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Sample records for significant hearing loss

  1. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  2. Hearing Loss

    ... the choices that can help people with hearing problems. home | health topics A-Z | videos A-Z | training | about us | contact us | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  3. Hearing Loss

    ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Ask ...

  4. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  5. Genes and Hearing Loss

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  6. Hearing loss and music

    Noise induced hearing loss - music; Sensory hearing loss - music ... damaged by loud sounds. The human ear is like any other body part -- too much use can damaged it. Over time, repeated exposure to loud noise and music can cause hearing loss.

  7. Types of Hearing Loss

    ... on this topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. Hearing loss can be categorized ... speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. ...

  8. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies. PMID:27259171

  9. Hearing loss in Diabetes Mellitus

    Pemmaiah K.D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The complex arrangement of inner ear makes it potential target of hyperglycaemic damage. A study was conducted to identify the probable occurrence of hearing loss as a complication of Diabetes Mellitus (DM.Aims and objective:· To assess the hearing loss in type 2 diabetic patients and correlate with age, duration of diabetes, HbA1C.· To correlate hearing loss with nerve conduction study.Design: Cross sectional study was done involving randomly 110 Type 2 DM patients. Data regarding their age and duration of diabetes was collected. Pure tone Audiometry and Nerve conduction study was done. HbA1c level determined. Data statistically analysed using Pearson correlation coefficient.Results: Out of 110 patients 48 patients (43.6% had bilateral Sensorineural hearing in higher frequency (2000hz, 4000hz. Among them Severe hearing loss (71 dB to 90dB was seen in 7 patients (6.36%, moderately severe hearing loss (61dB to 70dB in 16 patients (14.54% and moderate hearing loss(30dB to 60 dB in 25 patients (22.7%. Among 47 patients who had diabetes for more than 10 years, 29 patients (61.7% showed at least mild hearing loss. Duration of DM and sensorineural hearing loss at 2000Hz and 4000Hz showed statistically significant correlation (Pearson coefficient r= 0.561 and r= 0.727 respectively at 0.01 level. In other frequencies no significant correlation was found. Coefficient of determination was r2=0.31(31% and r2=0.52(52% respectively between duration of DM and hearing loss at 2000Hz and 4000Hz. The correlation of hearing loss in lower frequency with HbA1c did not show any statistical significance. However HbA1c and hearing loss in higher frequency (2000 hz and 4000hz showed statistically significant correlation (Pearson coefficient r= 0.282 and r= 0.385 respectively. The correlation of hearing loss with Nerve conduction study did not show any statistical significance.

  10. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    ... that focuses on hearing loss and hearing issues. Miracle Ear Children’s Foundation P.O. Box 59261 Minneapolis, MN 55459-0261 (800) 234-5422 www.miracle-ear.com Miracle Ear Children’s Foundation provides free ...

  11. What's Hearing Loss?

    ... cochlea during an operation. It takes over the job of the damaged or destroyed hair cells in the ... and Communicating A kid with hearing loss may attend a special school, special classes within ...

  12. Occupational hearing loss

    ... music can cause hearing loss. Sounds above 80 decibels (dB, a measurement of the loudness or strength ... is allowed. Both the length of exposure and decibel level are considered. If the sound is at ...

  13. Non-organic hearing loss.

    Nelson, Sarah C

    2012-12-01

    Annual hearing tests are compulsory in the British Armed Forces. This case report presents a 24-year old soldier who was found to have severe deterioration on her annual audiogram without any significant noise exposure. After two years of specialist audiological investigations she was diagnosed with non-organic hearing loss; further interrogation of her social circumstances suggested potential psychosocial triggers. This diagnosis should be considered early in military primary care in those with objective hearing loss on audiogram where there has been no exposure to significant noise. PMID:23402072

  14. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is ... I find additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound ...

  15. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems

  16. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    ... hearing loss. Here are the most common ones: Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Hearing aids ... list of organizations, contact: NIDCD Information Clearinghouse 1 Communication Avenue Bethesda, MD 20892-3456 Toll-free Voice: ( ...

  17. [Progressive hearing loss].

    Reiss, M; Reiss, G

    2000-01-01

    Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is defined as hearing loss of unknown etiology with fairly high-speed progression. Its diagnostic criteria consist of the following: that it is 1) progressive, 2) with bilateral involvement, and 3) of unknown etiology. Due to recent advances in diagnostics, imaging and management, SNHL has gained much interest from otologists in the last few years. They provide new insight into the physiology and pathophysiology of hearing. SNHL which is sudden in onset, fluctuating, and/or progressive complicates medical management, hearing aid selection, and individualized educational planning for a hearing-impaired patient. Existing hypotheses on the etiology of SNHL are judged on experimental, clinical, laboratory and radiological evidence. Cardiovascular and rheologic diseases, hereditary disorders, immunological phenomena, infections, environmental causes like noise, ototoxic drugs and industrial substances and systemic maladies must be included in the diagnostic reflections. Potential concepts of treatment include rheologic medications and corticosteroids. Hearing aids and timely cochlear implant operation are further possible forms of treatment. PMID:10893764

  18. Autism and Hearing Loss.

    Rosenhall, Ulf; Nordin, Viviann; Sandstrom, Mikael; Ahlsen, Gunilla; Gillberg, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Children and adolescents (N=199) with autistic disorder were audiologically evaluated. Mild to moderate hearing loss was diagnosed in 7.9 percent, with deafness diagnosed in 3.5 percent of all cases, which represented a prevalence considerably above that in the general population and comparable to the prevalence found in populations with mental…

  19. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    ... Follow us on Twitter Noise Manufacturing Construction SafeInSound Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  20. Children with Significant Hearing Loss: Learning to Listen, Talk, and Read--Evidence-Based Best Practices

    Martindale, Maura

    2007-01-01

    A considerable body of evidence obtained from studies of children who are deaf and who use cochlear implants has been useful in guiding practices that lead to higher levels of English language proficiency and age-appropriate literacy. Both (a) research conducted at implant centers and (b) educational programs with significant numbers of children…

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    Wormald, R

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the aetiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a paediatric population presenting to the National Centre of Medical Genetics. A retrospective chart review from 1998 to 2006. One hundred and twenty nine children were investigated for SNHL. The average age of diagnosis of hearing loss was 36 months. The degree of hearing loss was mild in 8 children, moderate in 33 children, severe in 31 children and profound in 57 children. Eighty-five children (66%) were diagnosed with a hereditary hearing loss, 11 (8%) children had an acquired hearing loss and no cause found in 33 (26%) children. This is the first report of the causes of hearing loss in Irish children. The mean age of diagnosis in our cohort is high and emphasises the need for a neonatal screening programme. There remains a number of children for whom the cause of hearing loss remains unknown.

  2. Hearing Loss: Diagnosis and Evaluation.

    Zazove, Philip; Atcherson, Samuel R; Moreland, Christopher; McKee, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is a common disability in the United States, most frequent among men, elderly individuals, and veterans but is increasingly affecting other younger adults. Types of hearing loss include sensorineural, conductive, and mixed. Hearing loss in children often is related to infections, time spent in a neonatal intensive care unit, and genetic etiologies. Presbycusis (ie, age-related hearing loss) is the most common etiology in adults. Adverse effects of untreated hearing loss include isolation, depression, lower income, and higher unemployment. Hearing aid use reduces levels of disability, cognitive impairment, and psychosocial distress while improving quality of life. At least 75% of individuals with hearing loss are not receiving treatment for it. All infants should be screened for hearing loss, as should children and adults with risk factors. The Joint Commission on Infant Hearing Screening has a 1-3-6 goal for screening: identification by age 1 month, confirmation by age 3 months, and intervention by age 6 months. The presence of an ongoing physician-patient relationship increases the likelihood that a patient will admit to having a hearing loss. Adults can be screened using single-question or standardized instrument screens. All patients with suspected hearing loss should undergo audiometry by an audiology subspecialist. PMID:26161523

  3. Occupational Hearing Loss in Korea

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-01-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases ...

  4. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  5. Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic otitis media.

    MacAndie, C; O'Reilly, B F

    1999-06-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated an association between chronic otitis media (COM) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), there still remains disagreement about the relationship. A retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between sensorineural hearing loss and chronic otitis media. Forty-one patients met the following criteria: unilateral COM and no history of head injury, meningitis or previous otological surgery. The differences in preoperative bone conduction threshold between diseased and control (contralateral normal) ear were statistically significant (P ossicular erosion was not associated with a significantly increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:10384849

  6. Hearing loss at work? Hearing loss from leisure activities?

    2006-01-01

    The nurses of the Medical Service would like invite all persons working on the CERN site to take part in a: HEARING LOSS DETECTION WEEK From 28 August to 1st September 2006 At the Infirmary, Building 57 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hearing tests - advice - information - documentation - protective equipment

  7. Vertigo and hearing loss.

    Newman-Toker, David E; Della Santina, Charles C; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms referable to disorders affecting the inner ear and vestibulocochlear nerve (eighth cranial nerve) include dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss, in various combinations. Similar symptoms may occur with involvement of the central nervous system, principally the brainstem and cerebellum, to which the vestibular and auditory systems are connected. Imaging choices should be tailored to patient symptoms and the clinical context. Computed tomography (CT) should be used primarily to assess bony structures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be used primarily to assess soft-tissue structures. Vascular imaging by angiography or venography should be obtained when vascular lesions are suspected. No imaging should be obtained in patients with typical presentations of common peripheral vestibular or auditory disorders. In current clinical practice, neuroimaging is often overused, especially CT in the assessment of acute dizziness and vertigo in the emergency department. Despite low sensitivity for ischemic strokes, CT is often used to rule out neurologic causes. When ischemic stroke is the principal concern in acute vestibular presentations, imaging should almost always be by MRI with diffusion-weighted images, rather than CT. In this chapter, we describe recommended strategies for audiovestibular imaging based on patient symptoms and signs. PMID:27430449

  8. Pre-enlistment hearing loss and hearing loss disability among US soldiers and marines

    Marlene E Gubata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a common condition among US adults, with some evidence of increasing prevalence in young adults. Noise-induced hearing loss attributable to employment is a significant source of preventable morbidity world-wide. The US military population is largely comprised of young adult males serving in a wide variety of occupations, many in high noise-level conditions, at least episodically. To identify accession and service-related risk factors for hearing-related disability, matched case-control study of US military personnel was conducted. Individuals evaluated for hearing loss disability in the US Army and Marine Corps were frequency matched to controls without history of disability evaluation on service and enlistment year. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the association between accession and service-related factors and hearing-related disability evaluations between October 2002 and September 2010. Individuals with medically disqualifying audiograms or hearing loss diagnoses at application for military service were 8 and 4 times more likely, respectively, to have a disability evaluation related to hearing loss, after controlling for relevant accession, demographic, and service-related factors. Conservative hearing loss thresholds on pre-enlistment audiograms, stricter hearing loss medical waiver policies or qualified baseline audiograms pre-enlistment are needed in the U.S military. Industrial corporations or labor unions may also benefit from identifying individuals with moderate hearing loss at the time of employment to ensure use of personal protective equipment and engineer controls of noise.

  9. Resounding Facts on Hearing Loss

    Apfel, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Provides a brief description of the physiology of the human ear. The effect of sustained noise levels on hearing loss is discussed, as well as the establishment of maximum noise levels for American industries. (CP)

  10. Pre-enlistment hearing loss and hearing loss disability among US soldiers and marines

    Marlene E Gubata; Elizabeth R Packnett; Xiaoshu Feng; David N Cowan; David W Niebuhr

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common condition among US adults, with some evidence of increasing prevalence in young adults. Noise-induced hearing loss attributable to employment is a significant source of preventable morbidity world-wide. The US military population is largely comprised of young adult males serving in a wide variety of occupations, many in high noise-level conditions, at least episodically. To identify accession and service-related risk factors for hearing-related disability, matched cas...

  11. Hearing loss in shipyard employees

    Evangelos C Alexopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is one of the most prevalent occupational illnesses, with a higher incidence in the heavy industry. Objectives of the Study: The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of NIHL in Greece and explore its correlations with other job and individual-related factors. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were administered, and audiograms were conducted to 757 employees of a shipyard company in Greece, both white- and blue-collar, during the period 2006-2009. A modification of the 1979′ equation of the American Academy of Otolaryngology was used to calculate hearing loss. Statistical analysis was conducted by means of the SPSS v. 17. Results: A 27.1% of the employees were hearing handicap. Hearing loss was correlated with age, past medical history of ear disease (Meniere′s disease, acoustic neuroma, otosclerosis or injury, hyperlipidemia, job title and level of education. A few questions on subjective hearing ability and symptoms showed strong discriminatory power of hearing pathology. Conclusions: The results of this study emphasize the burden of disease in the shipyard industry, and the need for continuous monitoring, implementation of preventive measures and hearing conservation programs.

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska; Adrian Davis

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medic...

  13. Fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    Brookhouser, Patrick E

    2002-08-01

    Childhood sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) that fluctuates or is progressive enhances parental concern and complicates medical management, hearing aid selection, and individualized educational planning for the affected child. Despite intensive multidisciplinary evaluation and intervention, continued threshold fluctuation or a gradual decline in auditory acuity may proceed unabated in a significant percentage of these youngsters. With the adoption of universal newborn hearing screening mandates by an increasing number of states, any challenges to the accurate determination of auditory thresholds must be addressed within the first few months of life. PMID:12487089

  14. Noise-induced hearing loss and hearing aids requirement

    C. Giordano; Garzaro, M; Nadalin, J; Pecorari, G; Boggero, R; ARGENTERO, P.; Albera, R

    2008-01-01

    Subjective disturbances, due to hearing loss, are auditory disability and handicap which can be evaluated with a questionnaire. The present study refers to a population of industrial workers affected by noise-induced hearing loss. Aim of the study is to identify the minimal level of hearing loss over which the patient felt changes in his quality of life, and the average auditory threshold at which the patient considered the application of a hearing aid useful or necessary. The sample comprise...

  15. Hearing Loss in Children: Data and Statistics

    ... territories, such as the percent screened for hearing loss or receiving diagnostic testing. Transition Into Adulthood A CDC study that followed school-aged children identified with hearing loss into young ...

  16. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Amir Houshang Mehrparvar; Mohammad Hossein Davari; Abolfazl Mollasadeghi; Mohammad Reza Vahidi; Mehrdad Mostaghaci; Maryam Bahaloo; Pedram Shokouh

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months...

  17. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl;

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...... after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup....

  18. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic hearing loss

    ... hearing loss tend to develop more severe hearing loss earlier in life than females who inherit a copy of the same gene mutation. A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits ... hearing loss in the United States. These cases are inherited ...

  19. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = - .60, p self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  20. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Chadi Saifan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiometry exams, he displayed persistent moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss bilaterally. Discussion. This case is notable because unlike all but one previously reported case, the patient—who was restated on methadone—did not make a complete recovery. Conclusion. Methadone overuse in rare cases causes SSHL.

  1. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  2. Relationship Between Hair Cell Loss and Hearing Loss in Fishes.

    Smith, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to intense sound or ototoxic chemicals can damage the auditory hair cells of vertebrates, resulting in hearing loss. Although the relationship between such hair cell damage and auditory function is fairly established for terrestrial vertebrates, there are limited data available to understand this relationship in fishes. Although investigators have measured either the morphological damage of the inner ear or the functional deficits in the hearing of fishes, very few have directly measured both in an attempt to find a relationship between the two. Those studies that have examined both auditory hair cell damage in the inner ear and the resulting hearing loss in fishes are reviewed here. In general, there is a significant linear relationship between the number of hair cells lost and the severity of hearing threshold shifts, although this varies between species and different hair cell-damaging stimuli. After trauma to the fish ear, auditory hair cells are able to regenerate to control level densities. With this regeneration also comes a restoration of hearing. Thus there is also a significant relationship between hair cell recovery and hearing recovery in fishes. PMID:26611069

  3. Sensorineural hearing loss in Kawasaki disease.

    Aggarwal, Varun; Etinger, Veronica; Orjuela, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a common nonspecific vasculitis seen in childhood. The most significant long-term sequela is coronary artery aneurysm. However, the spectrum of complications involves not only the heart, but also other organs such as the eyes, skin, kidneys, gallbladder, liver, and central nervous system. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a relatively unrecognized complication of the disease. Although most of the complications (except coronary artery aneurysm) are self-limiting, SNHL can be persistent. It is, especially important in infants and young children who might not be able to report the hearing deficits and are most likely to have cognitive and speech delays if this hearing loss is not addressed in a timely manner. We report a child with Kawasaki disease who had SNHL during the 2(nd) week of the illness. The aim of this article is to briefly review the pathophysiology behind this hearing loss and strongly emphasize the importance of universal hearing evaluation in all children diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. This screening in children with Kawasaki disease may provide some timely intervention if needed. Since most Kawasaki disease patients will be seen by cardiologists, we hope to create more awareness about this complication to the cardiology community as well. PMID:27011703

  4. Association between hearing loss and depressive symptoms in elderly

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss causes difficulties in speech understanding, which leads away from the family and social environment. This isolation may be associated with depressive disorders. Type of study: clinical prospective. Objective: To determine the association between hearing loss and depression in a group of non-institutionalized elderly. Method: The sample consisted of individuals aged over 60 years, undergoing complete audiological evaluation and screening for depressive symptoms with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS. Results: We evaluated 54 elderly, 26 (48.1% were female and 28 (51.9% males. It was found that 39 (72.2% had hearing thresholds change, and 17 (31.5% with mild hearing loss and 22 (40.7% with moderate hearing loss. Were evident signs of depression in 25 elderly (46.3%, and 22 (40.7% had hearing loss. Data analysis showed an association between hearing loss and depression (p = 0.016. Although not significant (p = 0.18, the association between the degree of hearing loss was positive in relation to the severity of the signs of depression. Conclusion: In elderly people surveyed, there was a strong association between hearing loss and signs of depression and tendency to be an association between the degree of hearing loss and the severity of the signs of depression.

  5. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: ... more information about enlarged vestibular aqueducts? What are vestibular aqueducts? The inner ear Credit: NIH Medical Arts ...

  6. Hearing aid-related satisfaction based on type and degree of hearing loss in elderly

    Farzad FarajiKhiavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the elderly; using a hearing aid to alleviate auditory impairment can positively affect their quality of life. This research aimed to determine the level of satisfaction concerning hearing aids in elderly people with hearing impairment based on the type and degree of hearing loss.Methods: An analytic cross-sectional research design was used ; the sample included 40 elderly people who used hearing aids. According to the World Health Organization (WHO age classification, participants were divided into two age groups: 65-74 years (n=20 and 75-90 years (n=20. Satisfaction levels were assessed using a standard satisfaction with amplification in daily life (SADL questionnaire.Results: Satisfaction levels in the 65-74 age group were significantly higher than that in the 75-90 age group (p=0.02. Participants with mixed hearing loss revealed higher satisfaction levels than participants with sensorineural hearing loss (p=0.02. On the negative effects dimension, participants with severe hearing loss exhibited significantly higher satisfaction levels than participants with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss (p=0.01.Conclusion: Total satisfaction mean scores were relatively high in the elderly participants . Negative features could be reduced via careful consultation regarding the aids’ amplifying capabilities and limitations in groups with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss.

  7. [Steroid-responsive sensorineural hearing loss with low tone loss].

    Toriya, R; Yamashita, H; Hisashi, K; Komune, S; Komiyama, S

    1995-11-01

    Five cases of sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset were reviewed. They were not responsive to administration of ATP and Vit. B12, but very responsive to steroid administration. All the patients were male and showed hearing loss in low frequencies in pure tone audiogram. Administration of steroid recovered hearing impairment immediately. However, cessation of steroid aggravated the recovered hearing. Serological and immunological examinations did not show any abnormal findings on all the patients. It was considered that these five patients had characteristics of both steroid-sensitive and low tone-loss type sensorineural hearing losses. PMID:8566929

  8. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Bruna Natália Freire Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: This is the first case report that brings together DHF and sudden hearing loss. In the development of this case no other cause to sudden hearing loss was found and the correlation between dengue and hearing loss was questioned. In the literature review was found that some viruses, as mumps virus, varicella-zoster virus and HSV-1 and HSV-2 are related to sudden hearing loss, all of them fit in the viral theory. Besides the viral theory of sudden hearing loss, there is the vascular theory that is the occlusion of the end artery that supplies the cochlea. DHF has a vascular commitment, and the hypothesis of a vascular cause could be elicited in this case. Many studies in this area are needed and this article has the objective of elicit the discussion about the subject. Could dengue be associated with sensorineural hearing loss?

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Bruna Natália Freire Ribeiro; Alexandre Caixeta Guimarães; Felipe Yazawa; Tammy Fumiko Messias Takara; Guilherme Machado de Carvalho; Carlos Eduardo Monteiro Zappelini

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue is an acute febrile infectious disease, with high fever followed by symptoms flu-like. Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is a vascular leak syndrome and could present spontaneous bleeding and worsening of symptoms after some days. Dengue could have some ENT manifestations, however hearing loss is not one of them. Sudden hearing loss is considered as sensorineural or perceptual hearing loss with a sudden onset in a person without other prior otological history. The relation b...

  10. Sensorineural Hearing Loss following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Pillion, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    A case study is presented of a 17-year-old male who sustained an anoxic brain injury and sensorineural hearing loss secondary to carbon monoxide poisoning. Audiological data is presented showing a slightly asymmetrical hearing loss of sensorineural origin and mild-to-severe degree for both ears. Word recognition performance was fair to poor bilaterally for speech presented at normal conversational levels in quiet. Management considerations of the hearing loss are discussed.

  11. Noise and Hearing Loss: A Review

    Daniel, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss is a major cause of deafness and hearing impairment in the United States. Though genetics and advanced age are major risk factors, temporary and permanent hearing impairments are becoming more common among young adults and children especially with the increased exposure to portable music players. Though…

  12. Introduction to audiology: Some basics about hearing loss, hearing technologies and barriers to hearing aid use

    Mourtou, Eleni; Meis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    loss and their various effects on communication, (3) the different degrees of hearing loss as defined by different national and international organizations, (4) statistics on the preva- lence of hearing loss worldwide, (5) some technological aspects of hearing instruments, (6) sta- tistics on non...

  13. Sudden (reversible) sensorineural hearing loss in pregnancy.

    Kenny, R

    2011-03-01

    Sudden hearing loss directly associated with pregnancy or birth is a little known and rare occurrence. The temporary, unilateral, low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in this case was reported after the birth of the patient\\'s first child, and again during the third trimester of her second pregnancy.

  14. Drug Induced Hearing Loss: Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve Hearing

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Drug-Induced Hearing Loss Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve ... brain there was a sound. What are ototoxic drugs and why are they important? Ototoxic drugs are ...

  15. Disrupted functional brain connectome in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Xu, Haibo; Fan, Wenliang; Zhao, Xueyan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is generally defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30 dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies and within a three-day period. This hearing loss is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The pathogenesis of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still unknown, and the alterations in the functional connectivity are suspected to involve one possible pathogenesis. Despite scarce findings with respect to alterations in brain functional networks in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, the alterations of the whole brain functional connectome and whether these alterations were already in existence in the acute period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of brain functional connectome in two large samples of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and to investigate the correlation between unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss characteristics and changes in the functional network properties. Pure tone audiometry was performed to assess hearing ability. Abnormal changes in the peripheral auditory system were examined using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The graph theoretical network analysis method was used to detect brain connectome alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Compared with the control groups, both groups of unilateral SSNHL patients exhibited a significantly increased clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency but a significantly decreased characteristic path length. In addition, the primary increased nodal strength (e.g., nodal betweenness, hubs) was observed in several regions primarily, including the limbic and paralimbic systems, and in the auditory network brain areas. These findings suggest that the alteration of network organization already exists in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period

  16. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully

  17. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss. PMID:27392187

  18. Coping with Hearing Loss and High School

    Exceptional Parent, 2010

    2010-01-01

    High school can be a bumpy road for teenagers, especially since most teenagers are trying to fit in and start to define their own individuality and future. Now imagine if a teenager has hearing loss. Besides not being able to hear their instructors or friends as well as their classmates, self image problems can be magnified if they need to wear…

  19. Gd enhanced MRI in sensorineural hearing loss

    The enhanced MRI hearing findings of the inner ear in 124 patients with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. MR images were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium (0.1 mmol/kg). In three out of seventy-nine patients with unilateral healing loss, cochlear and/or the vestibular enhancement was noted on the symptomatic side. The positive cases included those with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, mumps and so-called sudden deafness. Forty-five patients with bilateral hearing loss showed no enhancement within the inner ear. Although positive gadolinium enhancement of the inner ear may detect inflammatory lesions due to a viral infection, its incidence in sensorineural hearing loss, including cases of sudden deafness. seems to be extremely rare. (author)

  20. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    ... near the kitchen or near a band playing music. Background noise makes it hard to hear people ... used by individuals with middle ear problems or deafness in one ear. Because surgery is required to ...

  1. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: An update

    Goravalingappa, Ravi; Bhattacharyya, Abir K.

    1997-01-01

    For many otolaryngologists the management of acute sensorineural hearing loss is an intuitive exercise. The ideas that govern a practice is as important as treating the patients and preventing progression of the disease; this has evolved by retrospective, anecdotal reports and clinical experience rather than through prospective research. To evaluate the current literature on management of such sensorineural hearing loss, a medline search of the topic was carried out and evidence based on rece...

  2. Laboratory methods of assessing hearing loss.

    Møller, A R

    1982-01-01

    Methods for assessing hearing loss in human loss in human and in animal are reviewed with special reference to the use of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BSEP). The technique of recording and digital filtering of BSEP is described and compared with the results obtained by use of traditional analog filtering. The use of electrophysiological methods in assessing threshold shifts in studies of the effect of noise exposure on hearing in experimental animals is described for examples of resu...

  3. Diclofenac induced sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    M Bhanukumar; Vineetha Bharathan Menon; Justin Kurian; Madhan Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    A few cases of mild to moderate, gradual and reversible sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) with prolonged doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported. We present a case of sudden irreversible SNHL in a 60-year-old female after taking a single dose of diclofenac. The patient was a known case of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and was on regular treatment. We postulate that the patient's hearing loss was the result of diclofenac's ototoxic effects which may have been poten...

  4. Mitochondrial DNA A1555G mutation screening using a testing kit method and its significance in preventing aminoglycoside-related hearing loss

    LIU Xin; YANG Weiyan; HAN Dongyi; JIN Zhengce; GUAN Minxin; DAI Pu; HUANG Deliang; YUAN Huijun; LI Weiming; YU Fei; ZHANG Xin; KANG Dongyang; CAO Juyang

    2006-01-01

    To report a new screening method for mitochondrial DNA 1555A→G mutation and the results of genotype analysis in 19 maternal inherited deafness pedigrees. Method Five hundred and forty-six non-syndromic neuro-sensory hearing loss patients were tested for 1555A→G mutation using a new compact testing kit, which allows clear distinction between wild type and 1555 A→G mutated mtDNAs. Results Nineteen subjects among the 546 patients (3.48%) were found to carry mtDNA A1555G mutation. The results were confirmed by sequencing in an ABI 3100 Avant sequencer. Conclusions Maternal inherited deafness families are a frequently seen in outpatient group. The detection ofmtDNA 1555 A→G mutation with a low cost, ready to use detection kit is needed and suitable in China for large scale screening and preventive testing before usage of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  5. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey

    Carl Christian Lein Størmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of TromsØ. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians.

  6. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey.

    Størmer, Carl Christian Lein; Laukli, Einar; Høydal, Erik Harry; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of TromsØ. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians. PMID:26572701

  7. Audiological results with Baha in conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Pfiffner, Flurin; Caversaccio, Marco-Domenico; Kompis, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The level of improvement in the audiological results of Baha(®) users mainly depends on the patient's preoperative hearing thresholds and the type of Baha sound processor used. This investigation shows correlations between the preoperative hearing threshold and postoperative aided thresholds and audiological results in speech understanding in quiet of 84 Baha users with unilateral conductive hearing loss, bilateral conductive hearing loss and bilateral mixed hearing loss. Secondly, speech understanding in noise of 26 Baha users with different Baha sound processors (Compact, Divino, and BP100) is investigated. Linear regression between aided sound field thresholds and bone conduction (BC) thresholds of the better ear shows highest correlation coefficients and the steepest slope. Differences between better BC thresholds and aided sound field thresholds are smallest for mid-frequencies (1 and 2 kHz) and become larger at 0.5 and 4 kHz. For Baha users, the gain in speech recognition in quiet can be expected to lie in the order of magnitude of the gain in their hearing threshold. Compared to its predecessor sound processors Baha(®) Compact and Baha(®) Divino, Baha(®) BP100 improves speech understanding in noise significantly by +0.9 to +4.6 dB signal-to-noise ratio, depending on the setting and the use of directional microphone. For Baha users with unilateral and bilateral conductive hearing loss and bilateral mixed hearing loss, audiological results in aided sound field thresholds can be estimated with the better BC hearing threshold. The benefit in speech understanding in quiet can be expected to be similar to the gain in their sound field hearing threshold. The most recent technology of Baha sound processor improves speech understanding in noise by an order of magnitude that is well perceived by users and which can be very useful in everyday life. PMID:21389707

  8. Hearing and hearing loss: Causes, effects, and treatments

    Schmiedt, Richard A.

    2003-04-01

    Hearing loss can have multiple causes. The outer and middle ears are conductive pathways for acoustic energy to the inner ear (cochlea) and help shape our spectral sensitivity. Conductive hearing loss is mechanical in nature such that the energy transfer to the cochlea is impeded, often from eardrum perforations or middle ear fluid buildup. Beyond the middle ear, the cochlea comprises three interdependent systems necessary for normal hearing. The first is that of basilar-membrane micromechanics including the outer hair cells. This system forms the basis of the cochlear amplifier and is the most vulnerable to noise and drug exposure. The second system comprises the ion pumps in the lateral wall tissues of the cochlea. These highly metabolic cells provide energy to the cochlear amplifier in the form of electrochemical potentials. This second system is particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging. The third system comprises the inner hair cells and their associated sensory nerve fibers. This system is the transduction stage, changing mechanical vibrations to nerve impulses. New treatments for hearing loss are on the horizon; however, at present the best strategy is avoidance of cochlear trauma and the proper use of hearing aids. [Work supported by NIA and MUSC.

  9. Unilateral Hearing Loss in Children

    ... hearing ear face noise (dishwasher, room air conditioner, radio). Do not have the TV or radio on while eating dinner or at other times ... Information Handouts Dizziness and Balance Find an Audiologist Advertising Disclaimer Advertise with us The ASHA Leader  Celebrating ...

  10. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  11. Childhood hearing health: educating for prevention of hearing loss.

    Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Lacerda, Giselle; Lobato, Diolén Conceição Barros; Santos, Luciana; Moreira, Aline Carlezzo; Ribas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies for awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1%) presented hearing alterations. Conclusion The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential. PMID:25992146

  12. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss.

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  13. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss

    Oguz Kadir Egilmez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA, autosomal recessive (DFNB, mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN. To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear.

  14. [Recovery of hearing: results of delayed medical treatment in patients with idiopathic sudden hearing loss].

    Maassen, M M; Pfister, M; Plontke, S; Koitschev, A; Vögler, A; Löwenheim, H

    2002-12-01

    For the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), a variety of studies about intravenous drug administration with the beginning of treatment in the early period of less then one week after the onset of hearing loss have been performed. In contrast, very little information is available about the efficacy of intravenous drug therapy for ISSNHL with the beginning of treatment later than four weeks after the onset of hearing loss. In a retrospective chart review we studied the treatment results of 57 patients with ISSNHL with beginning of treatment later than four weeks after the onset of hearing loss with no spontaneous recovery of hearing. Patients received a treatment with intravenous administration of Dextran (concentration 40 g/l with NaCl 0.9%) and Procain-HCl (a derivative of the local anaesthetic lidocaine,400-800 mg in a 500 ml rheologic infusion of Dextran 40). 25% of the patients showed a significant improvement of 10 dB or more in hearing threshold at 1000 Hz measured in bone-conducted pure tone audiometry. In a subjective evaluation 53% of the patients noticed a subjective improvement of their individual hearing thresholds. PMID:12474128

  15. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Shahin Yazdani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine hearing thresholds at sound frequencies important for speech comprehension in subjects with ocular pseudoexfoliation (PXF and to compare them with that of controls without PXF. METHODS: Eighty-three subjects with ocular PXF and 83 age and sex matched controls without PXF were enrolled in this case-control study. Pure tone audiometry (bone conduction was performed at 1, 2 and 3 kilohertz (KHz in all subjects. Thresholds were compared to an age and sex stratified standard (ISO7029 and between study groups. Hearing loss was defined as sum of tested hearing thresholds (HTL-1,2,3 lower than the ISO7029 standard median. RESULTS: The study included 60 male and 23 female subjects in each group. Hearing loss was present in 147 of 166 (88.6% of examined ears in the case group vs 89 of 166 (53.6% in the control group (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.49-11.79. Overall 78 subjects (94.0% in the case group vs 58 subjects (69.9% in the control group had hearing loss in one or both ears (P < 0.001; OR=6.72; 95%CI, 2.42-18.62. Hearing thresholds at each of the examined frequencies and the HTL-1,2,3 were also significantly higher in individuals with PXF. Although glaucoma was significantly more common in subjects with PXF (51.8% vs 22.9%, P < 0.001, it was not associated with hearing

  16. SOX10 mutations mimic isolated hearing loss.

    Pingault, V; Faubert, E; Baral, V; Gherbi, S; Loundon, N; Couloigner, V; Denoyelle, F; Noël-Pétroff, N; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Bondurand, N; Marlin, S

    2015-10-01

    Ninety genes have been identified to date that are involved in non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 300 different forms of syndromic hearing impairment have been described. Mutations in SOX10, one of the genes contributing to syndromic hearing loss, induce a large range of phenotypes, including several subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome and Kallmann syndrome with deafness. In addition, rare mutations have been identified in patients with isolated signs of these diseases. We used the recent characterization of temporal bone imaging aspects in patients with SOX10 mutations to identify possible patients with isolated hearing loss due to SOX10 mutation. We selected 21 patients with isolated deafness and temporal bone morphological defects for mutational screening. We identified two SOX10 mutations and found that both resulted in a non-functional protein in vitro. Re-evaluation of the two affected patients showed that both had previously undiagnosed olfactory defects. Diagnosis of anosmia or hyposmia in young children is challenging, and particularly in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SOX10 mutations can mimic non-syndromic hearing impairment. MRI should complete temporal bones computed tomographic scan in the management of congenital deafness as it can detect brain anomalies, cochlear nerve defects, and olfactory bulb malformation in addition to inner ear malformations. PMID:25256313

  17. Hearing loss in the elderly : Consequences of hearing loss and considerations for audiological rehabilitation

    2011-01-01

    Presbyacusis is the most common cause of hearing loss and is considered to be among the three most commonly reported chronic health problems of the elderly. In future years, the problem is predicted to be aggravated as the expected life span of the population increases. The psychological and social consequences of hearing impairment have been the subject of several texts. Numerous articles have been published expressing concerns involving the considerable number of hearing aids that are not b...

  18. Clinical Study on 136 Children with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Li, Feng-Jiao; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wang, Li; Yang, Feng-Bo; Lan, Lan; Guan, Jing; Yin, Zi-Fang; Rosenhall, Ulf; Yu, Lan; Hellstrom, Sten; Xue, Xi-Jun; Duan, Mao-Li; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children (CSSNHL) is consistently increasing. However, the pathology and prognosis of CSSNHL are still poorly understood. This retrospective study evaluated clinical characteristics and possible associated factors of CSSNHL. Methods: One hundred and thirty-six CSSNHL patients treated in Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Institute of Otolaryngology at Chinese PLA General Hospital between July 2008 and August 2015 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed for clinical characteristics, audiological characteristics, laboratory examinations, and prognostic factors. Results: Among the 136 patients (151 ears), 121 patients (121 ears, 80.1%) were diagnosed with unilaterally CSSNHL, and 15 patients (30 ears, 19.9%) with bilateral CSSNHL. The complete recovery rate of CSSNHL was 9.3%, and the overall recovery rate was 37.7%. We found that initial degree of hearing loss, onset of treatment, tinnitus, the ascending type audiogram, gender, side of hearing loss, the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) had prognostic significance. Age, ear fullness, and vertigo had no significant correlation with recovery. Furthermore, the relevant blood tests showed 30.8% of the children had abnormal white blood cell (WBC) counts, 22.1% had elevated homocysteine levels, 65.8% had high alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 33.8% had high IgE antibody levels, and 86.1% had positive cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG antibodies. Conclusions: CSSNHL commonly occurs unilaterally and results in severe hearing loss. Initial severe hearing loss and bilateral hearing loss are negative prognostic factors for hearing recovery, while positive prognostic factors include tinnitus, gender, the ascending type audiogram, early treatment, identifiable ABR waves, and DPOAEs. Age, vertigo, and ear fullness are not correlated with the recovery. Some serologic indicators

  19. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter;

    2007-01-01

    in fact augment noise-induced hearing loss. This is contradictory to the beneficial effect of EPO reported by the vast majority of studies on stressed neural tissues. EPO administration may alter the blood flow dynamics of the cochlear vascular bed during or after noise exposure, by a potential...

  20. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  1. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a “wait-and-scan” group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  2. Mobile phone induced sensorineural hearing loss

    The increased use of mobile phones worldwide has focused interest on the biological effects and possible health outcomes of exposure to radiofrequency fields from mobile phones, and their base stations. Various reports suggest that mobile phone use can cause health problems like fatigue, headache, dizziness, tension and sleep disturbances, however, only limited research data is available in medical literature regarding interaction between electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones and auditory function and the possible impact on hearing. We report a case of sensorineural hearing loss due to Global System for Mobile Communication mobile phone use in a 42-year-old male. (author)

  3. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl’s gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl’s gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain’s plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  4. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss.

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-Jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl's gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl's gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain's plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  5. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention: Facts and Statistics

    ... the recommended amount of exposure time. Facts and Statistics Four million workers go to work each day ... Hearing Loss DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2010-136 Statistics on hearing loss in the manufacturing industry. Surveys ...

  6. Hearing in young adults. Part I: The effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices

    Hannah Keppler; Ingeborg Dhooge; Bart Vinck

    2015-01-01

    There is great concern regarding the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in youth caused by high sound levels during various leisure activities. Health-orientated behavior of young adults might be linked to the beliefs and attitudes toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices (HPDs). The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and HPDs on young adults′ hearing status. A questionnaire and an audi...

  7. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse.

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual's psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  8. Hearing loss in stranded odontocete dolphins and whales.

    David Mann

    Full Text Available The causes of dolphin and whale stranding can often be difficult to determine. Because toothed whales rely on echolocation for orientation and feeding, hearing deficits could lead to stranding. We report on the results of auditory evoked potential measurements from eight species of odontocete cetaceans that were found stranded or severely entangled in fishing gear during the period 2004 through 2009. Approximately 57% of the bottlenose dolphins and 36% of the rough-toothed dolphins had significant hearing deficits with a reduction in sensitivity equivalent to severe (70-90 dB or profound (>90 dB hearing loss in humans. The only stranded short-finned pilot whale examined had profound hearing loss. No impairments were detected in seven Risso's dolphins from three different stranding events, two pygmy killer whales, one Atlantic spotted dolphin, one spinner dolphin, or a juvenile Gervais' beaked whale. Hearing impairment could play a significant role in some cetacean stranding events, and the hearing of all cetaceans in rehabilitation should be tested.

  9. A Taxonomy of Fatigue Concepts and Their Relation to Hearing Loss.

    Hornsby, Benjamin W Y; Naylor, Graham; Bess, Fred H

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is common in individuals with a variety of chronic health conditions and can have significant negative effects on quality of life. Although limited in scope, recent work suggests persons with hearing loss may be at increased risk for fatigue, in part due to effortful listening that is exacerbated by their hearing impairment. However, the mechanisms responsible for hearing loss-related fatigue, and the efficacy of audiologic interventions for reducing fatigue, remain unclear. To improve our understanding of hearing loss-related fatigue, as a field it is important to develop a common conceptual understanding of this construct. In this article, the broader fatigue literature is reviewed to identify and describe core constructs, consequences, and methods for assessing fatigue and related constructs. Finally, the current knowledge linking hearing loss and fatigue is described and may be summarized as follows: Hearing impairment may increase the risk of subjective fatigue and vigor deficits; adults with hearing loss require more time to recover from fatigue after work and have more work absences; sustained, effortful, listening can be fatiguing; optimal methods for eliciting and measuring fatigue in persons with hearing loss remain unclear and may vary with listening condition; and amplification may minimize decrements in cognitive processing speed during sustained effortful listening. Future research is needed to develop reliable measurement methods to quantify hearing loss-related fatigue, explore factors responsible for modulating fatigue in people with hearing loss, and identify and evaluate potential interventions for reducing hearing loss-related fatigue. PMID:27355763

  10. Bilateral Pial siderosis and hearing loss

    Seven adult patients with bilateral progressive hearing loss (six male, one female; aged 40-74 years) were studied with a high-field strength (1.5-T) magnetic resonance (MR) system after previous negative workup with either air contrast or intravenous contrast medium-enhanced computed tomography (CT). In all instances, the patients showed extensive evidence of pial siderosis outlining the posterior fossa subarachnoid space. The siderosis was manifested (on long repetition time images) as an increasing susceptibility effect (hypointensity) with a prolongation of echo time. The results of this study indicate that a negative CT examination is inadequate in patients with bilateral hearing loss and that when evidence of siderosis is found on MR images, an etiology for prior subarachnoid hemorrhage must be pursued

  11. Diclofenac induced sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    M Bhanukumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A few cases of mild to moderate, gradual and reversible sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL with prolonged doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported. We present a case of sudden irreversible SNHL in a 60-year-old female after taking a single dose of diclofenac. The patient was a known case of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and was on regular treatment. We postulate that the patient's hearing loss was the result of diclofenac's ototoxic effects which may have been potentiated as a result of her long standing diabetes, hypertension and old age. Accordingly, we recommend the cautious use of diclofenac in patients with underlying diseases where diclofenac induced ototoxicity could potentially result in adverse otologic consequences.

  12. Complex Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Aleksandruk, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    Recent data on use of Ginkgo Biloba extract in otorhinolaryngological practice were presented. The mechanism of the curative action of Ginkgo Biloba extract (vasoprotective, antioxidative, rheological, and edematous) was described. Effectiveness of Ginkgo Biloba as a part of complex treatment of sensorineural hearing loss in children was elucidated. Results of the research proved effectiveness of treatment with Ginkgo Biloba and showed perspectives of Ginkgo Biloba use in treatment programs f...

  13. Occupational hearing loss of market mill workers in the city of Accra, Ghana

    Emmanuel D Kitcher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL is an irreversible sensorineural hearing loss associated with exposure to high levels of excessive noise. Prevention measures are not well established in developing countries. This comparative cross sectional study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in both a group of high risk workers and a control group and to assess their knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. A total of 101 market mill workers and 103 controls employed within markets in the city of Accra, Ghana, were evaluated using a structured questionnaire and pure tone audiometry. The questionnaire assessed factors including self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus, knowledge on the effects of noise on hearing health and the use of hearing protective devices. Pure tone audiometric testing was conducted for both mill workers and controls. Noise levels at the work premises of the mill workers and controls were measured. Symptoms of hearing loss were reported by 24 (23.76% and 8 (7.7% mill workers and controls respectively. Fifty-five (54.5% and fifty-four (52.37% mill workers and controls exhibited knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. Five (5.0% mill workers used hearing protective devices. There was significant sensorineural hearing loss and the presence of a 4 kHz audiometric notch among mill workers when compared with controls for the mean thresholds of 2 kHz, 3 kHz and 4 kHz (P = 0. 001. The prevalence of hearing loss in the better hearing ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively (P < 0.5. The prevalence of hearing loss, which may be characteristic of NIHL in the better hearing ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively. The majority of mill workers did not use hearing protection.

  14. Vision loss and hearing loss in painting and musical composition.

    Marmor, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    This article considers the impact of vision and hearing loss on great painters and musical composers. The visual work of Mary Cassatt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edgar Degas, and Claude Monet all showed alterations as their vision failed. In contrast, Gabriel Fauré, Bedřich Smetana, and Ludwig von Beethoven wrote many of their best compositions while totally deaf, and Georg Friedrich Handel and Frederick Delius struggled to compose late in life when they lost their vision (although their hearing remained excellent). There are 2 major distinctions between the role of vision and hearing for these artistic disciplines. First, there is a surrogate means of "hearing" music, through the musical score, which allows composers to write and edit music while totally deaf. The greatest problem with deafness for a skilled composer is interference from internal noise (tinnitus). There is no surrogate for vision to allow a painter to work when the subject is a blur or the colors on the canvas cannot be distinguished. Second, although the appreciation of art is visual and that of music is auditory, the transcription of both art and musical composition is visual. Thus, visual loss does pose a problem for a composer accustomed to working with good sight, because it disrupts habitual methods of writing and editing music. PMID:24565744

  15. CORRELATION BETWEEN TYMPANIC MEMBRANE PERFORATION AND HEARING LOSS

    Lidija RISTOVSKA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Perforation of the tympanic membrane primarily results from middle ear infections, trauma or iatrogenic causes. The perforation causes conductive hearing loss by reducing the surface area available for sound transmission to the ossicular chain. Objective: The objective was to analyze the characteristics of tympanic membrane perforations in relation to hearing loss and to determine the type and degree of hearing loss. Materials and methods: We analyzed audiometric, otoscopic findings and medical reports of 218 patients, 114 males (52.3% and 104 females (47.7%, aged 9 to 75 years (mean age of 47.9 years, examined during the period of November 2012 to October 2015. For statistical data analysis we used Chi-square test with level of significance p<0.05. Results: Most of the patients had unilateral perforations (89% with right ear predominance and involvement of two quadrants of pars tensa (37.2%. Mean air-bone gap was 23.9 dB. The largest air-bone gap was at frequency of 250 Hz. Most of the patients (73.1% had mixed hearing loss (p=0.032, and average hearing thresholds from 21 to 40 dB. Conclusion: Mean air-bone gap is largest at the lower frequencies, and decreases as frequency increases. Size of the perforation has effect on hearing loss. Mean air-bone gap increases with increasing size of the perforation. There is no big difference between the mean air-bone gap in posterior versus anterior perforations.

  16. Personal Sound Amplifiers for Adults with Hearing Loss.

    Mamo, Sara K; Reed, Nicholas S; Nieman, Carrie L; Oh, Esther S; Lin, Frank R

    2016-03-01

    Age-related hearing loss is highly prevalent and often untreated. Use of hearing aids has been associated with improvements in communication and quality of life, but such treatment is unaffordable or inaccessible for many adults. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical guide for physicians who work with older adults who are experiencing hearing and communication difficulties. Specifically, we review direct-to-consumer amplification products that can be used to address hearing loss in adults. Helping adults with hearing loss navigate hearing loss treatment options ranging from being professionally fitted with hearing aids to using direct-to-consumer amplification options is important for primary care clinicians to understand given our increasing understanding of the impact of hearing loss on cognitive, social, and physical functioning. PMID:26498713

  17. Introduction to auditory perception in listeners with hearing losses

    Florentine, Mary; Buus, Søren

    2003-04-01

    Listeners with hearing losses cannot hear low-level sounds. In addition, they often complain that audible sounds do not have a comfortable loudness, lack clarity, and are difficult to hear in the presence of other sounds. In particular, they have difficulty understanding speech in background noise. The mechanisms underlying these complaints are not completely understood, but hearing losses are known to alter many aspects of auditory processing. This presentation highlights alterations in audibility, loudness, pitch, spectral and temporal processes, and binaural hearing that may result from hearing losses. The changes in these auditory processes can vary widely across individuals with seemingly similar amounts of hearing loss. For example, two listeners with nearly identical thresholds can differ in their ability to process spectral and temporal features of sounds. Such individual differences make rehabilitation of hearing losses complex. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  18. Reiter's syndrome and hearing loss: a possible association?

    Monsanto, Rafael C; Neto, Arlindo C L; Lorenzetti, Fábio T M

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Patient complained of hearing loss and tinnitus after the onset of Reiter's syndrome. Audiometry confirmed the hearing loss on the left ear; blood work showed increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C3 fraction of the complement. Genotyping for HLA-B27 was positive. Treatment with prednisolone did not improve the hearing levels.

  19. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Caye-Thomasen, P.; Brandt, C.T.;

    2010-01-01

    pneumococcal serotype) for development of hearing loss. Methods. Results of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry, bacterial serotyping, follow-up audiological examinations, and medical records were collected, and disease-related risk factors for hearing loss were identified. The mean pure......Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the...... hearing loss, and another 16 (7%) had bilateral profound hearing loss. Significant risk factors for hearing loss were advanced age, the presence of comorbidity, severity of meningitis, a low CSF glucose level, a high CSF protein level, and a certain pneumococcal serotype (P <.05). By applying multivariate...

  20. Internet Access and Use in Adults With Hearing Loss

    Thorén, Elisabet Sundewall; Öberg, Marie; Wänström, Gunilla; Andersson, Gerhard; Lunner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background The future rehabilitation of adults with hearing loss is likely to involve online tools used by individuals at home. Online tools could also be useful for people who are not seeking professional help for their hearing problems. Hearing impairment is a disability that increases with age, and increased age is still associated with reduced use of the Internet. Therefore, to continue the research on online audiological rehabilitative tools for people with hearing loss, it is important ...

  1. A Review of Hearing Loss in Cleft Palate Patients

    Bilal Gani; Kinshuck, A. J.; Sharma, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cleft palate is associated with recurrent otitis media with effusion and hearing loss. This study analysed the way these patients' hearing is managed in Alder Hey Children's Hospital. Method. A retrospective audit was carried out on cleft palate patients in Alder Hey Children's Hospital. Audiology assessment and treatment options were reviewed. Comparisons were made between the use of ventilation tubes (VTs) and hearing aids (HAs). The types of cleft, types of hearing loss, and th...

