hearing should be tested after mumps infection.

  5. Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss in Teenagers Health Issues Listen Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers Article Body All parents complain at ... the damage is already underway. Symptoms that Suggest Hearing Loss May Include: Loss of hearing sensitivity, first to ...

  6. The Stigma of Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Wallhagen, Margaret I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose:?To explore dimensions of stigma experienced by older adults with hearing loss and those with whom they frequently communicate to target interventions promoting engagement and positive aging.?Design and Methods:?This longitudinal qualitative study conducted interviews over 1 year with dyads where one partner had hearing loss. Participants were naive to or had not worn hearing aids in the past year. Data were analyzed using grounded theory, constant comparative methodology.?Res...

  7. The Stigma of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhagen, Margaret I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore dimensions of stigma experienced by older adults with hearing loss and those with whom they frequently communicate to target interventions promoting engagement and positive aging. Design and Methods: This longitudinal qualitative study conducted interviews over 1 year with dyads where one partner had hearing loss. Participants…

  8. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  9. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Adults Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Adults [text version] Note: Lower numbers are ... chart depicts the prevalence of likely noise-induced hearing loss from 2 time periods in adults (20–69 ...

  10. Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Hearing Loss in Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hearing Loss Homepage Facts Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis ...

  11. Hearing Loss in Children: Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Hearing Loss in Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hearing Loss Homepage Facts Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis ...

  12. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood Hearing Loss Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: What are vestibular aqueducts? How ... How are enlarged vestibular aqueducts related to childhood hearing loss? Research suggests that most children with enlarged vestibular ...

  13. Early detection of hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schade, Götz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS is currently spreading in Germany, as well, even though there can be no talk of a comprehensive establishment. The introduction of UNHS in several federal states such as Hamburg, Hessen, and Schleswig-Holstein can be ascribed to the personal commitment of individual pediatric audiologists. Apart from the procurement of the screening equipment and the training of the staff responsible for the examination of the newborns, the tracking, i.e. the follow-up on children with conspicuous test results, is of utmost importance. This involves significant administration effort and work and is subject to data protection laws that can differ substantially between the various federal states. Among audiologists, there is consensus that within the first three months of a child’s life, a hearing loss must be diagnosed and that between the age of 3 and 6 months, the supply of a hearing aid must have been initiated. For this purpose, screening steps 1 (usually a TEOAE measurement and 2 (AABR testing need to be conducted in the maternity hospital. The follow-up of step 1 then comprises the repetition of the TEOAE- and AABR measurement for conspicuous children by a specialized physician. The follow-up of step 2 comprises the confirmatory diagnostics in a pediatric audiological center. This always implies BERA diagnostics during spontaneous sleep or under sedation. The subsequent early supply of a hearing aid should generally be conducted by a (pediatric acoustician specialized on children.

  14. Hearing loss at work? Hearing loss from leisure activities?

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The nurses of the Medical Service would like invite all persons working on the CERN site to take part in a: HEARING LOSS DETECTION WEEK From 28 August to 1st September 2006 At the Infirmary, Building 57 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hearing tests - advice - information - documentation - protective equipment

  15. Hearing loss in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Pemmaiah K.D; Srinivas D.R

    2011-01-01

    Background: The complex arrangement of inner ear makes it potential target of hyperglycaemic damage.A study was conducted to identify the probable occurrence of hearing loss as a complication of DiabetesMellitus (DM).Aims and objective:• To assess the hearing loss in type 2 diabetic patients and correlate with age, duration of diabetes,HbA1C.• To correlate hearing loss with nerve conduction study.Design: Cross sectional study was done involving randomly 110 Type 2 DM patients. Data regard...

  16. Effects of Hearing Loss on Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of Hearing Loss on Development It is well recognized that hearing is critical to speech and language development, communication, and learning. Children with listening difficulties due to hearing loss or auditory processing problems continue to be an ...

  17. Occupational hearing loss in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-12-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases exceeding exposure limit among workplace hazards. NIHL is the most common occupational disease except work-related disease such as musculoskeletal disorders and cerebrovascular diseases, and NIHL prevalence is thought to be much higher than reported in official publications. Noise affecting hearing comes from various sources such as workplaces, military settings, areas with exposure to high noise, and specific noise sources. There is also occupational hearing loss by non-noise including chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals, barotrauma, and trauma due to welding spark. Noise affects daily life through audiological effects such as hearing loss and tinnitus, non-audiological physical effects (e.g., cardiovascular), and psychosocial and behavioral effects. Development of systematic and comprehensive hearing conservation programs for lowering the noise level in workplaces and preventing the NIHL, and preparation of technological, administrative system for its settlement at workplace are urgently needed. PMID:21258593

  18. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... U.S. workers exposed to hazardous noise levels at work, and an additional 9 million exposed to ototoxic chemicals. An estimated $242 million is spent annually on worker’s compensation for hearing loss disability. NIOSH recommends removing hazardous ...

  19. Prevalence of occupational noise induced hearing loss amongst traffic police personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, V. K.; Mehta, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Traffic branch personnel of Pune traffic police were screened for presence of noise induced hearing loss. A very significant number (81.2%) showed sensorineural hearing loss. The various factors responsible for noise induced hearing loss are discussed.

  20. Amplification Considerations for Children With Minimal or Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss and Unilateral Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mckay, Sarah; Gravel, Judith S.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Children with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss and unilateral hearing loss are at higher risk for academic, speech-language, and social-emotional difficulties than their normal hearing peers. The choice to fit infants with moderate or greater degrees of bilateral hearing loss has been standard practice for most clinicians, but for those with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss, the fitting of hearing technology must be based on limited data. Evidence does n...

  1. Hearing loss among stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, C; Phillips, D E; Thomas, R G

    1987-12-01

    Pure-tone hearing thresholds were measured by air conduction for 140 right hemiplegic and 103 left hemiplegic patients who had suffered a single stroke. Statistical and informal testing of the mean audiometric thresholds revealed that: (1) the ability of the aphasic patient to attend to and to perform the audiometric test was independent of the severity of the aphasic impairment; (2) aphasic patients did not suffer disproportionately greater hearing losses than did other right hemiplegic stroke patients; (3) no relation was apparent between the severity of the hearing loss and the test ear or side of hemiplegia after stroke; (4) the severity of high-frequency hearing loss among stroke patients was consistent with that found in the elderly male population at Framingham, MA (Moscicki, Elkins, Baum, and McNamara, Ear Hear 1985;6:184-90); and (5) the prevalence of hearing loss among the stroke patients was greater than that reported at Framingham, but was consistent with rates found among elderly nursing home residents. PMID:3428485

  2. Noise-induced hearing loss and hearing aids requirement

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano, C.; Garzaro, M.; Nadalin, J.; Pecorari, G.; Boggero, R.; Argentero, P.; Albera, R.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective disturbances, due to hearing loss, are auditory disability and handicap which can be evaluated with a questionnaire. The present study refers to a population of industrial workers affected by noise-induced hearing loss. Aim of the study is to identify the minimal level of hearing loss over which the patient felt changes in his quality of life, and the average auditory threshold at which the patient considered the application of a hearing aid useful or necessary. The sample comprise...

  3. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children Patient Health Information News media interested in covering the latest ... loss in children. How does noise exposure cause hearing loss? Very loud sounds damage the inner ear by ...

  4. Prelinguistic Vocal Development in Infants with Typical Hearing and Infants with Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Oller, D. Kimbrough

    2008-01-01

    Delays in the onset of canonical babbling with hearing loss are extensively documented. Relatively little is known about other aspects of prelinguistic vocal development and hearing loss. Eight infants with typical hearing and eight with severe-to-profound hearing loss were matched with regard to a significant vocal development milestone, the…

  5. Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mail this page Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis Search the Consumer Updates ... or serious ear condition and lead to further hearing loss or other complications. “The problem might be as ...

  6. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... exposure and other causes. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Take the following quiz to help determine if ...

  7. Ten Ways to Recognize Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association, 25, 37-42. For more information on hearing loss, please contact the NIDCD Information Clearinghouse . Top * Note: ... Download: Download PDF version Related Topics: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss How Loud is Too Loud NIDCD's Noisy Planet ...

  8. Talking to someone with hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    It may be hard for a person with hearing loss to understand a conversation with one other person. ... conversation can be even harder. The person with hearing loss can feel isolated or cut off. If you ...

  9. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t?=?2.38, p?=?.02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r?=?.42, p?=?.002) and attention (r?=?.45, p?=?.001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r?=?-?.60, p?hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  10. Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents With Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Betty A.; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t?=?2.38, p?=?.02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r?=?.42, p?=?.002) and attention (r?=?.45, p?=?.001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r?=???.60, p?communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  11. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup.

  12. Hearing Loss in the Elderly: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Blakley, Brian W.

    1989-01-01

    Loss of hearing is tragic, yet most of those afflicted can be helped. Surgery is sometimes appropriate, but for the majority a hearing aid is the best answer. This article reviews what happens in different hearing losses, and gives an overview of hearing aids for the physician who lacks an extensive technical background but wishes to understand these devices a little better. Simple tips for investigation of hearing-aid complaints are included, as well as some tips for communication with hard-...

  13. Association between hearing loss and depressive symptoms in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss causes difficulties in speech understanding, which leads away from the family and social environment. This isolation may be associated with depressive disorders. Type of study: clinical prospective. Objective: To determine the association between hearing loss and depression in a group of non-institutionalized elderly. Method: The sample consisted of individuals aged over 60 years, undergoing complete audiological evaluation and screening for depressive symptoms with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS. Results: We evaluated 54 elderly, 26 (48.1% were female and 28 (51.9% males. It was found that 39 (72.2% had hearing thresholds change, and 17 (31.5% with mild hearing loss and 22 (40.7% with moderate hearing loss. Were evident signs of depression in 25 elderly (46.3%, and 22 (40.7% had hearing loss. Data analysis showed an association between hearing loss and depression (p = 0.016. Although not significant (p = 0.18, the association between the degree of hearing loss was positive in relation to the severity of the signs of depression. Conclusion: In elderly people surveyed, there was a strong association between hearing loss and signs of depression and tendency to be an association between the degree of hearing loss and the severity of the signs of depression.

  14. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  15. Introduction to audiology: Some basics about hearing loss, hearing technologies and barriers to hearing aid use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni; Meis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides background information for researchers who wish to become familiar with some basic medical and audiological aspects of hearing loss and the technology of hearing aids. It introduces (1) the disciplines involved in research on hearing loss, (2) the medical categories of hearing loss and their various effects on communication, (3) the different degrees of hearing loss as defined by different national and international organizations, (4) statistics on the preva- lence of hearing loss worldwide, (5) some technological aspects of hearing instruments, (6) sta- tistics on non-usage of hearing instruments worldwide, and (7) barriers to using hearing aids. Since hearing loss is a worldwide pervasive phenomenon which is likely to increase even further in the future, the authors point out that an understanding of the non-use of hearing aids is crucial.

  16. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne El-Sayegh; Iskandar Barakat; Daniel Glass; Chadi Saifan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiomet...

  17. Age-related hearing loss: gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharashenidze, N; Schacht, J; Kevanishvili, Z

    2007-03-01

    Hearing thresholds were measured in 224 Tbilisi citizens, 128 females and 96 males, at the frequencies of 0.125-16 kHz. None of the subjects reported any job-related noise exposures or other potentially confounding history. Initial signs of age-related hearing impairments were detected in females and males of 40-49 and 30-39 years of age, respectively. In both genders they involved high frequencies. In the following age decades, 50-59, 60-69, and 70-79 years, the hearing losses increased in magnitudes and extended to lower frequencies. From the age of 30-39 years to that of 40-49 and 50-59 years the dynamics of threshold elevations appeared more rapid in males than in females. The gender differences in hearing acuity increased respectively in this age period. Thereafter, in the ages of 60-69 and 70-79 years, the hearing alterations became steeper in females than in males. As a result, the gender differences in hearing smoothed significantly. PMID:17473326

  18. Ages of hearing loss diagnosis and cochlear implantation in hearing impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Early diagnosis of hearing loss lead to early intervention and improvement of developmental skills of children with hearing loss. The present study aimed to determine the mean age of hearing loss diagnosis and cochlear implantation (CI in hearing impaired children and to compare the age of performing cochlear implantation in children who were identified by newborn hearing screening with those who were not.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 96 children with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss who received cochlear implantation in Amir-e-Alam cochlear implantation center between the years 2008 and 2010. For data gathering, we assessed subjects' medical archives, interviewed with their parents and took medical history including demographic information, birth history and hearing loss history.Results: Mean age of hearing loss suspicion, diagnosis, hearing aids administration, Initiation of rehabilitation program, performing cochlear implantation and mean age when cochlear implantation was utilized were 6.73 (SD=5.79, 9.35 (SD=5.79, 13.41 (SD=6.10, 16 (SD=6.36, 41.25 (SD=11.12, and 42.15 (SD=11.00 months, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between them (p<0.05. 43.8% of hearing impaired children had been identified by newborn hearing screening. There was statistically significant difference between cochlear implantation operation age of children who were identified by newborn hearing screening with those who were not (p<0.0001.Conclusion: In spite of notable reduction in the age of hearing loss diagnosis and intervention during recent years, compared to international indices it is still tardy. Conducting newborn hearing screening can significantly reduce these ages.

  19. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Natália Freire Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: This is the first case report that brings together DHF and sudden hearing loss. In the development of this case no other cause to sudden hearing loss was found and the correlation between dengue and hearing loss was questioned. In the literature review was found that some viruses, as mumps virus, varicella-zoster virus and HSV-1 and HSV-2 are related to sudden hearing loss, all of them fit in the viral theory. Besides the viral theory of sudden hearing loss, there is the vascular theory that is the occlusion of the end artery that supplies the cochlea. DHF has a vascular commitment, and the hypothesis of a vascular cause could be elicited in this case. Many studies in this area are needed and this article has the objective of elicit the discussion about the subject. Could dengue be associated with sensorineural hearing loss?

  20. Sensorineural Hearing Loss following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Pillion, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    A case study is presented of a 17-year-old male who sustained an anoxic brain injury and sensorineural hearing loss secondary to carbon monoxide poisoning. Audiological data is presented showing a slightly asymmetrical hearing loss of sensorineural origin and mild-to-severe degree for both ears. Word recognition performance was fair to poor bilaterally for speech presented at normal conversational levels in quiet. Management considerations of the hearing loss are discussed.

  1. Noise and Hearing Loss: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss is a major cause of deafness and hearing impairment in the United States. Though genetics and advanced age are major risk factors, temporary and permanent hearing impairments are becoming more common among young adults and children especially with the increased exposure to portable music players. Though…

  2. ¿Hipoacusia súbita? / Sudden Hearing Loss?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Santiago, Cornejo Sch; Raimundo, García M; José, San Martín P.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Se presenta un caso de paciente mujer sin antecedentes mórbidos que consulta a nuestro servicio por síntomas sugerentes de hipoacusia súbita. La evaluación audiométrica y prueba calórica era compatible con una parálisis cocleovestibular y dado que no presentaba contraindicaciones, se decide iniciar [...] tratamiento con corticoides y antiviral oral. La evolución inicial fue favorable sin embargo al control del mes presentó un nuevo deterioro audiométrico. Esto motivó mayor estudio con el cual se pudo llegara un diagnóstico etiológico. Este caso es presentado para recordar que hay otras patologías que pueden simular una hipoacusia súbita idiopática, lo cual no se debe olvidaren el manejo de estos pacientes. Abstract in english Clinical case of female patient without morbid background who consults due to sudden hearing loss symptoms. The audiometric and caloric tests were compatible with a cochleo vestibular paralysis and because there were no contraindications, oral steroids and antiviral, treatment was indicated. Althoug [...] h the initial response was favorable, at the first month check up an audiometric deterioration was found. This led to further study achieving an etiological diagnosis. This case is presented to remind that there are other pathologies that can simulate an idiopathic sudden hearing loss, which should not be forgotten in the management of these patients.

  3. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JillBFirszt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g. cochlear implants, less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, and cortical organization following hearing recovery. Hearing in the congenitally affected ear of a 41 year old female improved significantly after stapedotomy and reconstruction. Pre-operative hearing threshold levels showed unilateral, mixed, moderately-severe to profound hearing loss. The contralateral ear had hearing threshold levels within normal limits. Testing was completed prior to, and three and nine months after surgery. Measurements were of sound localization with intensity-roved stimuli and speech recognition in various noise conditions. We also evoked magnetic resonance signals with monaural stimulation to the unaffected ear. Activation magnitudes were determined in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex regions via an interrupted single event design. Hearing improvement following 40 years of congenital unilateral hearing loss resulted in substantially improved sound localization and speech recognition in noise. Auditory cortex also reorganized. Contralateral auditory cortex responses were increased after hearing recovery and the extent of activated cortex was bilateral, including a greater portion of the posterior superior temporal plane. Thus, prolonged predominant monaural stimulation did not prevent auditory system changes consequent to restored binaural hearing. Results support future research of unilateral auditory deprivation effects and plasticity, with consideration for length of deprivation, age at hearing correction, degree and type of hearing loss.

  4. Treatment efficacy: hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, A E; Moeller, M P

    1998-02-01

    This article provides a review of the topic of treatment efficacy for children with hearing loss. Efficacy is related to a wide range of treatment goals in the areas of sensory and perceptual skill development, language development (regardless of communication modality), speech-production skill development, academic performance, and social-emotional growth. Topics addressed in this article include (a) the definition of hearing loss in children; (b) incidence and prevalence data; (c) the effects of childhood hearing loss on daily life, including language and literacy, speech perception and production, socialization and family dynamics; (d) the role of audiologists and speech-language pathologists in managing children with hearing loss; and (e) a summary of pertinent efficacy research for children with hearing loss. The analysis of the available research suggests that (a) early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing has long-term positive effects on overall development; (b) a variety of communication modalities exist for this population, and research to date has been more descriptive than prognostic on the choice of modality; (c) sensory aids (hearing aids, tactile aids, and cochlear implants) provide different degrees of benefit for children in the areas of speech perception, production, and language development, depending upon the extent of their hearing loss; (d) few studies have addressed rates of learning and long-term outcomes, but existing data suggest that enriched programs provide some children with hearing loss with the ability to overcome developmental lags in language and academic skills. PMID:9493747

  5. Noise Induced Hearing Loss: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Akhil Sareen; Vishwambhar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss is one of most common hearing deficit which is almost completely preventable. The hearing loss incurred would depend on the sound qualities, duration of exposure and individual susceptibility and protection. Thereby it can be prevented as we have some set norms for the noise at work places and recreational activities. Once suspected, screening and preventive measures to prevent further progression is taken. There are legislative guidelines for noise at w...

  6. Hearing loss in a textile factory.

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhatreh, F. M.; Abdul-baqi, K. J.; Turk, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the prevalence rate of hearing loss at different levels of noise in a textile factory and to find out the levels of hearing loss according to duration (years) of employment in the factory. METHODS Seventy workers exposed to different levels of noise were matched with 70 persons in the community who were not exposed to occupational noise. Noise levels dB(A) were measured at different locations in the factory. Hearing was assessed in all participants. Few cases we...

  7. Beta blockers and loss of hearing.

    OpenAIRE

    Fa?ldt, R.; Liedholm, H.; Aursnes, J.

    1984-01-01

    Loss of hearing in a 43 year old man during treatment with metoprolol was dose related and disappeared within a few months after the drug had been stopped. The hearing impairment was of mixed type, with an air bone gap without any disorder of the middle ear observable by conventional clinical methods. Similar scattered reports from international sources on loss of hearing during treatment with beta blockers are also presented.

  8. Relationship between hearing complaint and hearing loss among older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presbycusis is a public health problem. Despite its high prevalence, many elders do not have their hearing ability investigated periodically, because they do not have a specific complaint. Objective: To check whether there is a relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in elder people. Method: Transversal study in elders from a neighborhood in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul. After the definition of the neighborhood's geographic boundaries, all houses were visited, the older people's addresses were ascertained and the invitations to take part in the research were provided. A questionnaire survey was applied which had a question about hearing loss complaint and air-conducted hearing thresholds were obtained and studied. Out of the 72 identified elders 50 elders agreed to participate, 35 (70% women, and 15 (30% men. Results: It was confirmed that only 12 (24% elders showed a specific complaint of hearing loss, although 33 (66% elders showed slight, moderate, severe and profound hearing losses. Conclusion: Data analysis confirmed there was no relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in the assessed group, and demonstrated the need to forward the elders for audiological evaluation even without any specific complaint.

  9. Hearing Loss Protection Using Vitamins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Khazaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Machine-made life along with the industrialization of the societies has caused the human to deal with a kind of stressful environment made up of aching sound and vibration sources. Noisiness has been one of the biggest problems of today’s world that the people are in danger of its painful effects. Auditory disorder is the most common reason for Adult Acquired Hearing Loss. As a result, protection against auditory disorders seems to be necessary. Method: In accordance with the importance of this idea, a number of researches in the field of nutrition which resulted in finding the relation between NIHL and vitamins have been carried out. Through the assessment the fact that vitamins can have both preventative and curing influence on NIHL has been evident. Furthermore, it has been discovered that the deficiency of above-mentioned instances can in a way increase the sensitivity of auditory system to noise. Result: There are various mechanisms for NIHL, and each vitamin in a way can go against the destructive affection of it (NIHL. For instance, vitamins A,C and E along with Magnesium can wipe out the free radicals produced by noise exposure. Making use of Antioxidants combinations like vitamin E can prevent auditory cells from death and Noise Induced Hearing Loss from coming about.Conclusion: Vitamin A deficiency increases the sensitivity of auditory system to noise and as a result increases the susceptibility to NIHL. Vitamin C by preventing DNA Oxidation and Lipid Peroxidation in Cochlea has preventive and therapeutic effects on NIHL. Vitamin B12, B6 Deficiency and Folic Acid by damaging Stereo Vascular increase the vulnerability to NIHl. The mechanism and how vitamins affect each of above-mentioned instances will be covered within the article in details.

  10. Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Hearing Loss in Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hearing Loss Homepage Facts Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis ...

  11. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meister H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hartmut Meister,1 Sebastian Rählmann,1 Martin Walger,2 Sabine Margolf-Hackl,3 Jürgen Kießling3 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT-Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Othorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany Purpose: To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons.Methods: Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated.Results: Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity – as determined by the fluid intelligence measure – was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered.Conclusion: The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still, individual cognitive capacity might be relevant for hearing aid benefit during an initial phase of hearing aid provision if acclimatization has not yet taken place. Keywords: fluid intelligence, working memory, experience

  12. Occupational lead exposure and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, L S; Freels, S; Persky, V

    1997-07-01

    Studies of adults, children, and laboratory animals suggest an association between lead exposure and hearing loss. A causal relationship might direct mandated medical surveillance of lead-exposed workers to include audiometric testing. A cross-sectional, computerized dataset was obtained from a private occupational health screening company to examine the relationship between blood lead level and hearing loss. Audiometry and blood lead results were available for 183 workers. A statistically significant correlation was found between blood lead level and an elevated hearing threshold at 400 Hz (P = 0.03); no other frequencies showed such a correlation. This finding suggests either an interaction between nose exposure and lead, interaction of other exposure factors (such as cigarette smoking), or that factors other than biomechanical ones render the organ of Corti more susceptible at 4000 Hz. Further evaluation of these questions should be undertaken. Computerized databases created for worker surveillance may be a source for data useful for examining other causal connections in occupational settings. PMID:9253727

  13. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully

  14. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully.

  15. Relationship between hearing complaint and hearing loss among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Freitas, Cintia La Rocha; Milla?o, Luzia Fernandes; Gonc?alves, Andre?a Kruger; Becker Junior, Benno; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira Dos; Lopes, Tadeu Campos; Pol, Doralice Orrigo Da Cunha; Gonc?alves, Cle?zio Jose? Dos Santos; Martins, Isabel Amaral

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Presbycusis is a public health problem. Despite its high prevalence, many elders do not have their hearing ability investigated periodically, because they do not have a specific complaint. Objective: To check whether there is a relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in elder people. Method: Transversal study in elders from a neighborhood in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul. After the definition of the neighborhood's geographic boundaries, all ho...

  16. Hearing Screening and Diagnostic Evaluation of Children With Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Danielle S.; Holstrum, W. June; Gaffney, Marcus; Green, Denise; Oyler, Robert F.; Gravel, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    More than 90% of newborns in the United States are now being screened for hearing loss. A large fraction of cases of unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss are not currently identified through newborn hearing screening. This is of concern because a preponderance of research has demonstrated that unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss can lead to developmental delays and educational problems for some children. To help address this probable underidentification ...

  17. Hearing Loss in Children: Types of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... happen when any part of the ear or auditory (hearing) system is not working in the usual ... balance the nerves that go to the brain Auditory (ear) Nerve This nerve sends sound information from ...

  18. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Chronic Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jafari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media (COM can be treated by surgery. COM, however, may be associated with functional damage to the inner ear. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL due to COM has been found to be significant by some authors, whereas it has been considered negligible by others. The present study aimed to answer the question; Does COM cause SNHL ? Methods: 120 patients with unilateral COM admitted for tympano-mastoidectomy were selected for this observational case-control study. Air conduction threshold (ACT and bone conduction threshold (BCT averages were calculated at the speech frequencies (500, 1000, 2000Hz and 4 KHz, in affected (case ear and non affected (control ear and then entered in the questionnaire along with intraoperative findings. Multiple statistical tests were used to clarify the relationships between SNHL and COM. Results: COM was seen to be associated with SNHL. The Threshold shift was more accentuated at 4 KHz in older patients. SNHL at 4 KHz seemed to be higher than that at the speech frequencies. There was a significant positive relationship between the elevated BCT and duration of COM. The relationship between elevated BCT and cholesteatoma was also significant. Conclusion: The inner ear is vulnerable to COM. The proximity of the sensory cells to the potential source of harm (inflamed middle ear may mean higher exposure, as reflected by the fact that sensory cells processing high frequencies are more seriously damaged. SNHL in affected ear is strongly dependant on duration of disease.

  19. Reading skills of hearing and moderately severe hearing loss children in ordinary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aim: Hearing impairment in critical period of speech and language development is caused defects in oral and written language. The aim of this study is to use a test for comparing the reading skills of elementary fifth grade hearing and moderately severe hearing loss students in public schools. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 10 hearing impaired children selected from the total number of fifth grade moderately severe hearing loss students' community (public schools based on the inclusion criteria and compared with 10 hearing children that were matched according to grade, as a control group. In order to gather the data, reading and writing tests for school students was used. Data analysis was done through SPSS-16. Results: The findings indicated that hearing impaired children on auditory discrimination skills (P=0.001, word auditory memory (P=0.034 sentence auditory memory (P<0.001, phonological blending (P=0.034, phonological segmentation (P=0.012 and text reading comprehension (P=0.044 were significantly weaker than the control group, but they had similar function in other skills. Conclusion: Children with hearing impairment have the same function in tasks based on visual processing to normal children, whereas, in tasks based on auditory and phonological processing are weaker than them. Keywords: Reading skills, Hearing loss children, Public schools

  20. Leupeptin reduces impulse noise induced hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Gavriel Haim; Shulman Abraham; Stracher Alfred; Sohmer Haim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to continuous and impulse noise can induce a hearing loss. Leupeptin is an inhibitor of the calpains, a family of calcium-activated proteases which promote cell death. The objective of this study is to assess whether Leupeptin could reduce the hearing loss resulting from rifle impulse noise. Methods A polyethelene tube was implanted into middle ear cavities of eight fat sand rats (16 ears). Following determination of auditory nerve brainstem evoked response (ABR) ...

  1. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Note: ... Vision Loss Video (Quicktime) Transcript of Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Video ...

  2. Hearing Loss in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Abbasi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Systemic lupus erythematosus has its unique complications which warrant careful examination and assessment during follow/up visits of patients. The present study was conducted to evaluate prevalence of hearing loss in patients with SLE. Materials & Methods: At present a case- control study has been performed on 45 patients with SLE in a clinic of a teaching university hospital, Qazvin city, Iran. The patients were examined and evaluated for auditory and hearing problems as well as parameters related to their disease severity and progression. The control group was selected from the same clinic. Results: Five patients (11.1% complained from hearing loss, 4 patients s (8.9% complained from otorrhea, 3 patients (6.7% had tinnitus in research group, moreover twelve patients (26.7% in case group and 4 patients (8.9% in control group had sensorineural hearing loss. The difference was found to be statistically significant. No statistical significant relationship was found between severity, age of onset, and duration of the disease, and the lab tests of the patients with hearing loss. Conclusion: The present study implies that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus may develop sensorineural hearing loss during their course of the disease. It is recommended that audiology examination and/or audiometry become a part of routine follow/up studies of the patients.

  3. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  4. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a “wait-and-scan” group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss ithe naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  5. Childhood Hearing Health: Educating for Prevention of Hearing Loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adriana Bender Moreira, Lacerda; Claudia Giglio de Oliveira, Gonçalves; Giselle, Lacerda; Diolén Conceição Barros, Lobato; Luciana, Santos; Aline Carlezzo, Moreira; Angela, Ribas.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies f [...] or awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1%) presented hearing alterations. Conclusion The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential.

  6. Viral Causes of Hearing Loss: A Review for Hearing Health Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Brandon E.; Durstenfeld, Anne; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    A number of viral infections can cause hearing loss. Hearing loss induced by these viruses can be congenital or acquired, unilateral or bilateral. Certain viral infections can directly damage inner ear structures, others can induce inflammatory responses which then cause this damage, and still others can increase susceptibility or bacterial or fungal infection, leading to hearing loss. Typically, virus-induced hearing loss is sensorineural, although conductive and mixed hearing losses can be ...

  7. Unilateral Hearing Loss: the Benefit of Auditory Localization after Adaptation of Hearing Aids Individual

    OpenAIRE

    Sanches, Rita Ca?ssia Pires; Ribeiro, Juliana Pontalti; Felici, Maria Da Glo?ria Furlani Mendonc?a; Jacob, Regina Tangerino Souza; Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A unilateral hearing loss is characterized by decreased hearing in one ear. Objective: To evaluate the benefit on the location after hearing the adaptation of hearing aids Individual (HA) in individuals with unilateral hearing loss. Method: A prospective study of 31 individuals aged between 18 and 75 years and both genders with unilateral hearing loss of various types and grades, answered a questionnaire to evaluate the location of the sound source, by using the "Survey of heari...

  8. Acquired Hearing Loss and Psychiatric Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin CEYLAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: World Health Organization (WHO defines hearing loss as an impairment in perception, attention and organisation as well as in speaking, In this study, on the base of biopsychosocial theory, we aimed to determine both psychiatric symptoms of the patients who have acquired (but ideopathic hearing impairment/loss, and also, if there was, an association between this physical illness and psychiatric symptoms. Methods: The groups of patients with mild, moderate and severe hearing impairment and a healthy control group were enrolled in the study. Each group contained 30 persons. A sociodemographic questionnaire, the Symptom Check List 90-Revised Form (SCL-90-R and the Non-Patients Form of Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (SCID-NP were used. Results: The psychopathology that have been found in our study was 35.6% in patients group versus 20% in controls. 30-50% of patients with hearing loss reported both social and psychological problems. According to SCL-90-R, in the patients’ groups who had especially moderate and severe hearing loss were more paranoid and depressive; they had more eating and sleeping difficulties; also they complained more from musical hallucinations (25% and their scores of positive symptoms and of additional scales in SCL-90-R were higher than the controls (p< 0.001. In SCID-NP, especially the hallucination, the paranoia and the depression scores were higher in patients with hearing loss. Conclusion: The reasons for psychiatric symptoms in the patients with hearing impairment or loss are multiethiological and it is known that disability is the major ethiological factor. The results of our study showed us that the psychiatry and the other medical disciplines should always work together. (Archives of Neuropsychiatry 2009; 46: 149-56

  9. Early identification of hearing loss: screening and surveillance methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, P. E.; Bamford, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Service monitoring data on the outcomes of health visitors' screening for hearing loss at 8 months in West Berkshire indicate low sensitivity and low positive predictive value, despite efforts to improve the conduct of the screen. Nevertheless, data on a recent series of severely hearing impaired children indicate significantly earlier diagnosis than previously, due in part in the introduction of other service changes including neonatal 'at risk' screening and surveillance using parental obse...

  10. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee Monisha; Phadke S; Mittal Balraj

    2003-01-01

    Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant find...

  11. Classification and hearing evolution of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    N.O., Penido; O.L.M., Cruz; A., Zanoni; D.P., Inoue.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze clinical aspects, hearing evolution and efficacy of clinical treatment of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). This was a prospective clinical study of 136 consecutive patients with SSNHL divided into three groups after diagnostic evaluation: [...] patients with defined etiology (DE, N = 13, 10%), concurrent diseases (CD, N = 63, 46.04%) and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL, N = 60, 43.9%). Initial treatment consisted of prednisone and pentoxifylline. Clinical aspects and hearing evolution for up to 6 months were evaluated. Group CD comprised 73% of patients with metabolic decompensation in the initial evaluation and was significantly older (53.80 years) than groups DE (41.93 years) and ISSHL (39.13 years). Comparison of the mean initial and final hearing loss of the three groups revealed a significant hearing improvement for group CD (P = 0.001) and group ISSHL (P = 0.001). Group DE did not present a significant difference in thresholds. The clinical classification for SSNHL allows the identification of significant differences regarding age, initial and final hearing impairment and likelihood of response to therapy. Elevated age and presence of coexisting disease were associated with a greater initial hearing impact and poorer hearing recovery after 6 months. Patients with defined etiology presented a much more limited response to therapy. The occurrence of decompensated metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and the possibility of first manifestation of auto-immune disease and cerebello-pontine angle tumors justify an adequate protocol for investigation of SSNHL.

  12. Alcohol Use among Students with and without Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P.

    2015-01-01

    We compared alcohol use among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Adolescents with hearing loss reported consuming less alcohol, less binge drinking, fewer episodes of drunkenness, and a higher age at first drunkenness than their hearing peers. Alcohol use did not vary between students who were deaf or hard of hearing or between students…

  13. Print Knowledge of Preschool Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Lund, Emily; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Measures of print knowledge were compared across preschoolers with hearing loss and normal hearing. Alphabet knowledge did not differ between groups, but preschoolers with hearing loss performed lower on measures of print concepts and concepts of written words than preschoolers with normal hearing. Further study is needed in this area.

  14. SOX10 mutations mimic isolated hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, V; Faubert, E; Baral, V; Gherbi, S; Loundon, N; Couloigner, V; Denoyelle, F; Noël-Pétroff, N; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Bondurand, N; Marlin, S

    2014-09-25

    Ninety genes have been identified to date that are involved in non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 300 different forms of syndromic hearing impairment have been described. Mutations in SOX10, one of the genes contributing to syndromic hearing loss, induce a large range of phenotypes, including several subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome and Kallmann syndrome with deafness. In addition, rare mutations have been identified in patients with isolated signs of these diseases. We used the recent characterization of temporal bone imaging aspects in patients with SOX10 mutations to identify possible patients with isolated hearing loss due to SOX10 mutation. We selected 21 patients with isolated deafness and temporal bone morphological defects for mutational screening. We identified two SOX10 mutations and found that both resulted in a non-functional protein in vitro. Re-evaluation of the two affected patients showed that both had previously undiagnosed olfactory defects. Diagnosis of anosmia or hyposmia in young children is challenging, and particularly in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SOX10 mutations can mimic non-syndromic hearing impairment. MRI should complete temporal bones computed tomographic scan in the management of congenital deafness as it can detect brain anomalies, cochlear nerve defects, and olfactory bulb malformation in addition to inner ear malformations. PMID:25256313

  15. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  16. The comparative study of reading comprehension in normal-hearing and hearing-loss student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Afrooz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In different language approaches, reading is considered as a major skill. Language skills comprising listening, speaking, reading and writing are completely interlinked with each other. Thus, providing active application of listening and speaking skills, children will learn reading and writing skills easily. The aim of this research was to compare reading skills of hearing-loss students studying at exceptional schools with normal students of different degrees.Methods: The research was conducted post-traumatically using standardized 2006 PIRLS test. 80 students in fifth grade of exceptional primary schools, and first and fourth grade of exceptional high schools in Tehran City who had severe and or profound hearing loss were randomly selected along with 80 normal students in ordinary schools who were selected using available sampling method.Results: There were significant differences between reading comprehension of hearing-loss and normal students of all three grades (p<0.001. Reading comprehension in female students was significantly higher than the male ones (p<0.001. There were not any significant differences in mean reading comprehension scores of hearing-loss students in different grades which demonstrate that their reading skills had not developed in tandem with their age and school educations.Conclusion: This study shows that one of the significant concerns regarding hearing-loss students is their reading comprehension ability. Considering reading ability as one of the most important acquisitive abilities which students learn at school, evaluation of reading skills of hearing loss students as well as recognition of their strengths and weaknesses in this field is indispensable.

  17. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention: Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety & Health Topics NIOSH Share Compartir NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION NIOSH recommends that all worker exposures to ... for eight hours to minimize occupational noise induced hearing loss. NIOSH also recommends a 3 dBA exchange rate ...

  18. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Patient Health Information News media interested in covering the latest from AAO-HNS/F ...

  19. Genetic Variation Linked to Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... researchers has confirmed a link between age-related hearing loss and a gene producing a key protein in ... that genetics and environment interact, linking age-related hearing loss to other neurodegenerative risk factors. Results of the ...

  20. Mobile phone induced sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dousary, Surayie H

    2007-08-01

    The increased use of mobile phones worldwide has focused interest on the biological effects and possible health outcomes of exposure to radiofrequency fields from mobile phones, and their base stations. Various reports suggest that mobile phone use can cause health problems like fatigue, headache, dizziness, tension, and sleep disturbances; however, only limited research data is available in medical literature regarding interaction between electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones and auditory function; and the possible impact on hearing. We report a case of sensorineural hearing loss due to Global System for Mobile Communications mobile phone use, in a 42-year-old male. PMID:17676220

  1. Mobile phone induced sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased use of mobile phones worldwide has focused interest on the biological effects and possible health outcomes of exposure to radiofrequency fields from mobile phones, and their base stations. Various reports suggest that mobile phone use can cause health problems like fatigue, headache, dizziness, tension and sleep disturbances, however, only limited research data is available in medical literature regarding interaction between electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones and auditory function and the possible impact on hearing. We report a case of sensorineural hearing loss due to Global System for Mobile Communication mobile phone use in a 42-year-old male. (author)

  2. The Relationship between Nonverbal Cognitive Functions and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekveld, Adriana A.; Deijen, Jan Berend; Goverts, S. Theo; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between hearing loss and memory and attention when nonverbal, visually presented cognitive tests are used. Method: Hearing loss (pure-tone audiometry) and IQ were measured in 30 participants with mild to severe hearing loss. Participants performed cognitive tests of pattern recognition memory,…

  3. Prevalence of hearing loss and accuracy of self-report among factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Raymond, Delbert; Kerr, Madeleine J; Lusk, Sally L

    2011-01-01

    Noise represents one of the most common occupational health hazards. A Healthy People 2020 objective aims to reduce hearing loss in the noise-exposed public. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare perceived and measured hearing, and to determine the prevalence of hearing loss among a group of factory workers. Data collected as part of an intervention study promoting hearing protector use among workers at an automotive factory in the Midwest were used. Plant employees (n=2691) provided information regarding their perceived hearing ability, work role, and other demographics. The relationships among audiograms, a single-item measure of perceived hearing ability, and demographic data were explored using chi-square, McNemar's test, Mann-Whitney U-test, sensitivity, and specificity. The prevalence of hearing loss among noise-exposed factory workers was 42% (where hearing loss was defined as >25 dB loss at the OSHA-recommended frequencies of 2, 3, and 4 kHz in either ear). However, 76% of workers reported their hearing ability as excellent or good. The difference in perceived hearing ability was significant at each tested frequency between those with and without measured hearing loss. Self-reported hearing ability was poorly related to results of audiometry. Although this group of workers was employed in a regulated environment and served by a hearing conservation program, hearing loss was highly prevalent. These findings, together with national prevalence estimates, support the need for evaluation of hearing conservation programs and increased attention to the national goal of reducing adult hearing loss. PMID:21959114

  4. Hearing Loss Due to Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Statin Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammed Oylumlu; Faris Mahmode Lolan; Suleyman Ercan; Gokhan Altunbas; Zeynel Karatas; Vedat Davutoglu

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that high cholesterol levels might have adverse effects on hearing and interest- ingly statins may have beneficial effects on hearing loss. Herein, we share a dramatic improvement in acute hearing loss by statin administration in a young patient with familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating the possible role of statins in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss in the context of familial hypercholesterolemia. Although the st...

  5. Studies in Pediatric Hearing Loss at the House Research Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Johnson, Karen C.; Martinez, Amy S.; Visser-dumont, Leslie; Ganguly, Dianne Hammes; Still, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    Three clinical research projects are described that are relevant to pediatric hearing loss. The three projects fall into two distinct areas. The first area emphasizes clinical studies that track developmental outcomes in children with hearing loss; one project is specific to cochlear implants and the other to hearing aids. The second area addresses speech perception test development for very young children with hearing loss. Although these two lines of research are treated as separate areas, ...

  6. ???????????????????? Intratympanic Glucocorticoids for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ??

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ????? Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, VIP?????????????????????????(ITDvs ???????????/?????????????(RCT??? Cochrane Handbook 5.0.1 ??????????????? RevMan 5.0.2 ????Meta ????????5 ? RCTs?? 285 ????Meta ???????????????????OR(95% CI?3.94(1.03,15.12???????????(ITD?250 HZ???????????????(p < 0.05?????????????????????????(p = 0.20????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of intratympanic glucocorticoids for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Methods We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, CBM,CNKI, and VIP databases and International Clinical Trials Registry website of World Health Organization using the key words “glucocorticoids”, “hearing loss” for the literatures of English and Chinese. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of intratympanic glucocorticoids versus placebo or intratympanic glucocorticoids versus controlled group?oral glucocorticoid/placebo?for sudden sensorineural hearing loss were included. According to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Version 5.0.1, we assessed the quality of the included RCTs. A meta-analysis was carried out with the Cochrane Collaboration’s software RevMan 5.0.2. Results Five RCTs which contained 285 patients were included. Meta-analysis illustrated that there was sta-tistically significant on hearing recovery rate between the two groups (OR:3.94, 95% CI: 1.03-15.12. Hearing of pure tone average also improved significantly with intratympanic glucocorticoids therapy at 250HZ (p < 0.05. We found no statistically significant on the speech reception threshold (p = 0.20. Conclusion Com-pared with the control group, intratympanic glucocorticoids can significantly increase the hearing recovery rate of patients. Given the limitation of sample size of included studies into consideration, the results of this systematic review are still uncertain. Multi-center, large-scale, double-blinded randomized control trials are needed to confirm the available evidence.

  7. Occupational Noise-induced Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mh, Azizi

    2010-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a well-known entity in daily practice of otolaryngology. A wide variety of NIHLs are work-related. Occupational noise is the most common cause of NIHL in adults which is up to now considered incurable and the best approach to it is to utilize maximal protection. An effective noise exposure prevention program consists of identification of sources of noise and implementation of controlling measures and regulations at working environments as well as performin...

  8. Weather conditions and sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kateri Maria; Lolis Christos J; Bartzokas Aristides; Nousia Christina-Sophia; Danielides Vasilis; Skevas Antonios

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Climatic or meteorological condition changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL). We investigated the seasonal distribution of ISSHL and evaluated the influence of meteorological parameters (such as temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure), their variation and covariation on the incidence of the disease. Methods A total of 82 cases of ISSHL, admitted to our department over a five-year period, were enrolle...

  9. Role Salience and Anticipated Work–Family Relations Among Young Adults With and Without Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Most, Tova; Michael, Rinat

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of hearing status on role salience and anticipated work–family relations among 101 unmarried young adults aged 20–33 years: 35 with hearing loss (19 hard of hearing and 16 deaf) and 66 hearing. Participants completed the Life Role Salience scale, anticipated conflictual relations scale, anticipated facilitory relations scale, and a background questionnaire. The deaf participants demonstrated a significantly higher level of commitment to work but anticipated ...

  10. Imaging evaluation of sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, H C

    2001-06-01

    The imaging evaluation of patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) focuses on the acoustic pathways from the cochlea to the auditory cortex. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for most patients with SNHL, though computed tomography (CT) also plays an important role in the evaluation of bony changes and in patients for whom MRI is contraindicated. Conventional enhanced MRI is the most commonly used technique in this clinical setting. High-resolution fast spin-echo T2 MRI is an adjunctive technique that provides exquisite evaluation of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), internal auditory canal (IAC), cranial nerves, and membranous labyrinth, and plays a significant role in the diagnosis and surgical evaluation of SNHL. Categories of lesions that cause SNHL include brain lesions involving central auditory pathways; neoplasms of the CPA and IAC, the most common being schwannoma; other neoplastic, congenital, and cystic masses of the CPA and IAC; congenital anomalies of the inner ear; intrinsic cochlear nerve defects, inflammatory processes of the inner ear; and temporal bone trauma. PMID:11451098

  11. Vision loss and hearing loss in painting and musical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    This article considers the impact of vision and hearing loss on great painters and musical composers. The visual work of Mary Cassatt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edgar Degas, and Claude Monet all showed alterations as their vision failed. In contrast, Gabriel Fauré, Bed?ich Smetana, and Ludwig von Beethoven wrote many of their best compositions while totally deaf, and Georg Friedrich Handel and Frederick Delius struggled to compose late in life when they lost their vision (although their hearing remained excellent). There are 2 major distinctions between the role of vision and hearing for these artistic disciplines. First, there is a surrogate means of "hearing" music, through the musical score, which allows composers to write and edit music while totally deaf. The greatest problem with deafness for a skilled composer is interference from internal noise (tinnitus). There is no surrogate for vision to allow a painter to work when the subject is a blur or the colors on the canvas cannot be distinguished. Second, although the appreciation of art is visual and that of music is auditory, the transcription of both art and musical composition is visual. Thus, visual loss does pose a problem for a composer accustomed to working with good sight, because it disrupts habitual methods of writing and editing music. PMID:24565744

  12. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Children with a Hearing Loss: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Amineh Koravand; Benoît Jutras; Maryse Lassonde

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the patterns of neural activity in the central auditory system in children with hearing loss. Methods. Cortical potentials and mismatch responses (MMRs) were recorded from ten children aged between 9 and 10 years: five with hearing loss and five with normal hearing in passive oddball paradigms using verbal and nonverbal stimuli. Results. Results indicate a trend toward larger P1 amplitude, a significant reduction in amplitude, and latency of N2 in children with ...

  13. Occupational hearing loss of market mill workers in the city of Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitcher, Emmanuel D; Ocansey, Grace; Abaidoo, Benjamin; Atule, Alidu

    2014-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is an irreversible sensorineural hearing loss associated with exposure to high levels of excessive noise. Prevention measures are not well established in developing countries. This comparative cross sectional study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in both a group of high risk workers and a control group and to assess their knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. A total of 101 market mill workers and 103 controls employed within markets in the city of Accra, Ghana, were evaluated using a structured questionnaire and pure tone audiometry. The questionnaire assessed factors including self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus, knowledge on the effects of noise on hearing health and the use of hearing protective devices. Pure tone audiometric testing was conducted for both mill workers and controls. Noise levels at the work premises of the mill workers and controls were measured. Symptoms of hearing loss were reported by 24 (23.76%) and 8 (7.7%) mill workers and controls respectively. Fifty-five (54.5%) and fifty-four (52.37%) mill workers and controls exhibited knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. Five (5.0%) mill workers used hearing protective devices. There was significant sensorineural hearing loss and the presence of a 4 kHz audiometric notch among mill workers when compared with controls for the mean thresholds of 2 kHz, 3 kHz and 4 kHz (P = 0. 001). The prevalence of hearing loss in the better hearing ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively (P ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively. The majority of mill workers did not use hearing protection. PMID:24953884

  14. MR imaging of sensory neural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes MR findings in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) who do not have acoustic neuromas. Twenty-eight patients with SNHL were evaluated with pre- and postgadolinium thin-section axial T1-weighted imaging and axial T2- weighted imaging through the whole brain. Eleven patients had lesions in the labyrinth. Ten of the 11 lesions enhanced after gadolinium administration. The diagnoses included viral labyrinthitis (three patients), syphilitic labyrinthitis (two patients), bacterial labyrinthitis (one patient), vestibular neuromas (three patients), ostosclerosis (one patient), and intravestibular hemorrhage (one patient)

  15. Correlating the site of tympanic membrane perforation with Hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ijaduola Taiwo G; Nwaorgu Onyekwere G; Ibekwe Titus S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background It is recognized that the size of tympanic membrane(TM) perforation is proportional to the magnitude of hearing loss, however, there is no clear consensus on the effect of the location (site) of the perforation on the hearing loss. Hence the study is set to investigate the relationship between the location of perforation on TM and hearing loss. Methods A cross-sectional prospective study of consecutive adult patients with perforated TM conducted in the ENT clinic of Univer...

  16. Acute unilateral hearing loss as an unusual presentation of cholesteatoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bickerton Richard C; Ahmed Shahzada K; Thio Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Cholesteatomas are epithelial cysts that contain desquamated keratin. Patients commonly present with progressive hearing loss and a chronically discharging ear. We report an unusual presentation of the disease with an acute hearing loss suffered immediately after prolonged use of a pneumatic drill. Case presentation A 41 year old man with no previous history of ear problems presented with a sudden loss of hearing in his right ear immediately following the prolonged use of ...

  17. Including Children with Hearing Loss in Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Laurie; Schery, Teris K.

    2006-01-01

    These are typical scenarios of children with hearing loss who are being included increasingly in early childhood settings. Recent federal legislation encourages states to develop programs to screen the hearing of all infants before they leave the hospital, and currently 39 states have adopted newborn infant hearing screening mandates (ASHA 2005).…

  18. Medication for hearing loss after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of corticosteroid treatments for patients showing decreases in hearing levels after stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients experienced a hearing loss in pure-tone average at greater than 20 dB or less than 10 dB within 1 year after irradiation administration of 44 Gy/22 fractions followed by a 4 Gy boost. Eight received oral prednisone at a daily dose of 30 mg, which was gradually decreased (medicated group), and 13 received none (nonmedicated group). The average observation period was 26.7±16.6 (range: 6-69) months. Results: Hearing recovery was seen after initial onset of the hearing loss in all 8 patients in the medicated group and in 2 of 13 patients in the nonmedicated group (p=0.001). The hearing recovery, that is, the change in pure-tone average (dB) at the last follow-up from the onset of hearing loss, was 9.8±6.9 dB (recovery) in the medicated group and -9.4±12.8 dB (further loss) in the nonmedicated group (p=0.0013). The hearing recovery rate, normalizing to the degree of the hearing loss before medication, was also significantly higher in the medicated group than in the nonmedicated group (p=0.0014). Conclusions: Corticosteroidal intake is suggested to be effective in improving hearing loss after stereotactic radiotherapy, at least in young patients having a useful pretreatment hearing level, if the treatment for hearing loss is administered immediately aftng loss is administered immediately after the hearing loss is first detected

  19. Hearing loss and fluctuating hearing levels in X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia

    OpenAIRE

    Pantel, G.; Probst, R.; Podvinec, M.; Gu?rtler, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective:X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia is the most common of the genetically determined forms of osteomalacia. The occurrence of hearing loss in X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia has been known since 1984. However, observations on the progression of such hearing loss, and suggestions regarding possible therapy, have not previously been published.Methods:Case report of a patient with X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and hearing loss, with three years' aud...

  20. Hearing loss and tinnitus in adolescents and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Alice

    2001-05-01

    Little attention has been paid to hearing abilities and the effects of noise on the normal adolescent and young adult population. A series of studies will be presented on the prevalence of hearing loss and reported effects of hearing loss and tinnitus in adolescents and young adults from different cultural backgrounds. Adolescents and young adults from different backgrounds may tend to seek or avoid various noise environments that could be detrimental to their hearing and cause tinnitus. Attitudes and exposures to noise environments were evaluated to see if these may be correlated with their hearing losses and/or tinnitus. In addition, these adolescent and young adult subjects reported how often they used hearing protection in various noise environments. Finally, the issues of quality of life and the need for hearing conservation programs with these populations will be presented.

  1. Pediatric hearing loss: common causes, diagnosis and therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, M; Tabet, P; Saliba, I

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric hearing loss limits the child ability to develop effective auditory and speech capabilities. Early rehabilitation of hearing loss results in higher levels of linguistic, academic and social skills. To achieve the best outcomes, proper and timely diagnosis is essential. The etiology of hearing loss can be classified according to its nature as sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), conductive hearing loss (CHL) or mixed hearing loss (MHL). Congenital hearing loss could be genetic or non genetic (acquired), syndromic or non-syndromic. Hearing loss can be classified according to the severity into mild (26-40 dB HL), moderate (41-70 dB HL), severe (71-90dB HL) and profound (more than 90 dB HL). Management of hearing loss is mainly influenced by the nature, the bilaterality, the severity and the age at diagnosis. Severe to profound bilateral SNHL can be managed by cochlear implantation (unilateral or bilateral), if picked up at early age while mild to moderate bilateral SNHL are easier to manage with conventional hearing aids. CHL has less impact on the speech development of the child. It is usually managed by correcting the underlying etiology such as otitis media with effusion or even surgically in cases of external ear atresia or ossicular malformations. Unilateral SNHL have fortunately no impact on the language development of the child and can be passed undiagnosed until preschool-aged children. The implementation of national newborn hearing screening programs has improved the management of affected children by rehabilitating them at early stages to allow for normal speech development. In this review article, we aim to highlight the most common causes of pediatric hearing loss, their character and presentation and to review the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of a deaf child. PMID:25312238

  2. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Monisha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant finding to date has been the discovery of mutations in GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 as the major cause of profound prelingual deafness. This was first reported in a Tunisian family in 1994 and thereafter in many different countries. GJB2 gene encodes the gap-junction protein, connexin 26 (Cx26, mutations in which have become the first genetic marker of inherited hearing loss. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR, single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP and sequencing methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in Cx26 gene. In India as well, the Cx26 mutations are being screened in families with hearing impaired children using these molecular methods. Therefore, in order to create awareness among the clinicians and the affected families; we have attempted to review the Cx26 gene mutations responsible for autosomal recessive type of non-syndromic hearing loss. The efficacy and utility of Cx26 gene analysis might open the path to proper counseling of families for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. It may even facilitate the development of strategies in future for the treatment of this common genetic disorder.

  3. What are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible for the hearing complaint in the hearing loss for ototoxicity after the oncological treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberman, Patricia Helena Pecora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The neurosensory bilateral simetric hearing loss resulting of the oncological treatment is underestimated, because the patients has the hearing detection preserved, reporting complaints in determined situation, or the not comprehension of part of the message. Objective: Investigate which are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible by the presence of hearing complaints. Method: Prospective study evaluating 200 patients with cancer in the childhood out of the oncological treatment in at least 8 years, with average age to the diagnosis of 6,21 years (4,71. Was applied anamnesis to investigate the presence of hearing complaints and performed a tonal threshold audiometry. To check the association between the complaint and the hearing loss, was applied the Exact test of Fisher, with one error a=5%, the patients were split into: normal hearing, hearing loss in 8kHz, loss in 6-8 kHz, loss in 4-8 kHz, loss in 2-8 kHz and loss in < 1-8 kHz. Results: We found 125 patients with hearing loss, 10 presented hearing complaints. Between the patients with hearing loss, 16 presented loss only at 8kHz, and 1 with complaint; 22 with loss in 6-8 kHz, being 3 with complaint; 16 with loss in 4-8 kHz, from them 10 with complaint; 15 with loss 2-8 kHz, being 14 with complaint and 6 with loss in < 1-8 kHz all with complaints. There were a significant relationship between the loss and hearing complaint (p<0,001, when the frequency of 4 kHz was involved. Conclusion: The bigger the number of affected frequencies the bigger the occurrence of hearing complaint, most of all when the speech frequencies are involved, and the involvement of 4 kHz already determines the appearing of the complaints.

