WorldWideScience

Sample records for significant hearing loss

  1. Hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased hearing; Deafness; Loss of hearing; Conductive hearing loss; Sensorineural hearing loss; Presbycusis ... Symptoms of hearing loss may include: Certain sounds seeming too ... conversations when two or more people are talking Difficulty ...

  2. Hearing and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mr. Engelman

    2009-05-27

    How the ear works, and how you can prevent hearing loss! Turn em Down iPod's Popular Earbuds: Hip Or Harmful? How the ear works Common Indoor and Outdoor Noise Levels Article with Decibel Chart for Common Sounds How the ear works How the ear works with images and graphics What is noise-induced hearing loss? ======================== Hearing Loss Simulation Hearing Loss Demo # 1 So, how do you know if LOUD is TOO LOUD? How Loud is Too Loud? Noise Induced Hearing Loss ...

  3. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Significant hearing loss has been reported in approximately 50% of people with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). While not everyone who has OI develops hearing loss, the incidence is much higher than in the ...

  4. Could an underlying hearing loss be a significant factor in the handicap caused by tinnitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, S A B; Jayarajan, V; Bartlett, J

    2009-01-01

    There have been several studies that have demonstrated a link between the hearing loss of subjects and tinnitus. However, there has been no systematic evaluation of the link between perceived tinnitus distress and an underlying hearing loss. The purpose of the current study is to explore this association, and ascertain whether a subject's hearing loss contributes to the handicap caused by tinnitus. A group of 96 adults were evaluated with Pure Tone Audiometry and a questionnaire that included the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI). In 58% of the subjects, the side of the unilateral or worse tinnitus corresponded with the ear with poorer hearing thresholds. A subset of the THI, the Two Question Mean (TQM) that was related to questions with regard to communication, correlated significantly with the hearing thresholds in the better hearing ear ( P TQM scores ( P < 0.01). These results suggested that in tinnitus subjects with impaired hearing, the underlying hearing loss may be a significant factor in the perceived distress. PMID:19602769

  5. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program promotes better understanding of hearing loss by reviewing the causes of hearing loss, the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options, as well as tips for coping with hearing impairment. It also describes the anatomy of the outer, middle, and inner ear. This is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: The tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  6. Types of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Types of Hearing Loss Hearing Loss: Type of Hearing Loss | Degree of Hearing Loss | Configuration of Hearing Loss More information on this topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. Hearing loss can be categorized by which part of the ...

  7. Living with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Living with Hearing Loss Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Fast Facts There are two main types of hearing loss. Permanent hearing loss (called sensorineural) usually involves damage ...

  8. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss has many causes. 50% to 60% of hearing ...

  9. Hearing Loss in Children: Types of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... America Information For... Media Policy Makers Types of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of our hearing. There are four types of hearing loss: Conductive Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by something ...

  10. Hearing loss in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Murthy, V.; Krishna, Kirtan

    2011-01-01

    To study hearing loss in healthy pregnant women. Tertiary care hospital. Prospective study. We screened fifty healthy, non-complicated pregnant women (study group) in the third trimester for hearing loss who had no previous history for the same. Fifty healthy, non-pregnant women (control group) were also screened for hearing loss with a normal pure tone audiogram (PTA) for evidence of hearing loss. Thirteen women in the study group had evidence of hearing loss, in the form of absence of disto...

  11. Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss The importance of hearing Hearing allows you to ... surround the soft tissue of the inner ear. Hearing loss occurs when the inner ear is damaged. What ...

  12. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient Health Information News media interested in covering the ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  13. Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss can affect a childâ??s ability to develop communication, language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting services, the more likely they are ...

  14. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety & Health Topics NIOSH Share Compartir NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Occupational hearing loss is one of the ... controlled or eliminated. Learn About Workplace Noise and Hearing Loss Facts and Statistics Publications and Tools Hearing Loss ...

  15. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  16. Diphtheria and hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, C. R.; Cruickshanks, K. J.; Wiley, T. L.; Klein, R.; Klein, B. E.; Tweed, T. S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if infectious diseases usually experienced in childhood have an effect on hearing ability later in life. METHODS: The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (N = 3,753) is a population-based study of age-related hearing loss in adults aged 48 to 92 years in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. As part of this study, infectious disease history was obtained and hearing was tested using pure-tone audiometry. Hearing loss was defined as a pure-tone average of thresholds at 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz,...

  17. Reversible sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Robinson, P; Chelladurai, J

    2002-12-01

    We present an unusual case of temporary sensorineural hearing loss in a 6-year-old child due to carbon monoxide. This was shown on both the audiograms and confirmed with objective testing using otoacoustic emissions. Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the few recognised causes of reversible sensorineural hearing loss, though it may also lead to a permanent deficit. This is discussed along with other potential causes of reversible sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:12443820

  18. Occupational hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Al-otaibi, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT Occupational hearing loss is a common work related problem that can be attributed to an offending agent in the workplace. This paper describes the different causes of occupational hearing loss and its compensation. Physicians should be aware of this preventable medical condition.

  19. Intellectual Disabilities and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herer, Gilbert R.

    2012-01-01

    Undetected/untreated hearing loss imposes significant limitations upon individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). It can interfere with cognitive development, impede communicative and social interactions, and limit vocational aspirations. Over the past decade, the hearing of 9961 people with ID was evaluated at Special Olympics sports…

  20. Occupational hearing loss in farmers.

    OpenAIRE

    Plakke, B L; Dare, E

    1992-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a great deal of high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss among farmers. The studies have failed, however, to differentiate farmers who have occupational noise exposure only from other potential hearing loss etiologies. This study, through extensive case history information, has isolated a farm noise-exposure group and matched its members by age with persons with no significant noise exposure. Results indicate that farmers exposed only to noise from farming ha...

  1. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find additional information about hearing loss and older adults? The NIDCD maintains a directory of organizations that ... questions and provide information on hearing loss and older adults: Late-deafened adults Hearing aids Presbycusis For more ...

  2. Occupational hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintenance Construction Farming Jobs involving loud music or machinery In the U.S., laws regulate the maximum job ... Lonsbury-Martin BL, Martin GK. Noise-induced hearing loss. In: Cummings CW, Flint PW, Haughey BH, et al, eds. ...

  3. Fluctuant hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, S. K.

    1997-01-01

    122 cases of fluctuant hearing loss were studied. Serous otitis media was commonest followed by Meniere’s disease, Acoustic neuroma, fistula of round and oval window, oto-mandibular syndrome, Congenital cholesteatoma and maxillary sinusitis. Cases of Arachnoid cyst, Multiple sclerosis, abnormalities of base of skull and craniocervical region and cervical rib causing fluctuant hearing loss could not be detected. Aetio pathophysiology of all discussed.

  4. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems

  5. Experimental autoimmune hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Billings, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) has been hindered by the inaccessibility of the inner ear to biopsy and the lack of workable animal models. A report in this issue of the JCI describes a mouse model of CD4+ T cell–mediated ASNHL induced by immunization with peptides from the inner ear–specific proteins cochlin and ?-tectorin.

  6. Hearing Loss in Children: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... devices that can help children and adults with hearing loss. You can talk to your audiologist about which ... will ask you questions about your baby's health, hearing loss in you family, and how well you think ...

  7. Identifying Babies with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintained and might be outdated . Identifying Infants with Hearing Loss --- United States, 1999--2007 Please note: An erratum ... To view the erratum, please click here . Congenital hearing loss affects two to three infants per 1,000 ...

  8. Ideopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Stokroos, Robert Jan,

    1997-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, otologists have reported cases of sudden, unexpected sensorineural hearing loss. Today, in spite of the advancements in medicine, the pathophysiology of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL) has not been elucidated and little can be offered to people struck by the hearing loss. ... Zie: Samenvatting

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wormald, R

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the aetiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a paediatric population presenting to the National Centre of Medical Genetics. A retrospective chart review from 1998 to 2006. One hundred and twenty nine children were investigated for SNHL. The average age of diagnosis of hearing loss was 36 months. The degree of hearing loss was mild in 8 children, moderate in 33 children, severe in 31 children and profound in 57 children. Eighty-five children (66%) were diagnosed with a hereditary hearing loss, 11 (8%) children had an acquired hearing loss and no cause found in 33 (26%) children. This is the first report of the causes of hearing loss in Irish children. The mean age of diagnosis in our cohort is high and emphasises the need for a neonatal screening programme. There remains a number of children for whom the cause of hearing loss remains unknown.

  10. Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss Percent of Persons with Hearing Loss[*] Who Have Ever Used Hearing Aids [text version] ... 2010 and 2020. The number of persons with hearing loss is calculated based on National Health and Nutrition ...

  11. Sensorineural hearing loss and prematurity

    OpenAIRE

    Marlow, E.; Hunt, L.; Marlow, N.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To elucidate clinical antecedents of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in very preterm infants.?DESIGN—Case-control study.?SUBJECTS—Fifteen children < 33 weeks' gestation with significant SNHL born between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 1994, detected within 9 months of birth, and 30 matched control children.?METHODOLOGY—Perinatal variables in the two groups were compared using non-parametric tests and conditional logistic regression (EGRET).?RESULT...

  12. Imaging Evaluation of Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Vossough, A.

    2008-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common disorder in all societies.Radiologists are often asked to evaluate the complex inner ear structures and auditory pathways in search of a cause for hearing loss. The seemingly complex anatomy of the temporal bone can make some radiologists uncomfortable in interpretation of these studies. In this talk, we will briefly focus on the pertinent imaging anatomy and attempt to go over some of the imaging findings of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. Optimizing imagi...

  13. Rheumatoid Factor and Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Murthy, V.; Mohan Kumar, J.

    2011-01-01

    To find out the association between rheumatoid factor and hearing loss, a prospective study was conducted at Tertiary care/Medical college hospital. We screened 85 patients with positive rheumatoid factor for evidence of hearing loss. These patients were collected from the Departments of Medicine and Orthopedics. Out of 85 patients, who were positive for rheumatoid factor, underwent screening for hearing loss. These patients had a normal pure tone audiogram but Distortion product otoacoustic ...

  14. Occupational Hearing Loss in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-01-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases ...

  15. Inactivation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Myelinating Glial Cells Results in Significant Loss of Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons Accompanied by Age-Related Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. J.; Furusho, M.; D’Sa, C.; Kuwada, S.; Conti, L.; Morest, D. K.; Bansal, R.

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss has been attributed to many factors, including degeneration of sensory neurons in the auditory pathway and demyelination along the cochlear nerve. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which signal through four receptors (Fgfrs), are produced by auditory neurons and play a key role in embryonic development of the cochlea and in neuroprotection against sound-induced injury. However, the role of FGF signaling in the maintenance of normal auditory function in adult and aging mice remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the contribution of glial cells, which myelinate the cochlear nerves, is poorly understood. To address these questions, we generated transgenic mice in which Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 were specifically inactivated in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes but not in neurons. Adult mutant mice exhibited late onset of hearing impairment, which progressed markedly with age. The hearing impairment was accompanied by significant loss of myelinated spiral ganglion neurons. The pathology extended into the cochlear nucleus, without apparent loss of myelin or of the deletion-bearing glial cells themselves. This suggests that perturbation of FGF receptor-mediated glial function leads to the attenuation of glial support of neurons, leading to their loss and impairment of auditory functions. Thus, FGF/FGF receptor signaling provides a potentially novel mechanism of maintaining reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia in adult and aging animals. Dysfunction of glial cells and FGF receptor signaling may therefore be implicated in neurodegenerative hearing loss associated with normal aging. PMID:19598249

  16. Hearing loss due to mumps.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, R.; Richards, H.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of mumps was considered in 33 children with profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown origin. Fifteen gave a history of mumps, of whom 12 contracted the infection between the last normal and first abnormal hearing tests. Hearing should be tested after mumps infection.

  17. Hearing loss due to mumps.

    OpenAIRE

    Garty, B. Z.; Danon, Y. L.; Nitzan, M.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of mumps was considered in 33 children with profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown origin. Fifteen gave a history of mumps, of whom 12 contracted the infection between the last normal and first abnormal hearing tests. Hearing should be tested after mumps infection.

  18. The Stigma of Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Wallhagen, Margaret I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose:?To explore dimensions of stigma experienced by older adults with hearing loss and those with whom they frequently communicate to target interventions promoting engagement and positive aging.?Design and Methods:?This longitudinal qualitative study conducted interviews over 1 year with dyads where one partner had hearing loss. Participants were naive to or had not worn hearing aids in the past year. Data were analyzed using grounded theory, constant comparative methodology.?Res...