  2. MR imaging of sensory neural hearing loss

    This paper describes MR findings in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) who do not have acoustic neuromas. Twenty-eight patients with SNHL were evaluated with pre- and postgadolinium thin-section axial T1-weighted imaging and axial T2- weighted imaging through the whole brain. Eleven patients had lesions in the labyrinth. Ten of the 11 lesions enhanced after gadolinium administration. The diagnoses included viral labyrinthitis (three patients), syphilitic labyrinthitis (two patients), bacterial labyrinthitis (one patient), vestibular neuromas (three patients), ostosclerosis (one patient), and intravestibular hemorrhage (one patient)

  3. Influence of hearing loss and cognitive abilities on language development in CHARGE Syndrome.

    Vesseur, Annemarie; Langereis, Margreet; Free, Rolien; Snik, Ad; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mylanus, Emmanuel

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss and cognitive delay are frequently occurring features in CHARGE syndrome that may contribute to impaired language development. However, not much is known about language development in patients with CHARGE syndrome. In this retrospective study, hearing loss, cognitive abilities, and language development are described in 50 patients with CHARGE syndrome. After informed consent was given, data were collected from local medical files. Most patients (38.3%; 18/47 patients) had moderate hearing loss (41-70 dB) and 58.5% (24/41 patients) had an IQ below 70. The mean language quotients of the receptive and expressive language were more than one standard deviation below the norm. Both hearing loss and cognitive delay had an influence on language development. Language and cognitive data were not available for all patients, which may have resulted in a pre-selection of patients with a delay. In conclusion, while hearing thresholds, cognitive abilities and language development vary widely in CHARGE syndrome, they are mostly below average. Hearing loss and cognitive delay have a significant influence on language development in children with CHARGE syndrome. To improve our knowledge about and the quality of care we can provide to CHARGE patients, hearing and developmental tests should be performed regularly in order to differentiate between the contributions of hearing loss and cognitive delay to delays in language development, and to provide adequate hearing amplification in the case of hearing loss. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27145116

  4. Preliminary comparison of infants speech with and without hearing loss

    McGowan, Richard S.; Nittrouer, Susan; Chenausky, Karen

    2005-04-01

    The speech of ten children with hearing loss and ten children without hearing loss aged 12 months is examined. All the children with hearing loss were identified before six months of age, and all have parents who wish them to become oral communicators. The data are from twenty minute sessions with the caregiver and child, with their normal prostheses in place, in semi-structured settings. These data are part of a larger test battery applied to both caregiver and child that is part of a project comparing the development of children with hearing loss to those without hearing loss, known as the Early Development of Children with Hearing Loss. The speech comparisons are in terms of number of utterances, syllable shapes, and segment type. A subset of the data was given a detailed acoustic analysis, including formant frequencies and voice quality measures. [Work supported by NIDCD R01 006237 to Susan Nittrouer.

  5. A clinical study of age related hearing loss among diabetes patients

    Sheetal Krishnappa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age related hearing loss is one of the most common chronic health conditions affecting the elderly people. With aging, risk of presbycusis and diabetes increases. Our study aims at evaluating auditory dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus aged above 50 years as compared to non-diabetic patient. We also tried to find the relation between duration of diabetes and severity of hearing loss and whether HbA1c and blood sugars levels affected the type and severity of hearing loss. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study on 106 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 90 non-diabetic patients with age and sex matched (controls was carried out during November 2011 to October 2013. All patients were evaluated for hearing loss by subjecting to pure tone audiometry and blood investigations like glycated hemoglobin, fasting and postprandial blood sugars and serum creatinine levels. Results: A prevalence of 73% hearing loss was seen in diabetics. The degree of hearing loss increased with age. There was bilateral progressive sensory neural hearing loss with right sloping curve in both diabetics as well as controls but with significantly (P < 0.001 higher loss in diabetics (at 4 KHz and 8 KHz. A significant relationship between duration of the diabetes, HbA1c and severity of hearing loss was observed. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus was associated with higher hearing loss compared to presbycusis and hearing threshold was seen to affect all frequencies, but significantly the higher frequencies in diabetics. As duration of diabetes increased, the severity also increased. Poorer the HbA1c, more severe was the hearing loss.

  6. Subclinical Hearing Loss, Longer Sleep Duration, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Japanese General Population

    Kei Nakajima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss leads to impaired social functioning and quality of life. Hearing loss is also associated with sleeping disorders and cardiometabolic risk factors. Here, we determined whether subclinical hearing loss is associated with sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross-sectional and longitudinal study of healthy Japanese general population. 48,091 men and women aged 20–79 years who underwent medical checkups were included in a cross-sectional study, and 6,674 were included in an 8-year longitudinal study. The prevalence of audiometrically determined hearing loss (>25 dB at 4000 and 1000 Hz increased significantly with increasing sleep duration in any age strata. Logistic regression analysis showed that compared with reference sleep duration (6 h longer sleep duration (≥8 h was significantly associated with hearing loss, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Simultaneously, hearing loss was significantly associated with male sex, diabetes, and no habitual exercise. In the longitudinal study, the risk of longer sleep duration (≥8 h after 8 years was significantly greater in subjects with hearing loss at 4000 Hz at baseline. In conclusion, current results suggest a potential association of subclinical hearing loss with longer sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Japanese general population.

  7. Hearing Loss Due to Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Statin Treatment

    Muhammed Oylumlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that high cholesterol levels might have adverse effects on hearing and interest- ingly statins may have beneficial effects on hearing loss. Herein, we share a dramatic improvement in acute hearing loss by statin administration in a young patient with familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating the possible role of statins in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss in the context of familial hypercholesterolemia. Although the statin administra- tion as a therapeutic option for sudden hearing loss needs to be clarified in prospective studies, this case report might shed more light for possible association of dyslipidemia and hearing loss and role of statins in such cases.

  8. Hearing loss and disability exit: measurement issues and coping strategies

    Christensen, Vibeke T.; Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Rasmussen, Martin V.

    2007-01-01

    Using unique representative data containing self-reported functional and clinically measured hearing ability for the Danish population aged 50-64, we estimate the effect of hearing loss on receipt of disability benefits accounting for potential endogeneity of functional hearing. Our identification strategy involves simultaneous estimation of labor supply, functional hearing and coping strategies i.e. using assistive devices at work or informing one's employer about the problem. We find that f...

  9. Tinnitus: Characterization of associated hearing loss and modalities of treatment

    Natashya H Rent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the characteristics of hearing loss with respect to tinnitus and to study the efficacy of various modalities of treatment of tinnitus. Design: Prospective study. Materials and Methods: Patients were assigned into three groups. All patients underwent a complete ENT examination, followed by pure tone audiometry, tinnitus matching, and tinnitus handicap inventory (THI score. Patients were treated with gingko biloba, gabapentin, or tinnitus-retraining therapy (TRT for a period of 6 weeks following which above investigations were repeated. Results: The study showed a positive correlation between tinnitus loudness matches and frequency of maximum hearing threshold (r = 0.687, P = 0.001 and a significant relation between tinnitus loudness matching and THI score (r = 0.383, P = 0.001. However, no correlations were observed between pitch match frequency and THI scores. Gingko biloba and TRT were found to be effective in the management of tinnitus (P < 0.01, but no improvement was observed with gabapentin therapy (P = 0.051. Conclusion: Tinnitus loudness matches near the threshold of frequency of maximum hearing loss, thus indicating that as threshold of hearing increases, the perception of tinnitus loudness increases. However, pitch match frequency does not affect severity of tinnitus. Gingko biloba and TRT are useful in the treatment of tinnitus.

  10. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    Mukherjee Monisha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant finding to date has been the discovery of mutations in GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 as the major cause of profound prelingual deafness. This was first reported in a Tunisian family in 1994 and thereafter in many different countries. GJB2 gene encodes the gap-junction protein, connexin 26 (Cx26, mutations in which have become the first genetic marker of inherited hearing loss. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR, single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP and sequencing methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in Cx26 gene. In India as well, the Cx26 mutations are being screened in families with hearing impaired children using these molecular methods. Therefore, in order to create awareness among the clinicians and the affected families; we have attempted to review the Cx26 gene mutations responsible for autosomal recessive type of non-syndromic hearing loss. The efficacy and utility of Cx26 gene analysis might open the path to proper counseling of families for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. It may even facilitate the development of strategies in future for the treatment of this common genetic disorder.

  11. Hearing loss: Can it be neurobrucellosis?

    Hacer Aktürk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection transmitted from animals to humans mostly by ingestion through infected food products, direct contact with an infected animal. It can involve any organ system and present with a broad spectrum of clinical findings. Central nervous system involvement, so called neurobrucellosis, is rarely seen in pediatric age population. Neurologic anifestations may also show great variability and lead to confusion in diagnosis. Here, we report a case of chronic neurobrucellosis presenting with gradually worsening sensorineural hearing loss and subsequently developed meningitis. A 15 years old girl was diagnosed as neurobrucellosis with the aid of positive serum and CSF agglutination tests, in addition to clinical findings and positive exposure history to unpasteurized dairy products. Clinicians serving in endemic areas should consider brucellosis in differential diagnosis of such atypical clinical presentations to avoid delay in diagnosis and treatment. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(3: 125-128

  12. Unilateral sudden hearing loss: a rare symptom of Moyamoya disease.

    Gül, Fatih; Berçin, Sami; Müderris, Togay; Yalçıner, Gökhan; Ünal, Özkan; Kırış, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old female patient experienced a sudden onset of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss due to Moyamoya disease. A detailed summary of audiological and neurological findings indicated that the sudden hearing loss might be due to Moyamoya disease resulting in occlusion of posterior and middle cerebral arteries. Intravenous prednisolone and trimetazidine dihydrochloride may improve hearing thresholds and speech understanding. To our knowledge, this is the first article in the literature reporting a case of sudden hearing loss as the first manifestation of Moyamoya disease in a young adult. PMID:26890714

  13. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  14. Medication for hearing loss after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for vestibular schwannoma

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of corticosteroid treatments for patients showing decreases in hearing levels after stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients experienced a hearing loss in pure-tone average at greater than 20 dB or less than 10 dB within 1 year after irradiation administration of 44 Gy/22 fractions followed by a 4 Gy boost. Eight received oral prednisone at a daily dose of 30 mg, which was gradually decreased (medicated group), and 13 received none (nonmedicated group). The average observation period was 26.7±16.6 (range: 6-69) months. Results: Hearing recovery was seen after initial onset of the hearing loss in all 8 patients in the medicated group and in 2 of 13 patients in the nonmedicated group (p=0.001). The hearing recovery, that is, the change in pure-tone average (dB) at the last follow-up from the onset of hearing loss, was 9.8±6.9 dB (recovery) in the medicated group and -9.4±12.8 dB (further loss) in the nonmedicated group (p=0.0013). The hearing recovery rate, normalizing to the degree of the hearing loss before medication, was also significantly higher in the medicated group than in the nonmedicated group (p=0.0014). Conclusions: Corticosteroidal intake is suggested to be effective in improving hearing loss after stereotactic radiotherapy, at least in young patients having a useful pretreatment hearing level, if the treatment for hearing loss is administered immediately after the hearing loss is first detected

  15. The impact of hyperacusis and hearing loss on tinnitus perception in German teachers

    Sandra P Meuer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that a notable number of teachers are concerned with conditions of auditory impairment such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss. Studies focussing on characteristics and interdependencies of single hearing disorders (HD are rare. This explorative study examines tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss, and all possible combinations (tinnitus + hyperacusis; tinnitus + hearing loss; hyperacusis + hearing loss; tinnitus, hyperacusis + hearing loss in German teachers. The impact of single HD on perceived distress, depending on the number and kind of comorbid HD, was of special interest. Information was collected via online survey and includes self-reported data as well as data from the Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (Mini-TQ. Results show that most of the 1468 participants (45% suffered from two HD in different combinations, and the fewest (25% were afflicted with only one HD. Considering the seven HD groups, most teachers (30% suffered from all three HD. Across all groups, tinnitus was present in 1096, hyperacusis in 988, and hearing loss in 937 teachers. Multiple intergroup comparisons revealed that self-rated tinnitus-related distress rose significantly with the increasing number of HD. No significant differences were found for distress ratings of hyperacusis between the four groups including hyperacusis and between the four groups with hearing loss. In the Mini-TQ, groups including hyperacusis scored considerably higher than those excluding hyperacusis. The frequent prevalence of HD in German teachers points to a need of better noise prevention in German schools as one priority of occupational safety.

  16. Is hearing loss a feature of Joubert syndrome, a ciliopathy?

    H.Y. Kroes; B.G.A. van Zanten; S.A. de Ru; M. Boon; G.M.S. Mancini; M.S. van der Knaap; B.T. Poll-The; D. Lindhout

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess if hearing loss is a feature of Joubert syndrome (JBS). one of the ciliopathies and therefore possibly associated with hearing loss Design: Retrospective case series. Setting University Children's Hospital Patients Dutch patients with JBS. Main outcome measures Audiological data.

  17. Risk factors for hearing loss in infants under universal hearing screening program in Northern Thailand

    Namwongprom, Sirianong

    2015-01-01

    Watcharapol Poonual,1 Niramon Navacharoen,2 Jaran Kangsanarak,2 Sirianong Namwongprom3 1Clinical Epidemiology Program, 2Department of Otolaryngology, 3Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Objective: To define the risk factors for hearing loss in infants (aged 3 months) under universal hearing screening program. Materials and methods: A total of 3,120 infants (aged 3 months) who underwent hearing screening using a universal hearing screenin...

  18. Head Position Comparison between Students with Normal Hearing and Students with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Melo, Renato de Souza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Head sense position is coordinated by sensory activity of the vestibular system, located in the inner ear. Children with sensorineural hearing loss may show changes in the vestibular system as a result of injury to the inner ear, which can alter the sense of head position in this population. Aim: Analyze the head alignment in students with normal hearing and students with sensorineural hearing loss and compare the data between groups. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study examined the head alignment of 96 students, 48 with normal hearing and 48 with sensorineural hearing loss, aged between 7 and 18 years. The analysis of head alignment occurred through postural assessment performed according to the criteria proposed by Kendall et al. For data analysis we used the chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results: The students with hearing loss had a higher occurrence of changes in the alignment of the head than normally hearing students (p < 0.001. Forward head posture was the type of postural change observed most, occurring in greater proportion in children with hearing loss (p < 0.001, followed by the side slope head posture (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Children with sensorineural hearing loss showed more changes in the head posture compared with children with normal hearing.

  19. What are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible for the hearing complaint in the hearing loss for ototoxicity after the oncological treatment?

    Liberman, Patricia Helena Pecora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The neurosensory bilateral simetric hearing loss resulting of the oncological treatment is underestimated, because the patients has the hearing detection preserved, reporting complaints in determined situation, or the not comprehension of part of the message. Objective: Investigate which are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible by the presence of hearing complaints. Method: Prospective study evaluating 200 patients with cancer in the childhood out of the oncological treatment in at least 8 years, with average age to the diagnosis of 6,21 years (4,71. Was applied anamnesis to investigate the presence of hearing complaints and performed a tonal threshold audiometry. To check the association between the complaint and the hearing loss, was applied the Exact test of Fisher, with one error a=5%, the patients were split into: normal hearing, hearing loss in 8kHz, loss in 6-8 kHz, loss in 4-8 kHz, loss in 2-8 kHz and loss in < 1-8 kHz. Results: We found 125 patients with hearing loss, 10 presented hearing complaints. Between the patients with hearing loss, 16 presented loss only at 8kHz, and 1 with complaint; 22 with loss in 6-8 kHz, being 3 with complaint; 16 with loss in 4-8 kHz, from them 10 with complaint; 15 with loss 2-8 kHz, being 14 with complaint and 6 with loss in < 1-8 kHz all with complaints. There were a significant relationship between the loss and hearing complaint (p<0,001, when the frequency of 4 kHz was involved. Conclusion: The bigger the number of affected frequencies the bigger the occurrence of hearing complaint, most of all when the speech frequencies are involved, and the involvement of 4 kHz already determines the appearing of the complaints.

  20. The relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children

    Seyede Zohre Mousavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Oral stereognosis is the ability to recognize the objects placed in the mouth; this plays a significant role in speech sounds production. Since the children with hearing loss have articulation disorders, this study aimed to clear the relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children.Methods: In this cross-sectional non-invasive study, 40 children of 5-year-old (30 children with different degrees of hearing loss and 10 normal children were involved. Oral steriognostic test was done for all of them and the Mann-Whitney U was used for statistical analysis.Results: There were significant differences between the mean of oral stereognostic ability between the normal children and the children with severe (p<0.01 or profound hearing loss (p=0.05. There was no significant difference between the mean of oral stereognostic ability among the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss compared with together. Besides, there was no significant difference between the mean of the time of diagnosis among all of hearing loss and normal children.Conclusion: The study shows that the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss have inefficient oral stereognosis in comparison with the normal children.

  1. Minocycline Protection of Neomycin Induced Hearing Loss in Gerbils

    Alan M. Robinson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This animal study was designed to determine if minocycline ameliorates cochlear damage is caused by intratympanic injection of the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Baseline auditory-evoked brainstem responses were measured in gerbils that received 40 mM intratympanic neomycin either with 0, 1.2, or 1.5 mg/kg intraperitoneal minocycline. Four weeks later auditory-evoked brainstem responses were measured and compared to the baseline measurements. Minocycline treatments of 1.2 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg resulted in significantly lower threshold increases compared to 0 mg/kg, indicating protection of hearing loss between 6 kHz and 19 kHz. Cochleae were processed for histology and sectioned to allow quantification of the spiral ganglion neurons and histological evaluation of organ of Corti. Significant reduction of spiral ganglion neuron density was demonstrated in animals that did not receive minocycline, indicating that those receiving minocycline demonstrated enhanced survival of spiral ganglion neurons, enhanced survival of sensory hairs cells and spiral ganglion neurons, and reduced hearing threshold elevation correlates with minocycline treatment demonstrating that neomycin induced hearing loss can be reduced by the simultaneous application of minocycline.

  2. Risk of hearing loss in small for gestational age neonates

    Melani Rakhmi Mantu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Small for gestational age (SGA neonates often have intrauterine growth restriction due to placental insufficiency and chronic hypoxia. These conditions may cause developmental impairment, psychosocial disabilities, or metabolic dysfunction in later life. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of speech and language disabilities, learning impairment, and ncuromotor dysfunction in term SGA infants compared to term appropriate for gestational age (AGA infants. Objective To compare hearing loss in SGA and AGA neonates using otoacoustic emission (OAE tests and to study correlations between maternal risk factors and hearing loss in SGA neonates. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in St. Borromeus Hospital, Limijati Hospital, and Melinda Hospital in Bandung from February to May 2010. Study subjects consisted of full-term neonates born in these three hospitals. A retrospective medical record review was performed for this Study. Statistical analysis was done by multivariable logistic-regression. Results There was a total of 4279 subjects in our study, including 100 SGA neonates and 4179 AGA neonates. We observed a greater percentage of OAE 'refer' (indicating abnormal OAE results in the SGA group compared to the AGA group (P<0.001, Z=1.3.247. For subjects with OAE ,refer' results, we also analyzed the correlation to the following maternal risk factors: smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma. We also found significant differences between those with and without each of the four maternal risk factors studied (P<0.001. By using multivariant analysis to compare SGA and AGA neonates, we found the odds ratio (OR to be 4.34 (95% CI 2.52 to'7.49, P = 0.001, meaning the SGA group had a 4.34 times higher risk of hearing loss than the AGA group. Conclusion SGA neonates had a higher risk of hearing loss than A(3A neonates. In addition, maternal smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma significantly correlated to

  3. Triple difficulties in Japanese women with hearing loss: marriage, smoking, and mental health issues.

    Yoko Kobayashi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the consequences of early-onset hearing loss on several social and health measures and any related gender differences in Japanese populations. METHODS: Data from a 2007 nationally representative cross-sectional household survey of 136,849 men and women aged 20 to 39 years were obtained (prevalence of self-reported hearing loss: 0.74%. We focused particularly on four social and health measures: employment status (employed/unemployed, marital status (married/unmarried, smoking behavior (yes/no, and psychological distress (K6 instrument: ≥ 5 or not. We examined the association of hearing loss for each measure using generalized estimating equations to account for correlated individuals within households. FINDINGS: There was no significant association with employment status (p = 0.447. Men with hearing loss were more likely to be married, whereas women with hearing loss were less likely to be married (p < 0.001 for interaction. Although hearing loss was not associated with a current smoking status in men, women with hearing loss were more likely to be current smokers (p < 0.001 for interaction. Moreover, hearing loss was associated with psychological distress in men and women (both p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that hearing loss is related to social and health issues in daily life, including a lower likelihood of marriage, more frequent smoking, and poorer mental health, especially in women. These issues may reflect a gap between the actual needs of women with hearing loss and the formal support received as a result of existing public health policies in Japan.

  4. Disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada Immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss

    Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada (DNSI é caracterizada geralmente por uma disacusia neurossensorial bilateral, progressiva e assimétrica, acompanhada ou não por outros sintomas da orelha interna. Três pacientes com DNSI cujo quadro clínico e audiométrico eram sugestivos de doença auto-imune, e apresentaram resposta positiva à terapia imunossupressora ou pesquisa positiva de anticorpo anti hsp-70 68kD, foram estudados com relação às características clínicas, testes diagnósticos, alternativas terapêuticas e evolução da doença. Dois pacientes apresentaram quadro de disacusia neurossensorial rapidamente progressiva, associado a quadro vestibular, e outro, quadro de surdez súbita unilateral. Nenhum paciente apresentou positividade às provas reumatológicas, e apenas um paciente apresentou aumento na velocidade de hemossedimentação. Nenhum paciente obteve resposta adequada sustentada à corticoterapia, mas dois deles melhoraram com outras terapias imunossupressoras. O diagnóstico da DNSI é clínico e baseado na resposta positiva ao teste terapêutico com imunossupressores. A pesquisa de anticorpo anti-hsp70 de 68 kD pelo Western Blot é o único exame laboratorial específico para seu diagnóstico, possuindo sensibilidade de 42% e especificidade de 90%. Apenas 1 paciente apresentou positividade para este teste e não respondeu à terapia imunossupressora. Os dois pacientes com teste negativo responderam satisfatoriamente ao tratamento. A baixa sensibilidade do Western Blot e seu alto custo dificultam sua difusa utilização em nosso meio. A introdução precoce do tratamento é de suma importância por auxiliar no diagnóstico e por proporcionar um melhor prognóstico auditivo.The immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss (ISHL is characterized as an asymmetric and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Tree patients with ISHL were studied, regarding clinical aspects, diagnostic tests, treatment options and disease

  5. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.;

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...

  6. Analysis of audio-vestibular assessment in acute low-tone hearing loss.

    Im, Gi Jung; Kim, Sung Kyun; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study demonstrated excellent hearing recovery following the combined treatment of diuretic and oral steroid, and electrocochleography (ECoG) was significantly higher than normal side. This study reports characteristics of acute low-tone hearing loss (ALHL) that show the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG, and excellent recovery, even-though low-tone hearing loss is worse, which can be different compared with sudden deafness. Objective To analyze ALHL without vertigo, this study compared the ALHL group with all patients exhibiting low-tone hearing loss and ear fullness. Hearing changes and vestibular functions were analyzed. Materials and methods ALHL was defined as a mean hearing loss of ≥ 30 dB at 125, 250, and 500 Hz, and ≤ 20 dB at 2, 4, and 8 kHz. From 156 cases of low-tone hearing loss of more than 10 dB without vertigo, 31 met the ALHL criteria and were subjected to audio-vestibular assessments including PTA, ECoG, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing, and caloric testing. Results In ALHL, low-tone hearing loss was 42.7 ± 9.5 dB, and 83.9% of ALHL significantly recovered by more than 10 dB. The ECoG in ALHL was 0.334 ± 0.11 (higher than 0.25 ± 0.08 on the normal side) and ECoG abnormality was 35.5% (the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG value). PMID:26963446

  7. Comparison of Different Levels of Reading Comprehension between Hearing-Impaired Loss and Normal-Hearing Students

    Azam Sharifi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skill is one of the most important necessities of students' learning in everyday life. This skill is referred to the ability of comprehension, comment and conclusion from texts and receiving the meaning of the massage which is composed. Educational development in any student has a direct relation with the ability of the comprehension. This study is designed to investigate the effects of hearing loss on reading comprehension in hearing-impaired students compared to normal-hearing ones.Methods: Seventeen hearing-impaired students in 4th year of primary exceptional schools in Karaj, Robatkarim and Shahriyar, Iran, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Seventeen normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to exceptional ones as control group. They were compared for different levels of reading comprehension using the international standard booklet (PIRLS 2001. Results: There was a significant difference in performance between hearing-impaired and normal- hearing students in different levels of reading comprehension (p<0.05.Conclusion: Hearing loss has negative effects on different levels of reading comprehension, so in exceptional centers, reconsideration in educational planning in order to direct education from memorizing to comprehension and deeper layers of learning seems necessary.

  8. Profile and Stability of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn.

    Walton, Joseph P.; Hendricks-Munoz, Karen

    1991-01-01

    This study found that 19 of 51 infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss, an incidence 25 times greater than that of intensive care unit infants in general. Treatment durations with mechanical ventilation were significantly longer for the hearing-impaired group compared to the…

  9. Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Ramin Zojaji

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXS occurs due to the deposition of extracellular fibrillar materials on the anterior chamber of the eye. This syndrome has been considered to be part of a systemic disease with the potential involvement of the inner ear called sensoroneural hearing loss (SNHL.  In this study, we aimed on evaluating SNHL within PXS patients in Iran to compare them with other international reports. Materials and Methods: In total, 33 patients with PXS and 33 age and sex matched controls were enrolled prospectively in a case-control study. Both groups underwent complete ophthalmologic and otorhinolaryngologic examinations and pure tone audiometry (PTA testing. Six frequencies (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 KHz were evaluated for PTA in the same ethnic group in order to select the case and control individuals. Data were analyzed using t-test and chi-square test. Results: Forty-nine out of 66 ears (75.2% in the PXS group and 27 ears (40.9% in the control group had SNHL (P

  10. Clinical study on unilateral hearing loss in children

    A series of 60 children was studied (aged 0 to 10 years, 32 boys, 28 girls) with severe unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology. There were two peaks, at 0 and 6 years. In 19 children, hearing loss was identified during a conservative general health checkup for school or preschool children. In 21 children aged 0 years, 16 were suspected of hearing loss by newborn hearing screening. Temporal bone computed tomography scans were examined in 51 patients. Sixteen ears (31.4%) with hearing loss had inner ear and/or internal auditory canal abnormalities. In one patient, the anomaly was the presence of a bony wall dividing the internal auditory canal into two separate compartments associated with severe inner ear hypoplasia. Two patients had a common cavity. In one of these patients, the anomaly was revealed because of severe bacterial meningitis, and another was detected by newborn hearing screening. Six patients had a narrow internal auditory canal, 4 had a narrow internal auditory canal and hypoplastic cochlea, and 1 had a narrow internal auditory canal and cystic vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. Two patients had a cystic vestibule and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. One case showed fluctuation of the hearing level in the contralateral ear with normal hearing during the observation period at an average of 20 months. The number of children whose unilateral hearing loss is detected early by newborn hearing screening has enormously increased. Strategies for follow-up, early intervention, and support for families are necessary for young children with unilateral hearing impairment. (author)

  11. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    Okokhere Peter O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response.

  12. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response. PMID:19178735

  13. Behavioral training promotes multiple adaptive processes following acute hearing loss

    Keating, P; Rosenior-Patten, O.; Dahmen, J. C.; Bell, O.; King, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    eLife digest The brain normally compares the timing and intensity of the sounds that reach each ear to work out a sound’s origin. Hearing loss in one ear disrupts these between-ear comparisons, which causes listeners to make errors in this process. With time, however, the brain adapts to this hearing loss and once again learns to localize sounds accurately. Previous research has shown that young ferrets can adapt to hearing loss in one ear in two distinct ways. The ferrets either learn to rem...

  14. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid;

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  15. Sudden hearing loss: Our experiences in treatment with vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy

    Živić Ljubica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sudden hearing loss is a clinical entity of ambiguously defined aetiology manifested by hearing loss of more than 30 dB on three contiguous frequencies occurring within 72 hours. The lack of standard therapy protocol led to the use of variety of different therapies, thus making difficult objective quantification of their effect. Objective. The aim of the study was to present our experience in the treatment of sudden hearing loss with administration of vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy. Methods. Our research included 59 hospitally treated patients with a sudden hearing loss. During the period 1995-2004, 37 patients were treated using vasoactive agents (xanthinol nicotinate and pentoxifylline, and from 2004-2009, 22 patients were treated using parenteral corticosteroids (dexamethasone. All patients had unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of different level at frequencies from 500-4000 Hz, while other diagnostic procedures (laboratory tests, internist and neurology examinations, X-ray were within normal limits. Evaluation of therapy effect was done by follow-up of hearing threshold changes and subjective complaints. Results. The results showed that full recovery was achieved in patients with a mild and not fully severe hearing loss, with the majority of those (73% under corticosteroid treatment. In these patients recovery was also achieved more rapidly. A partial recovery of hearing was detected in patients with hearing loss of more than 80 dB, and mostly in patients treated with corticosteroids. Conclusion. Although statistical evaluation does not indicate significant differences between the application of vasoactive drugs or corticosteroids, clinical findings support advantages of corticosteroid therapy. Treatment of hearing loss, although controversial, requires change of some up-to-now used agents. Advantages should go in favour of contricosteroids.

  16. SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS IN YOUNG ADULTS WITH BMI OF 25 OR MORE

    Shashikala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A Body mass index [BMI] of 25 or greater is a significant health problem associated with a variety of disorders and in adults it has been found to be a risk factor for hearing loss. Higher BMI is independently associated with increased hearing loss. We investigated the hypothesis that young adults with a BMI of 25 or more are at increased risk of mild sensorineural hearing loss. AIMS AN D OBJECTIVES: To assess hearing acuity in individuals with high BMI (≥25 by audiometric assessment and compare it with the control group (BMI <25. SETTINGS AND DESIGN : A comparative and cross sectional study among volunteers residing in Bengaluru. METHODS AND MATERIAL : Data collected from 2 groups containing 30 participants each, test group contained individual with a BMI of 25 or more and the control group consisted individuals with BMI of <25, in the age group of 18 - 35 yrs. Pure tone audiometry was carried out across various frequencies (0. 5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 kHz in both groups. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student t - test was used to compare hearing thresholds across various frequencies in both groups. RESULTS: Compared to control group, high BMI (≥25 was associated with increased pure tone hearing thresholds across lower frequencies (0. 5, 1, 2 kHz. The degree of hearing loss is mild (26 - 40dB . CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that young adults with a BMI of 25 or more are at increasing risk of mild sensorineural hearing loss.

  17. Categorical loudness scaling and equal-loudness contours in listeners with normal hearing and hearing loss

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Trevino, Andrea C.; Gombert, Jessa N.; Liebig-Trehearn, Lauren; Kopun, Judy G.; Jesteadt, Walt; Neely, Stephen T.; Gorga, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes procedures for constructing equal-loudness contours (ELCs) in units of phons from categorical loudness scaling (CLS) data and characterizes the impact of hearing loss on these estimates of loudness. Additionally, this study developed a metric, level-dependent loudness loss, which uses CLS data to specify the deviation from normal loudness perception at various loudness levels and as function of frequency for an individual listener with hearing loss. CLS measurements were ...

  18. Hearing loss among patients with Turner's syndrome: literature review

    Cresio Alves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Turner's syndrome (TS is caused by a partial or total deletion of an X chromosome, occurring in 1:2,000 to 1:5,000 live born females. Hearing loss is one of its major clinical manifestations. However, there are few studies investigating this problem. OBJECTIVES: To review the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of hearing impairment in patients with TS. METHODS: A bibliographic search was performed in the Medline and Lilacs databanks (1980-2012 to identify the main papers associating Turner's syndrome, hearing impairment and its clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent otitis media, dysfunction of the Eustachian tube, conductive hearing loss during infancy and sensorineural hearing loss in adolescence are the audiologic disorders more common in ST. The karyotype appears to be important in the hearing loss, with studies demonstrating an increased prevalence in patients with monosomy 45,X or isochromosome 46,i(Xq. Morphologic studies of the cochlea are necessary to help out in the clarifying the etiology of the sensorineural hearing loss.

  19. Strong founder effect of p.P240L in CDH23 in Koreans and its significant contribution to severe-to-profound nonsyndromic hearing loss in a Korean pediatric population

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Ah Reum; Nayoung K.D. Kim; Kim, Min Young; Jeon, Eun-Hee; Kim, Bong Jik; Han, Young Eun; Chang, Mun Young; Park, Woong-Yang; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the prevalence of CDH23 mutations in East Asians, its large size hinders investigation. The pathologic mutation p.P240L in CDH23 is common in East Asians. However, whether this mutation represents a common founder or a mutational hot spot is unclear. The prevalence of CDH23 mutations with prelingual severe-to-profound sporadic or autosomal recessive sensorineural hearing loss (arSNHL) is unknown in Koreans. Methods From September 2010 to October 2014, children with severe-t...

  20. Earplugs Help Prevent Hearing Loss Tied to Loud Concerts

    ... hearing loss that can happen after a high-decibel music concert. While getting young people wear earplugs ... to enjoy the music, but at safer, lower decibel levels? The new study included 51 people, average ...

  1. 76 FR 62093 - Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting

    2011-10-06

    ... of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published in the Federal Register (FR... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of public meeting.......

  2. Double Jeopardy: Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Among Noise-Exposed Workers.

    Hong, OiSaeng; Chin, Dal Lae; Phelps, Stephanie; Joo, Yoonmee

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus and assess the relationship between tinnitus and hearing loss among firefighters and operating engineers, who are exposed to noise on-the-job. The study analyzed existing data from two different populations (154 firefighters and 769 operating engineers) who completed a survey and audiometric tests as part of a hearing loss prevention intervention study. Approximately 40% of both groups reported tinnitus; 34% of firefighters and 59% of operating engineers showed hearing loss at noise-sensitive frequencies (4 kHz and 6 kHz). Firefighters with high frequency hearing loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.05, 5.11]) and those with perceived impaired hearing status (OR = 3.53; 95% CI = [1.27, 9.80]) were significantly more likely to report tinnitus. Similarly, operating engineers who had hearing loss at both low (OR = 2.10; 95% CI = [1.40, 3.15]) and high frequencies (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = [1.37, 2.90]), and perceived impaired hearing status (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = [1.55, 3.05]) were twice as likely to report tinnitus. This study demonstrated that tinnitus is a considerable problem for noise-exposed workers. Workers with hearing loss demonstrated significantly higher rates of tinnitus. Comprehensive workplace hearing conservation programs should include tinnitus management for noise-exposed workers, along with other key elements such as noise control and hearing protection. PMID:26968456

  3. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Occupational Noise Exposure: Effects of Age-Corrections

    Krishnamurti, Sridhar

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (NIPTS) were computed from retrospective audiometric analyses by subtracting aging effects on hearing sensitivity in sixty-eight patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who reported significant occupational noise exposure histories. There were significant effects of age on NIPTS but no significant gender- or ear- differences in terms of NIPTS. The NIPTS at 2,000 Hz was found to be significantly greater than NIPTS at frequencies 500 Hz, 1,000...

  4. Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis

    ... set to a low volume that won’t disturb someone sleeping nearby. FDA regulates hearing aids as ... Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, ...

  5. Mechanisms of Hearing Loss in Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Asthagiri, Ashok R.; Vasquez, Raul A.; Butman, John A; Wu, Tianxia; Morgan, Keaton; Brewer, Carmen C.; King, Kelly; Zalewski, Chris; Kim, H. Jeffrey; Lonser, Russell R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) develop bilateral cochleovestibular schwannomas (CVSs) that cause binaural deafness in most individuals. Hearing loss occurs in an unpredictable manner and the underlying mechanisms are not known. To gain insight into the pathophysiologic basis for hearing loss in NF2, we performed a prospective cross-sectional study of untreated ears in NF2 patients. Methods One hundred consecutive NF2 patients in a prospective natural history study w...

  6. Vestibular function in families with inherited autosomal dominant hearing loss

    Street, Valerie A.; Kallman, Jeremy C.; Strombom, Paul D.; Bramhall, Naomi F; Phillips, James O.

    2008-01-01

    The inner ear contains the developmentally related cochlea and peripheral vestibular labyrinth. Given the similar physiology between these two organs, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction may be expected to occur simultaneously in individuals segregating mutations in inner ear genes. Twenty-two different genes have been discovered that when mutated lead to non-syndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss. A review of the literature indicates that families segregating mutations in 13 of these ...

  7. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  8. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    Plontke, S; Zenner, H.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined...

  9. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory

  10. Hearing Loss in Patients with Shunt-Treated Hydrocephalus.

    Panova, Margarita V; Geneva, Ina E; Madjarova, Kalina I; Bosheva, Miroslava N

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common manifestation of the long-term complications in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus along with motor development disturbance, cognitive and visual impairment, epilepsy and endocrine disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alterations of hearing in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus of non-tumor etiology and at least one year after implantation of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, as well as their impact on the quality of life of patients. The study included 70 patients (age range 1.25 years - 21.25 years) with shunted non-tumor hydrocephalus and at least one year after placement of the shunt system. Hearing alterations were proved by measuring the brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) for children up to 5 years of age and children with mental retardation; audiograms was used for children older than 5 years with normal neuro-psychological development (NPD). Of the 70 studied patients 17 (24%) had hearing loss (10 bilateral and 7-unilateral) and all of them had sensorineural hearing loss, which is associated with low weight at birth, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and brainstem symptoms at the time of diagnosis of hydrocephalus. Hearing pathology was found more often in shunt-treated patients with NPD retardation, poor functional status and low quality of life. Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus have hearing loss of sensorineural type. Children with brain stem symptomatology at diagnosing hydrocephalus and children with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus show higher risk of hearing loss. Children with shunted hydrocephalus and hearing loss show lower NPD, lower quality of life and lower functional status. PMID:27180348

  11. The Benefits of Nonlinear Frequency Compression for People with Mild Hearing Loss

    Boretzki, M; Kegel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear frequency compression compensates for hearing loss in frequency ranges where traditional amplification on its own does not provide sufficient benefit. The effectiveness of Phonak’s proprietary nonlinear frequency compression algorithm, SoundRecover, has been documented for more significant degrees hearing loss (Simpson, Hersbach & McDermott, 2005, 2006; Nyffeler, 2008). The purpose of this study was to test whether SoundRecover provides sufficient benefit for people with mild t...

  12. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    Andréa Cintra Lopes1, , , ,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type of hearing loss, it is evident the importance of preventive and conferences aimed at preserving hearing and health as a whole. Objective: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in audiometry admission of drivers. Methods: Retrospective study. By 76 charts of professional drivers in leased transport companies. We analyzed data from specific interview and pure tone audiometry. Results: The prevalence of abnormal tests was 22.36% with the lowest thresholds for tritonal average of 3,000, 4,000 and 6,000 Hz. The higher the age, the higher thresholds. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the occurrence of hearing in the absence of complaints. Considering that PAIR is preventable, justifies the importance of coordinated and multidisciplinary involving not only health teams and safety, but also the institutions involved in preserving the health of workers, as the team SESMET, unions or prosecutors.

  13. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  14. Cross-modal re-organization in adults with early stage hearing loss.

    Julia Campbell

    Full Text Available Cortical cross-modal re-organization, or recruitment of auditory cortical areas for visual processing, has been well-documented in deafness. However, the degree of sensory deprivation necessary to induce such cortical plasticity remains unclear. We recorded visual evoked potentials (VEP using high-density electroencephalography in nine persons with adult-onset mild-moderate hearing loss and eight normal hearing control subjects. Behavioral auditory performance was quantified using a clinical measure of speech perception-in-noise. Relative to normal hearing controls, adults with hearing loss showed significantly larger P1, N1, and P2 VEP amplitudes, decreased N1 latency, and a novel positive component (P2' following the P2 VEP. Current source density reconstruction of VEPs revealed a shift toward ventral stream processing including activation of auditory temporal cortex in hearing-impaired adults. The hearing loss group showed worse than normal speech perception performance in noise, which was strongly correlated with a decrease in the N1 VEP latency. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that visual cross-modal re-organization not only begins in the early stages of hearing impairment, but may also be an important factor in determining behavioral outcomes for listeners with hearing loss, a finding which demands further investigation.

  15. Factors associated with hearing loss among workers of the airline industry in Korea.

    Hong, O S; Kim, M J

    2001-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major occupational hazard. Occupational noise exposure threatens the hearing of many workers. In addition to noise exposure in the workplace, multiple factors affect individual susceptibility to NIHL. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with hearing loss in airport workers. A cross-sectional epidemiological design was used. Study subjects were 255 high noise-exposed full-time male workers at a large metropolitan airport in Korea. Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, audiological assessment, and a record review of baseline hearing and noise levels of locations where the employee worked. The result of multivariate analysis showed that both occupational noise exposure (noise exposure level, years of noise exposure) and personal risk factors including non-occupational noise exposure, history of ear disease, ototoxic drug use, cigarette smoking, hypertension, and use of hearing protective devices (HPDs) were significantly associated with hearing loss. An aggressive hearing conservation program is needed at the airport, emphasizing both job-related noise exposure and personal risk factors for hearing loss. PMID:12024523

  16. Annual rate of hearing loss falls after fractionated stereotactic irradiation for vestibular schwannoma

    Purpose: The rate of hearing loss in a population before and after irradiation was investigated to determine the effect of irradiation on hearing impairment. Methods and materials: In 72 patients with vestibular schwannoma who received fractionated stereotactic irradiation from 1992 to 1999, 21 had had their hearing levels examined 3 months or more before the treatment. The mean time between the initial examination and treatment was 18.6 months (range: 3-89 months), and the mean time between treatment and the last follow-up was 24.2 months (12-69 months). Thirty-six to 50 Gy in 20-25 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks was given using an X-ray beam from a linear accelerator. Pure tone average (PTA) was measured using the mean hearing level at five frequencies, and the annual rate of hearing loss was defined as [(hearing loss in PTA(dB))/(follow-up period (months)x12)]. Results: The actual cumulative curve of decrease in tumor size of 2 mm or more was 38.3% at 2 years and 80.0% at 3 years. The mean of hearing loss in PTA was 11.6±10.3 dB (-1 to 35 dB) from the initial examination to the start of irradiation and 11.9±14.4 dB (-14 to 37 dB) from the start of irradiation to the last follow-up. The mean annual rates of hearing loss before irradiation and in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years after irradiation were, respectively, 18.6, 11.2, 6.2, 5.1, and 5.0 dB/year. The annual rates of hearing loss in the 2nd year (P=0.025) and 3rd year (P=0.018) were significantly slower than the rate before irradiation. Conclusions: The mean annual rate of hearing loss was higher before irradiation than after irradiation, and hearing loss slowed rather than accelerated after irradiation. Although hearing loss after the treatment was usually permanent, fractionated stereotactic irradiation was suggested to be effective to lower the rate of hearing loss

  17. Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Newborns Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Shahnaz Pourarian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing is essential for humans to communicate with one another. Early diagnosis of hearing loss and intervention in neonates and infants can reduce developmental problems. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of hearing impairment in newborns admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU and analyze the associated risk factors.   Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of hearing loss in neonates who were admitted to the NICU at Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between January 2006 and January 2007. Auditory function was examined using otoacoustic emission (OAE followed by auditory brainstem response (ABR tests. Relevant potential risk factors were considered and neonates with a family history of hearing loss and craniofacial abnormality were excluded. For statistical analysis logistic regression, the chi-squared test, and Fisher’s exact test were used.    Results: Among the 124 neonates included in the study, 17 (13.7% showed hearing loss in the short term. There was a significant statistical relationship between gestational age of less than 36 weeks (P=0.013, antibiotic therapy (P= 0.033, oxygen therapy (P=0.04, and hearing loss. On the contrary, there was no significant relationship between hearing loss and use of a ventilator, or the presence of sepsis, hyperbilirubinemia, congenial heart disease, transient tachypnea of newborn, congenital pneumonia, or respiratory distress syndrome.  Conclusion: Auditory function in neonates who are admitted to a NICU, especially those treated with oxygenor antibiotics and those born prematurely, should be assessed during their stay in hospital. The importance of early diagnosis of hearing loss and intervention in these neonates and avoidance of any unnecessary oxygenor antibiotic therapy needs to be further promoted.

  18. Hearing loss impacts neural alpha oscillations under adverse listening conditions

    Eline Borch Petersen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Degradations in external, acoustic stimulation have long been suspected to increase the load on working memory. One neural signature of working memory load is enhanced power of alpha oscillations (6 ‒ 12 Hz. However, it is unknown to what extent common internal, auditory degradation, that is, hearing impairment, affects the neural mechanisms of working memory when audibility has been ensured via amplification. Using an adapted auditory Sternberg paradigm, we varied the orthogonal factors memory load and background noise level, while the electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded. In each trial, participants were presented with 2, 4, or 6 spoken digits embedded in one of three different levels of background noise. After a stimulus-free delay interval, participants indicated whether a probe digit had appeared in the sequence of digits. Participants were healthy older adults (62 – 86 years, with normal to moderately impaired hearing. Importantly, the background noise levels were individually adjusted and participants were wearing hearing aids to equalize audibility across participants. Irrespective of hearing loss, behavioral performance improved with lower memory load and also with lower levels of background noise. Interestingly, the alpha power in the stimulus-free delay interval was dependent on the interplay between task demands (memory load and noise level and hearing loss; while alpha power increased with hearing loss during low and intermediate levels of memory load and background noise, it dropped for participants with the relatively most severe hearing loss under the highest memory load and background noise level. These findings suggest that adaptive neural mechanisms for coping with adverse listening conditions break down for higher degrees of hearing loss, even when adequate hearing aid amplification is in place.

  19. Determinants of Conductive Hearing Loss in Tympanic Membrane Perforation

    Park, Hanaro; Hong, Seung No; Kim, Hyo Sang; Han, Jae Joon; Chung, Juyong; Seo, Myung-Whan; Oh, Seung-Ha; Chang, Sun-O

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tympanic membrane perforations are common, but there have been few studies of the factors determining the extent of the resulting conductive hearing loss. The aims of this study were to determine whether the size of tympanic membrane perforation, pneumatization of middle ear & mastoid cavity, and location of perforation were correlated with air-bone gap (ABG) of patients. Methods Forty-two patients who underwent tympanoplasty type I or myringoplasty were included and preoperative audiometry were analyzed. Digital image processing was applied in computed tomography for the estimation of middle ear & mastoid pneumatization volume and tympanic membrane photograph for the evaluation of perforation size and location. Results Preoperative mean ABG increased with perforation size (P=0.018), and correlated inversely with the middle ear & mastoid volume (P=0.005). However, perforations in anterior versus posterior locations showed no significant differences in mean ABG (P=0.924). Conclusion The degree of conductive hearing loss resulting from a tympanic membrane perforation would be expected with the size of perforation and pneumatization of middle ear and mastoid. PMID:26045905

  20. HEARING LOSS, ITS IMPLICATIONS AND PUBLIC HEALTH INTERVENTIONS

    Suneela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, over 5% of world’s population (More than 360 million population, have disabling hearing loss according to new global estimates on prevalence; 91% of these are adults and 9% of these are children. Overall, prevalence of disabling hearing loss in children all over the world is 1.7%.1 Prevalence of hearing loss in South Asia in pediatric age group is 2.4%. Consequences of hearing impairment include inability to interpret speech sounds, often producing a reduced ability to communicate, delay in language acquisition, economic and educational disadvantage, social isolation and stigmatization. Fifty percent of hearing loss is preventable through public health actions.1 From time to time, public and private sector enterprises plan at both, small and large scale to help people with hearing impairment. But still the services available and implementation status of actions to combat ear disorders is in naïve stage. The earlier the parent/family accept the fact of impairment and follow a well-planned rehabilitation program under professional supervision, the better are the chances for the child and the family to lead a more normal life.

  1. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program.

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist in the workplace and lead to workers' hearing damage. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCP in preventing further hearing loss in workers with audiograms suggestive of NIHL. The audiometric tests and medical records of 28 furniture company workers exposed to noise were reviewed and monitored for 2 years. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined five audiometric tests in the medical records (on admission and every semester) of 28 workers in a furniture company (totaling 140 audiometric exams) following the introduction of the HCP. Results Data analysis showed no differences between the audiometric tests conducted on admission and those performed every semester. Conclusions The HCP implemented was effective in preventing the worsening of hearing loss in workers already with NIHL when exposed to occupational noise. Therefore, such a measure could be useful for the employment of workers with hearing loss in job sectors that have noise exposure. PMID:26722345

  2. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist in the workplace and lead to workers' hearing damage. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCP in preventing further hearing loss in workers with audiograms suggestive of NIHL. The audiometric tests and medical records of 28 furniture company workers exposed to noise were reviewed and monitored for 2 years. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined five audiometric tests in the medical records (on admission and every semester) of 28 workers in a furniture company (totaling 140 audiometric exams) following the introduction of the HCP. Results Data analysis showed no differences between the audiometric tests conducted on admission and those performed every semester. Conclusions The HCP implemented was effective in preventing the worsening of hearing loss in workers already with NIHL when exposed to occupational noise. Therefore, such a measure could be useful for the employment of workers with hearing loss in job sectors that have noise exposure. PMID:26722345

  3. Characteristics and Spontaneous Recovery of Tinnitus Related to Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Mühlmeier, Guido; Baguley, David; Cox, Tony; Suckfüll, Markus; Meyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the characteristics and spontaneous recovery of tinnitus related to idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). Study Design: Retrospective analysis from two randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials for treatment of ISSNHL within 48 hours from onset (Study A), or of tinnitus related to ISSNHL within 3 months from onset (Study B). Setting: Forty-eight European sites (academic tertiary referral centers, private ENT practices). Patients: One hundred thirteen adult patients of which 65 with hearing loss ≥30 dB (Study A) and 48 with persistent acute tinnitus (Study B) at baseline. Interventions: Intratympanic (i.t.) injection of placebo gel in single dose or in triple dose during 3 consecutive days. Main Outcome Measures: Frequency of tinnitus, subjective tinnitus loudness, rates of complete tinnitus remission, and complete hearing recovery during 3 months follow-up. Results: In acute ISSNHL, tinnitus loudness decreased rapidly in cases of mild-moderate hearing loss, and tinnitus had completely resolved in two-thirds of patients after 3 months. Hearing recovery preceded tinnitus resolution. When associated with severe-profound hearing loss, tinnitus improved significantly less. Complete hearing recovery and full tinnitus remission were both about three times more frequent in mild-moderate hearing loss patients than in severe-profound cases. Improvement in tinnitus loudness over time can be approximated by a negative exponential function. Conclusions: Prognosis for ISSNHL-related tinnitus is relatively poor in case of severe-profound hearing loss and the longer it has persisted. Alleviation or management of tinnitus should be a key therapeutic objective especially in pronounced ISSNHL cases. PMID:27228021

  4. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    ... hearing loss in ears with fluid is 24 decibels...equivalent to wearing ear plugs. (Twenty-four decibels is about the level of the very softest ... can cause much more loss, up to 45 decibels (the range of conversational speech). Your child may ...