  4. Hearing Aids Communication : Integrating Social Interaction, Audiology and User Centered Design to Improve Communication with Hearing Loss and Hearing Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Globally, hearing loss is the second most frequent disability. About 80% of the persons affected by hearing loss do not use hearing aids. The goal of this edited volume is to present a theoretically founded, interdisciplinary approach geared at understanding and improving social interaction impacted by hearing loss and (non-) use of hearing technologies. The researchers report on pilot studies from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Switzerland and the USA. Using Conversation Analysis, the studies identify problems and serve as points of departure for possible solutions. Researchers and practitioners from the different disciplines (medicine, audiology, hearing rehabilitation, User Centered Design, Conversation Analysis, change business) as well as users of hearing technologies comment on this approach.

  5. Hearing Loss and Cognition: The Role of Hearing Aids, Social Isolation and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Emsley, Richard; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Moore, David R.; Fortnum, Heather; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Munro, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770) of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally. PMID:25760329

  6. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    JillBFirszt; HaroldBurton; RichardAChole

    2013-01-01

    Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g. cochlear implants), less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, ...

  7. Hearing loss and cognition: the role of hearing AIDS, social isolation and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Emsley, Richard; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Moore, David R; Fortnum, Heather; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Munro, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770) of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally. PMID:25760329

  8. The relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Zohre Mousavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Oral stereognosis is the ability to recognize the objects placed in the mouth; this plays a significant role in speech sounds production. Since the children with hearing loss have articulation disorders, this study aimed to clear the relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children.Methods: In this cross-sectional non-invasive study, 40 children of 5-year-old (30 children with different degrees of hearing loss and 10 normal children were involved. Oral steriognostic test was done for all of them and the Mann-Whitney U was used for statistical analysis.Results: There were significant differences between the mean of oral stereognostic ability between the normal children and the children with severe (p<0.01 or profound hearing loss (p=0.05. There was no significant difference between the mean of oral stereognostic ability among the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss compared with together. Besides, there was no significant difference between the mean of the time of diagnosis among all of hearing loss and normal children.Conclusion: The study shows that the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss have inefficient oral stereognosis in comparison with the normal children.

  9. Prognostic factors of profound idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Peir-Rong; Wu, Hung-Pin

    2014-06-01

    Profound idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is thought to have a poor prognosis, but few studies have focused on this condition. We aimed to assess the impact of patient factors, audiologic parameters, and salvage intratympanic steroid injection therapy on the prognosis of profound idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The demographic, clinical, and audiologic data, degree of hearing recovery, and efficacy of intratympanic steroid injection therapy in 576 patients with profound idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (mean age 56.2 ± 14.9 years) who had been admitted at four tertiary referral centers between 2000 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean hearing level at the initial presentation was 108.1 ± 9.5 dB. Many patients experienced vertigo (52.1%) and tinnitus (77.4%). At the 2-month follow-up, 172 (29.8%) patients showed some degree of hearing recovery, but only 21 (3.6%) patients recovered normal hearing. Further, the 116 patients who had received salvage intratympanic steroid injections showed a better audiologic outcome (improvement, 26.1 ± 24.3 vs. 15.7 ± 22.1 dB; P = 0.000) than those who had not (n = 429). In conclusion, a higher degree of hearing loss at the initial presentation indicates a poorer prognosis. Salvage intratympanic steroid injection therapy may improve the hearing of patients with profound idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss after the failure of systemic steroid therapy. PMID:23771280

  10. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Andréa Cintra Lopes1, , , ,; Vanessa Guioto Otowiz2; Patrícia Monteiro de Barros Lopes3; José Roberto Pereira Lauris2; Cibele Carméllo Santos5

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type o...

  11. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a cause of sensorineural hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Peckham, C. S.; Stark, O.; Dudgeon, J. A.; Martin, J. A.; Hawkins, G.

    1987-01-01

    Prospective studies have suggested that about 108 children with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss are born each year in England and Wales; this represents about 12% of all children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Over a nine year period 1644 children aged between 6 months and 4 years who were attending the Nuffield Hearing and Speech Centre were screened for CMV infection. The prevalence of CMV in the urine of children with sensori...

  12. Disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada Immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada (DNSI é caracterizada geralmente por uma disacusia neurossensorial bilateral, progressiva e assimétrica, acompanhada ou não por outros sintomas da orelha interna. Três pacientes com DNSI cujo quadro clínico e audiométrico eram sugestivos de doença auto-imune, e apresentaram resposta positiva à terapia imunossupressora ou pesquisa positiva de anticorpo anti hsp-70 68kD, foram estudados com relação às características clínicas, testes diagnósticos, alternativas terapêuticas e evolução da doença. Dois pacientes apresentaram quadro de disacusia neurossensorial rapidamente progressiva, associado a quadro vestibular, e outro, quadro de surdez súbita unilateral. Nenhum paciente apresentou positividade às provas reumatológicas, e apenas um paciente apresentou aumento na velocidade de hemossedimentação. Nenhum paciente obteve resposta adequada sustentada à corticoterapia, mas dois deles melhoraram com outras terapias imunossupressoras. O diagnóstico da DNSI é clínico e baseado na resposta positiva ao teste terapêutico com imunossupressores. A pesquisa de anticorpo anti-hsp70 de 68 kD pelo Western Blot é o único exame laboratorial específico para seu diagnóstico, possuindo sensibilidade de 42% e especificidade de 90%. Apenas 1 paciente apresentou positividade para este teste e não respondeu à terapia imunossupressora. Os dois pacientes com teste negativo responderam satisfatoriamente ao tratamento. A baixa sensibilidade do Western Blot e seu alto custo dificultam sua difusa utilização em nosso meio. A introdução precoce do tratamento é de suma importância por auxiliar no diagnóstico e por proporcionar um melhor prognóstico auditivo.The immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss (ISHL is characterized as an asymmetric and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Tree patients with ISHL were studied, regarding clinical aspects, diagnostic tests, treatment options and disease evolution. They presented whether positive response to immunosuppressive therapy or positiviness to Western Blot test for hsp 70-68kD. Two patients presented rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss, associated to vestibular symptoms and the other presented unilateral sudden deafness. No patient reacted to rheumatological testes, and one presented increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. None satisfactorily responded to corticotherapy, but two presented clinical improvement with other immunosuppressive therapies. The ISHL diagnosis is based on clinical aspects and on the positive response to therapeutic testes with immunosupressor drugs. The Western Blot test for hsp 70-68 kD, with 42% sensitivity and 90% specificity, is the only specific laboratorial exam for ISHL. One patient presented positiviness to this exam and did not responded to immunosuppressive therapy. Two patients with negative tests satisfactorily responded to immunosuppressive therapy. The low sensitivity and high costs of Western Blot test represent difficulties to the spread use of it. The early introduction of treatment has a major importance in the diagnosis of ISHL and to increase the auditory prognosis.

  13. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Hearing and Vision Loss Video (Quicktime) Transcript of Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to ... services, and a supportive online community. AFB’s Family of Sites AFB.org FamilyConnect ® CareerConnect ® Braille Bug ® Directory ...

  14. Mild and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Implications for Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstrum, W. June; Biernath, Krista; McKay, Sarah; Ross, Danielle S.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn hearing screening has become a standard practice in most birthing hospitals in the United States. Historically, the primary target for the identification of hearing loss has been infants with permanent bilateral loss of moderate degree or greater (i.e., greater than 40 dB). However, research indicates that without early identification and…

  15. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Usher Syndrome Having trouble with this video? Try one of these: Living with Hearing and Vision Loss ... Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Video NARRATOR 1: A woman with short gray hair. NARRATOR 2: ...

  16. Revalence of Hearing Loss and the Related Factors in BuAli Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaei

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Determining the prevalence of hearing loss and correlated factors in clients referring to audiology clinic of Buali hospital. Method and Material: This cross-sectional analytic-descriptive survery was carried out on six thousand and twenty ears of 3010 clients (1651 ,a;e amd 1359 female in Audiology clinic of Buali hospital , during Sept 2000 to Sept 2001. Results: Hearing loss is the most common reason for referring the clients (20.5%. 1319 ears (21.9% Showed sensorineural hearing impairment and conductive and mixed hearing loss are observed in 1059 (17.6% and 234 (3.9% ears, respectedly. Hearing loss degree most cases is mild (14% in both ears. There is no significant difference between male and female hearing threshold means (p>0.05 ‘ but a significant difference between hearing thresholds is observed in terms of age (p<0.05. Audiogram configuration in most cases is flat (55.1%. Otoscopic examination reveals abnormal condition in 2333 ears (38.8% . 37.2% of the studied cases have abnormal tympanogram mostly type B (15.9%. 2.2% of the clients wear hearing aid that mostly have B.T.E ones (1.5%. 6.2% of the clients , depends on their hearing impairment type and degree need rehabilitation services. Conclusion: The results are Valid only in the context of this study and it’s generaliztion needs further researches.

  17. Occupational Noise-induced Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Azizi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a well-known entity in daily practice of otolaryngology. A wide variety of NIHLs are work-related. Occupational noise is the most common cause of NIHL in adults which is up to now considered incurable and the best approach to it is to utilize maximal protection. An effective noise exposure prevention program consists of identification of sources of noise and implementation of controlling measures and regulations at working environments as well as performing periodic audiologic evaluation of those who are working at noisy environments. The present paper, briefly reviews occupational NIHL mainly based on the related data available on PubMed up to early 2010.

  18. Comparison of Different Levels of Reading Comprehension between Hearing-Impaired Loss and Normal-Hearing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Sharifi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skill is one of the most important necessities of students' learning in everyday life. This skill is referred to the ability of comprehension, comment and conclusion from texts and receiving the meaning of the massage which is composed. Educational development in any student has a direct relation with the ability of the comprehension. This study is designed to investigate the effects of hearing loss on reading comprehension in hearing-impaired students compared to normal-hearing ones.Methods: Seventeen hearing-impaired students in 4th year of primary exceptional schools in Karaj, Robatkarim and Shahriyar, Iran, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Seventeen normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to exceptional ones as control group. They were compared for different levels of reading comprehension using the international standard booklet (PIRLS 2001. Results: There was a significant difference in performance between hearing-impaired and normal- hearing students in different levels of reading comprehension (p<0.05.Conclusion: Hearing loss has negative effects on different levels of reading comprehension, so in exceptional centers, reconsideration in educational planning in order to direct education from memorizing to comprehension and deeper layers of learning seems necessary.

  19. 29 CFR 1904.10 - Recording criteria for cases involving occupational hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...for cases involving occupational hearing loss. 1904.10 Section 1904...for cases involving occupational hearing loss. (a) Basic requirement. If...previously experienced a recordable hearing loss, you must compare the...

  20. Screening of Connexin 26 in Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Danielle, Moreira; Daniela da, Silva; Priscila, Lopez; Jair Cortez, Mantovani.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The first locus for nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss is on chromosome 13q11-22. The 35delGmutation is present in 80% of cases in which GJB2 is involved, which makes the study of this mutation very important. The viability and benefits of screening for mutations in the conn [...] exin 26 gene are now beginning to change the diagnostic evaluation and identification of the etiology of hearing loss. Objective To investigate the occurrence of the 35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and their first degree relatives. Methods This transversal study included 72 patients from the local hospital. The patients were divided into three groups: group A, sensorineural hearing loss (n = 58); group B, first-degree relatives of group A with sensorineural hearing loss (n = 09); and group C, first-degree relatives of patients from group A without hearing loss (n = 05). All patients had audiological evaluation and genetic testing of the 35delG mutation. Results The 35delG mutation was found in four heterozygous mutations (three of them found in the same family). The other heterozygous mutation was found in a female patient with bilateral, moderate, prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss. A single homozygous mutation was found in a male patient, with severe sensorineural hearing loss in his right ear and profound hearing loss in the left ear. Conclusions The 35delG mutation was found in 7% of the cases. The test is easy to perform and inexpensive, but it is necessary to investigate other genes related to hearing loss.

  1. Prognostic effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time for sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y?ld?r?m, Erol; Murat Özcan, K; Palal?, Mehmet; Cetin, Mehmet Ali; Ensari, Serdar; Dere, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is one of the otological emergencies whose pathogenesis is uncertain and associated with total or partial loss of hearing function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time affects the management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Fifty-nine patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss admitted to our clinic between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In addition, each patient received intravenous piracetam and 37 patients received steroid therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was initiated between 1 and 7 days with 20 patients determined as Group A, between 8 and 14 days with 25 patients determined as Group B and between 15 and 28 days with 14 patients determined as Group C. Hearing gains of these three groups were statistically evaluated. Each of them showed statistically significant improvement. Lowest hearing gain was observed in Group C and the gain of this group was statistically less than the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the hearing gains of the Group A and Group B. Starting hyperbaric oxygen therapy in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss within the first 14 days has positive effect on the prognosis of the disease. PMID:24272206

  2. Clinical study on unilateral hearing loss in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of 60 children was studied (aged 0 to 10 years, 32 boys, 28 girls) with severe unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology. There were two peaks, at 0 and 6 years. In 19 children, hearing loss was identified during a conservative general health checkup for school or preschool children. In 21 children aged 0 years, 16 were suspected of hearing loss by newborn hearing screening. Temporal bone computed tomography scans were examined in 51 patients. Sixteen ears (31.4%) with hearing loss had inner ear and/or internal auditory canal abnormalities. In one patient, the anomaly was the presence of a bony wall dividing the internal auditory canal into two separate compartments associated with severe inner ear hypoplasia. Two patients had a common cavity. In one of these patients, the anomaly was revealed because of severe bacterial meningitis, and another was detected by newborn hearing screening. Six patients had a narrow internal auditory canal, 4 had a narrow internal auditory canal and hypoplastic cochlea, and 1 had a narrow internal auditory canal and cystic vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. Two patients had a cystic vestibule and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. One case showed fluctuation of the hearing level in the contralateral ear with normal hearing during the observation period at an average of 20 months. The number of children whose unilateral hearing loss is detected early by newborn hearing screening has enormously newborn hearing screening has enormously increased. Strategies for follow-up, early intervention, and support for families are necessary for young children with unilateral hearing impairment. (author)

  3. Noncarboplatin-induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss in a Patient With an Intracranial Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitanza, Nicholas A; Shaw, Theresa M; Gardner, Sharon L; Allen, Jeffrey C; Harter, David H; Karajannis, Matthias A

    2014-05-22

    Treatment for intracranial germ cell tumors includes platinum-based chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy, which are risk factors for hearing loss. In patients who experience significant sensorineural ototoxicity due to cochlear hair cell injury, dose reduction of chemotherapy may be necessary. This report describes an adolescent male, with excellent treatment response for an intracranial nongerminomatous germ cell tumor, who developed sensorineural hearing loss, which was central rather than cochlear in origin and unrelated to carboplatin. This patient highlights the need to carefully differentiate the type and etiology of sensorineural hearing loss in patients with brain tumors receiving ototoxic chemotherapy. PMID:23652864

  4. Prospective study of alcohol consumption and self-reported hearing loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curhan, Sharon G; Eavey, Roland; Wang, Molin; Stampfer, Meir J; Curhan, Gary C

    2015-02-01

    Chronic excess alcohol intake has been associated with irreversible hearing loss and acute alcohol intake may temporarily impair auditory function; however, some evidence suggests that long-term moderate alcohol intake may be related to lower risk of hearing loss. This study prospectively examined the association between total alcohol and individual alcoholic beverage consumption and risk of hearing loss in women. Data were prospectively collected from 65,424 participants in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II), aged 27-44 years at baseline (follow-up 1991-2009). Alcohol consumption was assessed using a validated questionnaire every 4 years. An incident case was defined as a self-reported hearing problem that began after 1991. Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. During 1,024,555 person-years of follow-up, 12,384 cases of hearing loss occurred. After multivariate adjustment, there was no significant association between total alcohol consumption and risk of hearing loss. In exploratory analyses, beer consumption was associated with increased risk and wine consumption was associated with reduced risk. No significant association was observed for consumption of liquor. Total alcohol consumption is not associated with risk of hearing loss in women. The modest associations observed for beer (direct) and wine (inverse) may be due to chance or residual confounding but merit further study. PMID:25468591

  5. Infants and Children with Hearing Loss Need Early Language Access

    OpenAIRE

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Moreland, Christopher J.; Napoli, Donna Jo; Osterling, Wendy; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Around 96 percent of children with hearing loss are born to parents with intact hearing,1 who may initially know little about deafness or sign language. Therefore, such parents will need information and support in making decisions about the medical, linguistic, and educational management of their child. Some of these decisions are time-sensitive and irreversible and come at a moment of emotional turmoil and vulnerability (when some parents grieve the toss of a normally hearing child).2 Clinic...

  6. Does Unilateral Hearing Loss Lead To Learning Handicap?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Movalleli

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss, even when limited to 1 ear, has been indicated as a handicap to communication and learning. Although this does not seem true based on my clinical impressions, there are no objective data available to evaluate, or even infer, what type of hearing loss can become a true handicap to overall academic achievement. Presented herein are findings that imply, although do not prove, the potential academic handicap of unilateral hearing loss. This study prospectively analyzed the audiologic and otologic screening tests in a university over a 9-year period. The University of Tokyo is one of the leading universities in Japan; the students examined undoubtedly had academic ability well above average, for the entrance examination is one of the most difficult to pass in Japan. The potential handicap to academic achievement caused by hearing impairment was evaluated by comparing the prevalence of hearing impairment among the study population.

  7. Identifying Hearing Loss in Young Children: Technology Replaces the Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiserman, William; Shisler, Lenore

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss can too easily be misdiagnosed or overlooked by providers serving young children. Parents and professionals may observe a language delay--an "invisible" condition--while failing to identify the underlying cause. Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) hearing screening technology, used extensively with newborns, is becoming an essential tool,…

  8. Postnatal risk factors associated with hearing loss among high-risk preterm infants: tertiary center results from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eras, Zeynep; Konukseven, Ozlem; Aksoy, Hatice Tatar; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Genç, Aydan; Sakrucu, Evrim Durgut; Develio?lu, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the postnatal risk factors associated with hearing loss as well as the prevalence of hearing loss among high-risk preterm infants in newborn hearing screening (NHS). We performed a retrospective study of high-risk preterm infants born with a gestational age ?32 weeks and/or a birth weight ?1,500 g. A NHS procedure was performed by automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) and automated evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE). Infants who failed TEOAE or AABR or both tests were referred to a tertiary audiology center for diagnosis confirmation and management. Postnatal risk factors associated with hearing loss were evaluated and compared for preterm infants with and without hearing loss. 1,360 high-risk preterm infants were assessed. Permanent hearing loss was found in 19 (1.4%) infants. Multivariate analysis revealed that proven sepsis (p = 0.019), mechanical ventilation ?5 days (p = 0.024), loop diuretics (p = 0.001), patent ductus arteriosus ligation (p = 0.018) and operation for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) (p = 0.034) were significant related factors for the hearing loss. This study showed a low prevalence of hearing loss and an association between operation for ROP and hearing loss in preterm infants, which has not been defined previously. Our results suggest that every neonatal intensive care unit should determine their own risk factors and take precautions to prevent hearing loss for these high-risk preterm infants. PMID:23917736

  9. Comparisons of social competence in young children with and without hearing loss: a dynamic systems framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael F; Quittner, Alexandra L; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-04-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5-5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that, due to deficits in oral language, children who were deaf would display lower levels of social competence than their hearing peers. Furthermore, language age would predict social competence scores. Social competence was measured with a general and deaf-specific measure. Results showed that children with hearing loss performed significantly worse than hearing peers on the general measure but better than the norms on the deaf-specific measure. Controlling for maternal education and income, regression analyses indicated that hearing status and language age predicted social competence in both groups. Among children with hearing loss, correlations were also found between age at diagnosis, age at amplification, and two of the general social competence measures. Results supported our hypothesis that deficits in language would have cascading negative effects on the development of social competence in young deaf children. Development of early intervention programs that target both language and social skills are needed for this population. PMID:25583707

  10. Factors associated with hearing loss among workers of the airline industry in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, O S; Kim, M J

    2001-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major occupational hazard. Occupational noise exposure threatens the hearing of many workers. In addition to noise exposure in the workplace, multiple factors affect individual susceptibility to NIHL. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with hearing loss in airport workers. A cross-sectional epidemiological design was used. Study subjects were 255 high noise-exposed full-time male workers at a large metropolitan airport in Korea. Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, audiological assessment, and a record review of baseline hearing and noise levels of locations where the employee worked. The result of multivariate analysis showed that both occupational noise exposure (noise exposure level, years of noise exposure) and personal risk factors including non-occupational noise exposure, history of ear disease, ototoxic drug use, cigarette smoking, hypertension, and use of hearing protective devices (HPDs) were significantly associated with hearing loss. An aggressive hearing conservation program is needed at the airport, emphasizing both job-related noise exposure and personal risk factors for hearing loss. PMID:12024523

  11. Cigarette smoking, passive smoking, alcohol consumption, and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Moore, David R; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Fortnum, Heather; Munro, Kevin J

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this large population-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between smoking, passive smoking, alcohol consumption, and hearing loss. The study sample was a subset of the UK Biobank Resource, 164,770 adults aged between 40 and 69 years who completed a speech-in-noise hearing test (the Digit Triplet Test). Hearing loss was defined as speech recognition in noise in the better ear poorer than 2 standard deviations below the mean with reference to young normally hearing listeners. In multiple logistic regression controlling for potential confounders, current smokers were more likely to have a hearing loss than non-smokers (odds ratio (OR) 1.15, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.21). Among non-smokers, those who reported passive exposure to tobacco smoke were more likely to have a hearing loss (OR 1.28, 95 %CI 1.21-1.35). For both smoking and passive smoking, there was evidence of a dose-response effect. Those who consume alcohol were less likely to have a hearing loss than lifetime teetotalers. The association was similar across three levels of consumption by volume of alcohol (lightest 25 %, OR 0.61, 95 %CI 0.57-0.65; middle 50 % OR 0.62, 95 %CI 0.58-0.66; heaviest 25 % OR 0.65, 95 %CI 0.61-0.70). The results suggest that lifestyle factors may moderate the risk of hearing loss. Alcohol consumption was associated with a protective effect. Quitting or reducing smoking and avoiding passive exposure to tobacco smoke may also help prevent or moderate age-related hearing loss. PMID:24899378

  12. Epistemics in audiological consultations : Divergent conceptualizations of 'hearing' in healthcare encounters between hearing aid acoustitians and patients with hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria

    Adult-onset hearing loss affects more than 20% of citizens in the US and in the EU. This second most frequent disability (World Health Organization 2001) is mostly due to aging and noise exposure ('sensorineural'). Although usage of hearing aids effectively increases life quality (Joore et al. 2003; Anteunis 2002), in many western countries, only 15% of those who could benefit from this technology use it, e.g. in the USA, Switzerland, and Finland (Bisgaard 2009). Technological innovation has not helped improve uptake. A longitudional interview study indicates that one barrier to hearing aid acceptance seems to lie in healthcare interactions: 88% of patients with hearing loss accessing the German healthcare system do not complete rehabilitation; the average time between first diagnosis and use of hearing aids is 8-10 years (Meis & Gabriel 2006). The present study contributes to an emering body of CA work on healthcare encounters with hearing loss which show that communication problems occur frequently between healthcare professionals and patients (e.g. Skelt 2006, Laakso 2011-2014, Ruusuvuori 2011-2014; Brouwer 2012, Heinemann et al. 2012, Egbert 2013). The presentation, based on 12 hours of naturally-occurring, video-taped audiological interactions in German, focuses on a specific communication problem which is due to an asymmetricity in "epistemic domains" (Stivers & Rossano 2010:8) in that divergences in the professional's and the patients' conceptualizations of hearing emerge and are frequently not resolved. The goal of these audiological consulations is to select and fit the best possible hearing aid for clients with hearing loss. In order to achieve this goal, audiologists routinely rely on their technological and medical knowledge, the results of a pure-tone audiogram, and the clients' subjective descriptions of hearing experiences in different environments. In these consultations, the institutional conceptualization of hearing (and thus of hearing loss) is that of an objectively measurable functioning of the ear, categorized in an audiogram by decibels and hertz. In contrast, persons with hearing loss perceive of their hearing, even during audiograms, as less precise and more varied. When asked by the audiologist about hearing experiences in different settings (e.g. dyadic conversation, multiperson interaction, telephone, outdoors, train station), the descriptions by clients are diffuse, broad, and metaphorical. Compared to visual impairment, describing hearing seems to be more difficult, and frequently, persons with hearing impairment resort to visual metaphors. A CA examination of conversational order in the areas of turn-taking, sequence, repair, topic, multimodality, and linguistic resources yields partial results for these audiological data, and including epistemics in the analysis achieves to 'grasp' the phenomenon more fully. CA research "into epistemics focuses on the knowledge claims that interactants assert, contest and defend in and through turns-at-talk and sequences of interaction” (Heritage 2013:370). Given that the audiologist and the patient frequently do not achieve a shared knowledge of the patient's hearing loss, these institutional encounters appear to be highly problematic in that the imbalance is not resolved. “(W)hen a speaker indicates that there is an imbalance of information between speaker and hearer, this indication is sufficient to motivate and warrant a sequence of interaction that will be closed when the imbalance is acknowledged as equalized for all practical purposes” (Heritage 2012: 32). The presentation concludes with connecting the interactional problems at the micro-level of direct healthcare encounters to the macro-level and globel problems of the impact of untreated hearing loss. The social repercussions are stigmatization, miscommunication, loss of work, social isolation, depression, and suicide (Carmen 2001). The financial loss per person dropping out of work due to hearing loss is estimated at 200,000 US Dollars (World Health Organization 2001). In Europe, the econmi

  13. Hearing loss in relation to physical properties of middle ear effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, M L; Zajtchuk, J T; Vap, J G; Paggi, R E

    1980-01-01

    Hearing loss was measured in cats after ligation of the eustachian tube (ET) on one side to produce middle ear effusions. Auditory nerve responses to broad-band clicks were recorded from the ear canal. Plots of N1 response amplitude and latency versus click sound pressure level (SPL) were constructed. Hearing loss was determined as the average displacement along the SPL axis of the latency plot, relative to a previously recorded control series. Viscosity of effusion was measured with a cone and plate viscometer. Specific gravity was measured using a 1 cc pycnometer. Middle ear pressure was assessed tympanographically. After ET ligation, all cats developed negative middle ear pressure within three days and flat (type B) tympanograms within seven days. Hearing loss also developed early and became maximal at about three weeks. Tympanocentesis yielded either thin fluid or glue-like effusions in nearly equal numbers. The data indicate there is not a significant difference between the amount of hearing loss associated with thin fluids or with glue. Viscosity is not clearly related to the duration of time the fluid is present in the middle ear. There is a significant positive correlation between the amount of hearing loss and the volume of fluid present in the middle ear. Thus, the amount of hearing loss appears to depend only on the volume of effusion and is not significantly dependent on other physical properties of the fluid. PMID:6778303

  14. Efficient estimates of cochlear hearing loss parameters in individual listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Jepsen, Morten LØve

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the level corresponding to the knee-point of the basilar membrane (BM) input/output (I/O) function can be used to estimate the amount of inner- and outer hair-cell loss (IHL, OHL) in listeners with a moderate cochlear hearing impairment Plack et al. (2004). According to Jepsen and Dau (2011) IHL + OHL = HLT [dB], where HLT stands for total hearing loss. Hence having estimates of the total hearing loss and OHC loss, one can estimate the IHL. In the present study, results from forward masking experiments based on temporal masking curves (TMC; Nelson et al., 2001) are presented and used to estimate the knee-point level and the compression ratio of the I/O function. A time-efficient paradigm based on the single-interval-up-down method (SIUD; Lecluyse and Meddis (2009)) was used. In contrast with previous studies, the present study used only on-frequency TMCs to derive estimates of the knee-point level. Further, it is explored whether it is possible to estimate the compression ratio using only on-frequency TMCs. 10 normal-hearing and 10 hearing-impaired listeners (with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss) were tested at 1, 2 and 4 kHz. The results showed a reasonable reliability and may be applicable to individualized hearing-aid fitting. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

  15. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Its Relationship With Hearing Loss in Children: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sharifian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA, a substantial fraction of the patients have progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This coexistence is due to the mutations of a gene expressed both in the kidney and in the cochlea. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between hearing loss and DRTA.Materials and Methods. In this study, 51 children diagnosed with renal tubular acidosis were evaluated. Diagnosis of DRTA was based on clinical manifestations and detection of normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, urine pH higher than 5.5, and positive urinary anion gap. Audiometry was performed in children with DRTA and sequencing of the ATP6V1B1 gene was done for those with sensorineural hearing loss.Results. Twenty-seven patients (52.9% had DRTA, of whom 51.9% were younger than 1 year old, 55.6% were boys, and 44.4% were girls. Eleven patients (40.7% had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, consisting of 5 of 15 boys (33.3% and 6 of 12 girls (50.0%. There was no correlation between hearing loss and gender. Three patients with hearing loss had mutation in the ATP6V1B1 gene (11.1% of patients with DRTA and 27.3% of patients with DRTA and hearing loss.Conclusions. This study indicated that a significant percentage of the children with DRTA had sensorineural hearing loss and mutation in ATP6V1B1 gene. It is recommended to investigate hearing impairment in all children with DRTA.

  16. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Video NARRATOR 1: A woman with short gray hair. ... Peck has Usher Syndrome. In this series of videos, she tells her story about overcoming some of ...

  17. Normal Ear, Ear with Hearing Loss, and Cochlear Implant Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Implant Surgery Recalls and Safety Animation: Normal Ear, Ear with Hearing Loss, and Cochlear Implant Procedure This ... implant works. First, the drawing shows the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear, along with implanted ...

  18. Mutations of GIPC3 cause nonsyndromic hearing loss DFNB72 but not DFNB81 that also maps to chromosome 19p

    OpenAIRE

    Rehman, Atteeq U.; Gul, Khitab; Morell, Robert J.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Riazuddin, Saima; Ali, Rana A.; Shahzad, Mohsin; Jaleel, Ateeq-ul; Andrade, Paula B.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Khan, Saadullah; Brewer, Carmen C.; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    A missense mutation of Gipc3 was previously reported to cause age-related hearing loss in mice. Point mutations of human GIPC3 were found in two small families, but association with hearing loss was not statistically significant. Here, we describe one frameshift and six missense mutations in GIPC3 cosegregating with DFNB72 hearing loss in six large families that support statistically significant evidence for genetic linkage. However, GIPC3 is not the only nonsyndromic hearing impairment gene ...

  19. Cochlear microphonics in sensorineural hearing loss: lesson from newborn hearing screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmmed, Ansar; Brockbank, Christopher; Adshead, June

    2008-08-01

    The diagnostic dilemma surrounding the presence of cochlear microphonics (CM) coupled with significantly elevated auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds in babies failing the newborn hearing screening is highlighted. A case report is presented where initial electo-diagnostic assessment could not help in differentiating between Auditory Neuropathy/Auditory Dys-synchrony (AN/AD) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In line with the protocol and guidelines provided by the national Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in the UK (NHSP) AN/AD was suspected in a baby due to the presence of CM at 85 dBnHL along with click evoked ABR thresholds of 95 dBnHL in one ear and 100 dBnHL in the other ear. Significantly elevated thresholds for 0.5 and 1kHz tone pip ABR fulfilled the audiological diagnostic criteria for AN/AD. However, the possibility of a SNHL could not be ruled out as the 85 dBnHL stimuli presented through inserts for the CM would have been significantly enhanced in the ear canals of the young baby to exceed the threshold level of the ABR that was carried out using headphones. SNHL was eventually diagnosed through clinical and family history, physical examination and imaging that showed enlarged vestibular aqueducts. Presence of CM in the presence of very high click ABR thresholds only suggests a pattern of test results and in such cases measuring thresholds for 0.5 and 1 kHz tone pip ABR may not be adequate to differentiate between SNHL and other conditions associated with AN/AD. There is a need for reviewing the existing AN/AD protocol from NHSP in the UK and new research to establish parameters for CM to assist in the differential diagnosis. A holistic audiological and medical approach is essential to manage babies who fail the newborn hearing screening. PMID:18571245

  20. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory

  1. Temporal bone computed tomography findings in bilateral sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Bamiou, D.; Phelps, P.; Sirimanna, T.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To examine the yield of computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bones when investigating sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and to identify factors associated with CT findings.?METHODS—Retrospective analysis of 116 consecutively investigated children with bilateral SNHL at the audiology department of Great Ormond Street Hospital, London. Main outcome measures were CT results, hearing loss parameters, history, and clinical examination.?RESULTS—A total of 33 (...

  2. Audiological issues and hearing loss among Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oleksiak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prevalence, severity, etiology, and treatment of audiology problems among Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI. A retrospective chart review was performed of 250 Veterans with mild TBI. Results of a comprehensive second-level mild TBI evaluation and subsequent visits to audiology were evaluated. We found the vast majority (87% of Veterans reported some level of hearing disturbance and those involved in blast injuries reported a higher incidence of hearing disturbance than those with other injury etiologies. Audiology referrals were given to 75 Veterans and 37 attended. At this visit, Veterans reported tinnitus (75.7% and hearing loss (59.8%. Nearly half (48.6% of Veterans were diagnosed with conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, or central auditory dysfunction. An additional 24.3% of Veterans had subclinical levels of auditory dysfunction. Our study has highlighted the increased prevalence of hearing loss among OIF/OEF Veterans and, thus, the need for appropriate referrals and treatment. Strategies to address perceived stigma associated with hearing loss may increase attendance at follow-up visits. Additionally, while only a third of audiograms were found to be abnormal, advanced testing resulted in a significant percentage of our population being diagnosed with auditory dysfunction.

  3. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Cintra Lopes1, , , ,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type of hearing loss, it is evident the importance of preventive and conferences aimed at preserving hearing and health as a whole. Objective: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in audiometry admission of drivers. Methods: Retrospective study. By 76 charts of professional drivers in leased transport companies. We analyzed data from specific interview and pure tone audiometry. Results: The prevalence of abnormal tests was 22.36% with the lowest thresholds for tritonal average of 3,000, 4,000 and 6,000 Hz. The higher the age, the higher thresholds. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the occurrence of hearing in the absence of complaints. Considering that PAIR is preventable, justifies the importance of coordinated and multidisciplinary involving not only health teams and safety, but also the institutions involved in preserving the health of workers, as the team SESMET, unions or prosecutors.

  4. Hearing loss as an unusual consequence of metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CE Owers

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A sixty-one year old man was referred with a history of progressive dysphagia, vomiting and weight loss with some back pain. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsies revealed a gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Despite the absence of metastatic disease on computed tomography, positron emission tomography demonstrated multiple vertebral and sternal deposits. He was reviewed in an ENT clinic with a sudden onset of hearing loss accompanied by dizziness, but no focal neurology. Magnetic resonance imaging identified bilateral 2cm lesions at the internal auditory meatus, consistent with a diagnosis of bilateral acoustic neuromas. The patient subsequently died of carcinomatosis and, because of the potential familial significance of bilateral acoustic neuromas, a limited post-mortem examination was carried out. Unexpectedly, this revealed bilateral adenocarcinoma metastases infiltrating the internal auditory meatus affecting the acoustic nerves. The authors believe this a very rare presentation of metastatic gastric disease.

  5. User Centered Design : From understanding hearing loss and hearing technologies towards understanding interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria; Matthews, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary approach of User Centered Design is presented here with a focus on innovation in the design and use of hearing technologies as well as on the potential of innovation in interaction. This approach is geared towards developing new products, systems, technologies and practices based on an understanding of why so few persons with hearing loss use the highly advanced hearing technologies. In integrating Conversation Analysis (“CA”), audiology and User Centered Design, three disciplines which are collaborating together for the first time, we are addressing the following questions: Who is the user? What are the interactional situations in which hearing loss and hearing aids are relevant? How can Conversation Analysis contribute to innovation? What are the challenges in such a collaboration?

  6. Hearing loss in chronic renal failure-hearing threshold changes following haemodialysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gatland, D.; Tucker, B.; Chalstrey, S.; Keene, M.; Baker, L.

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss, measured by pure tone audiometry, was determined in 66 patients with chronic renal failure and threshold changes following haemodialysis were measured in 31 patients. The incidence of hearing loss was 41% in the low, 15% in the middle and 53% in the high frequency ranges respectively. No correlations with weight changes, haematocrit, metabolic bone disease or ototoxic drug history were found. Of 62 ears studied, 38% had a decrease in low frequency...

  7. Word Recognition for Temporally and Spectrally Distorted Materials : The Effects of Age and Hearing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Sherri L.; Pichora-Fuller, Margaret Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of Experiment 1 was to measure word recognition in younger adults with normal hearing when speech or babble was temporally or spectrally distorted. In Experiment 2, older listeners with near-normal hearing and with hearing loss (for pure tones) were tested to evaluate their susceptibility to changes in speech level and distortion types. The results across groups and listening conditions were compared to assess the extent to which the effects of the distortions on word recognition resembled the effects of age-related differences in auditory processing or pure-tone hearing loss. Design: In Experiment 1, word recognition was measured in 16 younger adults with normal hearing using Northwestern University Auditory Test No. 6 words in quiet and the Words-in-Noise test distorted by temporal jittering, spectral smearing, or combined jittering and smearing. Another 16 younger adults were evaluated in four conditions using the Words-in-Noise test in combinations of unaltered or jittered speech and unaltered or jittered babble. In Experiment 2, word recognition in quiet and in babble was measured in 72 older adults with near-normal hearing and 72 older adults with hearing loss in four conditions: unaltered, jittered, smeared, and combined jittering and smearing. Results: For the listeners in Experiment 1, word recognition was poorer in the distorted conditions compared with the unaltered condition. The signal to noise ratio at 50% correct word recognition was 4.6 dB for the unaltered condition, 6.3 dB for the jittered, 6.8 dB for the smeared, 6.9 dB for the double-jitter, and 8.2 dB for the combined jitter-smear conditions. Jittering both the babble and speech signals did not significantly reduce performance compared with jittering only the speech. In Experiment 2, the older listeners with near-normal hearing and hearing loss performed best in the unaltered condition, followed by the jitter and smear conditions, with the poorest performance in the combined jitter-smear condition in both quiet and noise. Overall, listeners with near-normal hearing performed better than listeners with hearing loss by similar to 30% in quiet and similar to 6 dB in noise. In the quiet distorted conditions, when the level of the speech was increased, performance improved for the hearing loss group, but decreased for the older group with near-normal hearing. Recognition performance of younger listeners in the jitter-smear condition and the performance of older listeners with near-normal hearing in the unaltered conditions were similar. Likewise, the performance of older listeners with near-normal hearing in the jitter-smear condition and the performance of older listeners with hearing loss in the unaltered conditions were similar. Conclusions: The present experiments advance our understanding regarding how spectral or temporal distortions of the fine structure of speech affect word recognition in older listeners with and without clinically significant hearing loss. The Speech Intelligibility Index was able to predict group differences, but not the effects of distortion. Individual differences in performance were similar across all distortion conditions with both age and hearing loss being implicated. The speech materials needed to be both spectrally and temporally distorted to mimic the effects of age-related differences in auditory processing and hearing loss.

  8. Using the extended parallel process model to prevent noise-induced hearing loss among coal miners in Appalachia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray-Johnson, L.; Witte, K.; Patel, D.; Orrego, V.; Zuckerman, C.; Maxfield, A.M.; Thimons, E.D. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (US)

    2004-12-15

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss is the second most self-reported occupational illness or injury in the United States. Among coal miners, more than 90% of the population reports a hearing deficit by age 55. In this formative evaluation, focus groups were conducted with coal miners in Appalachia to ascertain whether miners perceive hearing loss as a major health risk and if so, what would motivate the consistent wearing of hearing protection devices (HPDs). The theoretical framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model was used to identify the miners' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and current behaviors regarding hearing protection. Focus group participants had strong perceived severity and varying levels of perceived susceptibility to hearing loss. Various barriers significantly reduced the self-efficacy and the response efficacy of using hearing protection.

  9. Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive abilities in elderly persons with hearing aids fitted at the initial stages of hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Shiroma, M.; Harashima, T.; Obuchi, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relation between the use of hearing aids at the initial stages of hearing loss and age-related changes in the auditory and cognitive abilities of elderly persons. 12 healthy elderly persons participated in an annual auditory and cognitive longitudinal examination for three years. According to their hearing level, they were divided into 3 subgroups - the normal hearing group, the hearing loss without hearing aids group, and the hearing loss with hearing aids ...

  10. Diversity in noise-induced temporary hearing loss in otophysine fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoser, Sonja; Ladich, Friedrich

    2003-04-01

    The effects of intense white noise (158 dB re 1 ?Pa for 12 and 24 h) on the hearing abilities of two otophysine fish species-the nonvocal goldfish Carassius auratus and the vocalizing catfish Pimelodus pictus-were investigated in relation to noise exposure duration. Hearing sensitivity was determined utilizing the auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording technique. Measurements in the frequency range between 0.2 and 4.0 kHz were conducted prior and directly after noise exposure as well as after 3, 7, and 14 days of recovery. Both species showed a significant loss of sensitivity (up to 26 dB in C. auratus and 32 dB in P. pictus) immediately after noise exposure, with the greatest hearing loss in the range of their most sensitive frequencies. Hearing loss differed between both species, and was more pronounced in the catfish. Exposure duration had no influence on hearing loss. Hearing thresholds of C. auratus recovered within three days, whereas those of P. pictus only returned to their initial values within 14 days after exposure in all but one frequency. The results indicate that hearing specialists are affected differently by noise exposure and that acoustic communication might be restricted in noisy habitats.

  11. Commentary: listening can be exhausting--fatigue in children and adults with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Fred H; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y

    2014-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of fatigue after sustained speech-processing demands are common among adults with hearing loss; however, systematic research examining hearing loss-related fatigue is limited, particularly with regard to fatigue among children with hearing loss (CHL). Many audiologists, educators, and parents have long suspected that CHL experience stress and fatigue as a result of the difficult listening demands they encounter throughout the day at school. Recent research in this area provides support for these intuitive suggestions. In this article, the authors provide a framework for understanding the construct of fatigue and its relation to hearing loss, particularly in children. Although empirical evidence is limited, preliminary data from recent studies suggest that some CHL experience significant fatigue-and such fatigue has the potential to compromise a child's performance in the classroom. In this commentary, the authors discuss several aspects of fatigue including its importance, definitions, prevalence, consequences, and potential linkage to increased listening effort in persons with hearing loss. The authors also provide a brief synopsis of subjective and objective methods to quantify listening effort and fatigue. Finally, the authors suggest a common-sense approach for identification of fatigue in CHL; and, the authors briefly comment on the use of amplification as a management strategy for reducing hearing-related fatigue. PMID:25255399

  12. Diffusion-Based Model for Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Aas, Sverre; Tronstad, Tron Vedul

    2007-01-01

    Among several different damaging mechanisms, oxidative stress is found to play an important role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). This is supported by both findings of oxidative damage after noise exposure, and the fact that upregulation of antioxidant defenses seem to reduce the ears susceptibility to noise. Oxidative stress mechanisms could help explain several of the characteristics of NIHL, and we therefore believe that it would be advantageous to estimate noise-induced hearing...

  13. Hearing Loss Raises Excitability in the Auditory Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Kotak, Vibhakar C.; Fujisawa, Sho; Lee, Fanyee Anja; Karthikeyan, Omkar; Aoki, Chiye; Sanes, Dan H.

    2005-01-01

    Developmental hearing impairments compromise sound discrimination, speech acquisition, and cognitive function; however, the adjustments of functional properties in the primary auditory cortex (A1) remain unknown. We induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in developing gerbils and then reared the animals for several days. The intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons were subsequently examined in a thalamocortical brain slice preparation with whole-cell recor...

  14. Resolution of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Following a Roller Coaster Ride

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Aman; Sinha, Amrita; Al-waa, Ahmad M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset during an aeroplane flight, which completely resolved during a roller coaster ride at Alton Towers theme park. A review of the literature concerning sudden idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and spontaneous resolution are discussed. Initially, pure-tone audiometry showed a profound sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and mild sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear (of note, the hearing was normal p...

  15. Sensorineural hearing loss after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thongyai Kanthong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is one of the major long term side effects from radiation therapy (RT in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC patients. This study aims to review the incidences of SNHL when treating with different radiation techniques. The additional objective is to determine the relationship of the SNHL with the radiation doses delivered to the inner ear. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 134 individual ears from 68 NPC patients, treated with conventional RT and IMRT in combination with chemotherapy from 2004-2008 was performed. Dosimetric data of the cochlea were analyzed. Significant SNHL was defined as > 15 dB increase in bone conduction threshold at 4 kHz and PTA (pure tone average of 0.5, 1, 2 kHz. Relative risk (RR was used to determine the associated factors with the hearing threshold changes at 4 kHz and PTA. Results Median audiological follow up time was 14 months. The incidence of high frequency (4 kHz SNHL was 44% for the whole group (48.75% in the conventional RT, 37% with IMRT. Internal auditory canal mean dose of > 50 Gy had shown a trend to increase the risk of high frequency SNHL (RR 2.02 with 95% CI 1.01-4.03, p = 0.047. Conclusion IMRT and radiation dose limitation to the inner ear appeared to decrease SNHL.

  16. Pegylated interferon/ribavirin-associated sudden hearing loss in a patient with chronic hepatitis C in Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria Cassia Jacintho, Mendes-Corrêa; Roseli Saraiva Moreira, Bittar; Norma, Salmito; Jeanne, Oiticica.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden hearing loss is defined as a sensorineural hearing loss, equal to or greater than 30 dB, at three or more consecutive frequencies, which takes place within 72 hours. Both peginterferon and ribavirin are well-known to be associated with significant adverse effects, but sudden hearing loss is u [...] ncommon. We report a 65-year-old male patient who developed sudden-onset hearing loss during combination therapy with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Peginterferon and ribavirin may cause sudden hearing loss that may not recover after discontinuation of therapy. Immediate treatment for all possible etiologies is essential, along with targeted investigations and early referral for an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist. Physicians should be aware of the possible ototoxic effects of peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy requiring appropriate surveillance.

  17. Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin alleviates hearing loss after transient cochlear ischemia and reperfusion in the gerbil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Akira T; Hakuba, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Shoichiro; Hyodo, Jun; Imai, Kiyohiro; Hato, Naohito; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2012-02-01

    To test liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) in transient cochlear ischemia/reperfusion as a model of sudden deafness, Mongolian gerbils were randomly assigned to receive 2 mL/kg of either low-affinity LEH (l-LEH, P??0? = 40 mm Hg), high-affinity LEH (h-LEH, P??0? = 10 mm Hg), homologous red blood cells (RBCs), or saline (each group n = 6) 30 min before 15-min occlusion of the bilateral vertebral arteries and reperfusion. Sequential changes in hearing were assessed by auditory brain response 1, 4, and 7 days after ischemia/reperfusion, when the animals were sacrificed for pathological studies. h-LEH was significantly more protective than l-LEH in suppressing hearing loss, in contrast to RBC or saline treatment, at 8, 16, and 32 kHz, where hearing loss was most severe (P < 0.05 between any two groups) on the first day after cochlear ischemia/reperfusion. Thereafter, hearing loss improved gradually in all groups, with a significant difference among groups up to 7 days, when morphological studies revealed that the inner hair cells but not the outer hair cells, were significantly lost in the groups in the same order. The results suggest that pretreatment with h-LEH is significantly more protective than l-LEH in mitigating hearing loss and underlying pathological damage, in contrast to transfusion or saline infusion 7 days after transient cochlear ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:21955137

  18. Pathology Case Study: Progressive Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böker, Dieter-Karsten

    This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which a woman sought help for an progressive eight-year diminished sense of hearing, which developed with vertigo and left-side tinnitus. Visitors can view both microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and have the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to introduce or test students of Neuropathology.

  19. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandi Subroto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss in every country in the world. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Worldwide, 16% of the disabling hearing loss in adults is attributed to occupational noise, ranging from 7 to 21% in the various subregions. The estimated cost of noise to developed countries ranges from 0.2 to 2% of the gross domestic product (GDP. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is bilateral and symmetrical, usually affecting the higher frequencies (3k, 4k or 6k Hz and then spreading to the lower frequencies (0.5k, 1k or 2k Hz. Other major health effects are lack of concentration, irritation, fatigue, headache, sleep disturbances, etc. The major industries responsible for excessive noise and exposing workers to hazardous levels of noise are textile, printing, saw mills, mining, etc. Hearing protectors should be used when engineering controls and work practices are not feasible for reducing noise exposure to safe levels. Earmuffs, ear plugs and ear canal caps are the main types of hearing protectors. In India, NIHL has been a compensable disease since 1948. It is only in 1996 that the first case got compensation. Awareness should be created among workers about the harmful effects of noise on hearing and other body systems by implementing compulsory education and training programs. There are very few published studies of NIHL in India. More extensive studies are needed to know the exact prevalence of NIHL among the various industries in India.

  20. Vowel Perception in Listeners With Normal Hearing and in Listeners With Hearing Loss: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lauren; Street, Nicole Drakopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the influence of hearing loss on perception of vowel slices. Methods Fourteen listeners aged 20-27 participated; ten (6 males) had hearing within normal limits and four (3 males) had moderate-severe sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Stimuli were six naturally-produced words consisting of the vowels /i a u æ ? ?/ in a /b V b/ context. Each word was presented as a whole and in eight slices: the initial transition, one half and one fourth of initial transition, full central vowel, one-half central vowel, ending transition, one half and one fourth of ending transition. Each of the 54 stimuli was presented 10 times at 70 dB SPL (sound press level); listeners were asked to identify the word. Stimuli were shaped using signal processing software for the listeners with SNHL to mimic gain provided by an appropriately-fitting hearing aid. Results Listeners with SNHL had a steeper rate of decreasing vowel identification with decreasing slice duration as compared to listeners with normal hearing, and the listeners with SNHL showed different patterns of vowel identification across vowels when compared to listeners with normal hearing. Conclusion Abnormal temporal integration is likely affecting vowel identification for listeners with SNHL, which in turn affects vowel internal representation at different levels of the auditory system. PMID:25729492

  1. Localization training results in individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Dwyer, Noël Y; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre-to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss. PMID:25457655

  2. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss. Forty consecutive patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (20 males and 20 females; age range 11-82 years), 40 age-matched control subjects, and 5 patients with Meniere's disease were examined using the same imaging protocol on a 1.5-T MR system. Pre- and post-contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3D SPGR; TR/TE=23/10 ms, no. of excitations=1, flip angle=30 ) images were obtained using a voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm3. Contrast enhancement in the area of the endolymphatic sac was assessed by two radiologists, and the frequency of contrast enhancement was compared between the three study groups. Enhancement of the ipsilateral endolymphatic sac was observed in 30 of the 40 patients with sudden hearing loss (75%). Twenty of these 30 patients also showed enhancement on the contralateral side, and 1 patient showed enhancement only on the contralateral side. Only 1 of the 5 patients with Meniere's disease showed enhancement. Nine of the 40 control subjects (22.5%) showed enhancement (bilateral enhancement in 5 subjects, unilateral in 4). The frequency of enhancement in patients with sudden hearing loss was significantly higher than that in control subjects (P<0.0001) or patients with Meniere's disease (P<0.05). The frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac is significantly increasendolymphatic sac is significantly increased in patients with sudden hearing loss, but further study is necessary to clarify the relationship between this finding and the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. (orig.)

  3. Wordlikeness and Word Learning in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Derek J.; McGregor, Karla K.; Bentler, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The more a novel word conforms to the phonotactics of the language, the more wordlike it is and the easier it is to learn. It is unknown to what extent children with hearing loss (CHL) take advantage of phonotactic cues to support word learning. Aims: This study investigated whether CHL had similar sensitivities to wordlikeness during…

  4. Professional Preparation: Developing Language in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muma, John; Perigoe, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are increasingly being identified at an early age and receiving family-centered intervention from infancy. This means that they are more likely to follow typical developmental sequences of learning. Therefore, professionals working with them need to be aware of developments in the scholarly literature that drive…

  5. Facilitating Emergent Literacy Skills in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupan, Barbra; Dempsey, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) familiarize readers with the components of emergent literacy and the impact hearing loss may have on the development of these skills; (b) demonstrate the importance of parent-professional collaboration and show how specific literacy-based activities can be integrated into existing daily routines and intervention programming; and…

  6. Global epidemic of infant hearing loss - priorities for prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, Wet

    2010-01-01

    Paper by : Swanepoel D (2010). The global challenge of infant hearing loss. Sound Foundation Through Early Amplification. Judith Gravel Lecture. Chicago, USA, 8-10 November 2010 as published in the Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference, edited by Richard C. Seewald and John M. Bamford

  7. Unilateral hearing loss in children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirakis, Susan E; Hurley, Raymond M

    2003-11-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of hearing loss in children with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunted hydrocephalus. Twelve hydrocephalic children with patent VP shunts participated. The etiology of the hydrocephalus was either intraventricular hemorrhage or spina bifida. Audiometric examination included pure-tone air conduction thresholds, tympanometry, contralateral and ipsilateral acoustic reflex thresholds (ARTs), and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). A unilateral, high-frequency, cochlear hearing loss was found in the ear ipsilateral to the shunt placement in 10 (83%) of the 12 shunt-treated hydrocephalic children. No hearing loss was observed in the ear contralateral to shunt placement. Based on the pure-tone audiometric findings, coupled with the decrease in DPOAE amplitude in the shunt ear, the hearing loss appears to be cochlear in nature. We suggest that cochlear hydrodynamics are disrupted as the result of reduced perilymph pressure, a consequence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reduction due to the combined effects of a patent shunt and a patent cochlear aqueduct. In addition, a concomitant brain stem involvement is evidenced in the ART pattern, possibly produced by the patent shunt draining the CSF from the subdural space, resulting in cranial base hypoplasia. PMID:14708839

  8. Have WISE EARS! for Life: Protect Yourself and Your Family from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protect yourself and your family from noise-induced hearing loss On this page: Who should worry about noise? ... exposure to loud sounds can cause noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) . At Home At Work NIHL is serious. ...

  9. Prevalence and degree of hearing loss among males in Beaver Dam cohort: Comparison of veterans and nonveterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Nondahl, MS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS conducted in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, was a population-based study that focused on the prevalence of hearing loss among 3,753 participants between 1993 and 1995. This article reports the results of several auditory measures from 999 veteran and 590 nonveteran males 48 to 92 years of age included in the EHLS. The auditory measures included pure tone thresholds, tympanometry and acoustic reflexes, word recognition in quiet and in competing message, and the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly-Screening (HHIE-S version. Hearing loss in the auditory domains of pure tone thresholds, word recognition in quiet, and word recognition in competing message increased with age but were not significantly different for the veterans and nonveterans. No significant differences were found between participant groups on the HHIE-S; however, regarding hearing aid usage, mixed differences were found.