  19. The Stigma of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhagen, Margaret I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore dimensions of stigma experienced by older adults with hearing loss and those with whom they frequently communicate to target interventions promoting engagement and positive aging. Design and Methods: This longitudinal qualitative study conducted interviews over 1 year with dyads where one partner had hearing loss. Participants…

  20. Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers Article Body All parents complain at ... the damage is already underway. Symptoms that Suggest Hearing Loss May Include: Loss of hearing sensitivity, first to ...

  1. Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Hearing Loss in Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hearing Loss Homepage Facts Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis ...

  2. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Adults Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Adults [text version] Note: Lower numbers are ... chart depicts the prevalence of likely noise-induced hearing loss from 2 time periods in adults (20–69 ...

  3. Hearing Loss in Children: Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Hearing Loss in Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hearing Loss Homepage Facts Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis ...

  4. Early detection of hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schade, Götz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS is currently spreading in Germany, as well, even though there can be no talk of a comprehensive establishment. The introduction of UNHS in several federal states such as Hamburg, Hessen, and Schleswig-Holstein can be ascribed to the personal commitment of individual pediatric audiologists. Apart from the procurement of the screening equipment and the training of the staff responsible for the examination of the newborns, the tracking, i.e. the follow-up on children with conspicuous test results, is of utmost importance. This involves significant administration effort and work and is subject to data protection laws that can differ substantially between the various federal states. Among audiologists, there is consensus that within the first three months of a child’s life, a hearing loss must be diagnosed and that between the age of 3 and 6 months, the supply of a hearing aid must have been initiated. For this purpose, screening steps 1 (usually a TEOAE measurement and 2 (AABR testing need to be conducted in the maternity hospital. The follow-up of step 1 then comprises the repetition of the TEOAE- and AABR measurement for conspicuous children by a specialized physician. The follow-up of step 2 comprises the confirmatory diagnostics in a pediatric audiological center. This always implies BERA diagnostics during spontaneous sleep or under sedation. The subsequent early supply of a hearing aid should generally be conducted by a (pediatric acoustician specialized on children.

  5. Hearing loss at work? Hearing loss from leisure activities?

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The nurses of the Medical Service would like invite all persons working on the CERN site to take part in a: HEARING LOSS DETECTION WEEK From 28 August to 1st September 2006 At the Infirmary, Building 57 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hearing tests - advice - information - documentation - protective equipment

  6. Hearing loss in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Pemmaiah K.D; Srinivas D.R

    2011-01-01

    Background: The complex arrangement of inner ear makes it potential target of hyperglycaemic damage.A study was conducted to identify the probable occurrence of hearing loss as a complication of DiabetesMellitus (DM).Aims and objective:• To assess the hearing loss in type 2 diabetic patients and correlate with age, duration of diabetes,HbA1C.• To correlate hearing loss with nerve conduction study.Design: Cross sectional study was done involving randomly 110 Type 2 DM patients. Data regard...

  7. Relation between arterial hypertension and hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To verify the relationship between systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) and hearing loss in middle-aged patient. Method: This study was carried out in the period from January to December 2007. The research was composed by 392 patients of both genders, aged from 45 to 60 years old. Anamnesis and threshold tonal audiometry data were analyzed. Results: There was a significant association between SAH and hearing loss. Conclusion: The results showed an evident association between SAH an...

  8. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  9. Effects of Hearing Loss on Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of Hearing Loss on Development It is well recognized that hearing is critical to speech and language development, communication, and learning. Children with listening difficulties due to hearing loss or auditory processing problems continue to be an ...

  10. Prevalence of occupational noise induced hearing loss amongst traffic police personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, V K; Mehta, A K

    1999-01-01

    Traffic branch personnel of Pune traffic police were screened for presence of noise induced hearing loss. A very significant number (81.2%) showed sensorineural hearing loss. The various factors responsible for noise induced hearing loss are discussed.

  11. Hearing loss in brainstem disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Luxon, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study of 309 unselected patients with brainstem disorders was carried out to establish the incidence and degree of hearing loss in this group as a whole and in each of three separate pathologies: multiple sclerosis, vertebro-basilar ischaemia and brainstem tumours. Pure tone audiograms were corrected for age and sex and upon analysis, thereafter, 59% and 26% of patients were found to have hearing thresholds in excess of 10dB and 30dB respectively. The hearing loss tended to be...

  12. What's Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the inner ear or cochlea. Hearing aid technology is available that can adjust the volume of ... is a language of hand movements that allows deaf people to communicate without speaking Cued Speech and ...

  13. Hearing loss in shipyard employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Tsouvaltzidou, Thomaella

    2015-01-01

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most prevalent occupational illnesses, with a higher incidence in the heavy industry. Objectives of the Study: The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of NIHL in Greece and explore its correlations with other job and individual-related factors. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were administered, and audiograms were conducted to 757 employees of a shipyard company in Greece, both white- and blue-collar, during the period 2006–2009. A modification of the 1979' equation of the American Academy of Otolaryngology was used to calculate hearing loss. Statistical analysis was conducted by means of the SPSS v. 17. Results: A 27.1% of the employees were hearing handicap. Hearing loss was correlated with age, past medical history of ear disease (Meniere's disease, acoustic neuroma, otosclerosis) or injury, hyperlipidemia, job title and level of education. A few questions on subjective hearing ability and symptoms showed strong discriminatory power of hearing pathology. Conclusions: The results of this study emphasize the burden of disease in the shipyard industry, and the need for continuous monitoring, implementation of preventive measures and hearing conservation programs.

  14. Amplification Considerations for Children With Minimal or Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss and Unilateral Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Sarah; Gravel, Judith S.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Children with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss and unilateral hearing loss are at higher risk for academic, speech-language, and social-emotional difficulties than their normal hearing peers. The choice to fit infants with moderate or greater degrees of bilateral hearing loss has been standard practice for most clinicians, but for those with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss, the fitting of hearing technology must be based on limited data. Evidence does n...

  15. Acquired Hearing Loss: Social and Psychological Issues and Adjustment Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutman, D.; Boisseau, B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores social and psychological issues facing those with acquired hearing loss, including self-identity, dealing with the loss, communication issues, and the impact of hearing impairment on significant others. Strategies and innovative approaches to promoting the well-being of deafened and hard-of-hearing individuals and their…

  16. Risk factors for hearing loss in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Vasconcelos Chaves Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify risk factors related to sensorineural hearing loss in elderly. Methods: The sample consisted of 60 selected elderly, divided into two groups: the Case Group, composed by 30 individuals, 21 females and 9 males, aged at least 60 years, presenting sensorineural hearing loss, and the Control Group, composed by 30 individuals matched on gender and age, with normal hearing. The patients were submitted to audiological anamnesis and tonal audiometry. The hearing impairment was defined according to average threshold greater than 35dBNA, in the frequencies of 1,000; 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, in the best ear. Results: Statistically significant odds ratios were: a to audiological history: noise exposure and family history of deafness; b to situations involving hearing difficulty: television, church, telephone, silent environment, spatial location of sound, difficulty with voices and noisy environment; c to otologic history: tinnitus, otorrhea and nausea; and d to medical history: visual problems, smoke, alcohol, thyroid problems and kidney disease. Conclusion: The findings of this study highlighted, for sensorineural hearing loss, risk factors related to audiologic, otologic and medical history, and to situations involving hearing difficulty.

  17. Prelinguistic Vocal Development in Infants with Typical Hearing and Infants with Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Oller, D. Kimbrough

    2008-01-01

    Delays in the onset of canonical babbling with hearing loss are extensively documented. Relatively little is known about other aspects of prelinguistic vocal development and hearing loss. Eight infants with typical hearing and eight with severe-to-profound hearing loss were matched with regard to a significant vocal development milestone, the…

  18. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children Patient Health Information News media interested in covering the latest ... loss in children. How does noise exposure cause hearing loss? Very loud sounds damage the inner ear by ...

  19. Noise-induced hearing loss and hearing aids requirement

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano, C.; Garzaro, M.; Nadalin, J.; Pecorari, G.; Boggero, R.; Argentero, P.; Albera, R.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective disturbances, due to hearing loss, are auditory disability and handicap which can be evaluated with a questionnaire. The present study refers to a population of industrial workers affected by noise-induced hearing loss. Aim of the study is to identify the minimal level of hearing loss over which the patient felt changes in his quality of life, and the average auditory threshold at which the patient considered the application of a hearing aid useful or necessary. The sample comprise...

  20. Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents With Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Betty A.; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t?=?2.38, p?=?.02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r?=?.42, p?=?.002) and attention (r?=?.45, p?=?.001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r?=???.60, p?significant correlations emerged between self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  1. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Hartmut; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin; Margolf-Hackl, Sabine; Kießling, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons. Methods Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated. Results Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity – as determined by the fluid intelligence measure – was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered. Conclusion The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still, individual cognitive capacity might be relevant for hearing aid benefit during an initial phase of hearing aid provision if acclimatization has not yet taken place. PMID:25709417

  2. Sensorineural hear-loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Bozkurt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate and type of the hearing loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; and to analyze whether these hearing loss rates were different from control group or not.Materials and methods: The study included 50 RA patients and 34 healthy control subjects. All two groups underwent, pure tone audiometric test between 250-8.000 Hz frequencies; stapes reflex test and otoacoustic emissions.Results: The mean ages were 36, 88 ± 8, 81 years in RA cases and 35, 58 ± 8, 19 years in control group. The mean disease duration was 4.72 (range 2-21 years in patients with RA. Hearing loss was detected in 10 (20% of the RA patients and 3 (8.8% of the control group. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant in terms of hearing loss (p=0,139. The sensorineural hearing loss was the most commonly detected hearing loss type. The distribution of this type of hearing loss was 14% in RA and 8.8% in control group. Hearing loss was present in 6 (85.7% of the seven RA patients whose duration of the disease was more than 10 years.Conclusion: There was not found significant difference between RA and control group with respect to hearing loss. In RA cases, the degree of hearing loss was increasing with the duration of the diseases.

  3. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... exposure and other causes. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Take the following quiz to help determine if ...

  4. Talking to someone with hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    It may be hard for a person with hearing loss to understand a conversation with one other person. ... conversation can be even harder. The person with hearing loss can feel isolated or cut off. If you ...

  5. Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mail this page Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis Search the Consumer Updates ... or serious ear condition and lead to further hearing loss or other complications. “The problem might be as ...

  6. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t?=?2.38, p?=?.02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r?=?.42, p?=?.002) and attention (r?=?.45, p?=?.001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r?=?-?.60, p?communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  7. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Houshang Mehrparvar; Mohammad Hossein Davari; Abolfazl Mollasadeghi; Mohammad Reza Vahidi; Mehrdad Mostaghaci; Maryam Bahaloo; Pedram Shokouh

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months...

  8. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup.

  9. Screening infants for hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J.; Watson, E.; Alberman, E.

    1990-01-01

    A computerised child health register was used to study the coverage, referral rate, and false positive rate of the eight month hearing distraction test in a cohort of 1990 births to residents of one district during an eight month period. Coverage by the age of 9 months was under 60% and varied with ethnic group and immunisation record. The true problem rate among those referred was 48%. None of the three children in the cohort who had a sensorineural hearing loss was picked up by screening, a...

  10. Hearing Loss in the Elderly: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Blakley, Brian W

    1989-01-01

    Loss of hearing is tragic, yet most of those afflicted can be helped. Surgery is sometimes appropriate, but for the majority a hearing aid is the best answer. This article reviews what happens in different hearing losses, and gives an overview of hearing aids for the physician who lacks an extensive technical background but wishes to understand these devices a little better. Simple tips for investigation of hearing-aid complaints are included, as well as some tips for communication with hard-...

  11. Hearing aid-related satisfaction based on type and degree of hearing loss in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad FarajiKhiavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the elderly; using a hearing aid to alleviate auditory impairment can positively affect their quality of life. This research aimed to determine the level of satisfaction concerning hearing aids in elderly people with hearing impairment based on the type and degree of hearing loss.Methods: An analytic cross-sectional research design was used ; the sample included 40 elderly people who used hearing aids. According to the World Health Organization (WHO age classification, participants were divided into two age groups: 65-74 years (n=20 and 75-90 years (n=20. Satisfaction levels were assessed using a standard satisfaction with amplification in daily life (SADL questionnaire.Results: Satisfaction levels in the 65-74 age group were significantly higher than that in the 75-90 age group (p=0.02. Participants with mixed hearing loss revealed higher satisfaction levels than participants with sensorineural hearing loss (p=0.02. On the negative effects dimension, participants with severe hearing loss exhibited significantly higher satisfaction levels than participants with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss (p=0.01.Conclusion: Total satisfaction mean scores were relatively high in the elderly participants . Negative features could be reduced via careful consultation regarding the aids’ amplifying capabilities and limitations in groups with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss.