  5. STUDY OF HEARING OUTCOMES IN SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS TREATED WITH TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR (TPA

    Rama Krishna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSHNL is a clinical condition that requires immediate management. There are many treatment options, which may not always revert the hearing to normal. Not only recording the degree of hearing loss, but also establishing the concurrent dysfunction of saccule by VEMP has facilitated a new approach to treatment strategy. Recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator ((rtPA proved its efficacy in stroke and subsequently considered an option in the management of ISSNHL. The curren t study, conducted at different centres, on 15 patients utilized rtPA. The results showed a promising trend when saccular pathology is also evident by VEMP in association with Hearing loss. We recommend use of rtPA as primary modality in cases of ISSNHL wi th Saccular involvement.

  6. Diversity in noise-induced temporary hearing loss in otophysine fishes

    Amoser, Sonja; Ladich, Friedrich

    2003-04-01

    The effects of intense white noise (158 dB re 1 μPa for 12 and 24 h) on the hearing abilities of two otophysine fish species-the nonvocal goldfish Carassius auratus and the vocalizing catfish Pimelodus pictus-were investigated in relation to noise exposure duration. Hearing sensitivity was determined utilizing the auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording technique. Measurements in the frequency range between 0.2 and 4.0 kHz were conducted prior and directly after noise exposure as well as after 3, 7, and 14 days of recovery. Both species showed a significant loss of sensitivity (up to 26 dB in C. auratus and 32 dB in P. pictus) immediately after noise exposure, with the greatest hearing loss in the range of their most sensitive frequencies. Hearing loss differed between both species, and was more pronounced in the catfish. Exposure duration had no influence on hearing loss. Hearing thresholds of C. auratus recovered within three days, whereas those of P. pictus only returned to their initial values within 14 days after exposure in all but one frequency. The results indicate that hearing specialists are affected differently by noise exposure and that acoustic communication might be restricted in noisy habitats.

  7. Oral steroid treatment for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Chen, Wei T.; Lee, Jui W.; Yuan, Chien H.; Chen, Rong F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the efficacy of long-term oral steroids in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), and to explore potential prognosis factors, the relationship of hearing recovery outcome, and the recovery time-course in ISSHL. Methods: In this retrospective study, we analyzed 215 cases diagnosed with idiopathic unilateral sudden deafness between January 2003 and December 2012 at a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. All of them received oral steroid therapy and were f...

  8. TMPRSS3 mutations in autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Battelino, Saba; Klancar, Gasper; Kovac, Jernej; Battelino, Tadej; Trebusak Podkrajsek, Katarina

    2016-05-01

    Nonsyndromic genetic deafness is highly heterogeneous in its clinical presentation, pattern of inheritance and underlying genetic causes. Mutations in TMPRSS3 gene encoding transmembrane serine protease account for Slovenia resulting in uniform phenotype with profound congenital hearing loss, and satisfactory hearing and speech recognition outcome after cochlear implantation. Consequently, TMPRSS3 gene analysis should be included in the first tier of genetic investigations of ARNSHL along with GJB2 and GJB6 genes. PMID:26036852

  9. Hearing loss among patients with Turner's syndrome: literature review

    Cresio Alves; Conceição Silva Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Turner's syndrome (TS) is caused by a partial or total deletion of an X chromosome, occurring in 1:2,000 to 1:5,000 live born females. Hearing loss is one of its major clinical manifestations. However, there are few studies investigating this problem. OBJECTIVES: To review the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of hearing impairment in patients with TS. METHODS: A bibliographic search was performed in the Medlin...

  10. Hearing loss associated with US military combat deployment

    Timothy S Wells

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to define the risk of hearing loss among US military members in relation to their deployment experiences. Data were drawn from the Millennium Cohort Study. Self-reported data and objective military service data were used to assess exposures and outcomes. Among all 48,540 participants, 7.5% self-reported new-onset hearing loss. Self-reported hearing loss showed moderate to substantial agreement (k = 0.57-0.69 with objective audiometric measures. New-onset hearing loss was associated with combat deployment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.49-1.77, as well as male sex and older age. Among deployers, new-onset hearing loss was also associated with proximity to improvised explosive devices (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.62-2.73 and with experiencing a combat-related head injury (AOR = 6.88, 95% CI = 3.77-12.54. These findings have implications for health care and disability planning, as well as for prevention programs.

  11. Research on Relationship Model of Social Adaptation,Social Support and Life Satisfaction of Tibetan Hearing Loss Children

    SHEN Ren-hong

    2014-01-01

    The paper takes 230 Tibetan hearing loss children sample to research on relationship model of social adaptation, social support and life satisfaction of Tibetan hearing loss children by hearing disabled children’s social adaptive behavior, social support assessment scale and life satisfaction rating scale. Results present that there be significant positive relationship between social support and social adaptation, between social adaptation and life satisfaction. Further more, the social suppo...

  12. Attainment of Developmental Tasks by Adolescents with Hearing Loss Attending Special Schools

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P.

    2014-01-01

    The investigators compared the perceived attainment of developmental tasks by 181 German adolescents with hearing loss and 254 peers without hearing loss. The adolescents with hearing loss were attending special schools for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. On average, the two groups perceived similar levels of success across the assessed…

  13. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Rahman Movahhed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been shown that low levels of pigmentation increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in humans. For this reason, white populations develop more pronounced noise- induced hearing loss in comparison to black populations. Similarly, blue-eyed individuals exhibit greater temporary threshold shift than brown-eyed subjects; still, no strong correlation has been verified between the lightness of hair color and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. This study was performed with the purpose of investigating a possible association between hair color and the degree of hearing loss due to firing noise. Study Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: A tertiary referral center with an accredited otorhinolaryngology-head & neck surgery department.   Materials and Methods: A total of 57 military recruits were divided into two groups; light-colored (blond and light brown and dark-colored hair (dark brown and black. The two groups were matched based on history of firing noise exposure (number of rounds; type of weapon and the level of hearing loss at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz sound frequencies was compared between them.   Results: The results showed that the mean level of hearing loss of light-colored hair individuals (20.5±17dB was significantly greater than that of dark-haired subjects (13.5±11dB, (P=0.023.   Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended.

  14. The Prevention of Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Children

    Robert V. Harrison

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, our acoustic environment is filled with amplified sound sources (e.g., MP3 players, video game stations, and sports/entertainment venues. There is serious concern and also some controversy about the risks of acoustic trauma in children. This overview provides some basic information on the physiological mechanisms that lead to noise induced hearing loss, a survey of various studies that, on balance, indicates that there is cause for concern, and finally a discussion on measures that can help to prevent noise induced hearing loss in children. This paper is designed for public health and other healthcare professions (ENT, audiologists, family doctors, and pediatricians who should understand the risks of noise induced hearing loss and its prevention.

  15. Smartphone-based audiometric test for screening hearing loss in the elderly.

    Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Handzel, Ophir; Ness, Lior; Ben-Artzi-Blima, Miri; Fait-Ghelbendorf, Karin; Himmelfarb, Mordechai

    2016-02-01

    Hearing loss is widespread among the elderly. One of the main obstacles to rehabilitation is identifying individuals with potentially correctable hearing loss. Smartphone-based hearing tests can be administered at home, thus greatly facilitating access to screening. This study evaluates the use of a smartphone application as a screening tool for hearing loss in individuals aged ≥ 65 years. Twenty-six subjects aged 84.4 ± 6.73 years (mean ± SD) were recruited. Pure-tone audiometry was administered by both a smartphone application (uHear for iPhone, v1.0 Unitron, Canada) and a standard portable audiometer by trained personnel. Participants also completed a questionnaire on their hearing. Pure-tone thresholds were compared between the two testing modalities and correlated with the questionnaire results. The cutoff point for failing screening tests was a pure tone average of 40 dB for the frequencies 250-6,000 Hz. The smartphone application's pure tone thresholds were higher (poorer hearing) than the audiometric thresholds, with a significant difference in all frequencies but 2,000 Hz. The application and the audiometric values were in agreement for 24 subjects (92 %). The application had a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 60 % for screening compared with the audiometer. The questionnaire was significantly less accurate, having assigned a passing score to three participants who failed both the application and audiometric tests. While a smartphone application may not be able to accurately determine the level of hearing impairment, it is useful as a highly accessible portable audiometer substitute for screening for hearing loss in elderly populations. PMID:25655259

  16. Sensorineural hearing loss after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is one of the major long term side effects from radiation therapy (RT) in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. This study aims to review the incidences of SNHL when treating with different radiation techniques. The additional objective is to determine the relationship of the SNHL with the radiation doses delivered to the inner ear. A retrospective cohort study of 134 individual ears from 68 NPC patients, treated with conventional RT and IMRT in combination with chemotherapy from 2004-2008 was performed. Dosimetric data of the cochlea were analyzed. Significant SNHL was defined as > 15 dB increase in bone conduction threshold at 4 kHz and PTA (pure tone average of 0.5, 1, 2 kHz). Relative risk (RR) was used to determine the associated factors with the hearing threshold changes at 4 kHz and PTA. Median audiological follow up time was 14 months. The incidence of high frequency (4 kHz) SNHL was 44% for the whole group (48.75% in the conventional RT, 37% with IMRT). Internal auditory canal mean dose of > 50 Gy had shown a trend to increase the risk of high frequency SNHL (RR 2.02 with 95% CI 1.01-4.03, p = 0.047). IMRT and radiation dose limitation to the inner ear appeared to decrease SNHL

  17. A family with optic atrophy and congenital hearing loss.

    Amemiya, T; Honda, A

    1994-06-01

    A 37-year-old woman had optic atrophy in both eyes and low-tone hearing disturbance of both ears noted after 34 years of age. Her visual acuity was 0.5 in the right eye and 0.6 in the left. The visual fields of both eyes showed slight progressive concentric narrowing. Hearing loss was gradually progressive. Her 13-year-old daughter also had optic atrophy in both eyes and low-tone hearing loss in both ears after 11 years of age. Her visual acuity was 0.8 in the right eye and 1.0 in the left. Her visual fields showed slight concentric narrowing. She had enlarged blind spots in both eyes. The mother and her daughter had deuteranomaly. Family history showed that the father, one brother and three sisters of the mother had congenital hearing loss. No other cause for the optic nerve atrophy and hearing disturbance could be found except heredity. PMID:7850273

  18. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss in India

    Nandi Subroto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss in every country in the world. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Worldwide, 16% of the disabling hearing loss in adults is attributed to occupational noise, ranging from 7 to 21% in the various subregions. The estimated cost of noise to developed countries ranges from 0.2 to 2% of the gross domestic product (GDP. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is bilateral and symmetrical, usually affecting the higher frequencies (3k, 4k or 6k Hz and then spreading to the lower frequencies (0.5k, 1k or 2k Hz. Other major health effects are lack of concentration, irritation, fatigue, headache, sleep disturbances, etc. The major industries responsible for excessive noise and exposing workers to hazardous levels of noise are textile, printing, saw mills, mining, etc. Hearing protectors should be used when engineering controls and work practices are not feasible for reducing noise exposure to safe levels. Earmuffs, ear plugs and ear canal caps are the main types of hearing protectors. In India, NIHL has been a compensable disease since 1948. It is only in 1996 that the first case got compensation. Awareness should be created among workers about the harmful effects of noise on hearing and other body systems by implementing compulsory education and training programs. There are very few published studies of NIHL in India. More extensive studies are needed to know the exact prevalence of NIHL among the various industries in India.

  19. Sensorineural hearing loss following irradiation to the malignant tumor of the head and neck

    We observed sensorineural hearing loss following X-ray irradiation to the malignant tumor of head and neck. There were 24 patients whose auditory organs lied within the irradiation field. Ten of these patients were affected by sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss occurred at a high frequency in elderly patients, epipharynx tumor and high dose of irradiation. Many cases revealed high tone hearing loss. Most cases showed about a 20∼30 dB hearing loss, so their impediment seemed not severe in daily life. In some of these cases, we could have temporal bone findings, but there were no particular findings relevant to sensorineural hearing loss. (author)

  20. Role of cochlear efferents in noise induced hearing loss

    Aran, J. M.; Popelář, Jiří; Smith, D. W.

    Cambridge : NOPHER, 2000, s. 10. [An International Symposium on noise induced hearing loss. Cambridge (GB), 07.07.2000-10.07.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/97/0830; GA MZd NK4747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Facilitating Emergent Literacy Skills in Children with Hearing Loss

    Zupan, Barbra; Dempsey, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) familiarize readers with the components of emergent literacy and the impact hearing loss may have on the development of these skills; (b) demonstrate the importance of parent-professional collaboration and show how specific literacy-based activities can be integrated into existing daily routines and intervention programming; and…

  2. Efficient estimates of cochlear hearing loss parameters in individual listeners

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the level corresponding to the knee-point of the basilar membrane (BM) input/output (I/O) function can be used to estimate the amount of inner- and outer hair-cell loss (IHL, OHL) in listeners with a moderate cochlear hearing impairment Plack et al. (2004). According to...

  3. Cognitive autonomy among adolescents with and without hearing loss: Associations with perceived social support.

    Michael, Rinat; Attias, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive autonomy is a skill which may help adolescents prepare for important decisions in adulthood. The current study examined the associations between cognitive autonomy and perceived social support among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Participants were 177 students: 55 were deaf and hard of hearing (dhh) and 122 were hearing. They completed the Cognitive Autonomy and Self-Evaluation Inventory, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and a demographic questionnaire. Significant positive correlations were found between some of the cognitive autonomy variables and some of the perceived social support variables. However, among the dhh group, they were fewer and weaker. Family support was found to be a significant predictor of three out of the five cognitive autonomy variables. In addition, significant differences were found between the dhh and hearing participants in some of the cognitive autonomy variables, but not in perceived social support. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:26874208

  4. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Occupational Noise Exposure: Effects of Age-Corrections

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (NIPTS were computed from retrospective audiometric analyses by subtracting aging effects on hearing sensitivity in sixty-eight patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who reported significant occupational noise exposure histories. There were significant effects of age on NIPTS but no significant gender- or ear- differences in terms of NIPTS. The NIPTS at 2,000 Hz was found to be significantly greater than NIPTS at frequencies 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, and 8,000 Hz. Defined noise notches were seen in the audiograms of 38/136 (27% ears with SNHL. Results support models that suggest interactive effects of aging and noise on sensorineural hearing loss in ears with occupational noise exposure.

  5. Hearing loss and contributing factors among airport workers in Malaysia.

    Nasir, H M; Rampal, K G

    2012-02-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common and important source of disability among the workers and often caused by occupational noise exposure. Aims of the study were to determine the prevalence and contributing factors of hearing loss among airport workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out at an airport in Malaysia. This study used stratified sampling method that involved 358 workers who were working in 3 different units between November 2008 and March 2009. Data for this study were collected by using questionnaires eliciting sociodemographic, occupational exposure history (previous and present), life-style including smoking habits and health-related data. Otoscopic and pure-tone audiometric tests were conducted for hearing assessment. Noise exposure status was categorize by using a noise logging dosimeter to obtain 8-hour Time-Weighted Average (TWA). Data was analyzed by using SPSS version 12.0.1 and EpiInfo 6.04. The prevalence of hearing loss was 33.5%. Age >40 years old (aOR 4.3, 95%CI 2.2-8.3) is the main risk factors for hearing loss followed by duration of noise exposure >5 years (aOR 2.5, 95%CI 1.4-4.7), smoking (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.2-3.4), duration of service >5 years (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.1-3.9), exposure to explosion (aOR 6.1, 95%CI 1.3-29.8), exposure to vibration (aOR 2.2, 95%CI 1.1-4.3) and working in engineering unit (aOR 5.9, 95%CI 1.1-30.9). The prevalence rate ratio of hearing loss for nonsmokers aged 40 years old and younger, smokers aged 40 years old and younger, non-smokers older than 40 years old and smokers older than 40 years old was 1.0, 1.7, 2.8 and 4.6 respectively. This result contributes towards better understanding of risk factors for hearing loss, which is relatively common among Malaysian workers. PMID:22582554

  6. Conductive hearing loss in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Schick, B; Brors, D; Prescher, A; Draf, W

    1999-05-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is a rare genetic overgrowth syndrome presenting with organomegaly, abdominal wall defects, macroglossia, and postnatal hypoglycemia. Head and neck manifestations of this abnormality include flame nevus of the forehead and characteristic sulci of the ear lobe. We present a 7-year-old child with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and a rare finding of conductive hearing loss on both sides due to congenital malleus and stapedial fixation. Small fenestra stapedotomy and mobilization of malleus fixation in the epitympanum improved the child's hearing. The bony fixation of the malleus and stapes is explained as atavism of the processus anterior mallei and peripheral lamina stapedialis in embryological development. PMID:10375044

  7. "PARAMETERS AFFECTING NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS IN INDUSTRY"

    D. Parvizpour

    1977-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on a study conducted in three different industries on 84.4 on their employees to determine the effect of over all noise intensity, length of employment and rest periods among them. It was found that the mentioned factors have direct effect on the induced hearing loss among the exposed workers. High noise level and long period of employment adversely affect the hearing ability while the breaks taken during daily working hours have prevented the expected defect.

  8. A STUDY ON NEONATAL HEARING LOSS USING TRANSIENT EVOKED OTOACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    Jayaprabha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deafness is an invisible disability that may often go undetected until school age, especially in children with no additional disabilities. It affects the social, emotional and cognitive development of an individual. However, this can be overcome through early identification and intervention, for which a screening programme is mandatory. But choosing any option needs realistic assessment of the magnitude of the problem in terms of prevalence as well as the risk factors operating in that specific context. So this study was performed to plan future neonatal screening programmes at Medical College Hospital, Thiruvananthapuram. The study was conducted on 402 babies born at SAT Hospital, Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram. The prevalence of neonatal hearing loss was found to be 0.8%. Craniofacial anomalies, family history of permanent childhood hearing loss and congenital infections were found to be the significant risk factors for hearing loss.

  9. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia

    Ditza Vilhena; Luís Pereira; Delfim Duarte; Nuno Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing lo...

  10. Long-Term Outcomes of Acute Low-Tone Hearing Loss

    Roh, Kyung Jin; Lee, Eun Jung; Park, Ah Young; Choi, Byeong Il; Son, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although acute low-tone hearing loss has been associated with cochlear hydrops or early stage Meniere's disease, its prognosis in the short-term has been reported to be better than sudden hearing loss. However, recurrence of hearing loss and possible progression to Meniere's disease remain important concerns in the clinical setting. This study aims to investigate the long-term audiological outcomes of acute low-tone hearing loss. Subjects and Methods A retrospective ...

  11. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss. Forty consecutive patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (20 males and 20 females; age range 11-82 years), 40 age-matched control subjects, and 5 patients with Meniere's disease were examined using the same imaging protocol on a 1.5-T MR system. Pre- and post-contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3D SPGR; TR/TE=23/10 ms, no. of excitations=1, flip angle=30 ) images were obtained using a voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm3. Contrast enhancement in the area of the endolymphatic sac was assessed by two radiologists, and the frequency of contrast enhancement was compared between the three study groups. Enhancement of the ipsilateral endolymphatic sac was observed in 30 of the 40 patients with sudden hearing loss (75%). Twenty of these 30 patients also showed enhancement on the contralateral side, and 1 patient showed enhancement only on the contralateral side. Only 1 of the 5 patients with Meniere's disease showed enhancement. Nine of the 40 control subjects (22.5%) showed enhancement (bilateral enhancement in 5 subjects, unilateral in 4). The frequency of enhancement in patients with sudden hearing loss was significantly higher than that in control subjects (P<0.0001) or patients with Meniere's disease (P<0.05). The frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac is significantly increased in patients with sudden hearing loss, but further study is necessary to clarify the relationship between this finding and the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. (orig.)

  12. Health Seeking Behavior among Parents of Children with Hearing Loss: A Cross Sectional Study

    Hiteshree C Patel, Mohua Moitra, Anjali Modi, Rahul Patel, S L Kantharia, Ishwar M Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevalence of hearing loss is 11.7% of the school going population (5-15 years. Such children fail to develop speech, language and cognitive skills unless proper habilitation is initiated. If detected early and managed suitably, will have a far better chance at a normal life than those who are habilitated late or not at all. Aims & objectives: To detect the age of suspicion, identification, intervention and treatment seeking behavior of children with hearing loss. Materials & methods: This was a cross- sectional study done in Children between 5 and 15 years age-group with hearing loss, coming to an ENT OPD, New Civil Hospital, Surat during the period of 1st August 2011 to 31 July 2012. Results: A total of 246 children were studied. Mean age of the study population was 9±3.46 years. Average age at first suspicion of hearing loss was 2.9±1.7 years, first consultation was 3.5±1.5 years and first intervention was 7.8±3.3 years. There was significant association between age of first suspicion of congenital hearing loss with father’s occupation (p=0.03. There was significant association between delay in diagnosis and gender (p= 0.04. As the level of education of parents and socio- economic status increased, preference for private set ups for first consultation also increased (p< 0.05. In 63.5% cases, advice of general practitioner resulted in the delay in referral to ENT specialist. Conclusion & Recommendations: Even after primary care, an average gap of 4.3 years is observed among parents for receiving intervention. Mother is the first person to suspect hearing loss among their children. Basic training of general practitioner/ MBBS doctors regarding primary ear care is required.

  13. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Shima Arastou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL patients with poor prognostic factors.     Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay between the onset of hearing loss and initiation of therapy were included in this study. Patients were randomized to the intervention group (combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy or the control group (systemic steroid therapy alone. All patients received oral treatment with systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day for 10 days, acyclovir (2 g/day for 10 days, divided into four doses, triamterene H (daily, and omeprazole (daily, during steroid treatment, and were advised to follow a low salt diet. The intervention group also received intratympanic dexamethasone injections (0.4 ml of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone two times a week for two consecutive weeks (four injections in total. A significant hearing improvement was defined as at least a 15-db decrease in pure tone average (PTA.  Results: Among all participants, 44 patients (57.14% showed significant improvement in hearing evaluation. More patients showed hearing improvement in the intervention group than in the control group (27 patients (75% versus 17 patients (41.4%, respectively; P = 0.001.  Conclusion:  The combination of intratympanic dexamethasone and systemic prednisolone is more effective than systemic prednisolone alone in the treatment of poor-prognosis SSNHL.

  14. Sensory neural hearing loss after concurrent cisplatin and radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Sensory neural hearing loss (SNHL) was evaluated in the patients who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Ten from 48 ears showed persistent SNHL. Radiotherapy techniques, radiation dose to inner ear and post-treatment otitis media were significant predicting factors for SNHL

  15. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with a factitious disorder.

    Maruyama, Ayako; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Ito, Taku; Narushima, Kenji; Kitamura, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Factitious disorders are characterized by intentionally abnormal physical and/or psychological behavior, and affected patients often make up their symptoms and clinical histories. The most serious and chronic type of factitious disorder is Munchausen syndrome. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman with a 2-year history of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) who later confessed to feigning her hearing loss. She was eventually diagnosed with a factitious disorder. During those 2 years, she was able to induce her SNHL by exposing herself to excessive noise or high doses of aspirin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing an association between a factitious disorder and SNHL. PMID:26670765

  16. MR imaging of 495 consecutive cases with sensorineural hearing loss

    495 consecutive patients with SNHL and 120 age-matched healthy controls were examined. Spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were used with 1.5 T equipment. An intracranial abnormality was found in 211 (42.6%) of the patients with 95 (19.2%) along the acoustic pathway. Eleven of the 95 patients had sensory hearing loss while 84 had neural hearing loss with the retrocochlear auditory pathway affected by lesions. In 62 of the 84 patients, the internal acoustic canal and cerebellopontine angle were involved. Twenty-two patients had intra-axial lesions. The controls had no pathologic changes along the auditory pathway. (orig./UG)

  17. ‘Ecstasy’ Enhances Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Church, Michael W.; Zhang, Jinsheng S.; Langford, Megan M.; Perrine, Shane A.

    2013-01-01

    ‘Ecstasy’ or 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA) is an amphetamine abused for its euphoric, empathogenic, hallucinatory, and stimulant effects. It is also used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. Common settings for Ecstasy use are nightclubs and “rave” parties where participants consume MDMA and dance to loud music. One concern with the club setting is that exposure to loud sounds can cause permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Another concern is that consumption of MDMA may enha...

  18. Acrylonitrile Potentiates Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Rat

    Fechter, Laurence D.; Gearhart, Caroline; Shirwany, Najeeb A

    2003-01-01

    Acrylonitrile, one of the 50 most commonly produced industrial chemicals, has recently been identified as a promoter of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). This agent has the potential to produce oxidative stress through multiple pathways. We hypothesize that acrylonitrile potentiates NIHL as a consequence of oxidative stress. The objectives of this study were to characterize acrylonitrile exposure conditions that promote permanent NIHL in rats and determine the ability of this nitrile to prod...

  19. Munchausen Syndrome: A Case with Presenting Sudden Hearing Loss

    Murat Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Munchausen syndrome is a psychiatric disorder that patients direct professionals with plausible, feigned, factitious symptoms. It%u2019s uncommon in otolaryngology clinics. We present a patient, complaint with sudden hearing loss and vertigo, and who underwent additional medical and invasive treatment in this paper. Patients with Munchausen syndrome allow invasive medical care easily, and they can be very convincing. It has to be diagnosed and kept in mind because of avoiding from unnecessary treatment.

  20. Gap-Junction Channels Dysfunction in Deafness and Hearing Loss

    MARTÍNEZ, Agustín D.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Figueroa, Vania; Maripillan, Jaime; Nicholson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Gap-junction channels connect the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, allowing the diffusion of ions and small metabolites. They are formed at the appositional plasma membranes by a family of related proteins named connexins. Mutations in connexins 26, 31, 30, 32, and 43 have been associated with nonsyndromic or syndromic deafness. The majority of these mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, but a few of them have been associated with dominantly inherited hearing loss. Mutations i...

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    Okokhere Peter O; Ibekwe Titus S; Akpede George O

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented...

  2. Sensori-neural hearing loss following radiotherapy to the nasopharynx

    A retrospective study was done to ascertain the risks of cochlear damage from radiotherapy of the nasopharynx. Audiometric evaluation, pre- and post-radiotherapy, revealed that 7 out of 13 patients had sustained sensori-neural deafness. Contrary to what is generally believed of the resistance of the cochlea to radiotherapeutic damage, eventual loss of hearing can occasionally be expected in patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck tumors

  3. Hearing Instruments for Unilateral Severe-to-Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Smith, Sandra Nelson; Lucas, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the nature and quality of the evidence for the use of hearing instruments in adults with a unilateral severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Design: The PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane, CINAHL, and DARE databases were searched with no restrictions on language. The search included articles from the start of each database until February 11, 2015. Studies were included that (a) assessed the impact of any form of hearing instrument, including devices that reroute signals between the ears or restore aspects of hearing to a deaf ear, in adults with a sensorineural severe to profound loss in one ear and normal or near-normal hearing in the other ear; (b) compared different devices or compared a device with placebo or the unaided condition; (c) measured outcomes in terms of speech perception, spatial listening, or quality of life; (d) were prospective controlled or observational studies. Studies that met prospectively defined criteria were subjected to random effects meta-analyses. Results: Twenty-seven studies reported in 30 articles were included. The evidence was graded as low-to-moderate quality having been obtained primarily from observational before-after comparisons. The meta-analysis identified statistically significant benefits to speech perception in noise for devices that rerouted the speech signals of interest from the worse ear to the better ear using either air or bone conduction (mean benefit, 2.5 dB). However, these devices also degraded speech understanding significantly and to a similar extent (mean deficit, 3.1 dB) when noise was rerouted to the better ear. Data on the effects of cochlear implantation on speech perception could not be pooled as the prospectively defined criteria for meta-analysis were not met. Inconsistency in the assessment of outcomes relating to sound localization also precluded the synthesis of evidence across studies. Evidence for

  4. Morphological correlates of hearing loss after cochlear implantation and electro-acoustic stimulation in a hearing-impaired Guinea pig model.

    Reiss, Lina A J; Stark, Gemaine; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T; Spear, Kayce A; Zhang, Hongzheng; Tanaka, Chiemi; Li, Hongzhe

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid or electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS) cochlear implants (CIs) are designed to provide high-frequency electric hearing together with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing. However, 30-50% of EAS CI recipients lose residual hearing after implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms of EAS-induced hearing loss in an animal model with high-frequency hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to 24 h of noise (12-24 kHz at 116 dB) to induce a high-frequency hearing loss. After recovery, two groups of animals were implanted (n = 6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n = 6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded biweekly to monitor changes in hearing. The organ of Corti was immunolabeled with phalloidin, anti-CtBP2, and anti-GluR2 to quantify hair cells, ribbons and post-synaptic receptors. The lateral wall was immunolabeled with phalloidin and lectin to quantify stria vascularis capillary diameters. Bimodal or trimodal diameter distributions were observed; the number and location of peaks were objectively determined using the Aikake Information Criterion and Expectation Maximization algorithm. Noise exposure led to immediate hearing loss at 16-32 kHz for all groups. Cochlear implantation led to additional hearing loss at 4-8 kHz; this hearing loss was negatively and positively correlated with minimum and maximum peaks of the bimodal or trimodal distributions of stria vascularis capillary diameters, respectively. After chronic stimulation, no significant group changes in thresholds were seen; however, elevated thresholds at 1 kHz in implanted, stimulated animals were significantly correlated with decreased presynaptic ribbon and postsynaptic receptor counts. Inner and outer hair cell counts did not differ between groups and

  5. Short-Term Outcomes of Acute Low-Tone Sensorineural Hearing Loss According to Treatment Modality

    Chang, Jinkyung; Yum, Gunhwee; Im, Ha-Young; Jung, Jong Yoon; Rah, Yoon Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We compared improvements in hearing thresholds in acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) patients after two different treatments: steroid alone and steroid and diuretic combined. We analyzed how the duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment affected hearing loss improvement and investigated the relation between presence of vertigo in ALHL patients and ALHL progression to Ménière's disease (MD). Subjects and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 47 ALHL patients aged 21 to 76 years. Patients received either orally administered steroid alone (n=12) or steroid and diuretic combined (n=35). We compared improvements in the two groups' hearing thresholds at three lower frequencies (125, 250, and 500 Hz) after participants had received one month of each respective treatment. Results Our two treatments did not show any statistical difference in hearing loss improvement after one month. Forty percent of ALHL patients with vertigo developed MD, which was a significantly higher rate than the 12.5% of ALHL patients without vertigo who developed MD. The shorter duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment significantly increased improvement in the sum of lower frequency hearing threshold after one month. Conclusions The current study suggests that steroid and diuretic administered together and steroid alone similarly improve the hearing threshold in ALHL patients after one month. We concluded that patients should initiate ALHL treatment as soon as they experience symptoms. ALHL patients should also be notified of their higher risk of developing MD. PMID:27144234

  6. Early-onset sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever.

    Ibekwe, T S; Okokhere, P O; Asogun, D; Blackie, F F; Nwegbu, M M; Wahab, K W; Omilabu, S A; Akpede, G O

    2011-02-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a viral hemorrhagic disease which affects one-fourth to two million people annually with the fatality rate of about 10,000. It is associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) usually at the convalescent stage. Recently, cases of SNHL at the acute phase have been reported. This study was done to further investigate the incidence and features of SNHL in acute phase of LF. It is a prospective case-control study of LF patients seen with acute SNHL conducted between July 2007 and April 2009 at Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital Nigeria. The diagnosis of acute LF was based on the clinical features and detection of IgM antibodies and/or positive Lassa virus-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using primers S36+ and LVS 339 while SNHL was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with PTA and speech discrimination tests. Patients with other acute febrile illnesses were used as control. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 11 and Fisher's exact test while level of significance was set at p 0.05). The incidence of SNHL in LF infection is about 13.5% and could be a reflection of a worse disease process. There is possibility of direct viral invasion aside immunological reaction as a causative mechanism. PMID:20809263

  7. Transforming growth factor β1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Silvia eMurillo-Cuesta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor ß (TGF-ß is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-ß as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss, we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-ß1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-ß1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-ß1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage.

  8. Dancing the aerobics ''hearing loss'' choreography

    Pinto, Beatriz M.; Carvalho, Antonio P. O.; Gallagher, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of gymnasiums' acoustic problems when used for aerobics exercises classes (and similar) with loud noise levels of amplified music. This type of gymnasium is usually a highly reverberant space, which is a consequence of a large volume surrounded by hard surfaces. A sample of five schools in Portugal was chosen for this survey. Noise levels in each room were measured using a precision sound level meter, and analyzed to calculate the standardized daily personal noise exposure levels (LEP,d). LEP,d values from 79 to 91 dB(A) were found to be typical values in this type of room, inducing a health risk for its occupants. The reverberation time (RT) values were also measured and compared with some European legal requirements (Portugal, France, and Belgium) for nearly similar situations. RT values (1 kHz) from 0.9 s to 2.8 s were found. These reverberation time values clearly differentiate between good and acoustically inadequate rooms. Some noise level and RT limits for this type of environment are given and suggestions for the improvement of the acoustical environment are shown. Significant reductions in reverberation time values and noise levels can be obtained by simple measures.

  9. Brain-stem auditory evoked responses during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: Predicting post-operative hearing loss

    Ramnarayan Ramachandran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The importance of brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring in reducing hearing loss during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia is now accepted. However the extent of the changes in the pattern of these potentials and the safe limits to which these changes are relevant in reducing postoperative hearing loss have not been established. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify these changes and relate these to the postoperative hearing loss. Settings and Design: This study was done at the Walton Centre for neurology and neurosurgery, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The study was designed to give a measure of the change in the wave pattern following microvascular decompression and relate it to postoperative hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia had preoperative and postoperative hearing assessments and intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square tests. Results: It was found that the wave V latency was increased by more than 0.9ms in nine patients, eight of whom suffered significant postoperative hearing loss as demonstrated by audiometry. It was also seen that progressive decrease in amplitude of wave V showed progressive hearing loss with 25% loss when amplitude fell by 50 and 100% loss when wave V was lost completely. However most of the patients did not have a clinically manifest hearing loss. Conclusions: A per-operative increase in the latency of wave V greater than 0.9 ms and a fall of amplitude of wave V of more than 50% indicates a risk to hearing.

  10. Neuro-rehabilitation Approach for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Sekiya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing loss. The estimated incidence rate is 5-30 cases per 100,000 people per year. The causes of SSHL and the mechanisms underlying SSHL currently remain unknown. Based on several hypotheses such as a circulatory disturbance to the cochlea, viral infection, and autoimmune disease, pharmaco-therapeutic approaches have been applied to treat SSHL patients; however, the efficacy of the standard treatment, corticosteroid therapy, is still under debate. Exposure to intense sounds has been shown to cause permanent damage to the auditory system; however, exposure to a moderate level enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma may reduce hearing impairments. Several neuroimaging studies recently suggested that the onset of SSHL induced maladaptive cortical reorganization in the human auditory cortex, and that the degree of cortical reorganization in the acute SSHL phase negatively correlated with the recovery rate from hearing loss. This article reports the development of a novel neuro-rehabilitation approach for SSHL, "constraint-induced sound therapy (CIST)". The aim of the CIST protocol is to prevent or reduce maladaptive cortical reorganization by using an enriched acoustic environment. The canal of the intact ear of SSHL patients is plugged in order to motivate them to actively use the affected ear and thereby prevent progress of maladaptive cortical reorganization. The affected ear is also exposed to music via a headphone for 6 hr per day during hospitalization. The CIST protocol appears to be a safe, easy, inexpensive, and effective treatment for SSHL. PMID:26863274

  11. Infants and children with hearing loss need early language access.

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Moreland, Christopher J; Napoli, Donna Jo; Osterling, Wendy; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Around 96 percent of children with hearing loss are born to parents with intact hearing, who may initially know little about deafness or sign language. Therefore, such parents will need information and support in making decisions about the medical, linguistic, and educational management of their child. Some of these decisions are time-sensitive and irreversible and come at a moment of emotional turmoil and vulnerability (when some parents grieve the loss of a normally hearing child). Clinical research indicates that a deaf child's poor communication skills can be made worse by increased level of parental depression. Given this, the importance of reliable and up-to-date support for parents' decisions is critical to the overall well-being of their child. In raising and educating a child, parents are often offered an exclusive choice between an oral environment (including assistive technology, speech reading, and voicing) and a signing environment. A heated controversy surrounds this choice, and has since at least the late 19th century, beginning with the International Congress on the Education of the Deaf in Milan, held in 1880. While families seek advice from many sources, including, increasingly, the internet, the primary care physician (PCP) is the professional medical figure the family interacts with repeatedly. The present article aims to help family advisors, particularly the PCP and other medical advisors in this regard. We argue that deaf children need to be exposed regularly and frequently to good language models in both visual and auditory modalities from the time hearing loss is detected and continued throughout their education to ensure proper cognitive, psychological, and educational development. Since there is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical studies on many of the issues families must confront, professional opinions, backed by what studies do exist, are the only option. We here give our strongly held professional opinions and stress the need for

  12. The effects of a hearing education program on recreational noise exposure, attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices in young adults

    Hannah Keppler; Dhooge Ingeborg; Degeest Sofie; Vinck Bart

    2015-01-01

    Excessive recreational noise exposure in young adults might result in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus. Inducing behavioral change in young adults is one of the aims of a hearing conservation program (HCP). The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effect of a hearing education program after 6 months in young adults in relation to knowledge regarding their individual hearing status. The results of a questionnaire regarding the weekly equivalent recreational noise exposur...

  13. Childhood sensorineural hearing loss: effects of combined exposure with aging or noise exposure later in life.

    Aarhus, Lisa; Tambs, Kristian; Nafstad, Per; Bjørgan, Eskil; Engdahl, Bo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to examine childhood high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (HF-SNHL) and the effects of combined exposure with aging or noise exposure on HF hearing thresholds in adulthood. Population-based cohort study of 30,003 adults (mean age 40 years) underwent an audiometry and completed a hearing questionnaire. At age 7-13 years, the same people had participated in a longitudinal school hearing investigation, in which 283 participants were diagnosed with HF-SNHL [PTA 3-8 kHz ≥ 25 dB HL (mean 45 dB HL), worse hearing ear], and 29,720 participants had normal hearing thresholds. The effect of childhood HF-SNHL on adult hearing threshold was significantly moderated by age. Age stratified analyses showed that the difference in HF hearing thresholds between adults with and without childhood HF-SNHL was 33 dB (95 % CI 31-34) in young adults (n = 173, aged 20-39 years) and 37 dB (95 % CI 34-39) in middle-aged adults (n = 110, aged 40-56 years). The combined exposure of childhood HF-SNHL and noise exposure showed a simple additive effect. It appears to be a super-additive effect of childhood-onset HF-SNHL and aging on adult hearing thresholds. An explanation might be that already damaged hair cells are more susceptible to age-related degeneration. To exclude possible birth cohort effects, the finding should be confirmed by a study with several audiometries in adulthood. PMID:25975623

  14. Differential pathologies resulting from sound exposure: Tinnitus vs hearing loss

    Longenecker, Ryan James

    The first step in identifying the mechanism(s) responsible for tinnitus development would be to discover a neural correlate that is differentially expressed in tinnitus-positive compared to tinnitus negative animals. Previous research has identified several neural correlates of tinnitus in animals that have tested positive for tinnitus. However it is unknown whether all or some of these correlates are linked to tinnitus or if they are a byproduct of hearing loss, a common outcome of tinnitus induction. Abnormally high spontaneous activity has frequently been linked to tinnitus. However, while some studies demonstrate that hyperactivity positively correlates with behavioral evidence of tinnitus, others show that when all animals develop hyperactivity to sound exposure, not all exposed animals show evidence of tinnitus. My working hypothesis is that certain aspects of hyperactivity are linked to tinnitus while other aspects are linked to hearing loss. The first specific aim utilized the gap induced prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (GIPAS) to monitor the development of tinnitus in CBA/CaJ mice during one year following sound exposure. Immediately after sound exposure, GIPAS testing revealed widespread gap detection deficits across all frequencies, which was likely due to temporary threshold shifts. However, three months after sound exposure these deficits were limited to a narrow frequency band and were consistently detected up to one year after exposure. This suggests the development of chronic tinnitus is a long lasting and highly dynamic process. The second specific aim assessed hearing loss in sound exposed mice using several techniques. Acoustic brainstem responses recorded initially after sound exposure reveal large magnitude deficits in all exposed mice. However, at the three month period, thresholds return to control levels in all mice suggesting that ABRs are not a reliable tool for assessing permanent hearing loss. Input/output functions of

  15. The paracrine effect of mesenchymal human stem cells restored hearing in β-tubulin induced autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    Yoo, T J; Du, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the activities of hASCs (Human Adipose tissue Derived Stem Cells) on experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) and how human stem cells regenerated mouse cochlea cells. We have restored hearing in 19 years old white female with autoimmune hearing loss with autologous adipose tissue derived stem cells and we wish to understand the mechanism of restoration of hearing in animal model. BALB/c mice underwent to develop EAHL; mice with EAHL were given hASCs intraperitoneally once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. ABR were examined over time. The helper type 1 autoreactive responses and T-reg cells were examined. H&E staining or immunostaining with APC conjugated anti-HLA-ABC antibody were conducted. The organ of Corti, stria vascularis, spira ligament and spiral ganglion in stem cell group are normal. In control group, without receiving stem cells, the organ of Corti is replaced by a single layer of cells, atrophy of stria vascularis. Systemic infusion of hASCs significantly improved hearing function and protected hair cells in established EAHL. The hASCs decreased the proliferation of antigen specific Th1/Th17 cells and induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin10 in splenocytes. They also induced the generation of antigen specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T-reg cells. The experiment showed the restoration is due to the paracrine activities of human stem cells, since there are newly regenerated mice spiral ganglion cells, not human mesenchymal stem cells derived tissue given by intraperitoneally. PMID:26235980

  16. The Relationship between Language Development and Behaviour Problems in Children with Hearing Loss

    Stevenson, Jim; McCann, Donna; Watkin, Peter; Worsfold, Sarah; Kennedy, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Background: There are well-replicated findings that link poor development on a range of communication skills with increased behavioural problems. This paper examines this relationship in children with hearing loss. Method: One hundred and twenty children with hearing loss (67 boys, 53 girls) and 63 hearing children (37 boys, 26 girls) with a mean…

  17. Comparisons of Social Competence in Young Children with and without Hearing Loss: A Dynamic Systems Framework

    Hoffman, Michael F.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5-5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that,…

  18. Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children with Peripheral Hearing Loss

    Koravand, Amineh; Jutras, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss. Method: Forty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task in which…

  19. Delayed loss of hearing after hearing preservation cochlear implantation: Human temporal bone pathology and implications for etiology.

    Quesnel, Alicia M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Rosowski, John J; Hansen, Marlan R; Gantz, Bruce J; Nadol, Joseph B

    2016-03-01

    After initially successful preservation of residual hearing with cochlear implantation, some patients experience subsequent delayed hearing loss. The etiology of such delayed hearing loss is unknown. Human temporal bone pathology is critically important in investigating the etiology, and directing future efforts to maximize long term hearing preservation in cochlear implant patients. Here we present the temporal bone pathology from a patient implanted during life with an Iowa/Nucleus Hybrid S8 implant, with initially preserved residual hearing and subsequent hearing loss. Both temporal bones were removed for histologic processing and evaluated. Complete clinical and audiologic records were available. He had bilateral symmetric high frequency severe to profound hearing loss prior to implantation. Since he was implanted unilaterally, the unimplanted ear was presumed to be representative of the pre-implantation pathology related to his hearing loss. The implanted and contralateral unimplanted temporal bones both showed complete degeneration of inner hair cells and outer hair cells in the basal half of the cochleae, and only mild patchy loss of inner hair cells and outer hair cells in the apical half. The total spiral ganglion neuron counts were similar in both ears: 15,138 (56% of normal for age) in the unimplanted right ear and 13,722 (51% of normal for age) in the implanted left ear. In the basal turn of the implanted left cochlea, loose fibrous tissue and new bone formation filled the scala tympani, and part of the scala vestibuli. Delayed loss of initially preserved hearing after cochlear implantation was not explained by additional post-implantation degeneration of hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons in this patient. Decreased compliance at the round window and increased damping in the scala tympani due to intracochlear fibrosis and new bone formation might explain part of the post-implantation hearing loss. Reduction of the inflammatory and immune response to

  20. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    Plontke, S.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined exposure of noise and chemicals. Based on the epidemiological and pathophysiological findings and against the background of published animal-experimental, pre-clinical and clinical findings, the various approaches for prevention, protection and therapeutic intervention with acoustic trauma are discussed. Pharmacological strategies involving anti-oxidative, anti-excitotoxic and anti-apoptotic substances as well as non-pharmacological strategies like "sound conditioning" are given attention. Furthermore, systemic and local substance application as well as the therapy of acute acoustic trauma and chronic hearing problems (including modern therapy forms for comorbidities such as tinnitus shall be delved into.

  1. Noise induced hearing loss: Screening with pure-tone audiometry and speech-in-noise testing

    Leensen, M. C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a highly prevalent public health problem, caused by exposure to loud noises both during leisure time, e.g. by listening to loud music, and during work. In the past years NIHL was the most commonly reported occupational disease in the Netherlands. Hearing damage caused by noise is irreversible, but largely preventable. The early detection of hearing loss is of great importance, and is applied by preventative testing of hearing ability. This thesis investiga...

  2. Effects of hearing loss on the subcortical representation of speech cues

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Drehobl, Sarah; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss often report frustration with speech being loud but not clear, especially in background noise. Despite advanced digital technology, hearing aid users may resort to removing their hearing aids in noisy environments due to the perception of excessive loudness. In an animal model, sensorineural hearing loss results in greater auditory nerve coding of the stimulus envelope, leading to a relative deficit of stimulus fine structure. Based on the hypothesi...

  3. Combination therapy using antioxidants and low level laser therapy (LLLT) on noise induced hearing loss (NIHL)

    Chang, So-Young; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Min young; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae-Yun; Rhee, Chung-Ku

    2016-02-01

    One of the most common factors that cause hearing disorders is noise trauma. Noise is an increasing hazard and it is pervasive, which makes it difficult to take precautions and prevent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The prevalence of hearing loss among factory workers to be 42 %[1]. Ocupational noise induced hearing loss (ONIHL) continues to be a significant occupational hazard. ONIHL is permanent and may cause significant disability, for which there currently exists no cure, but is largely preventable. More than 30 million Americans are potentially exposed to hazardous noise levels in occupations such as transportation, construction, and coal mining, as well as recreationally. In the mainstream setting, exposure avoidance strategies aimed to reduce the incidence of ONIHL remain the focus of public health and occupational medicine approaches[2]. In military conditions this is most often caused by such things as explosions, blasts, or loud noises from vehicles ranging from 100 to 140 dB[3] and military weapons generating approximately 140-185 dB peak sound pressure levels[4].