  10. Hearing loss in relation to sound exposure of professional symphony orchestra musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, J. H.; Pedersen, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate the hearing status of classical symphony orchestra musicians and (2) investigate the hypothesis that occupational sound exposure of symphony orchestra musicians leads to elevated hearing thresholds. DESIGN: The study population comprised all the musicians from five symphony orchestras. Questionnaires were filled in by 337 subjects, and 212 subjects performed an audiometric test. For a group of 182 musicians (363 ears) the results of the audiometry was analyzed in relation to the individual exposure, which was estimated on the basis of sound measurements and questionnaire data regarding the exposure time. The mean hearing threshold at the frequencies 3, 4, and 6 kHz, corrected for age and sex, was used as outcome. RESULTS: The musician ears with the highest exposure (29 of 363) had an additional threshold shift of 6.3 dB compared with the 238 ears with lowest exposure. The observed hearing loss of musicians was smaller compared with the noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS) predicted from ISO1999. A remaining confounding effect of age after ISO7029 age corrections could be observed to explain the difference in observed and predicted NIPTS. However, the observed hearing loss difference between the left and the right ear of musicians was 2.5 dB (95% confidence interval 1.5-3.6), which was similar to the NIPTS predicted from ISO1999. Most of the musicians had better hearing at 3, 4, and 6 kHz for age than expected, however, 29 ears with the highest exposure above 90.4 dBA with a mean exposure time of 41.7 years had significantly elevated hearing thresholds. Trumpet players and the left ear of first violinists had significantly elevated hearing thresholds compared with other musicians. CONCLUSION: Most of the symphony orchestra musicians had better hearing than expected but they had a work-related risk of developing additional noise-induced hearing loss. The additional NITPS of the left ear compared with the right ear was at the expected level based on the cumulated sound exposure and ISO1999, indicating that performing music may induce hearing loss to the same extent as industrial noise.

  11. Noise-induced hearing loss in children: A ‘less than silent’ environmental danger

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    A review of the problems of noise-induced hearing loss in children, especially related to recreational music and the use of personal entertainment devices. The pathophysiology of noise-induced hearing loss and its associated problems (eg, tinnitus) are discussed. The evidence for an increase in noise-induced hearing loss in children and young people is reviewed. Some practical advice (for clinicians, caregivers and children) on hearing loss prevention is provided.

  12. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WorsØe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have generated conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to determine whether systemic steroid treatment had an effect on hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  13. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Koshikawa, Tokiko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine (Japan); Nakashima, Tsutomu [Department of Otolayngology, Nagoya University School of Medicine (Japan); Ichinose, Nobuyasu [Toshiba Nasu Operations, Tochigi (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss. Forty consecutive patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (20 males and 20 females; age range 11-82 years), 40 age-matched control subjects, and 5 patients with Meniere's disease were examined using the same imaging protocol on a 1.5-T MR system. Pre- and post-contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3D SPGR; TR/TE=23/10 ms, no. of excitations=1, flip angle=30 ) images were obtained using a voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm{sup 3}. Contrast enhancement in the area of the endolymphatic sac was assessed by two radiologists, and the frequency of contrast enhancement was compared between the three study groups. Enhancement of the ipsilateral endolymphatic sac was observed in 30 of the 40 patients with sudden hearing loss (75%). Twenty of these 30 patients also showed enhancement on the contralateral side, and 1 patient showed enhancement only on the contralateral side. Only 1 of the 5 patients with Meniere's disease showed enhancement. Nine of the 40 control subjects (22.5%) showed enhancement (bilateral enhancement in 5 subjects, unilateral in 4). The frequency of enhancement in patients with sudden hearing loss was significantly higher than that in control subjects (P<0.0001) or patients with Meniere's disease (P<0.05). The frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac is significantly increased in patients with sudden hearing loss, but further study is necessary to clarify the relationship between this finding and the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. (orig.)

  14. Health Seeking Behavior among Parents of Children with Hearing Loss: A Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiteshree C Patel, Mohua Moitra, Anjali Modi, Rahul Patel, S L Kantharia, Ishwar M Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevalence of hearing loss is 11.7% of the school going population (5-15 years. Such children fail to develop speech, language and cognitive skills unless proper habilitation is initiated. If detected early and managed suitably, will have a far better chance at a normal life than those who are habilitated late or not at all. Aims & objectives: To detect the age of suspicion, identification, intervention and treatment seeking behavior of children with hearing loss. Materials & methods: This was a cross- sectional study done in Children between 5 and 15 years age-group with hearing loss, coming to an ENT OPD, New Civil Hospital, Surat during the period of 1st August 2011 to 31 July 2012. Results: A total of 246 children were studied. Mean age of the study population was 9±3.46 years. Average age at first suspicion of hearing loss was 2.9±1.7 years, first consultation was 3.5±1.5 years and first intervention was 7.8±3.3 years. There was significant association between age of first suspicion of congenital hearing loss with father’s occupation (p=0.03. There was significant association between delay in diagnosis and gender (p= 0.04. As the level of education of parents and socio- economic status increased, preference for private set ups for first consultation also increased (p< 0.05. In 63.5% cases, advice of general practitioner resulted in the delay in referral to ENT specialist. Conclusion & Recommendations: Even after primary care, an average gap of 4.3 years is observed among parents for receiving intervention. Mother is the first person to suspect hearing loss among their children. Basic training of general practitioner/ MBBS doctors regarding primary ear care is required.

  15. Physiological assessment of speech and voice production of adults with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M B; Carney, A E; Schulte, L

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the impact of hearing loss on phonatory, velopharyngeal, and articulatory functioning using a comprehensive physiological approach. Electroglottograph (EGG), nasal/oral air flow, and intraoral air pressure signals were recorded simultaneously from adults with impaired and normal hearing as they produced syllables and words of varying physiological difficulty. The individuals with moderate-to-profound hearing loss had good to excellent oral communication skills. Intraoral pressure, nasal air flow, durations of lip, velum, and vocal fold articulations, estimated subglottal pressure, mean phonatory air flow, fundamental frequency, and EGG abduction quotient were compared between the two subject groups. Data from the subjects with hearing loss also were compared across aided and unaided conditions to investigate the influence of auditory feedback on speech motor control. The speakers with hearing loss had significantly higher intraoral pressures, subglottal pressures, laryngeal resistances, and fundamental frequencies than those with normal hearing. There was notable between-subject variability. All of the individuals with profound hearing loss had at least one speech/voice physiology measure that fell outside of the normal range, and most of the subjects demonstrated unique clusters of abnormal behaviors. Abnormal behaviors were more evident in the phonatory than articulatory or velopharyngeal systems and were generally consistent with vocal fold hyperconstriction. There was evidence from individual data that vocal fold posturing influenced articulatory timing. The results did not support the idea that the speech production skills of adults with moderate-to-profound hearing loss who are good oral communicators deteriorate when there are increased motoric demands on the velopharyngeal and phonatory mechanism. Although no significant differences were found between the aided and unaided conditions, 7 of 10 subjects showed the same direction of change for subglottal pressure, intraoral pressure, nasal air flow, and the duration of lip and vocal fold articulations. We conclude that physiological assessments provide important information about the speech/voice production abilities of individuals with moderate-to-profound hearing loss and are a valuable addition to standard assessment batteries. PMID:8084183

  16. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Arastou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL patients with poor prognostic factors.     Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay between the onset of hearing loss and initiation of therapy were included in this study. Patients were randomized to the intervention group (combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy or the control group (systemic steroid therapy alone. All patients received oral treatment with systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day for 10 days, acyclovir (2 g/day for 10 days, divided into four doses, triamterene H (daily, and omeprazole (daily, during steroid treatment, and were advised to follow a low salt diet. The intervention group also received intratympanic dexamethasone injections (0.4 ml of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone two times a week for two consecutive weeks (four injections in total. A significant hearing improvement was defined as at least a 15-db decrease in pure tone average (PTA.  Results: Among all participants, 44 patients (57.14% showed significant improvement in hearing evaluation. More patients showed hearing improvement in the intervention group than in the control group (27 patients (75% versus 17 patients (41.4%, respectively; P = 0.001.  Conclusion:  The combination of intratympanic dexamethasone and systemic prednisolone is more effective than systemic prednisolone alone in the treatment of poor-prognosis SSNHL.

  17. Hearing loss and contributing factors among airport workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, H M; Rampal, K G

    2012-02-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common and important source of disability among the workers and often caused by occupational noise exposure. Aims of the study were to determine the prevalence and contributing factors of hearing loss among airport workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out at an airport in Malaysia. This study used stratified sampling method that involved 358 workers who were working in 3 different units between November 2008 and March 2009. Data for this study were collected by using questionnaires eliciting sociodemographic, occupational exposure history (previous and present), life-style including smoking habits and health-related data. Otoscopic and pure-tone audiometric tests were conducted for hearing assessment. Noise exposure status was categorize by using a noise logging dosimeter to obtain 8-hour Time-Weighted Average (TWA). Data was analyzed by using SPSS version 12.0.1 and EpiInfo 6.04. The prevalence of hearing loss was 33.5%. Age >40 years old (aOR 4.3, 95%CI 2.2-8.3) is the main risk factors for hearing loss followed by duration of noise exposure >5 years (aOR 2.5, 95%CI 1.4-4.7), smoking (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.2-3.4), duration of service >5 years (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.1-3.9), exposure to explosion (aOR 6.1, 95%CI 1.3-29.8), exposure to vibration (aOR 2.2, 95%CI 1.1-4.3) and working in engineering unit (aOR 5.9, 95%CI 1.1-30.9). The prevalence rate ratio of hearing loss for nonsmokers aged 40 years old and younger, smokers aged 40 years old and younger, non-smokers older than 40 years old and smokers older than 40 years old was 1.0, 1.7, 2.8 and 4.6 respectively. This result contributes towards better understanding of risk factors for hearing loss, which is relatively common among Malaysian workers. PMID:22582554

  18. "PARAMETERS AFFECTING NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS IN INDUSTRY"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Parvizpour

    1977-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on a study conducted in three different industries on 84.4 on their employees to determine the effect of over all noise intensity, length of employment and rest periods among them. It was found that the mentioned factors have direct effect on the induced hearing loss among the exposed workers. High noise level and long period of employment adversely affect the hearing ability while the breaks taken during daily working hours have prevented the expected defect.

  19. Cognitive spare capacity in older adults with hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmit Mishra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in working memory capacity are associated with speech recognition in adverse conditions, reflecting the need to maintain and process speech fragments until lexical access can be achieved. When working memory resources are engaged in unlocking the lexicon, there is less Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC available for higher level processing of speech. CSC is essential for interpreting the linguistic content of speech input and preparing an appropriate response, that is, engaging in conversation. Previously, we showed, using a Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT that in young adults with normal hearing, CSC was not generally related to working memory capacity (WMC and that when CSC decreased in noise it could be restored by visual cues. In the present study, we investigated CSC in 24 older adults with age-related hearing loss, by administering the CSC Test (CSCT and a battery of cognitive tests. We found generally reduced CSC in older adults with hearing loss compared to the younger group in our previous study, probably because they had poorer cognitive skills and deployed them differently. Importantly, CSC was not reduced in the older group when listening conditions were optimal. Visual cues improved CSC more for this group than for the younger group in our previous study. CSC of older adults with hearing loss was not generally related to WMC but it was consistently related to episodic long term memory, suggesting that the efficiency of this processing bottleneck is important for executive processing of speech in this group.

  20. Cognitive spare capacity in older adults with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sushmit; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lunner, Thomas; Rönnberg, Jerker; Rudner, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) are associated with speech recognition in adverse conditions, reflecting the need to maintain and process speech fragments until lexical access can be achieved. When working memory resources are engaged in unlocking the lexicon, there is less Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) available for higher level processing of speech. CSC is essential for interpreting the linguistic content of speech input and preparing an appropriate response, that is, engaging in conversation. Previously, we showed, using a Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT) that in young adults with normal hearing, CSC was not generally related to WMC and that when CSC decreased in noise it could be restored by visual cues. In the present study, we investigated CSC in 24 older adults with age-related hearing loss, by administering the CSCT and a battery of cognitive tests. We found generally reduced CSC in older adults with hearing loss compared to the younger group in our previous study, probably because they had poorer cognitive skills and deployed them differently. Importantly, CSC was not reduced in the older group when listening conditions were optimal. Visual cues improved CSC more for this group than for the younger group in our previous study. CSC of older adults with hearing loss was not generally related to WMC but it was consistently related to episodic long term memory, suggesting that the efficiency of this processing bottleneck is important for executive processing of speech in this group. PMID:24904409

  1. Phonological Awareness and Vocabulary Performance of Monolingual and Bilingual Preschool Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily; Werfel, Krystal L.; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study compared the phonological awareness skills and vocabulary performance of English monolingual and Spanish-English bilingual children with and without hearing loss. Preschool children with varying degrees of hearing loss (n = 18) and preschool children without hearing loss (n = 19) completed measures of phonological awareness and…

  2. Analogous and Distinctive Patterns of Prelinguistic Communication in Toddlers with and without Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Dromi, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to compare the prelinguistic communicative abilities of toddlers with hearing loss and without hearing loss during the 2nd year of life and shortly before the emergence of productive single-word lexicons. Method: The participants were 28 toddlers with hearing loss who participated in an early intervention program…

  3. [Extended high frequency audiometry in the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, G; Coppeta, L; Magrini, A; Parrella, M; Cappelletti, M C; Gardi, S; Messina, M; Bergamaschi, A

    2007-01-01

    An early detection of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) may allow more effective protection measures. Our aim was to investigate the usefulness of high-frequency audiometry to evaluate the possibility of a future use of the high frequencies audiometry as an early indicator for noise induced hearing loss. A cross-sectional study was performed involving 204 industrial noise exposed and 100 non-industrial noise-exposed workers. Each subject was tested with both conventional-frequency (0.25-8 kHz) and high-frequency (9-18 kHz) audiometry during the annually health surveillance campaign conducted in two Italian cement factories. As expected, noise exposed workers were found to have significantly higher hearing thresholds (P extended high frequencies. Marked differences were found for EHFA. Moreover, significant differences at EHFA were detected also in the subgroup of noise-exposed workers with normal findings at conventional audiometry. Our finding indicate that the use of the extended high frequency test may represent a useful tool for detecting early changes of hearing impairment and that it could be used in addition to the conventional test to better prevent the progression of noise hearing loss. PMID:18409674

  4. Hearing loss and cochlear damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis, with special reference to the role of neutrophil granulytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, CT; Caye-Thomsen, P

    2006-01-01

    Hearing loss is a well-known sequelae from meningitis, affecting up to 25% of survivors. However, the principal components of the infectious and inflammatory reaction responsible for the sensorineural hearing loss remain to be identified. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of an augmented neutrophil response on the development of hearing loss and cochlear damage in a model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rats. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and histopathology in rats treated with ceftriaxone 28 h after infection. Rats were treated with Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) initiated prior to infection, 28 h after infection or with ceftriaxone only. Rats were followed for 7 days, and assessment of hearing was performed before infection and 24 h and day 8 after infection. Pretreatment with G-CSF increased hearing loss 24 h after infection and on day 8 compared to untreated rats (Mann-Whitney, P = 0.012 and P = 0.013 respectively). The increased sensorineural hearing loss at day 8 was associated with significantly decreased spiral ganglion cell counts (P = 0.0006), increased damage to the organ of Corti (P = 0.007), increased areas of inflammatory infiltrates (P = 0.02) and increased white blood cell (WBC) counts in cerebrospinal fluid on day 8 after infection (P = 0.0084). Initiation of G-CSF 28 h after infection did not significantly affect hearing loss or cochlear pathology compared to controls. In conclusion, the inflammatory host reaction contributes significantly to the development of hearing loss in experimental meningitis.

  5. Developmental plasticity of spatial hearing following asymmetric hearing loss: context-dependent cue integration and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndrewJKing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Under normal hearing conditions, comparisons of the sounds reaching each ear are critical for accurate sound localization. Asymmetric hearing loss should therefore degrade spatial hearing and has become an important experimental tool for probing the plasticity of the auditory system, both during development and adulthood. In clinical populations, hearing loss affecting one ear more than the other is commonly associated with otitis media with effusion, a disorder experienced by approximately 80% of children before the age of two. Asymmetric hearing may also arise in other clinical situations, such as after unilateral cochlear implantation. Here, we consider the role played by spatial cue integration in sound localization under normal acoustical conditions. We then review evidence for adaptive changes in spatial hearing following a developmental hearing loss in one ear, and argue that adaptation may be achieved either by learning a new relationship between the altered cues and directions in space or by changing the way different cues are integrated in the brain. We next consider developmental plasticity as a source of vulnerability, describing maladaptive effects of asymmetric hearing loss that persist even when normal hearing is provided. We also examine the extent to which the consequences of asymmetric hearing loss depend upon its timing and duration. Although much of the experimental literature has focused on the effects of a stable unilateral hearing loss, some of the most common hearing impairments experienced by children tend to fluctuate over time. We therefore argue that there is a need to bridge this gap by investigating the effects of recurring hearing loss during development, and outline recent steps in this direction. We conclude by arguing that this work points toward a more nuanced view of developmental plasticity, in which plasticity may be selectively expressed in response to specific sensory contexts, and consider the clinical implications of this.

  6. Brain-stem auditory evoked responses during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: Predicting post-operative hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarayan Ramachandran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The importance of brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring in reducing hearing loss during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia is now accepted. However the extent of the changes in the pattern of these potentials and the safe limits to which these changes are relevant in reducing postoperative hearing loss have not been established. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify these changes and relate these to the postoperative hearing loss. Settings and Design: This study was done at the Walton Centre for neurology and neurosurgery, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The study was designed to give a measure of the change in the wave pattern following microvascular decompression and relate it to postoperative hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia had preoperative and postoperative hearing assessments and intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square tests. Results: It was found that the wave V latency was increased by more than 0.9ms in nine patients, eight of whom suffered significant postoperative hearing loss as demonstrated by audiometry. It was also seen that progressive decrease in amplitude of wave V showed progressive hearing loss with 25% loss when amplitude fell by 50 and 100% loss when wave V was lost completely. However most of the patients did not have a clinically manifest hearing loss. Conclusions: A per-operative increase in the latency of wave V greater than 0.9 ms and a fall of amplitude of wave V of more than 50% indicates a risk to hearing.

  7. Transforming growth factor ?1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Contreras, Julio; Celaya, Adelaida M.; Camarero, Guadalupe; Rivera, Teresa; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-? as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-?1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-?1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-?1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage. PMID:25852546

  8. Hearing loss in the developing world: Evaluating the iPhone mobile device as a screening tool

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    S, Peer; J J, Fagan.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developing countries have the world's highest prevalence of hearing loss, and hearing screening programmes are scarce. Mobile devices such as smartphones have potential for audiometric testing.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the uHear app using an Apple iPhone as a possible hearing screening too [...] l in the developing world, and to determine accuracy of certain hearing thresholds that could prove useful in early detection of hearing loss for high-risk populations in resource-poor communities.METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study design. Participants recruited from the Otolaryngology Clinic, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, completed a uHear test in three settings - waiting room (WR), quiet room (QR) and soundproof room (SR). Thresholds were compared with formal audiograms.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were tested (50 ears). The uHear test detected moderate or worse hearing loss (pure-tone average (PTA) >40 dB) accurately with a sensitivity of 100% in all three environments. Specificity was 88% (SR), 73% (QR) and 68% (WR). It was highly accurate in detecting high-frequency hearing loss (2 000, 4 000, 6 000 Hz) in the QR and SR with 'good' and 'very good' kappa values, showing statistical significance (p40 dB). It is highly sensitive for detecting threshold changes at high frequencies, making it reasonably well suited to detect presbycusis and ototoxic hearing loss from HIV, tuberculosis therapy and chemotherapy. Portability and ease of use make it appropriate to use in developing world communities that lack screening programmes.

  9. Mutations of GIPC3 cause nonsyndromic hearing loss DFNB72 but not DFNB81 that also maps to chromosome 19p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Gul, Khitab; Morell, Robert J; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ahmed, Zubair M; Riazuddin, Saima; Ali, Rana A; Shahzad, Mohsin; Jaleel, Ateeq-Ul; Andrade, Paula B; Khan, Shaheen N; Khan, Saadullah; Brewer, Carmen C; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B

    2011-12-01

    A missense mutation of Gipc3 was previously reported to cause age-related hearing loss in mice. Point mutations of human GIPC3 were found in two small families, but association with hearing loss was not statistically significant. Here, we describe one frameshift and six missense mutations in GIPC3 cosegregating with DFNB72 hearing loss in six large families that support statistically significant evidence for genetic linkage. However, GIPC3 is not the only nonsyndromic hearing impairment gene in this region; no GIPC3 mutations were found in a family cosegregating hearing loss with markers of chromosome 19p. Haplotype analysis excluded GIPC3 from the obligate linkage interval in this family and defined a novel locus spanning 4.08 Mb and 104 genes. This closely linked but distinct nonsyndromic hearing loss locus was designated DFNB81. PMID:21660509

  10. MR imaging of 495 consecutive cases with sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    495 consecutive patients with SNHL and 120 age-matched healthy controls were examined. Spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were used with 1.5 T equipment. An intracranial abnormality was found in 211 (42.6%) of the patients with 95 (19.2%) along the acoustic pathway. Eleven of the 95 patients had sensory hearing loss while 84 had neural hearing loss with the retrocochlear auditory pathway affected by lesions. In 62 of the 84 patients, the internal acoustic canal and cerebellopontine angle were involved. Twenty-two patients had intra-axial lesions. The controls had no pathologic changes along the auditory pathway. (orig./UG)

  11. Age-related hearing loss: is it a preventable condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeld, Eric C; Tanaka, Chiemi; Chen, Guang-di; Henderson, Donald

    2010-06-01

    Numerous techniques have been tested to attempt to prevent the onset or progression of age-related hearing loss (ARHL): raising the animals in an augmented acoustic environment (used successfully in mouse and rat models), enhancing the antioxidant defenses with exogenous antioxidant treatments (used with mixed results in mouse and rat models), raising the animals with a calorie restricted diet (used successfully in mouse and rat models), restoring lost endocochlear potential voltage with exogenous electrical stimulation (used successfully in the Mongolian gerbil model), and hypothetical enhancement of outer hair cell electromotility with salicylate therapy. Studies of human ARHL have revealed a set of unique hearing loss configurations with unique underlying pathologies. Animal research has developed models for the different forms of age-related peripheral pathology. Using the animal models, different techniques for prevention of ARHL have been developed and tested. The current review discusses ARHL patterns in humans and animal models, followed by discussions of the different prevention techniques. PMID:19735708

  12. Identification and genotype/phenotype correlation of mutations in a large German cohort with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christopher; Pérez-Álvarez, Jose Carmelo; Sigruener, Alexander; Haubner, Frank; Seidler, Till; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Strutz, Jürgen; Schmitz, Gerd

    2014-09-12

    The prevalence of hearing impairment is estimated as approximately 1 on 1,000 newborn children. To assess a higher mutation detection rate in individuals with hearing loss a three-step mutation screening program consisting of GJB2 in first line, then GJB1, GJB3 and GJB6 (second step) and if tested negative or heterozygote, testing of GJA1, GJB4, SLC26A4 and PJVK (third) was performed. Audiograms were derived from all patients to characterize audiological features of GJB2 mutations especially. In 59 patients (31.3 %) of the 188 probands, the hearing impairment was due to GJB2 mutations, 45 (23.9 %) of these being homozygous for 35delG mutation and 14 (7.4 %) compound heterozygous for GJB2 mutations in the coding region of exon 2 whereas no significant sequence variation was found in exon 1. In 22 (11.7 %) additional patients a single recessive mutation in GJB2, GJB3, GJB6 and SLC26A4 without a second mutation on the other allele was identified, making genetic counseling difficult. Our study showed significant difference in hearing loss degree in the patients with GJB2-mutations. Forty-five (45.5 %) GJB2-cases were identified in 99 individuals diagnosed with severe to profound hearing loss, 14 (17.7 %) GJB2-cases were identified in 79 individuals with moderate deafness whereas no clear GJB2 mutation was found in 10 patients with mild hearing loss (p GJB2, a step by step screening for mutations can be devised and in addition may lead to a better stratification of patients for specific therapeutical approaches. PMID:25214170

  13. Vestibular Schwannoma in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal ...

  14. Sensorineural hearing loss after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Thongyai Kanthong; Keskool Phawin; Thephamongkhol Kullathorn; Sermsree Achariyaporn; Petsuksiri Janjira; Chansilpa Yaowalak; Pattaranutaporn Pittayapoom

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is one of the major long term side effects from radiation therapy (RT) in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. This study aims to review the incidences of SNHL when treating with different radiation techniques. The additional objective is to determine the relationship of the SNHL with the radiation doses delivered to the inner ear. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 134 individual ears from 68 NPC patients, treated with conventional ...

  15. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Okokhere Peter O; Ibekwe Titus S; Akpede George O

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented...

  16. The Prevention of Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, our acoustic environment is filled with amplified sound sources (e.g., MP3 players, video game stations, and sports/entertainment venues). There is serious concern and also some controversy about the risks of acoustic trauma in children. This overview provides some basic information on the physiological mechanisms that lead to noise induced hearing loss, a survey of various studies that, on balance, indicates that there is cause for concern, and finally a discussion on measures ...

  17. Talker Differences in Clear and Conversational Speech: Vowel Intelligibility for Older Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the range of talker variability for vowel intelligibility in clear versus conversational speech for older adults with hearing loss and to determine whether talkers who produced a clear speech benefit for young listeners with normal hearing also did so for older adults with hearing loss. Method: Clear and conversational vowels…

  18. Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children with Peripheral Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koravand, Amineh; Jutras, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss. Method: Forty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task in which…

  19. The Relationship between Language Development and Behaviour Problems in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jim; McCann, Donna; Watkin, Peter; Worsfold, Sarah; Kennedy, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Background: There are well-replicated findings that link poor development on a range of communication skills with increased behavioural problems. This paper examines this relationship in children with hearing loss. Method: One hundred and twenty children with hearing loss (67 boys, 53 girls) and 63 hearing children (37 boys, 26 girls) with a mean…

  20. Listening Effort and Fatigue in School-Age Children with and without Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Candace Bourland; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2002-01-01

    Two studies compared either physiological signs of fatigue or evidence of effort expended by 20 school-age children with or without mild-to-moderate hearing loss under difficult hearing conditions. Although the first study found no differences in fatigue, the second study found that children with hearing loss expend more effort in listening than…

  1. Research on Relationship Model of Social Adaptation,Social Support and Life Satisfaction of Tibetan Hearing Loss Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Ren-hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper takes 230 Tibetan hearing loss children sample to research on relationship model of social adaptation, social support and life satisfaction of Tibetan hearing loss children by hearing disabled children’s social adaptive behavior, social support assessment scale and life satisfaction rating scale. Results present that there be significant positive relationship between social support and social adaptation, between social adaptation and life satisfaction. Further more, the social support doesn’t affect on life satisfaction rating, but through the social adaptation as intermediary affect on life satisfaction.

  2. Drug screening for hearing loss: using the zebrafish lateral line to screen for drugs that prevent and cause hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Henry C.; Santos, Felipe; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Rubel, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    Several animal models have been used for the study of mechanosensory hair cells and hearing loss. Because of the difficulty of tissue acquisition and large animal size, these traditional models are impractical for high-throughput screening. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful animal model for screening drugs that cause or prevent hair cell death. The unique characteristics of the zebrafish enable rapid in vivo imaging of hair cells and hair cell death. We have used this model to screen fo...

  3. Effects of sound preconditioning on hearing loss from low or middle-frequency noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y G; He, Y J; Li, D D; Zheng, S X; Niu, C M

    2000-10-01

    Objective. To explore prior noise exposures or sound conditioning as a moderator of hearing loss produced by traumatic exposure to low or middle-frequency noise. Method. Two experimental groups of guinea-pigs were conditioned using a 0.5 kHz octave band noise (OBN) at 85 dB, 6 h/d for 4 d. The subjects were allowed to recover for 3 d after conditioning. Then the first group was exposed to a 0.5 kHz OBN at 110 dB for 1 h, the second group was exposed to 1 kHz OBN at 110 dB for 1 h. Two control groups received 0.5 kHz and 1 kHz OBN respectively at 110 dB for 1 h without prior sound conditioning. Result. Hearing threshold shifts recorded at 48 h after the high-level noise exposure in conditioned groups and control groups demonstrated that conditioning provided significant protection on hearing threshold shift from low or middle frequency noise exposure. Histological examination revealed significantly less hair cell loss in the conditioned than in the control groups. In addition, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in red blood cell (RBC) of conditioned groups were significantly lower as compared with that of the control groups. Conclusion. Low-frequency conditioning provided significant protection not only on hearing threshold shift caused by noise of the same frequency, but also on that caused by middle frequency noise. PMID:11894866

  4. Mice Deficient for the Type II Transmembrane Serine Protease, TMPRSS1/hepsin, Exhibit Profound Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Guipponi, Michel; Tan, Justin; Cannon, Ping Z. F.; Donley, Lauren; Crewther, Pauline; Clarke, Maria; Wu, Qingyu; Shepherd, Robert K.; Scott, Hamish S.

    2007-01-01

    Defective proteolysis has been implicated in hearing loss through the discovery of mutations causing autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness in a type II transmembrane serine protease gene, TMPRSS3. To investigate their physiological function and the contribution of this family of proteases to the auditory function, we analyzed the hearing status of mice deficient for hepsin, also known as TMPRSS1. These mice exhibited profound hearing loss with elevated hearing thresholds compared with the...

  5. [The audiological phenotype and the prevalence of GJB2-related sensorineural loss of hearing in the infants suffering acoustic disturbances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalaiants, M R; Markova, T G; Bakhshinian, V V; Bliznets, E A; Poliakov, A V; Tavartikiladze, G A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study specific features of the audiological phenotype and the prevalence of GJB2-related sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in the infants suffering acoustic disturbances. The study included 264 children with bilateral non-syndromic sensorineural loss of hearing diagnosed during the first year of life by means of detailed audiological examination that included tympanometry, registration of short-latency auditory action potentials (SLAAP), delayed evoked otoacoustic emission (DEOAE), distortion product-frequency otoacoustic emission (DPFOAE), and auditory brain-stem response (ABR). In addition, stationary acoustically evoked responses (SAER) were recorded in 38 children presenting with hearing impairment associated with GJB2-related sensorineural loss of hearing. The follow-up dynamic study involved 113 children subjected to repeated audiological examination. The study revealed the genotype with pathological mutations in 182 (69.0%) children including 171 (64.8%) ones with biallelic mutations and 11 (4.2%) with a single mutation (heterozygous genotype). Eighty two (31.0%) children had genotype without mutations. A total of 21 different mutations and 30 different genotypes were identified. Analysis of the family histories of the children showed that neither the absence of relatives suffering from hearing impairment nor the presence of risk factors of acquired hearing impairment excludes the possibility of GJB2-related sensorineural loss of hearing in the infants. Otoacoustic emission fails to be registered in the majority of the children with the altered genotype (87%) during the stay in the maternity house. Mutations in the GJB2 gene are most frequently diagnosed in the patients with the moderate, moderately severe, and severe loss of hearing. At the same time, almost half of the infants presenting with the mild loss of hearing were found to exhibit changes in the GJB2 gene. The thresholds of registration of short-latency auditory action potentials remain stable in 90.0% of the children presenting with GJB2-related sensorineural loss of hearing which makes it possible to choose the strategy of their rehabilitative treatment (the use of hearing aids or cochlear implantation) during the very first months of life and predict the favourable outcome of cochlear implantation and hearing aid measures. The results of the present work illustrate the importance and practical significance of genetic studies (GJB2 gene tresting) of the infants suffering sensorineural loss of hearing and other acoustic disturbances for the elucidation of etiology of these conditions, prognosis of the disease, and the choice of the strategy for its treatment. PMID:24781170

  6. Internet Interventions for Hearing Loss : Examing rehabilitation, self-report measures and internet use for hearing-aid users

    OpenAIRE

    Sundewall Thore?n, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    In the future, audiological rehabilitation of adults with hearing loss will be more available, personalized and thorough due to the possibilities offered by the internet. By using the internet as a platform it is also possible to perform the process of rehabilitation in a cost-effective way. With tailored online rehabilitation programs containing topics such as communication strategies, hearing tactics and how to handle hearing aids it might be possible to foster behavioral changes that will ...

  7. Resolution of sudden sensorineural hearing loss following a roller coaster ride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aman; Sinha, Amrita; Al-Waa, Ahmad M

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset during an aeroplane flight, which completely resolved during a roller coaster ride at Alton Towers theme park. A review of the literature concerning sudden idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and spontaneous resolution are discussed. Initially, pure-tone audiometry showed a profound sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and mild sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear (of note, the hearing was normal prior to the episode). Following resolution of the patient's symptoms during a roller coaster ride, pure-tone audiometry showed normal hearing thresholds in both ears. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a symptom of cochlear injury and the mechanism of the patient's symptoms was attributed to a patent cochlear aqueduct. PMID:22754856

  8. Mechanisms of hearing loss after blast injury to the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Il; Gao, Simon S; Xia, Anping; Wang, Rosalie; Salles, Felipe T; Raphael, Patrick D; Abaya, Homer; Wachtel, Jacqueline; Baek, Jongmin; Jacobs, David; Rasband, Matthew N; Oghalai, John S

    2013-01-01

    Given the frequent use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the world, the study of traumatic blast injuries is of increasing interest. The ear is the most common organ affected by blast injury because it is the body's most sensitive pressure transducer. We fabricated a blast chamber to re-create blast profiles similar to that of IEDs and used it to develop a reproducible mouse model to study blast-induced hearing loss. The tympanic membrane was perforated in all mice after blast exposure and found to heal spontaneously. Micro-computed tomography demonstrated no evidence for middle ear or otic capsule injuries; however, the healed tympanic membrane was thickened. Auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emission threshold shifts were found to be correlated with blast intensity. As well, these threshold shifts were larger than those found in control mice that underwent surgical perforation of their tympanic membranes, indicating cochlear trauma. Histological studies one week and three months after the blast demonstrated no disruption or damage to the intra-cochlear membranes. However, there was loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) within the basal turn of the cochlea and decreased spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and afferent nerve synapses. Using our mouse model that recapitulates human IED exposure, our results identify that the mechanisms underlying blast-induced hearing loss does not include gross membranous rupture as is commonly believed. Instead, there is both OHC and SGN loss that produce auditory dysfunction. PMID:23840874

  9. Single-sided deafness & directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MartijnJohannes HermanusAgterberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Direction-specific interactions of sound waves with the head, torso and pinna provide unique spectral-shape cues that are used for the localization of sounds in the vertical plane, whereas horizontal sound localization is based primarily on the processing of binaural acoustic differences in arrival time (interaural time differences, or ITDs and sound level (interaural level differences, or ILDs. Because the binaural sound-localization cues are absent in listeners with total single-sided deafness (SSD, their ability to localize sound is heavily impaired. However, some studies have reported that SSD listeners are able, to some extent, to localize sound sources in azimuth, although the underlying mechanisms used for localization are unclear. To investigate whether SSD listeners rely on monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues of their hearing ear for directional hearing, we investigated localization performance for low-pass filtered (LP, 3 kHz and broadband (BB, 0.5 – 20 kHz noises in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We tested whether localization performance of SSD listeners further deteriorated when the pinna cavities of their hearing ear were filled with a mold that disrupted their spectral-shape cues. To remove the potential use of perceived sound level as an invalid azimuth cue, we randomly varied stimulus presentation levels over a broad range (45-65 dB SPL. Several listeners with SSD could localize HP and BB sound sources in the horizontal plane, but inter-subject variability was considerable. Localization performance of these listeners strongly reduced after diminishing of their spectral pinna-cues. We further show that inter-subject variability of SSD can be explained to a large extent by the severity of high-frequency hearing loss in their hearing ear.

  10. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, S; Okano, M; Maeda, Y; Hirai, H; Higaki, T; Noyama, Y; Haruna, T; Nishihira, J; Nishizaki, K

    2014-10-24

    Hearing loss related to aging is the most common sensory disorder among elderly individuals. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multi-functional molecule. The aim of this study was to identify the role of MIF in the inner ear. MIF-deficient mice (MIF(-/-) mice) of BALB/c background and wild-type BALB/c mice were used in this study. Expression of MIF protein in the inner ear was examined by immunohistochemistry in wild-type mice (WT). The hearing function was assessed by the click-evoked auditory brainstem response in both MIF(-/-) mice and WT at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18months of age. Morphological examination of the cochlea was also performed using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. MIF was observed in the spiral ligament, stria vascularis, Reissner's membrane, spiral ganglion cells (SGCs), saccular macula, and membranous labyrinth. The MIF(-/-) mice had a significant hearing loss as compared with the WT at 9, 12, and 18months of age. In the MIF(-/-) mice, scanning electron microscopy showed that the outer cochlear hair cells were affected, but that the inner cochlear hair cells were relatively well preserved. The number of SGCs was lower in the MIF(-/-) mice. MIF was strongly expressed in the mouse inner ear. Older MIF(-/-) mice showed accelerated age-related hearing loss and morphological inner ear abnormalities. These findings suggest that MIF plays an important role in the inner ear of mice. PMID:25194790

  11. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Faramarzi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran.Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg and audiometric variables was recorded.Findings:Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5% had normal hearing and 10 (3.5% sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion.Conclusion:We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity.

  12. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Taghi Heydari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran. Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg and audiometric variables was recorded. Findings:Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5% had normal hearing and 10 (3.5% sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion. Conclusion:We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity.

  13. Postural control in children with typical development and children with profound hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro de Sousa AM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aneliza Maria Monteiro de Sousa,1 Jônatas de França Barros,2 Brígido Martins de Sousa Neto31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil; 2Department of Physical Education at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 3University Center UNIEURO, Brasilia, Federal District, BrazilPurpose: To describe the behavior of the postural control in children with profound sensorineural hearing loss and compare the results of experimental tests with hearing children aged 7 to 10 years.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional study where 100 children were divided into experimental and control groups. We used a force platform, AccuSway Plus, where the tests were conducted under the experimental conditions: open base, eyes open (OBEO; open base, eyes closed (OBEC; closed base, eyes open (CBEO; closed base, eyes closed (CBEC. The body sway velocity (V of the center of pressure, the displacement in the anteroposterior direction (COPap and mediolateral (COPml of the center of pressure were the parameters to evaluate the postural control. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test, with a significance level of 5%.Results: In comparisons of variables between the groups, the experimental group outperformed by at least 75% of the control group values. In terms of global trends, the experimental group shows higher values of body oscillations in all experimental conditions and variables evaluated. Children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing. The inferential analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the balance between deaf and hearing children in the OBEC experimental condition in relation to the COPml parameter (P = 0.04. There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons between the sexes when the groups were analyzed separately. The prevalence of unknown etiology showed 58% of cases and congenital rubella in 16%. The discovery of deafness occurred in 70% of children before the age of 3 years.Conclusion: In this study, children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing children. This finding confirms the need to investigate postural control through longitudinal studies to identify the area of sensory deficit causing poor balance performance and promote more specific early interventions.Keywords: postural control, hearing impairment, balance, children, sensory deprivation, early intervention

  14. Hearing Loss among HIV-Seropositive and HIV-Seronegative Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Peter; Hoffman, Howard J.; Springer, Gayle; Cox, Christopher; Young, Mary A.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Plankey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Hearing sensitivity among adults has quality of life implications as individuals become older. There are limited data on hearing loss among aging HIV+ adults. OBJECTIVES 1) To evaluate pure-tone hearing thresholds among HIV+ and HIV- adults with similar demographic characteristics. 2) To determine if HIV disease variables and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are associated with pure-tone threshold levels. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS 262 men (117 HIV+) from the Baltimore/Washington, DC site of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and 134 women (105 HIV+) from the Washington, DC site of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) participated. Pure-tone air-conduction thresholds were collected in a sound-treated room at octave frequencies from 250 through 8000 Hz, along with interoctave frequencies of 750, 3000, and 6000 Hz. INTERVENTION(S) None. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES In each ear, a low-frequency pure-tone average (LPTA) was calculated using air-conduction thresholds at 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz and a high-frequency PTA (HPTA) was calculated using air-conduction thresholds at 3000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hz. Linear mixed regression models tested the effect of HIV on hearing after adjusting for age, sex, race, and noise exposure history. Differential HIV effects for LPTA and HPTA and better/worse ear were also examined. CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, log10 plasma HIV RNA concentrations, ever having had an AIDS-defining condition, and cumulative time on ART were included in the models for HIV+ participants only. RESULTS HPTA and LPTA were significantly higher (18% and 12%, respectively), for HIV+ participants compared to HIV- participants for the better ear. The direction of the effect was consistent across both the better and worse ear. There were no significant associations between HIV disease variables or treatment variables and LPTA or HPTA. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE HIV+ adults had significantly poorer lower and higher frequency hearing compared to HIV- adults. High frequency hearing loss is consistent with an accelerated aging (presbycusis); hearing loss in the low frequency range among middle-aged individuals is an unexpected finding. Since some vowels and consonants have predominantly low frequency acoustic energy, poorer hearing in lower frequencies may lead to increased communication difficulties in HIV+ individuals. PMID:25541676

  15. Can Noise in Dental Clinic Produce Hearing Loss?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sensorial hearing loss and irreversible noise induced is the major evitable occupational cause of hearing loss worldwide. The dentists are health professionals exposed to noises from equipment in their clinics and may suffer hearing losses. Objective: Measure the noise intensities emitted by the high rotation motors (mar used in public and private dental clinics, check whether they are harmful for the human ear and compare the results obtained in such services. Method: Serial, retrospective study with measures of the noise intensities in dBNA with a decibelimeter Minipa MSL-1352C, USA, in four dental clinics of the public service and four private clinics in Jundiaí-SP, initially from the basal environment noise in each clinic, during five minutes and then from the noise emitted by the high rotation motor (mar in operation during five minutes to obtain the averages. Results:Public clinics: 1basal medium=56.4dB;mar=77.2dB. 2basal medium=61.7dB;mar=73.7dB. 3basal medium=61.07dB;mar=75.04dB. 4basal medium=63.6dB;mar=77.3dB. Private clinics: 1basal medium=60,7dB;mar=79,1dB. 2basal=60,7dB;mar=83,1dB. 3basal=58,4dB;mar=75,5dB. 4basal=63dB;mar=76dB. Conclusion: The intensities measured of noise emitted by high rotation motors used in public and private dental clinics are below the limits harmful to the auditory health. In the public service, the basal medium noise intensity is higher than that of the private clinics, however the one of the high rotation motors is higher in the private clinics.

  16. Mechanisms of Hearing Loss after Blast Injury to the Ear

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-il; Gao, Simon S.; Xia, Anping; Wang, Rosalie; Salles, Felipe T.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Abaya, Homer; Wachtel, Jacqueline; Baek, Jongmin; Jacobs, David; Rasband, Matthew N.; Oghalai, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Given the frequent use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the world, the study of traumatic blast injuries is of increasing interest. The ear is the most common organ affected by blast injury because it is the body’s most sensitive pressure transducer. We fabricated a blast chamber to re-create blast profiles similar to that of IEDs and used it to develop a reproducible mouse model to study blast-induced hearing loss. The tympanic membrane was perforated in all mice after blast e...

  17. Prevalence, aetiology, and care of severe and profound hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Baille, M. F.; Arnaud, C.; Cans, C.; Grandjean, H.; Du Mazaubrun, C.; Rumeau-rouquette, C.

    1996-01-01

    Severe and profound hearing loss (> 70 dB) were analysed in a retrospective study of 226 children, born between 1976 and 1985, and recruited from three French administrative departments. The prevalence was 0.54 per 1000 children under 9 years old, with no decrease over the study period. A hereditary origin was identified in 20.8% of cases and an infectious origin in 11.5%. Perinatal risk factors were present in 11.5%, while the aetiology was undetermined in more than half the cases. In 85.8% ...

  18. Risk Factors for Hearing Loss in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment of head-and-neck carcinoma. The objective of this study was to perform a prospective multivariate assessment of the dose-effect relationship between intensity-modulated RT and hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Pure tone audiometry at 0.250-16 kHz was obtained before and after treatment in 101 patients (202 ears). All patients received full-course intensity-modulated RT (range, 56-70 Gy), with a median cochlear dose of 11.4 Gy (range, 0.2-69.7). Results: Audiometry was performed 1 week before and a median of 9 weeks (range, 1-112) after treatment. The mean hearing deterioration at pure tone average air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz was small (from 28.6 dB HL to 30.1 dB HL). However, individual patients showed clinically significant hearing loss, with 10-dB threshold shift incidences of 13% and 18% at pure tone averages air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz and 8-10-12.5 kHz, respectively. Post-treatment hearing capability was unfavorable in the case of greater inner ear radiation doses (p <0.0001), unfavorable baseline hearing capability (p <0.0001), green-eyed patients (p <0.0001), and older age (p <0.0001). Using multivariate analysis, a prediction of individual hearing capabiltity after treatment was made. Conclusion: RT-induced hearing loss in the mean population is modest. However, clinically significant hearing loss was observed in older patients with green eyes and unfavorable pretreatment hearing. In these patients, the intended raearing. In these patients, the intended radiation dose may be adjusted according to the proposed predictive model, aiming to decrease the risk of ototoxicity.

  19. Anosmia associated with hearing loss and benign positional vertigo after head trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ottaviano, G.; Marioni, G.; Marchese-ragona, R.; Trevisan, Cp; Filippis, C.; Staffieri, A.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that head trauma may cause hearing loss, which can be either conductive or sensorineural. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and olfactory dysfunction due to head trauma are also well known. The association between sensorineural hearing loss and anosmia, following head trauma, is extremely rare. Two rare cases of post-traumatic occurrence of hearing loss, olfactory dysfunction and benign positional vertigo are reported and the pathophysiology of the association between sens...

  20. Subclinical Hearing Loss, Longer Sleep Duration, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Japanese General Population

    OpenAIRE

    Kei Nakajima; Eiichiro Kanda; Ami Hosobuchi; Kaname Suwa

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss leads to impaired social functioning and quality of life. Hearing loss is also associated with sleeping disorders and cardiometabolic risk factors. Here, we determined whether subclinical hearing loss is associated with sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross-sectional and longitudinal study of healthy Japanese general population. 48,091 men and women aged 20–79 years who underwent medical checkups were included in a cross-sectional study, and 6,674 were incl...

  1. Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss in Children: Past and Current Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, audiologists have become increasingly aware of the potential effect of even mild degrees of hearing loss on the psychoeducational and psychosocial outcomes of children. This review describes some of the key research findings during the past several decades that have led us to our current thinking about unilateral and mild bilateral hearing loss in children. The first section addresses unilateral hearing loss. This is followed by a review of the literature on mild bilate...

  2. Reversible Sensorineural Hearing Loss due to Pachymeningitis Associated with Elevated Serum MPO-ANCA

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Eun-jung; Kim, Sung-hee; Lee, Su-hwan; Lee, Kyu-yup; Choi, Jae-hyuk; Nam, Eon-jeong; Lee, Sang-heun

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a progressive disease resulting in a diffuse thickening of dura mater due to inflammation, tumor or autoimmune diseases, but most cases are idiopathic. It is seldom reported to be related to sensorineural hearing loss, but it can cause sensorineural hearing loss which can be potentially reversed through treatment. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old woman who had progressive, bilateral, worse in the left, sensorineural hearing loss and visual disturbance ...

  3. Risk of hearing loss from combined exposure to hand-arm vibrations and noise

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersson, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss from noise exposure is one of the most common occupational injuries, and exposure to vibrations may increase the risk of noise-induced hearing loss. Earlier cross-sectional and longitudinal studies found an increased risk of noise-induced hearing loss among workers with vibration-induced white fingers (VWF) symptoms compared to workers without such symptoms. It has been suggested that vibrations to the hand stimulate the sympathetic nervous system and cause vasoconstriction in bo...

  4. Effects of auditory training in individuals with high-frequency hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Renata Beatriz Fernandes, Santos; Andrea Tortosa, Marangoni; Adriana Neves de, Andrade; Raquel, Prestes; Daniela, Gil.

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a formal auditory training program on the behavioral, electrophysiological and subjective aspects of auditory function in individuals with bilateral high-frequency hearing [...] loss. METHOD: A prospective study of seven individuals aged 46 to 57 years with symmetric, moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging from 3 to 8 kHz was conducted. Evaluations of auditory processing (sound location, verbal and non-verbal sequential memory tests, the speech-in-noise test, the staggered spondaic word test, synthetic sentence identification with competitive ipsilateral and contralateral competitive messages, random gap detection and the standard duration test), auditory brainstem response and long-latency potentials and the administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaire were performed in a sound booth before and immediately after formal auditory training. RESULTS: All of the participants demonstrated abnormal pre-training long-latency characteristics (abnormal latency or absence of the P3 component) and these abnormal characteristics were maintained in six of the seven individuals at the post-training evaluation. No significant differences were found between ears in the quantitative analysis of auditory brainstem responses or long-latency potentials. However, the subjects demonstrated improvements on all behavioral tests. For the questionnaire, the difference on the background noise subscale achieved statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Auditory training in adults with high-frequency hearing loss led to improvements in figure-background hearing skills for verbal sounds, temporal ordination and resolution, and communication in noisy environments. Electrophysiological changes were also observed because, after the training, some long latency components that were absent pre-training were observed during the re-evaluation.

  5. Sensori-neural hearing loss in patients treated with irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Cai; MØller, K

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation has been carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the inner ear to irradiation. Cochlear function was tested in a cohort of 22 patients before and 7-84 months after receiving external irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The pre-irradiation sensori-neural hearing threshold at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz was used as a baseline for the individual patient, and the observed sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) was calculated as the difference between pre- and post-irradiation values. The pre-irradiation hearing level or patient age was not correlated with the actual SNHL. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between the total radiation dose to the inner ear and the observed hearing impairment. SNHL was most pronounced in the high frequencies, with values up to 35 dB (4000 Hz) and 25 dB (2000 Hz) in some patients. The latent period for the complication appeared to be 12 months or more. The deleterious effect of irradiation on the hearing should be kept in mind both in treatment planning and in the follow-up after radiotherapy.

  6. Sudden hearing loss in a family with GJB2 related progressive deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotas, Haris; Theodosiou, Maria; Korres, George; Grigoriadou, Maria; Ferekidou, Elisabeth; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Petersen, Michael B; Korres, Stavros

    2008-11-01

    Mutations of GJB2, the gene encoding connexin 26, have been associated with prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss of mild to profound severity. One specific mutation, the 35delG, has accounted for the majority of mutations detected in the GJB2 gene in Caucasian populations. Recent studies have described progression of hearing loss in a proportion of cases with GJB2 deafness. We report an unusual family with four 35delG homozygous members, in which the parents were deaf-mute whilst both children had a postlingual progressive hearing loss. Furthermore, the son suffered from sudden hearing loss. PMID:18809215

  7. The importance of MRI examination for sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is commonly knwon as inner ear disease, although little is known about its cause in most cases. We evaluated 383 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 8.1% of the patients, MRI examination revealed some abnormal findings that may be associated with sudden sensorineural hearing loss: acoustic tumor was noted in 1%, abnormality of the vertebral-basilar artery in 1%, and infarction around the brainstem in 0.8%. In these cases, using MRI at an early stage of examination, we can establish the correct diagnosis of and treatment for hearing loss. (author)

  8. Temporal and spectral resolution of hearing in patients with precipitous hearing loss: Gap release of masking (GRM) and the role of cognitive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin David

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to measure temporal acuity and spectral resolution of hearing in new hearing-aid users over a period of time post-fitting, and to demonstrate the extent to which performance might change over time. For one-octave wide maskers with and without spectral and temporal gaps, masking was measured repeatedly over 3 months post-fitting. GRM was characterized as the release from masking under the gap conditions. The cognitive skills of the participants were assessed with two tests for measuring working memory capacity and lexical vigilance. The results showed that while the masking by one-octave wide noise maskers without any gaps was constant over time, GRM increased over time for maskers involving a temporal gap. Moreover, at low frequencies where the subjects had normal hearing-threshold levels, they performed as hearing-impaired for the spectral-gap condition. For the temporal-gap condition, they performed as normally hearing at both low and high frequencies. These results suggest that patients with precipitous hearing loss do not maintain normal spectral resolution through the low-frequency region, in which the hearing threshold levels are otherwise normal. Surprisingly, the results also showed moderate though highly significant correlation between lexical vigilance and GRM. [Work supported by the William Demant Foundation.] a)Currently at CNBH, Dept. Physiol., University of Cambridge, CB2 3EG Cambridge, UK.

  9. Vestibular schwannoma in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2011-03-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal MRI as a screening method. Of the 295 patients with SSNHL, VS was found in 12 (4%). All patients had intrameatal or small to medium-sized tumors. There were three cases with SSNHL in one ear and an incidental finding of intracanalicular VS in the contralateral ear. There were four cases of VS that showed good recovery from SSNHL with corticosteroid treatment. There were two cases that mimicked labyrinthitis with hearing loss and vertigo. A greater number of cases than expected of VS were detected in patients with SSNHL, as a result of increasing widespread use of MRI. Various unusual findings in these patients were identified. MRI would seem to be mandatory in all cases of SSNHL. PMID:22451804

  10. Programa de triagem auditiva neonatal: associação entre perda auditiva e fatores de risco Newborn hearing screening program: association between hearing loss and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Karla Santana Pereira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: perda auditiva em neonatos. OBJETIVOS: verificar a prevalência de alterações auditivas em neonatos do Hospital São Paulo, observando se há correlação com as variáveis: peso de nascimento, idade gestacional, relação peso e idade gestacional e fatores de risco para deficiência auditiva. MÉTODO: realizou-se uma análise retrospectiva dos prontuários de 1696 recém nascidos, sendo 648 nascidos pré-termo e 1048 a termo. Todas as crianças foram submetidas à avaliação audiológica constituída por pesquisa das emissões otoacústicas transientes e do reflexo cocleopalpebral e medidas de imitância acústica, estabelecendo-se o diagnóstico do tipo e grau de perda. RESULTADOS: a perda auditiva neurossensorial foi identificada em 0,82% das crianças nascidas a termo, e 3,1% das crianças pré-termo (com diferença estatisticamente significante. A perda auditiva condutiva foi a mais freqüente nas duas populações sendo observada em 14,6% das crianças nascidas a termo e 16,3% das crianças pré-termo. Houve suspeita de alterações do sistema auditivo central em 5,8% das crianças pré-termo e 3,3% das crianças a termo. Na população de crianças nascidas a termo, houve correlação significante entre falha na triagem auditiva e os riscos antecedente familiar e síndrome, sendo 37 vezes maior a chance de uma criança com síndrome falhar na triagem e sete vezes maior a chance de falhar na orelha direita quando esta tiver antecedente familiar de perda auditiva. Quanto menor a idade gestacional (BACKGROUND: hearing loss in newborns. Aim: to verify the prevalence of auditory alterations in newborns of Hospital São Paulo (hospital, observing if there are any correlations with the following variables: birth weight, gestational age, relation weight/gestational age and risk factors for hearing loss. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of the hospital records of 1696 newborns; 648 records of preterm infants and 1048 records of infants born at term. All of the infants had been submitted to an auditory evaluation consisting of: Transient Otoacoustic Emissions, investigation of the cochleal-palpebral reflexes and acoustic imittance tests, identifying the type and level of hearing loss. RESULTS: sensorineural hearing loss was identified in .82% of the infants who were born at term and in 3.1% of the preterm infants - with a statistically significant difference. Conductive hearing loss was the most frequent type of hearing loss in both groups, occurring in 14.6% of the term infants and in 16.3% of the preterm infants. Alteration of the central auditory system was considered as a possible diagnosis for 5.8% of the preterm infants and for 3.3% of the term infants. For the group of infants who were born at term, a significant correlation was observed between failure in the hearing screening test and the presence of risk factors such as family history and presence of a syndrome - the child who presented a syndrome had 37 times more chances of failing in the hearing screening test and seven times more chances of failing in the right ear when there was a family history for hearing loss. The lower the gestational age (< 30 weeks and birth weight (< 1500g, the higher the chances of failing in the hearing screening test (3 times more. CONCLUSION: hearing loss had a higher occurrence in preterm infants who remained in the ICU. Gestational age and birth weight were important variables related to the possibility of failure in the hearing screening test. A correlation was observed between the presence of a syndrome and sensorineural hearing loss in infants who were born at term.