  12. Association between hearing loss and depressive symptoms in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss causes difficulties in speech understanding, which leads away from the family and social environment. This isolation may be associated with depressive disorders. Type of study: clinical prospective. Objective: To determine the association between hearing loss and depression in a group of non-institutionalized elderly. Method: The sample consisted of individuals aged over 60 years, undergoing complete audiological evaluation and screening for depressive symptoms with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS. Results: We evaluated 54 elderly, 26 (48.1% were female and 28 (51.9% males. It was found that 39 (72.2% had hearing thresholds change, and 17 (31.5% with mild hearing loss and 22 (40.7% with moderate hearing loss. Were evident signs of depression in 25 elderly (46.3%, and 22 (40.7% had hearing loss. Data analysis showed an association between hearing loss and depression (p = 0.016. Although not significant (p = 0.18, the association between the degree of hearing loss was positive in relation to the severity of the signs of depression. Conclusion: In elderly people surveyed, there was a strong association between hearing loss and signs of depression and tendency to be an association between the degree of hearing loss and the severity of the signs of depression.

  13. Identifying hearing loss by means of iridology

    OpenAIRE

    Stearn, Natalie Anne; Swanepoel, De Wet

    2007-01-01

    Isolated reports of hearing loss presenting as markings on the iris exist, but to date the effectiveness of iridology to identify hearing loss has not been investigated. This study therefore aimed to determine the efficacy of iridological analysis in the identification of moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss in adolescents. A controlled trial was conducted with an iridologist, blind to the actual hearing status of participants, analyzing the irises of participants with and without ...

  14. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  15. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifan, Chadi; Barakat, Iskandar; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiometry exams, he displayed persistent moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss bilaterally. Discussion. This case is notable because unlike all but one previously reported case, the patient—who was restated on methadone—did not make a complete recovery. Conclusion. Methadone overuse in rare cases causes SSHL. PMID:23983704

  16. Introduction to audiology: Some basics about hearing loss, hearing technologies and barriers to hearing aid use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni; Meis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides background information for researchers who wish to become familiar with some basic medical and audiological aspects of hearing loss and the technology of hearing aids. It introduces (1) the disciplines involved in research on hearing loss, (2) the medical categories of hearing loss and their various effects on communication, (3) the different degrees of hearing loss as defined by different national and international organizations, (4) statistics on the preva- lence of hearing loss worldwide, (5) some technological aspects of hearing instruments, (6) sta- tistics on non-usage of hearing instruments worldwide, and (7) barriers to using hearing aids. Since hearing loss is a worldwide pervasive phenomenon which is likely to increase even further in the future, the authors point out that an understanding of the non-use of hearing aids is crucial.

  17. IDIOPATHIC SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS

    OpenAIRE

    Ufuk Derinsu; ?engül Terlemez; Ferda Akda?

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to present our patients with ISSHL and to assess the shape of the audiogram and the recovery incidence of the patients.Methods: 28 patients who were referred to our clinic under diagnosis as idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss during two years (between 2004 - 2006) were included in the study. Routine audiological evaluation was performed to all patients. Shape of initial audiograms was classified in 3 groups: (1) flat audiogram; (2) upsloping a...

  18. RADIATION THERAPY AND HEARING LOSS

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose–volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are e...

  19. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne El-Sayegh; Iskandar Barakat; Daniel Glass; Chadi Saifan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiomet...

  20. Negative consequences of uncorrected hearing loss--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinger, Stig

    2003-07-01

    Hearing loss gives rise to a number of disabilities. Problems in recognizing speech, especially in difficult environments, give rise to the largest number of complaints. Other kinds of disabilities may concern the reduced ability to detect, identify and localize sounds quickly and reliably. Such sounds may be warning or alarm signals, as well as music and birds singing. The communicative disability affects both hearing-impaired people and other people in their environment--family members, fellow workers, etc. Hearing-impaired people are not always aware of all the consequences of the impairment; they do not always know what they are missing. Several studies have shown that uncorrected hearing loss gives rise to poorer quality of life, related to isolation, reduced social activity, and a feeling of being excluded, leading to an increased prevalence of symptoms of depression. These findings indicate the importance of early identification of hearing loss and offers of rehabilitative support, where the fitting of hearing aids is usually an important component. Several studies also point to a significant correlation between hearing loss and loss of cognitive functions. Most of these studies show such a correlation without being able to show whether the hearing loss caused the reduction in cognitive performance or if both the hearing loss and the cognitive decline are parts of a common, general age-related degeneration. A couple of these studies, however, indicate that the uncorrected hearing loss may be the cause of cognitive decline. Whichever alternative is true, the correlation should be seen as a clear indication for early hearing aid fitting for those needing it. Monaural hearing aid fitting in subjects with bilateral hearing loss may give rise to a reduced ability to recognize speech presented to the unaided ear, the so-called late-onset auditory deprivation effect. This functional decline is reversible in some but not all subjects after fitting of a hearing aid also on the previously unaided ear. PMID:12918624

  1. Prognostic factors in sudden hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Enache, R; Sarafoleanu, I

    2008-01-01

    Sudden hearing loss is a sensorineural hypoacusis, unilateral in most of the cases, with an incidence peak in young adult. This article is the result of a four years retrospective study, in which we have tried to see how age, severity of hearing loss, presence or absence of vertigo, the timing of treatment initiation can influence the hearing recovery.

  2. Hearing loss among classical-orchestra musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppila, Esko; Koskinen, Heli; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2011-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate classical musicians' risk of hearing loss. We studied 63 musicians from four Helsinki classical orchestras. We measured their hearing loss with an audiometer, found their prior amount of exposure to sound and some individual susceptibility factors with a questionnaire, measured their present sound exposure with dosimeters, and tested their blood pressure and cholesterol levels, then compared their hearing loss to ISO 1999-1990's predictions. The musicians' hearing loss distribution corresponded to that of the general population, but highly exposed musicians had greater hearing loss at frequencies over 3 kHz than less-exposed ones. Their individual susceptibility factors were low. Music deteriorates hearing, but by less than what ISO 1999-1990 predicted. The low number of individual susceptibility factors explained the difference, but only reduced hearing loss and not the prevalence of tinnitus. PMID:21173486

  3. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Shokouh, Pedram; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Bahaloo, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not...

  4. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup. PMID:23844303

  5. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  6. IDIOPATHIC SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Derinsu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to present our patients with ISSHL and to assess the shape of the audiogram and the recovery incidence of the patients.Methods: 28 patients who were referred to our clinic under diagnosis as idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss during two years (between 2004 - 2006 were included in the study. Routine audiological evaluation was performed to all patients. Shape of initial audiograms was classified in 3 groups: (1 flat audiogram; (2 upsloping audiogram; (3 downsloping audiogram. Differences in PTA and WDS between pre and post-treatment were calculated to assess the recovery of hearing.Results: In this study, recovery rate was high in each of the three groups. There was no difference in the recovery rate between the groups. There was no relation between recovery and early referral to therapy. The groups were very small for statistical analysis.Conclusion: It is necessary to enlarge the study group to compare the effects of the factors on idiophatic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  7. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Natália Freire Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: This is the first case report that brings together DHF and sudden hearing loss. In the development of this case no other cause to sudden hearing loss was found and the correlation between dengue and hearing loss was questioned. In the literature review was found that some viruses, as mumps virus, varicella-zoster virus and HSV-1 and HSV-2 are related to sudden hearing loss, all of them fit in the viral theory. Besides the viral theory of sudden hearing loss, there is the vascular theory that is the occlusion of the end artery that supplies the cochlea. DHF has a vascular commitment, and the hypothesis of a vascular cause could be elicited in this case. Many studies in this area are needed and this article has the objective of elicit the discussion about the subject. Could dengue be associated with sensorineural hearing loss?

  8. Sensorineural Hearing Loss following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Pillion, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    A case study is presented of a 17-year-old male who sustained an anoxic brain injury and sensorineural hearing loss secondary to carbon monoxide poisoning. Audiological data is presented showing a slightly asymmetrical hearing loss of sensorineural origin and mild-to-severe degree for both ears. Word recognition performance was fair to poor bilaterally for speech presented at normal conversational levels in quiet. Management considerations of the hearing loss are discussed.

  9. Medulloblastoma Manifesting as Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Takami, Toshihiro; Ohata, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of medulloblastoma which presented with unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as an initial symptom. A 19-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of dizziness and facial numbness on the right side. His illness had begun two years previously with sudden hearing loss on the right side, for which he had been treated as an idiopathic sudden hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal signals located mainly in the right midd...

  10. Evaluation of Age-Related Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Su; Chung, Jong Woo

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is characterized by an increased hearing threshold and poor speech understanding in a noisy environment, slowed central processing of acoustic information, and impaired localization of sound sources. Presbycusis seriously affects the older people's quality of life. Particularly, hearing loss in the elderly contributes to social isolation, depression, and loss of self-esteem. Current amplification methods related to auditory rehabilitation can provide imp...

  11. Noise and Hearing Loss: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss is a major cause of deafness and hearing impairment in the United States. Though genetics and advanced age are major risk factors, temporary and permanent hearing impairments are becoming more common among young adults and children especially with the increased exposure to portable music players. Though…

  12. Reading Recovery for Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Ann; Charlesworth, Robert; Raban, Bridie; Rickards, Field

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the application of Reading Recovery for children with hearing loss by measuring and comparing the literacy achievement of 12 children who are deaf or hard of hearing and 12 children with typical hearing who were participating in Reading Recovery interventions in the second year of primary school. Progress was measured by…

  13. Relation between Glaucoma and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mollasadeghi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness throughout the world. Some studies have suggested a relationship between glaucoma and sensorineural hearing loss, while others have found no evidence of an association. We performed a study to determine whether there is a significant difference in hearing of patients with glaucoma and a match control population. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, from February, 2005 till April, 2006, 44 patients with glaucoma were studied. The age range was between 15 to 60 years. After taking a complete medical history, those suffering from presbycusis, history of exposure to ototoxic drugs and substances and history of ear surgery were excluded from the study. All of the patients were cases of open-angle glaucoma, and were surveyed separately for normal-pressure glaucoma. Then complete audiometric tests (PTA, SDS, SRT, Impedance were conducted for all of them, and the results compared with a control group. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the case group and control group in PTA, SDS, and SRT, except for Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG. There wasn't any statistically significant difference between two groups with respect to age, gender, and history of diseases. In the NTG group, significant difference was seen only in high frequencies. Conclusion: As mentioned, there was a statistically significant difference between NTG group and control group. It is therefore recommended to conduct complete audiometric tests and histopathologic examinations in this group for early detection of hearing loss and application of rehabilitative measures.

  14. Inactivation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Myelinating Glial Cells Results in Significant Loss of Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons Accompanied by Age-Related Hearing Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S. J.; Furusho, M.; D’sa, C.; Kuwada, S.; Conti, L.; Morest, D. K.; Bansal, R.

    2009-01-01

    Hearing loss has been attributed to many factors, including degeneration of sensory neurons in the auditory pathway and demyelination along the cochlear nerve. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which signal through four receptors (Fgfrs), are produced by auditory neurons and play a key role in embryonic development of the cochlea and in neuroprotection against sound-induced injury. However, the role of FGF signaling in the maintenance of normal auditory function in adult and aging mice remain...

  15. Evidence-Based Practices Are Not Reformulated Best Practices: A Response to Martindale's "Children with Significant Hearing Loss: Learning to Listen, Talk, and Read--Evidence-Based Best Practices"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Barbara R.; Williams, Cheri

    2008-01-01

    "Communication Disorders Quarterly's" special series on evidence-based practices and, specifically, Martindale's article on evidence-based practices in learning to listen, talk, and read among children with significant hearing loss appear to confuse best practices with evidence-based practices and, perhaps more serious, offer little evidence for…

  16. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JillBFirszt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g. cochlear implants, less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, and cortical organization following hearing recovery. Hearing in the congenitally affected ear of a 41 year old female improved significantly after stapedotomy and reconstruction. Pre-operative hearing threshold levels showed unilateral, mixed, moderately-severe to profound hearing loss. The contralateral ear had hearing threshold levels within normal limits. Testing was completed prior to, and three and nine months after surgery. Measurements were of sound localization with intensity-roved stimuli and speech recognition in various noise conditions. We also evoked magnetic resonance signals with monaural stimulation to the unaffected ear. Activation magnitudes were determined in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex regions via an interrupted single event design. Hearing improvement following 40 years of congenital unilateral hearing loss resulted in substantially improved sound localization and speech recognition in noise. Auditory cortex also reorganized. Contralateral auditory cortex responses were increased after hearing recovery and the extent of activated cortex was bilateral, including a greater portion of the posterior superior temporal plane. Thus, prolonged predominant monaural stimulation did not prevent auditory system changes consequent to restored binaural hearing. Results support future research of unilateral auditory deprivation effects and plasticity, with consideration for length of deprivation, age at hearing correction, degree and type of hearing loss.