  4. Prevalence and Parental Awareness of Hearing Loss in Children with Down Syndrome

    Wai-Ling Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To establish the prevalence of hearing deficit in children with Down syndrome (DS in Hong Kong as measured by brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP. The secondary objective is to examine the agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning in detecting hearing deficit in DS. Methods: Consecutive DS patients attending the Down′s Clinic in a regional pediatric referral center were recruited into this cross-sectional study. BAEP data performed within 12 months were retrieved. The care-taker was interviewed with a structured questionnaire to detect any symptom of hearing impairment. BAEP findings and clinical questionings were compared in an agreement analysis using quadratic weighted kappa statistics. Results: Fifty DS patients (35 male, 15 female, mean age 11.70 years ± 5.74 standard deviation were recruited. Eighteen patients (36.0% were identified having hearing deficit by BAEP. Among patients with hearing impairment, 13 patients (72.2% had a conductive deficit, and most have mild to moderate hearing loss. Five patients (27.8% had sensorineural deficit and most have moderate to severe degree. Eight (44.4% had bilateral hearing deficit. Care-takers of 13 patients (26.0% reported symptoms of hearing impairment, with 9 (69.2% having mild symptoms, 3 (23.1% had moderate symptoms and 1 (7.7% had severe symptoms. The weighted kappa was 0.045 (95.0% confidence interval − 0.138-0.229, indicating very poor strength of agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning. For patients with conductive hearing impairment, only 1 patients (7.7% recalled history of otitis media. Conclusions: The estimated point prevalence of hearing impairment in Chinese DS children in Hong Kong is 36%. Our finding of poor strength of agreement between objective testing and symptom questioning reflects significant underestimation of hearing impairment by history taking alone. In view of the high prevalence and low parental awareness, continuous surveillance of

  5. Prevalence and Parental Awareness of Hearing Loss in Children with Down Syndrome

    Wai-Ling Lau; Chun-Hung Ko; Wai-Wai Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background:To establish the prevalence of hearing deficit in children with Down syndrome (DS) in Hong Kong as measured by brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP).The secondary objective is to examine the agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning in detecting hearing deficit in DS.Methods:Consecutive DS patients attending the Down's Clinic in a regional pediatric referral center were recruited into this cross-sectional study.BAEP data performed within 12 months were retrieved.The care-taker was interviewed with a structured questionnaire to detect any symptom of hearing impairment.BAEP findings and clinical questionings were compared in an agreement analysis using quadratic weighted kappa statistics.Results:Fifty DS patients (35 male,15 female,mean age 11.70 years + 5.74 standard deviation) were recruited.Eighteen patients (36.0%) were identified having hearing deficit by BAEP.Among patients with hearing impairment,13 patients (72.2%) had a conductive deficit,and most have mild to moderate hearing loss.Five patients (27.8%) had sensorineural deficit and most have moderate to severe degree.Eight (44.4%) had bilateral hearing deficit.Care-takers of 13 patients (26.0%) reported symptoms of hearing impairment,with 9 (69.2%) having mild symptoms,3 (23.1%) had moderate symptoms and 1 (7.7%) had severe symptoms.The weighted kappa was 0.045 (95.0% confidence interval-0.138-0.229),indicating very poor strength of agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning.For patients with conductive hearing impairment,only 1 patients (7.7%) recalled history of otitis media.Conclusions:The estimated point prevalence of hearing impairment in Chinese DS children in Hong Kong is 36%.Our finding of poor strength of agreement between objective testing and symptom questioning reflects significant underestimation of hearing impairment by history taking alone.In view of the high prevalence and low parental awareness,continuous surveillance of hearing is mandatory

  6. Predictors of hearing loss in school entrants in a developing country

    Olusanya Bola

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing loss is a prevalent and significant disability that impairs functional development and educational attainment of school children in developing countries. Lack of a simple and practical screening protocol often deters routine and systematic hearing screening at school entry. Aim: To identify predictors of hearing loss for a practical screening model in school-aged children. Settings and Design: Community-based, retrospective case-control study of school entrants in an inner city. Methods: Results from the audiologic and non-audiologic examination of 50 hearing impaired children in randomly selected mainstream schools were compared with those of a control group of 150 normal hearing children, matched for age and sex from the same population. The non-audiologic evaluation consisted of medical history, general physical examination, anthropometry, motor skills, intelligence and visual acuity while the audiologic assessment consisted of otoscopy, audiometry and tympanometry. Statistical Analysis: Multiple logistic regression analysis of significant variables derived from univariate analysis incorporating student t-test and chi-square. Results: Besides parental literacy (OR:0.3; 95% CI:0.16-0.68, non-audiologic variables showed no association with hearing loss. In contrast, most audiologic indicators, enlarged nasal turbinate (OR:3.3; 95% CI:0.98-11.31, debris or foreign bodies in the ear canal (OR:5.4; 95% CI:1.0-36.03, impacted cerumen (OR:6.2; 95% CI:2.12-14.33, dull tympanic membrane (OR:2.2; 95% CI:1.10-4.46, perforated ear drum (OR:24.3; 95% CI:2.93-1100.17 and otitis media with effusion OME (OR:14.2; 95% CI:6.22-33.09, were associated with hearing loss. However, only parental literacy (OR:0.3; 95% CI:0.16-0.69, impacted cerumen (OR:4.0; 95% CI:1.66-9.43 and OME (OR:11.0; 95% CI:4.74-25.62 emerged as predictors. Conclusion: Selective screening based on the identification of impacted cerumen and OME will facilitate the

  7. Resolution of sudden sensorineural hearing loss following a roller coaster ride.

    Kumar, Aman; Sinha, Amrita; Al-Waa, Ahmad M

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset during an aeroplane flight, which completely resolved during a roller coaster ride at Alton Towers theme park. A review of the literature concerning sudden idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and spontaneous resolution are discussed. Initially, pure-tone audiometry showed a profound sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and mild sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear (of note, the hearing was normal prior to the episode). Following resolution of the patient's symptoms during a roller coaster ride, pure-tone audiometry showed normal hearing thresholds in both ears. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a symptom of cochlear injury and the mechanism of the patient's symptoms was attributed to a patent cochlear aqueduct. PMID:22754856

  8. SENSORY HEARING LOSS IN CHILDREN WITH MUMPS INFECTION

    S. Noorbaksh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Mumps infection is endemic in Iran and mumps parotiditis is acommon disease in Iranian children. There has been a dramaticdecrease in the worldwide incidence of mumps since the introductionand use in 1968 of the very effective and inexpensive mumps vaccine.In Iran probably due to a higher percentage of unvaccinated youngpersons <15yr, the incidence rate of mumps infection and its sequelaare higher in comparison to corresponding data from developedcountries prior to comprehensive vaccination programs. The aim ofthe study was to investigate the effects of the mumps virus on cochlearfunction and to determine the frequency of related Sensory NeuralHearing Loss (SNHL in children.Material& Methods:This descriptive case-series study was conducted in 94children, agedless than 14 years, hospitalized between 1999 and 2001, in thepediatric ward of the Hazrat Rasool Hospital in Tehran. All patientswith documented mumps infection (specific mumps-IgM antibodywere evaluated twice for audiometeric function on the basis ofdiagnostic parameters for sensory neural hearing loss; the first evaluationwas done on admission and the second three weeks later. 54 patients(age range 1-14y, mean age 4.83±3.93, male: female ratio30:24were studied in two years.Results:The highest incidence of mumps was seen in winter (37% and spring(28% and the lowest in summer (13%. Specific IgM antibody formumps virus was detected in 74 children. Comprehensive audiologicevaluation was done in 54 patients at admission and again 3 weekslater. SNHL was detected in 7.2% of patients; the 4.4% incidence ofSNHL in this study was higher than in other studies in developedcountries prior to comprehensive vaccination programs.Conclusion:Implementation of comprehensive vaccination programs in youngIranians could dramatically reduce the burden and costs imposed bythe infection and its sequelae.Keywords: Mumps infection ;SNLH(sensorineural hearing loss;Mumpsvaccination

  9. The Need for Improved Detection and Management of Adult-Onset Hearing Loss in Australia

    Catherine M. McMahon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset hearing loss is insidious and typically diagnosed and managed several years after onset. Often, this is after the loss having led to multiple negative consequences including effects on employment, depressive symptoms, and increased risk of mortality. In contrast, the use of hearing aids is associated with reduced depression, longer life expectancy, and retention in the workplace. Despite this, several studies indicate high levels of unmet need for hearing health services in older adults and poor use of prescribed hearing aids, often leading to their abandonment. In Australia, the largest component of financial cost of hearing loss (excluding the loss of well-being is due to lost workplace productivity. Nonetheless, the Australian public health system does not have an effective and sustainable hearing screening strategy to tackle the problem of poor detection of adult-onset hearing loss. Given the increasing prevalence and disease burden of hearing impairment in adults, two key areas are not adequately met in the Australian healthcare system: (1 early identification of persons with chronic hearing impairment; (2 appropriate and targeted referral of these patients to hearing health service providers. This paper reviews the current literature, including population-based data from the Blue Mountains Hearing Study, and suggests different models for early detection of adult-onset hearing loss.

  10. Hearing loss in the Royal Norwegian Navy: A longitudinal study.

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Baste, Valborg; Bratveit, Magne; Lind, Ola; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Moen, Bente E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate a significant threshold shift (STS) among personnel working on board the Royal Norwegian Navy's (RNoN) vessels between 2012 and 2014 and to identify possible determinants of STS. Hearing thresholds were measured by pure tone audiometry in two consecutive examinations (n = 226). STS was defined as an average change in hearing thresholds ≥ + 10 dB at 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz in either ear. Determinants of STS were assessed through a questionnaire. The incidence of STS was 23.0%. Significant determinants of STS were the number of episodes of temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in the Navy, exposure to continuous loud noise during work on board, and the number of gun shots (in the Navy, hunting, and sports). This study indicated a significant association between noise exposure on board Navy vessels and development of STS. PMID:27157689

  11. Hearing loss in the Royal Norwegian Navy: A longitudinal study

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Baste, Valborg; Bråtveit, Magne; Lind, Ola; Koefoed, Vilhelm F.; Moen, Bente E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate a significant threshold shift (STS) among personnel working on board the Royal Norwegian Navy's (RNoN) vessels between 2012 and 2014 and to identify possible determinants of STS. Hearing thresholds were measured by pure tone audiometry in two consecutive examinations (n = 226). STS was defined as an average change in hearing thresholds ≥ + 10 dB at 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz in either ear. Determinants of STS were assessed through a questionnaire. The incidence of STS was 23.0%. Significant determinants of STS were the number of episodes of temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in the Navy, exposure to continuous loud noise during work on board, and the number of gun shots (in the Navy, hunting, and sports). This study indicated a significant association between noise exposure on board Navy vessels and development of STS. PMID:27157689

  12. Phosphodiesterase 4D gene polymorphisms in sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Chien, Chen-Yu; Tai, Shu-Yu; Wang, Ling-Feng; Hsi, Edward; Chang, Ning-Chia; Wang, Hsun-Mo; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Kuen-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) gene has been reported as a risk gene for ischemic stroke. The vascular factors are between the hypothesized etiologies of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), and this genetic effect might be attributed for its role in SSNHL. We hypothesized that genetic variants of the PDE4D gene are associated with susceptibility to SSNHL. We conducted a case-control study with 362 SSNHL cases and 209 controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected. The genotypes were determined using TaqMan technology. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested for each SNP, and genetic effects were evaluated according to three inheritance modes. We carried out sex-specific analysis to analyze the overall data. All three SNPs were in HWE. When subjects were stratified by sex, the genetic effect was only evident in females but not in males. The TT genotype of rs702553 exhibited an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 3.83 (95 % confidence interval = 1.46-11.18) (p = 0.006) in female SSNHL. The TT genotype of SNP rs702553 was associated with female SSNHL under the recessive model (p = 0.004, OR 3.70). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, TT genotype of rs702553 was significantly associated with female SSNHL (p = 0.0043, OR 3.70). These results suggest that PDE4D gene polymorphisms influence the susceptibility for the development of SSNHL in the southern Taiwanese female population. PMID:26521189

  13. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia.

    Vilhena, Ditza; Pereira, Luís; Duarte, Delfim; Oliveira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a poorly understood complication. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of this complication, although prompt treatment does not guarantee a good outcome. PMID:26904339

  14. Single-sided deafness & directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear

    Martijn Johannes Hermanus Agterberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Direction-specific interactions of sound waves with the head, torso and pinna provide unique spectral-shape cues that are used for the localization of sounds in the vertical plane, whereas horizontal sound localization is based primarily on the processing of binaural acoustic differences in arrival time (interaural time differences, or ITDs and sound level (interaural level differences, or ILDs. Because the binaural sound-localization cues are absent in listeners with total single-sided deafness (SSD, their ability to localize sound is heavily impaired. However, some studies have reported that SSD listeners are able, to some extent, to localize sound sources in azimuth, although the underlying mechanisms used for localization are unclear. To investigate whether SSD listeners rely on monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues of their hearing ear for directional hearing, we investigated localization performance for low-pass filtered (LP, 3 kHz and broadband (BB, 0.5 – 20 kHz noises in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We tested whether localization performance of SSD listeners further deteriorated when the pinna cavities of their hearing ear were filled with a mold that disrupted their spectral-shape cues. To remove the potential use of perceived sound level as an invalid azimuth cue, we randomly varied stimulus presentation levels over a broad range (45-65 dB SPL. Several listeners with SSD could localize HP and BB sound sources in the horizontal plane, but inter-subject variability was considerable. Localization performance of these listeners strongly reduced after diminishing of their spectral pinna-cues. We further show that inter-subject variability of SSD can be explained to a large extent by the severity of high-frequency hearing loss in their hearing ear.

  15. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Seyed-Taghi Heydari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran. Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg and audiometric variables was recorded. Findings:Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5% had normal hearing and 10 (3.5% sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion. Conclusion:We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity.

  16. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Faramarzi, Abolhassan; Karimi, Mehran; Heydari, Seyed-Taghi; Shishegar, Mahmoud; Kaviani, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Objective The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran. Methods A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006–2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO) dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg) and audiometric variables was recorded. Findings Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5%) had normal hearing and 10 (3.5%) sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion. Conclusion We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity. PMID:23056722

  17. Postural control in children with typical development and children with profound hearing loss

    Monteiro de Sousa AM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aneliza Maria Monteiro de Sousa,1 Jônatas de França Barros,2 Brígido Martins de Sousa Neto31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil; 2Department of Physical Education at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 3University Center UNIEURO, Brasilia, Federal District, BrazilPurpose: To describe the behavior of the postural control in children with profound sensorineural hearing loss and compare the results of experimental tests with hearing children aged 7 to 10 years.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional study where 100 children were divided into experimental and control groups. We used a force platform, AccuSway Plus, where the tests were conducted under the experimental conditions: open base, eyes open (OBEO; open base, eyes closed (OBEC; closed base, eyes open (CBEO; closed base, eyes closed (CBEC. The body sway velocity (V of the center of pressure, the displacement in the anteroposterior direction (COPap and mediolateral (COPml of the center of pressure were the parameters to evaluate the postural control. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test, with a significance level of 5%.Results: In comparisons of variables between the groups, the experimental group outperformed by at least 75% of the control group values. In terms of global trends, the experimental group shows higher values of body oscillations in all experimental conditions and variables evaluated. Children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing. The inferential analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the balance between deaf and hearing children in the OBEC experimental condition in relation to the COPml parameter (P = 0.04. There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons between the sexes when the groups were analyzed separately. The prevalence of unknown etiology

  18. A pilot study of telepractice delivery for teaching listening and spoken language to children with hearing loss.

    Constantinescu, Gabriella; Waite, Monique; Dornan, Dimity; Rushbrooke, Emma; Brown, Jackie; McGovern, Jane; Ryan, Michelle; Hill, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Telemedicine ("telepractice") allows improved access to specialised early intervention services such as Auditory-Verbal Therapy (AVT) for children with hearing loss. We investigated the effectiveness of a tele-AVT programme (eAVT) in the spoken language development of a group of young children with hearing loss. In a retrospective study we compared the language outcomes of children with bilateral hearing loss receiving eAVT with a control group who received therapy In Person. Seven children in each group (mean age 2.4 years) were matched on pre-amplification hearing level for the better hearing ear, age at optimal amplification and enrolment in the AVT programme. The eAVT sessions were conducted via Skype. Results on the Preschool Language Scale-4 were compared at 2 years post optimal amplification. There were no significant differences in language scores between the two groups. Language scores for the children in the eAVT group were within the normal range for children with normal hearing. The results suggest that early intervention AVT via telepractice may be as effective as delivery In Person for children with hearing loss. PMID:24643949

  19. PERIPHERAL HEARING LOSS CAUSES HYPEREXCITABILITY OF THE INFERIOR COLLICULUS

    Sun Wei

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence has been found to suggest that early development of the central auditory system is dependent on acoustic stimuli. Peripheral damage caused by noise exposure and ototoxic drugs can induce functional and anatomical changes along the auditory pathways. The inferior colliculus (IC) is a unique structure in the auditory system located between the primary auditory nuclei of the brainstem and the thala-mus. Damage to the IC inhibitory circuitry may affect central auditory processing and sound perception. Here, we review some of the striking electrophysiological changes in the IC that occur after noise exposure and ototoxic drug treatment. A common occurrence that emerges in the IC after peripheral damage is hyper-excitability of sound-evoked response. The hyperexcitability of the IC is likely related with reduced inhibi-tory response that requires normal peripheral inputs. Early age hearing loss can result in a long lasting in-creased susceptibility to audiogenic seizure which is related to hyperactivity in the IC evoked by loud sounds. Our studies suggest that hearing loss can cause increased IC neuron responsiveness which may be related to tinnitus, hyperacusis, and audiogenic seizure.

  20. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Amir Hossain Ghazizadeh; Mehdi Bakhshaee; Ebrahim Mahdavi; Rahman Movahhed

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: It has been shown that low levels of pigmentation increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in humans. For this reason, white populations develop more pronounced noise- induced hearing loss in comparison to black populations. Similarly, blue-eyed individuals exhibit greater temporary threshold shift than brown-eyed subjects; still, no strong correlation has been verified between the lightness of hair color and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. This st...

  1. Two siblings with progressive, fluctuating hearing loss after head trauma, treated with cochlear implantation.

    Wolf, M.J.F. de; Honings, J.; Joosten, F. B. M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Description of two siblings with unexplained, progressive, perceptive hearing loss after head trauma. DESIGN: Case report. SUBJECTS: Two siblings aged six and eight years old with bilateral, intermittent but progressive hearing loss. RESULTS: These patients had a c.1172G>A (p.Ser391Asn) mutation in the SLC26A4 gene, which has not previously been reported and which caused Pendred or enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome. The diagnosis was based on the perceptive hearing loss, com...

  2. Classifying Human Audiometric Phenotypes of Age-Related Hearing Loss from Animal Models

    Dubno, Judy R.; Eckert, Mark A.; Lee, Fu-Shing; Matthews, Lois J.; Schmiedt, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbyacusis) has a complex etiology. Results from animal models detailing the effects of specific cochlear injuries on audiometric profiles may be used to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss in older humans and predict cochlear pathologies associated with certain audiometric configurations (“audiometric phenotypes”). Patterns of hearing loss associated with cochlear pathology in animal models were used to define schematic boundaries of human audiograms...

  3. Conductive and Mixed Hearing Losses: A Comparison between Summer and Autumn

    Nickbakht, Mansoureh; Borzoo, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Conductive hearing loss is common among children and adults. This study aims at comparing the results of conductive hearing loss in summer and autumn. Subjects and Methods Puretone audiometry and tympanometry tests were done for all patients who referred to the Iranian-based audiology center of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Ahvaz. Data on the patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss were analyzed. The impacts of season, age, and etiology of the disease were analyze...

  4. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss – A Common Hereditary Deafness

    Wingard, Jeffrey C.; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate th...

  5. High frequency hearing loss in students used to ear phone music: A randomized trial of 1,000 students

    Kiran Naik

    2014-01-01

    impairment in Groups C and D indicating a significant role of prolonged ear phone music as a cause of high frequency hearing loss in students. The thin percentage and absence of hearing loss in Groups B, C, and D suggests the impact of the duration of exposure also has a role in the pathology. Conclusion: This study proves beyond doubt that the prolonged usage of loud ear phone music is harmful to the ears and a simple way of pass time by hearing to ear phone music might cause hearing loss.

  6. Congenital stapes malformation: Rare conductive hearing loss in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Eliason, Michael; Conley, George S

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a known autosomal dominant cause of congenital hearing loss. It is characterized by a distinctive phenotypic appearance and often involves sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone abnormalities and inner ear dysmorphisms have been described in association with the disease. However, middle ear abnormalities as causes of conductive hearing loss are not typically seen in Waardenburg syndrome. We discuss a case of an 8-year-old female who meets diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome type 3 and who presented with a bilateral conductive hearing loss associated with congenital stapes fixation. We discuss management strategy in this previously unreported phenotype. PMID:26152551

  7. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Hong-Bo Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  8. The importance of MRI examination for sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is commonly knwon as inner ear disease, although little is known about its cause in most cases. We evaluated 383 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 8.1% of the patients, MRI examination revealed some abnormal findings that may be associated with sudden sensorineural hearing loss: acoustic tumor was noted in 1%, abnormality of the vertebral-basilar artery in 1%, and infarction around the brainstem in 0.8%. In these cases, using MRI at an early stage of examination, we can establish the correct diagnosis of and treatment for hearing loss. (author)

  9. The Nature of Victimization among Youths with Hearing Loss in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Titus, Janet C.

    2010-01-01

    The author profiles the prevalence, severity, and characteristics of victimization among a group of youths with hearing loss presenting to substance abuse treatment. Intake data on 111 deaf and hard of hearing youths (42% female) were analyzed and compared with data from a weighted, gender-matched sample of hearing youths. After gender is…

  10. Assessing Speech Intelligibility in Children with Hearing Loss: Toward Revitalizing a Valuable Clinical Tool

    Ertmer, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Newborn hearing screening, early intervention programs, and advancements in cochlear implant and hearing aid technology have greatly increased opportunities for children with hearing loss to become intelligible talkers. Optimizing speech intelligibility requires that progress be monitored closely. Although direct assessment of…

  11. Outcomes of 3-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss and Different Types of Additional Disabilities

    Cupples, Linda; Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Crowe, Kathryn; Seeto, Mark; Leigh, Greg; Street, Laura; Day, Julia; Marnane, Vivienne; Thomson, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated the speech, language, and functional auditory outcomes of 119 3-year-old children with hearing loss and additional disabilities. Outcomes were evaluated using direct assessment and caregiver report. Multiple regressions revealed that type of additional disability and level of maternal education were significant predictors of language outcomes. Poorer outcomes were achieved in a combined group of children with autism, cerebral palsy, and/or developmental delay (DD) (...

  12. Effects of auditory training in individuals with high-frequency hearing loss

    Renata Beatriz Fernandes Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a formal auditory training program on the behavioral, electrophysiological and subjective aspects of auditory function in individuals with bilateral high-frequency hearing loss. METHOD: A prospective study of seven individuals aged 46 to 57 years with symmetric, moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging from 3 to 8 kHz was conducted. Evaluations of auditory processing (sound location, verbal and non-verbal sequential memory tests, the speech-in-noise test, the staggered spondaic word test, synthetic sentence identification with competitive ipsilateral and contralateral competitive messages, random gap detection and the standard duration test, auditory brainstem response and long-latency potentials and the administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaire were performed in a sound booth before and immediately after formal auditory training. RESULTS: All of the participants demonstrated abnormal pre-training long-latency characteristics (abnormal latency or absence of the P3 component and these abnormal characteristics were maintained in six of the seven individuals at the post-training evaluation. No significant differences were found between ears in the quantitative analysis of auditory brainstem responses or long-latency potentials. However, the subjects demonstrated improvements on all behavioral tests. For the questionnaire, the difference on the background noise subscale achieved statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Auditory training in adults with high-frequency hearing loss led to improvements in figure-background hearing skills for verbal sounds, temporal ordination and resolution, and communication in noisy environments. Electrophysiological changes were also observed because, after the training, some long latency components that were absent pre-training were observed during the re-evaluation.

  13. Sensori-neural hearing loss in patients treated with irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    The present investigation has been carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the inner ear to irradiation. Cochlear function was tested in a cohort of 22 patients before and 7-84 months after receiving external irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The pre-irradiation sensori-neural hearing threshold at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz was used as a baseline for the individual patient, and the observed sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) was calculated as the difference between pre- and post-irradiation values. The pre-irradiation hearing level or patient age was not correlated with the actual SNHL. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between the total radiation dose to the inner ear and the observed hearing impairment. SNHL was most pronounced in the high frequencies, with values up to 35 dB (4000 Hz) and 25 dB (2000 Hz) in some patients. The latent period for the complication appeared to be 12 months or more. The deleterious effect of irradiation on the hearing should be kept in mind both in treatment planning and in the follow-up after radiotherapy

  14. Effects of hearing loss on the subcortical representation of speech cues.

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Drehobl, Sarah; Kraus, Nina

    2013-05-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss often report frustration with speech being loud but not clear, especially in background noise. Despite advanced digital technology, hearing aid users may resort to removing their hearing aids in noisy environments due to the perception of excessive loudness. In an animal model, sensorineural hearing loss results in greater auditory nerve coding of the stimulus envelope, leading to a relative deficit of stimulus fine structure. Based on the hypothesis that brainstem encoding of the temporal envelope is greater in humans with sensorineural hearing loss, speech-evoked brainstem responses were recorded in normal hearing and hearing impaired age-matched groups of older adults. In the hearing impaired group, there was a disruption in the balance of envelope-to-fine structure representation compared to that of the normal hearing group. This imbalance may underlie the difficulty experienced by individuals with sensorineural hearing loss when trying to understand speech in background noise. This finding advances the understanding of the effects of sensorineural hearing loss on central auditory processing of speech in humans. Moreover, this finding has clinical potential for developing new amplification or implantation technologies, and in developing new training regimens to address this relative deficit of fine structure representation. PMID:23654406

  15. Risk Factors for Hearing Loss in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment of head-and-neck carcinoma. The objective of this study was to perform a prospective multivariate assessment of the dose-effect relationship between intensity-modulated RT and hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Pure tone audiometry at 0.250-16 kHz was obtained before and after treatment in 101 patients (202 ears). All patients received full-course intensity-modulated RT (range, 56-70 Gy), with a median cochlear dose of 11.4 Gy (range, 0.2-69.7). Results: Audiometry was performed 1 week before and a median of 9 weeks (range, 1-112) after treatment. The mean hearing deterioration at pure tone average air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz was small (from 28.6 dB HL to 30.1 dB HL). However, individual patients showed clinically significant hearing loss, with 10-dB threshold shift incidences of 13% and 18% at pure tone averages air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz and 8-10-12.5 kHz, respectively. Post-treatment hearing capability was unfavorable in the case of greater inner ear radiation doses (p <0.0001), unfavorable baseline hearing capability (p <0.0001), green-eyed patients (p <0.0001), and older age (p <0.0001). Using multivariate analysis, a prediction of individual hearing capabiltity after treatment was made. Conclusion: RT-induced hearing loss in the mean population is modest. However, clinically significant hearing loss was observed in older patients with green eyes and unfavorable pretreatment hearing. In these patients, the intended radiation dose may be adjusted according to the proposed predictive model, aiming to decrease the risk of ototoxicity.

  16. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hear......To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea...

  17. An epidemiological study on hearing loss and its demographic characteristics within Garhwal region of Uttarakhand

    Ravindra Singh Bisht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing impaired cases attending ear, nose, and throat (ENT OPD were assessed for hearing loss and associated factors of Garhwal region of Uttarakhand. There has not been any such study yet in this region. Objective: Epidemiological study to investigate the hearing loss and its associated diseases in general population Garhwal region of Uttarakhand reporting in ENT OPD. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried out on OPD basis and a total of 300 patients were included in the study. The study included all the patients attending ENT OPD with a complaint of hearing loss. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Patients who were unable to respond to pure tone audiometry (PTA test. Assessment of hearing loss was done by PTA, which was done by a certified audiologist of the department. Results: Predominantly, patients were male of the late 50s. Moderate-severe sensory neural hearing loss was the most common type of hearing loss and intact tympanic membrane being most common otoscopic finding. The most common cause of hearing loss in this study group was presbycusis. Conclusion: Presbycusis is most common presentation of hearing loss in Garhwal region of Uttarakhand.

  18. Genetic mutation susceptibility of hearing loss in child with severe neonatal jaundice

    This case report demonstrates a case of 5-year-old non-syndromic Malay boy who passed the hearing screening test however he was confirmed has bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed at 3 months of age by brain stem evoked response (BSER). He has background history of severe neonatal jaundice and male siblings of hearing impairment. The antenatal and birth history was uneventful apart from maternal hypothyroidism. His other two elder brothers have bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and history of severe neonatal jaundice as well. The ear examinations, computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed normal findings. Right sided cochlear implantation was done at the age of 3 years old and he is still under audiology follow-up. Conclusion: Genetic studies are important to determine the cause of genetic mutation in susceptibility to hearing impairment that run in his family after severe neonatal jaundice. Those baby with risk of developing hearing loss required diagnostic hearing assessment. (author)

  19. The Effect of Celecoxib, a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor on Noise- Induced Hearing Loss

    Akram Pourbakht

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is the major cause of acquired hearing loss.  Celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, is a non- steroidal anti- inflammatory drug (NSAID with known antioxidant and antineoplastic activity. Therefore, we monitored the extent of temporary noise- induced threshold shifts (TTS and cochlear damage caused by high level 4- kHz noise exposure to verify the differences with those pretreated with celecoxib. Materials and Methods: Ten male albino guinea pigs (300-350 g in weight were randomly allocated into two groups: the primal group was exposed to 4- kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL for 3 hrs (group 1, n=5;  the latter pretreated with 50 mg/ kg celecoxib for 3 days, then  exposed to noise (group 2, n=5.  Before exposure and one hr after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated with auditory brainstem responses (ABR and finally the animals were euthanized for histological evaluation.  Results: Comparing the threshold shifts before/after noise exposure with those pretreated, we found out that TTS caused by noise exposure did not show significant mitigation by celecoxib.  By observing the organ of Corti at lower middle turn of cochlea in celecoxib pretreated group, considerable hair cell loss was discovered. Conclusion:The current study clearly confirmed that celecoxib had no attenuation against temporary noise-induced hearing loss.

  20. Investigation of the long-term effects of unilateral hearing loss in adults.

    Colletti, V; Fiorino, F G; Carner, M; Rizzi, R

    1988-05-01

    The recent audiological literature has put forward the hypothesis that children with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) show delays in educational achievement and academic progress and some behavioural difficulties. This motivated us to investigate the long-term effects of monaural auditory deprivation in a group of adults who had suffered from UHL since childhood. A group of subjects, ranging in age from 30 to 55 years, suffering from sensorineural UHL since early childhood, has been examined for psychosocial and psychoacoustical effects and statistically compared with a control group matched for age and sex. We prepared a questionnaire directed to provide some objective and subjective indices of psychosocial disability and handicap. Some questions were directed towards specific aspects of auditory function; others assessed the degree of education and the type of working performed. The results of the investigation confirmed the superiority of binaural v. monaural hearing. This was clearly demonstrated in psycho-acoustical performance in sound localisation, speech recognition in noise, together with the appreciation of music. On the other hand, the parameters concerned with educational, social and employment achievement did not support the existence of any significant difference between binaurally and monaurally hearing subjects. The data obtained in the present study thus do not support the existence of non-auditory, long-term effects of monaural hearing loss. PMID:3390628

  1. [The prevalence of hearing impairment in transport workers and peculiarities of management of occupational loss of hearing (as exemplified by the situation in the air and railway transport)].

    Pankova, V B; Skryabina, L Yu; Kas'kov, Yu N

    2016-01-01

    This article presents data on the prevalence of hearing impairment among the workers engaged in the main means of transportation(air and railway transport). They show that the relative frequency of occupational loss of hearing in the cockpit members of commercial aviation amounts to one third of all cases of analogous diseases in this country. The main professional groups of transport works suffering from hearing impairment are constituted by the representatives of the so-called elite specialities, such as flying crew personnel, locomotive engineers, and their assistants. This fact constitutes an important aspect (not only of medical but also of socio-economic significance) of the problem under consideration. The high prevalence of professional hearing impairment among the transport workers is attributable to the high noise level in the cabins of locomotives and aircraft cockpits as well as to the inadequate expert and diagnostic work or imperfection of the regulatory documentation. PMID:26977561

  2. Long-term treatment with aldosterone slows the progression of age-related hearing loss.

    Halonen, Joshua; Hinton, Ashley S; Frisina, Robert D; Ding, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P

    2016-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), clinically referred to as presbycusis, is one of the three most prevalent chronic medical conditions of our elderly, with the majority of persons over the age of 60 suffering from some degree of ARHL. The progressive loss of auditory sensitivity and perceptual capability results in significant declines in workplace productivity, quality of life, cognition and abilities to communicate effectively. Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone produced in the adrenal glands and plays a role in the maintenance of key ion pumps, including the Na-K(+)-Cl co-transporter 1 or NKCC1, which is involved in homeostatic maintenance of the endocochlear potential. Previously we reported that aldosterone (1 μM) increases NKCC1 protein expression in vitro and that this up-regulation of NKCC1 was not dose-dependent (dosing range from 1 nM to 100 μM). In the current study we measured behavioral and electrophysiological hearing function in middle-aged mice following long-term systemic treatment with aldosterone. We also confirmed that blood pressure remained stable during treatment and that NKCC1 protein expression was upregulated. Pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response was used as a functional measure of hearing, and the auditory brainstem response was used as an objective measure of peripheral sensitivity. Long-term treatment with aldosterone improved both behavioral and physiological measures of hearing (ABR thresholds). These results are the first to demonstrate a protective effect of aldosterone on age-related hearing loss and pave the way for translational drug development, using aldosterone as a key component to prevent or slow down the progression of ARHL. PMID:27157488

  3. THE INCIDENCE OF HEARING LOSS IN DOWN’S SYNDROME: A CLINICOAUDIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Satish S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT : Ear, nose, and throat (ENT problems are common in individuals with Down syndrome. High prevalence of ENT disease in Down syndrome is observed due to structural and functional abnormalities of ear, nose and throat and immune system of which hearing loss is one Hearing loss early in l ife leads to language disabilities. Appropriate screening would allow hearing losses to be detected early so that early treatment can be initiated. AIM : To assess type and degree of hearing loss in cases of Down syndrome. SETTING AND DESIGN : Cros s sectional study at tertiary referral centre. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Children clinically diagnosed as Down Syndrome (DS aged between 3 to 20 years were evaluated. A detailed history, clinical examinations and hearing assessments such as audiogram, tympanom etry and brainstem evoke response audiometry (BERA were used to evaluate these patients. RESULTS : A total of 60 patients (120 ears were enrolled for this study. This study showed that the commonest type of hearing loss were conductive in 68 ears (56.7%, mixed in 4 ears (3.3%. The other 48ears (40% had normal hearing. Most of them fall in the mild level of conductive hearing loss. CONCLUSION : Conductive hearing loss is a common feature (56.7%of ears in DS children.

  4. Guest Editorial: Computer-based hearing loss prevention education program for Veterans and military personnel

    Robert L. Folmer, PhD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the Veterans Benefits Administration, more than 672,000 Veterans were service-connected for hearing loss and more than 744,000 Veterans were service-connected for tinnitus as of fiscal year 2010 [1]. Hearing loss and tinnitus are the most prevalent disabilities experienced by Veterans who served during peacetime, Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom, World War II, and the Korean war. In fiscal year 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA provided 561,212 hearing aids at an estimated cost of $196.7 million and audiological services to Veterans at a cost of $227.4 million.1 Therefore, hearing loss and tinnitus prevention should be a priority for the VA. At least one type of hearing loss—noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL—can be prevented if appropriate protective strategies are implemented.

  5. Strategies for developing novel therapeutics for sensorineural hearing loss

    Takayuki eNakagawa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a common disability in the world; however, at present, options for the pharmacological treatment of SNHL are very limited. Previous studies involving human temporal bone analyses have revealed that the degeneration of the cochlea is a common mechanism of SNHL. A major problem for the development of novel pharmacotherapy for SNHL has been the limited regeneration capacity in mammalian cochlear cells. However, recent progress in basic studies has led to several effective strategies for the induction of regeneration in the mammalian cochlea, in accordance with the stage of degeneration. In addition, recent advances in the identification of human deafness genes and their characterization in mouse models have elucidated cellular and/or molecular mechanisms of SNHL, which will contribute to clarify molecular targets of pharmacotherapy for treatment of SNHL.

  6. Coronary artery bypass grafting and sensorineural hearing loss, a cohort study

    Ashraf Omer

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is routinely encountered by the otologist. The etiology is varied and often identifiable. One of the relatively less frequent causes is surgery. Apart from being an established entity with otological surgeries, sensorineural hearing loss has also been known to occur after non-otological procedures under general anesthesia. Commonest amongst these procedures is cardiopulmonary bypass, an association that has long been recognized. However, despite the proposition of diverse hypotheses in the past, the pathophysiology remains unclear. Methods The study is a prospective matched cohort study that will be carried out in Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Participants among exposed would include all those patients who would be undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery in the hospital who fall under the criteria for inclusion. Unexposed group would comprise of patients undergoing a non-bypass procedure of similar duration under the same type of anesthesia who meet the selection criteria. Both these groups will undergo audiometric testing at our hospital on three different occasions during the course of this study. Initially before the procedure to test the baseline hearing capacity; then one week after the procedure to assess any changes in hearing ability following the surgery; and finally a third audiogram at six weeks follow-up to assess further changes in any hearing deficits noted during the second phase of testing. Certain variables including the subjects' demographics and those concerning the procedure itself will be noted and used later for risk factors analysis. A detailed past medical and surgical history will also be obtained. Data analysis would include calculation of relative risk and significance of the results, by running the chi-square test. Other statistical tests like Fisher exact test may then be employed to facilitate data interpretation. Continuous scale may then be

  7. The Cultural and Linguistic Diversity of 3-Year-Old Children with Hearing Loss

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y.C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their caregivers when children were 3 years old. The data were from the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study, a prospectiv...

  8. Hearing Loss as a Function of Aging and Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

    Oh, In-Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Park, Dong Choon; Kim, MyungGu; Chung, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2014-01-01

    Background Although hearing loss may be caused by various factors, it is also a natural phenomenon associated with the aging process. This study was designed to assess the contributions of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension, both chronic diseases associated with aging, as well as aging itself, to hearing loss in health screening examinees. Methods This study included 37,773 individuals who underwent health screening examinations from 2009 to 2012. The relationships between hearing thresh...

  9. Altered Contralateral Auditory Cortical Morphology in Unilateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Fan, Wenliang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xueyan; Mella, Grace; LEI Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong; Xu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral gray matter volume alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period by the voxel-based morphometry method, and to determine if hearing impairment is associated with regional gray matter alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Study Design: Prospective case study. Setting: Tertiary class A teaching hospital. Patients: Thirty-nine patients with left-side unilateral sudden sensorineur...

  10. HEARING LOSS IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE - AN ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS

    Suja Sreedharan; Vishnu Prasad; Jayashree Bhatt; Mahesh Chandra Hegde; Salil Agarwal; Cherukattil Waheeda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic renal failure is believed to be of multifactorial etiology. Associated hypertension and diabetes mellitus, use of ototoxic drugs, hemodialysis and the changes in metabolic parameters are the various reasons quoted for the hearing loss. Objectives: Our study attempts to correlate the hearing thresholds with the multiple parameters like blood levels of urea, serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium and hemoglobin values incriminated in...

  11. Auditory cortical responses evoked by pure tones in healthy and sensorineural hearing loss subjects: functional MRI and magnetoencephalography

    ZHANG Yun-ting; GENG Zuo-jun; ZHANG Quan; LI Wei; ZHANG Jing

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography are new techniques of brain functional imaging which can provide the information of excitation of neurons by measure the changes of hemodynamics and electrophysiological data of local brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to study functional brain areas evoked by pure tones in healthy and sensorineural hearing loss subjects with these techniques and to compare the differences between the two groups.Methods Thirty healthy and 30 sensorineural hearing loss subjects were included in this study. In fMRI,block-design paradigm was used. During the active epoch the participants listened to 1000 Hz, sound pressure level 140 dB pure tones at duration 500 ms, interstimulus interval 1000 ms, which presented continuously via a magnetic resonance-compatible audio system. None stimulus was executed in control epoch. In magnetoencephalography study, every subject received stimuli of 1000 Hz tone bursts delivered to the bilateral ear at duration 8 ms, interstimulus intervals 1000 ms. Sound pressure level in healthy subjects was 30 dB; in sensorineural hearing loss subjects was 20 dB above everyone' s hearing threshold respectively. All subjects were examined with 306-channel whole-scalp neuromagnetometer.Results In fMRI, all subjects showed significant activations in bilateral Heschl's gyri, anterior pole of planum temporale, planum temporale, precentral gyri, postcentral gyri, supramarginal gyri, superior temporal gyri,inferior frontal gyri, occipital lobes and cerebellums. The healthy subjects had more intensive activation in bilateral Heschl's gyri, anterior pole of planum temporale, inferior frontal gyri, left superior temporal gyri and fight planum temporale than the hearing loss subjects. But in precentral gyri, postcentral gyri and occipital lobes,the activation is more intensive in the hearing loss subjects. In magnetoencephalography study, both in the

  12. Weighting of Acoustic Cues to a Manner Distinction by Children with and without Hearing Loss

    Nittrouer, Susan; Lowenstein, Joanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Children must develop optimal perceptual weighting strategies for processing speech in their first language. Hearing loss can interfere with that development, especially if cochlear implants are required. The three goals of this study were to measure, for children with and without hearing loss: (a) cue weighting for a manner distinction,…

  13. Age-related hearing loss in dogs and treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implant

    Haar, Gert ter

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common disorder in many breeds of dogs and auditory dysfunction and its clinical consequences can vary from mild to severe. Dogs with bilateral hearing loss are unable to anticipate dangers such as motor vehicles and they may consequently fall victim to serious or fatal injury. It

  14. Two siblings with progressive, fluctuating hearing loss after head trauma, treated with cochlear implantation.

    Wolf, M.J.F. de; Honings, J.; Joosten, F.B.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Description of two siblings with unexplained, progressive, perceptive hearing loss after head trauma. DESIGN: Case report. SUBJECTS: Two siblings aged six and eight years old with bilateral, intermittent but progressive hearing loss. RESULTS: These patients had a c.1172G>A (p.Ser391Asn

  15. 1 in 8 U.S. Workers Has Some Hearing Loss: CDC

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158434.html 1 in 8 U.S. Workers Has Some Hearing Loss: CDC Survey finds ... 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 13 percent of U.S. workers suffer from at least some hearing loss, ...

  16. The Cultural and Linguistic Diversity of 3-Year-Old Children with Hearing Loss

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y. C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their…

  17. Identifying Minimal Hearing Loss and Managing Its Effects on Literacy Learning

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Hendricks, Alison Eisel

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that students who have moderate to profound hearing loss may experience difficulty in learning how to read and write and can benefit from modifications to the classroom environment and curriculum, however, minimal hearing loss often goes undiagnosed, and its negative impact on literacy acquisition is less widely known.…

  18. Thyroid carcinoma, cataract and hearing loss in a patient after irradiation for facial hemangioma

    A rare case of a patient irradiated on the right side of the face for a large hemangioma during early childhood is reported. This patient suffers from sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and a cataract of the right eye, and she underwent surgery for Hurtle cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland. The literature discussing radiation-induced hearing loss is reviewed. (author)

  19. Using Repeated Reading and Explicit Instruction to Teach Vocabulary to Preschoolers with Hearing Loss

    Bobzien, Jonna L.; Richels, Corrin; Schwartz, Kathryn; Raver, Sharon A.; Hester, Peggy; Morin, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss often experience communication and language delays that result in difficulties acquiring novel vocabulary and literacy skills. This research examined the effectiveness of using repeated storybook reading paired with explicit teacher instruction to teach novel vocabulary to young children with hearing loss who were…

  20. Hearing loss among among classical musicians needs, means and attitudes

    Koskinen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Noise is usually defined either unwanted sound or sound that is harmful to the hearing. Earlier studies have shown that musicians are exposed to sound levels that can be harmful to hearing, and thus music can be considered as noise. Studies have also shown that musicians have hearing problems due to prolonged music exposure. This is also the case among classical musicians. According to the new noise directive, hearing conservation programs directed to entertainment sector are needed. However ...

  1. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. PMID:27242405

  2. Hearing loss in children with very low birth weight: current review of epidemiology and pathophysiology.

    Cristobal, R; Oghalai, J S

    2008-11-01

    An association between birth weight weight (VLBW)) and hearing loss has been long recognised. As universal hearing screening programmes have become widely implemented and the survival rate of VLBW babies in modern intensive care units has increased, we have gained a substantially better understanding of the nature of this problem. However, many gaps in our knowledge base exist. This review describes recent data on hearing loss in the VLBW population and explains the current level of understanding about the physiological basis underlying the auditory deficits in these patients. Although VLBW alone may not have a severe impact on hearing, it is commonly associated with multiple other risk factors that can alter hearing in a synergistic fashion. Therefore, the risk of hearing loss is substantially higher than in the general newborn population. Also, it is important to perform a more comprehensive audiometric evaluation than standard otoacoustic emission screening for infants who are in the neonatal intensive care unit in order not to miss hearing loss due to retrocochlear pathology. Furthermore, children with VLBW are also at increased risk of experiencing progressive or delayed-onset hearing loss, and thus should continue to have serial hearing evaluations after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:18941031

  3. Sepsis otopathy: experimental sepsis leads to significant hearing impairment due to apoptosis and glutamate excitotoxicity in murine cochlea

    Joachim Schmutzhard

    2013-05-01

    Hearing loss is frequent in intensive care patients and can be due to several causes. However, sepsis has not been examined as a possible cause. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of experimental sepsis on hearing thresholds and to evaluate pathological changes in the cochlea. The cecal ligation puncture technique was used to induce sepsis in 18 mice. Results were compared with those from 13 sham-operated and 13 untreated control mice. The hearing thresholds of the animals were evaluated with auditory evoked brainstem responses prior to the induction of sepsis and again at the peak of the disease. Immediately after the second measurement, the mice were sacrificed and the inner ears harvested and prepared for further evaluation. The cochleae were examined with light microscopy, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry for Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2. The mice with sepsis showed a significant hearing loss but not the control groups. Induction of apoptosis could be shown in the supporting cells of the organ of Corti. Furthermore, excitotoxicity could be shown at the basal pole of the inner hair cells. In this murine model, sepsis leads to significant hearing impairment. The physiological alteration could be linked to apoptosis in the supporting cells of the organ of Corti and to a disturbance of the synapses of the inner hair cells.

  4. Relationship between the external aperture and hearing loss in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome

    2006-01-01

    Backgroud Large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) is a major cause of hearing loss in childhood. This study aimed at measuring external aperture of enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA) and analyzing relationship between the size of external aperture and hearing loss.Methods Diagnostic criteria of LVAS were based on hearing loss and CT images. CT images of temporal bone of 100 LVAS patients were collected and 60 control subjects were reviewed retrospectively in the past 10 years. A battery of audiometric and vestibular function tests were performed. The width of the vestibular aqueduct (VA) was measured on axial CT images of the temporal bone.Results One hundred patients (65 men, 35 women) were diagnosed as having the isolated EVA. Hearing loss mostly occurred in early childhood. The diagnosis age of LVAS was 7.7 years on average. The causes of hearing loss could not be confirmed by initial consult. Typically, audiometric curve is the high-frequency down-sloping configuration. 92% of the cases had severe or profound sonsorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The mean size of the external aperture was (7.5±1.2) mm in present LVAS. Statistical analysis showed that the degree of hearing loss is unrelated to the width of VA. Conclusions LVAS is a distinct clinical entity characterized by fluctuating, progressive SNHL. The degree of hearing loss is unrelated to the size of external aperture of VA. The protective management and hearing aid have become the main therapies. The cochlear implantation might be performed if the hearing loss affected learning at school.

  5. Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Clinical Populations with Hearing Loss

    Anu Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review evidence for cross-modal cortical re-organization in clinical populations with hearing loss. Cross-modal plasticity refers to the ability for an intact sensory modality (e.g., vision or somatosensation to recruit cortical brain regions from a deprived sensory modality (e.g., audition to carry out sensory processing. We describe evidence for cross-modal changes in hearing loss across the age-spectrum and across different degrees of hearing impairment, including children with profound, bilateral deafness with cochlear implants, single-sided deafness before and after cochlear implantation, and adults with early-stage, mild-moderate, age-related hearing loss. Understanding cross-modal plasticity in the context of auditory deprivation, and the potential for reversal of these changes following intervention, may be vital in directing intervention and rehabilitation options for clinical populations with hearing loss.

  6. Transducer Type and Design Influence on the Hearing Loss Compensation Behaviour of the Electromagnetic Middle Ear Implant in a Finite Element Analysis

    Liu, Houguang; Ge, Shirong; Cheng, Gang; Yang, Jianhua; Rao, Zhushi; Huang, Xinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Several types of electromagnetic transducer for the middle ear implants (MEIs) have been developed as an alternative to conventional hearing aids for the rehabilitation of sensorineural hearing loss. Electromagnetic transducer type and design are thought to have a significant influence on their hearing compensation performance. To investigate these effects, a middle ear computational model was constructed based on a complete set of microcomputerized tomography section images of a human ear. I...

  7. The tonotopicity of styrene-induced hearing loss depends on the associated noise spectrum.

    Venet, Thomas; Campo, Pierre; Thomas, Aurélie; Cour, Chantal; Rieger, Benoît; Cosnier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The neuropharmacological and cochleotoxic effects of styrene can exacerbate the impact of noise on the peripheral auditory receptor. The mechanisms through which co-exposure to noise and styrene impairs hearing are complex as the slowly developing cochleotoxic process can be masked in the short-term by the rapid pharmacological effect on the central nervous system. The current investigation was therefore designed to delineate the auditory frequency range sensitive to noise, to styrene, and to noise and styrene combined. In case of different frequency ranges targeted by noise and styrene, it would be possible to point out the main factor responsible for cases of deafness by looking at the location of the audiometric deficits. Male Brown-Norway rats were exposed to 600-ppm styrene, to an octave band noise centered at 8 kHz, or to both noise and styrene. The noise exposure was of two different types: impulse noise with a LEX,8h (equivalent continuous noise level averaged over 8 h) of 80 dB and continuous noise with a LEX,8 h of 85 dB SPL. Hearing was tested using a non-invasive technique based on distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Hearing data were completed with histological analysis of cochleae. The results showed that exposure to styrene alone caused outer hair cell losses in the apical cochlear region, which discriminates low frequencies. In contrast, noise-induced hearing loss was located at half an octave above the central frequency of the spectrum, around 10-12 kHz. Damage due to impulse noise was significantly exacerbated by styrene, and the noise spectrum defined the location of the cochlear trauma. Combined exposure caused greater cell losses than the sum of losses measured with the impulse noise and styrene alone. The fact that the tonotopicity of the styrene-induced damage depends on the associated noise spectrum complicates the diagnosis of styrene-related hearing loss with a tone-frequency audiometric approach. In conclusion, there is not really a

  8. Biophysical Mechanisms Underlying Hearing Loss Associated with a Shortened Tectorial Membrane

    Oghalai, John S.; Xia, Anping; Liu, Christopher C.; Gao, Simon S.; Applegate, Brian E.; Puria, Sunil; Rousso, Itay; Steele, Charles

    2011-11-01

    The tectorial membrane (TM) connects to the stereociliary bundles of outer hair cells (OHCs). Herein, we summarize key experimental data and modeling analyses that describe how biophysical alterations to these connections underlie hearing loss. The heterozygous C1509G mutation in alpha tectorin produces partial congenital hearing loss that progresses in humans. We engineered this mutation in mice, and histology revealed that the TM was shortened. DIC imaging of freshly-dissected cochlea as well as imaging with optical coherence tomography indicated that the TM is malformed and only stimulates the first row of OHCs. Noise exposure produced acute threshold shifts that fully recovered in Tecta+/+ mice although there was some OHC loss within all three rows at the cochlear base. In contrast, threshold shifts only partially recovered in TectaC1509G/+ mice. This was associated with OHC loss more apically and nearly entirely within the first row. Young's modulus of the TM, measured using atomic force microscopy, was substantially reduced at the middle and basal regions. Both the wild-type and heterozygous conditions were simulated in a computational model. This demonstrated that the normalized stress distribution levels between the TM and the tall cilia were significantly elevated in the middle region of the heterozygous cochlea. Another feature of the TectaC1509G/+ mutation is higher prestin expression within all three rows of OHCs. This increased electricallyevoked movements of the reticular lamina and otoacoustic emissions. Furthermore, electrical stimulation was associated with an increased risk of OHC death as measured by vital dye staining. Together, these findings indicate that uncoupling of the TM from some OHCs not only leads to partial hearing loss, but also puts the OHCs that remain coupled at higher risk. Both the mechanics of the malformed TM and increased electromotility contribute to this higher risk profile.