  11. An Evaluation of the BKB-SIN, HINT, QuickSIN, and WIN Materials on Listeners with Normal Hearing and Listeners with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard H.; McArdle, Rachel A.; Smith, Sherri L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine in listeners with normal hearing and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss the within- and between-group differences obtained with 4 commonly available speech-in-noise protocols. Method: Recognition performances by 24 listeners with normal hearing and 72 listeners with sensorineural hearing

  12. Co-morbidities of hearing loss and occupational therapy in preschool children

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Varsha, Sewpersad.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: Many children with hearing impairment present with one or more health-related conditions defined as a co-morbidity in addition to hearing loss. Families and professionals are then faced with various challenges that often complicate the assessment, management and educational placement o [...] f these children. Appropriate holistic intervention is essential for the development and quality of life of the child. This study describes the co-morbidities within the field of occupational therapy, speech therapy and physiotherapy that pre-school children with hearing loss present with at the Centre for Language and Hearing Impaired Children (CLAHIC) and its implications for management. METHOD: A descriptive, retrospective research design was employed. Using a non-probability, purposive sampling strategy the records of 62 children diagnosed with a hearing loss that attended the CLAHIC from 1999 to 2010, were reviewed. RESULTS: The prevalent co-morbidities identified in this study were found mostly within the field of Occupational Therapy and included fine and gross motor delay, visual motor integration disorders and bilateral integration disorders. Further findings indicated that co-morbidities of hearing loss are independent of the degree of the hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that pre-school children with hearing loss, irrespective of the etiology and degree of hearing loss, should be screened for prevalent co-morbidities, such as fine and gross motor difficulties

  13. The Novel Mouse Mutation Oblivion Inactivates the PMCA2 Pump and Causes Progressive Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Spiden, Sarah L.; Bortolozzi, Mario; Di Leva, Francesca; Angelis, Martin Hrabe?; Fuchs, Helmut; Lim, Dmitry; Ortolano, Saida; Ingham, Neil J.; Brini, Marisa; Carafoli, Ernesto; Mammano, Fabio; Steel, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive hearing loss is common in the human population, but we have few clues to the molecular basis. Mouse mutants with progressive hearing loss offer valuable insights, and ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis is a useful way of generating models. We have characterised a new ENU-induced mouse mutant, Oblivion (allele symbol Obl), showing semi-dominant inheritance of hearing impairment. Obl/+ mutants showed increasing hearing impairment from post-natal day (P)20 to P90, and loss of au...

  14. Prophylactic and therapeutic functions of drug combinations against noise-induced hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Jianxin; Hungerford, Michelle; Luxmore, Randi; Ding, Dalian; Qiu, Ziyu; Lei, Debin; Yang, Aizhen; Liang, Ruqiang; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.

    2013-01-01

    Noise is the most common occupational and environmental hazard. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the second most common form of sensorineural hearing deficit, after age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). Although promising approaches have been identified for reducing NIHL, currently there are no effective medications to prevent NIHL. Development of an efficacious treatment has been hampered by the complex array of cellular and molecular pathways involved in NIHL. We turned this difficult...

  15. Blast-Induced Tinnitus and Hearing Loss in Rats: Behavioral and Imaging Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Johnny C.; Pace, Edward; Pierozynski, Paige; Kou, Zhifeng; Shen, Yimin; Vandevord, Pamela; Haacke, E. Mark; Zhang, Xueguo; Zhang, Jinsheng

    2012-01-01

    The current study used a rat model to investigate the underlying mechanisms of blast-induced tinnitus, hearing loss, and associated traumatic brain injury (TBI). Seven rats were used to evaluate behavioral evidence of tinnitus and hearing loss, and TBI using magnetic resonance imaging following a single 10-msec blast at 14?psi or 194 dB sound pressure level (SPL). The results demonstrated that the blast exposure induced early onset of tinnitus and central hearing impairment at a broad frequ...

  16. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WorsØe, Lise; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the pneumococcal serotype) for development of hearing loss.

  17. Curing Hearing Loss: Patient Expectations, Health Care Practitioners, and Basic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kazuo; Suchert, Steffen; Blevins, Nikolas H.; Heller, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Millions of patients are debilitated by hearing loss, mainly caused by degeneration of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. The underlying reasons for hair cell loss are highly diverse, ranging from genetic disposition, drug side effects, traumatic noise exposure, to the effects of aging. Whereas modern hearing aids offer some relief of the symptoms…

  18. The Cultural and Linguistic Diversity of 3-Year-Old Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y. C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their…

  19. Vowel Production in 7- to 12-Month-Old Infants with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Rebecca; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Rothpletz, Ann; Sedey, Allison

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine vowel production in 7- to 12-month-old infants with hearing loss. Fifty-four infants were divided into three groups according to degree of hearing loss (mild-to-moderate, moderately severe-to-severe, profound), and their vocalizations were phonetically transcribed from 30-minute videotaped samples. These…

  20. Hearing loss diagnosis followed by meningitis in Danish children, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parner, Erik T; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2007-01-01

    A higher risk of meningitis associated with cochlear implants may be explained in part by a generally higher risk of meningitis in children with severe to profound hearing loss. We investigated whether children with hearing loss have an increased risk of meningitis.

  1. Objective comparison between perforation and hearing loss / Comparação objetiva entre perfuração timpânica e perda auditiva

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fernando de Andrade Quintanilha, Ribeiro; Verônica Reche Rodrigues, Gaudino; Caio Dinelli, Pinheiro; Gil Junqueira, Marçal; Edson Ibrahim, Mitre.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Languages: English, Portuguese Abstract in portuguese INTRODUÇÃO: Parece não haver relação entre o tamanho das perfurações timpânicas e a perda auditiva. Alguns trabalhos na literatura estudaram esta relação, com dados conflitantes e sem uso adequado da metodologia empregada, principalmente quanto à medição do tamanho da perfuração que se faz de modo [...] subjetivo. OBJETIVO: Analisar através de um método objetivo o tamanho dessas perfurações e relacioná-las com perdas auditivas em quatro frequências sonoras. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo de corte transversal. Foram avaliadas 187 perfurações timpânicas através de digitalização de imagem, medidas porcentualmente com o uso do software ImageScope Version 11.1.2.760 e correlacionadas com os limiares auditivos em quatro frequências. RESULTADOS: Os dados foram avaliados estatisticamente pelo teste de correlação de Pearson, que não demonstrou correlação entre o tamanho da perfuração timpânica e o grau de perda auditiva. CONCLUSÃO: Não há relação significativa entre o tamanho das perfurações timpânicas e as quatro frequências estudadas. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: There appears to be no relationship between the size of tympanic perforations and hearing loss. Some studies in the literature have assessed this connection, with conflicting data and without proper methodology, especially concerning the measurement of the size of the perforation, wh [...] ich was performed in a subjective manner. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the size of tympanic perforations and to relate them to hearing loss in four different sound frequencies through the use of an objective method. METHODS: Transversal retrospective study. The present study evaluated 187 perforations through digital imaging, calculated the percentages of the tympanic membrane that was perforated using ImageScope software version 11.1.2.760 and correlated perforations size with hearing loss at four frequencies. RESULTS: Data were statistically analyzed using Pearson's correlation test. CONCLUSION: There was no significant relationship between the size of tympanic perforations and hearing loss in the four analyzed frequencies.

  2. The novel mouse mutation Oblivion inactivates the PMCA2 pump and causes progressive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiden, Sarah L; Bortolozzi, Mario; Di Leva, Francesca; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Fuchs, Helmut; Lim, Dmitry; Ortolano, Saida; Ingham, Neil J; Brini, Marisa; Carafoli, Ernesto; Mammano, Fabio; Steel, Karen P

    2008-10-01

    Progressive hearing loss is common in the human population, but we have few clues to the molecular basis. Mouse mutants with progressive hearing loss offer valuable insights, and ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis is a useful way of generating models. We have characterised a new ENU-induced mouse mutant, Oblivion (allele symbol Obl), showing semi-dominant inheritance of hearing impairment. Obl/+ mutants showed increasing hearing impairment from post-natal day (P)20 to P90, and loss of auditory function was followed by a corresponding base to apex progression of hair cell degeneration. Obl/Obl mutants were small, showed severe vestibular dysfunction by 2 weeks of age, and were completely deaf from birth; sensory hair cells were completely degenerate in the basal turn of the cochlea, although hair cells appeared normal in the apex. We mapped the mutation to Chromosome 6. Mutation analysis of Atp2b2 showed a missense mutation (2630C-->T) in exon 15, causing a serine to phenylalanine substitution (S877F) in transmembrane domain 6 of the PMCA2 pump, the resident Ca(2+) pump of hair cell stereocilia. Transmembrane domain mutations in these pumps generally are believed to be incompatible with normal targeting of the protein to the plasma membrane. However, analyses of hair cells in cultured utricular maculae of Obl/Obl mice and of the mutant Obl pump in model cells showed that the protein was correctly targeted to the plasma membrane. Biochemical and biophysical characterisation showed that the pump had lost a significant portion of its non-stimulated Ca(2+) exporting ability. These findings can explain the progressive loss of auditory function, and indicate the limits in our ability to predict mechanism from sequence alone. PMID:18974863

  3. Vitamins A, C, and E and selenium in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hakan; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Say?n, ?brahim; Güne?, Selçuk; Alt?nta?, Ahmet; Ye?in, Yakup; Kayhan, Fatma Tülin

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of vitamins A, C, and E, with selenium, in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). This was a prospective, controlled study performed at a tertiary teaching and research hospital. Over a 32-month period, patients were treated with either our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen plus vitamins A, C, and E and selenium (ACE+ group) or with only our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen (ACE- group). The demographics, additional symptoms, mean initial and final hearing levels, mean hearing gain, and recovery data were compared between the two groups. The ACE+ group, consisting of 70 (55.5 %) patients, received vitamin A (natural beta-carotene, 26,000 IU), vitamin C (ascorbic acid, 200 mg), vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol, 200 IU), and selenium (50 ?g) twice daily for 30 days in addition to our ISSNHL treatment regimen: methylprednisolone at an initial dose of 1 mg/kg body weight per day, tapered over 14 days; Rheomacrodex(®) [(10 g of dextran and 0.9 g of NaCl)/100 ml] 500 ml daily for 5 days; Vastarel(®) 20-mg tablet (20 mg of trimetazidine dihydrochloride) three times daily for 30 days; and ten 60-min hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) sessions (2.5 absolute atmospheres of 100 % O2), once daily, starting the day of hospitalization. The ACE- group comprised 56 (44.4 %) patients, who received only our ISSNHL treatment regimen. The mean hearing gains were 36.2 ± 20.3 dB in the ACE+ group and 27.1 ± 20.6 dB in the ACE- group. The mean hearing gain rates were significantly higher in the ACE+ group than in the ACE- group (p = 0.014). Treatment with vitamins A, C, and E and selenium was effective in ISSNHL patients undergoing treatment with methylprednisolone, dextran, trimetazidine dihydrochloride, and HBO, and might be more effective when the initial hearing level is below 46 dB. PMID:24519034

  4. [Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and jugular bulb diverticulum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Ren, J; Chen, Z

    1998-09-01

    The relationship between high placed jugular bulb (diverticulum) and inner ear disorder is not well known. Three of 19 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) treated in 1995 had right side jugular bulb diverticulum revealed by CT scan and MRA. One of the 3 SSHL cases complicated with delayed endolymphatic hydrops. The exact mechanism of causation of inner ear symptom is not clear, but may partly be due to pressure effects with the jugular fossa encroaching on inner ear structure such as the cochlear aqueduct and vestibular aqueduct, and due to turbular flow in the diverticulum striking the inner ear. It is needed to further study the influence of the diverticulum on the inner ear. PMID:11263142

  5. Progressive hearing loss following acquired cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompromised child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ken; Otake, Hironao; Tagaya, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Yoshinori; Hama, Asahito; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Naganawa, Shinji; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of progressive hearing loss after acquired CMV infection in a child with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). A 5-month-old female was diagnosed as having LCH. When she was 14 months old, she received an unrelated donor umbilical cord blood transfusion for the treatment of intractable LCH. CMV infection was confirmed after the blood transfusion. Because her own umbilical cord had no CMV, the CMV infection was not congenital. When she was 7 years old, mixed hearing loss was noted with bilateral otitis media with effusion. After that time, the sensorineural hearing loss progressed to bilateral profound hearing loss over 3 years. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium contrast enhancement revealed a high intensity area in the inner ear that suggested bilateral labyrinthitis. This case demonstrates the possibility that, under the immunodeficiency, the acquired CMV infection causes progressive sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:23084431

  6. Two Iranian Families with a Novel Mutation in GJB2 Causing Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Sheffield, Abraham M.; Sobhani, Masoomeh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Meyer, Nicole C; Van Camp, Guy; Hilgert, Nele; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Habibi, Farkhondeh; Daneshi, Ahmad; Nishimura, Carla; Avenarius, Matthew R.; Farhadi, Mohammad; Smith, Richard J.H.; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2, encoding connexin 26 (Cx26), cause both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss at the DFNA3 and DFNB1 loci, respectively. Most of the over 100 described GJB2 mutations cause autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss. Only a minority has been associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss. In this study, we present two families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss caused by a novel mutation in GJB2 (p.Asp46Asn). Both families were ascertained from the same village in northern Iran consistent with a founder effect. This finding implicates the D46N missense mutation in Cx26 as a common cause of deafness in this part of Iran mandating mutation screening of GJB2 for D46N in all persons with hearing loss who originate from this geographic region. PMID:21484990

  7. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated.

  8. On the limited transfer of information with noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoorenburg, G F

    1990-01-01

    Assessment of hearing handicap is frequently based on hearing loss in the frequency region from 0.5 to 2.0 kHz. The region above 2 kHz, however, is important for hearing, particularly when one considers speech perception in conditions with ambient noise. The present study, based on 200 individuals (400 ears) with noise-induced hearing loss, shows that the average value of hearing loss at 2 and 4 kHz is the best simple predictor of the speech-reception threshold measured in noisy conditions. Speech perception is still impaired when the speech level and the level of the interfering noise exceed the hearing loss. This implies that calculations of speech intelligibility based on the articulation-index procedure are invalid. In these calculations it is assumed that only the speech-to-noise level distance (and not the extent of the hearing loss) determines the speech threshold when both the signal and the noise level exceed the hearing loss. An alternative model may be based on the assumption that the frequency channels in the region of the lesion are completely inoperative and that pure tones in this frequency region are detected because excitation spreads toward a region with normal sensitivity. Experimental verification and predictions based on this model show that this assumption is too rigorous. Frequency channels in the region of the lesion do become activated at high stimulus levels, but their contribution to speech perception deteriorates. PMID:2356737

  9. Adjusting to Hearing Loss during High School: Preparing Students for Successful Transition to Postsecondary Education or Training. Tipsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Completion of postsecondary education frequently builds upon a student's successful academic and personal experience during high school. For students with hearing loss, healthy adjustment to hearing loss is a key lifelong developmental process. The vast majority (94%) of approximately 1.1 million K-12 students with hearing loss are educated in…

  10. Reading Intervention to Improve Narrative Production, Narrative Comprehension, and Motivation and Interest of Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulski, Lori A.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a reading intervention on narrative production, narrative comprehension, and reading motivation interest in children with hearing loss. Seven school children between the ages of 9 and 11 were paired with younger "reading buddies" (without hearing loss). The children with hearing loss read storybooks to an…

  11. The tonotopicity of styrene-induced hearing loss depends on the associated noise spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venet, Thomas; Campo, Pierre; Thomas, Aurélie; Cour, Chantal; Rieger, Benoît; Cosnier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The neuropharmacological and cochleotoxic effects of styrene can exacerbate the impact of noise on the peripheral auditory receptor. The mechanisms through which co-exposure to noise and styrene impairs hearing are complex as the slowly developing cochleotoxic process can be masked in the short-term by the rapid pharmacological effect on the central nervous system. The current investigation was therefore designed to delineate the auditory frequency range sensitive to noise, to styrene, and to noise and styrene combined. In case of different frequency ranges targeted by noise and styrene, it would be possible to point out the main factor responsible for cases of deafness by looking at the location of the audiometric deficits. Male Brown-Norway rats were exposed to 600-ppm styrene, to an octave band noise centered at 8kHz, or to both noise and styrene. The noise exposure was of two different types: impulse noise with a LEX,8h (equivalent continuous noise level averaged over 8h) of 80dB and continuous noise with a LEX,8h of 85dB SPL. Hearing was tested using a non-invasive technique based on distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Hearing data were completed with histological analysis of cochleae. The results showed that exposure to styrene alone caused outer hair cell losses in the apical cochlear region, which discriminates low frequencies. In contrast, noise-induced hearing loss was located at half an octave above the central frequency of the spectrum, around 10-12kHz. Damage due to impulse noise was significantly exacerbated by styrene, and the noise spectrum defined the location of the cochlear trauma. Combined exposure caused greater cell losses than the sum of losses measured with the impulse noise and styrene alone. The fact that the tonotopicity of the styrene-induced damage depends on the associated noise spectrum complicates the diagnosis of styrene-related hearing loss with a tone-frequency audiometric approach. In conclusion, there is not really a frequency specificity of impairments due to styrene. PMID:25689156

  12. P300 em sujeitos com perda auditiva P300 in subjects with hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Mirândola Barbosa Reis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: as avaliações comportamentais e eletrofisiológicas contribuem para o entendimento do sistema auditivo e do processo de intervenção. OBJETIVO: estudar P300 em sujeitos com perda auditiva neurossensorial congênita, segundo as variáveis gênero, idade e grau da perda auditiva. MÉTODO: a presente investigação consiste em um estudo descritivo, transversal. Foram examinados 29 sujeitos, sendo 15 do gênero masculino e 14 do gênero feminino, com idade entre 11 a 42 anos. Os critérios de elegibilidade para composição da amostra foram: idade superior a 11 anos e inferior a 45 anos; ser portador de deficiência auditiva congênita severa ou profunda; não apresentar outro tipo de distúrbio; não apresentar perda auditiva central e/ou comprometimento condutivo. A primeira etapa caracterizou-se por avaliação comportamental auditiva e fisiológica que incluiu: audiometria tonal limiar (via aérea e via óssea, logoaudiometria - LDV e medidas do ganho funcional para os sujeitos que faziam uso de próteses auditivas, Imitanciometria: curva timpanométrica e pesquisa dos reflexos ipsi e contra-laterais, registro das emissões otoacústicas (EOA - emissões otoacústicas transitórias (EOAT e emissões otoacústicas por produto de distorção (EOAPD. A avaliação eletrofisiológica constituiu a quarta etapa do procedimento de coleta de dados e incluiu: potenciais auditivos evocados de tronco encefálico (PEATE e de longa latência (P300. RESULTADOS: o P300 foi registrado em 17 sujeitos, com latência e amplitude média de 326,97ms e 3,76V, respectivamente. Apresentou diferenças significantes da latência em relação à idade (p BACKGROUND: behavioral and electrophysiological evaluations contribute to the understanding of the hearing system and to the intervention process. AIM: to investigate the occurrence of P300 in subjects with congenital severe to profound hearing loss, according to the variables of gender, age and hearing loss level. METHOD: the design of this research is a descriptive transversal study. Twenty-nine subjects, 15 male and 14 female, ranging in age from 11 to 42 years, were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were: to have at least 11 years of age and no more than 45 years; to have the diagnosis of congenital severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss; to have no other disorder; and absence of central hearing loss or any other auditory conductive disorder. The first stage consisted of an auditory behavioral and physiological evaluation, including: pure tone audiometry (air and bone conduction measures, speech audiometry, SDT (Speech Detection Threshold and functional gain measures for the subjects using hearing aids, and immittance measures - tympanometry and acoustic reflexes thresholds; transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE; distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE. The electrophysiological evaluation was the fourth stage of the study and included: auditory brainstem response (ABR and late latency response (P300. RESULTS: P300 was obtained for 17 out of the 29 subjects. Mean latency and amplitude were 326.97 ms and 3.76 V, respectively. A statistical significant difference was observed for latency when considering the variable age (electrode CzA2 p < 0.003 and CzA1 p < 0.02 and for amplitude when considering the variable hearing loss level (p < 0.0015. CONCLUSION: P300 can be recorded in subjects with hearing loss.

  13. Clinical analysis of post-irradiation sensorineural hearing loss in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of post-irradiation sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to evaluate its potentially contributing factors. Methods: Pure tonetest and impedance audiography were carried out in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a post-irradiation follow-up time over 1 year. Additionally, the test results were combined with clinical data and analyzed retrospectively. Results: The follow-up time of all patients ranged from 12 to 94 months (median 53 months). The incidences of SNHL at low and high frequencies were 8% and 42% respectively. Univariate analysis showed that patient's age and follow-up time affected the incidence of SNHL at high frequencies (t=2.051, P=0.0269; t=2.978, P=0.0011), but sex, preirradiation subjective hearing loss, irradiation dose and chemotherapy including cisplatin had no significance. Multivariate analysis by Binary Logistic Regression revealed that the risk of SNHL was correlated with patient's age and follow-up time (P=0.02; P=0.009). Conclusion: Post-irradiation SNHL at high frequencies in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma is more common than that at low frequencies. The independent prognostic factors for development of SNHL at high frequencies are patient's age and follow-up time. But the role of preirradiation hearing level ,irradiation dose and chemotherapy including cisplatin are not conclusive and further research is needed. (nclusive and further research is needed. (authors)

  14. Evolução da perda auditiva no decorrer do envelhecimento Hearing loss in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana dos Santos Baraldi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A perda auditiva associada ao envelhecimento refere-se à soma de perdas auditivas resultantes da degeneração fisiológica causada por exposição ao ruído, agentes ototóxicos e prejuízos causados por desordens e tratamentos médicos. Afeta cerca de 60% de todas as pessoas com idade acima de 65 anos. OBJETIVO: Verificar a degeneração do sistema auditivo no decorrer da idade através de medidas supraliminares e de sensibilidade auditiva. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo de coorte contemporânea com corte transversal. Foram avaliados 211 idosos, com idade média de 75,24 anos, sendo 61 do sexo masculino e 150 do sexo feminino. Os indivíduos foram submetidos a uma anamnese e à avaliação audiológica básica e divididos em quatro grupos, de acordo com a faixa etária. RESULTADOS: Declínio significativo do limiar nas 4 faixas etárias estabelecidas, diminuição do índice percentual de reconhecimento de fala, diferença significante com relação ao gênero. CONCLUSÃO: Com o avanço da idade, ocorreu um aumento gradual no grau da perda auditiva, os homens apresentaram limiares mais rebaixados na freqüência de 4000Hz em comparação com as mulheres e na inteligibilidade de fala observou-se decréscimo gradativo com o aumento da idade.Aging is a natural consequence of a society developing process. The city of São Paulo has almost one million people who are above sixty years of age. Age-related hearing loss equals the total hearing loss resulted from cell degeneration caused by noise exposure, ototoxic agents and the loss caused by disorders and medical treatments. AIM: To study age-related hearing degeneration by means of higher thresholds and hearing sensitivity measures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional contemporary cohort study in which we assessed 211 elderly patients with mean age of 75.24 years, of whom 61 were females and 150 were males. The subjects were submitted to an interview and a conventional audiometric assessment; and later divided into four groups according to age range. RESULTS: Significant threshold drop in the four established age groups, decrease in speech recognition ratio, and a significant difference regarding gender. CONCLUSION: As age advanced there was a gradual increase in hearing loss, men showed a lower threshold in the 4000Hz frequency when compared to women, and in the speech intelligibility test thre was also a gradual decrease with aging.

  15. How Hearing Loss Impacts Communication. Tipsheet: Serving Students Who Are Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atcherson, Samuel R.; Johnson, Marni I.

    2009-01-01

    Hearing, or auditory processing, involves the use of many hearing skills in a single or combined fashion. The sounds that humans hear can be characterized by their intensity (loudness), frequency (pitch), and timing. Impairment of any of the auditory structures from the visible ear to the central auditory nervous system within the brain can have a…

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as salvage treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, M; Magnano, M; Maffi, L; Pezzoli, L; Marcato, P; Orione, M; Cupi, D; Bongioannini, G

    2014-10-16

    The most commonly used treatment for sensorineural sudden hearing loss (SSHL) in clinical practice is the administration of steroids; however, a favorable result is not always obtained. We studied 58 patients who failed to recover after primary treatment with IV steroids, 44 of these met our inclusion criteria (mean age 50.7, 27 males, range 30-74). We treated 23 patients (mean age 47.3, 16 males, age range 22-74) with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) (2.5 ATA for 60 min for 15 treatments), while 21 (mean age 54.5, 11 males, age range 22-71) patients refused to be treated and served as a non-randomized control group. Patients treated with HBO had a mean improvement of 15.6 dB (SD ± 15.3), with 1 of them completely healed, 5 with a good recovery, 10 with a fair recovery and 7 unchanged. Patients who were not treated had a spontaneous mean improvement of 5.0 dB (SD ± 11.4) with 3 patients with a good recovery, 1 patient with a fair recovery and 17 patients unchanged. Mean improvement was significantly better in patients treated with HBO compared to controls (p = 0.0133). Patients with worst hearing had the greater degree of improvement whether or not they were treated in the first 10 days after the onset of the hearing loss or between 11 and 30 days. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy can lead to significant improvement of pure tone hearing thresholds in patients with SSHL who failed primary corticosteroid treatment and are within 4 weeks of the onset of deafness. PMID:25318685

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with unilateral safe chronic suppurative otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Singh Nanda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM is the major cause of hearing impairment, mainly conductive type of hearing loss. The occurrence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in CSOM is controversial and the controversy is more for safe mucosal type. This study aims to assess the association between SNHL and safe mucosal CSOM and its relation to patient's age, sex, duration of disease, active or inactive disease and speech frequencies. Methods: 100 patients with unilateral mucosal type of CSOM with normal contralateral ear were included in the study. The infected ear was taken as study ear and normal ear as control ear in all patients. All patients underwent hearing assessment by pure tone audiometry for both ears. In case of active disease, ear discharge was first cleared and then audiometric assessment done. Results were statistically compared in all patients for both study and control ears using parameters of patient's age, sex, duration of disease, speech frequency and active or inactive disease. Results: There was significant higher number of study ears with CSOM having average bone conduction threshold of all frequencies above 25 decibels which implies SNHL (21% compared to control contralateral ears without infection (5%. There was higher incidence of SNHL at higher speech frequencies. The incidence also increased with age of patient and duration of disease. The incidence was higher in active stage than inactive or quiescent stage. There was no difference among males and females. Conclusion: Safe mucosal CSOM can cause significant SNHL and risk increases with increasing age, duration of disease, higher speech frequencies and presence of active disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 551-555

  18. The Frequency of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Prescription in the Clients of the Avesina Education and Health Center, Audiometry Clinic, 1377

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bastani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determining the frequency of hearing disorders and hearing aid using in the clients referring to the Avesina education and health center, audiometry clinic, 1377. Method and Material: This is an assesive-descriptive survey that conducted on more than 2053 (1234 males and 819 females who referred for audiometry after examination by a physician. Case history, otoscopy, PTA, speech and immittance audiometry were conducted for all the clients. The findings were expressed in tables and diagrams of frequency. The age and sex relationship. All types of hearing losses and the number of the hearing-impaired clients need a hearing aid were assessed. Findings: 56% of this population were hearing-impaired and 44% had normal hearing were hearing. 60% were males and 40% females. Of the hearing-impaired, 44% had SNHL, 35.6% CHL and 8.2% mixed hearing loss. The hearing aid was prescribed for 204 (83 females and121 males if they need that only 20 females and 32 males wear it. Conclusion: It this sample, SNHL is of higher frequency. According to this survey, the more the age, the more the hearing aid is accepted (85% of wearer are more than 49 the prevalence of the hearing impaired males are more than females (60% versus 40%. Only 25% of the hearing-impaired wear hearing aids.

  19. Influence of environmental factors on the evolution of industrial noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Carmelo; Concetto, Giorgianni; Fortunato, Munaò; Brecciaroli, Renato; Tringali, Maria Antonietta; Beninato, Giovanni; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Domenico, Germanò

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate how environmental factors, associated with exposure to industrial noise, affect the development of chronic noise-induced hearing loss. The study was conducted on 186 male subjects working in two bottling plants, situated respectively in a small farming community, and in a medium-sized city with significant levels of noise pollution. Levels of occupational exposure were the same for the two groups. The subjects were selected by means of a preliminary medical examination, and exposed to tonal hearing tests and acoustic impedance tests. Statistical analysis was performed on hearing threshold values obtained at the frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz. The comparison between the thresholds obtained in the two groups showed a statistically significant difference, especially at the frequency of 4000 Hz and for occupational exposure exceeding 17 yr. The results led us to conclude that environmental factors, and urban noise in particular, influence the onset and development of occupational acoustic trauma, and that those working in the country are significantly less affected than those in the city. Since occupational exposure was the same for both groups, their different responses must therefore be interpreted as due to differences in non-occupational exposure, in turn dependent on different opportunities for rest from noise and different levels of exposure to noise pollution. PMID:16418922

  20. The association between low levels of lead in blood and occupational noise-induced hearing loss in steel workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the use of leaded gasoline has ceased in the last decade, background lead exposure has generally been reduced. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level lead exposure on human hearing loss. This study was conducted in a steel plant and 412 workers were recruited from all over the plant. Personal information such as demographics and work history was obtained through a questionnaire. All subjects took part in an audiometric examination of hearing thresholds, for both ears, with air-conducted pure tones at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. Subjects' blood samples were collected and analyzed for levels of manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead with inductive couple plasma-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, noise levels in different working zones were determined using a sound level meter with A-weighting network. Only subjects with hearing loss difference of no more than 15 dB between both ears and had no congenital abnormalities were included in further data analysis. Lead was the only metal in blood found significantly correlated with hearing loss for most tested sound frequencies (p < 0.05 to p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and noise level, the logistic regression model analysis indicated that elevated blood lead over 7 ?g/dL was significantly associated with hearing loss at the sound frequencies of 3000 through 8000 Hz with odds ratios raging from 3.06 to 6.26 (p < 0.05 ? p < 0.005). We concluded that el0.05 ? p < 0.005). We concluded that elevated blood lead at level below 10 ?g/dL might enhance the noise-induced hearing loss. Future research needs to further explore the detailed mechanism.

  1. Brief hearing loss disrupts binaural integration during two early critical periods of auditory cortex development

    OpenAIRE

    Polley, Daniel B.; Thompson, John H.; Guo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Early binaural experience can recalibrate central auditory circuits that support spatial hearing. However, it is not known how binaural integration matures shortly after hearing onset or whether various developmental stages are differentially impacted by disruptions of normal binaural experience. Here we induce a brief, reversible unilateral conductive hearing loss (CHL) at several experimentally determined milestones in mouse primary auditory cortex (A1) development and characterize its effe...

  2. Prevalence and degree of noise-induced hearing loss in South African gold miners

    OpenAIRE

    Strauss, Susan; Swanepoel, Wet; Becker, Piet J.; Eloff, Zahan; Hall, James W.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a large group of gold miners (N=57 714). Noise exposure levels were used to categorise participants into different noise group categories and a control group. HFA346 and LFA512 (high and low frequency) averages were calculated from hearing thresholds and, where possible, analyses were adjusted for age. The study found that exposure to occupational noise, despite hearing conservation programmes, was...

  3. Connexin26 (GJB2) deficiency reduces active cochlear amplification leading to late-onset hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Chen, J; Liang, C; Zong, L; Chen, J; Jones, R O; Zhao, H-B

    2015-01-22

    Connexin26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations account for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. The deafness is not always congenital. A large group of these patients (?30%) demonstrate a late-onset hearing loss, starting in childhood. They have normal hearing early in life and are therefore good candidates for applying protective and therapeutic interventions. However, the underlying deafness mechanism is unclear. In this study, we used a time-controlled, inducible gene knockout technique to knockout Cx26 expression in the cochlea after birth. We found that deletion of Cx26 after postnatal day 5 (P5) in mice could lead to late-onset hearing loss. Similar to clinical observations, the mice demonstrated progressive, mild to moderate hearing loss. The hearing loss initiated at high frequencies and then extended to the middle- and low-frequency range. The cochlea showed normal development and had no apparent hair cell loss. However, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) was reduced. The reduction was also progressive and large at high-frequencies. Consistent with DPOAE reduction, we found that outer hair cell electromotility-associated nonlinear capacitance was shifted to the right and the slope of voltage dependence was reduced. The endocochlear potential was reduced in Cx26 conditional knockout (cKO) mice but the reduction was not associated with progressive hearing loss. These data suggest that Cx26 deficiency may impair active cochlear amplification leading to late-onset hearing loss. Our study also helps develop newer protective and therapeutic interventions to this common nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:25451287

  4. Hearing Loss in Perinatally Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Human Immunodeficiency Virus -Exposed but Uninfected Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Peter; Zeldow, Bret; Hoffman, Howard J.; Buchanan, Ashley; Siberry, George K.; Rice, Mabel; Sirois, Patricia A.; Williams, Paige L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about hearing loss in children with HIV infection (HIV+). We examined the prevalence of hearing loss in perinatally HIV+ and HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children, compared these to the percentage with hearing loss in the general population, and evaluated possible risk factors for hearing loss in HIV+ and HEU children. Methods Audiometric examinations were completed in children who met any pre-specified criteria for possible hearing loss. The hearing examination consisted of a tympanogram in each ear and pure-tone air-conduction threshold testing from 500 through 4000 Hz. Hearing loss was defined as the pure-tone average over these frequencies ?20 dB hearing level (HL). The associations of demographic, parent/caregiver, HIV disease, and HIV treatment with hearing loss were evaluated with univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Hearing testing was completed in 231 children (145 HIV+ and 86 HEU). Hearing loss occurred in 20.0% of HIV+ children and 10.5% of HEU children. After adjusting for caregiver education level, HIV infection was associated with increased odds of hearing loss [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95–4.76, p=0.07]. Among HIV+ children, those with a CDC Class C diagnosis had over twice the odds of hearing loss (aOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.04–5.87, p=0.04). The prevalence of hearing loss was higher in both HIV+ and HEU children compared with NHANES III children. Conclusions Hearing loss was more common in both HIV+ and HEU children than in healthy children. More advanced HIV illness increased the risk of hearing loss in HIV+ children. PMID:22549437

  5. [Dip-shaped hearing loss of Békésy audiogram in high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Y; Inoue, T; Tanaka, Y

    1996-03-01

    Small dip-shaped hearing loss may be frequently observed on Bekesy audiograms in ears without any hearing loss on pure tone audiograms. Hearing tests and otoacoustic emission measurements were performed in club member of 2 senior high schools (K-D School and S-D School), in order to determine any relationship between inner ear impairments and the small dips on Bekesy audiograms. In the kendo, soccer, tennis and orchestral music clubs of K-D School micro-dips in depth over 10 dB were found to have incidences between 40% and 53%, and the micro-dips were distributed in frequencies above 5 kHz. In the of kendo, tennis, brass band and tea ceremony clubs of S-D School the incidences of micro-dips ears were between 30% and 48%, and the micro-dips tended to be distributed in higher frequencies except in the tea ceremony club. The micro-dips in the ears of the tea ceremony club members were distributed over all the frequencies examined, but most of them disappeared when counted for dip size above 15 dB remaining an ear at 7.5 kHz. Incidences of earphone or headphone users as a hobby were in the range of 30 to 70% in members of all clubs. There were no characteristic findings of clubs in the incidences of the earphone or headphone users. The degree of association between the micro-dip ears and the use of earphone or headphone was low. C-EOAEs which had a 6 ms or longer duration of evoked otoacoustic emissions were detected with an incidence of 40 to 65% and there was a significant association between the micro-dip ears and the C-EOAE ears. Incidences of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions were between 26% and 28% in all clubs and there were differences in the incidences between sexes. The frequency distribution of the spontaneous otoacoustic emissions were remarkably different to that of the micro-dips. To determine whether the C-EOAEs express a predisposition to inner ear susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss and to ascertain that the micro-dip is a precursor notice to noise-induced hearing loss, further follow-up surveys are needed. PMID:8934778

  6. Acceleration of Age-Related Hearing Loss by Early Noise Exposure: Evidence of a Misspent Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Kujawa, Sharon G.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Age-related and noise-induced hearing losses in humans are multifactorial, with contributions from, and potential interactions among, numerous variables that can shape final outcome. A recent retrospective clinical study suggests an age-noise interaction that exacerbates age-related hearing loss in previously noise-damaged ears (Gates et al., 2000). Here, we address the issue in an animal model by comparing noise-induced and age-related hearing loss (NIHL; AHL) in groups of CBA/CaJ mice expos...

  7. Hearing loss and risk of early retirement. The HUNT study

    OpenAIRE

    Helvik, Anne-sofie; Krokstad, Steinar; Tambs, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Background: We explore the possible consequences of measured hearing impairment (HI) and perceived hearing difficulties for early retirement in a large population-based study. Furthermore, we study whether having a part-time position was associated with measured HI and perceived hearing difficulties in the same population. Methods: This study included 25 740 persons from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) aged 20–54 years at baseline in HUNT1 (1984–1986) who also participated in the ...

  8. Characteristics of sensorineural hearing loss secondary to inner ear acoustic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spremo Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cochlear damage secondary to exposure to acoustic trauma is the consequence of the acoustic energy effects on the hearing cells in Korti's organ. OBJECTIVE The objective was to assess the correlation between the degree of sensorineural hearing loss and the type of audiogram registered in acoustic trauma exposed patients. METHOD We analyzed 262 audiograms of patients exposed to acoustic trauma in correlation to 146 audiograms of patients with cochlear damage and hearing loss not related to acoustic trauma. "A" group consisted of acoustic trauma cases, while "B" group incorporated cases with hearing loss secondary to cochlear ischaemia or degeneration. All audiograms were subdivided with regard to the mean hearing loss into three groups: mild (21-40 dB HL, moderate (41-60 dB HL and severe (over 60 dB HL hearing loss. Based on audiogram configuration five types of audiogram were defined: type 1 flat; type 2 hearing threshold slope at 2 kHz, type 3 hearing threshold slope at 4 kHz; type 4 hearing threshold notch at 2 kHz; type 5 notch at 4 kHz. RESULTS Mild hearing loss was recorded in 163 (62.2% ears in the acoustic trauma group, while in 78 (29.8% ears we established moderate hearing loss with the maximum threshold shift at frequencies ranging from 4 kHz to 8 kHz. The least frequent was profound hearing loss, obtained in 21 (8% audiograms in the acoustic trauma group. Characteristic audiogram configurations in the acoustic trauma patient group were: type 1 (N=66; 25.2%, type 2 (N=71; 27.1%, and type 3 (N=68; 25.9%. Audiogram configurations were significanly different in the acoustic trauma group in comparison to the cochlear ischaemia group of patients (p=0.0005. CONCLUSION Cochlear damage concomitant to acoustic trauma could be assessed by the audiogram configuration. Preserved hearing acuity at low and mild frequency range indicates the limited damage to the hearing cells in Korti's organ in the apical cochlear turn.

  9. Sensori-neural hearing loss after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: individualized risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) is a common complication to radiation therapy in the upper head and neck region. In this study, we estimated the dose response relationship for SNHL with adjustment for pre-therapeutic risk factors. Patients and methods: The pre- and post-therapeutic hearing levels were recorded in a previously published study of 20 patients receiving radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, the dose to the inner ear of these patients was estimated with a computed tomography (CT) based treatment planning system. CT data from a 'proxy patient' were used for patients with no available CT scan. SNHL was analyzed as a function of radiation dose and potential risk factors were tested. Results: The incidence of SNHL increased significantly with increasing dose to the cochlea. Increasing patient's age, and decreasing pre-therapeutic hearing level were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of SNHL. A nomogram is presented for estimating individualized dose constraints of potential use in treatment planning. Conclusions: The inner ear is a critical structure in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the dose to the inner ear should be carefully considered when planning radiation treatment in this region

  10. Acrylonitrile potentiates hearing loss and cochlear damage induced by moderate noise exposure in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diversity of chemical and drugs that can potentiate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has impeded efforts to predict such interactions. We have hypothesized that chemical contaminants that disrupt intrinsic antioxidant defenses hold significant risk for potentiating NIHL. If this is true, then acrylonitrile (ACN) would be expected to potentiate NIHL. ACN, one of the 50 most commonly used chemicals in the United States, is metabolized via two pathways that are likely to disrupt intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) buffering systems: (1) it conjugates glutathione, depleting this important antioxidant rapidly; (2) a second pathway involves the formation of cyanide, which can inhibit superoxide dismutase. We hypothesized that moderate noise exposure, that does not produce permanent hearing loss by itself, could initiate oxidative stress and that ACN could render the inner ear more sensitive to noise by disrupting intrinsic antioxidant defenses. Temporary and persistent effects of ACN alone (50 mg/kg, sc 5 days), noise alone (95 or 97 dB octave band noise, 4 h/day for 5 days), or ACN in combination with noise were determined using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and compound action potential (CAP) amplitudes. Histopathological damage to hair cells resulting from these treatments was also investigated using surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Individually, neither ACN nor noise exposures caused any permanent hearing or hair cell loss; only aermanent hearing or hair cell loss; only a reversible temporary threshold shift was measured in noise-exposed animals. However, when given in combination, ACN and noise induced permanent threshold shifts (13-16 dB between 7 and 40 kHz) and a decrease in DPOAE amplitudes (up to 25 dB at 19 kHz), as well as significant outer hair cell (OHC) loss (up to 20% in the first row between 13 and 47 kHz). This investigation demonstrates that ACN can potentiate NIHL at noise levels that are realistic in terms of human exposure, and that the OHCs are the main target of toxicity. While the exact mechanism is unknown, the results are consistent with the hypothesis of ROS involvement in NIHL at moderate levels

  11. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossain Ghazizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended.

  12. The Emergence of Early Intervention for Children with Hearing Loss in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenglin, Liu; Raver, Sharon A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, China began developing early intervention services for very young children with hearing loss, and their families. This article presents a broad description of some of these programs, including the national rehabilitation networks for speech and hearing training, increased attention on the development of professionals, the…

  13. School Nurses' Role in Identifying and Referring Children at Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Candace; Pakulski, Lori A.; Thompson, Amy; Dowling, Jamie; Price, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Young people are likely to experience noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), as the use of personal listening devices and other damaging factors (e.g., video games) increases. Little research has examined the role of school health personnel in the prevention and early identification of hearing impairment. A 32-item, valid and reliable survey was…

  14. Identification of Infants Born with Hearing Loss: A North American Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencher, Lenore; Mencher, George T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the importance of testing infants for hearing loss in the newborn nursery and describes the screening program of the Nova Scotia Hearing and Speech Clinic as a model. In the program, high risk neonates are identified through screening programs by hospital personnel or by community health nurses. (JDD)

  15. Resolução temporal em perdas auditivas sensorioneurais / Temporal resolution in sensorineural hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Giselle Goulart de Oliveira, Matos; Silvana, Frota.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a resolução temporal em adultos com perdas auditivas sensorioneurais de graus leve e moderado, por meio do teste Gaps in Noise (GIN), a fim de verificar se essas perdas influenciam no desempenho do teste. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 57 pacientes, com idades entre 20 e 59 anos (30 home [...] ns e 27 mulheres), que realizaram anamnese, avaliação otorrinolaringológica, avaliação audiológica básica e triagem do processamento auditivo, com o teste Dicótico de Dígitos. Os sujeitos foram alocados nos grupos G1 (audição normal), G2 (perda auditiva leve) e G3 (perda moderada). Foi realizada análise estatística apropriada e o nível de significância adotado foi de 5%. RESULTADOS: Observou-se presença significativa de homens no grupo com perda auditiva. Não foram encontradas diferenças significativas no desempenho do referido teste entre os grupos. Porém, no grupo controle, foram observados piores desempenhos, quando comparados com o critério de normalidade previsto para adultos jovens brasileiros. A média do limiar de detecção de gaps, da amostra geral, foi de 8,2 ms, em ambas as orelhas, e a média das porcentagens de acertos foi de 49,7% para a orelha direita (OD) e de 50,6% para a orelha esquerda (OE). CONCLUSÃO: A habilidade de resolução temporal avaliada pelo teste GIN não sofre influência da perda auditiva sensorioneural de graus leve e moderado, tanto nos limiares de detecção de gaps quanto na porcentagem de acertos, em ambas as orelhas. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To evaluate temporal resolution in adults with mild and moderate sensorineural hearing loss using the Gaps in Noise (GIN) test to determine whether these losses affect the test performance. METHODS: Fifty-seven patients between 20 and 59 years of age (30 men and 27 women) were evaluated; th [...] ese patients had a complete medical history taken and underwent ENT examination, basic audiological evaluation, and auditory screening via the dichotic digits test. The subjects were divided into three groups: G1 (normal hearing), G2 (mild hearing loss), and G3 (moderate hearing loss). The appropriate statistical analysis was performed, and the adopted level of significance was 5%. RESULTS: A significant proportion of men was observed in the group with hearing loss. There were no significant differences in test performance between the groups. However, the control group's performance was worse than the normality criteria set for young Brazilian adults. The mean gap detection threshold for the total sample was 8.2 ms in both ears, and the mean percentage of correct responses was 49.7% for the right ear (RE) and 50.6% for the left ear (LE). CONCLUSION: The temporal resolution evaluated by the GIN test was not influenced by mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss either in the gap detection thresholds or in the percentage of correct responses for both ears.

  16. Hearing Loss Severity: Impaired Processing of Formant Transition Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coez, A.; Belin, P.; Bizaguet, E.; Ferrary, E.; Zilbovicius, M.; Samson, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Normal hearing listeners exploit the formant transition (FT) detection to identify place of articulation for stop consonants. Neuro-imaging studies revealed that short FT induced less cortical activation than long FT. To determine the ability of hearing impaired listeners to distinguish short and long formant transitions (FT) from vowels of the…

  17. The cultural and linguistic diversity of 3-year-old children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y C

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their caregivers when children were 3 years old. The data were from the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study, a prospective, population-based study of children with hearing loss in Australia. The majority of the 406 children used spoken English at home; however, 28 other languages also were spoken. Compared with their caregivers, the children in this study used fewer spoken languages and had higher rates of oral monolingualism. Few children used a spoken language other than English in their early education environment. One quarter of the children used sign to communicate at home and/or in their early education environment. No associations between caregiver hearing status and children's communication mode were identified. This exploratory investigation of the communication modes and languages used by young children with hearing loss and their caregivers provides an initial examination of the cultural and linguistic diversity and heritage language attrition of this population. The findings of this study have implications for the development of resources and the provision of early education services to the families of children with hearing loss, especially where the caregivers use a language that is not the lingua franca of their country of residence. PMID:22942315

  18. Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, and Cleft Lip-Palate Syndrome; Its Association with Conductive Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss associated with the ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip palate syndrome was reported in one sporadic case and in a pedigree with four cases in three generations. (GW)

  19. Sensori-neural hearing loss after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: individualized risk estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Henriette B; Bentzen, SØren

    2002-01-01

    Sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) is a common complication to radiation therapy in the upper head and neck region. In this study, we estimated the dose response relationship for SNHL with adjustment for pre-therapeutic risk factors.

  20. Teachers' perceptions of the inclusion of children with hearing loss in general education settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriks-Brophy, Alice; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to document the attitudes of 63 classroom teachers in Ottawa, Canada, toward inclusive education for students with hearing loss. The objective was to determine whether teachers had the attitudes, knowledge, and teaching skills proposed to underlie the effective inclusion of these students in regular classrooms. It was found that the teachers had favorable attitudes toward inclusion for students with hearing loss, felt confident in their ability to teach them, and were knowledgeable about the effects of hearing loss on language and learning. They also clearly indicated that their teacher education programs had insufficiently prepared them to teach these students effectively. The results highlight the need for increased emphasis on the unique educational requirements of students with hearing loss in teacher education programs, and for the provision of appropriate supports for both teachers and students to promote successful inclusion. PMID:23858704

  1. Unilateral hearing loss following shunt placement for normal pressure hydrocephalus with a unilateral patent cochlear aqueduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Ho; Park, Seong-Hyun; Park, Jaechan; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss in patients who have undergone shunt placement for a hydrocephalus is perhaps an underestimated complication rather than a rare event. There appears to be a correlation between the occurrence of hearing loss and patient characteristics consistent with excessive drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and patent cochlear aqueduct (CA). We present the case of a 77-year-old man with unilateral dominant sensorineural hearing loss after a shunt placement for normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) combined with a patent cochlear aqueduct. Based on our experience and a review of the literature, we suggest an early restoration of the reduced CSF pressure using a programmable valve as a treatment strategy, which might prevent the persistent hearing loss. PMID:17643785

  2. Two Iranian families with a novel mutation in GJB2 causing autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Sheffield, Abraham M; Sobhani, Masoomeh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Meyer, Nicole C; Van Camp, Guy; Hilgert, Nele; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Habibi, Farkhondeh; Daneshi, Ahmad; Nishimura, Carla; Avenarius, Matthew R; Farhadi, Mohammad; Smith, Richard J H; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-05-01

    Mutations in GJB2, encoding connexin 26 (Cx26), cause both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) at the DFNA3 and DFNB1 loci, respectively. Most of the over 100 described GJB2 mutations cause ARNSHL. Only a minority has been associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss. In this study, we present two families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss caused by a novel mutation in GJB2 (p.Asp46Asn). Both families were ascertained from the same village in northern Iran consistent with a founder effect. This finding implicates the D46N missense mutation in Cx26 as a common cause of deafness in this part of Iran mandating mutation screening of GJB2 for D46N in all persons with hearing loss who originate from this geographic region. PMID:21484990

  3. Cell Phone Exposures and Hearing Loss in Children in the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudan, Madhuri; Kheifets, Leeka

    2013-01-01

    Children today are exposed to cell phones early in life, and may be the most vulnerable if exposure is harmful to health. We investigated the association between cell phone use and hearing loss in children.

  4. The consequences of noise-induced hearing loss on dairy farm communities in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Karen; Williams, Warwick

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) or noise injury (NI) affects individuals and others of dairy farm communities in New Zealand. Using "grab" or opportunistic sampling at DairyNZ discussion groups and a recreational function, a survey questionnaire was completed by 74 participants from two dairy farming communities in New Zealand. Self-reported hearing difficulties were highlighted by 48% (42) of the 74 participants. The effects of NI on individuals and others included communication difficulties leading to the development of coping strategies, social isolation; decreased employment opportunities, loss of productivity, and increased effort and adjustments by family and work colleagues. Frustration, anxiety, stress, resentment, depression, and fatigue are also negative consequences that may contribute to a loss of quality of life and contribute to further health costs. Increased lateness, absenteeism, sickness and other behavioral aspects were not expressed as normal issues in the workplace, as the majority of the individuals are/were self-employed or working in a family business. This study shows that each year in New Zealand NI results in significant negative social, psychological, and economic consequences for those individuals affected, along with their families, friends, and work colleagues. PMID:22994637

  5. Hearing Loss After Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors: Effect of Cochlear Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the effect of cochlear dose on sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor treated by using conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: We studied 78 pediatric patients (155 ears) with localized brain tumors treated in 1997-2001 who had not received platinum-based chemotherapy and were followed up for at least 48 months. They were evaluated prospectively by means of serial pure-tone audiograms (250 Hz-8 kHz) and/or auditory brainstem response before and every 6 months after CRT. Results: Hearing loss occurred in 14% (11 of 78) of patients and 11% (17 of 155) of cochleae, with onset most often at 3-5 years after CRT. The incidence of hearing loss was low for a cochlear mean dose of 30 Gy or less and increased at greater than 40-45 Gy. Risk was greater at high frequencies (6-8 kHz). In children who tested abnormal for hearing, average hearing thresholds increased from a less than 25 decibel (dB) hearing level (HL) at baseline to a mean of 46 ± 13 (SD) dB HL for high frequencies, 41 ± 7 dB HL for low frequencies, and 38 ± 6 dB HL for intermediate frequencies. Conclusions: Sensorineural hearing loss is a late effect of CRT. In the absence of other factors, including ototoxic chemotherapy, increase in cochlear dose correlates positively with hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor. To minimize the risk of hearing loss for children treated with radiation therapy, a cumulative cochlear dose less than 35 cumulative cochlear dose less than 35 Gy is recommended for patients planned to receive 54-59.4 Gy in 30-33 treatment fractions

  6. Prophylactic and therapeutic functions of T-type calcium blockers against noise-induced hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Haiyan; Zhang, Baoping; Shin, June-ho; Lei, Debin; Du, Yafei; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Qiuju; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Piccirillo, Jay; Bao, Jianxin

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear noise injury is the second most frequent cause of sensorineural hearing loss, after aging. Because calcium dysregulation is a widely recognized contributor to noise injury, we examined the potential of calcium channel blockers to reduce noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in mice. We focused on two T-type calcium blockers, trimethadione and ethosuximide, which are anti-epileptics approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Young C57BL/6 mice of either gender were divided into three g...

  7. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Failure from Oral and Intratympanic Corticosteroid

    OpenAIRE

    Imsuwansri, Thanarath; Poonsap, Pipat; Snidvongs, Kornkiat

    2012-01-01

    Systemic and intratympanic steroids are most widely used for treating idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Other treatments include vasodilator, immunosuppressant and antiviral medication. However, only 61% of patients achieve full recovery, and controversies about the standard treatment still exist. In this case report, we present a patient with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss who failed to respond to systemic and intratympanic steroid treatments but subsequently recove...

  8. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Its Relationship With Hearing Loss in Children: Preliminary Report

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Sharifian; Nasrin Esfandiar; Samira Mazaheri; Ariana Kariminejad; Masoumeh Mohkam; Reza Dalirani; Rana Esmaili; Mitra Ahmadi; Mehrnoush Hassas-Yeganeh

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. In autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA), a substantial fraction of the patients have progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This coexistence is due to the mutations of a gene expressed both in the kidney and in the cochlea. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between hearing loss and DRTA.Materials and Methods. In this study, 51 children diagnosed with renal tubular acidosis were evaluated. Diagnosis of DRTA was based on clinical ma...

  9. Coronary artery bypass grafting and sensorineural hearing loss, a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Omer

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is routinely encountered by the otologist. The etiology is varied and often identifiable. One of the relatively less frequent causes is surgery. Apart from being an established entity with otological surgeries, sensorineural hearing loss has also been known to occur after non-otological procedures under general anesthesia. Commonest amongst these procedures is cardiopulmonary bypass, an association that has long been recognized. However, d...