  17. Hearing loss in a textile factory.

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhatreh, F. M.; Abdul-baqi, K. J.; Turk, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the prevalence rate of hearing loss at different levels of noise in a textile factory and to find out the levels of hearing loss according to duration (years) of employment in the factory. METHODS Seventy workers exposed to different levels of noise were matched with 70 persons in the community who were not exposed to occupational noise. Noise levels dB(A) were measured at different locations in the factory. Hearing was assessed in all participants. Few cases we...

  18. Noise Induced Hearing Loss: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Akhil Sareen; Vishwambhar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss is one of most common hearing deficit which is almost completely preventable. The hearing loss incurred would depend on the sound qualities, duration of exposure and individual susceptibility and protection. Thereby it can be prevented as we have some set norms for the noise at work places and recreational activities. Once suspected, screening and preventive measures to prevent further progression is taken. There are legislative guidelines for noise at w...

  19. State of contemporary research in hearing function and hearing loss.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syka, Josef

    -, - (2006), s. 223-226. ISBN 80-228-1673-6. [International Acoustical Conference /33./. 04.10.2006-06.10.2006, Štrbské pleso] R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8113; GA MŠk LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Hearing loss * Hearing function Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  20. Leupeptin reduces impulse noise induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavriel Haim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to continuous and impulse noise can induce a hearing loss. Leupeptin is an inhibitor of the calpains, a family of calcium-activated proteases which promote cell death. The objective of this study is to assess whether Leupeptin could reduce the hearing loss resulting from rifle impulse noise. Methods A polyethelene tube was implanted into middle ear cavities of eight fat sand rats (16 ears. Following determination of auditory nerve brainstem evoked response (ABR threshold in each ear, the animals were exposed to the noise of 10 M16 rifle shots. Immediately after the exposure, saline was then applied to one (control ear and non-toxic concentrations of leupeptin determined in the first phase of the study were applied to the other ear, for four consecutive days. Results Eight days after the exposure, the threshold shift (ABR in the control ears was significantly greater (44 dB than in the leupeptin ears (27 dB. Conclusion Leupeptin applied to the middle ear cavity can reduce the hearing loss resulting from exposure to impulse noise.

  1. Sudden (reversible) sensorineural hearing loss in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny, R

    2011-03-01

    Sudden hearing loss directly associated with pregnancy or birth is a little known and rare occurrence. The temporary, unilateral, low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in this case was reported after the birth of the patient\\'s first child, and again during the third trimester of her second pregnancy.

  2. Restaurant noise, hearing loss, and hearing aids.

    OpenAIRE

    Lebo, C. P.; Smith, M. F.; Mosher, E. R.; Jelonek, S. J.; Schwind, D. R.; Decker, K. E.; Krusemark, H. J.; Kurz, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Our multidisciplinary team obtained noise data in 27 San Francisco Bay Area restaurants. These data included typical minimum, peak, and average sound pressure levels; digital tape recordings; subjective noise ratings; and on-site unaided and aided speech discrimination tests. We report the details and implications of these noise measurements and provide basic information on selecting hearing aids and suggestions for coping with restaurant noise.

  3. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully

  4. Aging, cognitive load, dementia and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Alessandro; Castiglione, Alessandro; Bovo, Roberto; Vallesi, Antonino; Gabelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural systems play a crucial role in the diagnosis, treatment and management of several neurological disorders. The function of the eye and ear represents a unique window for testing various conditions in cognitive decline or dementia. Touch and smell have also been found to be strongly involved in neurodegenerative conditions, and their decline has been significantly associated with the progression of the disease; hence, the idea that restoring sensory function in cognitively impaired adults might enable a significant improvement in their cognitive status, reducing the worldwide incidence and prevalence of dementia. Not all sensorineural 'windows' can benefit equally from the same procedures; however, hearing and vision can certainly gain the most from dependable therapeutic and other diagnostic options. The ear, including the vestibular system, deserves an honored place among the sensory organs in this context due mainly to the sophisticated electrical devices available that have amply demonstrated their effectiveness in treating hearing loss. Restoring an individual's hearing can reduce the cognitive 'load', i.e. the neural activity needed to understand/recognize the spoken word - an activity that becomes more demanding if the brain is obliged to recruit different neural populations to achieve the same performance, as happens in older adults with sensory impairments. The sensory interfaces may also facilitate the early diagnosis of conditions characterized by a lengthy preclinical phase, as well as enabling noninvasive, follow-up procedures to assess the outcome of rehabilitation measures and distinguish physiological brain aging from neurodegenerative disorders. The present study is a brief literature review on the issues and prospects relating to the unique relationship between hearing and cognitive decline, with a general introduction to the main topics before focusing on rehabilitation training with hearing aids and cochlear implants to combat cognitive decline. PMID:25733358

  5. Gene therapy for sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wade W; Monzack, Elyssa L; McDougald, Devin S; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising treatment modality that is being explored for several inherited disorders. Multiple human gene therapy clinical trials are currently ongoing, but few are directed at hearing loss. Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent sensory disabilities in the world, and genetics play an important role in the pathophysiology of hearing loss. Gene therapy offers the possibility of restoring hearing by overcoming the functional deficits created by the underlying genetic mutations. In addition, gene therapy could potentially be used to induce hair cell regeneration by delivering genes that are critical to hair cell differentiation into the cochlea. In this review, we examine the promises and challenges of applying gene therapy to the cochlea. We also summarize recent studies that have applied gene therapy to animal models of hearing loss. PMID:25166629

  6. Perceptual Consequences of “Hidden” Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Plack, Christopher J.; Barker, Daphne; Prendergast, Garreth

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic results from recent animal experiments show that noise exposure can cause a selective loss of high-threshold auditory nerve fibers without affecting absolute sensitivity permanently. This cochlear neuropathy has been described as hidden hearing loss, as it is not thought to be detectable using standard measures of audiometric threshold. It is possible that hidden hearing loss is a common condition in humans and may underlie some of the perceptual deficits experienced by people with c...

  7. The treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Westerlaken, Boris Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss that develops within 24 hours in otherwise healthy, normally hearing individuals. The hearing loss is of unknown origin and can be mild to profound, temporary or permanent. A known cause can be identified in only 10-15% of cases, even after an extensive evaluation. In the majority of cases the hearing loss is unilateral, but on occasion both ears are involved. The hearing loss is frequently ass...

  8. SELF REPORTED HEARING LOSS AMONG ELDERLY MALAYSIANS

    OpenAIRE

    MAJMIN SH; AZIMAH MN; LEE VKM; Zaitun, A.; Leelavathi, M.; ROSDINA AK; MOHD KA

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on patients attending a primary care facility to determine the prevalence of self reported hearing loss using a single question, “Do you have hearing loss?” Pure tone audiometry was performed to compare the accuracy of the self report. A total of 111 patients were recruited. The prevalence of self reported hearing loss using a single question and pure tone audiometry was 24.3% and 36.9% respectively. By using pure tone audiometry at a cut-off-level of...

  9. Counseling Your Client with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Marcia K.; Rosenbaum, Marilyn Schuurmans; Sheridan, Kristin M.

    1996-01-01

    Accommodating the requirements of clients who have late onset hearing loss (an estimated 1 in 10 adults) requires knowledge and ongoing effort from both the mental health counselor and the client. An example of successful teamwork to accommodate a client's hearing difficulty is presented. (EMK)

  10. Hearing Screening and Diagnostic Evaluation of Children With Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Danielle S.; Holstrum, W. June; Gaffney, Marcus; Green, Denise; Oyler, Robert F.; Gravel, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    More than 90% of newborns in the United States are now being screened for hearing loss. A large fraction of cases of unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss are not currently identified through newborn hearing screening. This is of concern because a preponderance of research has demonstrated that unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss can lead to developmental delays and educational problems for some children. To help address this probable underidentification ...

  11. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Chronic Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jafari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media (COM can be treated by surgery. COM, however, may be associated with functional damage to the inner ear. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL due to COM has been found to be significant by some authors, whereas it has been considered negligible by others. The present study aimed to answer the question; Does COM cause SNHL ? Methods: 120 patients with unilateral COM admitted for tympano-mastoidectomy were selected for this observational case-control study. Air conduction threshold (ACT and bone conduction threshold (BCT averages were calculated at the speech frequencies (500, 1000, 2000Hz and 4 KHz, in affected (case ear and non affected (control ear and then entered in the questionnaire along with intraoperative findings. Multiple statistical tests were used to clarify the relationships between SNHL and COM. Results: COM was seen to be associated with SNHL. The Threshold shift was more accentuated at 4 KHz in older patients. SNHL at 4 KHz seemed to be higher than that at the speech frequencies. There was a significant positive relationship between the elevated BCT and duration of COM. The relationship between elevated BCT and cholesteatoma was also significant. Conclusion: The inner ear is vulnerable to COM. The proximity of the sensory cells to the potential source of harm (inflamed middle ear may mean higher exposure, as reflected by the fact that sensory cells processing high frequencies are more seriously damaged. SNHL in affected ear is strongly dependant on duration of disease.

  12. Relationship between hearing complaint and hearing loss among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Freitas, Cintia La Rocha; Milla?o, Luzia Fernandes; Gonc?alves, Andre?a Kruger; Becker Junior, Benno; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira Dos; Lopes, Tadeu Campos; Pol, Doralice Orrigo Da Cunha; Gonc?alves, Cle?zio Jose? Dos Santos; Martins, Isabel Amaral

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Presbycusis is a public health problem. Despite its high prevalence, many elders do not have their hearing ability investigated periodically, because they do not have a specific complaint. Objective: To check whether there is a relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in elder people. Method: Transversal study in elders from a neighborhood in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul. After the definition of the neighborhood's geographic boundaries, all ho...

  13. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... listening devices include telephone and cell phone amplifying devices, smart phone or tablet "apps," and closed-circuit systems (hearing loop systems) in places of worship, theaters, and auditoriums. (Read the NIDCD fact sheet Assistive Devices for People with Hearing, Voice, Speech, or Language ...

  14. Gd enhanced MRI in sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enhanced MRI hearing findings of the inner ear in 124 patients with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. MR images were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium (0.1 mmol/kg). In three out of seventy-nine patients with unilateral healing loss, cochlear and/or the vestibular enhancement was noted on the symptomatic side. The positive cases included those with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, mumps and so-called sudden deafness. Forty-five patients with bilateral hearing loss showed no enhancement within the inner ear. Although positive gadolinium enhancement of the inner ear may detect inflammatory lesions due to a viral infection, its incidence in sensorineural hearing loss, including cases of sudden deafness. seems to be extremely rare. (author)

  15. Mitral Stenosis Presenting with Acute Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Gur, Chamutal; Lalazar, Gadi; Raphaeli, Guy; Gilon, Dan; Ben-chetrit, Eldad

    2006-01-01

    A 47-year old woman presented with acute hearing loss, followed by dyspnea and then reduced consciousness and a hemiparesis. Investigations led to a diagnosis of cardiac emboli related to rheumatic mitral stenosis.

  16. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Goravalingappa, Ravi; Bhattacharyya, Abir K.

    1997-01-01

    For many otolaryngologists the management of acute sensorineural hearing loss is an intuitive exercise. The ideas that govern a practice is as important as treating the patients and preventing progression of the disease; this has evolved by retrospective, anecdotal reports and clinical experience rather than through prospective research. To evaluate the current literature on management of such sensorineural hearing loss, a medline search of the topic was carried out and evidence based on rece...

  17. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: An Otologic Emergency

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayendra, H.; Buggaveeti, Greeshma; Parikh, Bhavin; Sangitha, R.

    2011-01-01

    The study purpose was to determine the efficacy of steroids, volume expanders and antivirals in the management of idiopathic sudden sensory neural hearing loss and to establish importance of early medical intervention. In this prospective study, thirty-four patients presenting with idiopathic sudden hearing loss of 30 db or more were enrolled in study group between 2005 and 2009. Patient variables as they related to recovery were studied and include patient age, time to onset of therapy, sta...

  18. Infection in childhood sensory hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Samile Noorbakhsh; Mohammad Farhadi; Azardokht Tabatabaei; Shabahang Mohamadi; Emam Jomeh

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the possible role of infectious agents on the occurrence of idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children. METHODS This case control study was carried out at Rasul Hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2002-2003. We compared specific serum antibodies (IgG, IgM) measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in 95 sensory hearing loss cases and 63 controls. RESULTS Acute infections (IgM) detected in cases included: cytomegalovirus (CMV) 34.6%, toxoplasma...