  9. Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after ototoxic hearing loss

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; He, Peijie; Jung, Jae Yun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Lee, Min Young; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2013-12-01

    The primary cause of hearing loss includes damage to cochlear hair cells. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has become a popular treatment for damaged nervous systems. Based on the idea that cochlea hair cells and neural cells are from same developmental origin, the effect of LLLT on hearing loss in animal models is evaluated. Hearing loss animal models were established, and the animals were irradiated by 830-nm diode laser once a day for 10 days. Power density of the laser treatment was 900 mW/cm2, and the fluence was 162 to 194 J. The tympanic membrane was evaluated after LLLT. Thresholds of auditory brainstem responses were evaluated before treatment, after gentamicin, and after 10 days of LLLT. Quantitative scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations were done by counting remaining hair cells. Tympanic membranes were intact at the end of the experiment. No adverse tissue reaction was found. On SEM images, LLLT significantly increased the number of hair cells in middle and basal turns. Hearing was significantly improved by laser irradiation. After LLLT treatment, both the hearing threshold and hair-cell count significantly improved.

  10. Developing Sound Skills for Reading: Teaching Phonological Awareness to Preschoolers With Hearing Loss.

    Gilliver, Megan; Cupples, Linda; Ching, Teresa Y C; Leigh, Greg; Gunnourie, Miriam

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of intervention for developing deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) preschoolers' phonological awareness (PA) skills. Thirty children (mean age 57 months) with aided, bilateral hearing loss (and who primarily communicated using spoken English) were recruited in the year prior to commencing formal schooling. The study used an experimental design with participants assigned to one of two intervention conditions-vocabulary instruction, or explicit PA instruction. Both intervention programs were based around items drawn from a common word set and presented over six short weekly sessions by a researcher using a computer tablet. Overall, participants showed greater knowledge of word items used in interventions and improved performance on rhyme-based PA skills following intervention. However, the PA group showed significantly greater improvement than the vocabulary group for both overall PA performance and for consonant-vowel-consonant blending. DHH children's order of PA skill development was also examined, with comparison to that shown for children without hearing loss. The results provide early encouraging evidence about the potential benefit of explicit PA instruction for this population. PMID:26895638

  11. Clinical analysis of post-irradiation sensorineural hearing loss in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of post-irradiation sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to evaluate its potentially contributing factors. Methods: Pure tonetest and impedance audiography were carried out in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a post-irradiation follow-up time over 1 year. Additionally, the test results were combined with clinical data and analyzed retrospectively. Results: The follow-up time of all patients ranged from 12 to 94 months (median 53 months). The incidences of SNHL at low and high frequencies were 8% and 42% respectively. Univariate analysis showed that patient's age and follow-up time affected the incidence of SNHL at high frequencies (t=2.051, P=0.0269; t=2.978, P=0.0011), but sex, preirradiation subjective hearing loss, irradiation dose and chemotherapy including cisplatin had no significance. Multivariate analysis by Binary Logistic Regression revealed that the risk of SNHL was correlated with patient's age and follow-up time (P=0.02; P=0.009). Conclusion: Post-irradiation SNHL at high frequencies in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma is more common than that at low frequencies. The independent prognostic factors for development of SNHL at high frequencies are patient's age and follow-up time. But the role of preirradiation hearing level ,irradiation dose and chemotherapy including cisplatin are not conclusive and further research is needed. (authors)

  12. A stepwise approach to the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary hearing loss.

    Tomaski, S M; Grundfast, K M

    1999-02-01

    What To Do Do suspect a genetic cause in all cases of hearing loss. Do develop a working knowledge of common types of HHI that you may draw on to aid in diagnosis. Do think of HHI when the audiogram reveals a hearing loss with a "cookie bite" configuration. Do refer the infant to a geneticist in cases where you suspect a syndromic HHI, a nonsyndromic HHI, and in cases of "cryptogenic" hearing loss where an underlying HHI may be present. Often, the associated symptoms are subtle and best detected by a professional who deals with these issues on a daily basis. Do get the infant or family plugged into an audiologist or otolaryngologist and speech pathologist who will preferably work as a team to maximize aural rehabilitation and ensure serial follow-up. It is never too early to fit a child with hearing aids. Do refer to the HHIRR center at Boys Town. Do refer to the correct "deaf" organization or "blind-deaf" organization. Do think about working up other siblings or family members. Do keep in mind that some members of the "deaf society" may regard deafness as an alternative lifestyle and may not be amenable to their child's referral for additional workup and aural rehabilitation. What Not To Do Do not assume the child is deaf and nothing can be done. Do not wait until the child is older to refer to an otolaryngologist, speech therapist, and audiologist. Do not order a sonogram. Do not order a temporal bone CT scan on newborns. Do not forget about other siblings who may have a similar pathology. Do not forget that some forms of HHI can present beyond infancy. The pediatrician is the front line and can play a major role in the diagnosis, workup, and treatment of HHI. Armed with the proper degree of suspicion, careful elicitation of family history, meticulous physical examination, evaluation of the audiogram, and adequate fund of knowledge of common types of genetic deafness, the pediatrician can make a timely diagnosis and appropriate referrals. This avoids delay in

  13. Adjusting to Hearing Loss during High School: Preparing Students for Successful Transition to Postsecondary Education or Training. Tipsheet

    Brooks, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Completion of postsecondary education frequently builds upon a student's successful academic and personal experience during high school. For students with hearing loss, healthy adjustment to hearing loss is a key lifelong developmental process. The vast majority (94%) of approximately 1.1 million K-12 students with hearing loss are educated in…

  14. Tracking occupational hearing loss across global industries: A comparative analysis of metrics

    Peter M Rabinowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational hearing loss is one of the most prevalent occupational conditions; yet, there is no acknowledged international metric to allow comparisons of risk between different industries and regions. In order to make recommendations for an international standard of occupational hearing loss, members of an international industry group (the International Aluminium Association submitted details of different hearing loss metrics currently in use by members. We compared the performance of these metrics using an audiometric data set for over 6000 individuals working in 10 locations of one member company. We calculated rates for each metric at each location from 2002 to 2006. For comparison, we calculated the difference of observed-expected (for age binaural high-frequency hearing loss (in dB/year for each location over the same time period. We performed linear regression to determine the correlation between each metric and the observed-expected rate of hearing loss. The different metrics produced discrepant results, with annual rates ranging from 0.0% for a less-sensitive metric to more than 10% for a highly sensitive metric. At least two metrics, a 10dB age-corrected threshold shift from baseline and a 15dB nonage-corrected shift metric, correlated well with the difference of observed-expected high-frequency hearing loss. This study suggests that it is feasible to develop an international standard for tracking occupational hearing loss in industrial working populations.

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as salvage treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a prospective controlled study.

    Pezzoli, M; Magnano, M; Maffi, L; Pezzoli, L; Marcato, P; Orione, M; Cupi, D; Bongioannini, G

    2015-07-01

    The most commonly used treatment for sensorineural sudden hearing loss (SSHL) in clinical practice is the administration of steroids; however, a favorable result is not always obtained. We studied 58 patients who failed to recover after primary treatment with IV steroids, 44 of these met our inclusion criteria (mean age 50.7, 27 males, range 30-74). We treated 23 patients (mean age 47.3, 16 males, age range 22-74) with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) (2.5 ATA for 60 min for 15 treatments), while 21 (mean age 54.5, 11 males, age range 22-71) patients refused to be treated and served as a non-randomized control group. Patients treated with HBO had a mean improvement of 15.6 dB (SD ± 15.3), with 1 of them completely healed, 5 with a good recovery, 10 with a fair recovery and 7 unchanged. Patients who were not treated had a spontaneous mean improvement of 5.0 dB (SD ± 11.4) with 3 patients with a good recovery, 1 patient with a fair recovery and 17 patients unchanged. Mean improvement was significantly better in patients treated with HBO compared to controls (p = 0.0133). Patients with worst hearing had the greater degree of improvement whether or not they were treated in the first 10 days after the onset of the hearing loss or between 11 and 30 days. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy can lead to significant improvement of pure tone hearing thresholds in patients with SSHL who failed primary corticosteroid treatment and are within 4 weeks of the onset of deafness. PMID:25318685

  16. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with unilateral safe chronic suppurative otitis media

    Manpreet Singh Nanda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM is the major cause of hearing impairment, mainly conductive type of hearing loss. The occurrence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in CSOM is controversial and the controversy is more for safe mucosal type. This study aims to assess the association between SNHL and safe mucosal CSOM and its relation to patient's age, sex, duration of disease, active or inactive disease and speech frequencies. Methods: 100 patients with unilateral mucosal type of CSOM with normal contralateral ear were included in the study. The infected ear was taken as study ear and normal ear as control ear in all patients. All patients underwent hearing assessment by pure tone audiometry for both ears. In case of active disease, ear discharge was first cleared and then audiometric assessment done. Results were statistically compared in all patients for both study and control ears using parameters of patient's age, sex, duration of disease, speech frequency and active or inactive disease. Results: There was significant higher number of study ears with CSOM having average bone conduction threshold of all frequencies above 25 decibels which implies SNHL (21% compared to control contralateral ears without infection (5%. There was higher incidence of SNHL at higher speech frequencies. The incidence also increased with age of patient and duration of disease. The incidence was higher in active stage than inactive or quiescent stage. There was no difference among males and females. Conclusion: Safe mucosal CSOM can cause significant SNHL and risk increases with increasing age, duration of disease, higher speech frequencies and presence of active disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 551-555

  17. Predictors of Parental Stress in Mothers of Young Children with Hearing Loss.

    Pipp-Siegel, Sandra; Sedey, Allison L.; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2002-01-01

    A study using three domains of the short form of the Parental Stress Index examined parental stress in 184 hearing mothers of young children with hearing impairments. Mothers demonstrated significantly less parental distress than a normative, hearing group. Predictors of stress included frequency of hassles, social support, annual family income,…

  18. Socioeconomic Position and Health-Seeking Behavior for Hearing Loss Among Older Adults in England.

    Benova, L; Grundy, E.; Ploubidis, GB

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether socioeconomic position (SEP) is associated with progression in the health-seeking process for hearing loss. Method. Logistic regression of data from a cross-sectional survey representative of noninstitutionalized, 50 years and older population of England (ELSA wave 2, 2004). Using self-reported hearing difficulty as starting point, we examined the association between SEP and health-seeking behaviors in 6 stages leading to hearing aid acquisition and use. ...

  19. Prospective study of inner ear radiation dose and hearing loss in head-and-neck cancer patients

    .5-23.0) and 5.4-dB (95% CI, 3.5-7.5) hearing decrement compared with the contralateral ear for 8000 Hz and 1000 Hz, respectively. Age and an initial hearing difference within an ear pair also affected hearing loss. The baseline hearing threshold was inversely related to radiation-induced hearing loss. The degree of hearing loss was dependent on the frequency tested, age, baseline hearing, and baseline difference in hearing between a patient's two ears. Conclusion: High-frequency (≥2000 Hz) hearing acuity worsens significantly after RT in a dose-dependent fashion. A larger number of patients needs to be studied to validate these results. This knowledge can be applied to create guidelines regarding future dose limits to the auditory apparatus for patients undergoing head-and-neck RT

  20. Case report: Unilateral conduction hearing loss due to central venous occlusion.

    Ribeiro, Phillip; Patel, Swetal; Qazi, Rizwan A

    2016-01-01

    Central venous stenosis is a well-known complication in patients with vascular access for hemodialysis. We report two cases involving patients on hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistulas who developed reversible unilateral conductive hearing loss secondary to critical stenosis of central veins draining the arteriovenous dialysis access. A proposed mechanism for the patients' reversible unilateral hearing loss is pterygoid venous plexus congestion leading to decreased Eustachian tube patency. Endovascular therapy was conducted to treat the stenosis and the hearing loss of both patients was returned to near normal after successful central venous angioplasty. PMID:27079669

  1. Hearing loss - non genetic etiology of newborns diagnosed in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Domuta, EM; Marginean, E; V. Sala; Valenas, O; Venter, C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to assess the newborns hospitalized in The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Emergency County Clinical Hospital Oradea with positive screening for hearing loss and to identify non-genetic causes of the hearing loss.Materials and Methods: This prospective study was presented in NICU in the period January 2008 to June 2012, on a number of 139 newborns with positive screening for hearing loss at the second test (AABR+TEOAE). Were excluded from the study newb...

  2. An allograft mouse model for the study of hearing loss secondary to vestibular schwannoma growth.

    Bonne, Nicolas-Xavier; Vitte, Jérémie; Chareyre, Fabrice; Karapetyan, Gevorg; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Tanaka, Karo; Moats, Rex A; Giovannini, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Vestibular schwannoma is a benign neoplasm arising from the Schwann cell sheath of the auditory-vestibular nerve. It most commonly affects both sides in the genetic condition Neurofibromatosis type 2, causing progressive high frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Here, we describe a microsurgical technique and stereotactic coordinates for schwannoma cell grafting in the vestibular nerve region that recapitulates local tumor growth in the cerebellopontine angle and inner auditory canal with resulting hearing loss. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence and MRI in vivo imaging, and hearing assessed by auditory brainstem responses. These techniques, by potentially enabling orthotopic grafting of a variety of cell lines will allow studies on the pathogenesis of tumor-related hearing loss and preclinical drug evaluation, including hearing endpoints, for NF2-related and sporadic schwannomas. PMID:27177628

  3. Fabry disease presenting with sudden hearing loss and otosclerosis: a case report

    Felisati Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting in a multiple-system disorder with a wide spectrum of physical signs and symptoms, predominantly affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems, skin, heart, kidneys, and eyes. Case presentation We describe the case of a 26-year-old European Caucasian man who had Fabry disease and who presented with episodic sudden unilateral hearing loss and was treated with glucocorticoids, pentoxifylline, hyperbaric oxygen, and fluoride because of concomitant audiometric evidence of otosclerosis. This case demonstrates the partial and transient beneficial effect of standard treatment for sudden hearing loss not related to Fabry disease and analyzes the possible connection between typical Fabry disease inner-ear lesions and otosclerosis. Whereas hearing loss has been described in connection with Fabry disease, otosclerosis-associated hearing loss in Fabry disease has not yet been described. Conclusions Although progressive hearing loss in patients with Fabry disease seems to be influenced by replacement therapy, few data concerning treatment of sudden hearing loss are available. The lack of literature concerning the pathogenesis of the otological involvement in Fabry disease makes it impossible to identify a connection between the latter and otosclerosis. Therefore, this report may help to reinforce the importance of a thorough evaluation of hearing in patients with Fabry disease and may be of help with therapeutic decision-making.

  4. The Frequency of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Prescription in the Clients of the Avesina Education and Health Center, Audiometry Clinic, 1377

    Abbas Bastani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determining the frequency of hearing disorders and hearing aid using in the clients referring to the Avesina education and health center, audiometry clinic, 1377. Method and Material: This is an assesive-descriptive survey that conducted on more than 2053 (1234 males and 819 females who referred for audiometry after examination by a physician. Case history, otoscopy, PTA, speech and immittance audiometry were conducted for all the clients. The findings were expressed in tables and diagrams of frequency. The age and sex relationship. All types of hearing losses and the number of the hearing-impaired clients need a hearing aid were assessed. Findings: 56% of this population were hearing-impaired and 44% had normal hearing were hearing. 60% were males and 40% females. Of the hearing-impaired, 44% had SNHL, 35.6% CHL and 8.2% mixed hearing loss. The hearing aid was prescribed for 204 (83 females and121 males if they need that only 20 females and 32 males wear it. Conclusion: It this sample, SNHL is of higher frequency. According to this survey, the more the age, the more the hearing aid is accepted (85% of wearer are more than 49 the prevalence of the hearing impaired males are more than females (60% versus 40%. Only 25% of the hearing-impaired wear hearing aids.

  5. The association between low levels of lead in blood and occupational noise-induced hearing loss in steel workers

    As the use of leaded gasoline has ceased in the last decade, background lead exposure has generally been reduced. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level lead exposure on human hearing loss. This study was conducted in a steel plant and 412 workers were recruited from all over the plant. Personal information such as demographics and work history was obtained through a questionnaire. All subjects took part in an audiometric examination of hearing thresholds, for both ears, with air-conducted pure tones at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. Subjects' blood samples were collected and analyzed for levels of manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead with inductive couple plasma-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, noise levels in different working zones were determined using a sound level meter with A-weighting network. Only subjects with hearing loss difference of no more than 15 dB between both ears and had no congenital abnormalities were included in further data analysis. Lead was the only metal in blood found significantly correlated with hearing loss for most tested sound frequencies (p < 0.05 to p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and noise level, the logistic regression model analysis indicated that elevated blood lead over 7 μg/dL was significantly associated with hearing loss at the sound frequencies of 3000 through 8000 Hz with odds ratios raging from 3.06 to 6.26 (p < 0.05 ∼ p < 0.005). We concluded that elevated blood lead at level below 10 μg/dL might enhance the noise-induced hearing loss. Future research needs to further explore the detailed mechanism.

  6. Are open-fit hearing aids a possible alternative to bone-anchored hearing devices in patients with mild to severe hearing loss? A preliminary trial

    Amberley V. Ostevik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Open-fit hearing aids (OFHAs may be of benefit for some individuals with chronic outer and middle ear conditions for which boneanchored hearing devices (BAHDs are normally recommended. The purpose of this study was to compare performance between OFHAs and BAHDs. A Starkey Destiny 800 OFHA was fit on eight adult BAHD users and speech perception measures in quiet and in background noise were compared under two different test conditions: i BAHD only and ii OFHA only. Equivalent outcome measure performance between these two conditions suggests that the OFHA was able to provide sufficient amplification for mild to moderate degrees of hearing loss (pure-tone averages (PTAs less than 47 dB HL. The improved speech perception performances and increased loudness ratings observed for several of the participants with moderately-severe to severe degrees of hearing loss (PTAs of 47 dB HL or greater in the BAHD only condition suggest that the OFHA did not provide sufficient amplification for these individuals. Therefore, OFHAs may be a successful alternative to the BAHD for individuals with no more than a moderate conductive hearing loss who are unable or unwilling to undergo implant surgery or unable to wear conventional hearing aids due to allergies, irritation, or chronic infection associated with the ear being blocked with a shell or earmold.

  7. Venturing beyond the Sentence Level: Narrative Skills in Children with Hearing Loss

    Reuterskiold, Christina; Ibertsson, Tina; Sahlen, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the differences in oral narrative skills between school-age children with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (HL) and children who have typical hearing and language development. Narrative samples were collected following a picture-elicited storytelling task. Language samples were transcribed and coded for a number of…

  8. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Amir Hossain Ghazizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended.

  9. Gray matter in the brain : Differences associated with tinnitus and hearing loss

    Boyen, Kris; Langers, Dave R. M.; de Kleine, Emile; van Dijk, Pim

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus, usually associated with hearing loss, is characterized by the perception of sound without an external sound source. The pathophysiology of tinnitus is poorly understood. In the present study, voxel-based morphometiy (VBM) was employed to identify gray matter differences related to hearing

  10. The Impact of Childhood Hearing Loss on the Family: Mothers' and Fathers' Stress and Coping Resources

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Most, Tova; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Haddad-eid, Eliana; Brand, Devora

    2016-01-01

    Parenting children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) presents unique long-term challenges that can place the parents at a greater risk for elevated levels of parenting stress. Adaptation of families to the various challenges presented by childhood hearing loss is influenced by their personal and social coping resources available for managing…

  11. Children's Performance in Complex Listening Conditions: Effects of Hearing Loss and Digital Noise Reduction

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of hearing loss (HL) on children's performance for an auditory task under demanding listening conditions and to determine the effect of digital noise reduction (DNR) on that performance. Method: Fifty children with normal hearing (NH) and 30 children with HL (8-12 years of age) categorized words in the presence of…

  12. Early Hearing Loss and Language Abilities in Children with Down Syndrome

    Laws, Glynis; Hall, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although many children with Down syndrome experience hearing loss, there has been little research to investigate its impact on speech and language development. Studies that have investigated the association give inconsistent results. These have often been based on samples where children with the most severe hearing impairments have…

  13. HEARING LOSS IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE - AN ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS

    Suja Sreedharan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic renal failure is believed to be of multifactorial etiology. Associated hypertension and diabetes mellitus, use of ototoxic drugs, hemodialysis and the changes in metabolic parameters are the various reasons quoted for the hearing loss. Objectives: Our study attempts to correlate the hearing thresholds with the multiple parameters like blood levels of urea, serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium and hemoglobin values incriminated in decreased hearing in CRF patients. Materials and methods:Prospective study of 25 patients receiving treatment for CRF. The threshold of the worsen ear was considered for statistical analysis. Results:18% of the patients at low frequencies (250 and 500 Hz, 32% of the patients at mid-frequencies (1000 and 2000 Hz, and 72% of the patients at high frequencies (4000 and 8000 Hz had decreased hearing for both bone and air conduction hearing. We found a positive correlation between hearing loss and increasing number of hemodialysis sessions, the levels of blood urea, serum creatinine, serum sodium and use of ototoxic drugs; while serum calcium, serum potassium and hemoglobin levels had a negative correlation. Conclusion:Though the management of CRF including hemodialysis has been refined, hearing loss continues to cause disability in CRF patients.

  14. Is sensorineural hearing loss a possible side effect of nasopharyngeal and parotid irradiation? A systematic review of the literature

    Background and purpose: Little has been published about permanent hearing loss due to radiotherapy, thus making it a rather unknown phenomenon. Therefore, we performed a study of the literature over the last 20 years. Materials and methods: Sixteen relevant clinical studies were found, reporting mostly on nasopharyngeal or parotid gland treatments. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiogram. Studies were assessed using a simple scoring list. Nine studies were used for further analysis. Data on the pure tone audiogram were pooled. Results: Results showed that, especially in the higher frequencies (≥4 kHz), loss can be measured. When data were pooled, in 42±3% of the patients a hearing loss was found of 10 dB or more at 4 kHz. Averaged over all measured frequencies the effect is less prominent but still statistically significant (18±2%). No significant difference between nasopharyngeal and parotid gland treatment was found (P<0.05). Conclusion: Only a few studies, mostly concerning small patient numbers, have investigated hearing damage due to radiotherapy. So far there has been no consensus on the subject. However, in this systematic review we found a significant effect. Dose to the inner ear therefore deserves more attention, especially in dose escalation studies and inverse planning

  15. Sensori-neural hearing loss after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: individualized risk estimation

    Background and purpose: Sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) is a common complication to radiation therapy in the upper head and neck region. In this study, we estimated the dose response relationship for SNHL with adjustment for pre-therapeutic risk factors. Patients and methods: The pre- and post-therapeutic hearing levels were recorded in a previously published study of 20 patients receiving radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, the dose to the inner ear of these patients was estimated with a computed tomography (CT) based treatment planning system. CT data from a 'proxy patient' were used for patients with no available CT scan. SNHL was analyzed as a function of radiation dose and potential risk factors were tested. Results: The incidence of SNHL increased significantly with increasing dose to the cochlea. Increasing patient's age, and decreasing pre-therapeutic hearing level were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of SNHL. A nomogram is presented for estimating individualized dose constraints of potential use in treatment planning. Conclusions: The inner ear is a critical structure in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the dose to the inner ear should be carefully considered when planning radiation treatment in this region

  16. Auditory assessment of children with severe hearing loss using behavioural observation audiometry and brainstem evoked response audiometry

    Rakhi Kumari; Priyanko Chakraborty; Jain, R K; Dhananjay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early detection of hearing loss has been a long-standing priority in the field of audiology. Currently available auditory testing methods include both behavioural and non-behavioural or objective tests of hearing. This study was planned with an objective to assess hearing loss in children using behavioural observation audiometry and brain stem evoked response audiometry. Methods: A total of 105 cases suffering from severe to profound hearing loss were registered. After proper h...

  17. Sudden Hearing Loss Treated With Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO – Case Study

    Fal Michał

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case study of a 32-year-old patient admitted to the Mazowia Hyperbaric Therapy Centre due to a sudden loss of hearing. In an interview the patient reported an abrupt hearing deterioration in his right ear and the feeling of congestion in the left ear with bilateral tinnitus present for over 2 months. The patient was qualified to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO. After 15 treatment sessions in a pressure chamber a noticeable improvement of hearing in his right-ear was noted (proved by pure tone audiometry and subjective hearing upswing in his left ear.

  18. The cultural and linguistic diversity of 3-year-old children with hearing loss.

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y C

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their caregivers when children were 3 years old. The data were from the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study, a prospective, population-based study of children with hearing loss in Australia. The majority of the 406 children used spoken English at home; however, 28 other languages also were spoken. Compared with their caregivers, the children in this study used fewer spoken languages and had higher rates of oral monolingualism. Few children used a spoken language other than English in their early education environment. One quarter of the children used sign to communicate at home and/or in their early education environment. No associations between caregiver hearing status and children's communication mode were identified. This exploratory investigation of the communication modes and languages used by young children with hearing loss and their caregivers provides an initial examination of the cultural and linguistic diversity and heritage language attrition of this population. The findings of this study have implications for the development of resources and the provision of early education services to the families of children with hearing loss, especially where the caregivers use a language that is not the lingua franca of their country of residence. PMID:22942315

  19. Clinical and experimental studies on the sensorineural hearing loss caused by irradiation

    In our study, 43 patients whose ears were presumably irradiated, were examined periodically before and after the irradiation; 10 were found to be affected by the sensorineural hearing loss, and these 10 were classified into two types. Type I; Patients of this group had a hearing impairment during or soon after irradiation and usually revealed marked deterioration of bone conduction in high frequencies accompanied by worsening of air conduction in low frequencies. The impaired hearing of this group soon recovered to the pre-treatment level. Type II; Patients of this group developed a slow progressive sensorineural hearing loss. They noticed the deafness with tinnitus several months after irradiation. To clarify the mechanism of the sensorineural hearing loss, histopathological investigations were done using nembutal anesthetized guinea pigs which were irradiated in the confined ear region unilaterally. We also examined histopathologically one human temporal bone belonging to a patient who had been irradiated for middle ear carcinoma. The histopathology of the guinea pigs and human case revealed the following conclusions: Type I hearing loss may be caused by toxic labyrinthitis secondary to the radiation otitis media or by the aseptic labyrinthitis as the result of hyperemia and increased permeability of the irradiated blood vessels in the cochlea. Type II hearing loss may be caused by the late rediation response of the cochleal blood vessels i.e. by the vasculitis which gives rise to obliteration of the vascular lumen and affects the blood supply of the hair cells. (author)

  20. Hearing loss and risk of early retirement. The HUNT study

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Krokstad, Steinar; Tambs, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Background: We explore the possible consequences of measured hearing impairment (HI) and perceived hearing difficulties for early retirement in a large population-based study. Furthermore, we study whether having a part-time position was associated with measured HI and perceived hearing difficulties in the same population. Methods: This study included 25 740 persons from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) aged 20–54 years at baseline in HUNT1 (1984–1986) who also participated in the follo...

  1. Endothelial dysfunction in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Nezamoddin Berjis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial dysfunction probably has a role in the etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL. The aim of this study was determining of the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and SSNHL. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, 30 patients with SSNHL and 30 otherwise healthy age and sex-matched controls were studied. Demographic data gathered included age, gender, family history of SSNHL, and history of smoking, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Laboratory data included measurement of hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS and lipid profile. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD. Results: The two groups were the same in age (47.9 ± 9.3 and 48.1 ± 9.6 years, P = 0.946 with female/male ratio of 1:1 in both groups. Diabetes and dyslipidemia were more frequent in patients than controls (20% vs. 0%, P = 0.024. Brachial artery diameter was greater in patients than controls before (4.24 ± 0.39 vs. 3.84 ± 0.23 mm, P < 0.001 and after ischemia (4.51 ± 0.43 vs. 4.28 ± 0.27 mm, P = 0.020, but FMD was lower in patients than controls (6.21 ± 3.0 vs. 11.52 ± 2.30%, P < 0.001. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that FMD was associated with SSNHL independent from FBS and lipid profile (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =0.439 [0.260-0.740], P = 0.002. Conclusion: Endothelial dysfunction, among other cardiovascular risk factors, is associated with SSNHL. This association is independent from other cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and dyslipidemia.

  2. Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, and Cleft Lip-Palate Syndrome; Its Association with Conductive Hearing Loss

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss associated with the ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip palate syndrome was reported in one sporadic case and in a pedigree with four cases in three generations. (GW)

  3. Anti-apoptotic treatment in mouse models of age-related hearing loss

    Fengchan Han; Oumei Wang; Quanxiang Cai

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL), or presbycusis, is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and top communication deficit of the aged population. Genetic predisposition is one of the major factors in the development of AHL. Generally, AHL is associated with an age-dependent loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons and stria vascularis cells in the inner ear. Although the mechanisms leading to genetic hearing loss are not completely understood, caspase-family proteases function as important signals in the inner ear pathology. It is now accepted that mouse models are the best tools to study the mechanism of genetic hearing loss or AHL. Here, we provide a brief review of recent studies on hearing improvement in mouse models of AHL by anti-apoptotic treatment.

  4. Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as

    2005-01-01

    Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as part of a Cleveland Institute of Art, Bachelor of Fine Arts thesis project in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory

  5. The WHO-DAS II: psychometric properties in the measurement of functional health status in adults with acquired hearing loss.

    Chisolm, Theresa H; Abrams, Harvey B; McArdle, Rachel; Wilson, Richard H; Doyle, Patrick J

    2005-01-01

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) Disability Assessment Scale II (WHO-DAS II) is a generic health-status instrument firmly grounded in the WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO-ICF). As such, it assesses functioning for six domains: communication, mobility, self-care, interpersonal, life activities, and participation. Domain scores aggregate to a total score. Because the WHO-DAS II contains questions relevant to hearing and communication, it has good face validity for use as an outcome measure for audiologic intervention. The purpose of the present study was to determine the psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II on a sample of individuals with adult-onset hearing loss, including convergent validity, internal consistency, and test-retest stability. Convergent validity was established by examining correlations between the WHO-DAS II (domain and total scores) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and the Hearing Aid Handicap for the Elderly (HHIE), two disease-specific measures, as well as with the Short Form-36 for veterans (SF-36V), a second generic measure. Data on all four measures were collected from 380 older individuals with adult-onset hearing loss who were not hearing aid users. The results of the convergent validity analysis revealed that the WHODAS II communication domain score was moderately and significantly correlated with scores on the APHAB and the HHIE. WHO-DAS II interpersonal and participation domain scores and the total scores were also moderately and significantly correlated with HHIE scores. These findings support the validity of using the WHO-DAS II for assessing activity limitations and participation restrictions of adult-onset hearing loss. Several WHO-DAS II domain scores and the total score were also significantly and moderately-markedly correlated with scores from the SF-36V. These findings support the validity of the WHO-DAS II as a generic health-status instrument

  6. Early detection of sensorineural hearing loss in Muckle-Wells-syndrome

    Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Koitschev, Assen; Tyrrell, Pascal N; Plontke, Stefan K.; Deschner, Norbert; Hansmann, Sandra; Ummenhofer, Katharina; Lohse, Peter; Koitschev, Christiane; Benseler, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Muckle-Wells-syndrome (MWS) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by systemic and organ-specific inflammation due to excessive interleukin (IL)-1 release. Inner ear inflammation results in irreversible sensorineural hearing loss, if untreated. Early recognition and therapy may prevent deafness. The aims of the study were to characterize the spectrum of hearing loss, optimize the otologic assessment for early disease and determine responsiveness to anti-IL-1-therapy regarding...

  7. Prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    Das, V K

    1990-01-01

    A cohort of 164 children born within the defined boundaries of greater Manchester during the years 1981 to 1984 inclusive were identified as having bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, giving a prevalence of 1.2/1000 population of 1/817 births. Ninety three children developed an additional conductive hearing loss secondary to otitis media with effusion lasting more than three months and 39 of these (42%) required surgical treatment. Those with congenital infections, adverse perinatal factors...

  8. Prophylactic and therapeutic functions of T-type calcium blockers against noise-induced hearing loss

    Shen, Haiyan; Zhang, BaoPing; Shin, June-Ho; Lei, Debin; Du, Yafei; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Qiuju; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Piccirillo, Jay; Bao, Jianxin

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear noise injury is the second most frequent cause of sensorineural hearing loss, after aging. Because calcium dysregulation is a widely recognized contributor to noise injury, we examined the potential of calcium channel blockers to reduce noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in mice. We focused on two T-type calcium blockers, trimethadione and ethosuximide, which are anti-epileptics approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Young C57BL/6 mice of either gender were divided into three g...

  9. The Effect of Celecoxib, a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor on Noise- Induced Hearing Loss

    Akram Pourbakht

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the major cause of acquired hearing loss.  Celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, is a non- steroidal anti- inflammatory drug (NSAID) with known antioxidant and antineoplastic activity. Therefore, we monitored the extent of temporary noise- induced threshold shifts (TTS) and cochlear damage caused by high level 4- kHz noise exposure to verify the differences with those pretreated with celecoxib. Materials and Methods: Ten male albin...

  10. Hearing Loss After Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors: Effect of Cochlear Dose

    Purpose: To determine the effect of cochlear dose on sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor treated by using conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: We studied 78 pediatric patients (155 ears) with localized brain tumors treated in 1997-2001 who had not received platinum-based chemotherapy and were followed up for at least 48 months. They were evaluated prospectively by means of serial pure-tone audiograms (250 Hz-8 kHz) and/or auditory brainstem response before and every 6 months after CRT. Results: Hearing loss occurred in 14% (11 of 78) of patients and 11% (17 of 155) of cochleae, with onset most often at 3-5 years after CRT. The incidence of hearing loss was low for a cochlear mean dose of 30 Gy or less and increased at greater than 40-45 Gy. Risk was greater at high frequencies (6-8 kHz). In children who tested abnormal for hearing, average hearing thresholds increased from a less than 25 decibel (dB) hearing level (HL) at baseline to a mean of 46 ± 13 (SD) dB HL for high frequencies, 41 ± 7 dB HL for low frequencies, and 38 ± 6 dB HL for intermediate frequencies. Conclusions: Sensorineural hearing loss is a late effect of CRT. In the absence of other factors, including ototoxic chemotherapy, increase in cochlear dose correlates positively with hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor. To minimize the risk of hearing loss for children treated with radiation therapy, a cumulative cochlear dose less than 35 Gy is recommended for patients planned to receive 54-59.4 Gy in 30-33 treatment fractions

  11. Auditory Evoked Potential Response and Hearing Loss: A Review

    Paulraj, M. P; Subramaniam, Kamalraj; Yaccob, Sazali Bin; Adom, Abdul H. Bin; Hema, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoacusis is the most prevalent sensory disability in the world and consequently, it can lead to impede speech in human beings. One best approach to tackle this issue is to conduct early and effective hearing screening test using Electroencephalogram (EEG). EEG based hearing threshold level determination is most suitable for persons who lack verbal communication and behavioral response to sound stimulation. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is a type of EEG signal emanated from the brain scalp...

  12. Epidemiology of occupational noise-induced hearing loss (ONIHL) in Poland.

    Sulkowski, Wieslaw J; Szymczak, Wieslaw; Kowalska, Sylwia; Sward-Matyja, Malgorzata

    2004-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a major health risk worldwide. In Europe about 35 million people are exposed to detrimental noise levels (> 85 dB-A) in industrial plants, and occupational deafness is a leading occupational compensible disease in the all countries; it is an insidious slow process that develops over a period of approximately 10 to 20 years. Accordingly to the latest estimations, more than 650,000 workers (of a total 5 million employed in industry) are put at risk in Poland. Despite progress in engineering approaches for reducing noise in the work environment and in improving hearing conservation programs (both the technical and medical) the ONIHL still remains a common and costly disability. The aim of this study is presentation of the most recent data on the incidence of ONIHL in Poland in the years 1992-2002 considered to be a base for implementing the effective prophylactic activities. The analysed data were derived from the central state register which collects all cases of occupational diseases recognized in the country. The highest incidence was found in such key industrial branches as coal mining, iron and steel, metallurgical and transport equipment; majority of cases were observed in southern and western provinces, mainly in the Silesian district, known from the significant concentration of noisy enterprises. The most affected were those workers aged 50-59 years and exposed to noise for over 20 years. More than 30 new cases of ONIHL were identified in the years 1992-1998 annually per 100,000 employees, and with beginning 1999 the rate was significantly decreased to 10 cases in 2002. One may presume that it results from the set up of national program of hearing preservation introduced in 1999 with obligatory pre-employment and follow-up pure-tone audiometry, as well as with hearing screening by means of the otoacoustic emissions. PMID:15101286

  13. Inflammasome activation in mouse inner ear in response to MCMV induced hearing loss

    Xi Shi; Yanfen Dong; Ya Li; ZenLu Zhao; Huan Li; Shiwei Qiu; Yaohan Li; Weiwei Guo; Yuehua Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To identify presence of inflammasome activated in mouse cochlea with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Method:MCMV was injected into the right cerebral hemisphere in neonatal BALB/c mice at 2000 pfu virus titers. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were tested to evaluate hearing at 21 days. Histopathological studies were conducted to confirm localizations of MCMV infected cells in the inner ear. Expression of inflammasome related factors was assessed by immunofluorescence, Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Results:In the mouse model of CMV induced SNHL, inflammasome related kinase Caspase-1 and downstream inflammatory factor IL-1b and IL-18 were found increased and activated after CMV infection in the cochlea. These factors could further up-regulate expression of IL-6 and TNF-a. These inflammatory factors are neurotoxicity and may contribute to hearing impairment. Furthermore, we also detected significantly increased AIM2 protein that accumulated in the SGN of cochleae with CMV infection. Significance:We have shown that inflammasome as a novel inherent immunity mechanism may contribute to hearing impairment. Conclusion:Our data indicate that imflammasome assemble in mouse inner ear in response to CMV infection. We have revealed a novel pa-thology event in CMV induced SNHL involving activation of inflammasome in mouse cochlea. Additionally, we have shown that inflammasome may be a novel target for prevention and treatment of CMV related SNHL. Copyright © 2016, The Authors. Production & hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd On behalf of PLA General Hospital Department of OtolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  14. Brain structural and functional alterations in patients with unilateral hearing loss.

    Yang, Ming; Chen, Hua-Jun; Liu, Bin; Huang, Zhi-Chun; Feng, Yuan; Li, Jing; Chen, Jing-Ya; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Ji, Hui; Feng, Xu; Zhu, Xin; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-10-01

    Alterations of brain structure and functional connectivity have been described in patients with hearing impairments due to distinct pathogenesis; however, the influence of unilateral hearing loss (UHL) on brain morphology and regional brain activity is still not completely understood. In this study, we aim to investigate regional brain structural and functional alterations in patients with UHL. T1-weighted volumetric images and task-free fMRIs were acquired from 14 patients with right-sided UHL (pure tone average ≥ 40 dB HL) and 19 healthy controls. Hearing ability was assessed by pure tone audiometry. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed to detect brain regions with changed gray matter volume or white matter volume in UHL. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was calculated to analyze brain activity at the baseline and was compared between two groups. Compared with controls, UHL patients showed decreased gray matter volume in bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus, left superior/middle/inferior temporal gyrus, and right parahippocampal gyrus and lingual gyrus. Meanwhile, patients showed significantly decreased ALFF in bilateral precuneus, left inferior parietal lobule, and right inferior frontal gyrus and insula and increased ALFF in right inferior and middle temporal gyrus. These findings suggest that chronic UHL could induce brain morphological changes and is associated with aberrant baseline brain activity. PMID:25093284

  15. Tone Task Proves Blind Hear Better--Early vision loss leads to keener hearing

    Michael Hopkin; 于明霞

    2004-01-01

    @@ It is no coincidence① that so many piano-tuners② are blind. Folklore③ says their lack of sight gives them acute hearing, ideally suited to the task. Now neuroscientists in Canada have shown that the sightless really do hear notes more precisely if they went blind when they were very young.

  16. Auditory Screening in Infants for Early Detection of Permanent Hearing Loss in Northern Iran

    Haghshenas, M; Zadeh, PY; Y. Javadian; Fard, HA; Delavari, K; Panjaki, HSA; Gorji, HAMH

    2014-01-01

    Background: Undiagnosed hearing loss can cause disorders in speech and language and delay in social and emotional development. Aim: This study aimed to screen for hearing loss in all newborns born in Babol city during 2009-2011. Subjects and Methods: Fifteen thousand one hundred and sixty-five newborns (49% [7430/15165] male and 51% [7735/15165] female) born during a 30-month period in Babol, underwent hearing screening by the otoacoustic emission (OAE) test at the age of 15 days. In infants ...

  17. Hearing loss in relation to sound exposure of professional symphony orchestra musicians

    Schmidt, J. H.; Pedersen, E. R.; Paarup, H. M.;

    2014-01-01

    B compared with the 238 ears with lowest exposure. The observed hearing loss of musicians was smaller compared with the noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS) predicted from ISO1999. A remaining confounding effect of age after ISO7029 age corrections could be observed to explain the difference...... in observed and predicted NIPTS. However, the observed hearing loss difference between the left and the right ear of musicians was 2.5 dB (95% confidence interval 1.5-3.6), which was similar to the NIPTS predicted from ISO1999. Most of the musicians had better hearing at 3, 4, and 6 kHz for age than expected...

  18. Hearing loss in Pompe disease revisited: results from a study of 24 children

    van Capelle, Carine I.; Goedegebure, Andre; Homans, Nienke C.; Hoeve, Hans L. J.; Reuser, Arnold J.

    2010-01-01

    Little information is available regarding the auditory function in Pompe patients. Hearing loss has been reported in classic infantile patients, but it is still unknown whether central nervous system involvement interferes with auditory function and whether enzyme replacement therapy can improve hearing. Auditory function has not been studied in children with milder forms of the disease. We analyzed repetitive auditory brainstem response measurements and pure tone audiometry in 24 children with Pompe disease. Only 1 of 13 patients with milder phenotypes showed recurrent conductive hearing loss, while 10 out of 11 classic infantile patients had sensorineural hearing defects. These patients also had a high prevalence of conductive hearing loss. Five patients showed evidence of mild retrocochlear pathology, suggestive of glycogen accumulation in the central nervous system. Hearing loss persisted during therapy in all patients. The results emphasize the need for careful monitoring of auditory function in classic infantile Pompe patients, and for early implementation of hearing aids to protect speech and language development. PMID:20596893

  19. Air blast circuit breaker noise and hearing loss: a multifactorial model for risk assessment.

    McBride, D I; Williams, S

    2000-04-01

    The assessment of the risk to hearing from impulse noise exposure may be a problem for the occupational physician because existing legislative and international noise exposure standards deal primarily with continuous noise, and are not valid in excess of the peak exposure limit of 200 pa (140 dB). Noise exposure in excess of this level, for example that due to firearms, is frequently perceived as harmful, but this is not necessarily the case, as impulse noise standards do, in fact, allow exposure with a maximum in the order of 6.3 kPa (170 dB). To illustrate this, a cross-sectional group of electrical transmission workers have been studied who were exposed to significant levels of impulse noise from air blast circuit breakers and firearms. Important hearing loss factors have been identified by means of a specially designed questionnaire. Using the Health & Safety Executive definition, the risk of hearing loss was determined by calculating prevalence odds ratios (ORs) for exposure to these factors. The OR for those with fewer than eight unprotected air blast circuit breaker exposures was 2.27 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-5.08), whilst for those with more than eight exposures the OR was 2.10 (95% CI, 0.97-4.54). For firearm exposure, ORs of 1.61 (95% CI, 0.95-2.74) were noted in the medium exposure group and 2.05 (95% CI, 1.08-3.86) in the high exposure group. When all the factors were included in the model, the most significant factor was age. The study gives support to the impulse noise exposure criteria, confirming the borderline risk from air blast circuit breaker noise exposure and the relative safety of moderate gunfire exposure. PMID:10912360

  20. WHEN EXPECTATION MEETS EXPERIENCE: PARENTS’ RECOLLECTIONS OF AND EXPERIENCES WITH A CHILD DIAGNOSED WITH HEARING LOSS SOON AFTER BIRTH

    Gilliver, Megan; Ching, Teresa YC; Sjahalam-King, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine parents’ recollections of and their experiences with bringing up a child diagnosed with hearing loss at a very young age. Design Based on the analysis of informal parent discussion groups, four open-ended questions were formulated to solicit information about parents’ expectations following diagnosis, as well as experiences and challenges when raising a child with a hearing loss. Study Sample Forty parents of children, aged between three to five years, who were diagnosed with hearing loss before the age of three years. Results Parents’ responses revealed strong support for early intervention, high expectations for their child’s development, and desire for information tailored to individual needs. Parents also reported anxiety relating to their perceptions of the significance of consistent device usage on their child’s development. Further concerns arose from their observations of the difficulties experienced by their child in real-world environments despite consistent device usage, and their perception of their child’s language delay despite early intervention. Conclusions The findings point to a need to support parents to form realistic expectations based on current knowledge. Implications for clinicians to provide improved management of children with hearing loss are discussed. PMID:24350690

  1. Sarcopenia and Hearing Loss in Older Koreans: Findings from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES 2010.

    Jieun Lee

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI is becoming a more significant issue as geriatric population increases. Sarcopenia in older people is known to have a diverse health problem in various circumstances in recent studies. We assessed whether the decrease in muscle mass is related to ARHI. We used the 2010 data of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES to examine the associations between sarcopenia and ARHI. A total number of participants was 1,622 including 746 males and 876 females aged 60 years or older. Muscle mass was assessed as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass, and hearing loss was defined as the pure-tone averages (PTA of test frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz at a threshold of 40 dB or higher in worse hearing side of the ear. Among 1,622 participants, 298 men and 256 women had hearing loss. Appendicular muscle mass (ASM, expressed as kg, was categorized in tertiles. In female population, after adjusting for age, smoking, drinking, amount of exercise, total body fat, education level, income level, and tinnitus, the odds ratio (OR for hearing loss was 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI = 0.92-2.68 in the middle tertile and 1.79 (1.03-3.08 in the lowest tertile, compared with the highest tertile. P for trend in this model was 0.036. Controlling further for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and three types of noise exposure did not change the association. Larger muscle mass is associated with lower prevalence of hearing loss in elderly Korean females.

  2. Efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training for people with hearing loss: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Helen Henshaw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Auditory training involves active listening to auditory stimuli and aims to improve performance in auditory tasks. As such, auditory training is a potential intervention for the management of people with hearing loss. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review (PROSPERO 2011: CRD42011001406 evaluated the published evidence-base for the efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training to improve speech intelligibility, cognition and communication abilities in adults with hearing loss, with or without hearing aids or cochlear implants. METHODS: A systematic search of eight databases and key journals identified 229 articles published since 1996, 13 of which met the inclusion criteria. Data were independently extracted and reviewed by the two authors. Study quality was assessed using ten pre-defined scientific and intervention-specific measures. RESULTS: Auditory training resulted in improved performance for trained tasks in 9/10 articles that reported on-task outcomes. Although significant generalisation of learning was shown to untrained measures of speech intelligibility (11/13 articles, cognition (1/1 articles and self-reported hearing abilities (1/2 articles, improvements were small and not robust. Where reported, compliance with computer-based auditory training was high, and retention of learning was shown at post-training follow-ups. Published evidence was of very-low to moderate study quality. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that published evidence for the efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training for adults with hearing loss is not robust and therefore cannot be reliably used to guide intervention at this time. We identify a need for high-quality evidence to further examine the efficacy of computer-based auditory training for people with hearing loss.

  3. Sarcopenia and Hearing Loss in Older Koreans: Findings from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2010.

    Lee, Jieun; Han, Kyungdo; Song, Jae Jun; Im, Gi Jung; Chae, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is becoming a more significant issue as geriatric population increases. Sarcopenia in older people is known to have a diverse health problem in various circumstances in recent studies. We assessed whether the decrease in muscle mass is related to ARHI. We used the 2010 data of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) to examine the associations between sarcopenia and ARHI. A total number of participants was 1,622 including 746 males and 876 females aged 60 years or older. Muscle mass was assessed as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass, and hearing loss was defined as the pure-tone averages (PTA) of test frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz at a threshold of 40 dB or higher in worse hearing side of the ear. Among 1,622 participants, 298 men and 256 women had hearing loss. Appendicular muscle mass (ASM), expressed as kg, was categorized in tertiles. In female population, after adjusting for age, smoking, drinking, amount of exercise, total body fat, education level, income level, and tinnitus, the odds ratio (OR) for hearing loss was 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.92-2.68) in the middle tertile and 1.79 (1.03-3.08) in the lowest tertile, compared with the highest tertile. P for trend in this model was 0.036. Controlling further for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and three types of noise exposure did not change the association. Larger muscle mass is associated with lower prevalence of hearing loss in elderly Korean females. PMID:26978776

  4. Coding deficits in noise-induced hidden hearing loss may stem from incomplete repair of ribbon synapses in the cochlea

    Lijuan eShi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has shown that noise-induced damage to the synapse between inner hair cells (IHCs and type I afferent auditory nerve fibers (ANFs may occur in the absence of permanent threshold shift (PTS, and that synapses connecting IHCs with low spontaneous rate (SR ANFs are disproportionately affected. Due to the functional importance of low-SR ANF units for temporal processing and signal coding in noisy backgrounds, deficits in cochlear coding associated with noise-induced damage may result in significant difficulties with temporal processing and hearing in noise (i.e., hidden hearing loss. However, significant noise-induced coding deficits have not been reported at the single unit level following the loss of low-SR units. We have found evidence to suggest that some aspects of neural coding are not significantly changed with the initial loss of low-SR ANFs, and that further coding deficits arise in association with the subsequent reestablishment of the synapses. This suggests that synaptopathy in hidden hearing loss may be the result of insufficient repair of disrupted synapses, and not simply due to the loss of low-SR units. These coding deficits include decreases in driven spike rate for intensity coding as well as several aspects of temporal coding: spike latency, peak-to-sustained spike ratio and the recovery of spike rate as a function of click-interval.