  10. Acute sensorineural hearing loss and severe otalgia due to scrub typhus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Dong-Min; Kang Ji-In; Lee Joonhan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Case presentations We encountered a patient with sensorineural hearing loss complicating scrub typhus, and three patients with scrub typhus who complained of otalgia, which was sudden onset, severe, paroxysmal, intermittent yet persistent pain lasting for several seconds, appeared within 1 week after the onset of fever and rash. The acute sensorineural hearing loss and otalgia were resolved after an...

  11. Molecular genetics of MARVELD2 and clinical phenotype in Pakistani and Slovak families segregating DFNB49 hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Gowri; Varga, Lukas; Trincot, Claire; Shahzad, Mohsin; Friedman, Penelope L; Klimes, Iwar; Greinwald, John H; Riazuddin, S Amer; Masindova, Ivica; Profant, Milan; Khan, Shaheen N; Friedman, Thomas B; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gasperikova, Daniela; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic mutations of MARVELD2, encoding tricellulin, a tricelluar tight junction protein, cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB49) in families of Pakistan and Czech Roma origin. In fact, they are a significant cause of prelingual hearing loss in the Czech Roma, second only to GJB2 variants. Previously, we reported that mice homozygous for p.Arg497* variant of Marveld2 had a broad phenotypic spectrum, where defects were observed in the inner ear, heart, mandibular salivary gland, thyroid gland and olfactory epithelium. The current study describes the types and frequencies of MARVELD2 alleles and clinically reexamines members of DFNB49 families. We found that MARVELD2 variants are responsible for about 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.8-2.6) of non-syndromic hearing loss in our cohort of 800 Pakistani families. The c.1331+2T>C allele is recurrent. In addition, we identified a novel large deletion in a single family, which appears to have resulted from non-allelic homologous recombination between two similar Alu short interspersed elements. Finally, we observed no other clinical manifestations co-segregating with hearing loss in DFNB49 human families, and hypothesize that the additional abnormalities in the Marveld2 mutant mouse indicates a critical non-redundant function for tricellulin in other organ systems. PMID:25666562

  12. Hearing loss and cerebrospinal fluid pressure: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogodzinski, Matthew S; Shallop, Jon K; Sprung, Juraj; Weingarten, Toby N; Wong, Gilbert Y; McDonald, Thomas J

    2008-03-01

    A decrease in cerebrospinal fluid pressure may result in an endolymphatic hydrops through a patent cochlear aqueduct or through the fundus of the internal auditory canal. This hydrops typically leads to low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. We describe the case of a man who presented with a subjective and objective hearing loss in addition to a headache 4 days after he had undergone a dural puncture. We treated him with a standard epidural blood patch. Immediately after treatment, his hearing improved and his headache resolved. PMID:18404909

  13. An Evaluation of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Thalassaemic Patients Treated with Desferrioxamine and Its Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sonbolestan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: In major thalassaemia patients who need blood transfusion, iron overload is a major therapeutic disadvantage that leads to heart failure which is the major cause of death in such patients. Desferrioxamine (DFO is the most efficient factor for iron chelation, but it carries adverse effects such sensory-neural hearing loss. Methods: The study began in March 2002 and continued untill March 2003, on 160 cases of thalassaemia to determine the incidence of sensory – neural hearing loss and its risk factors in patients who received Desferrioxamine (DFO. All cases underwent audiometric tests. Retrospectively, other needed information were either obtained through interview or extracted from the medical files. Results were analyzed with ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: Seventy-six patients of the total 156 patients showed impairment in PTA (48.7% with 24 of them suffering significant involvement (15.4%. These abnormalities generally affected high frequencies including, 4000 and 8000 Hz. Male gender, increased serum billirubin level and fasting blood sugar were statistically correlated with hearing loss (p.v = 0.038, p.v = 0.38, p.v = 0.002 respectively. There was no significant correlation between hearing loss and other factors. Mean DFO administration in patients, was 29.69 mg/kg/day and mean therapeutic index of DFO was 0.01 mg/kg/day/mg/lit. Both of them were below the critical level (<40mg/kg/day and <0.025mg/kg/day/mg/lit respectively, however hearing loss had developed. Conclusion: Controlling DFO dosage per se does not seem to be enough for decreasing ototoxicity rate. Periodic audiometric tests are highly recommended to detect hearing loss as soon as possible. There are some other factors such as male gender, increased billirubin and FBS, which contribute to DFO ototoxicity. Looking for these risk factors and controlling them, would help identifying susceptible patients and preventing this complication. Key words: Desferrioxamine (DFO, Sensory-neural hearing loss (SNHL, Thalassaemia therapeutic index (TI

  14. GJB2 Mutations and Degree of Hearing Loss: A Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeckx, Rikkert L.; Huygen, Patrick L. M.; Feldmann, Delphine; Marlin, Sandrine; Denoyelle, Françoise; Waligora, Jaroslaw; Mueller-Malesinska, Malgorzata; Pollak, Agneszka; Ploski, Rafal; Murgia, Alessandra; Orzan, Eva; Castorina, Pierangela; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Nowakowska-Szyrwinska, Ewa; Bal, Jerzy; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Janecke, Andreas R.; Nekahm-Heis, Doris; Seeman, Pavel; Bendova, Olga; Kenna, Margaret A.; Frangulov, Anna; Rehm, Heidi L.; Tekin, Mustafa; Incesulu, Armagan; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; du Sart, Desirée; Jenkins, Lucy; Lucas, Deirdre; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Avraham, Karen B.; Brownstein, Zippora; del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno, Felipe; Blin, Nikolaus; Pfister, Markus; Sziklai, Istvan; Toth, Timea; Kelley, Philip M.; Cohn, Edward S.; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Hilbert, Pascale; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Cremers, Cor W. R. J.; Löppönen, Tuija; Löppönen, Heikki; Parving, Agnete; Gronskov, Karen; Schrijver, Iris; Roberson, Joseph; Gualandi, Francesca; Martini, Alessandro; Lina-Granade, Geneviève; Pallares-Ruiz, Nathalie; Correia, Céu; Fialho, Graça; Cryns, Kim; Hilgert, Nele; Van de Heyning, Paul; Nishimura, Carla J.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Van Camp, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) affects 1 in 650 newborns, which makes it the most common congenital sensory impairment. Despite extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, mutations in one gene, GJB2, which encodes the connexin 26 protein and is involved in inner ear homeostasis, are found in up to 50% of patients with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss. Because of the high frequency of GJB2 mutations, mutation analysis of this gene is widely available as a diagnostic test. In this study, we assessed the association between genotype and degree of hearing loss in persons with HI and biallelic GJB2 mutations. We performed cross-sectional analyses of GJB2 genotype and audiometric data from 1,531 persons, from 16 different countries, with autosomal recessive, mild-to-profound nonsyndromic HI. The median age of all participants was 8 years; 90% of persons were within the age range of 0–26 years. Of the 83 different mutations identified, 47 were classified as nontruncating, and 36 as truncating. A total of 153 different genotypes were found, of which 56 were homozygous truncating (T/T), 30 were homozygous nontruncating (NT/NT), and 67 were compound heterozygous truncating/nontruncating (T/NT). The degree of HI associated with biallelic truncating mutations was significantly more severe than the HI associated with biallelic nontruncating mutations (P<.0001). The HI of 48 different genotypes was less severe than that of 35delG homozygotes. Several common mutations (M34T, V37I, and L90P) were associated with mild-to-moderate HI (median 25–40 dB). Two genotypes—35delG/R143W (median 105 dB) and 35delG/dela(GJB6-D13S1830) (median 108 dB)—had significantly more-severe HI than that of 35delG homozygotes. PMID:16380907

  15. Hearing Loss Associated with Retinitis Pigmentosa. Short Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Adrienne

    1985-01-01

    The article describes a variation of Usher's Syndrome, a genetic condition characterized by visual and auditory impairments, in which moderate, postlingual, and sometimes progressive hearing impairments may go undetected. Identification guidelines are offered. (Author/CL)

  16. Genetic and audiologic study in elderly with sensorineural hearing loss / Estudo genético e audiológico em idosos com perda auditiva sensorioneural

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kelly, Martins; Marília, Fontenele; Silva, Câmara; Edi Lúcia, Sartorato.

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve como objetivo correlacionar prováveis fatores predisponentes para a perda auditiva sensorioneural em idosos, investigando as características audiológicas e a frequência de mutações em genes considerados responsáveis por perda auditiva não-sindrômica. MÉTODOS: Sessenta idos [...] os foram separados em dois grupos: Grupo de Caso, composto por 30 indivíduos, 21 do gênero feminino e nove do gênero masculino, com 60 anos ou mais, apresentando diagnóstico de perda auditiva sensorioneural, e o Grupo Controle, composto por 30 idosos pareados com o grupo experimental por idade e gênero, apresentando audição normal. Os pacientes foram submetidos à anamnese e audiometria tonal liminar nas frequências de 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000 e 6000 Hz. Amostras de sangue foram coletadas de cada paciente para análise de mutações em genes nucleares e mitocondriais relacionados à perda auditiva sensorioneural não sindrômica. RESULTADOS: Houve uma maior tendência à exposição a ruído e consumo de bebidas alcoólicas no Grupo de Caso. Os sintomas estatisticamente significativos entre os grupos foram zumbido e dificuldade para ouvir em diversas situações como: ambiente silencioso, telefone, televisão, localização sonora e na igreja. Todos os indivíduos do Grupo de Caso apresentaram perda auditiva sensorioneural bilateral. A simetria e progressão da deficiência auditiva também foram estatisticamente significativas entre os grupos. Não foram identificadas mutações genéticas. CONCLUSÃO: Os sintomas mais relatados foram zumbido e dificuldades de comunicação. As características audiológicas predominantes foram perda auditiva sensorioneural, bilateral, simétrica e progressiva. Não foi evidenciada relação entre perda auditiva sensorioneural em idosos e genes considerados responsáveis por perda auditiva não sindrômica, pois não foram encontradas mutações genéticas neste estudo. Abstract in english PURPOSE: This study aimed to correlate probable predisposing factors for sensorineural hearing loss in elderly by investigating the audiologic characteristics and frequency of mutations in genes considered responsible for non-syndromic hearing loss. METHODS: Sixty elderly patients were separated int [...] o two groups: the Case Group, composed of 30 individuals, 21 females and nine males, all 60 years old or older and presenting diagnoses of sensorineural hearing loss, and the Control Group, composed of 30 elderly individuals matched to the experimental group by age and gender, presenting normal hearing. The patients underwent anamnesis and pure tone audiometry in frequencies of 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000 and 6000 Hz. Blood samples were collected from each patient for analysis of mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genes related to non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. RESULTS: It was observed a greater tendency to noise exposure and consumption of alcohol in the Case Group. The statistically significant symptoms between the groups were tinnitus and hearing difficulty in several situations as: silent environment, telephone, television, sound location and in church. All the individuals of Case Group presented sensorineural and bilateral hearing loss. The symmetry and progression of the hearing impairment were also statistically significant between the groups. No genetic mutations were identified. CONCLUSION: The most reported symptoms were communication difficulties and tinnitus. The predominant auditory characteristics included sensorineural, bilateral, progressive and symmetrical hearing loss. It was not evidenced a relationship between sensorineural hearing loss in elderly and genes considered responsible for non-syndromic hearing loss as no genetic mutation was found in this study.

  17. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m2 weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m2 every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m2 or 40 mg/m2 of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly daoss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m2 were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer

  18. Medical surveillance of occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) at RAPS hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the most challenging roles of a Certifying Surgeon is to act as catalyst for change. This paper is a presentation of the impact of such an effort. Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Noise - induced hearing loss (NIHL) is bilateral and symmetrical, usually affecting the higher frequencies 3 k, 4 k or 6 kHz ) and then spreading to the lower frequencies (0.5 k,1 k or 2 kHz). The major health effects are lack of concentration, irritation, fatigue, headache, sleep disturbances etc. Hearing protectors should be used when engineering controls and work practices are not feasible for reducing noise exposure to safe levels. Ear muffs, ear plugs and ear canal caps are the main types of hearing protectors. Awareness should be created among workers about the harmful effects of noise on hearing and other body systems by implementing compulsory education noise conservation programmes. The practice followed at RAPS Hospital for medical surveillance of Occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss is being briefed

  19. Hearing Assistive Technology Considerations for Older Individuals With Dual Sensory Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kricos, Patricia B.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the current state of the science related to audiologic rehabilitation of individuals with dual sensory impairment, with an emphasis on considerations for provision of appropriate hearing assistive technology for this population. A substantial increase in the number of older adults is predicted in the coming years, many of whom will have significant age-related impairments in hearing and vision. Thus, hearing care professionals will be called on increasingly to attend t...

  20. Glue Ear, Hearing Loss and IQ: An Association Moderated by the Child’s Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda J.; Maw, Richard; Midgley, Elizabeth; Golding, Jean; Steer, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Background Glue ear or otitis media with effusion (OME) is common in children and may be associated with hearing loss (HL). For most children it has no long lasting effects on cognitive development but it is unclear whether there are subgroups at higher risk of sequelae. Objectives To examine the association between a score comprising the number of times a child had OME and HL (OME/HL score) in the first four/five years of life and IQ at age 4 and 8. To examine whether any association between OME/HL and IQ is moderated by socioeconomic, child or family factors. Methods Prospective, longitudinal cohort study: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). 1155 children tested using tympanometry on up to nine occasions and hearing for speech (word recognition) on up to three occasions between age 8 months and 5 years. An OME/HL score was created and associations with IQ at ages 4 and 8 were examined. Potential moderators included a measure of the child’s cognitive stimulation at home (HOME score). Results For the whole sample at age 4 the group with the highest 10% OME/HL scores had performance IQ 5 points lower [95% CI ?9, ?1] and verbal IQ 6 points lower [95% CI ?10, ?3] than the unaffected group. By age 8 the evidence for group differences was weak. There were significant interactions between OME/HL and the HOME score: those with high OME/HL scores and low 18 month HOME scores had lower IQ at age 4 and 8 than those with high OME/HL scores and high HOME scores. Adjusted mean differences ranged from 5 to 8 IQ points at age 4 and 8. Conclusions The cognitive development of children from homes with lower levels of cognitive stimulation is susceptible to the effects of glue ear and hearing loss. PMID:24498289

  1. Report on hearing loss in oncology / Classificações das perdas auditivas em Oncologia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Christiane, Schultz; Maria Valéria Schmidt, Goffi-Gomez; Patrícia Helena Pecora, Liberman; André Lopes, Carvalho.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A cisplatina é um antineoplásico muito utilizado no tratamento de diferentes neoplasias, porém quando utilizada em doses acima de 360mg/m² pode causar ototoxicidade. Esta produz lesões cocleares que resultam em perda auditiva. Existem critérios que visam identificar e quantificar as perdas auditivas [...] . OBJETIVO: Descrever as características das classificações e identificar implicações e aplicações de cada uma, dentro das necessidades do acompanhamento ao paciente oncológico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Avaliamos 31 pacientes pré e pós-tratamento quimioterápico. Classificamos as perdas auditivas de acordo com os critérios e verificamos a sensibilidade e especificidade de cada um. RESULTADO: Houve grande variabilidade na detecção das alterações auditivas (de 29% a 61%). Somente 4 dos 31 indivíduos com alterações auditivas no exame pós-tratamento foram identificados por todos os critérios. Por vezes o indivíduo portador de perda auditiva era classificado com normal por algum critério. Dos 31 indivíduos, 18 apresentaram PTA normal no exame pós-tratamento. CONCLUSÃO: Nenhum dos critérios considera a queixa do paciente. Os critérios descritos mostraram inadequações para descrever as alterações auditivas encontradas, fazendo-se necessária a descrição de informações adicionais, para que o médico compreendesse a natureza da perda auditiva. É importante o refinamento desses instrumentos para melhor compreensão e tratamento dos pacientes oncológicos, assim como de sua qualidade de vida. Abstract in english Cisplatin is used frequently as an antineoplastic drug in the treatment of many different cancers. However, when used in doses over 360mg/m², ototoxicity may ensue, resulting in loss of hearing. Criteria for identifying and quantifying hearing loss have been devised. AIM: To describe the features of [...] different hearing loss classification systems and to identify their implications and use in oncologic patients. METHOD: Hearing loss was classified in 31 patients before and after chemotherapy, according to different criteria, assessing the sensitivity and specificity of each classification system. RESULTS: Hearing loss results were highly variable (ranging from 29% to 61%). Only 4 of 31 subjects with post-therapy hearing loss were identified by all the methods. A few subjects with hearing loss were classified as normal hearing in some of the criteria. A normal PTA was found in 18 of 31 subjects in the post-treatment evaluation. CONCLUSION: None of the criteria assesses the complaints of patients. The criteria described in this study were inadequate to identify hearing loss following chemotherapy, requiring additional information for physicians to better understand the hearing losses and their implications for the quality of life of patients.

  2. Report on hearing loss in oncology Classificações das perdas auditivas em Oncologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Schultz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is used frequently as an antineoplastic drug in the treatment of many different cancers. However, when used in doses over 360mg/m², ototoxicity may ensue, resulting in loss of hearing. Criteria for identifying and quantifying hearing loss have been devised. AIM: To describe the features of different hearing loss classification systems and to identify their implications and use in oncologic patients. METHOD: Hearing loss was classified in 31 patients before and after chemotherapy, according to different criteria, assessing the sensitivity and specificity of each classification system. RESULTS: Hearing loss results were highly variable (ranging from 29% to 61%. Only 4 of 31 subjects with post-therapy hearing loss were identified by all the methods. A few subjects with hearing loss were classified as normal hearing in some of the criteria. A normal PTA was found in 18 of 31 subjects in the post-treatment evaluation. CONCLUSION: None of the criteria assesses the complaints of patients. The criteria described in this study were inadequate to identify hearing loss following chemotherapy, requiring additional information for physicians to better understand the hearing losses and their implications for the quality of life of patients.A cisplatina é um antineoplásico muito utilizado no tratamento de diferentes neoplasias, porém quando utilizada em doses acima de 360mg/m² pode causar ototoxicidade. Esta produz lesões cocleares que resultam em perda auditiva. Existem critérios que visam identificar e quantificar as perdas auditivas. OBJETIVO: Descrever as características das classificações e identificar implicações e aplicações de cada uma, dentro das necessidades do acompanhamento ao paciente oncológico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Avaliamos 31 pacientes pré e pós-tratamento quimioterápico. Classificamos as perdas auditivas de acordo com os critérios e verificamos a sensibilidade e especificidade de cada um. RESULTADO: Houve grande variabilidade na detecção das alterações auditivas (de 29% a 61%. Somente 4 dos 31 indivíduos com alterações auditivas no exame pós-tratamento foram identificados por todos os critérios. Por vezes o indivíduo portador de perda auditiva era classificado com normal por algum critério. Dos 31 indivíduos, 18 apresentaram PTA normal no exame pós-tratamento. CONCLUSÃO: Nenhum dos critérios considera a queixa do paciente. Os critérios descritos mostraram inadequações para descrever as alterações auditivas encontradas, fazendo-se necessária a descrição de informações adicionais, para que o médico compreendesse a natureza da perda auditiva. É importante o refinamento desses instrumentos para melhor compreensão e tratamento dos pacientes oncológicos, assim como de sua qualidade de vida.

  3. A frameshift mutation in GRXCR2 causes recessively inherited hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Kohrman, David C; Naz, Sadaf

    2014-05-01

    More than 360 million humans are affected with some degree of hearing loss, either early or later in life. A genetic cause for the disorder is present in a majority of the cases. We mapped a locus (DFNB101) for hearing loss in humans to chromosome 5q in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Exome sequencing revealed an insertion mutation in GRXCR2 as the cause of moderate-to-severe and likely progressive hearing loss in the affected individuals of the family. The frameshift mutation is predicted to affect a conserved, cysteine-rich region of GRXCR2, and to result in an abnormal extension of the C-terminus. Functional studies by cell transfections demonstrated that the mutant protein is unstable and mislocalized relative to wild-type GRXCR2, consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. Targeted disruption of Grxcr2 is concurrently reported to cause hearing loss in mice. The structural abnormalities in this animal model suggest a role for GRXCR2 in the development of stereocilia bundles, specialized structures on the apical surface of sensory cells in the cochlea that are critical for sound detection. Our results indicate that GRXCR2 should be considered in differential genetic diagnosis for individuals with early onset, moderate-to-severe and progressive hearing loss. PMID:24619944

  4. Impact of Hearing Loss on Daily Life Style and Schooling among Children between 5 and 15 Years Age-Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiteshree C Patel, Mohua Moitra, Anjali Modi, Jaymin Contractor, S L Kantharia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: “Hearing”- one of the five special senses with which a human is gifted. At times, due to variety of reasons, this sense is impaired. Hearing impairment of any degree has a profound effect on children. It delays development of speech, slows educational progress and leads to being stigmatized. Objectives: To document the impact of hearing loss in daily life style and schooling of children between 5 and 15 years age-group. Materials & methods: This was cross- sectional study done in Children between 5 and 15 years age-group with hearing loss, coming to an ENT OPD, New Civil Hospital, Surat during the period of 1st August 2011 to 31 July 2012. Results: A total of 246 children were studied. Mean age of the study population was 9±3.46 years. Most common impactin life of children with hearing loss was that “they were not admitted to school by their parents” (31.3%. Among them, 84.4% had congenital deafness and 15.6% had acquired deafness. This difference was statistically significant. (p= 0.002, x2= 8.63. As per parents’ perception, academic performance of the children was significantly associated with type of school (normal Vs deaf & mute school” (p< 0.001. Conclusion: Most common impact was that “children being not admitted to school” and “children were lagging behind in studies”. Among the congenitally deaf children, the quality of life was significantly better in those who attended these special schools (p<0.001.

  5. Ocorrência de perda auditiva induzida pelo ruído em carpinteiros Occurrence of noise induced hearing loss in carpenters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hygor Veríssimo Farias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar a ocorrência de perda auditiva induzida pelo ruído (PAIR em carpinteiros, caracterizando a perda auditiva por faixa etária, tempo de exposição total ao ruído e uso regular de protetores auditivos durante o tempo total de exposição. MÉTODO: estudo retrospectivo, descritivo, em uma população de 80 carpinteiros da construção civil, atendidos em uma clínica particular. Foram analisados 60 trabalhadores, conforme dados obtidos na anamnese e ficha do exame audiométrico. RESULTADOS: 49% dos trabalhadores apresentaram audição normal, sendo 58% com limiares auditivos normais bilateralmente e 35% com entalhe audiométrico em 3 kHz, 4 kHz e/ou 6 kHz. 44% apresentaram perfil audiométrico sugestivo de PAIR, destes 74% foram classificados como PAIR bilateral e 19% como PAIR unilateral. Houve diferença estatística significante entre os grupo PAIR e Normal em relação às variáveis idade (p=0,001, assim como o tempo total de exposição ao ruído ocupacional (p=0,002. CONCLUSÃO: quanto maior a idade e o tempo de profissão como carpinteiro, maior é a sua alteração auditiva, principalmente, devido à exposição ao ruído elevado durante a jornada de trabalho, sendo também constatado que as medidas de controle pelo uso do protetor são insuficientes para prevenir perdas auditivas. Portanto, sugerem-se medidas preventivas em saúde auditiva ativamente nessa população estudada, no ramo da construção civil.PURPOSE: to investigate the occurrence of noise induced hearing loss in carpenters, characterizing the hearing loss for age group, time of total exposure to noise and regular use of hearing protectors during the total exposure time. METHOD: retrospective and descriptive study in a population of 80 construction carpenters, attended at a private clinic. 60 workers were analyzed, as data on medical history and record of audiometric testing. RESULTS: 49% of the workers shoed normal hearing, being 58% with normal bilaterally hearing thresholds and 35% with audiometric notch in 3 kHz, 4 kHz and/or 6 kHz. 44% showed suggestive audiometric profile of NIHL, of these 74% were classified as bilateral NIHL and 19% as unilateral NIHL. There were significant differences between the NIHL group and normal to the age variables (p=0.001, as well as the total time of exposure to occupational noise (p=0,002. CONCLUSION: the greater the age and length of employment as a carpenter were, the greater their hearing loss, mainly due to exposure to loud noise during the working day, and we also noted that measures taken in order to control the use of the auricular protector are insufficient to prevent hearing loss. Therefore, we suggest active preventive measures in hearing health in this studied population, in the field of civil construction.

  6. Associação entre perda auditiva e sintomatologia depressiva em idosos / Association between hearing loss and depressive symptoms in elderly

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adriane Ribeiro, Teixeira; Andréa Krüger, Gonçalves; Cíntia de La Rocha, Freitas; Cristina Loureiro Chaves, Soldera; Ângelo José Gonçalves, Bós; Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos, Santos; Sílvia, Dornelles.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese INTRODUÇÃO: A perda auditiva provoca dificuldades na compreensão da fala, o que origina afastamento do meio familiar e social. Este isolamento pode estar associado a quadros depressivos. Tipo de estudo: clínico prospectivo. OBJETIVO: Verificar a associação entre perda auditiva e depressão em um grup [...] o de idosos não institucionalizados. MÉTODO: A amostra foi composta por indivíduos com idade igual ou superior a 60 anos, submetidos à avaliação audiológica completa e rastreio de sintomatologia depressiva com a escala de depressão geriátrica (GDS). RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 54 idosos, sendo 26 (48,1%) do sexo feminino e 28 (51,9%) do sexo masculino. Constatou-se que 39 (72,2%) apresentaram limiares auditivos alterados, sendo 17 (31,5%) com perda auditiva leve e 22 (40,7%) com perda auditiva moderada. Foram evidenciados sinais de depressão em 25 idosos (46,3%), sendo que 22 (40,7%) apresentavam perda auditiva. A análise dos dados evidenciou associação entre a presença de perda auditiva e depressão (p=0,016). Apesar de não significativa (p=0,18), a associação entre o grau de perda auditiva foi positiva em relação à gravidade dos sinais de depressão. CONCLUSÃO: Nos idosos pesquisados, ocorreu forte associação entre a perda auditiva e os sinais de depressão e tendência a existir associação entre o grau de perda auditiva e a gravidade dos sinais de depressão. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: Hearing loss causes difficulties in speech understanding, which leads away from the family and social environment. This isolation may be associated with depressive disorders. Type of study: clinical prospective. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between hearing loss and depressio [...] n in a group of non-institutionalized elderly. METHOD: The sample consisted of individuals aged over 60 years, undergoing complete audiological evaluation and screening for depressive symptoms with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). RESULTS: We evaluated 54 elderly, 26 (48.1%) were female and 28 (51.9%) males. It was found that 39 (72.2%) had hearing thresholds change, and 17 (31.5%) with mild hearing loss and 22 (40.7%) with moderate hearing loss. Were evident signs of depression in 25 elderly (46.3%), and 22 (40.7%) had hearing loss. Data analysis showed an association between hearing loss and depression (p = 0.016). Although not significant (p = 0.18), the association between the degree of hearing loss was positive in relation to the severity of the signs of depression. CONCLUSION: In elderly people surveyed, there was a strong association between hearing loss and signs of depression and tendency to be an association between the degree of hearing loss and the severity of the signs of depression.

  7. Auditory nerve compound action potentials and brain stem auditory evoked potentials in patients with various degrees of hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A R; Møller, M B; Jannetta, P J; Jho, H D

    1991-06-01

    Click-evoked compound action potentials recorded in normal-hearing patients through a monopolar electrode placed on the intracranial portion of the eighth nerve were compared with the responses recorded in patients with high-frequency hearing loss or with high- and low-frequency hearing losses. That multiple peaks appear in the compound action potential in patients with hearing loss implies that click sounds elicit successive and separated volleys of neural excitation in the ascending auditory pathway, whereas click sounds in patients with normal hearing mainly give rise to a single volley of neural activity. This difference in the pattern of auditory nerve activity might explain why there are often multiple peaks in the brain stem auditory evoked potentials in patients with hearing loss and that the peaks are often less well-defined than peaks in patients with normal hearing. PMID:2058990

  8. Hearing loss and cognitive decline in older adults: questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Roberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Maggi, Stefania; Marengoni, Alessandra; Martini, Alessandro; Memo, Maurizio; Pecorelli, Sergio; Peracino, Andrea P; Quaranta, Nicola; Stella, Roberto; Lin, Frank R

    2014-12-01

    The association between hearing impairment, the diagnosis of dementia, and the role of sensory therapy has been proposed for some time, but further research is needed. Current understanding of this association requires the commitment of those experts who can integrate experience and research from several fields to be able to understand the link from hearing to dementia. A workshop whose panelists included experts from many areas, ranging from ear, nose and throat (ENT) to dementia's specialists, was promoted and organized by the Giovanni Lorenzini Medical Science Foundation (Milan, Italy; Houston, TX, USA) to increase the awareness of the relationship between hearing loss and dementia, and included questions and comments following a presentation from the clinical researcher, Frank Lin, who has been evaluating the relationship between hearing loss and cognitive decline since 2009. PMID:25281432

  9. Study the Age of Hearing Loss Diagnosis and the Related Factors in a Group of School-Age Children in Baghch-e-Ban School of Hard of Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Ahmadi

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Estimation of the age of hearing loss diagnosis in every society is recommended to be compared with standard criteria to establish common dirth in management and rehabilitation. This study was conducted in order to determine the age of hearing loss diagnosis with respect to common criteria in Baghche-Ban school of hard of hearing children in Tehran.Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 445 children in stages 2, 6 and 10 of Baghche-Ban school of hard of hearing participated. the research was performed by means of the three-stages questionaires that children filled with help of their parents.Results: The mean age of detection of hearing loss in both acquired and congenital hearing loss in children was 3.5 year-old. while the age in which hearing loss was doubted was 1.8 year-old. In another word the mean age of hearing loss detection decreased as the hearing loss increases(in moderate- profound hearing loss(P<0.01. Conclusion: among the refrence sources for refering children with hearing loss the least refering was related to physicians. Adversly the mean age of doubting and detection of hearing loss increased in children with family history of hearing loss.(P<0.01. Meanwhile no relationship was detected between the age of diagnosis of hearing loss and the number of deaf members in the family(P<0.02.

  10. Molecular diagnostics for congenital hearing loss including 15 deafness genes using a next generation sequencing platform

    OpenAIRE

    De Keulenaer Sarah; Hellemans Jan; Lefever Steve; Renard Jean-Pierre; De Schrijver Joachim; Van de Voorde Hendrik; Tabatabaiefar Mohammad; Van Nieuwerburgh Filip; Flamez Daisy; Pattyn Filip; Scharlaken Bieke; Deforce Dieter; Bekaert Sofie; Van Criekinge Wim; Vandesompele Jo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hereditary hearing loss (HL) can originate from mutations in one of many genes involved in the complex process of hearing. Identification of the genetic defects in patients is currently labor intensive and expensive. While screening with Sanger sequencing for GJB2 mutations is common, this is not the case for the other known deafness genes (> 60). Next generation sequencing technology (NGS) has the potential to be much more cost efficient. Published methods mainly use hybr...

  11. Prevalence of age-related hearing loss in Europe: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, T. N.; Hanebuth, D.; Probst, R.

    2011-01-01

    Populations are becoming progressively older thus presenting symptoms of diminished organ function due to degenerative processes. These may be physiological or caused by additional factors damaging the organ. Presbyacusis refers to the physiological age-related changes of the peripheral and central auditory system leading to hearing impairment and difficulty understanding spoken language. In contrast to epidemiological data of other continents, the prevalence of age-related hearing loss (ARHL...

  12. Genetics of Non Syndromic Hearing Loss in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Sukarova Stefanovska, E.; Cakar, M.; Filipce, I.; Plaseska Karanfilska, D.

    2012-01-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory deficit in humans affecting 1 in 1000 newborns. When present in an infant, deafness may have dramatic effects on language acquisition, seriously compromising the quality of their life. Deafness is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, with inherited causes as the most prominent etiological factor in deafness in developed countries. The genetic basis of hearing loss is complex with numerous loci and genes underlying hereditary senso...

  13. Neuromagnetic Index of Hemispheric Asymmetry Prognosticating the Outcome of Sudden Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lieber Po-hung; Shiao, An-suey; Chen, Kuang-chao; Lee, Po-lei; Niddam, David M.; Chang, Shyue-yih; Hsieh, Jen-chuen

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal relationship between central plastic changes and clinical presentations of peripheral hearing impairment remains unknown. Previously, we reported a unique plastic pattern of “healthy-side dominance” in acute unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). This study aimed to explore whether such hemispheric asymmetry bears any prognostic relevance to ISSNHL along the disease course. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), inter-hemispheric differences in pea...

  14. Audição e percepção da perda auditiva em idosos / Hearing and perception of hearing loss in elderly people

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria da Glória Canto de, Sousa; Iêda Chaves Pacheco, Russo.

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Avaliar a audição e a percepção dos indivíduos idosos sobre a sua condição de audição. MÉTODOS: Foi desenvolvida uma pesquisa descritiva e exploratória, tendo como sujeitos 40 alunos, sendo 34 do sexo feminino e seis do sexo masculino, com idades variando entre 61 e 88 anos, de uma Univers [...] idade Aberta à Terceira Idade, localizada na cidade do Salvador, na Universidade do Estado da Bahia. Para avaliação dos sujeitos foi aplicado o Inventário Auditivo para Idosos - IAPI e realizado o exame audiométrico. A análise dos dados foi feita a partir das variáveis: sexo, faixa etária e pela computação das respostas dadas pelos indivíduos ao Inventário Auditivo para Idosos. RESULTADOS: Dos idosos 37,5% apresentaram audição normal e 62,5% perda auditiva, sendo 30% perda auditiva assimétrica e 32,5% simétrica. Dos 25 sujeitos com perda auditiva, apenas 3 (12%) tiveram percepção da mesma com um IAPI superior a dez pontos e 22 (88%) com uma pontuação inferior a dez. Quanto ao sexo, 8% de homens e 4% de mulheres tiveram uma pontuação superior a dez no IAPI; 16% dos indivíduos do sexo masculino e 72% do feminino apresentaram pontuação inferior a dez. Houve um predomínio da configuração audiométrica do tipo descendente em 88% dos sujeitos. CONCLUSÃO: A maioria dos sujeitos estudados era portadora de perda auditiva, sendo que, quanto maior a idade, maior esta deficiência. Proporcionalmente, a perda auditiva ocorreu mais em homens do que em mulheres, mas poucos percebem a sua existência. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To evaluate the hearing of elderly individuals and their perception regarding their hearing condition. METHODS: A descriptive and exploratory research was developed using as subjects 40 students from a University for the Third Age located in Salvador, Bahia (Brazil), being 34 female and 6 m [...] ale, with ages ranging from 61 to 88 years. The evaluation used the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly - HHIE, and an audiometric assessment was carried out. Data analysis considered the following variables: gender, age and the answers computed in the HHIE. RESULTS: From the subjects, 37.5% had normal hearing and 62.5% presented hearing loss (30% asymmetric and 32.5% symmetric hearing loss). From the 25 subjects with hearing loss, only 3 (12%) were aware of it, according to the HHIE, scoring higher than ten points. In addition, 22 subjects (88%) had a score lower than ten. Regarding gender, 8% of the male subjects and 4% of the female subjects scored over ten at the HHIE; 16% of the male and 72% of the female scored under ten points. There was a predominance of the descendent audiometric configuration in 88% of the individuals. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the subjects studied had hearing loss, which increased with age. Proportionally, hearing loss occurred mostly in men, although few of them were aware of its existence.

  15. A gene for autosomal dominant hearing loss on the short arm of chromosome 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Camp, G.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hearing loss is the most common form of sensory impairment and many cases are attributable to genetic causes. The genetic defects underlying several syndromic forms of deafness have been identified, but little is known about the causes of non-syndromic hereditary deafness which accounts for the majority of inherited hearing loss. We report here a large Indonesian family with non-syndromal postlingual hearing loss starting in the high frequencies and showing autosomal dominant inheritance. To locate the gene responsible for the hearing loss in this family, we performed a genome search by genetic linkage analysis with microsatellite markers distributed over the whole genome. We have mapped the gene causing deafness in an extended Indonesian family to chromosome 1p with a multipoint lod score higher than 7. Two other smaller families, showing a similar hereditary hearing loss, were also tested for linkage with chromosome 1p. One family originating from the U.S. was linked to this new locus with a multipoint lod score exceeding 5. In another family from the Netherlands this locus was excluded. The flanking markers D1S255 and D1S211 define a region of 6 cM on chromosome 1p which is likely to contain the deafness gene present in the Indonesian and American family.

  16. Hearing Loss Is Negatively Related to Episodic and Semantic Long-Term Memory but Not to Short-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnberg, Jerker; Danielsson, Henrik; Rudner, Mary; Arlinger, Stig; Sternang, Ola; Wahlin, Ake; Nilsson, Lars-Goran

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the relationship between degree of hearing loss and different memory systems in hearing aid users. Method: Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to study the relationship between auditory and visual acuity and different cognitive and memory functions in an age-hetereogenous subsample of 160 hearing aid users without…

  17. The clinical significance of temporal bone CT with regard to hearing preservation in acoustic neurinoma removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since Rand and Kurze discussed the possibility of the anatomic preservation of the cochlear nerve via the posterior fossa transmeatal approach for the acoustic neurinoma, there have been increasingly many reports on the preservation of cochlear nerve function. With recent advances in diagnostic tools, today's neurosurgeon is able to make an earlier and more precise diagnosis of acoustic neurinomas even when the patient has good hearing. If useful hearing is to be kept, the cochlear nerve and blood supply of the labyrinth have to be preserved. In addition, surgical entry into the labyrinth, upon the removal of the posterior wall of the internal auditory canal, must be avoided, since it is likely to result in permanent hearing loss. Because of its superior contrast and spatial resolution, thin-section and high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone has the great advantage of demonstrating the exact relationship of the internal auditory canal to the posterior semicircular canal, the vestibule, and the common crus. In this study, thin-section, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone was performed in 11 cases of acoustic neurinoma pre- and postoperatively. At operation, the lateral limit of the bone removal of the posterior internal auditory canal was determined on the basis of preoperative computed tomography of the temporal bone. As a result, inadvertent entry into the labyrinth was avoided, and useful hearing was preserved in 8 cases. In orul hearing was preserved in 8 cases. In order to preserve useful hearing following total tumor removal, it is essential to plan the operative strategy meticulously on the basis of the findings of the preoperative investigation, Including temporal bone CT. (author)

  18. What are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible for the hearing complaint in the hearing loss for ototoxicity after the oncological treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Liberman, Patricia Helena Pecora; Goffi-gomez, M. Valeria Schmidt; Schultz, Christiane; Lopes, Luiz Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The neurosensory bilateral simetric hearing loss resulting of the oncological treatment is underestimated, because the patients has the hearing detection preserved, reporting complaints in determined situation, or the not comprehension of part of the message. Objective: Investigate which are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible by the presence of hearing complaints. Method: Prospective study evaluating 200 patients with cancer in the childhood out of the onco...

  19. The risk of noise-induced hearing loss in the Danish workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Tine; ThrysØe, Samuel Alberg

    2006-01-01

    The causal association between occupational noise exposure and permanent hearing loss is well-documented and well-founded primary preventive approaches have been developed. However, documentation of the impact on the present prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in the working population is limited. This study reports on the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in a population sample of 788 workers from 11 trades with expected high noise exposure levels and a reference group examined according to the same protocol. Full-shift A-weighted equivalent sound levels were recorded and pure tone audiometric examinations were conducted at the work sites in soundproof booths. Data were analyzed with multivariate regression techniques and adjusted for age, sex, ear disease, smoking and environmental noise exposure. An overall two-fold increased risk of hearing handicap (hearing threshold above 20 dB averaged across 2, 3 and 4 kHz for either ear) was observed in the noise exposed workers [odds ratio (OR) 1.99, 95%confidence interval (CI) 0.91-4.34]. Workers exposed for more than 20 years to an exposure level above 85 dB(A) had a three-fold increased risk (OR 3.05, 95% CI 1.33-6.99). Workers starting in noisy work during the last 10-15 years or workers below 30 years of age showed no increased risk of hearing handicap. This indicates that preventive measures enforced during the past 10-15 years to reduce noise exposure may have borne fruit. Systematic surveillance of noise and hearing levels in appropriate populations should still be included in an efficient hearing conservation program.

  20. Hearing loss and other ear problems among schoolboys in Abha, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfotouh, M A; Ghieth, M M; Badawi, I A

    1995-07-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the prevalence of hearing loss (HL) and its association with different ear problems among schoolboys in Abha City, Asir Region, Saudi Arabia. A representative sample of 974 schoolboys ages six to 12 years were subjected to both audiometric and otoscopic examinations. Audiometric examination identified 43 children with HL (40 conductive and three sensorineural), making a prevalence of 4.4% (1.7% mild, 2% moderate and 0.7% severe HL). Otoscopic examination revealed ear problems among 26.9% of schoolboys with the following prevalences: wax (21.3%), acute otitis media (1.9%), chronic otitis media (1.0%), foreign body (0.7%), otitis externa (0.7%), and congenital anomaly of the auricle (0.4%). Impacted wax accounted for reversible HL among a quarter (25.6%) of the hearing impaired children, whereas chronic otitis media accounted for 11.6%; acute otitis media 9.3%; otitis media with effusion, foreign body and congenital anomaly of the auricle each accounted for 2.3%. A significantly higher frequency of HL was detected among children with otitis media than among children without ear conditions (29.4% vs. 2.8%, Pmedia. Thus, attention should be given to regular screening for early detection and removal of the impacted wax for correcting the high prevalence of reversible HL due to such conditions. Children of low social class should be regarded as a high risk group for whom regular hearing screening is recommended. PMID:17590599

  1. A novel locus (DFNA23) for prelingual autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss maps to 14q21-q22 in a Swiss German kindred.

    OpenAIRE

    Salam, A. A.; Ha?fner, F. M.; Linder, T. E.; Spillmann, T.; Schinzel, A. A.; Leal, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    DFNA23, a novel locus for autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss, was identified in a Swiss German kindred. DNA samples were obtained from 22 family members in three generations: 10 with hearing impairment caused by the DFNA23 locus, 8 unaffected offspring, and 4 spouses of hearing-impaired pedigree members. In this kindred, the hearing-impaired family members have prelingual bilateral symmetrical hearing loss. All audiograms from hearing-impaired individuals displayed sloping curves, w...

  2. Prevalence of Auditory Neuropathy in a Population of Children with Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Saki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this investigation is to determine auditory neuropathy in the students with severe to profound hearing losses in Ahwaz.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 212 children of 7-11 year old with severe to profound hearing loss performed ordinary audiometric evaluations as well as ABR and OAE. The patients with normal DPOAE who had no record of acoustic reflex having normal ABR, were considered as the patients with auditory neuropathy. Results: The neuropathic complication found in 14 children was appeared in 8 ones as one-sided (57.14% and in 6 ones (42.86% as two-sided. 68% of the patients as diagnosed had a very low Speech Discrimination Score (SDS.Conclusion: we must be very vigilant in auditory neuropathy diagnosis for the purpose to be successful in appropriate treatment of severe to profound hearing losses.

  3. Lack of association between DNMT1 gene polymorphisms and noise-induced hearing loss in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feifei; Li, Xin; Li, Xiuting; Wang, Meilin; Chu, Haiyan; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Hengdong; Zhang, Zhengdong; Zhu, Baoli

    2013-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) plays a crucial role in maintaining of methylation and chromatin stability. And mutations in DNMT1 can induce one form of neurodegenerative diseases with dementia and sensorineural hearing loss. To assess whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or haplotypes of DNMT1 are related to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a Chinese population, we genotyped three functional polymorphisms (rs12984523, rs16999593, and rs2228612) in a case-control study involving 615 NIHL cases and 644 controls. However, no significant association was detected between these three SNPs and NIHL susceptibility in the Chinese population. Our data suggested that the DNMT1 polymorphisms may not contribute to risk of NIHL in the Chinese population. PMID:23771421

  4. Non-flat audiograms in sensorineural hearing loss and speech perception

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kelly Cristina Lira de, Andrade; Pedro de Lemos, Menezes; Aline Tenório Lins, Carnaúba; Renato Glauco de Sousa, Rodrigues; Mariana de Carvalho, Leal; Liliane Desgualdo, Pereira.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The audibility thresholds for the sound frequency of 137 upward- and downward-sloping audiograms showing sensorineural hearing loss were selected and analyzed in conjunction with speech recognition thresholds obtained from individuals seen at a public otolaryngology clinic to d [...] etermine which frequencies in slope audiograms best represent speech recognition thresholds. METHOD: The linear regression model and mean square error were used to determine the associations between the threshold values. RESULT: The mean square error identified larger errors when using thresholds of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz than when using audibility thresholds of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. The linear regression model showed a higher correlation (91%) between the audiogram thresholds for frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz than for the frequencies of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (88%). CONCLUSION: Frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were the most significant in predicting the speech recognition threshold.

  5. Non-flat audiograms in sensorineural hearing loss and speech perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Lira de Andrade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The audibility thresholds for the sound frequency of 137 upward- and downward-sloping audiograms showing sensorineural hearing loss were selected and analyzed in conjunction with speech recognition thresholds obtained from individuals seen at a public otolaryngology clinic to determine which frequencies in slope audiograms best represent speech recognition thresholds. METHOD: The linear regression model and mean square error were used to determine the associations between the threshold values. RESULT: The mean square error identified larger errors when using thresholds of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz than when using audibility thresholds of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. The linear regression model showed a higher correlation (91% between the audiogram thresholds for frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz than for the frequencies of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (88%. CONCLUSION: Frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were the most significant in predicting the speech recognition threshold.

  6. Prevalence of hearing loss among Saudi type 2 diabetic patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Al-mendalawi, Mahmood D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare hearing impairment and audiometric shapes associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with an age-matched control group in the Saudi population. METHODS This is an observational case-control study at a tertiary academic referral center. We recruited 196 individuals (age; 29-69 years) attending the Department of Otolaryngology, King Abdulaziz University Hospital between January 2005 to December 2009, and grouped them into T2DM (n=109) and control (n=87) group...

  7. Absence of plastin 1 causes abnormal maintenance of hair cell stereocilia and a moderate form of hearing loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ruth; Bullen, Anwen; Johnson, Stuart L; Grimm-Günter, Eva-Maria; Rivero, Francisco; Marcotti, Walter; Forge, Andrew; Daudet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Hearing relies on the mechanosensory inner and outer hair cells (OHCs) of the organ of Corti, which convert mechanical deflections of their actin-rich stereociliary bundles into electrochemical signals. Several actin-associated proteins are essential for stereocilia formation and maintenance, and their absence leads to deafness. One of the most abundant actin-bundling proteins of stereocilia is plastin 1, but its function has never been directly assessed. Here, we found that plastin 1 knock-out (Pls1 KO) mice have a moderate and progressive form of hearing loss across all frequencies. Auditory hair cells developed normally in Pls1 KO, but in young adult animals, the stereocilia of inner hair cells were reduced in width and length. The stereocilia of OHCs were comparatively less affected; however, they also showed signs of degeneration in ageing mice. The hair bundle stiffness and the acquisition of the electrophysiological properties of hair cells were unaffected by the absence of plastin 1, except for a significant change in the adaptation properties, but not the size of the mechanoelectrical transducer currents. These results show that in contrast to other actin-bundling proteins such as espin, harmonin or Eps8, plastin 1 is dispensable for the initial formation of stereocilia. However, the progressive hearing loss and morphological defects of hair cells in adult Pls1 KO mice point at a specific role for plastin 1 in the preservation of adult stereocilia and optimal hearing. Hence, mutations in the human PLS1 gene may be associated with relatively mild and progressive forms of hearing loss. PMID:25124451

  8. A Novel Mutation in COCH – Implications for Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in DFNA9 Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S.; Gandolfo, Luke; Shearer, A. Eliot; Webster, Jennifer A.; Jensen, Maren; Kimberling, William J.; Stephan, Dietrich; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Smith, Richard J.H.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Objective/Hypothesis To determine the cause of autosomal dominant hearing loss segregating in an American family. Study Design Family study. Methods Otologic and audiometric examination was performed on affected family members. Genome wide parametric multipoint linkage mapping using a dominant model was performed with Affymetrix 50K GeneChip data. Direct sequencing was used to confirm the causative mutation. Results In American family 467 segregating autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.362T>C; p.F121S) was identified in the COCH gene. This mutation was also associated with vestibular dysfunction typical of other DFNA9 families. However, affected family members also exhibited memory loss and night blindness. Conclusions The novel COCH mutation affects the functionally important LCCL domain where most DFNA9 mutations have been localized. The onset of the hearing loss, in the second or third decade of life, is earlier than in most DFNA9 families. The progression of hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in the American family is typical of other DFNA9 families with mutations in this domain. Memory loss and night blindness have not been previously reported in DFNA9 families. PMID:21046548

  9. Short-Term Word-Learning Rate in Children with Normal Hearing and Children with Hearing Loss in Limited and Extended High-Frequency Bandwidths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined children's word learning in limited and extended high-frequency bandwidth conditions. These conditions represent typical listening environments for children with hearing loss (HL) and children with normal hearing (NH), respectively. Method: Thirty-six children with NH and 14 children with moderate-to-severe HL served…

  10. Mutations in OTOGL, Encoding the Inner Ear Protein Otogelin-like, Cause Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Yariz, Kemal o; Duman, Duygu; Seco, Celia zazo; Dallman, Julia; Huang, Mingqian; Peters, Theo a; Sirmaci, Asli; Lu, Na; Schraders, Margit; Skromne, Isaac; Oostrik, Jaap; Diaz-horta, Oscar; Young, Juan i; Tokgoz-yilmaz, Suna; Konukseven, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Here we present OTOGL mutations, a homozygous one base pair deletion (c.1430 delT) causing a frameshift (p.Val477Glufs?25) in a large consanguineous family and two compound heterozygous mutations, c.547C>T (p.Arg183?) and c.5238+5G>A, in a nonconsanguineous family with moderate nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. OTOGL maps to the DFNB84 locus at 12q21.31 and encodes otogelin-like, which has structura...

  11. A Narrow Internal Auditory Canal with Duplication in a Patient with Congenital Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) with duplication is a rare anomaly of the temporal bone. It is associated with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve may cause the hearing loss. We present an unusual case of an isolated narrow IAC with duplication that was detected by a CT scan. In this case, the IAC was divided by a bony septum into an empty stenotic inferoposterior portion and a large anterosuperior portion containing the facial nerve that was clearly delineated on MRI

  12. Surdez súbita idiopática: aspectos etiológicos e fisiopatogênicos Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: etiopathogenic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Lazarini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Vários fatores têm sido postulados como causa da surdez súbita idiopática. Por meio de uma revisão bibliográfica foi feita uma análise crítica quanto aos aspectos etiológicos e fisiopatogênicos desta manifestação clínica. Estudos atuais sugerem que os distúrbios vasculares, a ruptura de membranas da orelha interna e as doenças auto-imunes são possíveis causas, mas a afecção viral tem recebido maior atenção nos últimos anos, embora ainda pouco se conheça sobre os mecanismos da surdez súbita idiopática. Os vírus podem causar a perda súbita da audição na infecção aguda, mas a forma latente, com uma possível reativação viral, também tem sido considerada no mecanismo de agressão à cóclea. Apesar de uma alteração da viscosidade sangüínea poder explicar a perda auditiva, estudos experimentais e clínicos não mostram sinais de ossificação e de fibrose na cóclea ou de ruptura de membranas do labirinto. Estes fatos contrapõem, respectivamente, a teoria vascular e a da fístula labiríntica. A eventual presença de anticorpos contra a orelha interna sugere que a surdez súbita idiopática possa ser de natureza auto-imune, fato este também não confirmado pela falta de relação entre os aspectos clínicos e morfológicos da doença auto-imune e da perda auditiva. A surdez súbita idiopática é, ainda, um tema controverso e obscuro em diversos aspectos.Several factors have been postulated to elicit the etiology of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Through a bibliographic review, we made a critical analysis of the different etiopathogenic aspects of its clinical manifestation. The most recent studies concerning the possible causes of sudden hearing loss suggest vascular disorders, rupture of the inner ear membrane and autoimmune diseases; however, viral infections have received a great deal of attention in recent years. Little is known about the mechanism of sudden hearing loss. Viruses can cause sudden hearing loss in an acute infection, however the latent form, and its possible reactivation have also been considered as explanations of the cochlear injury mechanism. Even though hearing loss can be explained by a blood viscosity change, experimental and clinical studies do not show any evidence of labyrinthine fibrosis and new bone formation, or labyrinthine membrane breaks. These findings are not in agreement with vascular and rupture membrane factors, respectively. The eventual presence of antibodies against the inner ear suggests that sudden hearing loss pathogenesis may be of autoimmune nature, but the difficulty in establishing the correlation of its morphological and clinical aspects to the hearing loss also do not help to support this statement. Sudden hearing loss is still a controversial and obscure subject in several aspects.

  13. Late recovery with cyclosporine-A of an auto-immune sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Di Leo, E.; Coppola, F.; Nettis, E.; Vacca, A.; Quaranta, N.

    2011-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss of immune-mediated origin may be present as a symptom in systemic autoimmune diseases or may occur as a primary disorder without other organ involvement (auto-immune inner ear disease). The diagnosis of auto-immune inner ear disease is still predicated on clinical features and to date specific diagnostic tests are not available. We report a case of right-sided sudden hearing loss in a female patient in which the clinical manifestations, in addition to ANA positivity...

  14. An overview of congenital/developmental sensorineural hearing loss with emphasis on the vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Joel D

    2004-08-01

    The evaluation of children with congenital/developmental hearing loss has undergone substantial transformation in recent years. This communication focuses on the most common cause of this type of hearing loss for which there are imaging findings: the vestibular aqueduct syndrome. The normal anatomy of the vestibular aqueduct is discussed in detail. The cochlear aqueduct with which it is commonly confused is also discussed. An overview of other congenital defects and abnormal middle/inner ear communications is also included. A brief discussion of cochlear implants is also included for completeness. PMID:15497615

  15. Mutations in a Novel Gene, TMIE, Are Associated with Hearing Loss Linked to the DFNB6 Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Sadaf; Giguere, Chantal M.; Kohrman, David C.; Mitchem, Kristina L.; Riazuddin, Saima; Morell, Robert J.; Ramesh, Arabandi; Srisailpathy, Srikumari; Deshmukh, Dilip; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Griffith, Andrew J.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Wilcox, Edward R.

    2002-01-01

    We have identified five different homozygous recessive mutations in a novel gene, TMIE (transmembrane inner ear expressed gene), in affected members of consanguineous families segregating severe-to-profound prelingual deafness, consistent with linkage to DFNB6. The mutations include an insertion, a deletion, and three missense mutations, and they indicate that loss of function of TMIE causes hearing loss in humans. TMIE encodes a protein with 156 amino acids and exhibits no significant nucleotide or deduced amino acid sequence similarity to any other gene. PMID:12145746

  16. Hearing loss in children with HIV/AIDS / Perda auditiva em crianças com HIV/AIDS

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana Karina Lima, Buriti; Simone Helena dos Santos, Oliveira; Lilian Ferreira, Muniz.