  19. Hearing loss treatment through stem cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Nazanin; Szu, Harold

    2006-04-01

    Despite the many challenges cell therapy will revolutionize medicine. With the use of cell therapies, hearing loss can be restored. Cell therapies have also shown great promise in helping to repair catastrophic spinal injuries, and helping victims of paralysis regain movement. Cell therapy can be defined as a group of new techniques, or technologies, that rely on replacing diseased or dysfunctional cells with healthy, functioning ones. These new techniques are being applied to hearing loss and damaged ear components.

  20. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Note: ... Vision Loss Video (Quicktime) Transcript of Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Video ...

  1. Pannexin 1 deficiency can induce hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Chen, Jin

    2015-07-17

    Gap junctions play a critical role in hearing. Connexin gap junction gene mutations can induce a high incidence of hearing loss. Pannexin (Panx) gene also encodes gap junction proteins in vertebrates. Panx1 is a predominant pannexin isoform and has extensive expression in the cochlea. Here, we report that deletion of Panx1 in the cochlea could produce a progressive hearing loss. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording showed that hearing loss was moderate to severe and severe at high-frequencies. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), which reflects the activity of active cochlear mechanics that can amply acoustic stimulation to enhance hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity, was also reduced. We further found that Panx1 deficiency could activate Caspase-3 cell apoptotic pathway in the cochlea to cause hair cells and other types of cells degeneration. These data indicate that like connexins Panx1 deficiency can also induce hearing loss. These data also suggest that pannexins play important rather than redundant roles in the cochlea and hearing. PMID:26002464

  2. Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coordinator to find available services in your state. Technology Many people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing have some hearing. The amount of hearing a deaf or hard-of-hearing person has is called "residual hearing". Technology does not "cure" hearing loss, but may help ...

  3. Conductive hearing loss produces a reversible binaural hearing impairment.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Dr; Hine, Je; Jiang, Zd; Matsuda, H.; Parsons, Ch; King, Aj

    1999-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss, produced by otitis media with effusion, is widespread in young children. However, little is known about its short- or long-term effects on hearing or the brain. To study the consequences of a conductive loss for the perception and processing of sounds, we plugged the left ear canal of ferrets for 7-15 months during either infancy or adulthood. Before or during plugging, the ferrets were trained to perform a binaural task requiring the detection of a 500 Hz tone, posit...

  4. Hearing Loss in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Abbasi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Systemic lupus erythematosus has its unique complications which warrant careful examination and assessment during follow/up visits of patients. The present study was conducted to evaluate prevalence of hearing loss in patients with SLE. Materials & Methods: At present a case- control study has been performed on 45 patients with SLE in a clinic of a teaching university hospital, Qazvin city, Iran. The patients were examined and evaluated for auditory and hearing problems as well as parameters related to their disease severity and progression. The control group was selected from the same clinic. Results: Five patients (11.1% complained from hearing loss, 4 patients s (8.9% complained from otorrhea, 3 patients (6.7% had tinnitus in research group, moreover twelve patients (26.7% in case group and 4 patients (8.9% in control group had sensorineural hearing loss. The difference was found to be statistically significant. No statistical significant relationship was found between severity, age of onset, and duration of the disease, and the lab tests of the patients with hearing loss. Conclusion: The present study implies that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus may develop sensorineural hearing loss during their course of the disease. It is recommended that audiology examination and/or audiometry become a part of routine follow/up studies of the patients.

  5. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  6. Hearing loss in Thai naval officers of coastal patrol crafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Srinoon, Sutasinee; Lormphongs, Srirat; Morioka, Ikuharu; Mungarndee, S Suriyaphun

    2014-11-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the prevalence of hearing loss and its risk factors among Thai naval officers. The subjects consisted of 149 males who were asked to complete a questionnaire. Audiometric threshold testing was performed at the audiometric frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 kHz. The noise levels and the organic solvent concentrations in the working environment were measured on a common type of gun boat. The findings revealed that 39.6% of naval officers had hearing loss. The noise level (LAeq) was 100.6 dB in the engine room. The organic solvent concentrations were less than the occupational exposure limit for organic solvents. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated 2 factors were significantly associated with hearing loss. They were age and service experience. The results suggest that the Thai navy should develop a hearing conservation program for naval officers on coastal patrol crafts. PMID:24285776

  7. Managing hearing loss in children and adults: Singapore context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, W K

    2005-05-01

    Hearing loss is common in Singapore, with as many as 360,000 persons affected. With Singapore's ageing population, this prevalence is expected to increase. Modern hearing devices have the potential to restore hearing in most patients. Cochlear implants can restore hearing in those with even profound total hearing loss, by stimulating the auditory nerve directly without the need for viable cochlear hair cells. A holistic approach to managing deafness is necessary, including addressing psychosocial issues. Many of the problems experienced by the hearing-impaired are caused by the ignorance and lack of understanding from other people around him/her. "Reverse education therapy" refers to the effective education of these people, to directly benefit the hearing-impaired. In children, hearing restoration together with early detection and effective rehabilitation enable up to 80% to 90% of those born with significant hearing loss to cope well in mainstream education. The infrastructure to support them and facilitate their integration into mainstream society is necessary, and some of these are in place in Singapore. Leisure time noise-induced hearing loss in children is becoming increasingly important. In adults, societal support and understanding are just as important, particularly towards the elderly and pre-lingually deafened adults. Public education in Singapore is necessary, including that on the recognition of the abilities of successfully treated individuals, as well as that on showing more compassion, support and patience towards those who have not benefited sufficiently from treatment. In the future, there is potential for the clinical application of cochlear hair cell/auditory nerve preservation and regeneration. PMID:15984097

  8. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a “wait-and-scan” group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss ithe naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  9. Correlating the site of tympanic membrane perforation with Hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaduola Taiwo G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recognized that the size of tympanic membrane(TM perforation is proportional to the magnitude of hearing loss, however, there is no clear consensus on the effect of the location (site of the perforation on the hearing loss. Hence the study is set to investigate the relationship between the location of perforation on TM and hearing loss. Methods A cross-sectional prospective study of consecutive adult patients with perforated TM conducted in the ENT clinic of University College Hospital Ibadan between January 1st 2005 and July 31st 2006. Instruments used for data collection/processing include questionnaires, video and micro-otoscopy, Pure tone audiometer, image J and SPSS packages. Results Sixty-two patients (22-males, 40-females, aged 16–75 years (mean = 35.4 +/- 4 with 77 perforated ear drums were studied and 15(24.2% had bilateral TM perforations, 21 (33.9% right unilateral and 26(41.9% left unilateral. The locations of the TM perforations were 60(77.9% central, 6(9.6% antero-inferior, 4(5.2% postero-inferior, 4(5.2% antero-superior and 3(3.9% postero-superior respectively with sizes ranging from 1.51%–89.05%, and corresponding hearing levels 30 dB – 80 dB (59% conductive and 41% mixed. Fifty-nine percent had pure conductive hearing loss and the rest mixed. Hearing losses (dBHL increased with the size of perforations (P = 0.01, r = 0.05. Correlation of location of perforations with magnitude of hearing loss in acute TM perorations was (P = 0.244, r = 0.273 and for chronic perforations (p = 0.047 & r = 0.31. Conclusion The location of perforation on the tympanic membrane (TM has no effect on the magnitude of hearing loss in acute TM perforations while it is significant in chronic ones.

  10. Viral Causes of Hearing Loss: A Review for Hearing Health Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Brandon E.; Durstenfeld, Anne; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    A number of viral infections can cause hearing loss. Hearing loss induced by these viruses can be congenital or acquired, unilateral or bilateral. Certain viral infections can directly damage inner ear structures, others can induce inflammatory responses which then cause this damage, and still others can increase susceptibility or bacterial or fungal infection, leading to hearing loss. Typically, virus-induced hearing loss is sensorineural, although conductive and mixed hearing losses can be ...

  11. Childhood Hearing Health: Educating for Prevention of Hearing Loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adriana Bender Moreira, Lacerda; Claudia Giglio de Oliveira, Gonçalves; Giselle, Lacerda; Diolén Conceição Barros, Lobato; Luciana, Santos; Aline Carlezzo, Moreira; Angela, Ribas.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies f [...] or awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1%) presented hearing alterations. Conclusion The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential.

  12. Unilateral Hearing Loss: the Benefit of Auditory Localization after Adaptation of Hearing Aids Individual

    OpenAIRE

    Sanches, Rita de Cássia Pires; Ribeiro, Juliana Pontalti; Felici, Maria da Glória Furlani de Mendonça; Jacob, Regina Tangerino de Souza; Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A unilateral hearing loss is characterized by decreased hearing in one ear. Objective: To evaluate the benefit on the location after hearing the adaptation of hearing aids Individual (HA) in individuals with unilateral hearing loss. Method: A prospective study of 31 individuals aged between 18 and 75 years and both genders with unilateral hearing loss of various types and grades, answered a questionnaire to evaluate the location of the sound source, by using the "Survey of heari...

  13. Acquired Hearing Loss and Psychiatric Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin CEYLAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: World Health Organization (WHO defines hearing loss as an impairment in perception, attention and organisation as well as in speaking, In this study, on the base of biopsychosocial theory, we aimed to determine both psychiatric symptoms of the patients who have acquired (but ideopathic hearing impairment/loss, and also, if there was, an association between this physical illness and psychiatric symptoms. Methods: The groups of patients with mild, moderate and severe hearing impairment and a healthy control group were enrolled in the study. Each group contained 30 persons. A sociodemographic questionnaire, the Symptom Check List 90-Revised Form (SCL-90-R and the Non-Patients Form of Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (SCID-NP were used. Results: The psychopathology that have been found in our study was 35.6% in patients group versus 20% in controls. 30-50% of patients with hearing loss reported both social and psychological problems. According to SCL-90-R, in the patients’ groups who had especially moderate and severe hearing loss were more paranoid and depressive; they had more eating and sleeping difficulties; also they complained more from musical hallucinations (25% and their scores of positive symptoms and of additional scales in SCL-90-R were higher than the controls (p< 0.001. In SCID-NP, especially the hallucination, the paranoia and the depression scores were higher in patients with hearing loss. Conclusion: The reasons for psychiatric symptoms in the patients with hearing impairment or loss are multiethiological and it is known that disability is the major ethiological factor. The results of our study showed us that the psychiatry and the other medical disciplines should always work together. (Archives of Neuropsychiatry 2009; 46: 149-56

  14. Screening for Hearing Loss in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Glenn C.

    1981-01-01

    Hearing loss in infants has severe, lifelong consequences. The critical period for speech and language development is from birth to age two, so every effort must be made to diagnose hearing problems early. Several simple screening and testing procedures can be carried out in a normal office visit. The use of a ‘high risk registry’ is advocated for newborns. Parents are usually the first to suspect a problem. Believe the parents... get the child tested.

  15. Oral steroid treatment for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei T.; Lee, Jui W.; Yuan, Chien H.; Chen, Rong F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the efficacy of long-term oral steroids in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), and to explore potential prognosis factors, the relationship of hearing recovery outcome, and the recovery time-course in ISSHL. Methods: In this retrospective study, we analyzed 215 cases diagnosed with idiopathic unilateral sudden deafness between January 2003 and December 2012 at a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. All of them received oral steroid therapy and were followed for at least 3 months. Results: Young age, the presence of no other disease (diabetes, hypertension, or cardiovascular disease), treatment within 7 days of the onset of ISSHL, mild hearing loss, and audiograms with ascending curves had a statistically significant better hearing recovery. The average pure-tone audiometry (PTA) was 67.8±23.9 dB initially, and was improved between one month (51.6±28.7 dB) and 2 months post treatment (49.7±28.6 dB). The average last-visit PTA was 49.9±29.2 dB. Conclusion: Approximately one third of patients had full recovery in hearing, one third had partial recovery, and approximately one third did not recover from hearing loss. In addition, the hearing level remained relatively stable following 2 months of treatment. More than 2 months of oral steroid therapy for ISSHL is not recommended because no additional benefits were evidenced. PMID:25737170

  16. Hearing loss in the elderly: History of occupational noise exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise exposure is one of the most common health risk factors, and workers are exposed to sound pressure levels capable of producing hearing loss. Aim: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in the elderly and its possible association with a history of occupational noise exposure and with sex. Methods: A prospective study in subjects aged over 60 years. The subjects underwent anamnesis and audiological assessment. The Mann-Whitney test and multiple logistic regression, with 95% confidence interval and p < 0.05, were used for statistical analysis. Results: There were 498 subjects from both sexes, and the median age was 69 years. From the comparison between men and women, we obtained the medium hearing I (500, 1000, and 2000 Hz p = 0.8318 and the mean hearing II (3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz; p < 0.0001. Comparing the thresholds of individuals with and without a history of occupational noise exposure, we obtained the medium hearing I (p = 0.9542 and the mean hearing II (p = 0.0007. Conclusion: There was a statistically significant association between hearing loss at high frequencies and the risk factors being male and occupational noise exposure.