  5. Vitamins A, C, and E and selenium in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Kaya, Hakan; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Sayın, İbrahim; Güneş, Selçuk; Altıntaş, Ahmet; Yeğin, Yakup; Kayhan, Fatma Tülin

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of vitamins A, C, and E, with selenium, in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). This was a prospective, controlled study performed at a tertiary teaching and research hospital. Over a 32-month period, patients were treated with either our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen plus vitamins A, C, and E and selenium (ACE+ group) or with only our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen (ACE- group). The demographics, additional symptoms, mean initial and final hearing levels, mean hearing gain, and recovery data were compared between the two groups. The ACE+ group, consisting of 70 (55.5 %) patients, received vitamin A (natural beta-carotene, 26,000 IU), vitamin C (ascorbic acid, 200 mg), vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol, 200 IU), and selenium (50 μg) twice daily for 30 days in addition to our ISSNHL treatment regimen: methylprednisolone at an initial dose of 1 mg/kg body weight per day, tapered over 14 days; Rheomacrodex(®) [(10 g of dextran and 0.9 g of NaCl)/100 ml] 500 ml daily for 5 days; Vastarel(®) 20-mg tablet (20 mg of trimetazidine dihydrochloride) three times daily for 30 days; and ten 60-min hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) sessions (2.5 absolute atmospheres of 100 % O2), once daily, starting the day of hospitalization. The ACE- group comprised 56 (44.4 %) patients, who received only our ISSNHL treatment regimen. The mean hearing gains were 36.2 ± 20.3 dB in the ACE+ group and 27.1 ± 20.6 dB in the ACE- group. The mean hearing gain rates were significantly higher in the ACE+ group than in the ACE- group (p = 0.014). Treatment with vitamins A, C, and E and selenium was effective in ISSNHL patients undergoing treatment with methylprednisolone, dextran, trimetazidine dihydrochloride, and HBO, and might be more effective when the initial hearing level is below 46 dB. PMID:24519034

  6. Auditory perceptual learning in adults with and without age-related hearing loss

    Hanin eKarawani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Speech recognition in adverse listening conditions becomes more difficult as we age, particularly for individuals with age-related hearing loss (ARHL. Whether these difficulties can be eased with training remains debated, because it is not clear whether the outcomes are sufficiently general to be of use outside of the training context. The aim of the current study was to compare training-induced learning and generalization between normal-hearing older adults and those with ARHL.Methods: 56 listeners (60-72 y/o, 35 participants with ARHL and 21 normal hearing adults participated in the study. The study design was a cross over design with three groups (immediate-training, delayed-training and no-training group. Trained participants received 13 sessions of home-based auditory training over the course of 4 weeks. Three adverse listening conditions were targeted: (1 Speech-in-noise (2 time compressed speech and (3 competing speakers, and the outcomes of training were compared between normal and ARHL groups. Pre- and post-test sessions were completed by all participants. Outcome measures included tests on all of the trained conditions as well as on a series of untrained conditions designed to assess the transfer of learning to other speech and non-speech conditions. Results: Significant improvements on all trained conditions were observed in both ARHL and normal-hearing groups over the course of training. Normal hearing participants learned more than participants with ARHL in the speech-in-noise condition, but showed similar patterns of learning in the other conditions. Greater pre- to post-test changes were observed in trained than in untrained listeners on all trained conditions. In addition, the ability of trained listeners from the ARHL group to discriminate minimally different pseudowords in noise also improved with training. Conclusions: ARHL did not preclude auditory perceptual learning but there was little generalization to

  7. An Evaluation of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Thalassaemic Patients Treated with Desferrioxamine and Its Risk Factors

    M Sonbolestan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: In major thalassaemia patients who need blood transfusion, iron overload is a major therapeutic disadvantage that leads to heart failure which is the major cause of death in such patients. Desferrioxamine (DFO is the most efficient factor for iron chelation, but it carries adverse effects such sensory-neural hearing loss. Methods: The study began in March 2002 and continued untill March 2003, on 160 cases of thalassaemia to determine the incidence of sensory – neural hearing loss and its risk factors in patients who received Desferrioxamine (DFO. All cases underwent audiometric tests. Retrospectively, other needed information were either obtained through interview or extracted from the medical files. Results were analyzed with ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: Seventy-six patients of the total 156 patients showed impairment in PTA (48.7% with 24 of them suffering significant involvement (15.4%. These abnormalities generally affected high frequencies including, 4000 and 8000 Hz. Male gender, increased serum billirubin level and fasting blood sugar were statistically correlated with hearing loss (p.v = 0.038, p.v = 0.38, p.v = 0.002 respectively. There was no significant correlation between hearing loss and other factors. Mean DFO administration in patients, was 29.69 mg/kg/day and mean therapeutic index of DFO was 0.01 mg/kg/day/mg/lit. Both of them were below the critical level (<40mg/kg/day and <0.025mg/kg/day/mg/lit respectively, however hearing loss had developed. Conclusion: Controlling DFO dosage per se does not seem to be enough for decreasing ototoxicity rate. Periodic audiometric tests are highly recommended to detect hearing loss as soon as possible. There are some other factors such as male gender, increased billirubin and FBS, which contribute to DFO ototoxicity. Looking for these risk factors and controlling them, would help identifying susceptible patients and preventing this complication. Key words

  8. Cochlea hair cell rescue after a noise-induced hearing loss using a low level laser therapy (LLLT)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Bahk, Chan Woong; Jung, Jae Yun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To see the effect of LLLT on noise-induced hearing loss. Methods: Eleven rats were exposed to noise (120 dB, 16 kHz, 6 h) and left ears were irradiated at 60J/cm2, 830 nm laser for 12 days. Right ears were control. Hearing levels were measured at frequencies of 4, 8, 12, 16, 32 kHz before noise exposure and after 12th irradiations. Results: The initial hearing levels were 26.5+/-4.7, 24.5+/-5.0, 24.0+/-5.2, 24.0+/-3.2, 24.5+/-5.5 dB SPL. After noise exposure, thresholds were 63.5+/-15.1, 64+/-16.8, 71.5+/-11.3, 73.5+/-15.6, 67.5+/-14.4 dB SPL in 4, 8, 12, 16, 32 kHz. After 12th irradiation, thresholds of treated ears recovered significantly 21+/-4.2, 20+/-3.5, 24+/-11.9, 24+/-12.9, 21+/-2.2 dB SPL and that of the untreated right ears measured 36.3+/-22.9, 45+/-15.8, 66.3+/-22.9, 50+/-16.8, 43.8+/-21.4 dB SPL. Conclusion: LLLT may promote recovery of hearing after noiseinduced hearing loss.

  9. Medical surveillance of occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) at RAPS hospital

    Full text: One of the most challenging roles of a Certifying Surgeon is to act as catalyst for change. This paper is a presentation of the impact of such an effort. Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Noise - induced hearing loss (NIHL) is bilateral and symmetrical, usually affecting the higher frequencies 3 k, 4 k or 6 kHz ) and then spreading to the lower frequencies (0.5 k,1 k or 2 kHz). The major health effects are lack of concentration, irritation, fatigue, headache, sleep disturbances etc. Hearing protectors should be used when engineering controls and work practices are not feasible for reducing noise exposure to safe levels. Ear muffs, ear plugs and ear canal caps are the main types of hearing protectors. Awareness should be created among workers about the harmful effects of noise on hearing and other body systems by implementing compulsory education noise conservation programmes. The practice followed at RAPS Hospital for medical surveillance of Occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss is being briefed

  10. Sensorineural hearing loss and ischemic injury: Development of animal models to assess vascular and oxidative effects.

    Olivetto, E; Simoni, E; Guaran, V; Astolfi, L; Martini, A

    2015-09-01

    Hearing loss may be genetic, associated with aging or exposure to noise or ototoxic substances. Its aetiology can be attributed to vascular injury, trauma, tumours, infections or autoimmune response. All these factors could be related to alterations in cochlear microcirculation resulting in hypoxia, which in turn may damage cochlear hair cells and neurons, leading to deafness. Hypoxia could underlie the aetiology of deafness, but very few data about it are presently available. The aim of this work is to develop animal models of hypoxia and ischemia suitable for study of cochlear vascular damage, characterizing them by electrophysiology and gene/protein expression analyses. The effects of hypoxia in infarction were mimicked in rat by partial permanent occlusion of the left coronary artery, and those of ischemia in thrombosis by complete temporary carotid occlusion. In our models both hypoxia and ischemia caused a small but significant hearing loss, localized at the cochlear apex. A slight induction of the coagulation cascade and of oxidative stress pathways was detected as cell survival mechanism, and cell damages were found on the cuticular plate of outer hair cells only after carotid ischemia. Based on these data, the two developed models appear suitable for in vivo studies of cochlear vascular damage. PMID:25987500

  11. Glue ear, hearing loss and IQ: an association moderated by the child's home environment.

    Amanda J Hall

    Full Text Available Glue ear or otitis media with effusion (OME is common in children and may be associated with hearing loss (HL. For most children it has no long lasting effects on cognitive development but it is unclear whether there are subgroups at higher risk of sequelae.To examine the association between a score comprising the number of times a child had OME and HL (OME/HL score in the first four/five years of life and IQ at age 4 and 8. To examine whether any association between OME/HL and IQ is moderated by socioeconomic, child or family factors.Prospective, longitudinal cohort study: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC. 1155 children tested using tympanometry on up to nine occasions and hearing for speech (word recognition on up to three occasions between age 8 months and 5 years. An OME/HL score was created and associations with IQ at ages 4 and 8 were examined. Potential moderators included a measure of the child's cognitive stimulation at home (HOME score.For the whole sample at age 4 the group with the highest 10% OME/HL scores had performance IQ 5 points lower [95% CI -9, -1] and verbal IQ 6 points lower [95% CI -10, -3] than the unaffected group. By age 8 the evidence for group differences was weak. There were significant interactions between OME/HL and the HOME score: those with high OME/HL scores and low 18 month HOME scores had lower IQ at age 4 and 8 than those with high OME/HL scores and high HOME scores. Adjusted mean differences ranged from 5 to 8 IQ points at age 4 and 8.The cognitive development of children from homes with lower levels of cognitive stimulation is susceptible to the effects of glue ear and hearing loss.

  12. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m2 weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m2 every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m2 or 40 mg/m2 of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m2 were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer

  13. Dosing study on the effectiveness of salicylate/N-acetylcysteine for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss

    John Coleman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of three different doses of sodium salicylate (SAL in combination with one dose of N-acetylcysteine (NAC to prevent noise-induced hearing loss was studied in chinchillas. After obtaining baseline-hearing thresholds, the chinchillas were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: three sets were injected intraperitoneally with 325 mg/kg NAC combined with 25, 50, or 75 mg/kg SAL, and a separate control group was injected with an equal volume of saline. Animals were injected twice daily for 2 days prior to and 1 hour before the noise exposure (6 hours to a 105-dB Standard Pressure Level octave band noise centered at 4 kHz. Immediate post-noise hearing thresholds were obtained followed by post-noise treatments at 1 hour then twice-daily for 2 days. Hearing tests continued at 1, 2, and 3 weeks post-noise, and immediately after the last hearing test, animals′ cochleae were stained for hair cell counts. All the groups showed hearing improvement until week 2. However, at week 3, saline treated animals demonstrated a 17-33 dB SPL permanent threshold shift (PTS across the test frequencies. Hearing loss was lowest in the 50 SAL/325 NAC mg/kg group (all frequencies, P < 0.001, and although PTS was reduced in the 25 and 75 mg/kg SAL dosage groups compared to the saline group, only the 75 mg/kg SAL group was significantly different at all but 2 kHz frequency. Coupled with the hearing loss, outer hair cell (OHC loss was maximal in the 4-8 kHz cochlear region of saline treated animals. However, there was a substantial reduction in the mean OHC loss of the NAC plus 50 or 75 mg/kg (but not the 25 mg/kg SAL groups. These findings suggest that SAL in combination with NAC is effective in reducing noise damage to the cochlea, but SAL has a relatively narrow therapeutic dosing window.

  14. Comprehensive genetic testing in the clinical evaluation of 1119 patients with hearing loss.

    Sloan-Heggen, Christina M; Bierer, Amanda O; Shearer, A Eliot; Kolbe, Diana L; Nishimura, Carla J; Frees, Kathy L; Ephraim, Sean S; Shibata, Seiji B; Booth, Kevin T; Campbell, Colleen A; Ranum, Paul T; Weaver, Amy E; Black-Ziegelbein, E Ann; Wang, Donghong; Azaiez, Hela; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-04-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans, affecting 1 in 500 newborns. Due to its genetic heterogeneity, comprehensive diagnostic testing has not previously been completed in a large multiethnic cohort. To determine the aggregate contribution inheritance makes to non-syndromic hearing loss, we performed comprehensive clinical genetic testing with targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing on 1119 sequentially accrued patients. No patient was excluded based on phenotype, inheritance or previous testing. Testing resulted in identification of the underlying genetic cause for hearing loss in 440 patients (39 %). Pathogenic variants were found in 49 genes and included missense variants (49 %), large copy number changes (18 %), small insertions and deletions (18 %), nonsense variants (8 %), splice-site alterations (6 %), and promoter variants (history of hearing loss or when the loss was congenital and symmetric. The spectrum of implicated genes showed wide ethnic variability. These findings support the more efficient utilization of medical resources through the development of evidence-based algorithms for the diagnosis of hearing loss. PMID:26969326

  15. Effects of fundamental frequency and vocal-tract length cues on sentence segregation by listeners with hearing loss

    Mackersie, Carol L.; Dewey, James; Guthrie, Lesli A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of hearing loss on the ability to separate competing talkers using talker differences in fundamental frequency (F0) and apparent vocal-tract length (VTL). Performance of 13 adults with hearing loss and 6 adults with normal hearing was measured using the Coordinate Response Measure. For listeners with hearing loss, the speech was amplified and filtered according to the NAL-RP hearing aid prescription. Target-to-competition ratios varied from 0 to 9 dB. T...

  16. Risk factors and prevalence of newborn hearing loss in a private health care system of Porto Velho, Northern Brazil

    Juliana Santos de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of hearing loss and to analyze the results of newborn hearing screening and audiological diagnosis in private health care systems. METHODS Cross-sectional and retrospective study in a database of newborn hearing screening performed by a private clinic in neonates born in private hospitals of Porto Velho, Rondônia, Northern Brazil. The screening results, the risk for hearing loss, the risk indicators for hearing loss and the diagnosis were descriptively analyzed. Newborns cared in rooming in with their mothers were compared to those admitted to the Intensive Care Unit regarding risk factors for hearing loss. RESULTS: Among 1,146 (100% enrolled newborns, 1,064 (92.8% passed and 82 (7.2% failed the hearing screening. Among all screened neonates, 1,063 (92.8% were cared in rooming and 83 (7.2% needed intensive care; 986 (86.0% were considered at low risk and 160 (14.0% at high risk for hearing problems. Of the 160 patients identified as having high risk for hearing loss, 83 (37.7% were admitted to an hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit, 76 (34.5% used ototoxic drugs and 38 (17.2% had a family history of hearing loss in childhood. Hearing loss was diagnosed in two patients (0.2% of the screened sample. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hearing loss in newborns from private hospitals was two cases per 1,000 evaluated patients. The use of ototoxic drugs, admission to Intensive Care Unit and family history of hearing loss were the most common risk factors for hearing loss in the studied population.

  17. Coding Deficits in Noise-Induced Hidden Hearing Loss May Stem from Incomplete Repair of Ribbon Synapses in the Cochlea

    Shi, Lijuan; Chang, Yin; Li, Xiaowei; Aiken, Steven J.; Liu, Lijie; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that noise-induced damage to the synapse between inner hair cells (IHCs) and type I afferent auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) may occur in the absence of permanent threshold shift (PTS), and that synapses connecting IHCs with low spontaneous rate (SR) ANFs are disproportionately affected. Due to the functional importance of low-SR ANF units for temporal processing and signal coding in noisy backgrounds, deficits in cochlear coding associated with noise-induced damage may result in significant difficulties with temporal processing and hearing in noise (i.e., “hidden hearing loss”). However, significant noise-induced coding deficits have not been reported at the single unit level following the loss of low-SR units. We have found evidence to suggest that some aspects of neural coding are not significantly changed with the initial loss of low-SR ANFs, and that further coding deficits arise in association with the subsequent reestablishment of the synapses. This suggests that synaptopathy in hidden hearing loss may be the result of insufficient repair of disrupted synapses, and not simply due to the loss of low-SR units. These coding deficits include decreases in driven spike rate for intensity coding as well as several aspects of temporal coding: spike latency, peak-to-sustained spike ratio and the recovery of spike rate as a function of click-interval. PMID:27252621

  18. THE EFFECT OF VOCAL TRAINING PRACTISED FOR THREE YEARS OLD CHILDREN WITH 35-40 MONTHS IN PRESCHOOL EDUCATION TO SENSIBILITY OF THE CHILDREN WITH HEARING LOSS AND WITHOUT HEARING LOSS IN MUSICAL SOUNDS

    TEMİZ, Ebru

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether the vocal training practiced within the musical activity in preschool education affects the sensibility of the children with hearing loss and without hearing loss to the musical sounds, and to ascertain whether there is a relation between hearing loss and the sensibility of musical sounds for above mentioned children. In conclusion, it was seen that the vocal training had the positive effect in sensibility of musical sound properties and the facto...

  19. Characterizing auditory processing and perception in individual listeners with sensorineural hearing loss

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    –438 (2008)] was used as a framework. The parameters of the cochlear processing stage of the model were adjusted to account for behaviorally estimated individual basilar-membrane inputoutput functions and the audiogram, from which the amounts of inner hair-cell and outer hair-cell losses were estimated as a......This study considered consequences of sensorineural hearing loss in ten listeners. The characterization of individual hearing loss was based on psychoacoustic data addressing audiometric pure-tone sensitivity, cochlear compression, frequency selectivity, temporal resolution, and intensity...

  20. A Link Loss Model for the On-body Propagation Channel for Binaural Hearing Aids

    Chandra, Rohit; Johansson, Anders J.

    2013-01-01

    Binaural hearing aids communicate with each other through a wireless link for synchronization. A propagation model is needed to estimate the ear-to-ear link loss for such binaural hearing aids. The link loss is a critical parameter in a link budget to decide the sensitivity of the transceiver. In this paper, we have presented a model for the deterministic component of the ear-to-ear link loss. The model takes into account the dominant paths having most of the power of the creeping wave from t...

  1. Acrylonitrile potentiates hearing loss and cochlear damage induced by moderate noise exposure in rats

    The diversity of chemical and drugs that can potentiate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has impeded efforts to predict such interactions. We have hypothesized that chemical contaminants that disrupt intrinsic antioxidant defenses hold significant risk for potentiating NIHL. If this is true, then acrylonitrile (ACN) would be expected to potentiate NIHL. ACN, one of the 50 most commonly used chemicals in the United States, is metabolized via two pathways that are likely to disrupt intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) buffering systems: (1) it conjugates glutathione, depleting this important antioxidant rapidly; (2) a second pathway involves the formation of cyanide, which can inhibit superoxide dismutase. We hypothesized that moderate noise exposure, that does not produce permanent hearing loss by itself, could initiate oxidative stress and that ACN could render the inner ear more sensitive to noise by disrupting intrinsic antioxidant defenses. Temporary and persistent effects of ACN alone (50 mg/kg, sc 5 days), noise alone (95 or 97 dB octave band noise, 4 h/day for 5 days), or ACN in combination with noise were determined using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and compound action potential (CAP) amplitudes. Histopathological damage to hair cells resulting from these treatments was also investigated using surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Individually, neither ACN nor noise exposures caused any permanent hearing or hair cell loss; only a reversible temporary threshold shift was measured in noise-exposed animals. However, when given in combination, ACN and noise induced permanent threshold shifts (13-16 dB between 7 and 40 kHz) and a decrease in DPOAE amplitudes (up to 25 dB at 19 kHz), as well as significant outer hair cell (OHC) loss (up to 20% in the first row between 13 and 47 kHz). This investigation demonstrates that ACN can potentiate NIHL at noise levels that are realistic in terms of human exposure, and that the OHCs are the

  2. Significant weight loss in breastfed term infants readmitted for hyperbilirubinemia

    De-Villegas Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight loss of greater than 7% from birth weight indicates possible feeding problems. Inadequate oral intake causes weight loss and increases the bilirubin enterohepatic circulation. The objective of this study was to describe the association between total serum bilirubin (TSB levels and weight loss in healthy term infants readmitted for hyperbilirubinemia after birth hospitalization. Methods We reviewed medical records of breastfed term infants who received phototherapy according to TSB levels readmitted to Caja Petrolera de Salud Clinic in La Paz, Bolivia during January 2005 through October 2008. Results Seventy-nine infants were studied (64.6% were males. The hyperbilirubinemia readmission rate was 5% among breastfed infants. Term infants were readmitted at a median age of 4 days. Mean TSB level was 18.6 ± 3 mg/dL. Thirty (38% had significant weight loss. A weak correlation between TSB levels and percent of weight loss was identified (r = 0.20; p 20 mg/dL was notably higher among infants with significant weight loss (46.7% vs. 18.4%; p Conclusions Significant weight loss could be a useful parameter to identify breastfed term infants at risk of severe hyperbilirubinemia either during birth hospitalization or outpatient follow-up visits in settings where routine pre-discharge TSB levels have not been implemented yet.

  3. Effects of Age and Hearing Loss on the Processing of Auditory Temporal Fine Structure.

    Moore, Brian C J

    2016-01-01

    Within the cochlea, broadband sounds like speech and music are filtered into a series of narrowband signals, each of which can be considered as a relatively slowly varying envelope (ENV) imposed on a rapidly oscillating carrier (the temporal fine structure, TFS). Information about ENV and TFS is conveyed in the timing and short-term rate of nerve spikes in the auditory nerve. There is evidence that both hearing loss and increasing age adversely affect the ability to use TFS information, but in many studies the effects of hearing loss and age have been confounded. This paper summarises evidence from studies that allow some separation of the effects of hearing loss and age. The results suggest that the monaural processing of TFS information, which is important for the perception of pitch and for segregating speech from background sounds, is adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, the former being more important. The monaural processing of ENV information is hardly affected by hearing loss or by increasing age. The binaural processing of TFS information, which is important for sound localisation and the binaural masking level difference, is also adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, but here the latter seems more important. The deterioration of binaural TFS processing with increasing age appears to start relatively early in life. The binaural processing of ENV information also deteriorates somewhat with increasing age. The reduced binaural processing abilities found for older/hearing-impaired listeners may partially account for the difficulties that such listeners experience in situations where the target speech and interfering sounds come from different directions in space, as is common in everyday life. PMID:27080640

  4. Treatment for Progressive Hearing Loss Due to Paget's Disease of Bone - A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Tanahashi, Shigeaki; Mizuta, Keisuke; Kato, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Paget's disease is a common bone remodeling disorder that typically begins with excessive bone resorption in the elderly. Bilateral progressive hearing loss is the most frequently encountered complication of Paget's disease. The types of hearing loss identified by audiometry are conductive, sensorineural, or both. However, the precise mechanism of hearing loss remains unclear, and the treatment has been controversial. We present a 73-year-old man who suffered from bilateral progressive hearing loss due to Paget's disease. Potent bisphosphonates, oral risedronate in daily adjusted dosages for 6 months, did not decrease or suppress the worsening of the hearing loss. The Nucleus CI24 Contour electrode array was successfully inserted on the left side without surgical and postoperative complications. The Japanese open set monosyllable word recognition test in a sound field at 65 dB had a result of 74%. This cochlear implantation can be an indication for cases of profound hearing loss due to Paget's disease. PMID:26915163

  5. Clinical Features and Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Secondary to Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage

    Lee, Jae Woo; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Sang Man; Kong, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang Yoo; Bong, Jeong Pyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A number of etiologies of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) have been proposed, including viral infection, vascular disturbance, and immune-mediated mechanisms. Intralabyrinthine hemorrhage (ILH) as a cause of SSNHL is extremely rare, and there have been no studies defining the characteristics of hearing impairment and prognosis in patients with ISSNHL due to ILH. This study aimed to investigate the difference in impaired hearing patterns and prognosis for hearing recovery between patients with ISSNHL due to ILH confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sex- and age-matched patients with ISSNHL due to causes other than ILH. Subjects and Methods We compared the results of audiometry and MRI in 12 patients who had ILH on MRI (hemorrhage group) and in 23 sex- and age-matched controls without abnormal findings related to their hearing loss on MRI (non-hemorrhage group). Initial hearing impairment, progression, and recovery of hearing loss were compared between the two groups. Results A majority of patients (92%) in the hemorrhage group complained of dizziness. Initial hearing impairment was more frequent in the hemorrhage group than in the non-hemorrhage group (94.09±35.9 vs. 66.66±30.1, p-value=0.036). The final recovery threshold in the hemorrhage group was worse (78.19±46.26 vs. 37.17±31.96, p-value=0.014) than that in the non-hemorrhage group. In the hemorrhage group, hearing recovery seemed to occur less often at high frequencies (2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz) than at low frequencies (250, 500, and 1,000 Hz). Conclusions The presence of ILH was associated with poor hearing prognosis and the occurrence of vertigo. The abrupt onset of hearing loss associated with vertigo and the presence of hyperresonance on fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI images of labyrinthic fluid strongly suggests acute intralabyrinthine hemorrhage, and is predictive of considerable hearing impairment and poor prognosis. PMID:27144231

  6. Even in the era of congenital hypothyroidism screening mild and subclinical sensorineural hearing loss remains a relatively common complication of severe congenital hypothyroidism.

    Bruno, Rocco; Aversa, Tommaso; Catena, Mariaausilia; Valenzise, Mariella; Lombardo, Fortunato; De Luca, Filippo; Wasniewska, Malgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Only few studies have focused on neurosensory hearing function of patients with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) identified by CH screening programs and treated early and, therefore, this issue remains still controversial. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether an early and adequate replacement treatment may be able to prevent sensorineural hearing loss in 32 screened children with CH and no associated risk factors for neuro-otologic alterations. These patients were recruited according to highly selective criteria aiming to preliminarily exclude the negative interference of both treatment variables and other underlying risk factors. All the selected patients underwent, at a median age of 15.4 years, an audiologic investigation, which evidenced a mild and subclinical hearing loss in 25% of them. The poorest hearing scores were recorded in the individuals with athyreosis and in those with absence of distal femur bony nucleus at CH diagnosis. The prevalence of hearing impairment was significantly higher in CH patients than in 32 age-matched control subjects with no CH (χ(2) = 6.3, p treatment; b) the risk of hearing loss is higher in CH young patients than in age-matched control subjects without CH; c) the risk of hearing loss is closely associated with the severity of CH; d) this risk is particularly relevant in the children with pre-natal onset of hypothyroidism. PMID:25987501

  7. Hearing Loss Alters Serotonergic Modulation of Intrinsic Excitability in Auditory Cortex

    Rao, Deepti; Basura, Gregory J.; Roche, Joseph; Daniels, Scott; Mancilla, Jaime G.; Manis, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss during early childhood alters auditory cortical evoked potentials in humans and profoundly changes auditory processing in hearing-impaired animals. Multiple mechanisms underlie the early postnatal establishment of cortical circuits, but one important set of developmental mechanisms relies on the neuromodulator serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]). On the other hand, early sensory activity may also regulate the establishment of adultlike 5-HT receptor expression an...

  8. Pitch, loudness and frequency selectivity in low-frequency hearing loss

    Brännström, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Ménière's disease and cochlear hydrops show fluctuating low-frequency hearing loss (FLFHL). At present these changes are followed as patients' subjective reports and occasional measurements. Consecutive long-term measurements should provide more comprehensive information on the hearing fluctuations than the occasional audiogram used today and constitute an approach to quantify the fluctuations. Quantifications could potentially be used to define disease subgroups and to...

  9. Hearing loss in Pompe disease revisited: results from a study of 24 children

    van Capelle, Carine I.; Goedegebure, Andre; Homans, Nienke C.; Hoeve, Hans L. J.; Reuser, Arnold J.; van der Ploeg, Ans T.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLittle information is available regarding the auditory function in Pompe patients. Hearing loss has been reported in classic infantile patients, but it is still unknown whether central nervous system involvement interferes with auditory function and whether enzyme replacement therapy can improve hearing. Auditory function has not been studied in children with milder forms of the disease. We analyzed repetitive auditory brainstem response measurements and pure tone audiometry in 24...

  10. Cochlear Implantation for Profound Hearing Loss After Multimodal Treatment for Neuroblastoma in Children

    Ryu, Nam-Gyu; Moon, Il Joon; Chang, Young Soo; Kim, Byoung Kil; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neuroblastoma (NBL) predominantly affects children under 5 years of age. Through multimodal therapy, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, the survival rate in patients with NBL have improved while treatment-related complications have also increased. Treatment-related ototoxicity, mainly from cisplatin, can result in profound hearing loss requiring cochlear implantation (CI). We analyzed the effectiveness and hearing preserva...

  11. Low Frequency Fluctuated Hearing Loss in a Case with Vestibular Schwannomas

    Mahin Sedaei

    1998-01-01

    A 34-year-old female with a history of a sudden mild left-sided hearing loss and high-pitched tinnitus along with fullness in the same ear was referred to the audiology clinic. Hearing fluctuation and variability in other symptoms were also reported. Although no complain of any vertigo or balance disorder was mentioned, light headedness was implied. Differential diagnosis of endolymphatic Fistula and retro cochlear lesion was demanded. Audiologic and radiologic findings of this patient are pr...

  12. Audio-visual speechreading in a group of hearing aid users. The effects of onset age, handicap age, and degree of hearing loss.

    Tillberg, I; Rönnberg, J; Svärd, I; Ahlner, B

    1996-01-01

    Speechreading ability was investigated among hearing aid users with different time of onset and different degree of hearing loss. Audio-visual and visual-only performance were assessed. One group of subjects had been hearing-impaired for a large part of their lives, and the impairments appeared early in life. The other group of subjects had been impaired for a fewer number of years, and the impairments appeared later in life. Differences between the groups were obtained. There was no significant difference on the audio-visual test between the groups in spite of the fact that the early onset group scored very poorly auditorily. However, the early-onset group performed significantly better on the visual test. It was concluded that the visual information constituted the dominant coding strategy for the early onset group. An interpretation chiefly in terms of early onset may be the most appropriate, since dB loss variations as such are not related to speechreading skill. PMID:8976000

  13. Sudden hearing loss associated with peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy during hepatitis C treatment

    2007-01-01

    Adverse effects associated with peginterferon and ribavirin during hepatitis C treatment are well known. Sudden hearing loss has rarely been reported. Possible mechanisms involved include direct ototoxicity of interferon, autoimmunity, and hematological changes. Hearing loss is frequently fully resolved after discontinuation of antiviral therapy. We report a 47-yearold man with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 2 ac who developed sudden hearing loss 22 wk after starting therapy with peginterferon alpha 2a at a dose of 180 μg per week and ribavirin 800 mg per day. Since symptoms did not worsen, antiviral therapy was continued for 2 wk, according to the patient's wish. Hearing loss resolved within 2 wk after the end of treatment. Serum liver alanine aminotransferase remained normal during and after the end of antiviral therapy. HCV RNA was undetectable at the end of therapy and remained negative 24 wk later. Thus, patients should be aware that hearing loss may occur with peginterferon therapy, but the decision whether to continue or to stop the treatment is based on the clinical judgment of the physician and the wishes of the patient.

  14. Schools of music and conservatories and hearing loss prevention.

    Chesky, Kris

    2011-03-01

    Music students are not being taught that music is a sound source capable of harming hearing. Ensemble directors of public school and college bands, orchestras, and choirs, are unaware and unprepared to recognize and manage risk from excessive sound exposures. Schools of music and conservatories around the world, and the organizations that accredit them, need to embrace the idea that schools of music are best suited to facilitate change, conduct research, create and impart knowledge, institute competency, and most importantly, cultivate a culture of responsibility and accountability throughout the music discipline. By drawing attention to actions pursued at and through the College of Music at the University of North Texas, the purpose of this paper is to encourage change and to assist others in efforts to reach the best conditions for preventing irreversible hearing disorders associated with music. PMID:21288066

  15. The benefits of Square dancing as a means of physical activity for Czech dancers with hearing loss

    Petra Kurková

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing, a strong line of communication that enables individuals to learn about the world around them, is a major factor contributing to the psychomotor development of every individual. Hearing loss can also affect the conception and perception of sounds and rhythm. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse the benefits of Square and Round dancing for persons with hearing loss. Methods: The present study is an analytic-descriptive qualitative research. The sample was constituted non-probabilistically based on the following features: a a participant had to have hearing problems (hearing loss and b had to have participated regularly in Square dance for at least two years. Each participant was asked to name possible people to be interviewed (snowball technique. We analysed the data of 7 individuals (6 males and 1 female with hearing loss. The mean age of the dancers with hearing loss was 51.3 years. The participants had no cochlear implants or any other physical or vision related impairments. Results: The present findings constitute the first published survey regarding Czech Square dancers' status, their family's hearing status, hearing aid use, communication preference, education in integrated or segregated settings, the influence of family background on dance initiation, coach preference (hearing or deaf, and the environment for participation in Square dance as a mode of physical activity with regular dancers and with dancers with hearing loss as well. In the present sample of dancers with hearing loss, most were from hearing families and had hearing siblings. The degree to which individuals with hearing loss feel comfortable with the hearing world appears to influence their later preference for participating in regular, as opposed to segregated, physical activities. More than half of the dancers with hearing loss who participated in this research study would like to meet with the deaf minority. One of the

  16. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B.; Sweeney, Alex D.; Bennett, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly...

  17. Hearing Loss in Stranded Odontocete Dolphins and Whales

    Mann, David; Hill-Cook, Mandy; Manire, Charles; Greenhow, Danielle; Montie, Eric; Powell, Jessica; Wells, Randall; Bauer, Gordon; Cunningham-Smith, Petra; Lingenfelser, Robert; DiGiovanni, Robert; Stone, Abigale; Brodsky, Micah; Stevens, Robert; Kieffer, George

    2010-01-01

    The causes of dolphin and whale stranding can often be difficult to determine. Because toothed whales rely on echolocation for orientation and feeding, hearing deficits could lead to stranding. We report on the results of auditory evoked potential measurements from eight species of odontocete cetaceans that were found stranded or severely entangled in fishing gear during the period 2004 through 2009. Approximately 57% of the bottlenose dolphins and 36% of the rough-toothed dolphins had signif...

  18. Evolução da perda auditiva no decorrer do envelhecimento Hearing loss in aging

    Giovana dos Santos Baraldi

    2007-02-01

    later divided into four groups according to age range. RESULTS: Significant threshold drop in the four established age groups, decrease in speech recognition ratio, and a significant difference regarding gender. CONCLUSION: As age advanced there was a gradual increase in hearing loss, men showed a lower threshold in the 4000Hz frequency when compared to women, and in the speech intelligibility test thre was also a gradual decrease with aging.

  19. Folic acid deficiency induces premature hearing loss through mechanisms involving cochlear oxidative stress and impairment of homocysteine metabolism

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Garrido, Francisco; Partearroyo, Teresa; Cediel, Rafael; Varela, Gregorio; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Pajares, María A.

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional imbalance is emerging as a causative factor of hearing loss. Epidemiologic studies have linked hearing loss to elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and folate deficiency, and have shown that folate supplementation lowers tHcy levels potentially ameliorating age-related hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to address the impact of folate deficiency on hearing loss and to examine the underlying mechanisms. For this purpose, 2-mo-old C57BL/6J mice (Animalia Chordata Mus m...

  20. Genome-wide association analysis on normal hearing function identifies PCDH20 and SLC28A3 as candidates for hearing function and loss.

    Vuckovic, Dragana; Dawson, Sally; Scheffer, Deborah I; Rantanen, Taina; Morgan, Anna; Di Stazio, Mariateresa; Vozzi, Diego; Nutile, Teresa; Concas, Maria P; Biino, Ginevra; Nolan, Lisa; Bahl, Aileen; Loukola, Anu; Viljanen, Anne; Davis, Adrian; Ciullo, Marina; Corey, David P; Pirastu, Mario; Gasparini, Paolo; Girotto, Giorgia

    2015-10-01

    Hearing loss and individual differences in normal hearing both have a substantial genetic basis. Although many new genes contributing to deafness have been identified, very little is known about genes/variants modulating the normal range of hearing ability. To fill this gap, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis on hearing thresholds (tested at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 kHz) and on pure-tone averages (low-, medium- and high-frequency thresholds grouped) in several isolated populations from Italy and Central Asia (total N = 2636). Here, we detected two genome-wide significant loci close to PCDH20 and SLC28A3 (top hits: rs78043697, P = 4.71E-10 and rs7032430, P = 2.39E-09, respectively). For both loci, we sought replication in two independent cohorts: B58C from the UK (N = 5892) and FITSA from Finland (N = 270). Both loci were successfully replicated at a nominal level of significance (P < 0.05). In order to confirm our quantitative findings, we carried out RT-PCR and reported RNA-Seq data, which showed that both genes are expressed in mouse inner ear, especially in hair cells, further suggesting them as good candidates for modulatory genes in the auditory system. Sequencing data revealed no functional variants in the coding region of PCDH20 or SLC28A3, suggesting that variation in regulatory sequences may affect expression. Overall, these results contribute to a better understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying human hearing function. PMID:26188009

  1. [Clinical observations of acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss considered as cochlear hydrops].

    Yamasoba, T; Sugasawa, T; Yagi, M; Harada, T; Futaki, T

    1990-02-01

    Acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) has the following three criteria; obscure origin, acute onset and sensorineural hearing loss limited to low frequencies. Sixteen cases of ALHL which were considered as cochlear hydrops using glycerol test and electrocochleogram were studied. All patients visited our department within two weeks after onset and were followed up for one year or more after initial examination. The subjective symptoms, the character of vestibular and hearing impairment and prognosis of 16 cases with ALHL were also investigated. The results were as follows. 1. Patients complained of ear fullness rather than hearing impairment. Four patients were unaware of hearing loss. 2. Recruitment phenomenon was found in all of 15 cases examined. Vestibular findings were mostly normal, except that spontaneous nystagmus was found in two cases and head-shaking nystagmus in one. 3. Recurrence and fluctuation of hearing impairment occurred in 14 cases. Three cases had an attack of rotatory vertigo once and two has diagnosed as Meniere's disease later. 4. During three months prior to last examination, hearing was stabilized in nine cases and continued to fluctuate in seven cases. In the former, hearing was improved in four cases, unchanged in three, and worsened in two. 5. Two patients underwent an endolymphatic sac operation and have had a good prognosis. 6. The authors suggest that most of ALHL should be considered as transient cochlear hydrops because the subjective symptom and audiological and vestibular findings of our cases are similar to those of cases which were reported as ALHL by other investigators. According to the findings of glycerol test and electrocochleogram, endolymphatic hydrops in ALHL is considered to exist in all turns of cochlea. PMID:2348281

  2. A review of new insights on the association between hearing loss and cognitive decline in ageing.

    Fortunato, S; Forli, F; Guglielmi, V; De Corso, E; Paludetti, G; Berrettini, S; Fetoni, A R

    2016-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) has a multifactorial pathogenesis and it is an inevitable hearing impairment associated with reduction of communicative skills related to ageing. Increasing evidence has linked ARHL to more rapid progression of cognitive decline and incidental dementia. Many aspects of daily living of elderly people have been associated to hearing abilities, showing that hearing loss (HL) affects the quality of life, social relationships, motor skills, psychological aspects and function and morphology in specific brain areas. Epidemiological and clinical studies confirm the assumption of a relationship between these conditions. However, the mechanisms are still unclear and are reviewed herein. Long-term hearing deprivation of auditory inputs can impact cognitive performance by decreasing the quality of communication leading to social isolation and depression and facilitate dementia. On the contrary, the limited cognitive skills may reduce the cognitive resources available for auditory perception, increasing the effects of HL. In addition, hearing loss and cognitive decline may reflect a 'common cause' on the auditory pathway and brain. In fact, some pathogenetic factors are recongised in common microvascular disease factors such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Interdisciplinary efforts to investigate and address HL in the context of brain and cognitive ageing are needed. Surprisingly, few studies have been adressed on the effectiveness of hearing aids in changing the natural history of cognitive decline. Effective interventions with hearing aids or cochlear implant may improve social and emotional function, communication, cognitive function and positively impact quality of life. The aim of this review is to overview new insights on this challenging topic and provide new ideas for future research. PMID:27214827

  3. Detection of Left-Sided and Right-Sided Hearing Loss via Fractional Fourier Transform

    Shuihua Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect hearing loss more efficiently and accurately, this study proposed a new method based on fractional Fourier transform (FRFT. Three-dimensional volumetric magnetic resonance images were obtained from 15 patients with left-sided hearing loss (LHL, 20 healthy controls (HC, and 14 patients with right-sided hearing loss (RHL. Twenty-five FRFT spectrums were reduced by principal component analysis with thresholds of 90%, 95%, and 98%, respectively. The classifier is the single-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network (SFN trained by the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. The results showed that the accuracies of all three classes are higher than 95%. In all, our method is promising and may raise interest from other researchers.

  4. Denervation of the Eustachian Tube and Hearing Loss Following Trigeminal Schwannoma Resection

    Ito, Christopher J.; Malone, Alexander K.; Wong, Ricky H.; van Loveren, Harry R.; Boyev, K. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To discuss eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) as a cause of hearing loss and to discuss its pathogenesis following resection of trigeminal schwannomas. Methods Presented herein are two cases of trigeminal schwannoma that were resected surgically with sacrifice of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve. Neither of the cases had evidence of extracranial extension nor preoperative ETD. Both patients developed ETD and have been followed without evidence of schwannoma recurrence. Conclusions Trigeminal schwannomas are rare tumors that typically require surgical resection. Hearing loss is a potential postsurgical deficit and warrants evaluation by an otolaryngologist with consideration given to a preoperative audiogram. ETD as a result of trigeminal motor branch sacrifice should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative hearing loss in this patient subset as it may be reversed with placement of a tympanostomy tube. PMID:26937336

  5. Intratympanic dexamethasone injection vs methylprednisolone for the treatment of refractory sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Berjis, Nezamoddin; Soheilipour, Saeed; Musavi, Alireza; Hashemi, Seyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: During the past years various drugs have been used for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) treatment including steroids that are shown to be beneficial. Directed delivery of high doses of steroids into the inner ear is suggested for its potential and known as intratympanic steroids therapy (IST). Despite the use of dexamethasone and methylprednisolone as the traditional treatments, there are still debates about the optimal dosage, preferred drug, and the route of administration. Materials and Methods: We performed a randomized clinical trial study in which 50 patients suffering from SSNHL and resistant to standard therapy were employed. Each patient took 0.5 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg/mg) along with bicarbonate or dexamethasone (4 mg/mL) through direct intratympanic injection. This method was performed and scheduled once every 2 days for three times only for the dexamethasone receiving group. Hearing test was carried out and the results were analyzed according to a four-frequency (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 kHz) pure tone average (PTA) and Siegel's criteria. Results: According to Siegel's criteria, three out of 25 (12%) dexamethasone receiving patients were healed in 1 and 4 (16%), 9 (32%) were respectively recovered in Siegel's criteria 2, 3, and 9 (32%) showed no recovery. In the group receiving methylprednisolone, recovery was found in 6 (24%), 8 (32%), 7 (28%) patients in the Siegel's criteria 1, 2, 3, respectively, and in 4 (16%) patients no recovery was recorded. In methylprednisolone group, hearing was significantly improved compared to the dexamethasone group (P therapies by Dexamethasone.

  6. Study the Age of Hearing Loss Diagnosis and the Related Factors in a Group of School-Age Children in Baghch-e-Ban School of Hard of Hearing

    Mahnaz Ahmadi

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Estimation of the age of hearing loss diagnosis in every society is recommended to be compared with standard criteria to establish common dirth in management and rehabilitation. This study was conducted in order to determine the age of hearing loss diagnosis with respect to common criteria in Baghche-Ban school of hard of hearing children in Tehran.Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 445 children in stages 2, 6 and 10 of Baghche-Ban school of hard of hearing participated. the research was performed by means of the three-stages questionaires that children filled with help of their parents.Results: The mean age of detection of hearing loss in both acquired and congenital hearing loss in children was 3.5 year-old. while the age in which hearing loss was doubted was 1.8 year-old. In another word the mean age of hearing loss detection decreased as the hearing loss increases(in moderate- profound hearing loss(P<0.01. Conclusion: among the refrence sources for refering children with hearing loss the least refering was related to physicians. Adversly the mean age of doubting and detection of hearing loss increased in children with family history of hearing loss.(P<0.01. Meanwhile no relationship was detected between the age of diagnosis of hearing loss and the number of deaf members in the family(P<0.02.

  7. Non-flat audiograms in sensorineural hearing loss and speech perception

    Kelly Cristina Lira de Andrade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The audibility thresholds for the sound frequency of 137 upward- and downward-sloping audiograms showing sensorineural hearing loss were selected and analyzed in conjunction with speech recognition thresholds obtained from individuals seen at a public otolaryngology clinic to determine which frequencies in slope audiograms best represent speech recognition thresholds. METHOD: The linear regression model and mean square error were used to determine the associations between the threshold values. RESULT: The mean square error identified larger errors when using thresholds of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz than when using audibility thresholds of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. The linear regression model showed a higher correlation (91% between the audiogram thresholds for frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz than for the frequencies of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (88%. CONCLUSION: Frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were the most significant in predicting the speech recognition threshold.

  8. Dual Language versus English-Only Support for Bilingual Children with Hearing Loss Who Use Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    Bunta, Ferenc; Douglas, Michael; Dickson, Hanna; Cantu, Amy; Wickesberg, Jennifer; Gifford, René H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a critical need to understand better speech and language development in bilingual children learning two spoken languages who use cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing aids (HAs). The paucity of knowledge in this area poses a significant barrier to providing maximal communicative outcomes to a growing number of children who have…

  9. New language outcome measures for Mandarin speaking children with hearing loss

    Xueman Liu; Jill de Villiers; Wendy Lee; Chunyan Ning; Eric Rolfhus; Teresa Hutchings; Fan Jiang; Yiwen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:The paper discusses recent evidence on the assessment of language outcomes in children with hearing loss acquiring oral language. Methods: Research emphasizes that language tests must be specific enough to capture subtle deficits in vocabulary and grammar learning at different developmental ages. The Diagnostic Receptive and Expressive Assessment of Mandarin (DREAM) was carefully designed to be a comprehensive standardized Mandarin assessment normed in Mainland China. Results:This paper summarizes the evidence-based item design process and validity and reliability results of DREAM. A pilot study reported here shows that DREAM provided detailed information about hearing impaired children's language abilities and can be used to aid intervention planning to maximize progress. Conclusion: DREAM represents an example of translational science, transferring methods from empirical studies of language acquisition in research environments into applied domains such as assessment and intervention. Research on outcomes in China will advance significantly with the availability of evidence-based comprehensive language tests that measure a sufficient age range of skills, are normed on Mandarin speaking children in mainland China, and are designed to capture features central to Mandarin language acquisition.

  10. Permanent hearing loss among professional spice grinders in an urban community in southwest Nigeria.

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Bamigboye, Babatunde A; Somefun, Abayomi O

    2012-02-01

    This study set out to determine the pattern and predictors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among small-scale and self-employed chili pepper grinders in Lagos, Southwest Nigeria. Audiological evaluation was conducted for all participants after noise level measurement. Of 136 studied, 85 (62.5%) were confirmed with slight-to-moderate NIHL. Mean age was 40.2 years, mean years spent as grinders was 9.3 years and mean hours spent daily at work was 13.3 hours. The mean age of those with NIHL was significantly higher than those without. Spending over 10 years in commercial grinding and working ≤12 hours daily were predictive of NIHL. Questionnaire-based screening using symptoms of NIHL was associated with a sensitivity of 44.7%, specificity of 62.7%, and positive predictive value of 66.7%. In conclusion, pepper grinding is associated with high/excessive noise levels and NIHL. Hearing conservation program incorporating engineering modification of locally fabricated grinders is warranted in this and similar populations in developing countries. PMID:22173475

  11. A Narrow Internal Auditory Canal with Duplication in a Patient with Congenital Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) with duplication is a rare anomaly of the temporal bone. It is associated with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve may cause the hearing loss. We present an unusual case of an isolated narrow IAC with duplication that was detected by a CT scan. In this case, the IAC was divided by a bony septum into an empty stenotic inferoposterior portion and a large anterosuperior portion containing the facial nerve that was clearly delineated on MRI

  12. Personal listening devices and the prevention of noise induced hearing loss in children: The cheers for ears pilot program

    Dunay Schmulian Taljaard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether the Cheers for Ears Program on noise induced hearing loss prevention was effective in improving current knowledge of noise impact of personal listening devices on hearing, and in changing self-reported listening behavior of primary school students aged between 9 years and 13 years. A survey study was implemented at participating primary schools. Schools represented various levels of socio-economic status. Informed consent (parents and teachers and informed assent (pupils were obtained. All pupils participated in two interactive sessions (the second 6 weeks after first and only those who provided assent and consent were surveyed at three points during the study: Prior to the first session (baseline, directly post-session and at 3 months post-session. A total of 318 pupils were surveyed. The median age of the participants was 11 years (nearly 50% of the total cohort. Significant changes are reported in their knowledge about hearing and in listening behavior of the participants as measured by pre- and post-measurement. The changes in behaviors were stable and sustained at 3 months post-intervention survey point and the success of the program can be attributed to the multimodal interactive nature of the sessions, the spacing of the sessions and the survey points. Wide-ranging support from schools and departments also played a role. The pilot Cheers for Ears Program is effective in increasing knowledge on the harmful effects of noise and therefore, it may prevent future noise-induced hearing loss.

  13. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation is associated with computer-based auditory training uptake, engagement, and adherence for people with hearing loss

    Helen eHenshaw; Abby eMcCormack; Melanie Ann Ferguson

    2015-01-01

    Hearing aid intervention typically occurs after significant delay, or not at all, resulting in an unmet need for many people with hearing loss. Computer-based auditory training (CBAT) may provide generalized benefits to real-world listening, particularly in adverse listening conditions, and can be conveniently delivered in the home environment. Yet as with any intervention, adherence to CBAT is critical to its success. The main aim of this investigation was to explore motivations for uptake, ...

  14. Prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among people working with sound systems and general population in Brazil: A cross-sectional study

    Trevisani Virgínia FM

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Music is ever present in our daily lives, establishing a link between humans and the arts through the senses and pleasure. Sound technicians are the link between musicians and audiences or consumers. Recently, general concern has arisen regarding occurrences of hearing loss induced by noise from excessively amplified sound-producing activities within leisure and professional environments. Sound technicians' activities expose them to the risk of hearing loss, and consequently put at risk their quality of life, the quality of the musical product and consumers' hearing. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among sound technicians in Brazil and compare this with a control group without occupational noise exposure. Methods This was a cross-sectional study comparing 177 participants in two groups: 82 sound technicians and 95 controls (non-sound technicians. A questionnaire on music listening habits and associated complaints was applied, and data were gathered regarding the professionals' numbers of working hours per day and both groups' hearing complaint and presence of tinnitus. The participants' ear canals were visually inspected using an otoscope. Hearing assessments were performed (tonal and speech audiometry using a portable digital AD 229 E audiometer funded by FAPESP. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the sound technicians and controls regarding age and gender. Thus, the study sample was homogenous and would be unlikely to lead to bias in the results. A statistically significant difference in hearing loss was observed between the groups: 50% among the sound technicians and 10.5% among the controls. The difference could be addressed to high sound levels. Conclusion The sound technicians presented a higher prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure than did the general population, although

  15. [The prevention of noise inducted hearing loss: the new challenge of active electronic hearing protection].