    2013-12-16

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Languages: English, Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Investigar a ocorrência de perda auditiva em crianças com HIV/AIDS e verificar sua associação com a carga viral, as doenças oportunistas e o tratamento antirretroviral instituído. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo, transversal, realizado em 23 crianças com HIV/AIDS de dois serviços especiali [...] zados de João Pessoa (PB). Seus responsáveis responderam a um questionário, contendo dados sobre a situação clínica e a saúde auditiva das crianças, sendo estas submetidas a avaliação audiológica. Foram respeitadas as orientações para pesquisa em seres humanos contidas na Resolução CNE Nº 196/1996. Os achados foram analisados a partir da estatística descritiva. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que a lamivudina (3TC) foi o antirretroviral mais utilizado em 17 (94,4%) pacientes, seguido do Kaletra (KAL), administrado em 14 (77,8%) pacientes, do d4T em 11 (61,1%) e da zidovudina (AZT) em sete (38,9%). A otite foi a doença oportunista de maior frequência com 11 (61,1%) registros. No exame audiométrico, observou-se 39 (84,8%) orelhas com perda auditiva e sete (15,2%) normais. Na imitanciometria, encontrou-se cinco (10,9%) orelhas normais, caracterizadas por curvas timpanométrica tipo A. As demais 41 (89,1%), mostraram-se alteradas com predominância na curva do tipo B em 67,4% dos casos. CONCLUSÃO: Houve alterações auditivas nas crianças com HIV/AIDS analisadas neste estudo, sendo as perdas auditivas discretas as de maior ocorrência. Foi verificada associação significativa com o uso da terapia antirretroviral e com a otite. Desta forma, percebe-se a importância do monitoramento auditivo e da intervenção o mais cedo possível, favorecendo um desenvolvimento linguístico adequado e reduzindo possíveis dificuldades de aprendizagem e de inclusão social. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To investigate the occurrence of hearing loss in children with HIV and its association with viral load, opportunistic diseases, and antiretroviral treatment. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 23 HIV-positive children under care at two specialized centers in João Pe [...] ssoa, Paraíba, Brazil. Their parents or legal guardians responded to a questionnaire, containing data on the clinical situation and the hearing health of the children, who were then submitted to audiological assessment. We complied with the guidelines for human research contained in the CNE (National Education Council) Resolution number 196/1996. The findings were analyzed through descriptive statistics. RESULTS: We observed that lamivudine (3TC) was the antiretroviral drug most used in 17 (94.4%) patients, followed by Kaletra (KAL), administered in 14 (77.8%) patients, d4T in 11 (61.1%) patients, and zidovudine (AZT) in 7 (38.9%) participants. Otitis was the most frequent opportunistic disease, with 11 (61.1%) cases. In the audiometric examination, we observed 39 (84.8%) ears with hearing loss and 7 (15.2%) normal ears. After the immitance testing, we found five (10.9%) normal ears, characterized by type A tympanometric curves. The other 41 (89.1%) ears were revealed as altered, with predominance of type B curves in 67.4% of the cases. CONCLUSION: There were hearing alterations in children with HIV/AIDS analyzed in this study. Discreet hearing losses were the most occurring. We verified statistically significant associations with the use of antiretroviral therapy and otitis. Therefore, we point out the importance of auditory monitoring and intervention as soon as possible, thus favoring adequate development in language and decreasing possible difficulties in learning and social inclusion.

  17. Disrupted Bone Remodeling Leads to Cochlear Overgrowth and Hearing Loss in a Mouse Model of Fibrous Dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Akil, Omar; Hall-glenn, Faith; Chang, Jolie; Li, Alfred; Chang, Wenhan; Lustig, Lawrence R.; Alliston, Tamara; Hsiao, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Normal hearing requires exquisite cooperation between bony and sensorineural structures within the cochlea. For example, the inner ear secretes proteins such as osteoprotegrin (OPG) that can prevent cochlear bone remodeling. Accordingly, diseases that affect bone regulation can also result in hearing loss. Patients with fibrous dysplasia develop trabecular bone overgrowth resulting in hearing loss if the lesions affect the temporal bones. Unfortunately, the mechanisms responsible for this hea...

  18. Neuromagnetic index of hemispheric asymmetry predicting long-term outcome in sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lieber Po-Hung; Chen, Kuang-Chao; Lee, Po-Lei; Niddam, David M; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Chou, Chih-Cher; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Shiao, An-Suey

    2013-01-01

    The neuromagnetic index of hemispheric asymmetry in terms of ipsilateral/contralateral ratio at acute stage was previously revealed to prognosticate the 1-month hearing outcome of acute unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), showing a dynamic relationship between top- and down-levels of auditory pathway. However, the prognostic effect of reorganization pattern for the long-term results remained elusive. This study aimed to probe the prognosticating relevance of hemispheric asymmetry to the hearing at chronic stage of ISSNHL. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), inter-hemispheric differences in peak dipole of N100m responses to monaural tones were evaluated in 21 controls and 21 ISSNHL patients at initial and final (12 months later) stages. Predictive value of hemispheric asymmetry was assessed by correlating hearing level and ipsilateral/contralateral ratio (I/C) of N100m latency and amplitude. Healthy-side dominance of N100m was observed in ISSNHL initially, and remained in three final prognostic subgroups (complete, partial, and no recovery) of ISSNHL. The initial I/C(amplitude) on affected-ear stimulation strongly correlated with the hearing level of final stage in ISSNHL. However, there was no prognostic effect of hemispheric asymmetry pattern for the 12-month hearing improvement. The heterogeneity between neuromagnetic index and hearing levels possibly echoed different pathogeneses of ISSNHL. Since a restored hearing status did not necessarily lead toward a normal functional organization, the dynamics of hemispheric asymmetry could actually index a central resilient reorganization in the brain for sound processing in ISSNHL. Our finding showed not only a clinically relevant measure to predict final hearing of ISSNHL, but also a linkage between central plasticity and cochlear lesion. This finding suggests a new perspective, and perhaps new interventions, to diagnose and treat unilateral ISSNHL. PMID:22982726

  19. Confirmation of diagnosis in Romanian children with DFNB1 related hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Dragomir

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available DFNB1 locus has been linked to a nonsyndromic “invisible disability” called congenital sensorineural hearing loss and deafness. Mutations of GJB2 and GJB6 genes are associated with deafness at the DFNB1 locus. The diagnosis of DFNB1 is made with molecular genetic testing. DNA-based testing can be used both prenatally and postnatally. Purpose: to get evidence for implementation of newborn hearing screening programs at national level; to use the molecular testing of children at risk for confirmation of diagnosis and early intervention. OAEs and ABR were performed for 4303 newborns. Audiologic evaluation of 38 children suspected of having hearing loss was performed too. Physical examinations and family history were used to get information about congenital deafness. DNA from blood samples was isolated, and two PCR multiplex assays were developed to detect DFNB1 mutations. Only 23 newborns were screened positive. Newborns were referred to audiologic evaluation, genetic counseling and testing for the etiologic diagnosis. Physical examination revealed no other abnormal findings. GJB2 mutations were detected in 36.03% of patients, and all of them have 35delG mutation. None of them was found to have GJB6 mutations. Our results suggested that molecular testing was an accurate method of early determining cause of congenital hearing loss and helped us to exclude GJB6 gene from the routine hearing screening protocol.

  20. A influência das perdas auditivas sensorioneurais na ordenação temporal / The influence of sensoryneural hearing loss on temporal ordering

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Giselle Goulart de Oliveira, Matos; Silvana, Frota.

    1435-14-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a ordenação temporal em adultos com perdas auditivas sensorioneurais de graus leve e moderado, por meio do teste Padrão de Duração, a fim de verificar se essas perdas influenciam no desempenho do teste. MÉTODO: foram avaliados 57 pacientes, com idades entre 20 a 59 anos, sendo 30 h [...] omens e 27 mulheres. Todos responderam a anamnese, passaram por avaliação otorrinolaringológica, avaliação audiológica básica e triagem do processamento auditivo, com o teste Dicótico de Dígitos. Os participantes foram alocados em 3 grupos: G1 (audição normal para as médias de 0,5/1/2 KHz e de 3/4/6 KHz), G2 (perda auditiva de grau leve em pelo menos uma das médias) e G3 (perda de grau moderado em pelo menos uma das médias). A comparação foi realizada entre a audição normal e a presença da perda auditiva (G2+G3) e entre os três grupos descritos. O índice de normalidade utilizado foi de 70% de acertos. Para a análise estatística foram utilizados os testes não-paramétricos de Mann-Whitney, ANOVA de Kruskal-Wallis, Análise de Variância "one-way", t de Student, Qui-quadrado. O critério de determinação de significância adotado foi o nível de 5%. RESULTADOS: observou-se presença significante de homens no grupo com perda auditiva. A porcentagem de acertos da amostra geral foi de 62,3% e não ocorreu diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: a habilidade de ordenação temporal avaliada pelo teste Padrão de Duração não sofre influência da perda auditiva sensorioneural de grau leve e moderado. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to evaluate the temporal ordering ability in adults with mild to moderate sensoryneural hearing loss, through the Duration Pattern Test, in order to determine whether these losses affect the performance of the aforesaid test. METHOD: 57 adults from 20 to 59 years of age were evaluated, bein [...] g 30 male and 27 female. All of them underwent a screening test consisting of medical history, ENT examination, basic audiological testing and hearing process screening with the Dichotic Digit Test. After this process, the participants were allocated into three groups, namely: G1 (normal hearing for the averages of 0.5 / 1 / 2 and 3/4/6 KHz), G2 (mild hearing loss in at least one of the averages) and G3 (moderate loss in at least one of the averages). The results were analyzed through comparison between normal hearing and the presence of hearing loss (G2 + G3) and among the three groups described. The normality index used was 70% of successes. For statistical analysis, the tests used were Nonparametric Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA, "One-way" Analysis of Variance, student's t and chi-square. The determining criterion of significance adopted was level 5%. RESULTS: there was a significant presence of men with hearing loss in the group. The percentage of correct answers in the overall sample was 62.3%, revealing no statistically significant difference among groups. CONCLUSION: the temporal ordering ability evaluated by the Duration Pattern Test is not influenced by mild to moderate sensoryneural hearing loss.

  1. Clinical significance of temporal bone CT with regard to hearing preservation in acoustic neurinoma removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezu, Hiromichi; Seki, Yojirou; Aiba, Tadashi

    1988-02-01

    Since Rand and Kurze discussed the possibility of the anatomic preservation of the cochlear nerve via the posterior fossa transmeatal approach for the acoustic neurinoma, there have been increasingly many reports on the preservation of cochlear nerve function. With recent advances in diagnostic tools, today's neurosurgeon is able to make an earlier and more precise diagnosis of acoustic neurinomas even when the patient has good hearing. If useful hearing is to be kept, the cochlear nerve and blood supply of the labyrinth have to be preserved. In addition, surgical entry into the labyrinth, upon the removal of the posterior wall of the internal auditory canal, must be avoided, since it is likely to result in permanent hearing loss. Because of its superior contrast and spatial resolution, thin-section and high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone has the great advantage of demonstrating the exact relationship of the internal auditory canal to the posterior semicircular canal, the vestibule, and the common crus. In this study, thin-section, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone was performed in 11 cases of acoustic neurinoma pre- and postoperatively. At operation, the lateral limit of the bone removal of the posterior internal auditory canal was determined on the basis of preoperative computed tomography of the temporal bone. As a result, inadvertent entry into the labyrinth was avoided, and useful hearing was preserved in 8 cases. In order to preserve useful hearing following total tumor removal, it is essential to plan the operative strategy meticulously on the basis of the findings of the preoperative investigation, Including temporal bone CT.

  2. Impact of Early Intervention on Expressive and Receptive Language Development among Young Children with Permanent Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Choo, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    Along with early detection, early intervention (EI) is critical for children identified with hearing loss. Evidence indicates that many children with sensorineural hearing loss experience improved language abilities if EI services were initiated at an "early" age. The present study's objectives were to determine the impact of a state EI program on…

  3. Homozygosity for the V37I Connexin 26 mutation in three unrelated children with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bason, L; Dudley, T; Lewis, K; Shah, U; Potsic, W; Ferraris, A; Fortina, P; Rappaport, E; Krantz, I D

    2002-06-01

    Mutations in the Connexin 26 (Cx26) gene have been found to account for approximately 20% of all childhood deafness. This number approaches 50% in documented recessive cases of hearing loss. Two mutations, 35delG and 167delT, account for the majority of reported mutations in this gene, but to date, more than 60 mutations have been described. No other single gene has yet been identified that contributes this significantly to the aetiology of hearing loss. Several mutations in this gene have been found to predominate in specific ethnic populations (167delT in Ashkenazi Jews and 235delC in Japanese individuals). While the majority of mutations found in Cx26 result in frame shifts and premature terminations, a number of missense mutations have also been identified. The V37I missense mutation has been reported as both a polymorphism and as a potentially disease-causing missense mutation. The present authors have identified three unrelated individuals with sensorineural hearing loss who are homozygous for this mutation. One individual is of Philippine ancestry, another is from a Chinese and Cambodian background, while the third is of Chinese ancestry, raising the possibility that this mutation may be more frequent among populations in eastern Asia. PMID:12121355

  4. Audioprofile-directed screening identifies novel mutations in KCNQ4 causing hearing loss at the DFNA2 locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S.; Tack, Dylan; McMordie, Sarah J.; DeLuca, Adam; Hur, In Ae; Nishimura, Carla; Huygen, Patrick; Casavant, Thomas L.; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gene identification in small families segregating autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss presents a significant challenge. To address this challenge, we have developed a machine learning based software tool, AudioGene v2.0, to prioritize candidate genes for mutation screening based on audioprofiling. Methods We analyzed audiometric data from a cohort of American families with high frequency autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss. Those families predicted to have a DFNA2 audioprofile by AudioGene v2.0 were screened for mutations in the KCNQ4 gene. Results Two novel missense mutations and a stop mutation were detected in three American families predicted to have DFNA2-related deafness for a positive predictive value of 6.3%. The false negative rate was 0%. The missense mutations were located in the channel pore region and the stop mutation was in transmembrane domain S5. The latter is the first DFNA2-causing stop mutation reported in KCNQ4. Conclusions Our data suggest: (1) that the N-terminal end of the P-loop is crucial in maintaining the integrity of the KCNQ4 channel pore; and, (2) that AudioGene audioprofile analysis can effectively prioritize genes for mutation screening in small families segregating high frequency autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss. AudioGene software will be made freely available to clinicians and researchers once it has been fullly validated. PMID:18941426

  5. Intronic Variants in the NFKB1 Gene May Influence Hearing Forecast in Patients with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Sonia; Sanchez, Elena; Requena, Teresa; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Benitez, Jesus; Perez, Nicolas; Trinidad, Gabriel; Soto-Varela, Andrés; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Fraile, Jesus; Perez, Paz; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Batuecas, Angel; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Aran, Ismael; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Meniere's disease is an episodic vestibular syndrome associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and tinnitus. Patients with MD have an elevated prevalence of several autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis), which suggests a shared autoimmune background. Functional variants of several genes involved in the NF-?B pathway, such as REL, TNFAIP3, NFKB1 and TNIP1, have been associated with two or more immune-mediated diseases and allelic variations in the TLR10 gene may influence bilateral affectation and clinical course in MD. We have genotyped 716 cases of MD and 1628 controls by using the ImmunoChip, a high-density genotyping array containing 186 autoimmune loci, to explore the association of immune system related-loci with sporadic MD. Although no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached a genome-wide significant association (p40 dB HL) (log-rank test, corrected p values were p?=?0.009 for rs3774937 and p?=?0.003 for rs4648011, respectively). No variants influenced hearing in bilateral MD. Our data support that the allelic variants rs3774937 and rs4648011 can modify hearing outcome in patients with MD and unilateral SNHL. PMID:25397881

  6. Intronic variants in the NFKB1 gene may influence hearing forecast in patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in Meniere's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Sonia; Sanchez, Elena; Requena, Teresa; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Benitez, Jesus; Perez, Nicolas; Trinidad, Gabriel; Soto-Varela, Andrés; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Fraile, Jesus; Perez, Paz; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Batuecas, Angel; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M; Aran, Ismael; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Meniere's disease is an episodic vestibular syndrome associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and tinnitus. Patients with MD have an elevated prevalence of several autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis), which suggests a shared autoimmune background. Functional variants of several genes involved in the NF-?B pathway, such as REL, TNFAIP3, NFKB1 and TNIP1, have been associated with two or more immune-mediated diseases and allelic variations in the TLR10 gene may influence bilateral affectation and clinical course in MD. We have genotyped 716 cases of MD and 1628 controls by using the ImmunoChip, a high-density genotyping array containing 186 autoimmune loci, to explore the association of immune system related-loci with sporadic MD. Although no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached a genome-wide significant association (p40 dB HL) (log-rank test, corrected p values were p?=?0.009 for rs3774937 and p?=?0.003 for rs4648011, respectively). No variants influenced hearing in bilateral MD. Our data support that the allelic variants rs3774937 and rs4648011 can modify hearing outcome in patients with MD and unilateral SNHL. PMID:25397881

  7. Self-Evaluation Scores of Hearing Difficulties and Quality of Life Components among Retired Workers with Noise-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYAKITA, T.; UEDA, A.; ZUSHO, H.; KUDOH, Y.

    2002-02-01

    This study is intended to clarify the relationships between hearing loss caused both by noise exposure and aging and self-rated scores of hearing disabilities and to elucidate the structure of the quality of life (QOL) determinants and their moderating conditions among retired workers with noise-related hearing loss. The questionnaire consisted of three parts: background questions, the hearing disabilities and handicap scale (HDHS), and questions regarding QOL covering five areas, self-rated health, personal health practice, social support network, life satisfaction, and life events. Two hundred ten retired workers aged 56-65 years old (60·6±1·6) with noise-related hearing loss responded to our questionnaire. All were previously engaged in noise exposed work such as shipbuilding, steel and woodwork. According to the hearing disability score (DIS score), subjects were divided into three groups and comparisons were made of the hearing handicap score (HD score) among those groups. Although groups with a higher DIS score showed a higher HD score, a large individual difference in HD score was observed in each of the three groups with the same DIS score level. The results of multiple regression analysis including two variables (life satisfaction and HD score) as the dependent variables and seven variables as the independent variables showed that the strongest explanatory variable for life satisfaction was social support network, followed by handicaps caused by hearing disabilities, self-rated health and personal health practice. It was demonstrated that hearing disabilities and handicap measured by the Japanese version of the HDHS were directly associated with the deterioration in QOL. Measures of the social support network, life satisfaction, and hearing disabilities and handicaps may assist in the detection of workers who can be targeted for a variety of interventions, such as audiological rehabilitation or the creation of a barrier-free community that is supportive of the hearing impaired.

  8. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  9. Musical hallucination associated with hearing loss / Alucinações musicais associadas a perda auditiva

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    T G, Sanchez; S C M, Rocha; K A B, Knobel; M A, Kii; R M R, Santos; C B, Pereira.

    Full Text Available Apesar das alucinações musicais causarem grandes repercussões na vida dos pacientes, sempre foram pouco valorizadas e estudadas pelos profissionais. Alguns investigadores sugerem uma combinação de disfunções periféricas e centrais como o mecanismo causador das alucinações. A fisiopatologia mais acei [...] ta entre os pesquisadores de alucinação musical associada à hipoacusia ou anacusia (causada por lesão coclear, de nervo coclear ou interrupção de informação na ponte ou mesencéfalo) é a desibinição de circuitos de memória auditiva devido à deprivação sensorial. Em relação às áreas corticais envolvidas na alucinação musical, há evidência de que um mecanismo excitatório no córtex temporal superior, como nas epilepsias, seja responsável pela alucinação musical. Finalmente, considerando a lateralidade, estudos funcionais de percepção e imagética em indivíduos normais mostraram que canções com letras levam a ativação temporal bilateral e melodias ativam apenas o lobo temporal direito. É bem documentado o efeito de aparelhos auditivos na alucinação musical através de uma melhora da perda auditiva. Neurolépticos, antidepressivos e anticonvulsivantes têm sido usados no tratamento de alucinação musical na experiência clínica, mas não há eficácia comprovada na maioria dos casos. Há casos descritos na literatura com melhora das alucinações musicais com uso de carbamazepina, meclobemide e donepezil, entretanto sem resultados consistentes. Abstract in english In spite of the fact that musical hallucination have a significant impact on patients' lives, they have received very little attention of experts. Some researchers agree on a combination of peripheral and central dysfunctions as the mechanism that causes hallucination. The most accepted physiopathol [...] ogy of musical hallucination associated to hearing loss (caused by cochlear lesion, cochlear nerve lesion or by interruption of mesencephalon or pontine auditory information) is the disinhibition of auditory memory circuits due to sensory deprivation. Concerning the cortical area involved in musical hallucination, there is evidence that the excitatory mechanism of the superior temporal gyrus, as in epilepsies, is responsible for musical hallucination. In musical release hallucination there is also activation of the auditory association cortex. Finally, considering the laterality, functional studies with musical perception and imagery in normal individuals showed that songs with words cause bilateral temporal activation and melodies activate only the right lobe. The effect of hearing aids on the improvement of musical hallucination as a result of the hearing loss improvement is well documented. It happens because auditory hallucination may be influenced by the external acoustical environment. Neuroleptics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used in the treatment of musical hallucination. Cases of improvement with the administration of carbamazepine, meclobemide and donepezil were reported, but the results obtained were not consistent.

  10. Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Black and White Elders: Results of the Cardiovascular Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sheila R.; Kuller, Lewis; Talbott, Evelyn O.; McHugh-Pemu, Kathleen; Buhari, Alhaji M.; Xu, Xiaohui

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the impact of age, gender, and race on the prevalence and severity of hearing loss in elder adults, aged 72-96 years, after accounting for income, education, smoking, and clinical and subclinical cardiovascular disease. Methods: Air-conduction thresholds for standard and extended high-frequency…

  11. Relationships between Early Child Factors and School Readiness Skills in Young Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Marjorie; DesJardin, Jean L.; Shea, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this longitudinal study is to examine the relationships between early child factors (i.e., age at identification, enrollment in early intervention, oral language skills) and school readiness skills (i.e., conceptual knowledge) in a group of young children with hearing loss (HL). Standardized language, cognition, and conceptual…

  12. Strategy for the customized mass screening of genetic sensorineural hearing loss in koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mun Young; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2014-09-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common sensorineural disorder. More than half of congenital bilateral profound deafness cases have been estimated to be attributed to genetic cause. Identification of genetic cause can provide valuable information. We developed new diagnostic strategy combining phenotype-driven candidate gene approach and targeted exome sequencing to find out the causative mutation of hearing loss. The causative mutation detection rates of this strategy were 78.1% and 54.8% in Korean multiplex families and sporadic severe to profound hearing loss families, respectively. The most frequent causative genes of Korean multiplex families were SLC26A4 and POU3F4. The other causative genes were MRNR1, WFS1, COCH, TECTA, MYO6, COL11A2, EYA4, GJB3, OTOF, STRC, MYO3A, and GJB2. The most frequent causative gene of Korean sporadic severe to profound hearing loss families was SLC26A4 followed by GJB2, CHD7, and CDH23. Based upon the results, the value of this strategy as a diagnostic tool seems to be promising. Although whole genome and exome sequencing have advanced as the development of next-generation sequencing, this new strategy could be a good screening and diagnostic tool to find the causative mutations. PMID:25279224

  13. Telepractice: A Wide-Angle View for Persons with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Ellen R.; Cason, Jana

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the current status of telepractice as a service delivery model for persons with hearing loss. Telepractice can be broadly viewed as the delivery of preventative, habilitation, or rehabilitation services through telecommunications technology. Telemedicine and telehealth are closely aligned to telepractice, often with overlapping…

  14. Lessons for Inclusion: Classroom Experiences of Students with Mild and Moderate Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Up to 15 % of the student population in integrated classrooms has mild or moderate hearing loss (MMHL) (Niskar et al., 2001), a communication disability that can impact language development, academic performance, and social-emotional quality of life. Due to the mostly intelligible speech of these students, teachers may easily overlook their…

  15. Measurement of hearing loss due to perforated tympanic membrane using image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardesai, Neha; Sardesai, Ravindra; Chang, Chein-I.

    2014-05-01

    The tympanic membrane (ear drum) is a thin tissue film that is stretched between the outer and middle ear. Sound waves travel from outside the ear, and strike the tympanic membrane resulting in its vibration. These vibrations amplify the sound waves and transmit them to the ossicles (auditory bones). The magnitude of amplification is directly proportional to vibrating area of tympanic membrane. Hence a perforation in this membrane would result in hearing loss. Pure-tone audiometry is the traditional procedure used to detect the amount of hearing loss in a patient. However, it is lengthy and less efficient, as it largely depends on the response of the patient to sound intensity and frequency of pure-tones. We present a relatively more efficient approach to determine hearing loss due to perforated tympanic membrane using image processing techniques. We describe an algorithm that uses unsharp masking to sharpen images of the perforations as well as the tympanic membrane. Then, it converts the image into a binary image using thresholding. A median filter is applied to get rid of the noise component in the image. The ratio of the area of perforation and total area of tympanic membrane will define the percentage of hearing loss. Our approach will eliminate the error introduced due to patient dependency as in the traditional method.

  16. Communication, Academic, and Social Skills of Young Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriks-Brophy, Alice; Durieux-Smith, Andree; Olds, Janet; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M.; Duquette, Cheryll; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reports on data collected as part of a larger research study designed to investigate factors that facilitate the integration of children with hearing loss into mainstream environments. Aspects of communicative, academic, and social functioning for 43 adolescents and young adults were examined using questionnaires. In addition,…

  17. Passing otoacustic emissions as a complementar method in the topodiagnosis of the neurosensories hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschi, Cacineli Marion de

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To evaluate the otoacustic emissions (EOAETs in patients with neurosensory hearing loss do not belong to the clinical routine. However it would obtain valuables information concerning the topodiagnosis. Objective: To identify signs of retro cochlear alteration in individuals with neurosensory dysacusis diagnosis. Method: A transversal, observational, quantitative and, prospective study. Were analyzed 34 patients' records of users of the Speech Therapy Attendance Service. In the study were included individuals with neurosensory hearing loss of moderate to deep degree. An evaluation of Passing Otoacustic Emissions (EOAETs was performed in all the individuals of the sample. Those that do not presented EOAETs had the external and middle ear' condition evaluates through meatoscopy and tympanometry to eliminate ears with sings of conductive alteration. Results: Before that the exclusion criteria were applied, they have remained 13 individuals, totalizing 26 ears: four with hearing loss of moderate degree (15%, four with moderately severe degree (15%, two with severe degree (8%, 15 with deep degree (58% and, one with deafness (4%. The tympanometric curves found were 22 (85% Type A and, four (15% Type C. It was verified the presence of EOAETs in only two ears (8% of a same individual. Conclusion: It was verified the predominance of the EOAETs absence in individuals with neurosensory hearing loss of moderate to deep degree. In one case the EOAETs were registered, that suggest retrocochlear alteration. Raising suspicion of retrocochlear alterations.

  18. Comprehensive genetic testing for hereditary hearing loss using massively parallel sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, A. Eliot; DeLuca, Adam P.; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Taylor, Kyle R.; Gurrola, José; Scherer, Steve; Scheetz, Todd E.; Smith, Richard J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The extreme genetic heterogeneity of nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL) makes genetic diagnosis expensive and time consuming using available methods. To assess the feasibility of target-enrichment and massively parallel sequencing technologies to interrogate all exons of all genes implicated in NSHL, we tested nine patients diagnosed with hearing loss. Solid-phase (NimbleGen) or solution-based (SureSelect) sequence capture, followed by 454 or Illumina sequencing, respectively, were compared. Sequencing reads were mapped using GSMAPPER, BFAST, and BOWTIE, and pathogenic variants were identified using a custom-variant calling and annotation pipeline (ASAP) that incorporates publicly available in silico pathogenicity prediction tools (SIFT, BLOSUM, Polyphen2, and Align-GVGD). Samples included one negative control, three positive controls (one biological replicate), and six unknowns (10 samples total), in which we genotyped 605 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by Sanger sequencing to measure sensitivity and specificity for SureSelect-Illumina and NimbleGen-454 methods at saturating sequence coverage. Causative mutations were identified in the positive controls but not in the negative control. In five of six idiopathic hearing loss patients we identified the pathogenic mutation. Massively parallel sequencing technologies provide sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility at levels sufficient to perform genetic diagnosis of hearing loss. PMID:21078986

  19. Parents' Communication Decision for Children with Hearing Loss: Sources of Information and Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Kalli B.; Vallotton, Claire D.; Johnson, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    Choosing a method of communication for a child with hearing loss is a complex process that must occur early to prevent developmental consequences. Research shows that parents' decisions are influenced by professionals; parental attitudes and knowledge also may be influential. The present study investigated additional influences on parents'…

  20. [On the discussion of the new aspects of the occupational hearing loss classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, V B; Sineva, E L; Tavartkiladze, G A; Bushmanov, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to analyse the materials of verification of the newly developed classification of occupational hearing loss harmonized with the international criteria an medico-social expertise of hearing impairment. The classification is designed for the practical application in the clinical work of otorhinolaryngologists, occupational pathologists, and medico-social experts who must practice the identical approaches at all stages of the preliminary and final diagnostics of occupational ear diseases, competence assurance, and social maintenance for the subjects presenting with hearing disorders. The authors emphasize the importance of taking account of presbyacusis characteristics at the stage of pre-nosological changes of the hearing function in the subjects exposed to strong occupational noise, i.e. prior to the appearance of the «signs of noise influence on the organs of hearing". Such an approach makes it possible to eliminate the discrepancies in drawing conclusion about the presence of presbyacusis or "signs of noise influence on the organs of hearing". PMID:25246216

  1. Postural Evaluation of Vertebral Column in Children and Teenagers with Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toscano, Carla Fabiana da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posture is determined by the performance of the visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems. Children with hearing loss can present problems in their posture or postural control, enabling postural deviations and alterations to appear in their vertebral column, possibly provoked by a hypoactivity of the vestibular system as a result of deafness. Objective: To evaluate the posture of the vertebral column in children and teenagers with hearing loss at school age, taking into consideration the sample gender and age. Method: A descriptive and prospective study was performed at both Duque de Caxias School and Rotary Rehabilitation and Special Education Center in Caruaru - Pernambuco. 44 students aged between 7-17 years old, out of whom 22 were female and 22 were male, with hearing loss were evaluated. The study was developed by way of a postural evaluation, using a symmetrograph, marking specific anatomical points with stickers placed over polystyrene balls and fixed with double-sided adhesive tape. Results:The results showed that all of the individuals evaluated in this study presented some kind of postural alteration in their vertebral column. Scoliosis was the most observed alteration among the students (84.1%, followed by thoracic hyperkyphosis (68.2%. Conclusion: It has been concluded that children and teenagers with hearing loss are exposed to postural alteration in their vertebral column. Such a condition can be associated with a number of factors comprising unfavorable ergonomics of the school environment, bad postural habits and impairment of the vestibular system by virtue of the hearing loss.

  2. Targeted genomic capture and massively parallel sequencing to identify novel variants causing Chinese hereditary hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinjun; Zhu, Hongmei; Qian, Xuli; Chen, Zhibin; Yao, Jun; Lu, Yajie; Cao, Xin; Xing, Guangqian

    2014-11-12

    BackgroundHereditary hearing loss is genetically heterogeneous, and hundreds of mutations in than 60 genes are involved in this disease. Therefore, it is difficult to identify the causative gene mutations involved. In this study, we combined targeted genomic capture and massively parallel sequencing (MPS) to address this issue.MethodsUsing targeted genomic capture and MPS, 104 genes and three microRNA regions were selected and simultaneously sequenced in 23 unrelated probands of Chinese families with nonsyndromic hearing loss. The results were validated by Sanger sequencing for all available members of the probands¿ families. To analyze the possible pathogenic functional effects of the variants, three types of prediction programs (Mutation Taster, PROVEAN and SIFT) were used. A total of 195 healthy Chinese Han individuals were compared as controls to verify the novel causative mutations.ResultsOf the 23 probands, six had mutations in DFNA genes [WFS1 (n¿=¿2), COCH, ACTG1, TMC1, and POU4F3] known to cause autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. These included one novel in-frame indel mutation, three novel missense mutations and two reported missense mutations. Furthermore, one proband from a family with recessive DFNB carried two monoallelic mutations in the GJB2 and USH2A genes. All of these mutations co-segregated with the hearing loss phenotype in 36 affected individuals from 7 families and were predicted to be pathogenic.ConclusionsMutations in uncommon deafness genes contribute to a portion of nonsyndromic deafness cases. In the future, critical gene mutations may be accurately and quickly identified in families with hereditary hearing loss by targeted genomic capture and MPS. PMID:25388789

  3. Prótese implantável do ouvido médio: ganho funcional em perda auditiva mista / Middle ear implants: functional gain in mixed hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mario Emilio, Zernotti; Maria Fernanda, Di Gregorio; Andrea C. Bravo, Sarasty.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Atresia óssea e otite média crônica são os principais grupos de beneficiários com implantes do ouvido médio. Cirurgia de atresia é tecnicamente complexo, tem muitas complicações e resultados funcionais pobres. Os aparelhos auditivos osseointegrados são uma alternativa. Eles fornecem um ganho funcion [...] al muito bom, mas tem muitos problemas de pele e osseointegração. Na otite média crônica, ossiculoplastias resolveram parcialmente o problema de audição. Infelizmente, em alguns casos de otites média e cavidades abertas, equipamentos com aparelhos auditivos convencionais são difíceis e muitas vezes insatisfatórios. OBJETIVO: Determinar a utilidade de um implante do ouvido médio. Desenho de estudo longitudinal. MÉTODOS: Vibrant-Soundbrigde foi implantado em oito pacientes com perda auditiva mista grave. Quatro apresentavam otite média crônica e quatro apresentavam atresia unilateral. A colocação do estimulador (FMT ou Floating Mass Transducer) foi em cinco pacientes na janela redonda, dois no estribo e um na janela oval. RESULTADOS: Ganho funcional foi de 35 dB, 40 dB, 48,7 dB e 50 dB para as frequências de 500, 1000, 2000 e 4000 Hz, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: Vibrant-Soundbrigde é uma excelente opção no restabelecimento da audição em perda auditiva mista grave e profunda. Ele fornece um excelente ganho funcional em doenças de difícil tratamento com equipamentos convencionais. Abstract in english Osseous atresia and chronic otitis media are diseases benefit with middle ear implants. Surgery for atresia is technically complicated, has significant number of complications and functional results are often poor. The osseointegrated hearing aids are an alternative. They provide a very good functio [...] nal gain, but have many problems with the skin and osseointegration. In chronic otitis media, the ossiculoplasty solved partially the hearing problem. Unfortunately in some cases of otitis media and in open cavities fitted with conventional hearing aids the gain is unsatisfactory. AIM: To determine the usefulness of an active middle ear implant. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Longitudinal Study. Vibrant- Soundbrigde was implanted in eight patients with severe mixed hearing loss. Four patients had chronic otitis media and four had unilateral atresia. The placement of the stimulator (FMT or Floating Mass Transducer) was in five patients on round window, two in stapes and one in the oval window. RESULTS: Functional gain was 35 dB, 40 dB, 48.7 dB and 50 dB for the frequencies 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz, respectively. CONCLUSION: Vibrant-Soundbrigde is an excellent option in hearing recovery in severe and profound mixed hearing loss. It also provides an excellent functional gain in diseases difficult to treat with conventional hearing aids.

  4. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

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    Full Text Available ... Changes Health and Aging Retirement Living Continuing to Work as a Senior with Vision Loss Get Connected Join the Community Calendar of Events Message Boards Blog Newsletter Announcements ...

  5. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

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    Full Text Available ... Services Join Our Mission Help us expand our resources for people with vision loss. Donate Now Our Mission VisionAware helps adults who are losing their sight continue to live ...

  6. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

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    Full Text Available ... Resources for Independent Living with Vision Loss American Foundation for the Blind ® | Reader's Digest Partners for Sight ... E-mail: visionaware@afb.net Copyright © 2015 American Foundation for the Blind. All rights reserved. Material provided ...

  7. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

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    Full Text Available ... Personal Stories Handling the News Help Others Understand Your Vision Problems Coping with Vision Loss For Family and Friends Support Groups and Other Resources Working with People ...

  8. Hand-arm vibration in the aetiology of hearing loss in lumberjacks.

    OpenAIRE

    Pyykko?, I.; Starck, J.; Fa?rkkila?, M.; Hoikkala, M.; Korhonen, O.; Nurminen, M.

    1981-01-01

    A longitudinal study of hearing loss was conducted among a group of lumberjacks in the years 1972 and 1974--8. The number of subjects increased from 72 in 1972 to 203 in 1978. They were classified according to (1) a history of vibration-induced white finger (VWF), (2) age, (3) duration of exposure, an (4) duration of ear muff usage. The hearing level at 4000 Hz was used to indicate the noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS). The lumberjacks were exposed, at their present pace of work...

  9. [Vohwinkel syndrome. Hearing loss and keratoderma on the hands and feet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, S; Butsch, F; Schopf, R; Keilmann, A

    2013-07-01

    The combination of sensorineural hearing loss and keratoderma on the hands and feet is rare. We report the case of a child that failed newborn hearing screening and also showed keratoderma on both hands and feet. The child's father exhibited the same constellation of symptoms, which is typical for mutilating keratoderma with deafness (Vohwinkel syndrome). This hereditary autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutation of the GJB2 gene that encodes the protein connexin 26. In our case it was highly likely that the GJB2 gene in the father carried a spontaneous mutation that was inherited by the daughter. PMID:23247752

  10. Characterizing auditory processing and perception in individual listeners with sensorineural hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten LØve; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    This study considered consequences of sensorineural hearing loss in ten listeners. The characterization of individual hearing loss was based on psychoacoustic data addressing audiometric pure-tone sensitivity, cochlear compression, frequency selectivity, temporal resolution, and intensity discrimination. In the experiments it was found that listeners with comparable audiograms can show very different results in the supra-threshold measures. In an attempt to account for the observed individual data, a model of auditory signal processing and perception [Jepsen et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 422–438 (2008)] was used as a framework. The parameters of the cochlear processing stage of the model were adjusted to account for behaviorally estimated individual basilar-membrane inputoutput functions and the audiogram, from which the amounts of inner hair-cell and outer hair-cell losses were estimated as a function of frequency. All other model parameters were left unchanged. The predictions showed a reasonably good agreement with the measured individual data in the frequency selectivity and forward masking conditions while the variation of intensity discrimination thresholds across listeners was underestimated by the model. The model and the associated parameters for individual hearing-impaired listeners might be useful for investigating effects of individual hearing impairment in more complex conditions, such as speech intelligibility in noise.

  11. Perspectives for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by cellular regeneration of the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Branco, Mario S; Cabrera, Sonia; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2014-11-20

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a caused by the loss of the cochlear hair cells with the consequent deafferentation of spiral ganglion neurons. Humans do not show endogenous cellular regeneration in the inner ear and there is no exogenous therapy that allows the replacement of the damaged hair cells. Currently, treatment is based on the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants that present different outcomes, some difficulties in auditory discrimination and a limited useful life. More advanced technology is hindered by the functional capacity of the remaining spiral ganglion neurons. The latest advances with stem cell therapy and cellular reprogramming have developed several possibilities to induce endogenous regeneration or stem cell transplantation to replace damaged inner ear hair cells and restore hearing function. With further knowledge of the cellular and molecular biology of the inner ear and its embryonic development, it will be possible to use induced stem cells as in vitro models of disease and as replacement cellular therapy. Investigation in this area is focused on generating cellular therapy with clinical use for the treatment of profound sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25459416

  12. Suspeita da perda auditiva por familiares Hearing loss suspected by the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Ferreira de Souza Monteiro

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: caracterizar e analisar a suspeita de perda auditiva, por parte de familiares, em crianças assistidas na Associação de Pais e Amigos do Deficiente Auditivo (APADA em Teresina-PI. MÉTODOS: estudo descritivo realizado na APADA no período de setembro a outubro de 2006, com aplicação de formulários para 14 mães e/ou responsáveis para levantamento das variáveis: identificar o familiar que suspeitou da perda auditiva na criança; o motivo que levou a suspeita; a idade da criança quando da detecção pelo familiar; a atitude da família após a descoberta da perda auditiva; a idade da criança quando ocorreu procura profissional e a orientação recebida; o tempo entre a suspeita da perda auditiva, por parte do familiar, e a confirmação profissional de diagnóstico. RESULTADOS: os dados apontam que 86% da suspeita foi percebido pelas mães. O motivo da suspeita foi pela não reação ao som por parte da criança (71%. 36% dos familiares perceberam o problema na idade de 7 a 12 meses. 79% tiveram como primeira atitude procurar o médico, 36% procuraram o profissional da saúde com até um ano de idade, 29% receberam a orientação do profissional para o uso do aparelho auditivo e tiveram a confirmação da perda auditiva de 7 meses a 1 ano de idade ou após os 4 anos. CONCLUSÃO: o diagnóstico da perda auditiva foi tardio frente a suspeita por parte dos familiares e dos profissionais de saúde e não estiveram relacionadas com os programas da triagem auditiva neonatal.PURPOSE: to analyze and characterize children suspected by the family of hearing loss attended at Associação de Pais e Amigos do Deficiente Auditivo (APADA in Teresina, PI. METHODS: a descriptive study was carried out at PFHIA from September to October 2006. Form were filled out by 14 mothers and/or the responsible adult to find the following variables: identify the family member who suspected hearing loss in the child; the reason which led to the suspicion; the age of the child when hearing loss was detected by the family member; the attitude of the family after discovering the hearing loss; the age of the child when professional help was obtained and the orientation received; the time lapse from suspicion of hearing loss by the family to professional confirmation. RESULTS: the data shows that hearing loss was suspected by the mothers in 86%. The reason for the suspicion was no reaction to sound from the child (71%. 36% of the families noticed the problem at the age of 7 to 12 months, 79% looked for medical help as their first attitude, 36% looked for a health professional before 1 year of age, 29% received the health orientation to use hearing aids and had the confirmation of hearing loss from 7 months to 1 year of age or after the age of 4. CONCLUSION: the diagnosis of hearing loss was late and discovered by members of the family and health professionals and was not related to newborn hearing screening programs.

  13. Suspeita da perda auditiva por familiares / Hearing loss suspected by the family

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Claudete Ferreira de Souza, Monteiro; Janaína Mendes de Sousa, Caldas; Nilena Carla Monteiro Araújo Arêa, Leão; Marina Rocha, Soares.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVOS: caracterizar e analisar a suspeita de perda auditiva, por parte de familiares, em crianças assistidas na Associação de Pais e Amigos do Deficiente Auditivo (APADA) em Teresina-PI. MÉTODOS: estudo descritivo realizado na APADA no período de setembro a outubro de 2006, com aplicação de form [...] ulários para 14 mães e/ou responsáveis para levantamento das variáveis: identificar o familiar que suspeitou da perda auditiva na criança; o motivo que levou a suspeita; a idade da criança quando da detecção pelo familiar; a atitude da família após a descoberta da perda auditiva; a idade da criança quando ocorreu procura profissional e a orientação recebida; o tempo entre a suspeita da perda auditiva, por parte do familiar, e a confirmação profissional de diagnóstico. RESULTADOS: os dados apontam que 86% da suspeita foi percebido pelas mães. O motivo da suspeita foi pela não reação ao som por parte da criança (71%). 36% dos familiares perceberam o problema na idade de 7 a 12 meses. 79% tiveram como primeira atitude procurar o médico, 36% procuraram o profissional da saúde com até um ano de idade, 29% receberam a orientação do profissional para o uso do aparelho auditivo e tiveram a confirmação da perda auditiva de 7 meses a 1 ano de idade ou após os 4 anos. CONCLUSÃO: o diagnóstico da perda auditiva foi tardio frente a suspeita por parte dos familiares e dos profissionais de saúde e não estiveram relacionadas com os programas da triagem auditiva neonatal. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to analyze and characterize children suspected by the family of hearing loss attended at Associação de Pais e Amigos do Deficiente Auditivo (APADA) in Teresina, PI. METHODS: a descriptive study was carried out at PFHIA from September to October 2006. Form were filled out by 14 mothers and/o [...] r the responsible adult to find the following variables: identify the family member who suspected hearing loss in the child; the reason which led to the suspicion; the age of the child when hearing loss was detected by the family member; the attitude of the family after discovering the hearing loss; the age of the child when professional help was obtained and the orientation received; the time lapse from suspicion of hearing loss by the family to professional confirmation. RESULTS: the data shows that hearing loss was suspected by the mothers in 86%. The reason for the suspicion was no reaction to sound from the child (71%). 36% of the families noticed the problem at the age of 7 to 12 months, 79% looked for medical help as their first attitude, 36% looked for a health professional before 1 year of age, 29% received the health orientation to use hearing aids and had the confirmation of hearing loss from 7 months to 1 year of age or after the age of 4. CONCLUSION: the diagnosis of hearing loss was late and discovered by members of the family and health professionals and was not related to newborn hearing screening programs.

  14. Effect of intravenous administration of steroids in the management of sudden sensori-neural hearing loss: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunandhan, S; Agarwal, Anoop Kumar; Natarajan, Kiran; Murali, Sathiya; Anand Kumar, R S; Kameswaran, Mohan

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and outcomes of intravenous high dose steroids in patients diagnosed with sudden sensori-neural hearing loss (SSNHL). The study also looked at the various co-morbidities influencing the outcomes of IV steroid therapy and also evaluated the improvement in associated symptoms like vertigo and tinnitus. This prospective study involved 30 patients treated during the 1 year period from January 2010 to 2011 in the Department of Otolaryngology, Madras ENT Research Foundation, Chennai. Male: female ratio was 1.3:1 and age range was 19-80 years. For all patients, pre treatment pure tone audiometry (PTA) was compared with post treatment PTA at 1 month. Treatment was given in the form of intravenous high dose methyl prednisolone. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 (20 pts) included SSNHL with no co-morbidity, group 2 (10 pts) included SSNHL with various co-morbidities. The mean hearing level improved from an average of 79.53 dB (HL) before treatment to 42.33 dB (HL) after treatment. In patients with predominantly low frequency HL (16 pts) PTA improved from 76.01 to 32.6 dB while in high frequency HL PTA improved from 83.55 to 53.43 dB. In our study of 30 patients, complete recovery occurred in 56.66% cases and marked improvement (>30 dB) in 16.66% patients. There was no improvement in 26.66% cases. Patients in group 2 had co-morbid factors like diabetes mellitus, dys-thyroidism and hypertension. A statistically significant improvement in the associated symptoms of tinnitus/vertigo, were also noted after IV steroid treatment. According to our results, emergency administration of high dose of Intra-venous corticosteroids to patients with SSNHL is highly recommended. Patients with high frequency preservation have better hearing improvement at the end of treatment. The critical time period for commencing IV treatment is less than 6 h from onset of hearing loss in order to restore normal hearing. High dose Intravenous steroids are a safe and effective treatment in sudden sensori-neural hearing loss. PMID:24427572

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss among liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinder infusion workers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Ju; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2009-12-01

    We assessed the exposure levels of noise, estimated prevalence, and identify risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among male workers with a cross-sectional study in a liquefied petroleum gas cylinder infusion factory in Taipei City. Male in-field workers exposed to noise and administrative controls were enrolled in 2006 and 2007. Face-to-face interviews were applied for demographics, employment history, and drinking/smoking habit. We then performed the measurements on noise levels in field and administration area, and hearing thresholds on study subjects with standard apparatus and protocols. Existence of hearing loss > 25 dBHL for the average of 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 2 kHz was accordingly determined for NIHL. The effects from noise exposure, predisposing characteristics, employment-related factors, and personal habits to NIHL were estimated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. A total of 75 subjects were involved in research and 56.8% of in-field workers had NIHL. Between the in-field and administration groups, hearing thresholds on the worse ear showed significant differences at frequencies of 4 k, 6 k, and 8 kHz with aging considered. Adjusted odds ratio for field noise exposure (OR=99.57, 95% CI: 3.53, 2,808.74) and frequent tea or coffee consumption (OR=0.03, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.51) were found significant. Current study addressed NIHL in a specific industry in Taiwan. Further efforts in minimizing its impact are still in need. PMID:19996535

  16. Hand-arm vibration in the aetiology of hearing loss in lumberjacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkö, I; Starck, J; Färkkilä, M; Hoikkala, M; Korhonen, O; Nurminen, M

    1981-01-01

    A longitudinal study of hearing loss was conducted among a group of lumberjacks in the years 1972 and 1974--8. The number of subjects increased from 72 in 1972 to 203 in 1978. They were classified according to (1) a history of vibration-induced white finger (VWF), (2) age, (3) duration of exposure, an (4) duration of ear muff usage. The hearing level at 4000 Hz was used to indicate the noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS). The lumberjacks were exposed, at their present pace of work, to noise, Leq values 96-103 dB(A), and to the vibration of a chain saw (linear acceleration 30-70 ms-2). The chain saws of the early 1960s were more hazardous, with the average noise level of 111 dB(A) and a variation acceleration of 60-180 ms-2. When classified on the basis of age, the lumberjacks with VWF had about a 10 dB greater NIPTS than subjects without VWF. NIPTS increased with the duration of exposure to chain saw noise, but with equal noise exposure the NIPTS was about 10 dB greater in lumberjacks with VWF than without VWF. With the same duration of ear protection the lumberjacks with VWF consistently had about a 10 dB greater NIPTS than those without VWF. The differences in NIPTS were statistically significant. The possible reason for more advanced NIPTS in subjects with VWF is that vibration might operate in both of these disorders through a common mechanism--that is, producing a vasoconstriction in both cochlear and digital blood vessels as a result of sympathetic nervous system activity. PMID:7272242

  17. Loudness modulation after transient and permanent hearing loss: implications for tinnitus and hyperacusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, P; Schönwiesner, M; Hébert, S

    2014-12-26

    Loudness is the primary perceptual correlate of sound intensity. The relationship between sound intensity and loudness is not fixed, and can be modified by short-term sound deprivation or stimulation. Deprivation increases sound sensitivity, whereas stimulation decreases it. We review the effects of short-term auditory deprivation and stimulation on the auditory central nervous system of humans and animals, and we extend the discussion to permanent auditory deprivation (hearing loss) and auditory pathologies of loudness perception. Although there is sufficient evidence to conclude that loudness can be modulated in normal hearing listeners by temporary sound deprivation and stimulation, evidence is scanter for the hearing-impaired listeners. In addition, cortical effects of sound deprivation and stimulation in humans, which may correlate with loudness coding, are still largely unknown and should be the target of future research. PMID:25135356

  18. Progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in CLIC5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Oonk, Anne M M; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; Draaisma, Jos M T; Gandía, Marta; Oostrik, Jaap; Neveling, Kornelia; Kunst, Henricus P M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; del Castillo, Ignacio; Pennings, Ronald J E; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Schraders, Margit

    2015-02-01

    In a consanguineous Turkish family diagnosed with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI), a homozygous region of 47.4?Mb was shared by the two affected siblings on chromosome 6p21.1-q15. This region contains 247 genes including the known deafness gene MYO6. No pathogenic variants were found in MYO6, neither with sequence analysis of the coding region and splice sites nor with mRNA analysis. Subsequent candidate gene evaluation revealed CLIC5 as an excellent candidate gene. The orthologous mouse gene is mutated in the jitterbug mutant that exhibits progressive hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction. Mutation analysis of CLIC5 revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation c.96T>A (p.(Cys32Ter)) that segregated with the hearing loss. Further analysis of CLIC5 in 213 arNSHI patients from mostly Dutch and Spanish origin did not reveal any additional pathogenic variants. CLIC5 mutations are thus not a common cause of arNSHI in these populations. The hearing loss in the present family had an onset in early childhood and progressed from mild to severe or even profound before the second decade. Impaired hearing is accompanied by vestibular areflexia and in one of the patients with mild renal dysfunction. Although we demonstrate that CLIC5 is expressed in many other human tissues, no additional symptoms were observed in these patients. In conclusion, our results show that CLIC5 is a novel arNSHI gene involved in progressive hearing impairment, vestibular and possibly mild renal dysfunction in a family of Turkish origin. PMID:24781754

  19. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Senior with Vision Loss Get Connected Join the Community Calendar of Events Message Boards Blog Newsletter Announcements ... national and local services, and a supportive online community. AFB’s Family of Sites AFB.org FamilyConnect ® CareerConnect ® ...

  20. Loss-of-Function Mutations of ILDR1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment DFNB42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Guntram; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Kakar, Naseebullah; von Ameln, Simon; Grillet, Nicolas; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Ansar, Muhammad; Basit, Sulman; Javed, Qamar; Morell, Robert J.; Nasreen, Nabilah; Shearer, A. Eliot; Ahmad, Adeel; Kahrizi, Kimia; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Ali, Rana A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Goebel, Ingrid; Meyer, Nicole C.; Kimberling, William J.; Webster, Jennifer A.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Schiller, Martin R.; Bahlo, Melanie; Najmabadi, Hossein; Gillespie, Peter G.; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Richard J.H.; Ahmad, Wasim; Müller, Ulrich; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By using homozygosity mapping in a consanguineous Pakistani family, we detected linkage of nonsyndromic hearing loss to a 7.6 Mb region on chromosome 3q13.31-q21.1 within the previously reported DFNB42 locus. Subsequent candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1135G>T [p.Glu379X]) in ILDR1 as the cause of hearing impairment. By analyzing additional consanguineous families with homozygosity at this locus, we detected ILDR1 mutations in the affected individuals of 10 more families from Pakistan and Iran. The identified ILDR1 variants include missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations as well as a start codon mutation in the family that originally defined the DFNB42 locus. ILDR1 encodes the evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1, a putative transmembrane receptor of unknown function. In situ hybridization detected expression of Ildr1, the murine ortholog, early in development in the vestibule and in hair cells and supporting cells of the cochlea. Expression in hair cell- and supporting cell-containing neurosensory organs is conserved in the zebrafish, in which the ildr1 ortholog is prominently expressed in the developing ear and neuromasts of the lateral line. These data identify loss-of-function mutations of ILDR1, a gene with a conserved expression pattern pointing to a conserved function in hearing in vertebrates, as underlying nonsyndromic prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:21255762

  1. Formative evaluation of a multimedia self-administered computerized hearing loss prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Vachhani, Jay J; Galvez, Gino; Griest, Susan E

    2014-11-28

    Objective: To determine which features make a computer-based hearing health education intervention effective, easy to use, and enjoyable. The study examined which features of a multimedia self-administered computerized hearing loss prevention program, developed by the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (referred to as the NCRAR-HLPP), users liked and disliked, and the reasons why. Design: A formative evaluation was conducted in which participants completed a questionnaire to assess knowledge and attitudes towards hearing and hearing loss prevention, used the NCRAR-HLPP, completed the questionnaire for a second time, and were interviewed to learn their opinions about the NCRAR-HLPP. Study sample: Twenty-five male and four female Veterans recruited from the Portland VA Medical Center who were aged between 25 and 65 years. Results: Participants reported that using the NCRAR-HLPP was a positive experience. Ease of use, multimedia content, personal relevance, and use of emotion were positive features of the program. The questionnaire showed increased knowledge and improved attitude scores following use of the program. Conclusion: This formative evaluation showed changes designed to target user preferences and improve user instructions will be made in future versions of the program. PMID:25431117

  2. A Link Loss Model for the On-body Propagation Channel for Binaural Hearing Aids

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Binaural hearing aids communicate with each other through a wireless link for synchronization. A propagation model is needed to estimate the ear-to-ear link loss for such binaural hearing aids. The link loss is a critical parameter in a link budget to decide the sensitivity of the transceiver. In this paper, we have presented a model for the deterministic component of the ear-to-ear link loss. The model takes into account the dominant paths having most of the power of the creeping wave from the transceiver in one ear to the transceiver in other ear and the effect of the protruding part of the outer ear called pinna. Simulations are done to validate the model using in-the-ear (ITE) placement of antennas at 2.45 GHz on two heterogeneous phantoms of different age-group and body size. The model agrees with the simulations. The ear-to-ear link loss between the antennas for the binaural hearing aids in the homogeneous SAM phantom is compared with a heterogeneous phantom. It is found that the absence of the pinna an...