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss in insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koosha A.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among patients who have sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology, diabetes is one of the diseases to be routinely investigated. The relationship between diabetes mellitus and hearing loss is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM compared to control group.Methods: In a cross-sectional study pure tone audiometry (PTA and speech audiometry was performed in 62 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM, aged under 40 years, and in 62 randomly selected age-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Subjects with otological and other metabolic diseases were excluded from the study. We applied the SPSS.10 statistical analysis software Chi-square and student's test. Results: Statistical analysis showed that the hearing of the diabetic patients were significantly worsen than the control subjects. The hearing level tended to be worsen in the diabetic patients than that in control subjects, but the differences were statistically significant only at frequencies of 250,500, 4000 and 8000 Hz p>0.05(. There wasn't statistical significant difference between sex in two study groups p>0.05(. The mean duration of diabetes was no statistically significant with hearing loss p>0.05(. The frequency of complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy in the diabetic groups had no correlation with speech threshold (p>0.05(.? There were no significant differences between speech reception threshold, speech discrimination score and acoustic reflex in two groups.Conclusions: We conclude that type I diabetes mellitus can cause sensorineural hearing loss.

  18. Assesment of Hearing Loss in Patients with Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Cenk Güvenç

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by T-cell mediated hyperproliferation of keratinocytes. Sensorineural hearing loss accompanied by autoimmune diseases was first described by McCabe in 1979. Cases of hearing loss associated with various autoimmune diseases have been reported. However, the number of studies evaluating the hearing loss in patients with psoriasis is insufficient. In this study, we aimed to assess hearing loss in psoriasis patients. Material and Methods: Fifty-one psoriasis patients, who were admitted to our outpatient clinic in 2010, and 51 healthy volunteers were included in the study. All participants underwent a complete ear, nose and throat examination before audiological assessment followed by, pure-tone audiometry in a sound-isolated audiology laboratory. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW Statistics version 18.0.0. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean bone and hearing thresholds were higher for all frequencies in patients than in controls. The values reached statistical significance at all frequencies except for right ear air conduction at 1000 Hz, bone conduction at 500 and 1000 Hz, left ear air conduction at 500 Hz, and bone conduction at 500 Hz (p<0.05. We compared the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI scores adjusted for age and disease duration and thresholds matched with frequencies and found a significant correlation between PASI score and hearing loss at medium and high frequencies. Conclusion: In psoriasis, chronic inflammation is thought to be the main pathological process destroying structure and functions of skin, nails and joints. We think that the same process may affect the cochlea in a similar way. The correlation between high PASI scores and hearing loss at medium and high frequencies may be an unexpected result of increased inflammatory mediators responsible from the disease in exacerbation periods.

  19. Evaluation of Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Su

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is characterized by an increased hearing threshold and poor speech understanding in a noisy environment, slowed central processing of acoustic information, and impaired localization of sound sources. Presbycusis seriously affects the older people's quality of life. Particularly, hearing loss in the elderly contributes to social isolation, depression, and loss of self-esteem. Current amplification methods related to auditory rehabilitation can provide improved communication ability to users. But, simple auditory rehabilitation is ineffective in managing the central auditory processing disorder and the psychosocial problem of presbycusis. The evaluation of central auditory processing disorder and psychosocial disorder in presbycusis should not be overlooked while providing auditory rehabilitation. PMID:24653906

  20. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with coronary artery bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mohsen Mirmohammad; Radman, Masoud; Bidaki, Reza; Sonbolestan, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study is planned to obtain a better understanding of the correlation between sudden sensorineural hearing loss and cardiopulmonary bypass. There are many causes for sudden hearing loss which include infectious, circulatory, inner ear problems like meniere's disease, neoplastic, traumatic, metabolic, neurologic, immunologic, toxic, cochlear, idiopathic (unknown cause) and other causes. One of the less common cause is surgery include cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. Materials and Methods: This study is a self controlled clinical trial on 105 patients that was carried out in chamran Hospital, Esfahan, Iran. Participants were including all those patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery in the hospital who fell under the criteria for inclusion. Patients underwent audiometric testing at our hospital on three or two different occasions during the course of this study, Initially before the procedure to test the baseline hearing capacity; then two week after the procedure to assess any changes in hearing ability following the surgery. Data analysis performed by co-variance analysis. Results: In our study the changes in the threshold of hearing in frequency of 1000 in right ear and in frequencies of 2000 and 4000 in left ear were significant, but this changes were about 2-3 db and were not noticeable. The difference in degree of SNHL, before and after surgery in different frequencies were been shown. Conclusion: As loss of the patients with symptomatic sensory neural hearing loss in this study, It isn't commanded the routin auditory assessment pre and post surgery was been done. PMID:23930250

  1. The HEAR-QL: Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umansky, Amy M.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Lieu, Judith E.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Few quality of life (QOL) assessment tools are available for children with specific chronic conditions, and none have been designed specifically for children with hearing loss (HL). A validated hearing-related QOL questionnaire could help clinicians determine whether an intervention is beneficial and whether one intervention is better than another. Purpose To examine QOL in children with HL and assess the validity, reliability, and factor structure of a new measure, the Hearing Environments and Reflection on Quality of Life (HEAR-QL) questionnaire. Research Design A descriptive and correlational study of a convenience sample of children. Study Sample Participants included 35 children with unilateral HL, 45 with bilateral HL, and 35 siblings with normal hearing. Data Collection and Analysis Children 7-12 years old were recruited by mail from a tertiary-care pediatric otolaryngology practice and the local county's Special School District. With parent consent, children completed the validated Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) 4.0 and a 35-item HEAR-QL questionnaire. The factor structure of the HEAR-QL was determined through principal components analysis (PCA), and mean scores were computed for each subscale and the total HEAR-QL. Three weeks following return of the initial questionnaires, a second HEAR-QL questionnaire was sent to participants to assess test-retest reliability. Both PedsQL and HEAR-QL scores were compared between children with and without HL, between children with unilateral and bilateral HL, and between children who used and did not use a hearing device using analysis of variance. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for both the HEAR-QL and PedsQL. A multivariable, hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted with independent variables associated with HEAR-QL in unadjusted tests. Results Using exploratory PCA, the 35-item HEAR-QL was reduced to 26 items (Cronbach's ?=0.97; sensitivity 91% and specificity 92% at cut-off score of 93.5) loading on 3 factors: difficulty hearing in certain environments/situations (Environments ?=0.97), impact of HL on social/sports activities (Activities ?=0.92), and impact of HL on child's feelings (Feelings ?=0.88). Sensitivity 78.8% and specificity 30.9% at a cut-off score of 69.6 on the PedsQL ((at-risk for impaired QOL) were lower than for the HEAR-QL. Participants with HL reported significantly lower mean total HEAR-QL scores (71 [SD 18] versus 98 [SD 5]; p < 0.001), but not mean total PedsQL scores (77 [SD 14] versus 83 [SD 15]; p = 0.47), than participants with normal hearing. Among children with bilateral HL, children who used a hearing device reported lower mean total HEAR-QL scores (p = 0.01), but not mean total PedsQL scores (p = 0.55), than children who did not use a hearing device. The intraclass correlation (ICC) for test-retest reliability for the 26-item HEAR-QL total score was .83. Hearing status and use of a device were independently associated with the HEAR-QL, and the variables in the model accounted for 46% of the HEAR-QL total score variance. Conclusion The HEAR-QL appears to be a valid, reliable, and sensitive questionnaire for children with HL. The HEAR-QL was better able than the PedsQL to distinguish between children with and without HL and can help evaluate interventions for children with HL. PMID:22212764

  2. Mouse Models of Age-related Mitochondrial Neurosensory Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitocho...

  3. Early detection of hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Schade, Götz

    2010-01-01

    The universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) is currently spreading in Germany, as well, even though there can be no talk of a comprehensive establishment. The introduction of UNHS in several federal states such as Hamburg, Hessen, and Schleswig-Holstein can be ascribed to the personal commitment of individual pediatric audiologists. Apart from the procurement of the screening equipment and the training of the staff responsible for the examination of the newborns, the tracking, i.e. the fol...

  4. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Yazdani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine hearing thresholds at sound frequencies important for speech comprehension in subjects with ocular pseudoexfoliation (PXF and to compare them with that of controls without PXF. METHODS: Eighty-three subjects with ocular PXF and 83 age and sex matched controls without PXF were enrolled in this case-control study. Pure tone audiometry (bone conduction was performed at 1, 2 and 3 kilohertz (KHz in all subjects. Thresholds were compared to an age and sex stratified standard (ISO7029 and between study groups. Hearing loss was defined as sum of tested hearing thresholds (HTL-1,2,3 lower than the ISO7029 standard median. RESULTS: The study included 60 male and 23 female subjects in each group. Hearing loss was present in 147 of 166 (88.6% of examined ears in the case group vs 89 of 166 (53.6% in the control group (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.49-11.79. Overall 78 subjects (94.0% in the case group vs 58 subjects (69.9% in the control group had hearing loss in one or both ears (P < 0.001; OR=6.72; 95%CI, 2.42-18.62. Hearing thresholds at each of the examined frequencies and the HTL-1,2,3 were also significantly higher in individuals with PXF. Although glaucoma was significantly more common in subjects with PXF (51.8% vs 22.9%, P < 0.001, it was not associated with hearing loss in any of the study groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hearing thresholds at frequencies which are important for speech comprehension are significantly worse in individuals with ocular PXF as compared to matched controls. This finding may support the multi-organ nature of PXF syndrome.

  1. Perda auditiva genética / Genetic hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ricardo, Godinho; Ivan, Keogh; Roland, Eavey.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O progresso das pesquisas relacionadas à perda auditiva genética tem provocado um importante avanço do entendimento dos mecanismos moleculares que governam o desenvolvimento, a função, a resposta ao trauma e o envelhecimento do ouvido interno. Em países desenvolvidos, mais de 50% dos casos de surdez [...] na infância é causada por alterações genéticas e as perdas auditivas relacionadas à idade têm sido associadas com mecanismos genéticos. OBJETIVO: O objetivo desta revisão é relatar as informações mais recentes relacionadas às perdas audtivas de origem genética. FORAMA DE ESTUDO: Revisão sistemática. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: A revisão da literatura inclui artigos indexados à MEDLINE (Biblioteca Nacional de Saúde, NIH-USA) e publicados nos últimos 3 anos, além das informações disponíveis na Hereditary Hearing Loss Home Page. CONCLUSÃO: Os recentes avanços no entendimento das perdas auditivas de origem genética têm favorecido a nossa compreensão da função auditiva e tornado o diagnóstico mais apurado. Possivelmente, no futuro, este conhecimento também proporcionará o desenvolvimento de novas terapias para o tratamento das causas genéticas das perdas auditivas. Abstract in english The progress in the research of genetic hearing loss has advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern inner ear development, function and response to injury and aging. In the developed world, over 50% of childhood deafness is attributable to genetic causes and even age-related [...] hearing loss has been associated with genetic mechanisms. AIM: The objective of this review is to summarize recent knowledge in genetic hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Sistematic review. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The literature review included articles indexed at MEDLINE (The National Library of Medicine, The National Institute of Health - USA) focusing on publications from the past 3 years plus the information available at the Hereditary Hearing Loss Home Page. CONCLUSION: Advances in the genetics of hearing loss have enhanced our comprehension of auditory function and have enabled more accurate diagnosis. Hopefully, as we further understand the molecular elements of the auditory system, this knowledge will help in the development of new therapies for the treatment of the underlying genetic defects.

  2. Improved Horizontal Directional Hearing in Bone Conduction Device Users with Acquired Unilateral Conductive Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Agterberg, Martijn J. H.; Snik, Ad F. M.; Hol, Myrthe K. S.; Esch, Thamar E. M.; Cremers, Cor W. R. J.; Wanrooij, Marc M.; Opstal, A. John

    2010-01-01

    We examined horizontal directional hearing in patients with acquired severe unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL). All patients (n?=?12) had been fitted with a bone conduction device (BCD) to restore bilateral hearing. The patients were tested in the unaided (monaural) and aided (binaural) hearing condition. Five listeners without hearing loss were tested as a control group while listening with a monaural plug and earmuff, or with both ears (binaural). We randomly varied stimulus pres...