    Giordano, Carlo; Cociglio, Marco; Nadalin, Juri; Bronuzzi, Fabrizio; Raimondo, Luca; Riva, Giuseppe; Pira, Enrico; Coggiola, Maurizio; Victorians, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Based on today's common hearing aid design and technology, the team of researchers successfully designed a DPI which allows the worker to be "protected" against loudness and in the same time guarantee a good level of communication and perception of the surrounding environment. The design of this new device is very much similar to a standard BTE hearing aid which allows the use of an active DPI very comfortable, robust and easy to use. The research using the prototypes was divided into 3 phases: Phase 1: 24 volunteers coming from non-industry companies did undergo a specific trial protocol. Phase 2: 6 workers coming from a mining company did undergo the same protocol used in Phase 1. Phase 3: The Acoustics Laboratory from the "Energetica" Department of the Polytechnic of Turin (University/Institute) took objective measures for the DPI attenuation figures used in phase 1 and 2. PMID:22073685

  16. Study on high risk factors of neonatal hearing loss failing in hearing screening%听力筛查未通过的新生儿听力损失的高危因素研究

    孙磊; 郭玲

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析听力筛查未通过的新生儿听力损失的高危因素.方法:对43 568例新生儿出生后3~5天用耳声发射仪进行初筛,初筛未通过者在出生后42天内进行复筛,复筛未通过者在出生后3月内用脑干听觉诱发电位仪、声导抗、诊断型耳声发射进行听力障碍的诊断.结果:43 568例新生儿复筛未通过者802例,进行初次诊断者660例,占全部听力筛查儿的1.51%,其中256人出现不同程度的听力损失(含分泌性中耳炎导致的传导性听力损失),重度聋在听力筛查儿中的发生率为1.45‰.分泌性中耳炎发生率在听力损失组与听力正常组差异有统计学意义(x2检验,P<0.01).1∶1配对的病例对照多因素分析显示听力损失家族史是听力损失的独立危险因素.结论:听力筛查未通过的新生儿中,约一半听力损失伴有分泌性中耳炎,听力损失家族史是新生儿听力损失高危因素,应加强妇幼保健宣传教育,针对迟发性听力损失,应重视随访.%Objective: To analyze the high risk factors of neonatal hearing loss failing in hearing screening. Methods: Primary screening was conducted in 43 568 neonates at 3 - 5 days after birth with distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), the neonates failing in primary screening received the second screening at 42 days after birth, then the neonates failing in the second screening received diagnosis of hearing loss within three months after birth with brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) , acoustic immitance, and DPOAE. Results: Among 43 568 neonates, 802 neonates failed in the second screening, 660 neonates received primary diagnosis, accounting for 1. 51% of all the neonates, 256 neonates were found with different degrees of hearing loss (including the neonates with conductive hearing loss induced by secretory otitis media) , the incidence rate of severe deafness in neonatal hearing screening was 1.45%0. There was statistically significant

  17. Swept-sine noise-induced damage as a hearing loss model for preclinical assays

    Lorena eSanz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models are key tools for studying cochlear alterations in noise-induced hearing loss and for evaluating new therapies. Stimuli used to induce deafness in mice are usually white and octave band noises that include very low frequencies, considering the large mouse auditory range. We designed different sound stimuli, enriched in frequencies up to 20 kHz (violet noises to examine their impact on hearing thresholds and cochlear cytoarchitecture after short exposure. In addition, we developed a cytocochleogram to quantitatively assess the ensuing structural degeneration and its functional correlation. Finally, we used this mouse model and cochleogram procedure to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of transforming growth factor β1 inhibitors P17 and P144 on noise-induced hearing loss. CBA mice were exposed to violet swept-sine noise with different frequency ranges (2-20 or 9-13 kHz and levels (105 or 120 dB SPL for 30 minutes. Mice were evaluated by auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emission tests prior to and 2, 14 and 28 days after noise exposure. Cochlear pathology was assessed with gross histology; hair cell number was estimated by a stereological counting method. Our results indicate that functional and morphological changes induced by violet swept-sine noise depend on the sound level and frequency composition. Partial hearing recovery followed the exposure to 105 dB SPL, whereas permanent cochlear damage resulted from the exposure to 120 dB SPL. Exposure to 9-13 kHz noise caused an auditory threshold shift in those frequencies that correlated with hair cell loss in the corresponding areas of the cochlea that were spotted on the cytocochleogram. In summary, we present mouse models of noise-induced hearing loss, which depending on the sound properties of the noise, cause different degrees of cochlear damage, and could therefore be used to study molecules which are potential players in hearing loss protection and repair.

  18. Low Iron Diet Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Young Rats

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    noise exposure compared to control (p < 0.05). The average number of young rat SGCs from the ID group were significantly decreased in the basal turn of the cochlea compared to the control (p < 0.05). Therefore, ID without anemia delayed the recovery from noise-induced hearing loss and ribbon synapses damage, increased SGCs loss, and upregulated prestin after noise exposure. Thus, the cochleae in rat pups with ID without anemia were potentially susceptible to loud noise exposure, and this deficit may be attributed to the reduction of ribbon synapses and SGCs. PMID:27483303

  19. Low Iron Diet Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Young Rats.

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    average number of young rat SGCs from the ID group were significantly decreased in the basal turn of the cochlea compared to the control (p < 0.05). Therefore, ID without anemia delayed the recovery from noise-induced hearing loss and ribbon synapses damage, increased SGCs loss, and upregulated prestin after noise exposure. Thus, the cochleae in rat pups with ID without anemia were potentially susceptible to loud noise exposure, and this deficit may be attributed to the reduction of ribbon synapses and SGCs. PMID:27483303

  20. Long-Term Dietary Folate Deficiency Accelerates Progressive Hearing Loss on CBA/Ca Mice

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Partearroyo, Teresa; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Pajares, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary folic acid deficiency induced early hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice after 2-months, corroborates the epidemiological association previously described between vitamin deficiency and this sensory impairment. However, this strain is prone to early hearing loss, and hence we decided to analyze whether the effects exerted by folate deprivation follow the same pattern in a mouse strain such as CBA/Ca, which is resistant to hearing impairment. Here, we show results of a long-term study on hearing carried out on CBA/Ca mice subjected to dietary folate deprivation. Systemic changes included decreased serum folate levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and signs of anemia in the group fed with folate-deficient (FD) diet. Initial signs of hearing loss were detected in this strain after 8-months of vitamin deficiency, and correlated with histological damage in the cochleae. In conclusion, the data presented reinforce the importance of adequate folic acid levels for the auditory system and suggest that the impact of dietary deficiencies may depend on the genetic background.

  1. Evidence of noise-induced hearing loss in young people studying popular music.

    Barlow, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The number of students studying popular music, music technology, and sound engineering courses at both school and university to has increased rapidly in the last few years. These students are generally involved in music-making/recording and listening to a high level, usually in environments with amplified music. Recent studies have shown that these students are potentially exposed to a high risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL( and are not covered by the same regulatory framework as employees. This study examined the pure tone air conduction hearing thresholds of 50 undergraduate students, including recent school leavers, on a range of popular music courses, to assess if there was evidence of hearing loss. Forty-four percent of students showed evidence of audiometric notch at 4-6 kHz, and 16% were classified under the UK Occupational Health and Safety guidelines as exhibiting mild hearing loss. Instance of audiometric notch was considerably higher than reported from studies of the general population but was around the same level or lower than that reported from studies of "traditional" music courses and conservatoires, suggesting no higher risk for popular music students than for "classical" music students. No relationship with age was present, suggesting that younger students were as likely to exhibit audiometric notch as mature students. This indicates that these students may be damaging their hearing through leisure activities while still at school, suggesting a need for robust education measures to focus on noise exposure of young people. PMID:21695357

  2. High-frequency hearing loss, occupational noise exposure and hypertension: a cross-sectional study in male workers

    Lai Jim-Shoung

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between occupational noise exposure and hypertension is inconsistent because of an exposure bias caused by outer-ear measurements of noise levels among workers. This study used hearing loss values (HLVs measured at 4 kHz and 6 kHz in both ears as a biomarker to investigate the chronic effects of noise exposure on hypertension in 790 aircraft-manufacturing workers. Methods Participants were divided into a high hearing loss (HL group (n = 214; average HLVs ≥ 30 decibel [dB] at 4 kHz or 6 kHz bilaterally; 83.1 ± 4.9 A-weighted decibel [dBA], a median HL group (n = 302; 15 ≤ average HLVs Results The prevalence rates of hypertension were significantly higher in the high HL (43.5%; p = 0.021 and median HL (42.1%; p = 0.029 groups than in the low HL group (33.2%. The high HL and median HL workers had 1.48-fold (95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 1.02-2.15; p = 0.040 and 1.46-fold (95%CI = 1.03-2.05; p = 0.031 higher risks of hypertension relative to the low HL workers. Employment duration was significantly and positively correlated with the risk of hypertension among workers with average HLVs ≥ 15 dB at 4 kHz (p Conclusions Our findings suggest that high-frequency hearing loss is a good biomarker of occupational noise exposure and that noise-induced hearing loss may be associated with the risk of hypertension.

  3. Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mn-SOD Heterozygous Knockout Mice

    Makoto Kinoshita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing loss (AHL reduces the quality of life for many elderly individuals. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, one of the antioxidant enzymes acting within the mitochondria, plays a crucial role in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS. To determine whether reduction in Mn-SOD accelerates AHL, we evaluated auditory function in Mn-SOD heterozygous knockout (HET mice and their littermate wild-type (WT C57BL/6 mice by means of auditory brainstem response (ABR. Mean ABR thresholds were significantly increased at 16 months when compared to those at 4 months in both WT and HET mice, but they did not significantly differ between them at either age. The extent of hair cell loss, spiral ganglion cell density, and thickness of the stria vascularis also did not differ between WT and HET mice at either age. At 16 months, immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was significantly greater in the SGC and SV in HET mice compared to WT mice, but that of 4-hydroxynonenal did not differ between them. These findings suggest that, although decrease of Mn-SOD by half may increase oxidative stress in the cochlea to some extent, it may not be sufficient to accelerate age-related cochlear damage under physiological aging process.

  4. Effects of fundamental frequency and vocal-tract length cues on sentence segregation by listeners with hearing loss.

    Mackersie, Carol L; Dewey, James; Guthrie, Lesli A

    2011-08-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of hearing loss on the ability to separate competing talkers using talker differences in fundamental frequency (F0) and apparent vocal-tract length (VTL). Performance of 13 adults with hearing loss and 6 adults with normal hearing was measured using the Coordinate Response Measure. For listeners with hearing loss, the speech was amplified and filtered according to the NAL-RP hearing aid prescription. Target-to-competition ratios varied from 0 to 9 dB. The target sentence was randomly assigned to the higher or lower values of F0 or VTL on each trial. Performance improved for F0 differences up to 9 and 6 semitones for people with normal hearing and hearing loss, respectively, but only when the target talker had the higher F0. Recognition for the lower F0 target improved when trial-to-trial uncertainty was removed (9-semitone condition). Scores improved with increasing differences in VTL for the normal-hearing group. On average, hearing-impaired listeners did not benefit from VTL cues, but substantial inter-subject variability was observed. The amount of benefit from VTL cues was related to the average hearing loss in the 1-3-kHz region when the target talker had the shorter VTL. PMID:21877813

  5. Relation between temporal envelope coding, pitch discrimination, and compression estimates in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss

    Bianchi, Federica; Santurette, Sébastien; Fereczkowski, Michal;

    2015-01-01

    of cochlear compression. Overall, these findings suggest that some HI listeners may benefit from an enhancement of temporal envelope coding in pitch discrimination of unresolved complex tones, and that this enhancement may be also ascribed to a reduction of cochlear compression following SNHL. © 2015......Recent physiological studies in animals showed that noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) increased the amplitude of envelope coding in single auditory-nerve fibers. The present study investigated whether SNHL in human listeners was associated with enhanced temporal envelope coding......, whether this enhancement affected pitch discrimination performance, and whether loss of compression following SNHL was a potential factor in envelope coding enhancement. Envelope processing was assessed in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners in a behavioral amplitude...

  6. Impact of Hearing Loss on Daily Life Style and Schooling among Children between 5 and 15 Years Age-Group

    Hiteshree C Patel, Mohua Moitra, Anjali Modi, Jaymin Contractor, S L Kantharia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: “Hearing”- one of the five special senses with which a human is gifted. At times, due to variety of reasons, this sense is impaired. Hearing impairment of any degree has a profound effect on children. It delays development of speech, slows educational progress and leads to being stigmatized. Objectives: To document the impact of hearing loss in daily life style and schooling of children between 5 and 15 years age-group. Materials & methods: This was cross- sectional study done in Children between 5 and 15 years age-group with hearing loss, coming to an ENT OPD, New Civil Hospital, Surat during the period of 1st August 2011 to 31 July 2012. Results: A total of 246 children were studied. Mean age of the study population was 9±3.46 years. Most common impactin life of children with hearing loss was that “they were not admitted to school by their parents” (31.3%. Among them, 84.4% had congenital deafness and 15.6% had acquired deafness. This difference was statistically significant. (p= 0.002, x2= 8.63. As per parents’ perception, academic performance of the children was significantly associated with type of school (normal Vs deaf & mute school” (p< 0.001. Conclusion: Most common impact was that “children being not admitted to school” and “children were lagging behind in studies”. Among the congenitally deaf children, the quality of life was significantly better in those who attended these special schools (p<0.001.

  7. Reversible induction of phantom auditory sensations through simulated unilateral hearing loss.

    Roland Schaette

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, a phantom auditory sensation, is associated with hearing loss in most cases, but it is unclear if hearing loss causes tinnitus. Phantom auditory sensations can be induced in normal hearing listeners when they experience severe auditory deprivation such as confinement in an anechoic chamber, which can be regarded as somewhat analogous to a profound bilateral hearing loss. As this condition is relatively uncommon among tinnitus patients, induction of phantom sounds by a lesser degree of auditory deprivation could advance our understanding of the mechanisms of tinnitus. In this study, we therefore investigated the reporting of phantom sounds after continuous use of an earplug. 18 healthy volunteers with normal hearing wore a silicone earplug continuously in one ear for 7 days. The attenuation provided by the earplugs simulated a mild high-frequency hearing loss, mean attenuation increased from 30 dB at 3 and 4 kHz. 14 out of 18 participants reported phantom sounds during earplug use. 11 participants presented with stable phantom sounds on day 7 and underwent tinnitus spectrum characterization with the earplug still in place. The spectra showed that the phantom sounds were perceived predominantly as high-pitched, corresponding to the frequency range most affected by the earplug. In all cases, the auditory phantom disappeared when the earplug was removed, indicating a causal relation between auditory deprivation and phantom sounds. This relation matches the predictions of our computational model of tinnitus development, which proposes a possible mechanism by which a stabilization of neuronal activity through homeostatic plasticity in the central auditory system could lead to the development of a neuronal correlate of tinnitus when auditory nerve activity is reduced due to the earplug.

  8. Hearing loss and cochlear damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis, with special reference to the role of neutrophil granulytes

    Brandt, CT; Caye-Thomsen, P; Lund, SP;

    2006-01-01

    augmented neutrophil response on the development of hearing loss and cochlear damage in a model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rats. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and histopathology in rats...

  9. Testing the effects of a message framing intervention on intentions towards hearing loss prevention in adolescents

    Bruijn, G.J. de; Spaans, P.; Jansen, B.; Riet, J.P. van 't

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent hearing loss is a public health problem that has eluded effective intervention. A persuasive message strategy was tested for its effectiveness on adolescents’ intention to listen to music at a reduced volume. The messages manipulated both type of message frame [positive consequence

  10. Testing the Effects of a Message Framing Intervention on Intentions towards Hearing Loss Prevention in Adolescents

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Spaans, Pieter; Jansen, Bastiaan; van't Riet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent hearing loss is a public health problem that has eluded effective intervention. A persuasive message strategy was tested for its effectiveness on adolescents' intention to listen to music at a reduced volume. The messages manipulated both type of message frame [positive consequences of listening to music at a reduced volume…

  11. Lessons for Inclusion: Classroom Experiences of Students with Mild and Moderate Hearing Loss

    Dalton, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Up to 15 % of the student population in integrated classrooms has mild or moderate hearing loss (MMHL) (Niskar et al., 2001), a communication disability that can impact language development, academic performance, and social-emotional quality of life. Due to the mostly intelligible speech of these students, teachers may easily overlook their…

  12. Communication, Academic, and Social Skills of Young Adults with Hearing Loss

    Eriks-Brophy, Alice; Durieux-Smith, Andree; Olds, Janet; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M.; Duquette, Cheryll; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reports on data collected as part of a larger research study designed to investigate factors that facilitate the integration of children with hearing loss into mainstream environments. Aspects of communicative, academic, and social functioning for 43 adolescents and young adults were examined using questionnaires. In addition,…

  13. Modification of Speech Discrimination in Patients with Binaural Asymmetrical Hearing Loss

    Arkebauer, Herbert J.; Mencher, George T.

    1971-01-01

    Testing of patients with bilateral asymmetrical hearing losses for differences in speech discrimination under varying listening conditions showed detrimental interaction between ears. Also, when difference between ears was greater, speech discrimination was better, and the greater the impairment in better ear, the greater results obtained by…

  14. Telepractice: A Wide-Angle View for Persons with Hearing Loss

    Cohn, Ellen R.; Cason, Jana

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the current status of telepractice as a service delivery model for persons with hearing loss. Telepractice can be broadly viewed as the delivery of preventative, habilitation, or rehabilitation services through telecommunications technology. Telemedicine and telehealth are closely aligned to telepractice, often with overlapping…

  15. No hearing loss after repeated courses of tobramycin in cystic fibrosis patients

    Scheenstra, Renske J; Heijerman, Harry G M; Zuur, Charlotte L; Touw, Daan J; Rijntjes, Evert

    2010-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that repeated treatment courses with tobramycin 10 mg/kg (twice daily for 3 weeks) may be safely applied in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with respect to ototoxicity. The risk of hearing loss in this patient group is less than expected, which could be explained by ei

  16. A small molecule mitigates hearing loss in a mouse model of Usher syndrome III.

    Alagramam, Kumar N; Gopal, Suhasini R; Geng, Ruishuang; Chen, Daniel H-C; Nemet, Ina; Lee, Richard; Tian, Guilian; Miyagi, Masaru; Malagu, Karine F; Lock, Christopher J; Esmieu, William R K; Owens, Andrew P; Lindsay, Nicola A; Ouwehand, Krista; Albertus, Faywell; Fischer, David F; Bürli, Roland W; MacLeod, Angus M; Harte, William E; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Imanishi, Yoshikazu

    2016-06-01

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3), characterized by progressive deafness, variable balance disorder and blindness, is caused by destabilizing mutations in the gene encoding the clarin-1 (CLRN1) protein. Here we report a new strategy to mitigate hearing loss associated with a common USH3 mutation CLRN1(N48K) that involves cell-based high-throughput screening of small molecules capable of stabilizing CLRN1(N48K), followed by a secondary screening to eliminate general proteasome inhibitors, and finally an iterative process to optimize structure-activity relationships. This resulted in the identification of BioFocus 844 (BF844). To test the efficacy of BF844, we developed a mouse model that mimicked the progressive hearing loss associated with USH3. BF844 effectively attenuated progressive hearing loss and prevented deafness in this model. Because the CLRN1(N48K) mutation causes both hearing and vision loss, BF844 could in principle prevent both sensory deficiencies in patients with USH3. Moreover, the strategy described here could help identify drugs for other protein-destabilizing monogenic disorders. PMID:27110679

  17. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Caye-Thomasen, P.; Brandt, C.T.; Thomsen, J.; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the pneumoco...

  18. Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Newborns Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Shahnaz Pourarian

    2012-03-01

     Conclusion: Auditory function in neonates who are admitted to a NICU, especially those treated with oxygenor antibiotics and those born prematurely, should be assessed during their stay in hospital. The importance of early diagnosis of hearing loss and intervention in these neonates and avoidance of any unnecessary oxygenor antibiotic therapy needs to be further promoted.

  19. Music venues and hearing loss: Opportunities for and barriers to improving environmental conditions

    Vogel, I.; Ploeg, C.P.B. van der; Brug, J.; Raat, H.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the opportunities for and barriers to improving environmental conditions in order to reduce the risk for music-induced hearing loss in people who attend music venues. Individual semi-structured interviews were held with 20 representatives of music venues and of governmental organ

  20. Serving Clients with Hearing Loss: Best Practices in Mental Health Counseling

    Fusick, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the risk factors and characteristics of clients with hearing loss, including inequitable access to education and mental health care services, financial barriers, communication problems, and societal discrimination. Culturally specific counseling approaches and techniques for mental health counselors serving clients with…

  1. The effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus in patients with bilateral hearing loss : A systematic review

    Ramakers, Geerte G J; van Zon, Alice; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present an overview of the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus in adults with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and Embase databases were searched for articles from database inception up to January 13, 2015. METHODS: A system

  2. Discotheques and the Risk of Hearing Loss among Youth: Risky Listening Behavior and Its Psychosocial Correlates

    Vogel, Ineke; Brug, Johannes; Van Der Ploeg, Catharina P. B.; Raat, Hein

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing population at risk of hearing loss and tinnitus due to increasing high-volume music listening. To inform prevention strategies and interventions, this study aimed to identify important protection motivation theory-based constructs as well as the constructs "consideration of future consequences" and "habit strength" as…

  3. Two sisters with mental retardation, cataract, ataxia, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy.

    Begeer, J H; Scholte, F A; van Essen, A J

    1991-01-01

    Two sisters are described with a disorder characterised by mental retardation, congenital cataract, progressive spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and signs of peripheral neuropathy. Progressive hearing loss, ataxia, and polyneuropathy became evident in the third decade. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed including the syndromes described by Berman et al and Koletzko et al.

  4. Experience with cochlear implants in Greenlanders with profound hearing loss living in Greenland

    Homøe, Preben; Andersen, Ture; Grøntved, Aksel;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cochlear implant (CI) treatment was introduced to the world in the 1980s and has become a routine treatment for congenital or acquired severe-to-profound hearing loss. CI treatment requires access to a highly skilled team of ear, nose and throat specialists, audiologists and speech-lan...

  5. Passing otoacustic emissions as a complementar method in the topodiagnosis of the neurosensories hearing loss

    Franceschi, Cacineli Marion de

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To evaluate the otoacustic emissions (EOAETs in patients with neurosensory hearing loss do not belong to the clinical routine. However it would obtain valuables information concerning the topodiagnosis. Objective: To identify signs of retro cochlear alteration in individuals with neurosensory dysacusis diagnosis. Method: A transversal, observational, quantitative and, prospective study. Were analyzed 34 patients' records of users of the Speech Therapy Attendance Service. In the study were included individuals with neurosensory hearing loss of moderate to deep degree. An evaluation of Passing Otoacustic Emissions (EOAETs was performed in all the individuals of the sample. Those that do not presented EOAETs had the external and middle ear' condition evaluates through meatoscopy and tympanometry to eliminate ears with sings of conductive alteration. Results: Before that the exclusion criteria were applied, they have remained 13 individuals, totalizing 26 ears: four with hearing loss of moderate degree (15%, four with moderately severe degree (15%, two with severe degree (8%, 15 with deep degree (58% and, one with deafness (4%. The tympanometric curves found were 22 (85% Type A and, four (15% Type C. It was verified the presence of EOAETs in only two ears (8% of a same individual. Conclusion: It was verified the predominance of the EOAETs absence in individuals with neurosensory hearing loss of moderate to deep degree. In one case the EOAETs were registered, that suggest retrocochlear alteration. Raising suspicion of retrocochlear alterations.

  6. Megadolicho basilar artery as a cause of asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss - case report

    Melo, Antonio Antunes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: At the differentiated diagnosis of asymmetrical sensorineural hearing losses, vascular disorders are present, one of which is megadolicho basilar artery. This disease is generally asymptomatic, and when symptoms are found, they can be caused by a compression or ischemia. Clinically, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, headache, facial hypoesthesia, trigeminal neuralgia, vertigo, diplopia and facial palsy, among others, are likely to occur. The image examination of choice for its diagnosis is nuclear magnetic resonance. The megadolicho basilar artery therapy can be surgical or conservative, according to the associated findings. A multidisciplinary approach, including a neurologist, neurosurgeon and an otorhinolaryngologist is recommended for a proper administration of the case. Objective: Report the case of a patient with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss, diagnosed of megadolicho basilar artery. Case report: JBS, 57-year-old white male with a history of asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and bilateral whistle-like tinnitus for several years. The otorhinolaryngologic evaluation, including otoscopy, anterior rhinoscopy and oral pharynx, was normal. Final Comments: The treatment consisted in following up with the patient, controlling the tinnitus by drugs and using an individual sound amplification apparatus on the left ear.

  7. The Protective Effect of Conditioning on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Is Frequency-Dependent

    Akram Pourbakht

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the extent of temporary threshold shift (TTS and hair cell loss following high level 4 kHz noise exposure with those preconditioned with moderate level 1 and 4 kHz octave band noise. Fifteen Male albino guinea pigs (300- 350 g in weight were randomly allocated into three groups: those exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL (group 1, n=5; those conditioned with 1 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, then exposed to noise (group 2, n=5; those conditioned with 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, then exposed to noise (group 3, n=5. An hour and one week after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated by auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR and then animals were euthanized for histological evaluation. We found that TTS and cochlear damage caused by noise exposure were significantly reduced by 1 kHz and 4 kHz conditioning (P<0.001. We also showed that 4 kHz protocol attenuates noise- induced TTS but no significant TTS reduction occurred by 1 kHz conditioning. Both protocol protected noise-induced cochlear damage. We concluded that lower tone conditioning could not protect against higher tone temporary noise-induced hearing loss, thus conditioning is a local acting and frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  8. Sensorineural Hearing Loss After Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Purpose: To analyze the effects of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in relation to sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) after contemporary treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 87 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were treated with RT or chemoradiotherapy using either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT between 2004 and 2005. Tympanometry and pure-tone audiogram assessments were performed before treatment and then serially at 6-month intervals. The dose-volume data of the cochlea were analyzed. The effects of cisplatin administered in concurrent and nonconcurrent phases was explored. Results: Of the 170 eligible ears, RT (n = 30) and chemoradiotherapy (n = 140) resulted in 40% (n = 12) and 56.4% (n = 79) persistent SNHL (≥15 dB loss), respectively, after a median follow-up of 2 years. SNHL at a high frequency was more frequent statistically in the chemoradiotherapy group than in the RT-alone group (55% vs. 33.3%, p 2 increase (p < 0.01), respectively. Age, gender, and nonconcurrent cisplatin dose were not statistically significant factors. A mean radiation dose to the cochlea of <47 Gy would result in <15% of patients developing severe (≥30 dB) high-frequency SNHL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that high-frequency SNHL is significantly related to the mean cochlea dose and the concurrent cisplatin dose. A mean dose constraint of 47 Gy to the cochlea is recommended to minimize SNHL after chemoradiotherapy.

  9. A Case-control Study on High-risk Factors for Newborn Hearing Loss in Seven Cities of Shandong Province

    NIE Wenying; WU Hanrong; QI Yisheng; LIN Qian; XIANG Lili; LI Hui; LI Yinghui

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the high-risk factors for newborn heating loss and to provide information for preventing the development of hearing loss and delaying its progression, from May 2003 to June 2006, neonates who failed to pass the universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) were referred to Jinan Newborn Hearing Screening and Rehabilitation Center from 7 newborn heating screening centers in seven cities of Shandong province. One-to-one pair-matched case-control method was employed for statistical analysis of the basic features of definitely identified cases. High-risk factors relating to the bilateral hearing loss were evaluated by univariate and multivariate Logistic regression analysis. Our results revealed that 721 transferred newborns who didn't pass the heating screening received audiological and medical evaluation and 367 were confirmed to have heating loss. Of them,177 neonates with heating loss who met the matching requirements were included in the study as subjects. Univariate analysis showed that high-risk factors related to hearing loss incuded age of father, education backgrounds of parents, parity, birth weight, gestational weeks, craniofacial deformity,history of receiving treatment in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), neonatal disease, family history of otopathy and family history of congenital hearing loss. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis revealed that 4 independent risk factors were related to bilateral hearing loss, including parity (OR=16.285, 95% CI 3.379-78.481), neonatal disease (OR=34.968, 95% CI 2.720-449.534),family history of congenital hearing loss (OR=69.488, 95% CI 4.417-1093.300) and birth weight (OR=0.241, 95% CI 0.090-0.648). It is concluded that parity, neonatal disease and family history of hearing loss are the promoting factors of bilateral hearing loss in neonates and appropriate intervention measures should be taken to deal with the risk factors.

  10. The development of noise-induced hearing loss in military trades

    Abel, Sharon M.; Jewell, Stephanie

    2001-05-01

    An investigation is in progress to determine risk factors for the development of noise-induced hearing loss in Canadian Forces personnel. A total of 1057 individuals representing a wide range of military trades have contributed their current audiogram, first audiogram on record, and responses to a 56-item questionnaire. The protocol for the hearing test was standardized and conformed to current audiological practice. The items included in the questionnaire related to demographics, occupational and nonoccupational noise exposure history, training in and utilization of personal hearing protectors, and factors other than noise which might affect hearing (e.g., head injury, ear disease, exposure to solvents, and the use of medications). Analyses are underway to determine the average current hearing thresholds as a function of frequency and change relative to baseline values at recruitment for groups defined by trade, rated noise hazard, and years of service. Preliminary results suggest ways to improve the training of personnel with respect to the effects of both occupational and nonoccupational noise exposure and methods of implementing hearing conservation strategies. The role of head injury, history of ear disease, and the use of medications appear to be small. [Work supported by Veterans Affairs Canada.

  11. Jiang Tang Fang Long Jiao Nang in Treating Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus with Hearing Loss

    LI Rui-yu; LI Meng; WANG Rui; LI Bin; GUO Ya-jing

    2008-01-01

    To study the efficacy and safety of the Jiang Tang Fang Long Jiao Nang (Hypoglycemic Anti-Deafness Capsule) in treating non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus with hearing loss. Methods Two hundred ninety six patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and hearing loss were randomly assigned to a treatment group(n=164, 208 ears) and a control group(n=132,184 ears). Patients in the treatment group were treated with the Jiang Tang Fang Long Jiao Nang and supplement herbal preparations as indicated by traditional Chinese medicine dialectical assessment, while control patients received glibenclamide and conventional treatments for deafness. Hearing, fasting blood glucose (FBG), post-prandial blood glucose(PBG), 24 hour urine sugar, platelet function indices, blood superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxides (LPO) levels, and symptom improvement were compared between the two groups. Results The rate of hearing improvement was 56.7% for the treatment group and 26.6% for the control. FBG, PBG and 24 hour urine sugar improved in both groups, but the last two were superior in the treatment group compared to the control. Symptoms improvement was also superior in the treatment group compared to the control. In patients receiving Jiang Tang Fang Long Jiao Nang treatment, platelet function indices, SOD and LPO were all improved, while only LOP improvement was noticed in control patients. No acute or long-term toxicity was demonstrated for the Jiang Tang Fang Long Jiao Nang in animal tests. The Jiang Tang Fang Long Jiao Nang lowered blood glucose and serum triglycerides in a rat model of alloxan-induced diabetes. Conclusion The Jiang Tang Fang Long Jiao Nang is effective in improving hearing and diabetic indices in diabetic patients with deafness, without significant side effects.

  12. Evaluation of a dual-channel full dynamic range compression system for people with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Moore, B C; Johnson, J S; Clark, T M; Pluvinage, V

    1992-10-01

    This article describes an evaluation of an in the ear hearing aid, which applies fast-acting full dynamic range compression independently in two frequency bands. This can compensate for the loudness recruitment typically associated with sensorineural hearing loss. The crossover frequency between the two bands and the gain and compression ratio in each band are programmable to suit the individual patient. Twenty subjects with moderate sensorineural hearing loss were tested in a counterbalanced order using the aid programmed as a linear amplifier (condition L) and as a two-band compressor (condition C). All subjects were fitted binaurally. Subjects were also tested without hearing aids (condition U) and using the hearing aids that they normally wore (condition Own). Speech intelligibility was measured in quiet at three sound levels (50, 65, and 80 dB SPL), and speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in 12-talker babble were measured under monaurally and binaurally aided conditions, with the speech and babble both coincident and spatially separated. In condition C, speech intelligibility in quiet was high at all sound levels. Speech intelligibility at the two lower levels decreased in condition L, and decreased still further in conditions Own and U. Condition C gave, on average, better speech intelligibility in babble (lower SRTs) than conditions L, Own, or U. The advantage of condition C over condition L varied across subjects and was correlated with the dynamic range for tones at high frequencies; small dynamic ranges were associated with greater benefit from compression. A significant advantage for binaural aiding was found both when the speech and noise were spatially separated and when they were coincident. The binaural advantage was similar for the C and L conditions, indicating that the independent compression at the two ears did not adversely affect the use of binaural cues. Questionnaires on the subjects' experiences with the aids in everyday life indicated that

  13. Postural Evaluation of Vertebral Column in Children and Teenagers with Hearing Loss

    Toscano, Carla Fabiana da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posture is determined by the performance of the visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems. Children with hearing loss can present problems in their posture or postural control, enabling postural deviations and alterations to appear in their vertebral column, possibly provoked by a hypoactivity of the vestibular system as a result of deafness. Objective: To evaluate the posture of the vertebral column in children and teenagers with hearing loss at school age, taking into consideration the sample gender and age. Method: A descriptive and prospective study was performed at both Duque de Caxias School and Rotary Rehabilitation and Special Education Center in Caruaru - Pernambuco. 44 students aged between 7-17 years old, out of whom 22 were female and 22 were male, with hearing loss were evaluated. The study was developed by way of a postural evaluation, using a symmetrograph, marking specific anatomical points with stickers placed over polystyrene balls and fixed with double-sided adhesive tape. Results:The results showed that all of the individuals evaluated in this study presented some kind of postural alteration in their vertebral column. Scoliosis was the most observed alteration among the students (84.1%, followed by thoracic hyperkyphosis (68.2%. Conclusion: It has been concluded that children and teenagers with hearing loss are exposed to postural alteration in their vertebral column. Such a condition can be associated with a number of factors comprising unfavorable ergonomics of the school environment, bad postural habits and impairment of the vestibular system by virtue of the hearing loss.

  14. Self-Evaluation Scores of Hearing Difficulties and Quality of Life Components among Retired Workers with Noise-Related Hearing Loss

    MIYAKITA, T.; UEDA, A.; ZUSHO, H.; KUDOH, Y.

    2002-02-01

    This study is intended to clarify the relationships between hearing loss caused both by noise exposure and aging and self-rated scores of hearing disabilities and to elucidate the structure of the quality of life (QOL) determinants and their moderating conditions among retired workers with noise-related hearing loss. The questionnaire consisted of three parts: background questions, the hearing disabilities and handicap scale (HDHS), and questions regarding QOL covering five areas, self-rated health, personal health practice, social support network, life satisfaction, and life events. Two hundred ten retired workers aged 56-65 years old (60·6±1·6) with noise-related hearing loss responded to our questionnaire. All were previously engaged in noise exposed work such as shipbuilding, steel and woodwork. According to the hearing disability score (DIS score), subjects were divided into three groups and comparisons were made of the hearing handicap score (HD score) among those groups. Although groups with a higher DIS score showed a higher HD score, a large individual difference in HD score was observed in each of the three groups with the same DIS score level. The results of multiple regression analysis including two variables (life satisfaction and HD score) as the dependent variables and seven variables as the independent variables showed that the strongest explanatory variable for life satisfaction was social support network, followed by handicaps caused by hearing disabilities, self-rated health and personal health practice. It was demonstrated that hearing disabilities and handicap measured by the Japanese version of the HDHS were directly associated with the deterioration in QOL. Measures of the social support network, life satisfaction, and hearing disabilities and handicaps may assist in the detection of workers who can be targeted for a variety of interventions, such as audiological rehabilitation or the creation of a barrier-free community that is supportive

  15. 77 FR 15003 - Passive Activity Losses and Credits Limited; Hearing

    2012-03-14

    ...) that was published in the Federal Register on Monday, November 28, 2011 (76 FR 72875). The notice also... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BJ33 Passive Activity Losses and Credits Limited;...

  16. Evaluation of treatment thresholds for unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in preterm infants: effects on serum bilirubin and on hearing loss?

    Christian V Hulzebos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia may cause deafness. In the Netherlands, 25% lower total serum bilirubin (TSB treatment thresholds were recently implemented for preterm infants. OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate of hearing loss in jaundiced preterms treated at high or at low TSB thresholds. DESIGN/METHODS: In this retrospective study conducted at two neonatal intensive care units in the Netherlands, we included preterms (gestational age 35 dB. RESULTS: There were 479 patients in the high and 144 in the low threshold group. Both groups had similar gestational ages (29.5 weeks and birth weights (1300 g. Mean and mean peak TSB levels were significantly lower after the implementation of the novel thresholds: 152 ± 43 µmol/L and 212 ± 52 µmol/L versus 131 ± 37 µmol/L and 188 ± 46 µmol/L for the high versus low thresholds, respectively (P<0.001. The incidence of hearing loss was 2.7% (13/479 in the high and 0.7% (1/144 in the low TSB threshold group (NNT = 50, 95% CI, 25-3302. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of lower treatment thresholds resulted in reduced mean and peak TSB levels. The incidence of hearing impairment in preterms with a gestational age <32 weeks treated at low TSB thresholds was substantially lower compared to preterms treated at high TSB thresholds. Further research with larger sample sizes and power is needed to determine if this effect is statistically significant.

  17. Management of Children with Severe, Severe-profound, and Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Iseli, Claire; Buchman, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    Management of children with severe, severe-profound, and profound sensorineural hearing loss is best achieved using a family-centered approach by a team of health professionals, including audiologists, speech pathologists, otolaryngologists, pediatricians, genetic counselors, and early intervention programs. Early diagnosis and intervention offers the best chance for speech and language acquisition. Although hearing aids can provide some of the needed information, they are often not sufficient for spoken language development and a cochlear implant is needed. This must be combined with a strong audiology and speech therapy rehabilitation program. PMID:26293693

  18. Suppression of Tinnitus in a Patient with Unilateral Sudden Hearing Loss: A Case Report

    Alessandra Fioretti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 67-year-old woman with severe disabling right-sided tinnitus, mild hyperacusis, and headache. The tinnitus was associated with sudden right hearing loss and vertigo, which occurred about 18 months before. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI resulted in normal anatomical structures of the cochlea and of the cranial nerves showing a partial empty sella syndrome with suprasellar cistern hernia. Angio-MR revealed a bilateral contact between the anterior-inferior cerebellar artery (AICA and the acoustic-facial nerve with a potential neurovascular conflict. Surgery was considered unnecessary after further evaluations. The right ear was successfully treated with a combination device (hearing aid plus sound generator. Shortly after a standard fitting procedure, the patient reported a reduction of tinnitus, hyperacusis, and headache which completely disappeared at the follow-up evaluation after 3, 6, and 12 months. This paper demonstrates that the combination device resulted in a complete tinnitus and hyperacusis suppression in a patient with unilateral sensorineural sudden hearing loss. Our paper further supports the restoration of peripheral sensory input for the treatment of tinnitus associated with hearing loss in selected patients.

  19. Perspectives for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by cellular regeneration of the inner ear.

    Almeida-Branco, Mario S; Cabrera, Sonia; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a caused by the loss of the cochlear hair cells with the consequent deafferentation of spiral ganglion neurons. Humans do not show endogenous cellular regeneration in the inner ear and there is no exogenous therapy that allows the replacement of the damaged hair cells. Currently, treatment is based on the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants that present different outcomes, some difficulties in auditory discrimination and a limited useful life. More advanced technology is hindered by the functional capacity of the remaining spiral ganglion neurons. The latest advances with stem cell therapy and cellular reprogramming have developed several possibilities to induce endogenous regeneration or stem cell transplantation to replace damaged inner ear hair cells and restore hearing function. With further knowledge of the cellular and molecular biology of the inner ear and its embryonic development, it will be possible to use induced stem cells as in vitro models of disease and as replacement cellular therapy. Investigation in this area is focused on generating cellular therapy with clinical use for the treatment of profound sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25459416

  20. Postlingual hearing loss as a mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation phenotype.

    Katarzyna Iwanicka-Pronicka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of isolated hearing loss (HL associated with the m.3243A>G mutation is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and heteroplasmy level of the m.3243A>G mutation in a large group of Polish patients with postlingual bilateral sensorineural HL of unidentified cause. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A molecular search was undertaken in the archival blood DNA of 1482 unrelated patients with isolated HL that had begun at ages between 5 and 40 years. Maternal relatives of the probands were subsequently investigated and all carriers underwent audiological tests. The m.3243A>G mutation was found in 16 of 1482 probands (an incidence of 1.08% and 18 family members. Of these 34 individuals, hearing impairment was detected in 29 patients and the mean onset of HL was at 26 years. Some 42% of the identified m.3243A>G carriers did not develop multisystem symptomatology over the following 10 years. Mean heteroplasmy level of m.3243A>G was lowest in blood at a level of 14% and highest in urine at 58%. These values were independent of the manifested clinical severity of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: A single m.3243A>G carrier can usually be found among each 100 individuals who have postlingual hearing loss of unknown cause. Urine samples are best for detecting the m.3243A>G mutation and diagnosing mitochondrially inherited hearing loss.

  1. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis associated with progressive hearing loss: A nonfamilial variant of Jones syndrome

    Bagavad Gita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival fibromatosis is characterized by gingival tissue overgrowth of a firm and fibrotic nature. The growth is slow and progressive and is drug-induced, idiopathic, or hereditary in etiology. It occurs isolated or frequently as a component of various syndromes. Our patient presented with the complaint of gingival enlargement associated with progressive deafness, characteristic of Jones syndrome. This case report is important and unique since it is the first known one to have a Jones syndrome-like presentation without a family history. A male patient aged 14 years reported with the chief complaint of swelling of gums and progressive hearing loss in both ears for the past one year. There was no family history or history of drug intake. Enlargement was generalized, fibrotic and bulbous, involving the free and attached gingiva, extending up to the middle 1/3 rd of the crown. Investigations such as pure tone audiogram, impedance audiometry, and Tone decay test concluded that there was severe right and moderate left sensorineural hearing loss. The case was diagnosed to be idiopathic, generalized gingival fibromatosis with progressive hearing loss. The gingival overgrowth was managed by gingivectomy and periodic review. The patient was advised to use high occlusion computer generated hearing aids for his deafness as it was not treatable by medicines or surgery. This unique case report once again emphasizes the heterogeneity of gingival fibromatosis, which can present in an atypical manner.

  2. Suspeita da perda auditiva por familiares Hearing loss suspected by the family

    Claudete Ferreira de Souza Monteiro

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: caracterizar e analisar a suspeita de perda auditiva, por parte de familiares, em crianças assistidas na Associação de Pais e Amigos do Deficiente Auditivo (APADA em Teresina-PI. MÉTODOS: estudo descritivo realizado na APADA no período de setembro a outubro de 2006, com aplicação de formulários para 14 mães e/ou responsáveis para levantamento das variáveis: identificar o familiar que suspeitou da perda auditiva na criança; o motivo que levou a suspeita; a idade da criança quando da detecção pelo familiar; a atitude da família após a descoberta da perda auditiva; a idade da criança quando ocorreu procura profissional e a orientação recebida; o tempo entre a suspeita da perda auditiva, por parte do familiar, e a confirmação profissional de diagnóstico. RESULTADOS: os dados apontam que 86% da suspeita foi percebido pelas mães. O motivo da suspeita foi pela não reação ao som por parte da criança (71%. 36% dos familiares perceberam o problema na idade de 7 a 12 meses. 79% tiveram como primeira atitude procurar o médico, 36% procuraram o profissional da saúde com até um ano de idade, 29% receberam a orientação do profissional para o uso do aparelho auditivo e tiveram a confirmação da perda auditiva de 7 meses a 1 ano de idade ou após os 4 anos. CONCLUSÃO: o diagnóstico da perda auditiva foi tardio frente a suspeita por parte dos familiares e dos profissionais de saúde e não estiveram relacionadas com os programas da triagem auditiva neonatal.PURPOSE: to analyze and characterize children suspected by the family of hearing loss attended at Associação de Pais e Amigos do Deficiente Auditivo (APADA in Teresina, PI. METHODS: a descriptive study was carried out at PFHIA from September to October 2006. Form were filled out by 14 mothers and/or the responsible adult to find the following variables: identify the family member who suspected hearing loss in the child; the reason which led to the suspicion; the

  3. Bilateral sudden hearing loss following habitual abortion: a case report and review of literature.

    Yin, Tuanfang; Huang, Fengying; Ren, Jihao; Liu, Wei; Chen, Xing; Li, Lihua; Xie, Dinghua; Lu, Yongde

    2013-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The most common causes of this disease are known to be the vascular and viral agents, but immune disorders are involved in the development of sudden deafness. The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune system disorder, which is defined as the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) in the patient's blood, then cause venous and/or arterial thrombosis in various organs of the body, for example, thrombosis can occur in the placenta and/or the inner ear. As a result, it can cause abortion and/or sudden deafness. Bilateral SSNHL following habitual abortion is a rare clinical event. Here, we report a case of 32-year-old woman who presented with bilateral sudden hearing loss following recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) as the first manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Combine the literature, the diagnosis, clinical implication and treatment are discussed. PMID:24040484

  4. Testing the effects of a message framing intervention on intentions towards hearing loss prevention in adolescents.

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Spaans, Pieter; Jansen, Bastiaan; van't Riet, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent hearing loss is a public health problem that has eluded effective intervention. A persuasive message strategy was tested for its effectiveness on adolescents' intention to listen to music at a reduced volume. The messages manipulated both type of message frame [positive consequences of listening to music at a reduced volume (gain-framed) versus negative consequences of not listening to music at a reduced volume (loss-framed)] and type of temporal context (short-term versus long-term consequences). Participants were recruited from four vocational and secondary education schools in the Netherlands and message exposure took place online during class hours. Two weeks prior to message exposure, adolescents provided data on intention and risk perception towards hearing loss and use of (digital) music players. After message exposure, 194 adolescents (mean age = 14.71 years, SD = 1.00, 37.8% males) provided immediate follow-up data on intention. Results revealed that intention to listen to music at a reduced volume increased in those exposed to a loss-framed message with short-term consequences. No changes were found in the other conditions. Messages that emphasize negative short-term consequences of not listening to music at a moderate volume have the ability to influence adolescents' intention towards hearing loss prevention. PMID:26956040

  5. Studying the Amount of Noise Exposure and Measuring the Hearing Loss in Workers of Door and Window Construction Factory

    Ali Khavanin

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Material and method: by using a dosimeter we tried to study the amount of noise exposure each worker is exposed to; the microphone was connected to the collar of the shirts and the dosimeter to the belt. The audiometric evaluations were performed before starting work in the factory. Results: the years of experience in the factory has a significant correlation with amount of hearing loss in the workers of the noisy environments (based on the findings of the dosimetric measurements Conclusion: the findings of the current study demonstrated that workers of the door and window construction factory were exposed to high level of noises and their hearing thresholds were largely affected by the noise pollution. This is in accordance with results of the similar studies. This impact was mostly revealed in the forgers.

  6. Progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in CLIC5.

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Oonk, Anne M M; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; Draaisma, Jos M T; Gandía, Marta; Oostrik, Jaap; Neveling, Kornelia; Kunst, Henricus P M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; del Castillo, Ignacio; Pennings, Ronald J E; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Schraders, Margit

    2015-02-01

    In a consanguineous Turkish family diagnosed with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI), a homozygous region of 47.4 Mb was shared by the two affected siblings on chromosome 6p21.1-q15. This region contains 247 genes including the known deafness gene MYO6. No pathogenic variants were found in MYO6, neither with sequence analysis of the coding region and splice sites nor with mRNA analysis. Subsequent candidate gene evaluation revealed CLIC5 as an excellent candidate gene. The orthologous mouse gene is mutated in the jitterbug mutant that exhibits progressive hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction. Mutation analysis of CLIC5 revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation c.96T>A (p.(Cys32Ter)) that segregated with the hearing loss. Further analysis of CLIC5 in 213 arNSHI patients from mostly Dutch and Spanish origin did not reveal any additional pathogenic variants. CLIC5 mutations are thus not a common cause of arNSHI in these populations. The hearing loss in the present family had an onset in early childhood and progressed from mild to severe or even profound before the second decade. Impaired hearing is accompanied by vestibular areflexia and in one of the patients with mild renal dysfunction. Although we demonstrate that CLIC5 is expressed in many other human tissues, no additional symptoms were observed in these patients. In conclusion, our results show that CLIC5 is a novel arNSHI gene involved in progressive hearing impairment, vestibular and possibly mild renal dysfunction in a family of Turkish origin. PMID:24781754

  7. The influence of non-linear frequency compression on the perception of music by adults with a moderate to severe hearing loss: Subjective impressions

    Marinda Uys

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To date, the main direction in frequency-lowering hearing aid studies has been in relation to speech perception abilities. With improvements in hearing aid technology, interest in musical perception as a dimension that could improve hearing aid users’ quality of life has grown. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of non-linear frequency compression (NFC on hearing aid users’ subjective impressions of listening to music. Design & sample: A survey research design was implemented to elicit participants’ (N=40 subjective impressions of musical stimuli with and without NFC. Results: The use of NFC significantly improved hearing aid users’ perception of the musical qualities of overall fidelity, tinniness and reverberance. Although participants preferred to listen to the loudness, fullness, crispness, naturalness and pleasantness of music with the use of NFC, these benefits were not significant. Conclusion: The use of NFC can increase hearing aid users’ enjoyment and appreciation of music. Given that a relatively large percentage of hearing aid users express a loss of enjoyment of music, audiologists should not ignore the possible benefits of NFC, especially if one takes into account that previous research indicates speech perception benefits with this technology.