  3. Relating hearing loss and executive functions to hearing aid users' preference for, and speech recognition with, different combinations of binaural noise reduction and microphone directionality

    OpenAIRE

    Neher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how executive functions relate to preferred hearing aid (HA) processing is sparse and seemingly inconsistent with related knowledge for speech recognition outcomes. This study thus aimed to find out if (1) performance on a measure of reading span (RS) is related to preferred binaural noise reduction (NR) strength, (2) similar relations exist for two different, non-verbal measures of executive function, (3) pure-tone average hearing loss (PTA), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and mic...

  4. Predicting the effect of hearing loss and audibility on amplified speech reception in a multi-talker listening scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, William S; Kalluri, Sridhar; Pentony, Shareka; Nooraei, Nazanin

    2013-06-01

    Auditive and cognitive influences on speech perception in a complex situation were investigated in listeners with normal hearing (NH) and hearing loss (HL). The speech corpus used was the Nonsense-Syllable Response Measure [NSRM; Woods and Kalluri, (2010). International Hearing Aid Research Conference, pp. 40-41], a 12-talker corpus which combines 154 nonsense syllables with 8 different carrier phrases. Listeners heard NSRM sentences in quiet, background noise, and in background noise plus other "jammer" NSRM sentences. All stimuli were linearly amplified. A "proficiency" value, determined from the results in quiet and the quiet-condition speech intelligibility index (SII), was used with the SII in predicting results in the other conditions. Results for nine of ten NH subjects were well-predicted (within the limits of binomial variability) in the noise condition, as were eight of these subjects in the noise-plus-jammers condition. All 16 HL results were well-predicted in the noise condition, as were 9 of the HL in the noise-plus-jammers condition. Hierarchical regression partialling out the effects of age found proficiency in noise-plus-jammers significantly correlated with results of "trail-making" tests, thought to index processing speed and attention-deployment ability, and proficiency in quiet and noise was found significantly correlated with results from a backward digit-span memory test. PMID:23742377

  5. Comparison of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential and Caloric Tests Findings in Noise Induced Hearing Loss-Affected and Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farinoosh Fakharnia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Balance disturbance is one of the non-auditory effects of noisy industrial environments that is usually neglected. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise on vestibular system among workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL, based on both vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP and caloric tests.Methods: Thirty male workers with noise-induced hearing loss and thirty male matched controls were examined by VEMP and caloric tests. Study parameters included unilateral weakness, p13 and n23 latencies, and p13-n23 amplitude. Caloric test was performed only for 20 patients.Results: No significant difference was observed in unilateral weakness between the two groups. On the other hand, the difference in mean latencies of p13 in the right ear (p=0.003 and left ear (p=0.01 was significant between the two groups. However, the difference in n23 latency was significant only in the right ear (p=0.03. There was no significant difference between groups in p13-n23 amplitude.Conclusion: It seems that pars inferior of vestibule is the susceptible part in individuals with NIHL. In general, abnormal findings in both VEMP and caloric tests were more common compared to functional symptoms such as vertigo, which may be due to central compensation and the symmetry of the disorder.

  6. Genomic analysis of a heterogeneous Mendelian phenotype: multiple novel alleles for inherited hearing loss in the Palestinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh Tom

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recessively inherited phenotypes are frequent in the Palestinian population, as the result of a historical tradition of marriages within extended kindreds, particularly in isolated villages. In order to characterise the genetics of inherited hearing loss in this population, we worked with West Bank schools for the deaf to identify children with prelingual, bilateral, severe to profound hearing loss not attributable to infection, trauma or other known environmental exposure. Of 156 families enrolled, hearing loss in 17 families (11 per cent was due to mutations in GJB2 (connexin 26, a smaller fraction of GJB2-associated deafness than in other populations. In order to estimate how many different genes might be responsible for hearing loss in this population, we evaluated ten families for linkage to all 36 known human autosomal deafness-related genes, fully sequencing hearing-related genes at any linked sites in informative relatives. Four families harboured four novel alleles of TMPRSS3 (988?A = 352stop, otoancorin (1067A >T = D356V and pendrin (716T > A = V239D and 1001G > T = 346stop. In each family, all affected individuals were homozygous for the critical mutation. Each allele was specific to one or a few families in the cohort; none were widespread. Since epidemiological tests of association of mutations with deafness were not feasible for such rare alleles, we used functional and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate their consequences. In six other families, hearing loss was not linked to any known gene, suggesting that these families harbour novel genes responsible for this phenotype. We conclude that inherited hearing loss is highly heterogeneous in this population, with most extended families acting as genetic isolates in this context. We also conclude that the same genes are responsible for hearing loss in this population as elsewhere, so that gene discovery in these families informs the genetics of hearing loss worldwide.

  7. Ocorrência de perda auditiva induzida pelo ruído em carpinteiros / Occurrence of noise induced hearing loss in carpenters

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Victor Hygor Veríssimo, Farias; Ana Karina Lima, Buriti; Marine Raquel Diniz da, Rosa.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: investigar a ocorrência de perda auditiva induzida pelo ruído (PAIR) em carpinteiros, caracterizando a perda auditiva por faixa etária, tempo de exposição total ao ruído e uso regular de protetores auditivos durante o tempo total de exposição. MÉTODO: estudo retrospectivo, descritivo, em u [...] ma população de 80 carpinteiros da construção civil, atendidos em uma clínica particular. Foram analisados 60 trabalhadores, conforme dados obtidos na anamnese e ficha do exame audiométrico. RESULTADOS: 49% dos trabalhadores apresentaram audição normal, sendo 58% com limiares auditivos normais bilateralmente e 35% com entalhe audiométrico em 3 kHz, 4 kHz e/ou 6 kHz. 44% apresentaram perfil audiométrico sugestivo de PAIR, destes 74% foram classificados como PAIR bilateral e 19% como PAIR unilateral. Houve diferença estatística significante entre os grupo PAIR e Normal em relação às variáveis idade (p=0,001), assim como o tempo total de exposição ao ruído ocupacional (p=0,002). CONCLUSÃO: quanto maior a idade e o tempo de profissão como carpinteiro, maior é a sua alteração auditiva, principalmente, devido à exposição ao ruído elevado durante a jornada de trabalho, sendo também constatado que as medidas de controle pelo uso do protetor são insuficientes para prevenir perdas auditivas. Portanto, sugerem-se medidas preventivas em saúde auditiva ativamente nessa população estudada, no ramo da construção civil. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to investigate the occurrence of noise induced hearing loss in carpenters, characterizing the hearing loss for age group, time of total exposure to noise and regular use of hearing protectors during the total exposure time. METHOD: retrospective and descriptive study in a population of 80 c [...] onstruction carpenters, attended at a private clinic. 60 workers were analyzed, as data on medical history and record of audiometric testing. RESULTS: 49% of the workers shoed normal hearing, being 58% with normal bilaterally hearing thresholds and 35% with audiometric notch in 3 kHz, 4 kHz and/or 6 kHz. 44% showed suggestive audiometric profile of NIHL, of these 74% were classified as bilateral NIHL and 19% as unilateral NIHL. There were significant differences between the NIHL group and normal to the age variables (p=0.001), as well as the total time of exposure to occupational noise (p=0,002). CONCLUSION: the greater the age and length of employment as a carpenter were, the greater their hearing loss, mainly due to exposure to loud noise during the working day, and we also noted that measures taken in order to control the use of the auricular protector are insufficient to prevent hearing loss. Therefore, we suggest active preventive measures in hearing health in this studied population, in the field of civil construction.

  8. Survey on infant hearing loss at Caritas Baby Hospital in Bethlehem-Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Corradin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the epidemiology of infants’ hearing loss (IHL among patients under 3 months of age at Caritas Baby Hospital, the only pediatric hospital in Palestine. It was aimed to demonstrate that IHL is a major health problem in Palestine and to assess the first available data of the newborn hearing screening program conducted between September 25, 2006 and December 31, 2011. Data was uploaded and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS version 21. A total of 8144 infants were tested, 4812 (59% were males and 3332 (41% were females. As to their origin, 72% (5886 came from the Bethlehem district, 25% (2044 from the Hebron district, while 3% (214 from the other Palestinian districts (Jericho, Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin and Jerusalem. The transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs and the automated auditory brainstem response were used according to the manufacturer guidelines. The results were interpreted according to the indications of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Consensus Development Conference on Neonatal Hearing Screening. Out of the 8144 infants tested, 1507 (14.6% did not pass the 1st test, 477 (32.8% of these 1507 infants failed retesting, while 498 (33% patients were lost to follow-up. Only 152 (31.9% patients that failed retesting went to an audiologist. The audiologist evaluation revealed that 101 (66.4% patients presented with a mild-moderate or profound hearing loss according to the Bureau International of Audiophonologie standards, 44 (28.9% patients had otitis media, whereas 7 cases (4.7% had no hearing disorders. The overall unadjusted percentage of hearing loss was 1.24%, and the adjusted overall percentage was 1.85%. The chart review showed that jaundice, sepsis, prematurity, lung disease were more common among the affected patients. The high prevalence of childhood deafness in Palestine is of utmost importance and deserves immediate attention on the part of the Palestinian government. Meanwhile, Caritas Baby Hospital undertook to set up a newborn hearing screening unit utilizing the TEOAE method.

  9. Labyrinthine enhancement of Gd-MR in patients with sudden hearing loss and vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, no definitive diagnostic study was available to assess causes of sudden-onset hearing loss and vertigo. Our observations have led to an interesting new finding: labyrinthine enhancement on Gd-enhanced MR imaging in four patients with sudden unilateral hearing loss and/or vertigo. MR findings were correlated with audiologic and vestibular studies. All patients were studied with T2-weighted axial images through the whole brain and with Gd-DTPA-enhanced, 3-mm, axial, T1-weighted images through the temporal bone. No labyrinthine enhancement was seen in 20 control patients referred for other clinical problems. Gd-MR imaging might be able to distinguish patients with retrocochlear lesions from those in whom the abnormal process is in the labyrinth or is intraaxial

  10. Surdez súbita causada por hemorragia intralabiríntica Sudden hearing loss caused by labyrinthine hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Salomone

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A surdez súbita sensorioneural é uma perda auditiva súbita ou rapidamente progressiva. Na maioria dos casos a etiologia não é descoberta. Uma das causas possíveis de surdez súbita é a hemorragia intralabiríntica que, antes do surgimento da ressonância magnética, não era corretamente diagnosticada. O objetivo deste trabalho é relatar um caso de surdez súbita causada por hemorragia intralabiríntica e realizar uma revisão da literatura sobre este assunto.Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is relatively frequent. In most cases, the etiology is not discovered. One of the possible causes for sudden deafness is inner labyrinth bleeding, which was difficult to diagnose before the advent of magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of sudden hearing loss caused by a labyrinthine hemorrhage, and to present a review of the literature on this topic.

  11. Sensorineural Hearing Loss After Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Longitudinal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the effects of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in relation to sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) after contemporary treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 87 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were treated with RT or chemoradiotherapy using either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT between 2004 and 2005. Tympanometry and pure-tone audiogram assessments were performed before treatment and then serially at 6-month intervals. The dose-volume data of the cochlea were analyzed. The effects of cisplatin administered in concurrent and nonconcurrent phases was explored. Results: Of the 170 eligible ears, RT (n = 30) and chemoradiotherapy (n = 140) resulted in 40% (n = 12) and 56.4% (n = 79) persistent SNHL (?15 dB loss), respectively, after a median follow-up of 2 years. SNHL at a high frequency was more frequent statistically in the chemoradiotherapy group than in the RT-alone group (55% vs. 33.3%, p 2 increase (p < 0.01), respectively. Age, gender, and nonconcurrent cisplatin dose were not statistically significant factors. A mean radiation dose to the cochlea of <47 Gy would result in <15% of patients dev Gy would result in <15% of patients developing severe (?30 dB) high-frequency SNHL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that high-frequency SNHL is significantly related to the mean cochlea dose and the concurrent cisplatin dose. A mean dose constraint of 47 Gy to the cochlea is recommended to minimize SNHL after chemoradiotherapy.

  12. GPSM2 Mutations Cause the Brain Malformations and Hearing Loss in Chudley-McCullough Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Dan; Chudley, Albert e; Coghlan, Gail; Ishak, Gisele e; Innes, A.  micheil; Lemire, Edmond g; Rogers, R.  curtis; Mhanni, Aizeddin a; Phelps, Ian g; Jones, Steven j M.; Zhan, Shing h; Fejes, Anthony p; Shahin, Hashem; Kanaan, Moien; Akay, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive inheritance, severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss, and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum are hallmarks of the clinically well-established Chudley-McCullough syndrome (CMS). Although not always reported in the literature, frontal polymicrogyria and gray matter heterotopia are uniformly present, whereas cerebellar dysplasia, ventriculomegaly, and arachnoid cysts are nearly invariant. Despite these striking brain malformations, individuals with CMS generally do...

  13. Experience with cochlear implants in Greenlanders with profound hearing loss living in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    HomØe, Preben; Andersen, Ture

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) treatment was introduced to the world in the 1980s and has become a routine treatment for congenital or acquired severe-to-profound hearing loss. CI treatment requires access to a highly skilled team of ear, nose and throat specialists, audiologists and speech-language pathologists for evaluation, surgery and rehabilitation. In particular, children treated with CI are in need of long-term post-operative auditory training and other follow-up support.

  14. Experience with cochlear implants in Greenlanders with profound hearing loss living in Greenland

    OpenAIRE

    Preben Homøe; Ture Andersen; Aksel Grøntved; Lone Percy-Smith; Michael Bille

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Cochlear implant (CI) treatment was introduced to the world in the 1980s and has become a routine treatment for congenital or acquired severe-to-profound hearing loss. CI treatment requires access to a highly skilled team of ear, nose and throat specialists, audiologists and speech-language pathologists for evaluation, surgery and rehabilitation. In particular, children treated with CI are in need of long-term post-operative auditory training and other follow-up support. Design. Th...

  15. Rituximab ameliorated severe hearing loss in Cogan's syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bacciu Salvatore; Zavota Laura; Rubino Pierangela; Laganà Bruno; Orsoni Jelka G; Mora Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody inducing depletion of B lymphocytes and presently approved for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. Here is the first report of the use of this drug in a case of Cogan's syndrome (CS). Case Presentation a 25-year-old Italian woman was referred with conjunctival hyperaemia, interstitial keratitis, moderate bilateral sensorineural hearing loss accompanied by tinnitus, dizziness, nausea and vertigo, poorly respon...

  16. Neural and behavioral correlates of noise-induced hearing loss in rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popelá?, Ji?í; Rybalko, Natalia; Grécová, Jolana; Profant, Oliver; Syka, Josef

    Shanghai : Chinese Academy for Science, 2006. s. 81-82. [The 2nd Shanghai International Conference on Physiological Biophysics-Audition and Vision 2006. 03.11.2006-07.11.2006, Shanghai] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA309/04/1074; GA MZd NR8113; GA MŠk LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Hearing loss Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  17. Effects of furosemide on the hearing loss induced by impulse noise

    OpenAIRE

    Kriksunov Leonid; Weinberger Jeffrey M; Adelman Cahtia; Sohmer Haim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The permanent hearing loss following exposure to intense noise can be due either to mechanical structural damage (tearing) caused directly by the noise or to metabolic (biochemical) damage resulting from the elevated levels of free radicals released during transduction of the sound overstimulation. Drugs which depress active cochlear mechanics (e.g. furosemide and salicylic acid) or anti-oxidants (which counteract the free radicals) are effective in reducing the threshold ...

  18. Protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on noise-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Fetoni, Ar; Ralli, M.; Sergi, B.; Parrilla, C.; Troiani, D.; Paludetti, G.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the involvement of oxidative stress in noise-induced hearing loss. The present study analysed, in an animal experimental model, the time course of the pathogenic mechanisms of noise-induced cochlear damage and the efficacy of the antioxidant drug N-acetylcysteine in reducing noise ototoxicity. Animals were divided into two groups, exposed to noise one treated with N-acetylcysteine for 3 days and one (the control group) with saline. Acoustic trauma was induced by a...

  19. Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome Presented with Sensory Ataxia Associated with Bilateral Hearing Loss and Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Madjdinasab Nastaran; Moravej Aleali Armaghan

    2009-01-01

    Primary Sjorgen syndrome is one of the commonest autoimmune diseases with characteristic of involvement of lachrymal and salivary glands, but other organ involvements as peripheral and central nervous system are also possible. The reported case is a 23 year old lady presented with progressive sensory ataxia and weakness of four limbs, bilateral sensory hearing loss and cognitive impairment with minimental score equal to 15/30 since one year prior to admission with associated bilateral central...

  20. Cytomegalovirus glycoprotein H genotype distribution and the relationship with hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska, Edyta; Jab?o?ska, Agnieszka; Studzi?ska, Miros?awa; Kasztelewicz, Beata; Zawili?ska, Barbara; Wi?niewska-Ligier, Ma?gorzata; Dzier?anowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Wo?niakowska-G?sicka, Teresa; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena; Le?nikowski, Zbigniew J

    2014-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading cause of congenital infection and a leading infectious cause of hearing loss in children. The ORF UL75 gene encodes envelope glycoprotein H (gH), which is essential for CMV entry into host cells and the target of the immune response in humans. However, the distribution of gH variants and the relationship between the viral genotype, viral load, and sequelae in children infected with CMV is debated. The UL75 genetic variation of CMV isolates from 42 newborns infected congenitally with CMV and 93 infants with postnatal or unproven congenital CMV infection was analyzed. Genotyping was performed by analysis of PCR-amplified fragments, and the viral load was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. There were no differences in the distribution of gH genotypes in the children infected congenitally and postnatally. Mixed-genotype infections with both gH1 and gH2 variants were detected in approximately 25% of the examined patients. No relationship between UL75 gene polymorphisms and the symptoms at birth was observed. The results suggest that the infection with gH2 genotype diminishes the risk of hearing loss in children (P?=?0.010). In addition, sensorineural hearing loss was associated with CMV gH1 genotype infection in infants (P?=?0.032) and a high viral load in urine (P?=?0.005). In conclusion, it was found that the gH genotype does not predict clinical sequelae in newborn infants following congenital CMV infection. However, these results suggest that the gH genotype might be associated with hearing loss in children. PMID:24615599

  1. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Abolhassan Faramarzi; Mehran Karimi; Seyed-Taghi Heydari; Mahmoud Shishegar; Masoud Kaviani

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran. Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thala...

  2. The relationship of sensorineural hearing loss with age, disease duration and the presence of cholesteatoma in chronic suppurative otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Gün

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations about the possiblee relationship between chronic supurative otitis media (CSOM and senrorineural hearing loss (SNHL have contradictory results and conclusions. A retropective study designed to evaluate SNHL at 1000 Hz and 6000 Hz frequncies related to CSOM and its association with age , disease duration and cholesteatoma. Charts of 124 patients with unilateral CSOM undergoing ear surgery from January 2003 to August 2008 reviewed. Inclusion criteria were no history of head trauma, meningitis, post-traumatic tympanic membran perforation, acoustic trauma, posible labyrintine fistula and using systemic drugs have possible cause to SNHL. Audiograms, ages and disease durations obtained from these charts were analyzed. SNHL occurred in 12 patients. There were not significant relation between age, disease duration, existence of cholesteatoma and SNHL at 1000Hz and 6000 Hz frequencies in the patients. We conclude that CSOM may cause SNHL, but in vast majority of patients this loss is not clinicaly significant.

  3. Familial Alström syndrome: a rare cause of bilateral progressive hearing loss / Familial Alström syndrome: a rare cause of bilateral progressive hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fayez, Bahmad Jr.; Carolina Sousa Alves, Costa; Marina Santos, Teixeira; Jairo de, Barros Filho; Lucas Moura, Viana; Jan, Marshall.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A Síndrome de Alstrom é uma doença muito rara, causada pela mutação no gene Obesidade infantil; ALMS1, que apresenta uma degeneração progressiva das funções sensoriais, resultando em de-Diabetes mellitus tipo 2; ficiências visuais e auditivas, além de distúrbios metabólicos como obesid [...] ade na infância, hipe-Retinite pigmentosa rinsulinemia e diabetes tipo II. Objetivo: Apresentar o perfil audiométrico de dois irmãos da mesma família afetados pela Síndrome de Alström. Método: Estudo prospectivo, analítico descritivo, os pacientes afetados foram submetidos a um questionário previamente testado, audiometria tonal e vocal seriadas, análise de emissões otoacústicas, e de respostas de potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico, além de análise genético-molecular para comprovação diagnóstica. Resultados: Ambos os pacientes apresentaram perda auditiva bilateral com o início na infância e progressão lenta para perda auditiva neurosensorial severa no primeiro caso e, profunda, no segundo. As emissões otoacústicas estavam ausentes, e o potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico estava normal em ambos os pacientes, bilateralmente. Conclusão: A Síndrome de Alström apresenta início precoce de perda auditiva neurossensorial, antes da adolescência, 10 a 20 anos para desenvolver perda auditiva severa a profunda. A lesão auditiva é essencialmente coclear, de acordo com os resultados dos testes de emissões otoacústicas e de potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico. Abstract in english Introduction: Alström Syndrome is a rare disease caused by mutations in ALMS1 gene. It is characterized by a progressive degeneration of sensory functions, resulting in visual and audiological impairment, as well as metabolic disturbances such as childhood obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and diabetes me [...] llitus type 2. Objective: To report and discuss the genetic and audiological findings in two siblings with Alström syndrome. Methods: This was a prospective, analytical and descriptive study, using questionnaires, serial audiograms, otoacoustic emissions, and auditory brainstem response analysis, as well as molecular genetic analysis. Results: Both patients presented childhood-onset bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, which progressed to moderate impairment in the first case and severe hearing loss in the second. Otoacoustic emissions were absent, and auditory brainstem responses were bilaterally normal in both cases. Conclusion: In the present patients, Alström Syndrome began with a neurosensory hearing loss in early childhood that progressed to a profound loss in ten to twenty years. The auditory lesions were cochlear in origen according to the otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging in children with unilateral hearing loss: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Eunkyung Cho Lieu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Language acquisition was assumed to proceed normally in children with unilateral hearing loss (UHL since they have one functioning ear. However, children with UHL score poorly on speech-language tests and have higher rates of educational problems compared to normal hearing (NH peers. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is an imaging modality used to measure microstructural integrity of brain white matter. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate differences in fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD in hearing- and non-hearing-related structures in the brain between children with UHL and their NH siblings. Study Design: Prospective observational cohortSetting: Academic medical center.Subjects and Methods: 61 children were recruited, tested and imaged. 29 children with severe-to-profound UHL were compared to 20 siblings with NH using IQ and oral language testing, and MRI with DTI. 12 children had inadequate MRI data. Parents provided demographic data and indicated whether children had a need for an individualized educational program (IEP or speech therapy (ST. DTI parameters were measured in auditory and non-auditory regions of interest (ROIs. Between-group comparisons were evaluated with non-parametric tests. Results: Lower FA of left lateral lemniscus was observed for children with UHL compared to their NH siblings, as well as trends towards differences in other auditory and nonauditory regions. Correlation analyses showed associations between several DTI parameters and outcomes in children with UHL. Regression analyses revealed relationships between educational outcome variables and several DTI parameters, which may provide clinically useful information for guidance of speech therapy. Discussion/Conclusion: White matter microstructural patterns in several brain regions are preserved despite unilateral rather than bilateral auditory input which contrasts with findings in patients with bilateral hearing loss.

  5. Progress towards early detection services for infants with hearing loss in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Norberto V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of infants with permanent hearing loss through infant hearing screening is recognised and routinely offered as a vital component of early childhood care in developed countries. This article investigates the initiatives and progress towards early detection of infants with hearing loss in developing countries against the backdrop of the dearth of epidemiological data from this region. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study based on responses to a structured questionnaire eliciting information on the nature and scope of early hearing detection services; strategies for financing services; parental and professional attitudes towards screening; and the performance of screening programmes. Responses were complemented with relevant data from the internet and PubMed/Medline. Results Pilot projects using objective screening tests are on-going in a growing number of countries. Screening services are provided at public/private hospitals and/or community health centres and at no charge only in a few countries. Attitudes amongst parents and health care workers are typically positive towards such programmes. Screening efficiency, as measured by referral rate at discharge, was generally found to be lower than desired but several programmes achieved other international benchmarks. Coverage is generally above 90% but poor follow-up rates remain a challenge in some countries. The mean age of diagnosis is usually less than six months, even for community-based programmes. Conclusion Lack of adequate resources by many governments may limit rapid nationwide introduction of services for early hearing detection and intervention, but may not deter such services altogether. Parents may be required to pay for services in some settings in line with the existing practice where healthcare services are predominantly financed by out-of-pocket spending rather than public funding. However, governments and their international development partners need to complement current voluntary initiatives through systematic scaling-up of public awareness and requisite manpower development towards sustainable service capacities at all levels of healthcare delivery.

  6. A rapid method for simultaneous multi-gene mutation screening in children with nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wan; Cheng, Jing; Ding, Hui; Jiang, Zhengwen; Guo, Yufen; Yuan, Huijun

    2014-10-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is a common genetically heterogeneous sensory disorder, occurring in 1 to 3 per 1000 live births. In spite of the extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, variants in GJB2, MT-RNR1, and SLC26A4 genes have been considered as the main reasons of nonsyndromic hearing loss in Chinese population. We developed a rapid multiplex genetic screening system called the SNPscan assay technique which could detect the 115 mutations of the above three genes. This technique is a high-throughput and cost-saving SNP genotyping method. We found that the carrier rate of mutations in the GJB2 gene, MT-RNR1 gene, and SLC26A4 gene was 26.21%, 1.86%, and 25.46% of the patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss, respectively. Using this method, up to 50% of the patients in our study were identified to have hereditary HL caused by mutations in the three genes. It is applicable to not only genetic diagnosis of HL, but also molecular screening of other inherited diseases. PMID:25149764

  7. Gipc3 mutations associated with audiogenic seizures and sensorineural hearing loss in mouse and human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charizopoulou, Nikoletta; Lelli, Andrea; Schraders, Margit; Ray, Kausik; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Ramesh, Arabandi; Srisailapathy, C. R. Srikumari; Oostrik, Jaap; Admiraal, Ronald J. C.; Neely, Harold R.; Latoche, Joseph R.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Northup, John K.; Kremer, Hannie; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Noben-Trauth, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss affects the quality of life and communication of millions of people, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we identify mutations in Gipc3 underlying progressive sensorineural hearing loss (age-related hearing loss 5, ahl5) and audiogenic seizures (juvenile audiogenic monogenic seizure 1, jams1) in mice and autosomal recessive deafness DFNB15 and DFNB95 in humans. Gipc3 localizes to inner ear sensory hair cells and spiral ganglion. A missense mutation in the PDZ domain has an attenuating effect on mechanotransduction and the acquisition of mature inner hair cell potassium currents. Magnitude and temporal progression of wave I amplitude of afferent neurons correlate with susceptibility and resistance to audiogenic seizures. The Gipc3343A allele disrupts the structure of the stereocilia bundle and affects long-term function of auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. Our study suggests a pivotal role of Gipc3 in acoustic signal acquisition and propagation in cochlear hair cells. PMID:21326233

  8. Enhancing Theory-of-Mind Discourse among Deaf Parents of Children with Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margalit Ziv

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with hearing loss often have difficulties in the socio-emotional domain that can be attributed to a significant delay in the development of theory of mind (ToM. The current article describes a workshop aimed at enhancing deaf parents' awareness of the importance of ToM development and enriching parent-child conversations with developmentally appropriate mental state contents. Eight deaf mothers from mid- low SES background participated in six sessions and were guided to enrich their mental discourse while naturally interacting with their deaf children. The mothers' use of mental terms was assessed at the beginning and end of the program. Following their participation in the workshop, mothers used more mental terms when interacting with their children, explained more elaborately mental motives underlying people's behavior and described their children's personality by referring more frequently to their social likes and dislikes. We conclude that parental guidance that addresses parents' interests and needs can assist in enriching their mental discourse and mediation when interacting with their children. As parents are major agents in enhancing development of theory of mind, the reported change may have long-lasting effects on their children.

  9. Noise-induced hearing loss and associated factors among vector control workers in a Malaysian state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamani, Retneswari; Rasib, Abdul; Darus, Azlan; Ting, Anselm Su

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among vector control workers in the state of Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted on 181 vector control workers who were working in district health offices in a state in Malaysia. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and audiometry. Prevalence of NIHL was 26% among this group of workers. NIHL was significantly associated with the age-group of 40 years and older, length of service of 10 or more years, current occupational noise exposure, listening to loud music, history of firearms use, and history of mumps/measles infection. Following logistic regression, age of more than 40 years and noise exposure in current occupation were associated with NIHL with an odds ratio of 3.45 (95% confidence interval = 1.68-7.07) and 6.87 (95% confidence interval = 1.54-30.69), respectively, among this group of vector control workers. PMID:22548779

  10. Relationship between tinnitus pitch and edge of hearing loss in individuals with a narrow tinnitus bandwidth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Magdalena; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; Hall, Deborah A

    2014-12-01

    Objective: Psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus, in particular dominant tinnitus pitch and its relationship to the shape of the audiogram, are important in determining and verifying pathophysiological mechanisms of the condition. Our previous study postulated that this relationship might vary between different groups of people with tinnitus. For a small subset of participants with narrow tinnitus bandwidth, pitch was associated with the audiometric edge, consistent with the tonotopic reorganization theory. The current study objective was to establish this relationship in an independent sample. Design: This was a retrospective design using data from five studies conducted between 2008 and 2013. Study sample: From a cohort of 380 participants, a subgroup group of 129 with narrow tinnitus bandwidth were selected. Results: Tinnitus pitch generally fell within the area of hearing loss. There was a statistically significant correlation between dominant tinnitus pitch and edge frequency; higher edge frequency being associated with higher dominant tinnitus pitch. However, similar to our previous study, for the majority of participants pitch was more than an octave above the edge frequency. Conclusions: The findings did not support our prediction and are therefore not consistent with the reorganization theory postulating tinnitus pitch to correspond to the audiometric edge. PMID:25470623

  11. Efficacy of Individual Computer-Based Auditory Training for People with Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Henshaw, Helen; Ferguson, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Auditory training involves active listening to auditory stimuli and aims to improve performance in auditory tasks. As such, auditory training is a potential intervention for the management of people with hearing loss. Objective This systematic review (PROSPERO 2011: CRD42011001406) evaluated the published evidence-base for the efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training to improve speech intelligibility, cognition and communication abilities in adults with hearing loss, wi...

  12. Neuroprotective effects of cutamesine, a ligand of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone, against noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Daisuke; Sun, Guang-Wei; Cui, Yong; Mita, Shiro; Otsuki, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Nibu, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Kaoru; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    The sigma-1 receptor, which is expressed throughout the brain, provides physiological benefits that include higher brain function. The sigma-1 receptor functions as a chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum and may control cell death and regeneration within the central nervous system. Cutamesine (1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl) piperazine dihydrochloride) is a ligand selective for this receptor and may mediate neuroprotective effects in the context of neurodegenerative disease. We therefore assessed whether cutamesine protects the inner ear from noise-induced or aging-associated hearing loss. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting revealed that the sigma-1 receptor is present in adult cochlea. We treated mice with 0, 3, or 30 mg/kg cutamesine from 10 days before noise exposure until the end of the study. All subjects were exposed to a 120-dB, 4-kHz octave-band noise for 2 hr. We assessed auditory thresholds by measuring the auditory-evoked brainstem responses at 4, 8, and 16 kHz, prior to and 1 week, 1 month, or 3 months following noise exposure. For the aging study, measurements were made before treatment was initiated and after 3 or 9 months of cutamesine treatment. Damage to fibrocytes within the cochlear spiral limbus was assessed by quantitative histology. Cutamesine significantly reduced threshold shifts and cell death within the spiral limbus in response to intense noise. These effects were not dose or time dependent. Conversely, cutamesine did not prevent aging-associated hearing loss. These results suggest that cutamesine reduces noise-induced hearing loss and cochlear damage during the acute phase that follows exposure to an intense noise. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25612541

  13. Getting Your Hearing Tested

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as it once was. Physician: Is there a family history of hearing loss? Your parents? Brothers or sisters? ... the hearing loss. For example, was there a family history of hearing loss, was there a history of ...

  14. Protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on noise-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetoni, A R; Ralli, M; Sergi, B; Parrilla, C; Troiani, D; Paludetti, G

    2009-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the involvement of oxidative stress in noise-induced hearing loss. The present study analysed, in an animal experimental model, the time course of the pathogenic mechanisms of noise-induced cochlear damage and the efficacy of the antioxidant drug N-acetylcysteine in reducing noise ototoxicity. Animals were divided into two groups, exposed to noise one treated with N-acetylcysteine for 3 days and one (the control group) with saline. Acoustic trauma was induced by a continuous pure tone of 6 kHz, at 120 dB SPL for 30 minutes. Electrocochleographic recordings were made from an implanted round window electrode and the compound action potentials were measured daily at 2-16 kHz for 7 days. Morphological changes were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The acoustic threshold measured 1 hour after acoustic trauma was elevated in the control group to 70-90 dB in the higher frequencies of the compound action potential audiogram, with a maximum threshold elevation ranging between 12 and 16 kHz. During the first 24 h, following acoustic trauma, there was a partial recovery of compound action potential thresholds of about 20 dB to reach a final threshold elevation of about 50-70 dB; there was no further improvement over the remaining experimental week. Animals treated with N-acetylcysteine showed a similar temporary threshold shift but a clear improvement in the recovery of compound action potential thresholds, with significantly reduced permanent threshold shift and hair cell loss. These data suggest that N-acetylcysteine is able to attenuate the toxic effect of acoustic trauma and could represent an interesting molecule for preventing inner ear injuries. PMID:20111615

  15. Patients affected with Fabry disease have an increased incidence of progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness: an investigation of twenty-two hemizygous male patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chassaing Augustin

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease (FD, OMIM 301500 is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to the deficient activity of alpha-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. While the progressive systemic deposition of uncleaved glycosphingolipids throughout the body is known to have protean clinical manifestations, few data are available regarding the cochlear involvement. Methods We non-invasively investigated cochlear functions in 22 consecutive hemizygous males (age 19–64 years, mean 39 affected with classic FD. Conventional audiometry, tympanometry, ABR audiometry, otoacoustic emissions were performed in all patients, together with medical history record and physical examination as part of an exhaustive baseline evaluation prior to enzyme replacement therapy. Results A total of 12 patients (54.5% with classic FD were found to have abnormal audition. Five patients had progressive hearing loss and seven patients (32% experienced sudden deafness. In addition, a hearing loss on high-tone frequencies was found in 7 out of the 10 remaining patients without clinical impairment, despite their young age at time of examination. The incidence of hearing loss appeared significantly increased in FD patients with kidney failure (P tinnitus aurium was also found in six patients (27%. Conclusion This is the first evidence of a high incidence of both progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness in a cohort of male patients affected with classic Fabry disease. The exact pathophysiologic mechanism(s of the cochlear involvement deserves further studies.

  16. Swept-sine noise-induced damage as a hearing loss model for preclinical assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Lorena; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Cobo, Pedro; Cediel-Algovia, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Rivera, Teresa; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Avendaño, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are key tools for studying cochlear alterations in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and for evaluating new therapies. Stimuli used to induce deafness in mice are usually white and octave band noises that include very low frequencies, considering the large mouse auditory range. We designed different sound stimuli, enriched in frequencies up to 20 kHz (“violet” noises) to examine their impact on hearing thresholds and cochlear cytoarchitecture after short exposure. In addition, we developed a cytocochleogram to quantitatively assess the ensuing structural degeneration and its functional correlation. Finally, we used this mouse model and cochleogram procedure to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) inhibitors P17 and P144 on NIHL. CBA mice were exposed to violet swept-sine noise (VS) with different frequency ranges (2–20 or 9–13 kHz) and levels (105 or 120 dB SPL) for 30 min. Mice were evaluated by auditory brainstem response (ABR) and otoacoustic emission tests prior to and 2, 14 and 28 days after noise exposure. Cochlear pathology was assessed with gross histology; hair cell number was estimated by a stereological counting method. Our results indicate that functional and morphological changes induced by VS depend on the sound level and frequency composition. Partial hearing recovery followed the exposure to 105 dB SPL, whereas permanent cochlear damage resulted from the exposure to 120 dB SPL. Exposure to 9–13 kHz noise caused an auditory threshold shift (TS) in those frequencies that correlated with hair cell loss in the corresponding areas of the cochlea that were spotted on the cytocochleogram. In summary, we present mouse models of NIHL, which depending on the sound properties of the noise, cause different degrees of cochlear damage, and could therefore be used to study molecules which are potential players in hearing loss protection and repair.

  17. Swept-sine noise-induced damage as a hearing loss model for preclinical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Lorena; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Cobo, Pedro; Cediel-Algovia, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Rivera, Teresa; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Avendaño, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are key tools for studying cochlear alterations in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and for evaluating new therapies. Stimuli used to induce deafness in mice are usually white and octave band noises that include very low frequencies, considering the large mouse auditory range. We designed different sound stimuli, enriched in frequencies up to 20 kHz ("violet" noises) to examine their impact on hearing thresholds and cochlear cytoarchitecture after short exposure. In addition, we developed a cytocochleogram to quantitatively assess the ensuing structural degeneration and its functional correlation. Finally, we used this mouse model and cochleogram procedure to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) inhibitors P17 and P144 on NIHL. CBA mice were exposed to violet swept-sine noise (VS) with different frequency ranges (2-20 or 9-13 kHz) and levels (105 or 120 dB SPL) for 30 min. Mice were evaluated by auditory brainstem response (ABR) and otoacoustic emission tests prior to and 2, 14 and 28 days after noise exposure. Cochlear pathology was assessed with gross histology; hair cell number was estimated by a stereological counting method. Our results indicate that functional and morphological changes induced by VS depend on the sound level and frequency composition. Partial hearing recovery followed the exposure to 105 dB SPL, whereas permanent cochlear damage resulted from the exposure to 120 dB SPL. Exposure to 9-13 kHz noise caused an auditory threshold shift (TS) in those frequencies that correlated with hair cell loss in the corresponding areas of the cochlea that were spotted on the cytocochleogram. In summary, we present mouse models of NIHL, which depending on the sound properties of the noise, cause different degrees of cochlear damage, and could therefore be used to study molecules which are potential players in hearing loss protection and repair. PMID:25762930

  18. Delayed development of sensorineural hearing loss after neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: a case report with brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, G; Erwin, C W; Goldstein, R F; Provenzale, J M; Ware, R E

    1996-03-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss has long been known to be a clinical consequence of kernicterus. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) that occur in hyperbilirubinemic infants, can be reversed in the neonatal period by exchange transfusion. The case was reported in an infant with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia from hemolysis due to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and napthalene exposure. BAEPs showed that the baby had normal hearing at 30 decibels at 13 days of age, after exchange transfusions, but had developed profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss by 7 months of age. The brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at 7 months are also presented. PMID:8631524

  19. Protective Effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC Administration on Prevention of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL in Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motalebi Kashani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Oxidative stress due to free radicals formation plays an important role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL. Many hypotheses have been proposed regarding the biochemical prevention of this complication. This study was performed with the purpose of determining the preventive effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC administration, as an antioxidant agent, on NIHL in Rabbit.Methods: In an experimental study, 24 adult white male rabbits were divided into four groups, including: 1 control, 2 noise exposure (100dB octave band noise centered at 4000Hz for 40h, 3 noise exposure plus NAC administration (325mg/kg, daily ip injection, and 4 no exposure and NAC administration. Audiometric test of rabbits was assessed by auditory brainstem response (ABR technique in three stages. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare the groups, and a p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: The mean ABR threshold shift for the noise exposure plus NAC administration group, 1 hour after exposure at 1, 2, 4 and 8kHz frequencies were, respectively, 16.66±1.63, 21.66±1.75, 33.5±2.34, and 39.33±2.25dB. These values were significantly less than the same values in the noise exposure group.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that NAC can provide a proper protective effect against hearing loss resulting from noise exposure.

  20. Environmental Cadmium and Lead Exposures and Hearing Loss in U.S. Adults: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 to 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yoon-hyeong; Hu, Howard; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Miller, Josef; Park, Sung Kyun

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although cadmium and lead are known risk factors for hearing loss in animal models, few epidemiologic studies have been conducted on their associations with hearing ability in the general population.

  1. FGF23 Deficiency Leads to Mixed Hearing Loss and Middle Ear Malformation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, Andrew C.; Yuan, Quan; Fan, Yi; Kalwani, Neil; Caruso, Paul; Cunnane, MaryBeth; Lanske, Beate; Stankovi?, Konstantina M.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating hormone important in phosphate homeostasis. Abnormal serum levels of FGF23 result in systemic pathologies in humans and mice, including renal phosphate wasting diseases and hyperphosphatemia. We sought to uncover the role FGF23 plays in the auditory system due to shared molecular mechanisms and genetic pathways between ear and kidney development, the critical roles multiple FGFs play in auditory development and the known hearing phenotype in mice deficient in klotho (KL), a critical co-factor for FGF23 signaling. Using functional assessments of hearing, we demonstrate that Fgf mice are profoundly deaf. Fgf mice have moderate hearing loss above 20 kHz, consistent with mixed conductive and sensorineural pathology of both middle and inner ear origin. Histology and high-voltage X-ray computed tomography of Fgf mice demonstrate dysplastic bulla and ossicles; Fgf mice have near-normal morphology. The cochleae of mutant mice appear nearly normal on gross and microscopic inspection. In wild type mice, FGF23 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the cochlea. Measurements from Fgf mice do not match the auditory phenotype of Kl?/? mice, suggesting that loss of FGF23 activity impacts the auditory system via mechanisms at least partially independent of KL. Given the extensive middle ear malformations and the overlap of initiation of FGF23 activity and Eustachian tube development, this work suggests a possible role for FGF23 in otitis media. PMID:25243481

  2. Identification of autoantibodies against inner ear antigens in a cohort of children with idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Elettra; Vannucci, Gaia; Lunardi, Claudio; Bianchi, Benedetta; Bason, Caterina; Puccetti, Antonio; Giani, Teresa; Pagnini, Ilaria; Cimaz, Rolando; Simonini, Gabriele

    2013-12-01

    Immune-mediated pathogenesis has been suggested for idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss. Recent studies have investigated the relationship between idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and autoantibodies against inner ear antigens. We conducted a prospective, observational study in a series of pediatric patients affected by idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss. Autoantibodies against inner ear (anti-Cogan peptide, anti-connexin 26, anti-DEP1/CD148 and anti-reovirus), previously described in the serum of patients with Cogan's syndrome, were detected in our population. The characteristics of children whose results were positive were also evaluated to verify if clinical data, disease progression and response to treatment could confirm an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Eleven patients were enrolled and 9 of them were positive for inner ear antibodies. Non-organ specific autoantibodies were present in 5 children out of 9. An immune-mediated condition was diagnosed in 2 cases and minor immune manifestations were found in 2 additional patients. In 5 cases hearing loss remained stable without therapy, while 4 children developed progression. Two subjects were treated with corticosteroids and methotrexate, achieving hearing improvement. Another subject showed stabilization on methotrexate. Inner ear autoantibodies can be positive in children with autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss, and in conjunction with clinical data may assist the clinician in identifying a subset amenable for immune modulation therapy. Large prospective studies are needed to investigate usefulness, diagnostic and prognostic role of these autoantibodies. PMID:23944678

  3. Steroid-dependent sensorineural hearing loss in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease showing auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yukihide; Kataoka, Yuko; Sugaya, Akiko; Kariya, Shin; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-11-28

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common form of hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy and sometimes involves disorders of the peripheral auditory system. We present a case of steroid-dependent auditory neuropathy associated with CMT, in which the patient experienced 3 episodes of acute exacerbation of hearing loss and successful rescue of hearing by prednisolone. An 8-year-old boy was referred to the otolaryngology department at the University Hospital. He had been diagnosed with CMT type 1 (demyelinating type) at the Child Neurology Department and was suffering from mild hearing loss due to auditory neuropathy. An audiological diagnosis of auditory neuropathy was confirmed by auditory brainstem response and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. At 9 years and 0 months old, 9 years and 2 months old, and 10 years and 0 months old, he had experienced acute exacerbations of hearing loss, each of which was successfully rescued by intravenous or oral prednisolone within 2 weeks. Steroid-responsive cases of CMT have been reported, but this is the first case report of steroid-responsive sensorineural hearing loss in CMT. The present case may have implications for the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25440412

  4. Sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis after closed head injury presenting with unilateral hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brors, D. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Schaefers, M. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Schick, B.; Draf, W. [Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Dazert, S. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Kahle, G. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Fulda (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Sinus thrombosis has rarely been associated with closed head injury; more often, thrombosis of the sigmoid or transverse sinus is caused by otogenic inflammations or tumours, or occurs during pregnancy. Symptoms are frequently vague, while untreated thrombus progression may be fatal due to venous congestion and infarction. We report a 32-year-old man presenting with right hearing loss, tinnitus and headache 2 days after a closed head injury. Neurological examination showed no additional abnormality. The EEG showed focal bifrontal slowing. CT revealed a fracture of the occipital bone. MRI and MRA demonstrated complete thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. After 2 weeks of intravenous heparin therapy followed by warfarin, the patient's hearing improved and MRI and MRA showed complete recanalisation of the sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Venous sinus thrombosis can be an undetected sequel to head injury. Appropriate imaging studies should be carried out to enable therapy to be started as soon as possible. (orig.)

  5. Parental Support for Language Development During Joint Book Reading for Young Children With Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesJardin, Jean L; Doll, Emily R; Stika, Carren J; Eisenberg, Laurie S; Johnson, Karen J; Ganguly, Dianne Hammes; Colson, Bethany G; Henning, Shirley C

    2014-05-01

    Parent and child joint book reading (JBR) characteristics and parent facilitative language techniques (FLTs) were investigated in two groups of parents and their young children; children with normal hearing (NH; n = 60) and children with hearing loss (HL; n = 45). Parent-child dyads were videotaped during JBR interactions, and parent and child behaviors were coded for specific JBR behaviors using a scale developed for this study. Children's oral language skills were assessed using the Preschool Language Scale-4 (PLS-4). Parents of children with HL scored higher on two of the four subscales of JBR: Literacy Strategies and Teacher Techniques. Parents of children with NH utilized higher level FLTs with their children who had higher language skills. Higher level FLTs were positively related to children's oral language abilities. Implications are discussed for professionals who work with families of very young children with HL. PMID:25309136

  6. Hand-arm vibration in the aetiology of hearing loss in lumberjacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyykko, I.

    1981-01-01

    A longitudinal study of hearing loss was conducted among lumberjacks, who were classified according to their age, history of vibration-induced white finger (VWF), duration of exposure to chain saw noise, and duration of ear-muff usage. Noise exposure levels measured at work varied between Leq values of 96-103 dB(A), with concomitant vibration of the chain saw (linear acceleration of 30-70 m/s.sq). Hearing levels at 4 kHz were determined to indicate the noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS). With respect to age alone, it was found that lumberjack with VWF exhibited an NIPTS around 10 dB greater than those without VWF. While NIPTS was seen to increase among all lumberjacks with exposure to chain saw noise, it was indicated that for equal exposures, those with VWF showed an approximately 10 dB higher level of NIPTS than those without VWF.

  7. Neuromagnetic index of hemispheric asymmetry prognosticating the outcome of sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lieber Po-Hung; Shiao, An-Suey; Chen, Kuang-Chao; Lee, Po-Lei; Niddam, David M; Chang, Shyue-Yih; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal relationship between central plastic changes and clinical presentations of peripheral hearing impairment remains unknown. Previously, we reported a unique plastic pattern of "healthy-side dominance" in acute unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). This study aimed to explore whether such hemispheric asymmetry bears any prognostic relevance to ISSNHL along the disease course. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), inter-hemispheric differences in peak dipole amplitude and latency of N100m to monaural tones were evaluated in 21 controls and 21 ISSNHL patients at two stages: initial and fixed stage (1 month later). Dynamics/Prognostication of hemispheric asymmetry were assessed by the interplay between hearing level/hearing gain and ipsilateral/contralateral ratio (I/C) of N100m latency and amplitude. Healthy-side dominance of N100m amplitude was observed in ISSNHL initially. The pattern changed with disease process. There is a strong correlation between the hearing level at the fixed stage and initial I/C(amplitude) on affected-ear stimulation in ISSNHL. The optimal cut-off value with the best prognostication effect for the hearing improvement at the fixed stage was an initial I/C(latency) on affected-ear stimulation of 1.34 (between subgroups of complete and partial recovery) and an initial I/C(latency) on healthy-ear stimulation of 0.76 (between subgroups of partial and no recovery), respectively. This study suggested that a dynamic process of central auditory plasticity can be induced by peripheral lesions. The hemispheric asymmetry at the initial stage bears an excellent prognostic potential for the treatment outcomes and hearing level at the fixed stage in ISSNHL. Our study demonstrated that such brain signature of central auditory plasticity in terms of both N100m latency and amplitude at defined time can serve as a prognostication predictor for ISSNHL. Further studies are needed to explore the long-term temporal scenario of auditory hemispheric asymmetry and to get better psychoacoustic correlates of pathological hemispheric asymmetry in ISSNHL. PMID:22532839

  8. Puerarin alleviates noise-induced hearing loss via affecting PKC? and GABAB receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Juan; Liao, Yong-Hui; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Yan-Yan; Huang, Jing; Chen, Jing; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Shi, Ming; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-02-15

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) often results from prolonged exposure to high levels of noise. Our previous study revealed that during the development of NIHL, the expression of protein kinase C ? subunit (PKC?) and GABAB receptor (GABABR) was changed within the cochlear nuclear complex (CNC), suggesting that these molecules might be the potential targets for the treatment of NIHL. As an extending study, here we focused on puerarin, a major isoflavonoid extracted from Pueraria lobota, which has been used in the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and investigated whether it could protect against NIHL by acting on PKC? and GABABR. Transgenic GAD67-GFP knock-in mice were subjected to the NIHL model and their auditory functions were evaluated by the auditory brainstem response thresholds and distortion product oto-acoustic emission signals. Our results showed that 200mg/kg puerarin treatment ameliorated the thresholds of auditory brainstem response of NIHL mice significantly. Triple immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopy results revealed that GFP-positive neurons in the superficial layers of CNC expressed both PKC? and GABABR1, and GAD67-positive terminals contacted PKC?- or GABABR1-positive neurons. Immunoblotting and RT-PCR results showed that NIHL increased the expression of PKC? but decreased that of GABABR1 and GABABR2 at both protein and mRNA levels in the CNC. Puerarin significantly attenuated the increased expression of PKC? but elevated the reduced expression of GABABR1 and GABABR2 after noise exposure. Thus, we provided the first evidence that puerarin ameliorated the auditory functions of NIHL mice, and this effect may be due to its ability to regulate the expression of PKC? and GABABR. PMID:25592416

  9. Dual Sensory Loss and Depressive Symptoms: The Importance of Hearing, Daily Functioning and Activity Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KimMatthewKiely

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between dual sensory loss (DSL and mental health has been well established. However, most studies have relied on self-report data and lacked measures that would enable researchers to examine causal pathways between DSL and depression. This study seeks to extend this research by examining the effects of DSL on mental health, and identify factors that explain the longitudinal associations between sensory loss and depressive symptoms. Methods: Piecewise linear-mixed models were used to analyse 16-years of longitudinal data collected on up to five occasions from 1611 adults (51% men aged between 65 and 103 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D. Vision loss (VL was defined by corrected visual acuity greater than 0.3 logMAR in the better eye, blindness or glaucoma. Hearing loss (HL was defined by pure tone average (PTA greater than 25 dB in the better hearing ear. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, medical conditions, lifestyle behaviours, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs, cognitive function, and social engagement. Results: Unadjusted models indicated that higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with HL (B=1.16, SE=0.33 and DSL (B=2.15, SE=0.39 but not VL. Greater rates of change in depressive symptoms were also evident after the onset of HL (B=0.16, SE=0.06, p

  10. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough to enjoy talking with friends or family. Hearing disorders make it hard, but not impossible, to hear. They can often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. What causes hearing loss? Some ...

  11. Protecting Your Hearing

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Narrator: Hearing -- it is an essential part of every day life. But as we grow older, we are more likely to have problems with our hearing. There are many causes of hearing loss. Hearing ...

  12. Screening of the hearing of newborns - Update

    OpenAIRE

    Von Voß, Hubertus; Nickisch, Andreas; Siebert, Uwe; Grill, Eva; Hessel, Franz; Kunze, Silke; Schnell-inderst, Petra; Wasem, Ju?rgen

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Permanent congenital bilateral hearing loss (CHL) of moderate or greater degree (?40 dB HL) is a rare disease, with a prevalence of about 1 to 3 per 1000 births. However, it is one of the most frequent congenital diseases. Reliance on physician observation and parental recognition has not been successful in the past in detecting significant hearing loss in the first year of life. With this strategy significant hearing losses have been detected in the second year of life. With ...

  13. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people rely on the vibration setting on their cell phones to alert them to calls. Telephone amplifying devices ... hearingloss.org National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Information Clearinghouse 1 Communication Avenue Bethesda, MD ...

  14. THE PRESENCE OF ADENOID VEGETATIONS AND NASAL SPEECH, AND HEARING LOSS IN RELATION TO SECRETORY OTITIS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela KOPACHEVA

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the treatment of 68 children with secretory otitis media. Children underwent adenoid vegetations, nasal speech, conductive hearing loss, ventilation disturbance in Eustachian tube. In all children adenoidectomy was indicated.38 boys and 30 girls at the age of 3-17 were divided in two main groups: * 29 children without hypertrophic (enlarged adenoids, * 39 children with enlarged (hypertrophic adenoids.The surgical treatment included insertion of ventilation tubes and adenoidectomy where there where hypertrophic adenoids.Clinical material was analyzed according to hearing threshold, hearing level, middle ear condition estimated by pure tone audiometry and tympanometry before and after treatment. Data concerning both groups were compared.The results indicated that adenoidectomy combined with the ventilation tubes facilitates secretory otitis media heeling as well as decrease of hearing impairments. That enables prompt restoration of the hearing function as an important precondition for development of the language, social, emotional and academic development of children.