  3. Compensatory changes in cortical resource allocation in adults with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Julia; Sharma, Anu

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss has been linked to many types of cognitive decline in adults, including an association between hearing loss severity and dementia. However, it remains unclear whether cortical re-organization associated with hearing loss occurs in early stages of hearing decline and in early stages of auditory processing. In this study, we examined compensatory plasticity in adults with mild-moderate hearing loss using obligatory, passively-elicited, cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP). High-density EEG elicited by speech stimuli was recorded in adults with hearing loss and age-matched normal hearing controls. Latency, amplitude and source localization of the P1, N1, P2 components of the CAEP were analyzed. Adults with mild-moderate hearing loss showed increases in latency and amplitude of the P2 CAEP relative to control subjects. Current density reconstructions revealed decreased activation in temporal cortex and increased activation in frontal cortical areas for hearing-impaired listeners relative to normal hearing listeners. Participants' behavioral performance on a clinical test of speech perception in noise was significantly correlated with the increases in P2 latency. Our results indicate that changes in cortical resource allocation are apparent in early stages of adult hearing loss, and that these passively-elicited cortical changes are related to behavioral speech perception outcome. PMID:24478637

  4. Compensatory changes in cortical resource allocation in adults with hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JuliaCampbell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss has been linked to many types of cognitive decline in adults, including an association between hearing loss severity and dementia. However, it remains unclear whether cortical re-organization associated with hearing loss occurs in early stages of hearing decline and in early stages of auditory processing. In this study, we examined compensatory plasticity in adults with mild-moderate hearing loss using obligatory, passively-elicited, cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP. High density EEG elicited by speech stimuli was recorded in adults with hearing loss and age-matched normal hearing controls. Latency, amplitude and source localization of the P1, N1, P2 components of the CAEP were analyzed. Adults with mild-moderate hearing loss showed increases in latency and amplitude of the P2 CAEP relative to control subjects. Current density reconstructions revealed decreased activation in temporal cortex and increased activation in frontal cortical areas for hearing-impaired listeners relative to normal hearing listeners. Participants’ behavioral performance on a clinical test of speech perception in noise was significantly correlated with the increases in P2 latency. Our results indicate that changes in cortical resource allocation are apparent in early stages of adult hearing loss, and that these passively-elicited cortical changes are related to behavioral speech perception outcome.

  5. Urografin in the Treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad S. Totonchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to find out whether combined treatment of intravenous urografin and corticosteroid has a therapeutic advantage over oral corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL. The design of the study was an interventional and controlled clinical trial. Between 2003 and 2005, patients with SSNHL were treated in our center in Tabriz, Iran. Patients were selected if they had a hearing loss of at least 30 dB in at least 3 frequencies on audiometric testing. Audiograms were performed before admission, 1 and 2 weeks and 1 and 2 months after treatment. Patients who were put on bed rest and received intravenous urografin and hydrocortisone were compared with outpatients treated with oral steroid alone. Various descriptive analytical calculations and both Chi-square and t-test were used to analyze the data. Sixty patients were included in this study. Fifty-one patients referred to the otological clinics for the appropriate treatment within the first two weeks after the onset of hearing loss. The overall improvement of both groups was 53.3%. Seventeen (56.6% of 30 patients treated in the inpatient group who received intravenous urografin and intravenous corticosteroid had hearing improvement, while half of the outpatient group received oral corticosteroid responded positively to the treatment (p>0.05. This study revealed no significant difference in hearing improvement between the hospitalized patients who received intravenous urografin and corticosteroid and the patients who received oral corticosteroid alone.

  6. Hearing Loss Due to Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Statin Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammed Oylumlu; Faris Mahmode Lolan; Suleyman Ercan; Gokhan Altunbas; Zeynel Karatas; Vedat Davutoglu

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that high cholesterol levels might have adverse effects on hearing and interest- ingly statins may have beneficial effects on hearing loss. Herein, we share a dramatic improvement in acute hearing loss by statin administration in a young patient with familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating the possible role of statins in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss in the context of familial hypercholesterolemia. Although the st...

  7. ???????????????????? Intratympanic Glucocorticoids for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ??

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ?????????????????????????????????????????????? ????? Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, VIP?????????????????????????(ITDvs ???????????/?????????????(RCT??? Cochrane Handbook 5.0.1 ??????????????? RevMan 5.0.2 ????Meta ????????5 ? RCTs?? 285 ????Meta ???????????????????OR(95% CI?3.94(1.03,15.12???????????(ITD?250 HZ???????????????(p < 0.05?????????????????????????(p = 0.20????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of intratympanic glucocorticoids for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Methods We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, CBM,CNKI, and VIP databases and International Clinical Trials Registry website of World Health Organization using the key words “glucocorticoids”, “hearing loss” for the literatures of English and Chinese. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of intratympanic glucocorticoids versus placebo or intratympanic glucocorticoids versus controlled group?oral glucocorticoid/placebo?for sudden sensorineural hearing loss were included. According to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Version 5.0.1, we assessed the quality of the included RCTs. A meta-analysis was carried out with the Cochrane Collaboration’s software RevMan 5.0.2. Results Five RCTs which contained 285 patients were included. Meta-analysis illustrated that there was sta-tistically significant on hearing recovery rate between the two groups (OR:3.94, 95% CI: 1.03-15.12. Hearing of pure tone average also improved significantly with intratympanic glucocorticoids therapy at 250HZ (p < 0.05. We found no statistically significant on the speech reception threshold (p = 0.20. Conclusion Com-pared with the control group, intratympanic glucocorticoids can significantly increase the hearing recovery rate of patients. Given the limitation of sample size of included studies into consideration, the results of this systematic review are still uncertain. Multi-center, large-scale, double-blinded randomized control trials are needed to confirm the available evidence.

  8. Improved horizontal directional hearing in bone conduction device users with acquired unilateral conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Snik, Ad F M; Hol, Myrthe K S; van Esch, Thamar E M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Van Wanrooij, Marc M; Van Opstal, A John

    2011-02-01

    We examined horizontal directional hearing in patients with acquired severe unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL). All patients (n = 12) had been fitted with a bone conduction device (BCD) to restore bilateral hearing. The patients were tested in the unaided (monaural) and aided (binaural) hearing condition. Five listeners without hearing loss were tested as a control group while listening with a monaural plug and earmuff, or with both ears (binaural). We randomly varied stimulus presentation levels to assess whether listeners relied on the acoustic head-shadow effect (HSE) for horizontal (azimuth) localization. Moreover, to prevent sound localization on the basis of monaural spectral shape cues from head and pinna, subjects were exposed to narrow band (1/3 octave) noises. We demonstrate that the BCD significantly improved sound localization in 8/12 of the UCHL patients. Interestingly, under monaural hearing (BCD off), we observed fairly good unaided azimuth localization performance in 4/12 of the patients. Our multiple regression analysis shows that all patients relied on the ambiguous HSE for localization. In contrast, acutely plugged control listeners did not employ the HSE. Our data confirm and further extend results of recent studies on the use of sound localization cues in chronic and acute monaural listening. PMID:20838845

  9. Bilateral Pial siderosis and hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven adult patients with bilateral progressive hearing loss (six male, one female; aged 40-74 years) were studied with a high-field strength (1.5-T) magnetic resonance (MR) system after previous negative workup with either air contrast or intravenous contrast medium-enhanced computed tomography (CT). In all instances, the patients showed extensive evidence of pial siderosis outlining the posterior fossa subarachnoid space. The siderosis was manifested (on long repetition time images) as an increasing susceptibility effect (hypointensity) with a prolongation of echo time. The results of this study indicate that a negative CT examination is inadequate in patients with bilateral hearing loss and that when evidence of siderosis is found on MR images, an etiology for prior subarachnoid hemorrhage must be pursued

  10. Role Salience and Anticipated Work–Family Relations Among Young Adults With and Without Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Most, Tova; Michael, Rinat

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of hearing status on role salience and anticipated work–family relations among 101 unmarried young adults aged 20–33 years: 35 with hearing loss (19 hard of hearing and 16 deaf) and 66 hearing. Participants completed the Life Role Salience scale, anticipated conflictual relations scale, anticipated facilitory relations scale, and a background questionnaire. The deaf participants demonstrated a significantly higher level of commitment to work but anticipated ...

  11. Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin Zojaji; Ali Alesheykh; Mohammad Reza Sedaghat; Kiamarz Navia; Morteza Mazloom Farsi Baf; Masoud Khaki; Aliasghar Raouf

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXS) occurs due to the deposition of extracellular fibrillar materials on the anterior chamber of the eye. This syndrome has been considered to be part of a systemic disease with the potential involvement of the inner ear called sensoroneural hearing loss (SNHL).  In this study, we aimed on evaluating SNHL within PXS patients in Iran to compare them with other international reports. Materials and Methods: In total, 33 patients with PXS and 33 age and...

  12. Weather conditions and sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kateri Maria; Lolis Christos J; Bartzokas Aristides; Nousia Christina-Sophia; Danielides Vasilis; Skevas Antonios

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Climatic or meteorological condition changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL). We investigated the seasonal distribution of ISSHL and evaluated the influence of meteorological parameters (such as temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure), their variation and covariation on the incidence of the disease. Methods A total of 82 cases of ISSHL, admitted to our department over a five-year period, were enrolle...

  13. Studying VEMP in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Rajati; Mehdi Bakhshaee; Ebrahim Naghavi; Faezeh Hoseinnejad; Hamid Reza Rouhi; Rahman Movahhed

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has a prevalence of 10 in 100,000. Viral infections, vascular obstruction and rupture of the intracochlear membranes are supposed to be its most common etiologies. About 40% of patients experience vertigo or imbalance. The VEMP (vestibular evoked myogenic potentials) test is a known approach for detailed study of the labyrinth. The advantage of this test in comparison to other tests is the selected study of sacculus and sacculocochlear p...

  14. Occupational Noise-induced Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mh, Azizi

    2010-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a well-known entity in daily practice of otolaryngology. A wide variety of NIHLs are work-related. Occupational noise is the most common cause of NIHL in adults which is up to now considered incurable and the best approach to it is to utilize maximal protection. An effective noise exposure prevention program consists of identification of sources of noise and implementation of controlling measures and regulations at working environments as well as performin...

  15. Observations From a Musician With Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Einhorn, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Extensive personal experience with professional recording and audio signal processing technology has enabled the author to continue his music career after experiencing sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The iPhone™ is one such device that has been found useful for many music and general listening situations that would otherwise be intractable. Additional techniques and technologies are described that the author has found useful for specific situations, including music composition, rehearsal...

  16. Ocular pseudoexfoliation associated with hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaban, Reham I.; Asfour, Wafa M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Ocular pseudoexfoliation (PXF) has been recently considered as a systemic disease affecting other organs as well as the eye. This prospective study is to assess the relationship between PXF and sensorineural hearing loss. METHODS Patients attending a general ophthalmic clinic at King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan from (March 2002 through to March 2003) who were found to have ocular PXF on routine ophthalmic examination were referred to the Audiometric Department. P...

  17. ‘Ecstasy’ Enhances Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Church, Michael W.; Zhang, Jinsheng S.; Langford, Megan M.; Perrine, Shane A.

    2013-01-01

    ‘Ecstasy’ or 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA) is an amphetamine abused for its euphoric, empathogenic, hallucinatory, and stimulant effects. It is also used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. Common settings for Ecstasy use are nightclubs and “rave” parties where participants consume MDMA and dance to loud music. One concern with the club setting is that exposure to loud sounds can cause permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Another concern is that consumption of MDMA ...

  18. Measurement of Conductive Hearing Loss in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Zhaobing; Wood, Melissa; Rosowski, John J.

    2009-01-01

    In order to discriminate conductive hearing loss from sensorineural impairment, quantitative measurements were used to evaluate the effect of artificial conductive pathology on distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) in mice. The conductive manipulations were created by perforating the pars flaccida of the tympanic membrane, filling or partially filling the middle-ear cavity with saline, fixing the ossicular cha...

  19. Weather conditions and sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateri Maria

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climatic or meteorological condition changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL. We investigated the seasonal distribution of ISSHL and evaluated the influence of meteorological parameters (such as temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure, their variation and covariation on the incidence of the disease. Methods A total of 82 cases of ISSHL, admitted to our department over a five-year period, were enrolled in the study. Seasonal distribution of the disease was investigated by dividing the year in four seasons. Meteorological data included daily values of 13 distinct parameters recorded at the meteorological station of the University of Ioannina during this period. A relationship between each meteorological variable and the incidence of ISSHL was investigated by applying (?2 test on data from 13 contingency tables as well as by using logistic regression and t-test approaches. In addition, the influence of different weather types on the incidence of ISSHL was investigated using Cluster Analysis in order to create eight clusters (weather types characteristic for the prefecture of Ioannina. Results The results of the study could not indicate any seasonal distribution of the disease. The incidence of ISSHL could not be significantly correlated either to any distinct meteorological parameter or to any specific weather type. Conclusions Meteorological conditions, such as those dominating in the Northwestern Greece, and/or their changes, have no proven effect on the incidence of ISSHL.