  8. LOWER DOSE OF AMINOGLYCOSIDE OTOTOXIC EXPOSURE CAUSES PRESYNAPTIC ALTERATIONS ASSOICATED WITH HEARING LOSS

    LIU Ke; WANG Xiaoyu; LI Sijun; TANG Siquan; XU Yice; WANG Xuefeng; SUN Jianhe; YANG Weiyan; YANG Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study presynaptic alternations of cochlear ribbons arising from aminoglycoside ototoxic stimuli in C57BL/6J mice. Methods Animals were injected with low dose gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day) for 14 days, From the 14th to 28th days, the mice were maintained free of gentamicin treatment. Immunohisto-chemistry labeling was employed to trace RIBEYE, a major presynaptic componment of ribbon synapses. RIBEYE/CtBP2 expression levels were assessed and compared with hearing threshold shifts. Auditory func-tion was assessed by auditory brainstem responses. The stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs) and IHCs was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Hearing thresholds were elevated with peak hearing loss observed on the 7th day after gentamicin exposure, followed by improvement after the 7th day. RIBEYE/CtBP2 expression directly correlated with observed hearing threshold shifts. Strikingly, we did not see any obvious changes in stereocilia in both OHCs and IHCs until the 28th day. Mild changes in stereocil-ia were only observed in OHCs on the 28th day. Conclusions These findings indicate that presynapse co-chlear ribbons, rather than stereocilia, may be sensitive to aminoglycoside ototoxic exposure in mice cochle-ae. A pattern of RIBEYE/CtBP2 expression changes seems to parallel hearing threshold shifts and suggests presynaptic response properties to lower dosage of aminoglycoside ototoxic stimuli.

  9. The Accuracy of IOS Device-based uHear as a Screening Tool for Hearing Loss: A Preliminary Study From the Middle East

    Rashid Al-Abri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine and explore the potential use of uHear as a screening test for determining hearing disability by evaluating its accuracy in a clinical setting and a soundproof booth when compared to the gold standard conventional audiometry.   Methods: Seventy Sultan Qaboos University students above the age of 17 years who had normal hearing were recruited for the study. They underwent a hearing test using conventional audiometry in a soundproof room, a self-administered uHear evaluation in a side room resembling a clinic setting, and a self-administered uHear test in a soundproof booth. The mean pure tone average (PTA of thresholds at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz for all the three test modalities was calculated, compared, and analyzed statistically.   Results: There were 36 male and 34 female students in the study. The PTA with conventional audiometry ranged from 1 to 21 dB across left and right ears. The PTA using uHear in the side room for the same participants was 25 dB in the right ear and 28 dB in the left ear (3–54 dB across all ears. The PTA for uHear in the soundproof booth was 18 dB and 17 dB (1–43 dB in the right and left ears, respectively. Twenty-three percent of participants were reported to have a mild hearing impairment (PTA > 25 dB using the soundproof uHear test, and this number was 64% for the same test in the side room. For the same group, only 3% of participants were reported to have a moderate hearing impairment (PTA > 40 dB using the uHear test in a soundproof booth, and 13% in the side room.   Conclusion: uHear in any setting lacks specificity in the range of normal hearing and is highly unreliable in giving the exact hearing threshold in clinical settings. However, there is a potential for the use of uHear if it is used to rule out moderate hearing loss, even in a clinical setting, as exemplified by our study. This method needs standardization through further research.

  10. Hearing Impairment

    ... hearing loss is present at birth. Acquired hearing loss happens later in life — during childhood, the teen years, or in adulthood — ... for your ears to avoid a permanent hearing loss. See your doctor right away ... basis. What's Life Like for People Who Are Hearing Impaired? For ...

  11. Perda auditiva hereditária: relato de casos Hereditary hearing loss: case report

    Aline Mizozoe de Amorim

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever os resultados da avaliação auditiva de uma família com perda auditiva de caráter hereditário autossômico dominante. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 17 indivíduos, por meio da audiometria tonal, audiometria vocal, timpanometria e pesquisa dos reflexos acústicos, além de acompanhamento genético. RESULTADOS: Dos 17 sujeitos avaliados, 11 apresentaram algum grau de perda auditiva neurossensorial (64,7%, sendo oito do sexo feminino (73% e três do sexo masculino (27%. A idade dos sujeitos avaliados variou de cinco a 68 anos (média=29,6 e a idade do aparecimento da queixa variou de 20 a 38 anos (média=26,1. Ocorreu a progressão da perda auditiva com o aumento da idade, sendo que a partir dos 41 anos, não houve indivíduos com audição normal na família. CONCLUSÃO: a investigação audiológica de todos os membros da família, independentemente da queixa, é imprescindível, pois a perda auditiva pode existir, mesmo que esta ocorra em freqüências isoladas.PURPOSE: to describe the hearing findings of a family with autosome dominant hereditary hearing loss. METHODS: we evaluated 17 subjects. The evaluation was made by pure tone audiometry, Speech audiometry, tympanometry and acoustic reflex testing, in addition to genetic follow-up. RESULTS: from 17 evaluated subjects, 11 showed some degree of neurosensorial hearing loss (64.7%, being 8 female gender (73% and 3 male gender (27%. The subject age varied from 5 to 68 years (average = 39.6 and the time from the complaint's appearance varied from 20 to 38 years. The hearing loss was modified with age. We did not find normal hearing after the age of 41 years in the family. CONCLUSION: the hearing investigation regarding all members of the family regardless of any complaint is extremely indispensable due to the existence of hearing loss even when limited to isolated frequencies.

  12. A Link Loss Model for the On-body Propagation Channel for Binaural Hearing Aids

    Chandra, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Binaural hearing aids communicate with each other through a wireless link for synchronization. A propagation model is needed to estimate the ear-to-ear link loss for such binaural hearing aids. The link loss is a critical parameter in a link budget to decide the sensitivity of the transceiver. In this paper, we have presented a model for the deterministic component of the ear-to-ear link loss. The model takes into account the dominant paths having most of the power of the creeping wave from the transceiver in one ear to the transceiver in other ear and the effect of the protruding part of the outer ear called pinna. Simulations are done to validate the model using in-the-ear (ITE) placement of antennas at 2.45 GHz on two heterogeneous phantoms of different age-group and body size. The model agrees with the simulations. The ear-to-ear link loss between the antennas for the binaural hearing aids in the homogeneous SAM phantom is compared with a heterogeneous phantom. It is found that the absence of the pinna an...

  13. Sudden Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with HLA A1-B8-DR3 Haplotype.

    Psillas, G; Daniilidis, M; Gerofotis, A; Veros, K; Vasilaki, A; Vital, I; Markou, K

    2013-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be present as a symptom in systemic autoimmune diseases or may occur as a primary disorder without another organ involvement (autoimmune inner ear disease). The diagnosis of autoimmune inner ear disease is still predicated on clinical features, and to date specific diagnostic tests are not available. We report a case of bilateral sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, intense rotatory vertigo, and nausea in a female patient in which the clinical manifestations, in addition to raised levels of circulating immune complexes, antithyroglobulin antibodies, and the presence of the HLA A1-B8-DR3 haplotype, allowed us to hypothesize an autoimmune inner ear disease. Cyclosporine-A immunosuppressive treatment in addition to steroids helped in hearing recovery that occurred progressively with normalization of the hearing function after a five-month treatment. Cyclosporine-A could be proposed as a therapeutic option in case of autoimmune inner ear disease allowing the suspension of corticosteroids that, at high dose, expose patients to potentially serious adverse events. PMID:24106629

  14. Sudden Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with HLA A1-B8-DR3 Haplotype

    G. Psillas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be present as a symptom in systemic autoimmune diseases or may occur as a primary disorder without another organ involvement (autoimmune inner ear disease. The diagnosis of autoimmune inner ear disease is still predicated on clinical features, and to date specific diagnostic tests are not available. We report a case of bilateral sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, intense rotatory vertigo, and nausea in a female patient in which the clinical manifestations, in addition to raised levels of circulating immune complexes, antithyroglobulin antibodies, and the presence of the HLA A1-B8-DR3 haplotype, allowed us to hypothesize an autoimmune inner ear disease. Cyclosporine-A immunosuppressive treatment in addition to steroids helped in hearing recovery that occurred progressively with normalization of the hearing function after a five-month treatment. Cyclosporine-A could be proposed as a therapeutic option in case of autoimmune inner ear disease allowing the suspension of corticosteroids that, at high dose, expose patients to potentially serious adverse events.

  15. Simultaneous bilateral laser therapy accelerates recovery after noise-induced hearing loss in a rat model

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Chang, So-Young; Moy, Wesley J.; Oh, Connie; Kim, Se-Hyung; Rhee, Chung-Ku; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae Yun

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a common type of hearing loss. The effects of laser therapy have been investigated from various perspectives, including in wound healing, inflammation reduction, and nerve regeneration, as well as in hearing research. A promising feature of the laser is its capability to penetrate soft tissue; depending on the wavelength, laser energy can penetrate into the deepest part of the body without damaging non-target soft tissues. Based on this idea, we developed bilateral transtympanic laser therapy, which uses simultaneous laser irradiation in both ears, and evaluated the effects of bilateral laser therapy on cochlear damage caused by noise overexposure. Thus, the purpose of this research was to assess the benefits of simultaneous bilateral laser therapy compared with unilateral laser therapy and a control. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to narrow-band noise at 115 dB SPL for 6 h. Multiple auditory brainstem responses were measured after each laser irradiation, and cochlear hair cells were counted after the 15th such irradiation. The penetration depth of the 808 nm laser was also measured after sacrifice. Approximately 5% of the laser energy reached the contralateral cochlea. Both bilateral and unilateral laser therapy decreased the hearing threshold after noise overstimulation in the rat model. The bilateral laser therapy group showed faster functional recovery at all tested frequencies compared with the unilateral laser therapy group. However, there was no difference in the endpoint ABR results or final hair cell survival, which was analyzed histologically. PMID:27547558

  16. Simultaneous bilateral laser therapy accelerates recovery after noise-induced hearing loss in a rat model.

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Chang, So-Young; Moy, Wesley J; Oh, Connie; Kim, Se-Hyung; Rhee, Chung-Ku; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae Yun; Lee, Min Young

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a common type of hearing loss. The effects of laser therapy have been investigated from various perspectives, including in wound healing, inflammation reduction, and nerve regeneration, as well as in hearing research. A promising feature of the laser is its capability to penetrate soft tissue; depending on the wavelength, laser energy can penetrate into the deepest part of the body without damaging non-target soft tissues. Based on this idea, we developed bilateral transtympanic laser therapy, which uses simultaneous laser irradiation in both ears, and evaluated the effects of bilateral laser therapy on cochlear damage caused by noise overexposure. Thus, the purpose of this research was to assess the benefits of simultaneous bilateral laser therapy compared with unilateral laser therapy and a control. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to narrow-band noise at 115 dB SPL for 6 h. Multiple auditory brainstem responses were measured after each laser irradiation, and cochlear hair cells were counted after the 15th such irradiation. The penetration depth of the 808 nm laser was also measured after sacrifice. Approximately 5% of the laser energy reached the contralateral cochlea. Both bilateral and unilateral laser therapy decreased the hearing threshold after noise overstimulation in the rat model. The bilateral laser therapy group showed faster functional recovery at all tested frequencies compared with the unilateral laser therapy group. However, there was no difference in the endpoint ABR results or final hair cell survival, which was analyzed histologically. PMID:27547558

  17. High frequency hearing loss in students used to ear phone music: A randomized trial of 1,000 students

    Kiran Naik; Sunil Pai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hearing loss is often thought of as a natural phenomenon of the aging process. However, studies are beginning to show that hearing loss is becoming increasingly more common amongst younger people. Approximately, 20-30 million people between the ages of 20 and 69 years have high frequency hearing loss due to chronic exposure to loud noise above 90 decibels (dB) thanks to the advent of MP3 players and cellphones, according to the National Institute of Deafness. [1] If you are one ...

  18. The effect of a traditional dance training program on the physical fitness of adults with hearing loss.

    Tsimaras, Vasileios K; Kyriazis, Dimitrios A; Christoulas, Kosmas I; Fotiadou, Eleni G; Kokaridas, Dimitrios G; Angelopoulou, Nikoletta A

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a traditional dance training program on aerobic capacity and muscle strength of adults with hearing loss. Twenty-three adults with hearing loss were separated into 2 groups. Thirteen subjects (6 men, 7 women, mean age, 25.7 +/- 3.9 years) constituted the intervention group, whereas 10 subjects (5 men, 5 women, mean age, 26.4 +/- 5.9 years) formed the control group. Pretraining and posttraining treadmill tests were performed to determine heart rate (HR peak), peak minute ventilation (VE peak), peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak, absolute and relative), and time to exhaustion (min). Peak torque of hamstring and quadriceps muscles at angular velocities of 60 degrees /s, 180 degrees /s, and 300 degrees /s was also measured. The intervention group followed a 12-week traditional dance training program, whereas the control group received no training during this period. Repeated measures of multiple analyses of variance were used to test mean differences between the values of both groups. A paired t-test was used to compare the values within each group prior and after program participation. A significance level of 0.05 was used for all tests. Following the 12-week training program, significant improvements in peak physiological parameters were seen for the intervention group for peak minute ventilation, peak oxygen consumption (both absolute and relative), time to exhaustion, and peak torque values between the 2 measurements (initial and final). No significant improvements in peak physiological parameters and peak torque were noticed in the control group. In conclusion, adults with hearing loss can improve their physical fitness levels with the application of a systematic and well-designed traditional dance training program. PMID:20300019

  19. NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS IN CHINA:A POTENTIALLY COSTLY PUB-LIC HEALTH LSSUE

    Shi Yongbing; William Hal Martin

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss and tinnitus are among the most common consequences of long term noise exposure and re-main an under-addressed heath issue in most developing nations including China. The rapid industrializa-tion and life style changes in China increase the concern over noise exposure and noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Research on NIHL in China is limited. The current paper reviews studies published in English and Chinese language literatures regarding noise exposure and NIHL in China. Their implication on the Chi-nese population is discussed. The possible utility of a research model such as the Dangerous Decibels® as a means to increase understanding of the scope of NIHL among the Chinese population, to educate the gener-al public in China (especially the young) about NIHL and its prevention, and to study effects of language and cultural factors on international information dissemination and behavioral interventions is proposed.

  20. Labyrinthine enhancement of Gd-MR in patients with sudden hearing loss and vertigo

    In the past, no definitive diagnostic study was available to assess causes of sudden-onset hearing loss and vertigo. Our observations have led to an interesting new finding: labyrinthine enhancement on Gd-enhanced MR imaging in four patients with sudden unilateral hearing loss and/or vertigo. MR findings were correlated with audiologic and vestibular studies. All patients were studied with T2-weighted axial images through the whole brain and with Gd-DTPA-enhanced, 3-mm, axial, T1-weighted images through the temporal bone. No labyrinthine enhancement was seen in 20 control patients referred for other clinical problems. Gd-MR imaging might be able to distinguish patients with retrocochlear lesions from those in whom the abnormal process is in the labyrinth or is intraaxial

  1. Survey on infant hearing loss at Caritas Baby Hospital in Bethlehem-Palestine

    Lucia Corradin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the epidemiology of infants’ hearing loss (IHL among patients under 3 months of age at Caritas Baby Hospital, the only pediatric hospital in Palestine. It was aimed to demonstrate that IHL is a major health problem in Palestine and to assess the first available data of the newborn hearing screening program conducted between September 25, 2006 and December 31, 2011. Data was uploaded and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS version 21. A total of 8144 infants were tested, 4812 (59% were males and 3332 (41% were females. As to their origin, 72% (5886 came from the Bethlehem district, 25% (2044 from the Hebron district, while 3% (214 from the other Palestinian districts (Jericho, Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin and Jerusalem. The transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs and the automated auditory brainstem response were used according to the manufacturer guidelines. The results were interpreted according to the indications of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Consensus Development Conference on Neonatal Hearing Screening. Out of the 8144 infants tested, 1507 (14.6% did not pass the 1st test, 477 (32.8% of these 1507 infants failed retesting, while 498 (33% patients were lost to follow-up. Only 152 (31.9% patients that failed retesting went to an audiologist. The audiologist evaluation revealed that 101 (66.4% patients presented with a mild-moderate or profound hearing loss according to the Bureau International of Audiophonologie standards, 44 (28.9% patients had otitis media, whereas 7 cases (4.7% had no hearing disorders. The overall unadjusted percentage of hearing loss was 1.24%, and the adjusted overall percentage was 1.85%. The chart review showed that jaundice, sepsis, prematurity, lung disease were more common among the affected patients. The high prevalence of childhood deafness in Palestine is of utmost

  2. Survey on Infant Hearing Loss at Caritas Baby Hospital in Bethlehem-Palestine.

    Corradin, Lucia; Hindiyeh, Musa; Khaled, Rasha; Rishmawi, Fadi; Zidan, Marwan; Marzouqa, Hiyam

    2014-03-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of infants' hearing loss (IHL) among patients under 3 months of age at Caritas Baby Hospital, the only pediatric hospital in Palestine. It was aimed to demonstrate that IHL is a major health problem in Palestine and to assess the first available data of the newborn hearing screening program conducted between September 25, 2006 and December 31, 2011. Data was uploaded and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS version 21). A total of 8144 infants were tested, 4812 (59%) were males and 3332 (41%) were females. As to their origin, 72% (5886) came from the Bethlehem district, 25% (2044) from the Hebron district, while 3% (214) from the other Palestinian districts (Jericho, Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin and Jerusalem). The transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) and the automated auditory brainstem response were used according to the manufacturer guidelines. The results were interpreted according to the indications of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Consensus Development Conference on Neonatal Hearing Screening. Out of the 8144 infants tested, 1507 (14.6%) did not pass the 1(st) test, 477 (32.8%) of these 1507 infants failed retesting, while 498 (33%) patients were lost to follow-up. Only 152 (31.9%) patients that failed retesting went to an audiologist. The audiologist evaluation revealed that 101 (66.4%) patients presented with a mild-moderate or profound hearing loss according to the Bureau International of Audiophonologie standards, 44 (28.9%) patients had otitis media, whereas 7 cases (4.7%) had no hearing disorders. The overall unadjusted percentage of hearing loss was 1.24%, and the adjusted overall percentage was 1.85%. The chart review showed that jaundice, sepsis, prematurity, lung disease were more common among the affected patients. The high prevalence of childhood deafness in Palestine is of utmost

  3. Genomic analysis of a heterogeneous Mendelian phenotype: multiple novel alleles for inherited hearing loss in the Palestinian population

    Walsh Tom

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recessively inherited phenotypes are frequent in the Palestinian population, as the result of a historical tradition of marriages within extended kindreds, particularly in isolated villages. In order to characterise the genetics of inherited hearing loss in this population, we worked with West Bank schools for the deaf to identify children with prelingual, bilateral, severe to profound hearing loss not attributable to infection, trauma or other known environmental exposure. Of 156 families enrolled, hearing loss in 17 families (11 per cent was due to mutations in GJB2 (connexin 26, a smaller fraction of GJB2-associated deafness than in other populations. In order to estimate how many different genes might be responsible for hearing loss in this population, we evaluated ten families for linkage to all 36 known human autosomal deafness-related genes, fully sequencing hearing-related genes at any linked sites in informative relatives. Four families harboured four novel alleles of TMPRSS3 (988ΔA = 352stop, otoancorin (1067A >T = D356V and pendrin (716T > A = V239D and 1001G > T = 346stop. In each family, all affected individuals were homozygous for the critical mutation. Each allele was specific to one or a few families in the cohort; none were widespread. Since epidemiological tests of association of mutations with deafness were not feasible for such rare alleles, we used functional and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate their consequences. In six other families, hearing loss was not linked to any known gene, suggesting that these families harbour novel genes responsible for this phenotype. We conclude that inherited hearing loss is highly heterogeneous in this population, with most extended families acting as genetic isolates in this context. We also conclude that the same genes are responsible for hearing loss in this population as elsewhere, so that gene discovery in these families informs the genetics of hearing loss worldwide.

  4. Mutational analysis of EYA1, SIX1 and SIX5 genes and strategies for management of hearing loss in patients with BOR/BO syndrome.

    Mee Hyun Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Branchio-oto-renal (BOR or branchio-otic (BO syndrome is one of the most common forms of autosomal dominant syndromic hearing loss. Mutations in EYA1, SIX1 and SIX5 genes have been associated with BOR syndrome. In this study, clinical and genetic analyses were performed in patients with BOR/BO syndrome focusing on auditory manifestations and rehabilitation. METHODS: The audiologic manifestations were reviewed in 10 patients with BOR/BO syndrome. The operative findings and hearing outcome were analyzed in patients who underwent middle ear surgeries. The modality and outcome of auditory rehabilitation were evaluated. Genetic analysis was performed for EYA1, SIX1, and SIX5 genes. RESULTS: All patients presented with mixed hearing loss. Five patients underwent middle ear surgeries without successful hearing gain. Cochlear implantation performed in two patients resulted in significant hearing improvement. Genetic analysis revealed four novel EYA1 mutations and a large deletion encompassing the EYA1 gene. CONCLUSIONS: Auditory rehabilitation in BOR/BO syndrome should be individually tailored keeping in mind the high failure rate after middle ear surgeries. Successful outcome can be expected with cochlear implantations in patients with BOR/BO syndrome who cannot benefit from hearing aids. The novel EYA1 mutations may add to the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of BOR syndrome in the East Asian population.

  5. Assessment of hearing loss in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB patients undergoing Aminoglycoside treatment

    Sheikh Nizamuddin

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Aminoglycosides in MDR-TB patients may cause irreversible hearing loss involving higher frequencies and can become a hearing handicap as speech frequencies are too implied in more or less of the patients, thus underlining the need for regular audiologic evaluation in patients of MDR-TB during the treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1734-1740

  6. Effects of Auditory-Verbal Therapy for School-Aged Children with Hearing Loss: An Exploratory Study

    Fairgray, Elizabeth; Purdy, Suzanne C.; Smart, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    With modern improvements to hearing aids and cochlear implant (CI) technology, and consequently improved access to speech, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies for children with hearing loss, such as auditory-verbal therapy (AVT). Speech and language, speech perception in noise, and reading were evaluated before and after…

  7. Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Polyneuropathy in a Patient with Sweet’s Syndrome

    Cala, Cather M; Lauren Kole; Naveed Sami

    2015-01-01

    Sweet’s syndrome is an inflammatory systemic disease which has been associated with various underlying causes. The disease can involve multiple areas of the body including the skin and neurological system. There have been only two cases which have described otological involvement. This report presents a patient who developed loss of hearing secondary to Sweet’s syndrome after developing cutaneous involvement along with peripheral neuropathy. Despite the patient’s skin and neuropathy noticing ...

  8. Auditory training during development mitigates a hearing loss-induced perceptual deficit.

    Emma Sarro; Dan Sanes

    2014-01-01

    Sensory experience during early development can shape the central nervous system and this is thought to influence adult perceptual skills. In the auditory system, early induction of conductive hearing loss (CHL) leads to deficits in central auditory coding properties in adult animals, and this is accompanied by diminished perceptual thresholds. In contrast, a brief regimen of auditory training during development can enhance the perceptual skills of animals when tested in adulthood. Here, we a...

  9. Hypobaric pressure exposure effects on cochlear frequency selectivity in fluctuating, low-frequency hearing loss.

    Brännström, K. J.; Grenner, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To study the effects of hypobaric pressure chamber exposure on the cochlear frequency selectivity of subjects with monaural, fluctuating, low-frequency hearing loss, such as occurs in Ménière's disease.Methods:We used a hypobaric pressure chamber to create relative underpressure in the ear canal, in order to impose positive pressure gradients on the inner ear. Psychophysical tuning curves, transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions and speech recognition scores in noise were measured in...

  10. Genetic and pharmacological intervention for treatment/prevention of hearing loss

    Cotanche, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty years ago it was first demonstrated that birds could regenerate their cochlear hair cells following noise damage or aminoglycoside treatment. An understanding of how this structural and functional regeneration occurred might lead to the development of therapies for treatment of sensorineural hearing loss in humans. Recent experiments have demonstrated that noise exposure and aminoglycoside treatment lead to apoptosis of the hair cells. In birds, this programmed cell death induces the a...

  11. Non-flat audiograms in sensorineural hearing loss and speech perception

    Kelly Cristina Lira de Andrade; Pedro de Lemos Menezes; Aline Tenório Lins Carnaúba; Renato Glauco de Sousa Rodrigues; Mariana de Carvalho Leal; Liliane Desgualdo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The audibility thresholds for the sound frequency of 137 upward- and downward-sloping audiograms showing sensorineural hearing loss were selected and analyzed in conjunction with speech recognition thresholds obtained from individuals seen at a public otolaryngology clinic to determine which frequencies in slope audiograms best represent speech recognition thresholds. METHOD: The linear regression model and mean square error were used to determine the associations between the thr...

  12. The internal acoustic canal - another review area in paediatric sensorineural hearing loss

    Chetcuti, Karen [The Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Kumbla, Surekha [The Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Monash Health, Clayton, VIC (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Morphological abnormalities of the internal acoustic canal (IAC), albeit rare, are sometimes associated with hearing loss in children. We present an illustration of the spectrum of IAC abnormalities together with a brief review of the embryology and anatomy of the IAC and the techniques used when imaging the petrous temporal bone. This review focuses on morphological abnormalities of the IAC together with their clinical implications and impact on clinical management. (orig.)

  13. Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Van Eynde, Charlotte; Swillen, Ann; Lambeens, Elien; Verhaert, Nicolas; Desloovere, Christian; Luts, Heleen; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hens, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence, type, severity, and age-dependency of hearing loss in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Method: Extensive audiological measurements were conducted in 40 persons with proven 22q11.2 deletion (aged 6-36 years). Besides air and bone conduction thresholds in the frequency range between 0.125…

  14. Effects of furosemide on the hearing loss induced by impulse noise

    Kriksunov Leonid; Weinberger Jeffrey M; Adelman Cahtia; Sohmer Haim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The permanent hearing loss following exposure to intense noise can be due either to mechanical structural damage (tearing) caused directly by the noise or to metabolic (biochemical) damage resulting from the elevated levels of free radicals released during transduction of the sound overstimulation. Drugs which depress active cochlear mechanics (e.g. furosemide and salicylic acid) or anti-oxidants (which counteract the free radicals) are effective in reducing the threshold ...

  15. Burden of Noise Induced Hearing Loss among Manufacturing Industrial Workers in Malaysia

    Tahir, Noraita; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Jaseema BEGUM

    2015-01-01

    Background: Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the highest reported occupational disease among industrial workers but there is scarcity of data on disease burden in Malaysia. This study estimated the risks and burden of NIHL in manufacturing industries in Malaysia.Methods: This cross-sectional industrial survey was conducted by interviewing OSH practitioners at 26 industries categorized as food, tobacco, textile, wearing apparel, wood products except furniture, paper, refined petroleum, che...

  16. Tuberculous Mastoiditis Presenting with Unilateral Hearing Loss,Facial Paralysis and Neck Mass

    R. Safi-Khani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a rare cause of mastoiditis, but diagnosis is often delayed, with potentially serious results. Case: We report a case of tuberculous mastoiditis with unilateral hearing loss, facial paralysis, and cervical lymph adenopathy on presentation. Conclusion: Tuberculous mastoiditis must be considered in all cases of chronic refractory mastoiditis especially in the presence of demonstrable complications such as facial paralysis, other cranial nerve palsies, and destruction of middle ear osscicles.

  17. Hearing Aids

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  18. Comparison of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential and Caloric Tests Findings in Noise Induced Hearing Loss-Affected and Healthy Individuals

    Farinoosh Fakharnia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Balance disturbance is one of the non-auditory effects of noisy industrial environments that is usually neglected. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise on vestibular system among workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL, based on both vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP and caloric tests.Methods: Thirty male workers with noise-induced hearing loss and thirty male matched controls were examined by VEMP and caloric tests. Study parameters included unilateral weakness, p13 and n23 latencies, and p13-n23 amplitude. Caloric test was performed only for 20 patients.Results: No significant difference was observed in unilateral weakness between the two groups. On the other hand, the difference in mean latencies of p13 in the right ear (p=0.003 and left ear (p=0.01 was significant between the two groups. However, the difference in n23 latency was significant only in the right ear (p=0.03. There was no significant difference between groups in p13-n23 amplitude.Conclusion: It seems that pars inferior of vestibule is the susceptible part in individuals with NIHL. In general, abnormal findings in both VEMP and caloric tests were more common compared to functional symptoms such as vertigo, which may be due to central compensation and the symmetry of the disorder.

  19. Renexin as a rescue regimen for noise-induced hearing loss

    So Young Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renexin, a compound of cilostazol and ginkgo biloba extract, has been reported to produce neuroprotective effects through antioxidant, antiplatelet, and vasodilatory mechanisms. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of renexin on hearing, the organ of Corti (OC, and medial olivocochlear efferents against noise-induced damage. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 110 dB SPL white noise for 60 min and then randomly divided into three groups: high- and low-dose renexin-treated groups and noise only group. Renexin were administered for 7 days: 90 mg/kg to the low-dose, and 180 mg/kg to the high-dose groups. All mice, including the controls underwent hearing tests on postnoise day 8 and were killed for cochlear harvest. We compared the hearing thresholds and morphology of the OC and cochlear efferents across the groups. The renexin-treated groups recovered from the immediate threshold shifts in a dose-dependent manner, while the noise group showed a permanent hearing loss. The renexin-treated ears demonstrated less degeneration of the OC. The diameters of the efferent terminals labeled with α-synuclein were preserved in the high-dose renexin-treated group. In the western blot assay of the cochlear homogenates, the treated groups displayed stronger expressions of α-synuclein than the noise and control groups, which may indicate that noise-induced enhanced activity of the cochlear efferent system was protected by renexin. Our results suggest that pharmacologic treatment with renexin is hopeful to reduce or prevent noise-induced hearing loss as a rescue regimen after noise exposure.

  20. Extremely low penetrance of hearing loss in four Chinese families with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1555G mutation

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of four Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluation revealed the variable phenotype of hearing impairment including audiometric configuration in these subjects, although these subjects share some common features: bilateral and sensorineural hearing impairment. Strikingly, these Chinese pedigrees exhibited extremely low penetrance of hearing loss (5.2%, 4.8%, 4.2%, and 13.3%, respectively, and with an average 8% penetrance). In particular, four of all five affected matrilineal relatives of these pedigrees had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical homoplasmic A1555G mutation, associated with hearing impairment in many families from different genetic backgrounds. The fact that mtDNA of those pedigrees belonged to different haplogroups R9a, N9a, D4a, and D4 suggested that the A1555G mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mtDNA in China. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mutations in tRNA and rRNAs or secondary LHON mutations in these Chinese families. These data imply that the nuclear background or/and mitochondrial haplotype may not play a significant role in the phenotypic expression of the A1555G mutation in these Chinese pedigrees. However, aminoglycoside appears to be a major modifier factor for the phenotypic manifestation of the A1555G mutation in these Chinese families

  1. Otoacoustic Emissions in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Changes of Measures with Treatment

    Shadman Nemati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To identify changes in OAEs parameters in treatment course of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (iSSNHL. Materials and Methods: In aprospective studyfromAugust 2005 to January 2009, 26 patients with iSSNHL underwent conventional audiometry/tympanometry and two types of OAEs (TEOAEs and DPOAEs before and after the completion of standard drug therapy.The changes in pre- and post- treatment parameters were compared with each other and with normal-contralateral ears. Results: In TEOAEs, the mean overall correlation (reproducibility and the mean overall strength in involved ears were 10.96±23.36 and 0.99±3.45 dB, respectively, before the treatment, which reached 22.88±36.55 and 1.85±5.3, respectively, after the treatment (P>0.05. Significant difference between “correlation score” (average of correlations at 3-4 involved frequencies before and after treatment was found: 6.52 ±18.19 vs. 21.67±37.8 (P

  2. Hearing Loss in Infants with Microcephaly and Evidence of Congenital Zika Virus Infection - Brazil, November 2015-May 2016.

    Leal, Mariana C; Muniz, Lilian F; Ferreira, Tamires S A; Santos, Cristiane M; Almeida, Luciana C; Van Der Linden, Vanessa; Ramos, Regina C F; Rodrigues, Laura C; Neto, Silvio S Caldas

    2016-01-01

    Congenital infection with Zika virus causes microcephaly and other brain abnormalities (1). Hearing loss associated with other congenital viral infections is well described; however, little is known about hearing loss in infants with congenital Zika virus infection. A retrospective assessment of a series of 70 infants aged 0-10 months with microcephaly and laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection was conducted by the Hospital Agamenon Magalhães in Brazil and partners. The infants were enrolled during November 2015-May 2016 and had screening and diagnostic hearing tests. Five (7%) infants had sensorineural hearing loss, all of whom had severe microcephaly; however, one child was tested after receiving treatment with an ototoxic antibiotic. If this child is excluded, the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss was 5.8% (four of 69), which is similar to that seen in association with other congenital viral infections. Additional information is needed to understand the prevalence and spectrum of hearing loss in children with congenital Zika virus infection; all infants born to women with evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy should have their hearing tested, including infants who appear normal at birth. PMID:27585248

  3. Occurence of a round window membrane rupture in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Haubner Frank

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurence of a round window membrane rupture and the effects of hearing restoration after exploratory tympanotomy and sealing of the round window (niche in patients with unilateral sudden deafness. Methods Retrospective analysis of patients’ charts in a tertiary referral center. Charts of 69 patients with sudden deafness followed by exploratory tympanotomy were retrospectively analyzed. Pure-tone audiometry data before and after tympanotomy were compared to determine the outcome of hearing recovery. The postoperative hearing test values were documented 3 weeks after tympanotomy. All surgical reports were reviewed with regard to the surgical technique performed and the intraoperative findings. Results 18.8% of the patients revealed a visible perilymphatic fistula in the round window niche. 89.8% of the patients reported no typical history for a round window membrane rupture. All patients were treated with an exploratory tympanotomy under local anesthesia and an intravenous corticosteroid treatment regimen. The majority of the surgeons used a fat plomb to cover the round window. Postoperative hearing was significantly improved compared to the preoperative hearing test data. No patient showed a worsened hearing curve after the treatment. Conclusion Most patients suffering from unilateral sudden deafness had no visible perilymphatic fistula. In our study population, the majority of patients reported no typical history of a pressure elevation in the inner ear. Exploratory tympanotomy is a safe procedure that may support hearing recovery in patients with sudden deafness in addition to the established treatment regimen including high-dose steroids.

  4. Strategies for the prevention of MP3-induced hearing loss among adolescents : Expert opinions from a Delphi study

    Vogel, I.; Brug, J.; Ploeg, C.P.B. van der; Raat, H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To identify parties involved in the prevention of MP3-induced hearing loss among adolescents and potentially effective prevention strategies and interventions. METHODS. Thirty experts in fields such as scientific research, medical practice, community health professions, education, youth w

  5. 3-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING OF THE INNER-EAR IN IDIOPATHIC SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING-LOSS

    ALBERS, FWJ; DEMUYNCK, KMNP; CASSELMAN, JW

    1994-01-01

    Five patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) were examined by a combination of high-resolution computed tomography and special magnetic resonance imaging techniques. By three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state magnetic resonance imaging excellent visuali

  6. The optimal window time to treat noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) with low level laser therapy (LLLT)

    Chang, So-Young; Suh, Myung-Whan; Bahk, Chan Woong; Jung, Jae Yun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Rhee, Chung-Ku

    2012-02-01

    The transcanal LLLT was found to recover noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) but the LLLT was performed immediately after the induction of NIHL. The aim of this study was to find an optimal window time to treat and recover a NIHL with LLLT. Bilateral ears of 6SD rats (12ears) were exposed to noise. Left ears of the rats were irradiated with a LLLT (830 nm, 594 J/cm2 per day) for 12 days, starting 3 days and 7 days post exposure to noise. Right ears were used as control ears. The hearing levels were measured at each frequency of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 32 kHz before and after the noise exposure and post 12th irradiations. The initial hearing levels in all frequencies before and after the noise exposure were 26.5, 24.5, 24.0, 24.0 and 24.5 dB SPL and 63.5, 64, 71.5, 73.5 and 67.5 dB SPL in 4, 8, 12, 16 and 32 kHz, respectively in 6 ears. After 12th irradiation, the thresholds of the LLLT treated left ears of the 3-day group recovered significantly compared to those of the untreated right. However, for the 7 day group, the recovery of the LLLT treated left ears was not significantly improved compared to that of the untreated right. The results of this study suggest that the optimal window time to treat NIHL with LLLT was within 3 days from the exposure to noise but the hearing failed to recover if the LLLT was started 7 days post exposure to noise.

  7. Evaluation of the use of a questionnaire by non-specialists to detect hearing loss in preschool Brazilian children.

    Gomes, Mariana; Lichtig, Ida

    2005-06-01

    In developing countries there is a lack of trained personnel and testing equipment to facilitate early detection of hearing impairment in children. There is a need to develop a strategic functional model for identification of hearing impairments through a scheme for the optimal utilization of the limited and local resources in the community. A questionnaire offers a low-cost option, specially if it is administered by non-professionals. This study evaluated a parent report questionnaire by non-professionals, to identify hearing loss in pre-school children of a poor community in São Paulo city. Seven volunteers were trained by a professional to use the questionnaire. A total of 133 children aged 3-6 years enrolled in this study. Their parents answered the questionnaire administered by the volunteers and the children underwent audiological screening (audiometry and imitanciometry). The results showed that the volunteers reproduced the evaluation of the professional regarding the use of the questionnaire. The majority of the results were statistically significant and the minimal percentage of concordance was 77%. Of the 133 children who were tested, 12 failed the audiometry screening (9.02%) and 18 failed the tympanometry screening (13.53%). The questionnaire did not differentiate between the children who failed in the audiological screening from those who did not, suggesting further refinements are necessary. PMID:15900189

  8. Facilitators and Barriers to the Inclusion of Orally Educated Children and Youth with Hearing Loss in Schools: Promoting Partnerships to Support Inclusion

    Eriks-Brophy, Alice; Durieux-Smith, Andree; Olds, Janet; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Duquette, Cheryll; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2006-01-01

    The majority of orally educated children with hearing loss are receiving their schooling in inclusive settings. Nevertheless, there is little recent research examining their integration experiences. A series of 10 focus groups with young people with hearing loss, their parents and itinerant teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students were used…

  9. Immune system of the inner ear as a novel therapeutic target for sensorineural hearing loss

    Takayuki eOkano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a common clinical condition resulting from dysfunction in one or more parts in the auditory pathway between the inner ear and auditory cortex. Despite the prevalence of SNHL, little is known about its etiopathology, although several mechanisms have been postulated including ischemia, viral infection or reactivation, and microtrauma. Immune-mediated inner ear disease has been introduced and accepted as one SNHL pathophysiology; it responds to immunosuppressive therapy and is one of the few reversible forms of bilateral SNHL. The concept of immune-mediated inner ear disease is straightforward and comprehensible, but criteria for clinical diagnosis and the precise mechanism of hearing loss have not been determined. Moreover, the therapeutic mechanisms of corticosteroids are unclear, leading to several misconceptions by both clinicians and investigators concerning corticosteroid therapy. This review addresses our current understanding of the immune system in the inner ear and its involvement in the pathophysiology in SNHL. Treatment of SNHL, including immune-mediated inner ear disorder, will be discussed with a focus on the immune mechanism and immunocompetent cells as therapeutic targets. Finally, possible interventions modulating the immune system in the inner ear to repair the tissue organization and improve hearing in patients with SNHL will be discussed. Tissue macrophages in the inner ear appear to be a potential target for modulating the immune response in the inner ear in the pathophysiology of SNHL.

  10. Hearing loss prevention for carpenters: Part 1 - Using health communication and health promotion models to develop training that works

    Carol Merry Stephenson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In phase 1 of a large multiyear effort, health communication and health promotion models were used to develop a comprehensive hearing loss prevention training program for carpenters. Additionally, a survey was designed to be used as an evaluation instrument. The models informed an iterative research process in which the authors used key informant interviews, focus groups, and early versions of the survey tool to identify critical issues expected to be relevant to the success of the hearing loss prevention training. Commonly held attitudes and beliefs associated with occupational noise exposure and hearing losses, as well as issues associated with the use or non-use of hearing protectors, were identified. The training program was then specifically constructed to positively shape attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions associated with healthy hearing behaviors - especially those associated with appropriate hearing protector use. The goal was to directly address the key issues and overcome the barriers identified during the formative research phase. The survey was finalized using factor analysis methods and repeated pilot testing. It was designed to be used with the training as an evaluation tool and thus could indicate changes over time in attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions regarding hearing loss prevention. Finally, the training program was fine tuned with industry participation so that its delivery would integrate seamlessly into the existing health and safety training provided to apprentice carpenters. In phase 2, reported elsewhere in this volume, the training program and the survey were tested through a demonstration project at two sites.

  11. Hearing loss

    ... Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap 149. Baloh RW, Jen J. ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 430. Bauer CA, Jenkins HA. ...

  12. Hearing Loss

    ... Noise from lawn mowers, snow blowers, or loud music can damage the inner ear. This can result ... see if another medicine can be used. Sudden deafness is a medical emergency that may be curable ...

  13. Sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis after closed head injury presenting with unilateral hearing loss

    Sinus thrombosis has rarely been associated with closed head injury; more often, thrombosis of the sigmoid or transverse sinus is caused by otogenic inflammations or tumours, or occurs during pregnancy. Symptoms are frequently vague, while untreated thrombus progression may be fatal due to venous congestion and infarction. We report a 32-year-old man presenting with right hearing loss, tinnitus and headache 2 days after a closed head injury. Neurological examination showed no additional abnormality. The EEG showed focal bifrontal slowing. CT revealed a fracture of the occipital bone. MRI and MRA demonstrated complete thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. After 2 weeks of intravenous heparin therapy followed by warfarin, the patient's hearing improved and MRI and MRA showed complete recanalisation of the sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Venous sinus thrombosis can be an undetected sequel to head injury. Appropriate imaging studies should be carried out to enable therapy to be started as soon as possible. (orig.)

  14. Listening in adverse conditions: Masking release and effects of hearing loss

    Jespersgaard, Claus Forup Corlin

    Speech perception is a complex process involving the ability to detect the speech signal, separate it from interfering sounds and decode the transmitted speech information. In contrast to normalhearing (NH) listeners, hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show a large reduction in the masking...... release (MR), which is the improvement in speech intelligibility when the interferer is different from steady-state noise (e.g., a competing talker). MR is usually measured as the difference in speech reception thresholds (SRTs), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) where 50% of the speech is understood, and...... and HI listeners, to study the effects of hearing loss on the ability to decode speech, and to establish a framework for modeling speech intelligibility based on an auditory processing model. The first part of the thesis established the modeling framework and showed that, by using a model that...

  15. Sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis after closed head injury presenting with unilateral hearing loss

    Brors, D. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Schaefers, M. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Schick, B.; Draf, W. [Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Dazert, S. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Kahle, G. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Fulda (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Sinus thrombosis has rarely been associated with closed head injury; more often, thrombosis of the sigmoid or transverse sinus is caused by otogenic inflammations or tumours, or occurs during pregnancy. Symptoms are frequently vague, while untreated thrombus progression may be fatal due to venous congestion and infarction. We report a 32-year-old man presenting with right hearing loss, tinnitus and headache 2 days after a closed head injury. Neurological examination showed no additional abnormality. The EEG showed focal bifrontal slowing. CT revealed a fracture of the occipital bone. MRI and MRA demonstrated complete thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. After 2 weeks of intravenous heparin therapy followed by warfarin, the patient's hearing improved and MRI and MRA showed complete recanalisation of the sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Venous sinus thrombosis can be an undetected sequel to head injury. Appropriate imaging studies should be carried out to enable therapy to be started as soon as possible. (orig.)

  16. Dual Sensory Loss and Depressive Symptoms: The Importance of Hearing, Daily Functioning and Activity Engagement

    Kim Matthew Kiely

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between dual sensory loss (DSL and mental health has been well established. However, most studies have relied on self-report data and lacked measures that would enable researchers to examine causal pathways between DSL and depression. This study seeks to extend this research by examining the effects of DSL on mental health, and identify factors that explain the longitudinal associations between sensory loss and depressive symptoms. Methods: Piecewise linear-mixed models were used to analyse 16-years of longitudinal data collected on up to five occasions from 1611 adults (51% men aged between 65 and 103 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D. Vision loss (VL was defined by corrected visual acuity greater than 0.3 logMAR in the better eye, blindness or glaucoma. Hearing loss (HL was defined by pure tone average (PTA greater than 25 dB in the better hearing ear. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, medical conditions, lifestyle behaviours, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs, cognitive function, and social engagement. Results: Unadjusted models indicated that higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with HL (B=1.16, SE=0.33 and DSL (B=2.15, SE=0.39 but not VL. Greater rates of change in depressive symptoms were also evident after the onset of HL (B=0.16, SE=0.06, p

  17. Exposure to music and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among professional pop/rock/jazz musicians.

    Halevi-Katz, Dana N; Yaakobi, Erez; Putter-Katz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has been extensively studied in industrial work environments. With the advent of new technologies, loud music has been increasingly affecting listeners outside of the industrial setting. Most research on the effects of music and hearing loss has focused on classical musicians. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between the amount of experience a professional pop/rock/jazz musician has and objective and subjective variables of the musician's hearing loss. This study also examined professional pop/rock/jazz musicians' use of hearing protection devices in relation to the extent of their exposure to amplified music. Forty-four pop/rock/jazz musicians were interviewed using the Pop/Rock/Jazz Musician's Questionnaire (PRJMQ) in order to obtain self-reported symptoms of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Forty-two of the subjects were also tested for air-conduction hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 1-8 kHz. Results show that the extent of professional pop/rock/jazz musicians' exposure to amplified music was related to both objective and subjective variables of hearing loss: Greater musical experience was positively linked to higher hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 3-6 kHz and to the subjective symptom of tinnitus. Weekly hours playing were found to have a greater effect on hearing loss in comparison to years playing. Use of hearing protection was not linked to the extent of exposure to amplified music. It is recommended that further research be conducted with a larger sample, in order to gain a greater understanding of the detrimental effects of hours playing versus years playing. PMID:25913555

  18. Exposure to music and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among professional pop/rock/jazz musicians

    Halevi-Katz, Dana N.; Yaakobi, Erez; Putter-Katz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has been extensively studied in industrial work environments. With the advent of new technologies, loud music has been increasingly affecting listeners outside of the industrial setting. Most research on the effects of music and hearing loss has focused on classical musicians. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between the amount of experience a professional pop/rock/jazz musician has and objective and subjective variables of the musician's hearing loss. This study also examined professional pop/rock/jazz musicians’ use of hearing protection devices in relation to the extent of their exposure to amplified music. Forty-four pop/rock/jazz musicians were interviewed using the Pop/Rock/Jazz Musician's Questionnaire (PRJMQ) in order to obtain self-reported symptoms of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Forty-two of the subjects were also tested for air-conduction hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 1-8 kHz. Results show that the extent of professional pop/rock/jazz musicians’ exposure to amplified music was related to both objective and subjective variables of hearing loss: Greater musical experience was positively linked to higher hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 3-6 kHz and to the subjective symptom of tinnitus. Weekly hours playing were found to have a greater effect on hearing loss in comparison to years playing. Use of hearing protection was not linked to the extent of exposure to amplified music. It is recommended that further research be conducted with a larger sample, in order to gain a greater understanding of the detrimental effects of hours playing versus years playing. PMID:25913555

  19. Burden of Noise Induced Hearing Loss among Manufacturing Industrial Workers in Malaysia

    Noraita TAHIR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL is the highest reported occupational disease among industrial workers but there is scarcity of data on disease burden in Malaysia. This study estimated the risks and burden of NIHL in manufacturing industries in Malaysia.Methods: This cross-sectional industrial survey was conducted by interviewing OSH practitioners at 26 industries categorized as food, tobacco, textile, wearing apparel, wood products except furniture, paper, refined petroleum, chemicals, non-metallic mineral, basic metal, fabricated metal, motor vehicle parts. The catchment population is imputed based on stratified sampling design involving 60% of workers diagnosed with NIHL.Results: A total of 18 industries exposed to noise level of 86-90dBA and 8 industries at more than 91dBA were identified. All industries provide regular awareness training and hearing protection device to their workers but none of them implement attenuation, majority of them (81% conduct onsite audiometric test annually. In overall, the risk of NIHL and incidence per 100,000 manufacturing workers projected is 8% (139 new cases, the highest risk and incidence is 32% (26 in motor vehicle parts industry; followed by 23% (1140 new cases in tobacco industry and 23% (269 new cases in fabricated metal industry. Male workers (89% were exposed to a greater risk compared to female (11%. It was estimated that 103,000 workers were potentially affected by NIHL in Malaysia.Conclusion: NIHL is a major burden among industrial workers in Malaysia. Implementation of effective hearing conservation program and self-enforcement of noise regulations by the employer could potentially reduce the burden. Keywords: Noise, Hearing loss, Manufacturing, Malaysia

  20. Patients affected with Fabry disease have an increased incidence of progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness: an investigation of twenty-two hemizygous male patients

    Chassaing Augustin

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease (FD, OMIM 301500 is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to the deficient activity of alpha-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. While the progressive systemic deposition of uncleaved glycosphingolipids throughout the body is known to have protean clinical manifestations, few data are available regarding the cochlear involvement. Methods We non-invasively investigated cochlear functions in 22 consecutive hemizygous males (age 19–64 years, mean 39 affected with classic FD. Conventional audiometry, tympanometry, ABR audiometry, otoacoustic emissions were performed in all patients, together with medical history record and physical examination as part of an exhaustive baseline evaluation prior to enzyme replacement therapy. Results A total of 12 patients (54.5% with classic FD were found to have abnormal audition. Five patients had progressive hearing loss and seven patients (32% experienced sudden deafness. In addition, a hearing loss on high-tone frequencies was found in 7 out of the 10 remaining patients without clinical impairment, despite their young age at time of examination. The incidence of hearing loss appeared significantly increased in FD patients with kidney failure (P tinnitus aurium was also found in six patients (27%. Conclusion This is the first evidence of a high incidence of both progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness in a cohort of male patients affected with classic Fabry disease. The exact pathophysiologic mechanism(s of the cochlear involvement deserves further studies.