  15. SNaPshot reveals high mutation and carrier frequencies of 15 common hearing loss mutants in a Chinese newborn cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Cao, Y; Li, H-B; Mao, J; Liu, M-J; Liu, Y-H; Wang, B-J; Jiang, D; Zhu, Q; Ding, Y; Wang, W; Li, H; Choy, K W

    2015-05-01

    Genetic causes account for more than half of congenital hearing loss cases. The most frequent mutations found in non-syndromic hearing loss patients occur in GJB2 and SLC26A4. Mitochondrial genome mutations are also prevalent. However, the frequency of common hearing loss mutations in the Chinese population has not yet been well estimated. Here, we implemented the SNaPshot genotyping method to investigate the carrier frequency of 15 commonly reported hearing loss mutations in GJB2, SLC26A4 and the mitochondrial genome based on a cohort of 5800 neonates in China. Up to 15.9% (923/5800) of the newborns carry at least one mutant allele. The top three were GJB2-c.109G>A, GJB2-c.235delC, and SLC26A4-c.919A>G, with notably high carrier frequencies of 1/10, 1/53 and 1/62 respectively, and mt-7444G>A with 1/141 was the most frequent allele in the mitochondrial genome. In this cohort, 0.48% (28/5800) of neonates were genetically diagnosed with hearing loss, from which seven cases failed an OAE test. This is the first epidemiological study of non-syndromic hearing loss in Chinese newborns indicating a notably high carrier frequency (1 per 6.3 newborns) among these 15 mutant alleles. Our carrier frequency data also aid in effective risk assessment and genetic counseling for hearing loss patients in the Chinese population. PMID:24989646

  16. As deficiências auditivas relacionadas às alterações do DNA mitocondrial. Hearing loss related to mitochondrial DNA changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. P. de Carvalho

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência auditiva é sintoma comum que pode apresentar várias etiologias, entre elas as causadas por alterações genéticas. As mutações genéticas podem ocorrer em genes nucleares e mitocondriais. A mitocôndria, uma organela intracelular, tem o seu próprio genoma (DNA, que é uma molécula circular e é transmitido exclusivamente pela mãe. As mutações do DNA mitocondrial são transmitidas pela linhagem materna, mas podem ocorrer mutações espontâneas. O fenótipo, ou expressão clínica, da mutação mitocondrial vai depender da quantidade de DNA mitocondrial mutante existente na célula, situação conhecida como heteroplasmia. A mitocôndria tem a função de disponibilizar energia para as células sob a forma de ATP (trifosfato de adenosina. Os órgãos que requerem grande quantidade de energia são mais comumente acometidos em casos de mutações do DNA mitocondrial, como células nervosas, musculares, endócrinas, ópticas e auditivas. Como a cóclea é grande consumidora de energia, uma mutação no DNA mitocondrial de células ciliadas causa deficiência auditiva do tipo neurossensorial, bilateral, simétrica e progressiva. As deficiências auditivas causadas por mutações no DNA mitocondrial correspondem a 0,5% a 1% de todas as deficiências auditivas de origem genética. Foi realizada uma extensa revisão bibliográfica, a fim de estudar as deficiências auditivas causadas por alterações no DNA mitocondrial. A deficiência auditiva pode se apresentar na forma isolada (forma não sindrômica, como nos casos de hiper-sensibilidade aos antibióticos aminoglicosídeos e presbiacusia, ou associada a outras doenças (forma sindrômica, como na síndrome de Kearns-Sayre e diabete e surdez de herança materna.Hearing loss is a common symptom that may be manifested by many etiologies and it is frequently associated to genetic problems. Genetic mutations may occur in nuclear or mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that have their own genome (DNA; mitochondrial DNA is from exclusive maternal inheritance. Although mitochondrial DNA mutations derive from maternal inheritance, spontaneous mutations may also occur. The phenotype is the clinical expression of a mitochondrial mutation and depends on the amount of mutant mitochondrial DNA contained in the cell. This phenomenon is known as heteroplasmy. The mitochondria provide energy to the cells by releasing ATP; thus, the greater the amount of energy required by the cell, the more likely it is to be affected by mitochondrial DNA mutations. Examples of high metabolism cells are nervous system cells, muscle cells, endocrine cells, optical and auditory cells. The cochlea has great energy turnover and mitochondrial DNA mutations of the hair cells will cause sensorineural hearing loss, which is normally bilateral, symmetrical and progressive. Hearing loss secondary to mitochondrial DNA mutations comprises 0.5 to 1% of all genetic hearing losses. Based on the literature review, it may be observed that hearing loss secondary to mitochondrial DNA mutations manifest in two distinct forms: isolated hearing loss (nonsyndromic, as in aminoglycoside hypersensitivity and presbyacusis, or associated to other diseases in a syndrome, such as Kearns-Sayre syndrome and maternally inherited diabetes and deafness.

  17. As deficiências auditivas relacionadas às alterações do DNA mitocondrial. / Hearing loss related to mitochondrial DNA changes

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria F. P. de, Carvalho; Fernando A. Quintanilha, Ribeiro.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência auditiva é sintoma comum que pode apresentar várias etiologias, entre elas as causadas por alterações genéticas. As mutações genéticas podem ocorrer em genes nucleares e mitocondriais. A mitocôndria, uma organela intracelular, tem o seu próprio genoma (DNA), que é uma molécula circular [...] e é transmitido exclusivamente pela mãe. As mutações do DNA mitocondrial são transmitidas pela linhagem materna, mas podem ocorrer mutações espontâneas. O fenótipo, ou expressão clínica, da mutação mitocondrial vai depender da quantidade de DNA mitocondrial mutante existente na célula, situação conhecida como heteroplasmia. A mitocôndria tem a função de disponibilizar energia para as células sob a forma de ATP (trifosfato de adenosina). Os órgãos que requerem grande quantidade de energia são mais comumente acometidos em casos de mutações do DNA mitocondrial, como células nervosas, musculares, endócrinas, ópticas e auditivas. Como a cóclea é grande consumidora de energia, uma mutação no DNA mitocondrial de células ciliadas causa deficiência auditiva do tipo neurossensorial, bilateral, simétrica e progressiva. As deficiências auditivas causadas por mutações no DNA mitocondrial correspondem a 0,5% a 1% de todas as deficiências auditivas de origem genética. Foi realizada uma extensa revisão bibliográfica, a fim de estudar as deficiências auditivas causadas por alterações no DNA mitocondrial. A deficiência auditiva pode se apresentar na forma isolada (forma não sindrômica), como nos casos de hiper-sensibilidade aos antibióticos aminoglicosídeos e presbiacusia, ou associada a outras doenças (forma sindrômica), como na síndrome de Kearns-Sayre e diabete e surdez de herança materna. Abstract in english Hearing loss is a common symptom that may be manifested by many etiologies and it is frequently associated to genetic problems. Genetic mutations may occur in nuclear or mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that have their own genome (DNA); mitochondrial DNA is from exclusi [...] ve maternal inheritance. Although mitochondrial DNA mutations derive from maternal inheritance, spontaneous mutations may also occur. The phenotype is the clinical expression of a mitochondrial mutation and depends on the amount of mutant mitochondrial DNA contained in the cell. This phenomenon is known as heteroplasmy. The mitochondria provide energy to the cells by releasing ATP; thus, the greater the amount of energy required by the cell, the more likely it is to be affected by mitochondrial DNA mutations. Examples of high metabolism cells are nervous system cells, muscle cells, endocrine cells, optical and auditory cells. The cochlea has great energy turnover and mitochondrial DNA mutations of the hair cells will cause sensorineural hearing loss, which is normally bilateral, symmetrical and progressive. Hearing loss secondary to mitochondrial DNA mutations comprises 0.5 to 1% of all genetic hearing losses. Based on the literature review, it may be observed that hearing loss secondary to mitochondrial DNA mutations manifest in two distinct forms: isolated hearing loss (nonsyndromic), as in aminoglycoside hypersensitivity and presbyacusis, or associated to other diseases in a syndrome, such as Kearns-Sayre syndrome and maternally inherited diabetes and deafness.

  18. Indicadores de risco para perda auditiva em neonatos e lactentes atendidos em um programa de triagem auditiva neonatal Risk indicators for hearing loss of newborns and infants in a newborn hearing screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Maria Sobral Griz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever os indicadores de risco para perda auditiva presentes em neonatos e lactentes que realizaram a Triagem Auditiva Neonatal no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, nascidos em 2008. MÉTODOS: foram pesquisados os 787 neonatos e lactentes que realizaram a Triagem Auditiva Neonatal no citado Hospital, nascidos em 2008. Foi montado um banco de dados com informações do formulário com histórico familiar e clínico dos pesquisados e resultado da triagem, para análise dos indicadores de risco. RESULTADOS: os indicadores de risco mais prevalentes na população estudada foram presença de hiperbilirrubinemia, nascimento pré-termo, baixo peso ao nascimento, uso de medicamento durante o período gestacional, permanência em Unidade de Terapia intensiva e presença de infecções intra-uterinas durante a gestação. Os indicadores de risco para perda auditiva com associação estatisticamente significante com o resultado falha na triagem foram nascimento pré-termo, baixo peso, permanência em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, uso de ventilação mecânica e uso de medicamento ototóxicos. CONCLUSÃO: houve ocorrência de indicadores de risco pré, peri e pós-natais, porém apenas foi encontrada significância estatística entre alguns indicadores peri e pós-natais e a falha na triagem.PURPOSE: to characterize neonates and infants who were born in 2008 and have been submitted to the Newborn Hearing Screening Program of the Federal University of Pernambuco Hospital according to the presence of risk factors related to hearing loss. METHODS: a total of 787 newborns took part in the study. Information from clinical charts and tests results were collected in order set up a database. RESULTS: the most prevalent risk factors for hearing loss in the related population was hyperbilirubinemia, prematurity, low weigh at birth, use of medication during pregnancy, presence of diseases during pregnancy and permanence in a Newborn Intensive Care Unit. The factors that have shown significant statistic relation with hearing loss were: prematurity, low weigh at birth, permanence in a Newborn Intensive Care Unit, neonatal ventilation dependence and ototoxic drug exposure. CONCLUSION: we identified prenatal, per natal and postnatal risks factors for hearing loss. Although, only per natal and postnatal risks factors were significantly related to hearing loss.

  19. Molecular diagnostics for congenital hearing loss including 15 deafness genes using a next generation sequencing platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Keulenaer Sarah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hearing loss (HL can originate from mutations in one of many genes involved in the complex process of hearing. Identification of the genetic defects in patients is currently labor intensive and expensive. While screening with Sanger sequencing for GJB2 mutations is common, this is not the case for the other known deafness genes (> 60. Next generation sequencing technology (NGS has the potential to be much more cost efficient. Published methods mainly use hybridization based target enrichment procedures that are time saving and efficient, but lead to loss in sensitivity. In this study we used a semi-automated PCR amplification and NGS in order to combine high sensitivity, speed and cost efficiency. Results In this proof of concept study, we screened 15 autosomal recessive deafness genes in 5 patients with congenital genetic deafness. 646 specific primer pairs for all exons and most of the UTR of the 15 selected genes were designed using primerXL. Using patient specific identifiers, all amplicons were pooled and analyzed using the Roche 454 NGS technology. Three of these patients are members of families in which a region of interest has previously been characterized by linkage studies. In these, we were able to identify two new mutations in CDH23 and OTOF. For another patient, the etiology of deafness was unclear, and no causal mutation was found. In a fifth patient, included as a positive control, we could confirm a known mutation in TMC1. Conclusions We have developed an assay that holds great promise as a tool for screening patients with familial autosomal recessive nonsyndromal hearing loss (ARNSHL. For the first time, an efficient, reliable and cost effective genetic test, based on PCR enrichment, for newborns with undiagnosed deafness is available.

  20. Novel CLDN14 mutations in Pakistani families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Andrade, Paula B; Khan, Bushra; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the CLDN14 gene are known to cause autosomal recessive (AR) non-sydromic hearing loss (NSHL) at the DFNB29 locus on chromosome 21q22.13. As part of an ongoing study to localize and identify NSHL genes, the ARNSHL segregating in four Pakistani consanguineous families were mapped to the 21q22.13 region with either established or suggestive linkage. Given the known involvement of CLDN14 gene in NSHL, DNA samples from hearing-impaired members from the four families were sequenced to potentially identify causal variants within this gene. Three novel CLDN14 mutations, c.167G>A (p.Trp56*), c.242G>A (p.Arg81His), and c.694G>A (p.Gly232Arg), segregate with hearing loss (HL) in three of the families. The previously reported CLDN14 mutation c.254T>A (p.Val85Asp) was observed in the fourth family. None of the mutations were detected in 400 Pakistani control chromosomes and all were deemed damaging based on bioinformatics analyses. The non-sense mutation c.167G>A (p.Trp56*) is the first stop codon mutation in CLDN14 gene to be identified to cause NSHL. The c.242G>A (p.Arg81His) and c.694G>A (p.Gly232Arg) mutations were identified within the first extracellular loop and the carboxyl-tail of claudin-14, respectively, which highlights the importance of the extracellular domains and phosphorylation of cytoplasmic tail residues to claudin function within the inner ear. The HL due to novel CLDN14 mutations is prelingual, severe-to-profound with greater loss in the high frequencies. PMID:22246673

  1. Phenotypic variability of CLDN14 mutations causing DFNB29 hearing loss in the Pakistani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Latief, Noreen; Belyantseva, Inna A; Iqbal, Farheena; Riazuddin, S Amer; Amer Riazuddin, Sheikh; Khan, Shaheen N; Friedman, Thomas B; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-02-01

    Human hereditary deafness at the DFNB29 locus on chromosome 21q22.1 is caused by recessive mutations of CLDN14, encoding claudin 14. This tight junction protein is tetramembrane spanning that localizes to the apical tight junctions of organ of Corti hair cells and in many other tissues. Typically, the DFNB29 phenotype is characterized by prelingual, bilateral, sensorineural hearing loss. The goal of this study was to define the identity and frequency of CLDN14 mutations and associated inner ear phenotypes in a cohort of 800 Pakistani families segregating deafness. Hearing loss in 15 multi-generational families was found to co-segregate with CLDN14-linked STR markers. The sequence of the six exons and regions flanking the introns of CLDN14 in these 15 families revealed five likely pathogenic alleles. Two are novel missense substitutions (p.Ser87Ile and p.Ala94Val), whereas p.Arg81His, p.Val85Asp and p.Met133ArgfsX23 have been reported previously. Haplotype analyses indicate that p.Val85Asp and p.Met133ArgfsX23 are founder mutations. The p.Val85Asp accounts for ~67% of the mutant alleles of CLDN14 in our cohort. Combined with the previously reported data, CLDN14 mutations were identified in 18 of 800 Pakistani families (2.25; 95% CI, 1.4-3.5). Hearing loss in the affected individuals homozygous for CLDN14 mutations varied from moderate to profound. This phenotypic variability may be due to environmental factors (for example drug and noise exposure) and/or genetic modifiers. PMID:23235333

  2. Triagem auditiva neonatal: ocorrência de falhas, perdas auditivas e indicadores de riscos Neonatal Hearing Screening: failures, hearing loss and risk indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Mari Onoda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Verificar o índice de falha, de perda auditiva e sua associação com variáveis demográficas e indicadores de risco para deficiência auditiva em recém-nascidos submetidos ao Programa de Triagem Auditiva Neonatal em um hospital secundário. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo transversal e retrospectivo com 1570 neonatos submetidos às várias etapas do Programa de Triagem Auditiva Neonatal. Inicialmente, foram realizados testes de emissões otoacústicas (ILO Echocheck e pesquisa do Reflexo Cócleo-palpebral. Depois, foram analisadas características demográficas e clínicas dos neonatos, índice de falha na triagem, ocorrência de perda auditiva e sua associação com variáveis demográficas e indicadores de risco. RESULTADOS: Apresentaram falha nas primeiras etapas do Programa 26 (1,7% neonatos, que foram encaminhados para avaliação diagnóstica. Destes, 16 (61,5% não compareceram, dois (7,7% apresentaram resultados normais e oito (30,8% tiveram diagnóstico de alteração auditiva. O índice de falha na triagem foi 1,7% e a frequência de alterações auditivas 0,5%. CONCLUSÕES: Os neonatos pré-termo de muito baixo peso apresentaram maiores índices de falha na triagem e maior ocorrência de alterações auditivas. Os fatores associados à falha na triagem e às alterações auditivas foram semelhantes aos descritos na literatura.To check the rate of failure, hearing loss and its association with demographic variables and risk indicators for hearing loss in newborns submitted to the Newborn Hearing Screening in a secondary hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional and retrospective study, involving 1,570 newborns submitted to the different stages of the Newborn Hearing Screening Program. Initially, we carried out otoacoustic emission tests (ILO Echocheck and the cochlear-eyelid reflex. Afterwards, we analyzed the demographic and clinical characteristics of the newborns, screening rate of failure, hearing loss and its association with demographic variables and risk indicators. RESULTS: Twenty-six newborns had failures in the first stages of the Program (1.7%, who were then referred to diagnostic evaluation. Of these, 16 (61.5% did not come, two (7.7% had normal results and eight (30.8% were diagnosed with hearing disorders. The screening failure rate was 1.7% and the frequency of hearing disorders was 0.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-term newborns of very low birth weights had higher rates of screening failures and a greater occurrence of hearing changes. The factors associated with screening failure and hearing changes were similar to the ones described in the literature.

  3. The clinical characteristics and treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chang; Gong, Qilin; Zuo, Wenjing; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Aidong

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). The clinical features of the VS patients were explored by retrospectively analyzing the clinical data from 542 cases of SSNHL patients between January 2008 and March 2013. There were 10 cases (10 ears) diagnosed with VS in 542 cases of SSNHL patients (10 ears, 1.85 %), 3 males, 7 females, with a range of 28-57 years. Among all the cases, eight patients with abnormal ABR, ten with ear ipsilateral stapedius reflexes which were completely not elicited and seven patients with healthy ear contralateral stapedius reflexes which were completely not elicited. Neuromas were classified by Koos grades according to size (8 of grade I, 1 of grade II, 1 of grade IV). Eight small VS  patients were taken waiting and MRI therapy strategies. Meanwhile, we used glucocorticoid treatment and timely and short-term medication to improve the microcirculation of the inner ear for these patients. And four cases' hearing was improved. Some vestibular schwannomas have SSNHL as initial symptoms, especially the small ones in internal auditory canal. To prevent misdiagnosis or leak-diagnosis, MRI should be performed as a routine test for SSNHL, and ABR is sometimes necessary for SSNHL patients. It is also necessary to give appropriate treatment to protect hearing of the small vestibular schwannoma patients whose first symptoms are diagnosed as SSNHL in acute phase. PMID:24452772

  4. Unilateral hearing loss in children: speech-language and school performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, J. E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Problem/Objectives Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) in children is a relatively common problem often identified by newborn screening or school screening. This review summarizes the outcomes of a large study of children with UHL which identified risk factors for educational problems, describes the results of pilot studies of intervention, and proposes guidelines for interventions and future studies. Methods Cohort of children age 6–12 years with UHL was compared to their siblings with normal hearing on the primary outcomes of cognition, achievement, and language. Secondary outcomes examined included behavioral, speech, and educational problems. A subgroup of children with UHL was followed longitudinally to examine change over time. Results Children with UHL had lower language and verbal IQ scores than their siblings with normal hearing. They required individualized education plans (a measure of educational difficulty) at three times the rate and speech therapy at twice the rate of their siblings. The additional educational concerns did not ameliorate over time. Low maternal education levels and lower baseline cognitive skills were independent risk factors for school problems. Pilot studies suggest that children with UHL might benefit from amplification, but may need attention to cognitive or executive function skills as well. Conclusions Children with UHL are at risk for delays in speech-language development, cognition, and behavioral problems that can affect functioning at school. Controlled studies are urgently needed to determine whether amplification, auditory rehabilitation, school-provided educational assistance, or other interventions are able to reduce or eliminate this risk. PMID:24383229

  5. Mutations in DNMT1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Christopher J.; Botuyan, Maria-victoria; Wu, Yanhong; Ward, Christopher J.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Hammans, Simon; Hojo, Kaori; Yamanishi, Hiromitch; Karpf, Adam R.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Simon, Mariella; Lander, Cecilie; Boardman, Lisa A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Smith, Glenn E.

    2011-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is crucial for maintenance of methylation, gene regulation and chromatin stability1-3. DNA mismatch repair, cell cycle regulation in post-mitotic neurons4,5 and neurogenesis6 are influenced by DNA methylation. Here we show mutations in DNMT1 cause both central and peripheral neurodegeneration in one form of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN1) with dementia and hearing loss7,8. Exome sequencing led to the identification of DNMT1 mutation c.A1484G...

  6. Neuroradiological imaging in patients with sensorineural hearing loss prior to cochlear implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochlear implantation (CI) is an established technique for enabling speech perception in patients suffering from severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Thorough preoperative radiological assessment is essential for correctly evaluating the indication for surgery and safely performing cochlear implantation. CT and conventional and functional MRI are available for radiological assessment. Therefore, knowledge of the most frequent congenital syndromal, non-syndromal, and acquired malformations of inner ear structures is fundamental. This article provides information about imaging techniques prior to CI and relevant malformations of the inner ear. Safety aspects for patients with a cochlear implant undergoing MR imaging are also discussed. (orig.)

  7. Phenotypic variability of CLDN14 mutations causing DFNB29 hearing loss in the Pakistani population

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, Zil-e-huma; Latief, Noreen; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Iqbal, Farheena; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2012-01-01

    Human hereditary deafness at the DFNB29 autosomal locus on chromosome 21q22.1 is caused by recessive mutations of CLDN14, encoding claudin 14. This tight junction protein is tetra-membrane spanning that localizes to the apical tight junctions of organ of Corti hair cells and in many other tissues. Typically, the DFNB29 phenotype is characterized by pre-lingual, bi-lateral, sensorineural hearing loss. The goal of this study was to define the identity and frequency of CLDN14 mutations and assoc...

  8. Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mn-SOD Heterozygous Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiko Shimizu; Tatsuya Yamasoba; Akinori Kashio; Takashi Sakamoto; Makoto Kinoshita

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL) reduces the quality of life for many elderly individuals. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), one of the antioxidant enzymes acting within the mitochondria, plays a crucial role in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). To determine whether reduction in Mn-SOD accelerates AHL, we evaluated auditory function in Mn-SOD heterozygous knockout (HET) mice and their littermate wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice by means of auditory brainstem response (ABR). Mean ABR t...

  9. Temporal integration of loudness in listeners with hearing losses of primarily cochlear origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, SØren; Florentine, Mary

    1999-01-01

    To investigate how hearing loss of primarily cochlear origin affects the loudness of brief tones, loudness matches between 5- and 200-ms tones were obtained as a function of level for 15 listeners with cochlear impairments and for seven age-matched controls. Three frequencies, usually 0.5, 1, and 4 kHz, were tested in each listener using a two-interval, two-alternative forced-choice (2I, 2AFC) paradigm with a roving-level, up–down adaptive procedure. Results for the normal listeners generally were consistent with published data [e.g., , J. Acoust Soc. Am. 99, 1633–1644 (1996)]. The amount of temporal integration—defined as the level difference between equally loud short and long tones—varied nonmonotonically with level and was largest at moderate levels. No consistent effect of frequency was apparent. The impaired listeners varied widely, but most showed a clear effect of level on the amount of temporal integration. Overall, their results appear consistent with expectations based on knowledge of the general properties of their loudness-growth functions and the equal-loudness-ratio hypothesis, which states that the loudness ratio between equal-SPL long and brief tones is the same at all SPLs. The impaired listeners' amounts of temporal integration at high SPLs often were larger than normal, although it was reduced near threshold. When evaluated at equal SLs, the amount of temporal integration well above threshold usually was in the low end of the normal range. Two listeners with abrupt high-frequency hearing losses (slopes >50 dB/octave) showed larger-than-normal maximal amounts of temporal integration (40 to 50 dB). This finding is consistent with the shallow loudness functions predicted by our excitation-pattern model for impaired listeners [, in Modeling Sensorineural Hearing Loss, edited by W. Jesteadt (Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ, 1997), pp. 187–198]. Loudness functions derived from impaired listeners' temporal-integration functions indicate that restoration of loudness in listeners with cochlear hearing loss usually will require the same gain whether the sound is short or long. ©1999 Acoustical Society of America.

  10. Phonetic discrimination of Persian vowels in children with severe hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Ebrahimian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing-impairment leads to problems in language perception which in turn results in difficulties in language production. The present study investigated hearing-impaired children's ability to discriminate Persian vowels. It aimed to describe the extent to which children have difficulty comprehending and discriminating phonetic features of vowels.Methods: To fulfill this aim, a researcher-made test, which was based on the Auditory Perception Test 2001, investigated the phonetic discrimination of vowels in Persian-speaking and hearing-impaired children aged five to eight years. The test has two sections, auditory-visual and just auditory discrimination of vowels, which included five subtests assessing discrimination of front and back vowels. Through this test, the phonetic discrimination ability of 22 hearing-impaired children was evaluated. The gathered data were analyzed using matched t-test and repeated measures ANOVA.Results: The findings showed that there is a significant difference between correct responses to the sections on front and back vowels (p<0.05. The audio-visual test showed that the /â/ vowel is easier to discriminate than other back vowels. Moreover, in the auditory test the /â/ vowel had the highest mean. The audio-visual test showed that the /i/ vowel is easier to discriminate than the other front vowels (/e/ /æ/. However, the discrimination of front vowels in the auditory test was the same.Conclusion: The results revealed that back vowels were more easily discriminated than front vowels by hearing-impaired children.

  11. Age-related hearing loss: Aquaporin 4 gene expression changes in the mouse cochlea and auditory midbrain

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Nathan; D Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Presbycusis – age-related hearing loss, is the number one communication disorder, and one of the top three chronic medical conditions of our aged population. Aquaporins, particularly aquaporin 4 (Aqp4), are membrane proteins with important roles in water and ion flux across cell membranes, including cells of the inner ear and pathways of the brain used for hearing. To more fully understand the biological bases of presbycusis, 39 CBA mice, a well-studied animal model of presbycusis, underwen...

  12. Incidência e prevalência de perda auditiva induzida por ruído em trabalhadores de uma indústria metalúrgica, Manaus - AM, Brasil / Incidence and prevalence of noise induced hearing loss in workers of a metallurgical company in Manaus - AM, Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana Cristina Furtado de Carvalho, Régis; Karla Geovanna Moraes, Crispim; Aldo Pacheco, Ferreira.

    1456-14-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Languages: English, Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: estimar a incidência e a prevalência de déficit auditivo sugestivo de Perda Auditiva Induzida por Ruído e sua associação com idade e tempo de serviço em trabalhadores de uma indústria metalúrgica do pólo industrial de Manaus. MÉTODOS: estudo transversal descritivo em trabalhadores qu [...] e se submeteram a exame audiométrico periódico no ano de 2012, totalizando 1499 sujeitos. Para estimativa da incidência foram selecionadas audiometrias de 763 trabalhadores com audição dentro da normalidade no exame de referência e comparados com exame atual. Realizou-se análise estatística por meio de medidas de tendência central, dispersão e distribuições de frequência. Para verificação de diferenças estatisticamente significantes utilizou-se o teste qui-quadrado, com nível de significância (p?0,05). RESULTADOS: a prevalência de perda auditiva foi de 44,23% sendo 28,89% sugestivo de PAIR. Houve maior prevalência de perda auditiva nos trabalhadores com faixa etária acima de 45 anos e com tempo de serviço superior a 21 anos. Apenas 11,1% dos trabalhadores acima dos 21 anos de serviço apresentaram audição normal, e 61,9% perda auditiva sugestiva de Perda Auditiva Induzida por Ruído. A classificação de Não Sugestivo de Perda Auditiva Induzida por Ruído permanece estável nos indivíduos abaixo de 20 anos de exposição laboral (14,9%) e nas pessoas expostas com mais de 20 anos aumenta para 27%. A incidência de perda auditiva foi de 28% e desse total 19,7% sugestiva de Perda Auditiva Induzida por Ruído. Houve maior prevalência de perda auditiva grau leve. Conclusão: a prevalência e a incidência de perda auditiva aumentaram com a idade e tempo de serviço. As empresas devem se empenhar na implementação do Programa de Conservação Auditiva a fim de minimizar essas perdas. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to estimate the incidence and prevalence of hearing loss suggestive of Noise Induced Hearing Loss and its association with age and time of service in metallurgical industrial pole workers in Manaus. METHODS: cross-sectional study in workers who underwent audiometric testing periodical i [...] n 2012, totaling 1499 subjects. To estimate the incidence were selected 763 audiometrys with normal hearing at the reference testing and after compared with the current audiometry. Statistical analyses were performed using measures of central tendency, dispersion and frequency distributions. To verify statistically significant differences, we used the chi-square test, with significance level (p ? 0.05). RESULTS: the prevalence of hearing loss was estimated at 44.23% and 28.89% suggestive of Noise Induced Hearing Loss. There was a higher prevalence of hearing loss among workers aged from 45 years and time of service exceeding 21 years. Only 11.1% of workers over 21 years of service have normal hearing and 61.9% loss of these features suggestive of Noise Induced Hearing Loss. The classification of Not Suggestive of Noise Induced Hearing Loss remains stable in individuals below 20 years of occupational exposure (14.9%), and in people exposed to more than 20 years, increases to 27%. The incidence of hearing loss was 28% and within this total, 19.7% were suggestive of Noise Induced Hearing Loss. Most hearing loss, both suggestive of Noise Induced Hearing Loss, or not, were classified in light. CONCLUSION: the prevalence and incidence of hearing loss increased with age and time of service. Companies should strive to implement Hearing Conservation Program to minimize these losses.

  13. Speech masking release in listeners with flat hearing loss: effects of masker fluctuation rate on identification scores and phonetic feature reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Christian; Husson, Mathieu; Ardoint, Marine; Debruille, Xavier

    2006-09-01

    Consonant identification was measured for a stationary and amplitude-modulated noise masker in four listeners with flat cochlear hearing loss, and four age-matched normal-hearing listeners. The masker modulation rate was systematically varied between 2 and 128 Hz. Masking release (MR), that is better identification performance in fluctuating, than in stationary noise, was highest in a masker fluctuating at 8-16 Hz in all normal-hearing listeners. In comparison, MR was only observed in two out of the four impaired listeners. In these listeners, MR was poorer than normal, and peaked at lower rates, that is 2 or 8 Hz. MR corresponded to increased reception of information for voicing, place, and manner between 2 and 64 Hz in all normal-hearing listeners. In impaired listeners, increased reception of information was mainly observed for manner, and mainly reduced for place, but these differences were not significant. For all phonetic features, MR was observed at lower masker fluctuation rates (< or =32 Hz) than in normal-hearing listeners. This study therefore shows that cochlear damage affects MR, both quantitatively and qualitatively. PMID:17005491

  14. Getting Your Hearing Tested

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not as good as it once was. Physician: Is there a family history of hearing loss? ... Patient: Yeah, my father had a hearing loss. Physician: Did he wear a hearing aid? Patient: Yes, ...

  15. Genetics of non syndromic hearing loss in the republic of macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukarova Stefanovska, E; Cakar, M; Filipce, I; Plaseska Karanfilska, D

    2012-12-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory deficit in humans affecting 1 in 1000 newborns. When present in an infant, deafness may have dramatic effects on language acquisition, seriously compromising the quality of their life. Deafness is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, with inherited causes as the most prominent etiological factor in deafness in developed countries. The genetic basis of hearing loss is complex with numerous loci and genes underlying hereditary sensoryneural non syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) in humans. Despite the wide functional heterogeneity of the genes, mutations in the GJB2 gene are found to be the most common cause of sporadic and recessive NSHL in many populations worldwide. Molecular characterization of deafness in the Republic of Macedonia was performed in 130 NSHL profoundly deaf children from different ethnic origins. Molecular studies included direct sequencing of the GJB2 gene and specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses for the del(GJB6-D13S1830) mutation. Five common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations [A1555G, 961delT+ C(n), T1095C, C1494T and A827G] were also analyzed using the SNaPShot method. In preliminary studies, GJB2 gene mutations were found in 36.4% of analyzed patients, with predominance of 35delG in Macedonian and Albanian patients and W24X in Gypsy patients, respectively. No del(GJB6-D13S1830) mutation was found. None of the analyzed deafness-associated mutations in mtDNA were identified in the studied patients. PMID:24052745

  16. FGF23 deficiency leads to mixed hearing loss and middle ear malformation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, Andrew C; Yuan, Quan; Fan, Yi; Kalwani, Neil; Caruso, Paul; Cunnane, MaryBeth; Lanske, Beate; Stankovi?, Konstantina M

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating hormone important in phosphate homeostasis. Abnormal serum levels of FGF23 result in systemic pathologies in humans and mice, including renal phosphate wasting diseases and hyperphosphatemia. We sought to uncover the role FGF23 plays in the auditory system due to shared molecular mechanisms and genetic pathways between ear and kidney development, the critical roles multiple FGFs play in auditory development and the known hearing phenotype in mice deficient in klotho (KL), a critical co-factor for FGF23 signaling. Using functional assessments of hearing, we demonstrate that Fgf[Formula: see text] mice are profoundly deaf. Fgf[Formula: see text] mice have moderate hearing loss above 20 kHz, consistent with mixed conductive and sensorineural pathology of both middle and inner ear origin. Histology and high-voltage X-ray computed tomography of Fgf[Formula: see text] mice demonstrate dysplastic bulla and ossicles; Fgf[Formula: see text] mice have near-normal morphology. The cochleae of mutant mice appear nearly normal on gross and microscopic inspection. In wild type mice, FGF23 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the cochlea. Measurements from Fgf[Formula: see text] mice do not match the auditory phenotype of Kl-/- mice, suggesting that loss of FGF23 activity impacts the auditory system via mechanisms at least partially independent of KL. Given the extensive middle ear malformations and the overlap of initiation of FGF23 activity and Eustachian tube development, this work suggests a possible role for FGF23 in otitis media. PMID:25243481

  17. Hearing loss due to concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Cisplatin-based chemo-irradiation (CRT) is increasingly used for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We aimed to assess hearing deterioration due to low-dose cisplatin chemoradiation and to compare the observed hearing loss with hearing loss in our previously described high-dose cisplatin CRT cohort. Materials and methods: A prospective analysis of hearing thresholds at low and (ultra)-high frequencies obtained before and after treatment in 60 patients. Patients received low-dose cisplatin (6 mg/m2, daily infusions, 20-25 days) with concomitant accelerated radiotherapy (70 Gy). Results: Audiometry up to 16 kHz was performed before therapy and 31 days (median) post-treatment. The total incidence of ototoxicity in CTCAEv3.0 was 31% in audiograms up to 8 kHz, and 5% of ears tested qualified for HAs due to treatment. The mean hearing loss at speech frequencies was 2.6 dB (SD 5.7) and 2.3 dB (SD 9.2) at PTA 1-2-4 kHz air-conduction and bone-conduction, respectively. The mean hearing loss at ultra-high frequencies (PTA AC 8-10-12.5 kHz) was 9.0 dB (SD 8.1). Low-dose cisplatin CRT caused less acute hearing loss (CTCAE 31%), compared to high-dose cisplatin CRT (CTCAE 78%). Conclusions: Low-dose cisplatin chemo-irradiation for HNSCC is a relatively safe treatment protocol with respect to ototoxicity

  18. Genetic testing for sporadic hearing loss using targeted massively parallel sequencing identifies 10 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X; Guo, L; Ji, H; Sun, S; Chai, R; Wang, L; Li, H

    2014-05-22

    The genetic heterogeneity of non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) has hampered the identification of its pathogenic mutations. Several recent studies applied targeted genome enrichment (TGE) and massively parallel sequencing (MPS) to simultaneously screen a large set of known hearing loss (HL) genes. However, most of these studies were focused on familial cases. To evaluate the effectiveness of TGE and MPS on screening sporadic NSHL patients, we recruited 63 unrelated sporadic NSHL probands, who had various levels of HL and were excluded for mutations in GJB2, MT-RNR1, and SLC26A4 genes. TGE and MPS were performed on 131 known HL genes using the Human Deafness Panel oto-DA3 (Otogenetics Corporation., Norcross, GA). We identified 14 pathogenic variants in STRC, CATSPER2, USH2A, TRIOBP, MYO15A, GPR98, and TMPRSS3 genes in eight patients (diagnostic rate?=?12.7%). Among these variants, 10 were novel compound heterozygous mutations. The identification of pathogenic mutations could predict the progression of HL, and guide diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:24853665

  19. Aberrant Cx26 hemichannels and keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome: insights into syndromic hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Helmuth A.; Verselis, Vytas K.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation of the GJB2 gene, which encodes the connexin 26 (Cx26) gap junction (GJ) protein, is the most common cause of hereditary, sensorineural hearing loss. Cx26 is not expressed in hair cells, but is widely expressed throughout the non-sensory epithelial cells of the cochlea. Most GJB2 mutations produce non-syndromic deafness, but a subset produces syndromic deafness in which profound hearing loss is accompanied by a diverse array of infectious and neoplastic cutaneous disorders that can be fatal. Although GJ channels, which are assembled by the docking of two, so-called hemichannels (HCs), have been the main focus of deafness-associated disease models, it is now evident that the HCs themselves can function in the absence of docking and contribute to signaling across the cell membrane as a novel class of ion channel. A notable feature of syndromic deafness mutants is that the HCs exhibit aberrant behaviors providing a plausible basis for disease that is associated with excessive or altered contributions of Cx26 HCs that, in turn, lead to compromised cell integrity. Here we discuss some of the aberrant Cx26 HC properties that have been described for mutants associated with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome, a particularly severe Cx26-associated syndrome, which shed light on genotype-phenotype relationships and causes underlying cochlear dysfunction. PMID:25386120

  20. High-throughput detection of mutations responsible for childhood hearing loss using resequencing microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenna Margaret A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite current knowledge of mutations in 45 genes that can cause nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, no unified clinical test has been developed that can comprehensively detect mutations in multiple genes. We therefore designed Affymetrix resequencing microarrays capable of resequencing 13 genes mutated in SNHL (GJB2, GJB6, CDH23, KCNE1, KCNQ1, MYO7A, OTOF, PDS, MYO6, SLC26A5, TMIE, TMPRSS3, USH1C. We present results from hearing loss arrays developed in two different research facilities and highlight some of the approaches we adopted to enhance the applicability of resequencing arrays in a clinical setting. Results We leveraged sequence and intensity pattern features responsible for diminished coverage and accuracy and developed a novel algorithm, sPROFILER, which resolved >80% of no-calls from GSEQ and allowed 99.6% (range: 99.2-99.8% of sequence to be called, while maintaining overall accuracy at >99.8% based upon dideoxy sequencing comparison. Conclusions Together, these findings provide insight into critical issues for disease-centered resequencing protocols suitable for clinical application and support the use of array-based resequencing technology as a valuable molecular diagnostic tool for pediatric SNHL and other genetic diseases with substantial genetic heterogeneity.

  1. Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome Presented with Sensory Ataxia Associated with Bilateral Hearing Loss and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madjdinasab Nastaran

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary Sjorgen syndrome is one of the commonest autoimmune diseases with characteristic of involvement of lachrymal and salivary glands, but other organ involvements as peripheral and central nervous system are also possible. The reported case is a 23 year old lady presented with progressive sensory ataxia and weakness of four limbs, bilateral sensory hearing loss and cognitive impairment with minimental score equal to 15/30 since one year prior to admission with associated bilateral central corneal opacity, dry mouth and dry eyes. Electro physiologic studies showed sensory motor axonal polyneuropathy . A biopsy of sural nerve and salivary glands of lower lip showed lymphocytic infiltration. Serologic evidence showed positive Anti Ro (SS-B, negative HCV and HIV antibody, thereafter the diagnosis was confirmed and according to this diagnosis she received high dose of intravenous methyl prednisolon then both hearing loss and cognitive impairment improved partially (minimental score 21/30 . At last, she underwent plasmapheresis and her sensory ataxia improved greatly.

  2. Inner ear anomalies causing congenital sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many congenital dysplasias of the osseous labyrinth have been identified, and the differential diagnosis of these dysplasias is essential for delivering proper patient management. We retrospectively reviewed the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of 20 children who had congenital sensorineural hearing loss. The children included cases of enlarged vestibular aqueduct and endolymphatic sac (n=8), aplasia of the semicircular canal (n=4), lateral semicircular canal-vestibule dysplasia (n=3), common cavity malformations with a large vestibule (n=1), cochlear hypoplasia (n=1), Mondini's dysplasia with large vestibular aqueduct (n=1), Mondini's dysplasia with a large vestibule (n=1), and small internal auditory canal (n=1). Six cases were unilateral. Nine cases had combined deformities, and nine cased had cochlear implants. CT was performed with a 1.0-mm thickness in the direct coronal and axial sections with using bone algorithms. MR was performed with a temporal 3D T2 FSE 10-mm scan and with routine brain images. We describe here the imaging features for the anomalies of the inner ear in patients suffering from congenital sensorineural hearing loss

  3. AudioGene: Predicting Hearing Loss Genotypes from Phenotypes to Guide Genetic Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kyle R.; DeLuca, Adam P.; Shearer, A. Eliot; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Black-Ziegelbein, E. Ann; Anand, V. Nikhil; Sloan, Christina M.; Eppsteiner, Robert W.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Huygen, Patrick L. M.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Braun, Terry A.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss (ADNSHL) is a common and often progressive sensory deficit. ADNSHL displays a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, and varying rates of progression. Accurate, comprehensive and cost-effective genetic testing facilitates genetic counseling and provides valuable prognostic information to affected individuals. In this paper, we describe the algorithm underlying AudioGene, a software system employing machine-learning techniques that utilizes phenotypic information derived from audiograms to predict the genetic cause of hearing loss in persons segregating ADNSHL. Our data show that AudioGene has an accuracy of 68% in predicting the causative gene within its top three predictions, as compared to 44% for a Majority classifier. We also show that AudioGene remains effective for audiograms with high levels of clinical measurement noise. We identify audiometric outliers for each genetic locus and hypothesize that outliers may reflect modifying genetic effects. As personalized genomic medicine becomes more common, AudioGene will be increasingly useful as a phenotypic filter to assess pathogenicity of variants identified by massively parallel sequencing. PMID:23280582

  4. Tuberculous meningitis-induced unilateral sensorineural hearing loss: a temporal bone study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chen-Chieh; Kaga, Kimitaka; Tsuzuku, Toshihiro

    2007-05-01

    The relationship between meningitis and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) has long been studied. Many histopathological studies of animal models and human temporal bones with respect to bacterial meningitis have been carried out. However, the relationship between SNHL and tuberculous meningitis was seldom addressed and the pathophysiology remains unclear. We carried out temporal bone studies on material from a 22-year-old patient who developed a right unilateral SNHL before dying from tuberculous meningitis. The histopathological findings for the right temporal bone were as follows: (1) inflammation mainly appeared in the internal auditory canal, modiolus and Rosenthal's canal and extended to the osseous spiral ligament, whereas the perilymphatic spaces were less involved; (2) the organ of Corti, cochlear nerve fibres and spiral ganglion cells were severely degenerated, particularly in the basal and middle turns; (3) the contralateral side (for which the patient had no complaints) showed an inner space free from inflammation, but some granulomatous formations were observed in the middle ear cavity. We conclude that the modiolus and cochlear aqueduct are the main routes for the spread of infection from the meninges to the inner ear. The progression of hearing loss resembles that of bacterial meningitis and shares attributes of retrocochlear SNHL. PMID:17453485

  5. [An integrated prevention intervention for the management of SSUEm118 operator with hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardi, J; Latocca, R; Boffi, G; D'Orso, M; Cesana, G C

    2007-01-01

    Noise risk is moderate in hospital but there are some areas, as SSUEm118, where the background noise is not negligible. In this context it is important not to underestimate hearing loss even minimal, because the noise interference can cause errors of understanding, as the case in exam: an operator 118. The clinical assessment of this worker with liminar tonal audiometry and vocal audiometry revealed a mild unilateral mixed hearing loss with good voice response. The equivalent sound pressure level (Leq) throughout the SSUEm118 area is under the first attention level, the index NR is comparable to office type environments and the distance between speaker and listener for satisfactory face-to-face communication is suitable. The present study proposes a multi-multidisciplinary approach to define prevention and protection measures and health surveillance plan with audiometric testing and possible judgment of the unfitness to specific work. For this specific case advices given to SSUEm118 administrator allowed a good repositioning of the worker. PMID:18409763

  6. Auditoria dos programas de prevenção de perdas auditivas em Curitiba (PPPA) / Hearing loss prevention programs control of Curitiba (HLPP)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Regina C.M., Cavalli; Thais C., Morata; Jair M., Marques.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente trabalho teve como objetivo examinar se medidas práticas de prevenção de perdas auditivas, adotadas por indústrias de Curitiba e região metropolitana, atendem às exigências da legislação trabalhista vigente e recomendações científicas que abordam este tema. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coor [...] te transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Um questionário elaborado pelo instituto americano National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) em 1996, para auditoria de programas de prevenção de perdas auditivas (PPPA), nos serviu de instrumento para a coleta de dados. O instrumento original possui 89 questões divididas em oito temas relacionados à prática dos programas: treinamento e educação, envolvimento do supervisor, medição do ruído, controle de Engenharia e Administrativo, monitoração audiométrica e manutenção dos registros, encaminhamentos, equipamento de proteção individual e questões administrativas. A coleta de dados foi realizada com Médicos do Trabalho, Engenheiros e/ou Técnicos de Segurança das indústrias. As empresas foram divididas em dois grupos: o das empresas que possuem um PPPA e o das que não possuem. CONCLUSÃO: Com base nos dados obtidos concluímos que não houve diferença significativa de conduta entre os grupos e que ambos cumprem parcialmente a legislação trabalhista relacionada à prevenção dos efeitos do ruído. Quanto às questões que abordam aspectos que se excedem às exigências legais, concluímos que as empresas que possuem PPPA dedicam maiores esforços à prevenção de perdas auditivas. Com estes dados identificamos pontos fortes e fracos das medidas que vêm sendo adotadas pelas indústrias da região, os quais poderão nos direcionar à elaboração de medidas preventivas mais efetivas e de propostas para revisão da legislação vigente. Abstract in english AIM: The objective of this study is to examine if the hearing loss prevention practices in industries located in the greater Curitiba area are meeting legal requirements and scientific recommendations. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A questionnaire prepared by the American Na [...] tional Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NIOSH, in 1996, for auditing hearing loss prevention programs (HLPP) was used as an instrument for data collection. This instrument has 89 questions, divided in eight themes about the following aspects of HLPP programs: training and education, supervisor involvement, noise measurement, engineering and administrative controls, monitoring audiometry, record keeping, referrals, hearing protections devices and administrative aspects. The data was collected through interviews with occupational physicians, engineers and/or safety technicians. The industries were divided in two groups: one composed of industries with HLPPs and another without HLPPs. CONCLUSION: No significant difference was observed between groups and both meet, in part, the legal requirements for hearing loss prevention. Questions about practices that exceed the legal requirements indicated that industries with HLPPs dedicated greater efforts to hearing loss prevention. Through the data analysis, we could identify the strengths and weaknesses of the HLPP programs in this region of Brazil. This information can lead to the proposal of more effective preventive measures and legislation revisions.

  7. Auditoria dos programas de prevenção de perdas auditivas em Curitiba (PPPA Hearing loss prevention programs control of Curitiba (HLPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina C.M. Cavalli

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente trabalho teve como objetivo examinar se medidas práticas de prevenção de perdas auditivas, adotadas por indústrias de Curitiba e região metropolitana, atendem às exigências da legislação trabalhista vigente e recomendações científicas que abordam este tema. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Um questionário elaborado pelo instituto americano National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH em 1996, para auditoria de programas de prevenção de perdas auditivas (PPPA, nos serviu de instrumento para a coleta de dados. O instrumento original possui 89 questões divididas em oito temas relacionados à prática dos programas: treinamento e educação, envolvimento do supervisor, medição do ruído, controle de Engenharia e Administrativo, monitoração audiométrica e manutenção dos registros, encaminhamentos, equipamento de proteção individual e questões administrativas. A coleta de dados foi realizada com Médicos do Trabalho, Engenheiros e/ou Técnicos de Segurança das indústrias. As empresas foram divididas em dois grupos: o das empresas que possuem um PPPA e o das que não possuem. CONCLUSÃO: Com base nos dados obtidos concluímos que não houve diferença significativa de conduta entre os grupos e que ambos cumprem parcialmente a legislação trabalhista relacionada à prevenção dos efeitos do ruído. Quanto às questões que abordam aspectos que se excedem às exigências legais, concluímos que as empresas que possuem PPPA dedicam maiores esforços à prevenção de perdas auditivas. Com estes dados identificamos pontos fortes e fracos das medidas que vêm sendo adotadas pelas indústrias da região, os quais poderão nos direcionar à elaboração de medidas preventivas mais efetivas e de propostas para revisão da legislação vigente.AIM: The objective of this study is to examine if the hearing loss prevention practices in industries located in the greater Curitiba area are meeting legal requirements and scientific recommendations. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A questionnaire prepared by the American National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NIOSH, in 1996, for auditing hearing loss prevention programs (HLPP was used as an instrument for data collection. This instrument has 89 questions, divided in eight themes about the following aspects of HLPP programs: training and education, supervisor involvement, noise measurement, engineering and administrative controls, monitoring audiometry, record keeping, referrals, hearing protections devices and administrative aspects. The data was collected through interviews with occupational physicians, engineers and/or safety technicians. The industries were divided in two groups: one composed of industries with HLPPs and another without HLPPs. CONCLUSION: No significant difference was observed between groups and both meet, in part, the legal requirements for hearing loss prevention. Questions about practices that exceed the legal requirements indicated that industries with HLPPs dedicated greater efforts to hearing loss prevention. Through the data analysis, we could identify the strengths and weaknesses of the HLPP programs in this region of Brazil. This information can lead to the proposal of more effective preventive measures and legislation revisions.

  8. Development and analysis of a low-cost screening tool to identify and classify hearing loss in children: a proposal for developing countries

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alessandra Giannella, Samelli; Camila Maia, Rabelo; Ana Paula Chaparin, Vespasiano.

    1943-19-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A lack of attention has been given to hearing health in primary care in developing countries. A strategy involving low-cost screening tools may fill the current gap in hearing health care provided to children. Therefore, it is necessary to establish and adopt lower-cost procedures that ar [...] e accessible to underserved areas that lack other physical or human resources that would enable the identification of groups at risk for hearing loss. The aim of this study was to develop and analyze the efficacy of a low-cost screening tool to identify and classify hearing loss in children. METHODS: A total of 214 2-to-10 year-old children participated in this study. The study was conducted by providing a questionnaire to the parents and comparing the answers with the results of a complete audiological assessment. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed, and discriminant analysis techniques were used to classify each child based on the total score. RESULTS: We found conductive hearing loss in 39.3% of children, sensorineural hearing loss in 7.4% and normal hearing in 53.3%. The discriminant analysis technique provided the following classification rule for the total score on the questionnaire: 0 to 4 points - normal hearing; 5 to 7 points - conductive hearing loss; over 7 points - sensorineural hearing loss. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the questionnaire could be used as a screening tool to classify children with normal hearing or hearing loss and according to the type of hearing loss based on the total questionnaire score

  9. Relationship between conversational repair strategies and cognitive-linguistic skills in children with moderate hearing loss in Ahvaz, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Zamani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Conversational repair skills are essential for establishing mutually successful verbal communication. Cognitive and linguistic disorders can have negative effects on these skills. Children with hearing loss have special cognitive and linguistic issues. This study was performed to contribute to the paucity of data on conversational repair strategies used by hearing impaired children.Methods: The participants included 58 children with moderate hearing loss (38 boys and 20 girls aged 6 to 7 from Ahvaz city. A cross-sectional study design was used. Frequency of using different types of repair strategies in ten repair situations was calculated. Scores of intelligence, memory, word finding, lexical richness, and mean length of sentences was obtained through cognitive-linguistic tests. Data was analyzed employing an independent t-test, Pearson correlation coefficient, and logistic regression.Results: A direct correlation was observed between clarification strategy and communicative social intelligence (p=0.045. A direct correlation was observed between applying different types of conversational repair strategies and linguistic abilities in children with moderate hearing loss (p<0.05.Conclusion: Children with moderate hearing loss (age: 6-7 years use repetition more than any other strategy to repair conversation. One unit increase in word finding ability or in mean length of sentence predicts one unit increase in the degree of using repetition strategy.

  10. Comparing Analog and Digital Hearing Aids in Reducing Hearing Disability

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    Ghassem Mohammad Khani

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing analog and digital hearing aids reducing disability caused by hearing deficiency among moderate to severe sensorineural hearing-impaired persons. Method and Material: This descriptive-analytic study was carried out on two groups of subjects participated in this study in some audiology clinics of hearing aid since May 2002 to October 2003. Twenty subjects wore analog hearing aids and twenty one subjects wore digital hearing aids. In this study , no subject had previous middle ear or psychological problems. APHAB questionnaire was completed before using hearing aid and 2 months after to determine benefit of hearing aid use. Results: Total score mean of APHAB inventory before and after use of analoge hearing aids were 52.215+6.420 and 32.300+3.443 respectively. Also total score mean of APHAB inventory before and after use of digital hearing aids were 54.9252+9.028 and 26.321+10.916 respectively. There was no significant difference between total mean score of APHAB inventory before and after using analog and digital hearing aids (P=0.058.While there was significant difference between total mean score of APHAB questionnaire before and after use of analog hearing aids (P<0.001 and also before and after use of digital hearing aids (P<0.001. Moreover age, gender , litracy level , occupation , degree of hearing loss and manner of hearing aid usage did not have significant effect on APHAB results. Configuration of loss had siginficant effect on aversiveness subscale before and after use of analog hearing aids (P=0.008. Previous experience and duration of hearing aid usage had significant effect on aversiveness subscale before and after use of digital hearing aids (P=0.043 and (P=0.024, respectively , while all of these three items did not have significant effect on total mean score of APHAB inventory and also total mean scores of three subscales of ease of communication , reverberation and background noise. Conclusion: Comparing to analog hearing aid , digital one is significantly benefitial for reverberation and background noise for hearing-impaired persons , but it has no benefit for ease of communication and aversiveness that may be arised from effects of the individual expectation , psychological and personal factors.

  11. Sensorineural hearing loss: a complication of acute otitis media in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Park, Sung Joon; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Min-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    We aim to evaluate the incidence and clinical manifestations of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in adult patients with acute otitis media (AOM). Seventy-five patients (age > 18 years; 83 ears) diagnosed with AOM between January 2008 and March 2011 at our clinic were enroled and retrospectively reviewed. We detected audiometrically confirmed SNHL during the course of AOM in eight patients. The clinical course, treatment, and audiometric final outcome of each case were reviewed. SNHL was associated with AOM in 8 out of 83 ears (9.3%). The mean age of patients was 57.5 years, and the mean follow-up period was 21.1 months (range 0.6-46.3 months). The most common symptom was tinnitus. Mean bone conduction hearing threshold was 39.5 dB in pure tone audiometry. All patients showed high-frequency HL, and three showed pan-frequency HL. All patients were treated with oral antibiotics at the initial visit. Seven ears were treated with a combination of oral steroids. Myringotomy was also performed. Seven of eight patients showed improvement; however, 8 kHz thresholds were not improved. This suggested that the inflammation spread through the round window. The mean duration of recovery was 18.6 days. SNHL associated with AOM in adult patients occurs during the early phases of the disease course. High-frequency hearing was commonly affected and was well treated with oral antibiotics, myringotomy, and steroid therapy. Audiometry can be helpful for treating adult patients with AOM. Active treatment, including myringotomy, should be performed during the early phase, if SNHL is suspected. PMID:23990061

  12. Hearing Screening in the Elderly and Evaluating the Need for Hearing Aid

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    Leyla Jalilvand Karimi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting the elderly. The impacts of hearing loss are depression, social isolation, and functional disability, particularly for those who have not yet been evaluated or treated for hearing loss. The aim of this study was audiologic screening and assessing candidacy for hearing aid in the elderly people.Materials and Methods: This analytic-cross sectional study was performed on 52 older adults aged from 51 to 97. Subjects were evaluated according to ASHA guidelines for audiologic screening in adults (1997. Using HHIE-S as hearing disability screening instrume