  20. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in patients with hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ordubazari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the prevalence of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD in patients with hearing loss. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran, Iran, 2000-2001. SUBJECTS (MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample derived from patients who have been introduced to the Audiometric Center of Loghman Hakim Hospital in Tehran, Iran, and underwent an audiometric examination. Among them 100 adult patients (55 males and 45 females were selected, who suffered from hearing loss. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The patients were clinically examined for TMD signs, and corresponding medical data forms were completed for each one of them. The data obtained included findings of the clinical examination: (a TMD signs, (b signs of hearing disorders (hearing loss, tinnitus, ear pain and vertigo, and (c type of hearing loss (sensory neurotic, conductive, or mixed. RESULTS: Among all patients with hearing loss, 82 patients were found to present TMD. With regard to the outbreak, in patients with hearing loss there is a 95% possibility to present TMD (min. 75%, max. 90. The signs of these 82 patients with hearing loss included 89% hearing loss, 58% tinnitus, 50% ear pain, and 42% vertigo. Out of the three types of hearing loss, the sensory neurotic type was prevailed. CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of this study it could be stated that a relationship may exist between hearing loss and signs of temporomandibular joint disorders.

  1. Teaching Children with Hearing Loss in Reading Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Ann; Charlesworth, Robert; Raban, Bridie; Rickards, Field

    2006-01-01

    This study quantitatively analyzed the structure of Reading Recovery lessons for children with hearing loss by examining and comparing the supportive interactions of three Reading Recovery teachers of 12 children with hearing loss and three Reading Recovery teachers of 12 hearing children. All of the children were in the second year of primary…

  2. 76 FR 62093 - Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ...Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: Occupational Safety...parties to participate in an informal stakeholder meeting on preventing occupational hearing...engineering controls. OSHA is holding this stakeholder meeting as part of its commitment...

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss milestones: past and future

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A.L., Edwards; D., Kritzingert.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study was conducted on the Rand Mutual Assurance (RMA) noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) compensation claims from 1998 to 2008 to determine if the 2008 milestone agreed at the 2003 Mine Health and Safety Summit was achieved. The number and costs of NIHL compensation claims in differe [...] nt commodity sectors and workplaces were collated. A secondary analysis of the ages of employees compensated after 2008 was conducted. A complementary retrospective analysis of audiogram data investigated the percentage loss of hearing (PLH) shift in different homogeneously exposed groups and occupations at two gold mines. The compensation claims analysis indicated a significant decrease in NIHL claims from 1998 to 2008, but the milestone was not achieved. The reason may be either that claims have not been submitted timeously as required by Instruction 171 and that the current submissions are a result of pre-2003 noise exposure, or that employees who were baselined are still developing NIHL owing to ineffective hearing conservation programmes in place in the mining industry. On the basis of best practice for hearing conservation, recommendations are made for leading indicators in hearing conservation programmes and for reducing the risks of NIHL in order to achieve the 2013 milestone.

  4. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Note: This video may ... Vision Loss Video (Quicktime) Transcript of Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Video NARRATOR 1: A ...

  5. Designer aminoglycosides prevent cochlear hair cell loss and hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Markus E.; Han, Kyu-Hee; Sotoudeh, Kayvon; Hsieh, Yi-Ju; Effertz, Thomas; Vu, Andrew A.; Verhoeven, Sarah; Hsieh, Michael H.; Greenhouse, Robert; Cheng, Alan G.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent a rapidly growing challenge to human health. Aminoglycosides are widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, but they inflict permanent hearing loss in up to ~50% of patients by causing selective sensory hair cell loss. Here, we hypothesized that reducing aminoglycoside entry into hair cells via mechanotransducer channels would reduce ototoxicity, and therefore we synthesized 9 aminoglycosides with modifications based on biophysical properties of the hair cell mechanotransducer channel and interactions between aminoglycosides and the bacterial ribosome. Compared with the parent aminoglycoside sisomicin, all 9 derivatives displayed no or reduced ototoxicity, with the lead compound N1MS 17 times less ototoxic and with reduced penetration of hair cell mechanotransducer channels in rat cochlear cultures. Both N1MS and sisomicin suppressed growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with N1MS exhibiting superior activity against extended spectrum ? lactamase producers, despite diminished activity against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Moreover, systemic sisomicin treatment of mice resulted in 75% to 85% hair cell loss and profound hearing loss, whereas N1MS treatment preserved both hair cells and hearing. Finally, in mice with E. coli–infected bladders, systemic N1MS treatment eliminated bacteria from urinary tract tissues and serially collected urine samples, without compromising auditory and kidney functions. Together, our findings establish N1MS as a nonototoxic aminoglycoside and support targeted modification as a promising approach to generating nonototoxic antibiotics. PMID:25555219

  6. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WorsØe, Lise Lotte; Caye-Thomasen, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the pneumococcal serotype) for development of hearing loss. Methods. Results of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry, bacterial serotyping, follow-up audiological examinations, and medical records were collected, and disease-related risk factors for hearing loss were identified. The mean pure-tone hearing threshold levels were compared with normative data. Results. Of 240 patients examined by use of audiometry, 129 (54%) had a hearing deficit, and 50 (39%) of these 129 patients were not suspected of hearing loss at discharge from hospital. Of the 240 patients, 16 (7%) had profound unilateral hearing loss, and another 16 (7%) had bilateral profound hearing loss. Significant risk factors for hearing loss were advanced age, the presence of comorbidity, severity of meningitis, a low CSF glucose level, a high CSF protein level, and a certain pneumococcal serotype (P <.05). By applying multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that advanced age, female sex, and a certain serotype were significant risk factors, because fewer patients with serotype 6B had hearing loss than did patients with serotype 12F (P = .03), which was the most commonly occurring serotype. Conclusion. Hearing loss is common after pneumococcal meningitis, and audiometry should be performed on all those who survive pneumococcal meningitis. Important risk factors for hearing loss are advanced age, female sex, severity of meningitis, and bacterial serotype

  7. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Children with a Hearing Loss: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Amineh Koravand; Benoît Jutras; Maryse Lassonde

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the patterns of neural activity in the central auditory system in children with hearing loss. Methods. Cortical potentials and mismatch responses (MMRs) were recorded from ten children aged between 9 and 10 years: five with hearing loss and five with normal hearing in passive oddball paradigms using verbal and nonverbal stimuli. Results. Results indicate a trend toward larger P1 amplitude, a significant reduction in amplitude, and latency of N2 in children with ...

  8. [Hearing loss and hyperthyroidism (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokianakis, G; Ferekidis, E; Pantazopoulos, P

    1978-11-22

    The audiometric findings on 23 patients with diquited hypothyroidism for a minimum of 4 months to a maximum of 20 years are presented. Audiometric tests, including acustic impedance measurements (tympanometry, stapedius reflex) were performed on all patients before and after an adequate substitution therapy. In 12 patients there was a definite impairment of hearing before the substitution therapy. Eight of them have shown a mild to moderate sensory-neural deafness. Four showed a mixed deafness, in three of which a negative pressure of 300 mm H2O was measured in the middle ear, the fourth one had a seromucotympanon. In three patients with pure sensory-neural deafness the stapedius reflex was elicitated only 30 dB over the pure tone threshold in speech frequencies. The audiometric measurements after an adequate substitution therapy of minimum 4 months has shown a definite improvement of hearing loss. PMID:749865

  9. A study on hearing loss in type II diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Jankar DS, Bodhe CD, Bhutada TB

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes-related sensorineural hearing impairment affects people’s ability to hear and understand sounds. We carried out this case control study with the purpose of determining the hearing loss in type II diabetes mellitus in relation to the age and gender of the patients and duration of the illness using tuning fork tests and pure tone audiometry. Aim: To study the hearing loss in type II diabetics and controls. Objectives:1. To study the hearing loss in relation to different age groups i...

  10. Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive abilities in elderly persons with hearing aids fitted at the initial stages of hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiroma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the relation between the use of hearing aids at the initial stages of hearing loss and age-related changes in the auditory and cognitive abilities of elderly persons. 12 healthy elderly persons participated in an annual auditory and cognitive longitudinal examination for three years. According to their hearing level, they were divided into 3 subgroups - the normal hearing group, the hearing loss without hearing aids group, and the hearing loss with hearing aids group. All the subjects underwent 4 tests: pure-tone audiometry, syllable intelligibility test, dichotic listening test (DLT, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R Short Forms. Comparison between the 3 groups revealed that the hearing loss without hearing aids group showed the lowest scores for the performance tasks, in contrast to the hearing level and intelligibility results. The other groups showed no significant difference in the WAIS-R subtests. This result indicates that prescription of a hearing aid during the early stages of hearing loss is related to the retention of cognitive abilities in such elderly people. However, there were no statistical significant correlations between the auditory and cognitive tasks.

  11. Prevalence and Factors Associated With Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Use in Korean Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid usage rates among Korean elders by comparing the differences between those with and without hearing loss, and between those who used and did not use hearing aids. Methods: This study was based on data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010–2012). The study sample consisted of 5,447 Koreans aged ?60 years who received a hearing assessment. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiometry test and classified according to the World Health Organization’s criteria. Hearing aid use was assessed by self-report. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between hearing loss, hearing aid use, and related variables. Results: Hearing loss was found in 16.8% of the elders and only 15.9% of them used a hearing aid. Male (95% CI: 1.27–2.15), tinnitus (95% CI: 1.58–2.32), dizziness (95% CI: 1.05–1.73), and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.32–2.38) were the variables most strongly associated with hearing loss after multivariate adjustment. Tinnitus (95% CI: 1.34–4.13) and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.01–5.02) were strongly associated with hearing aid use after multivariate adjustment. Conclusion: More than half of South Korean elders aged ?60 and older have hearing loss but the rate of hearing aid use is very low. An aural public health program should address modifiable risk factors, such as tinnitus and noise exposure, and non-modifiable risk factors associated with hearing loss in the elderly. PMID:25905073

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Chisato

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is involved in several apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways in auditory tissues. These pathways are the major causes of most types of sensorineural hearing loss, including age-related hearing loss, hereditary hearing loss, ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss, and noise-induced hearing loss. ROS production can be triggered by dysfunctional mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increases or decreases in ROS-related enzymes. Although apoptotic cell death pathways are mostly activated by ROS production, there are other pathways involved in hearing loss that do not depend on ROS production. Further studies of other pathways, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress and necrotic cell death, are required. PMID:25874222

  13. Evaluation of Occupational Hearing Loss in Fire Fighters in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karimi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a controversial occupational disease in fire fighters because exposure to hazardous levels of noise in this job is so variable and unpredictable. In this study, audiometric assessments were performed on 117 fire fighters to evaluate their hearing loss. The results showed that the average fire fighter has a characteristic noise-induced threshold shift, with maximum hearing loss occurring at 6000 Hz. The hearing loss at the test frequencies was related to age, although the association exceeded that of general population only in 6000 Hz frequency in left ear (p=0.021. Despite finding a pattern of threshold shift typical of occupational hearing loss, it must be noted that after controlling for age, there was no strong relation between length of time on the job and the degree of hearing loss. It seems that more extensive studies are needed to evaluate this relationship.

  14. MR imaging of sensory neural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes MR findings in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) who do not have acoustic neuromas. Twenty-eight patients with SNHL were evaluated with pre- and postgadolinium thin-section axial T1-weighted imaging and axial T2- weighted imaging through the whole brain. Eleven patients had lesions in the labyrinth. Ten of the 11 lesions enhanced after gadolinium administration. The diagnoses included viral labyrinthitis (three patients), syphilitic labyrinthitis (two patients), bacterial labyrinthitis (one patient), vestibular neuromas (three patients), ostosclerosis (one patient), and intravestibular hemorrhage (one patient)

  15. Auditory Steady-State Responses for estimating moderate hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, De Wet; Erasmus, Hettie

    2007-01-01

    The Auditory Steady-State Response (ASSR) has gained popularity as an alternative technique for objective audiometry but its use in less severe degrees of hearing loss has been questioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of the ASSR in estimating moderate degrees of hearing loss. Seven subjects (12 ears) with moderate sensorineural hearing loss between 15 and 18 years of ages were enrolled in the study. 48 behavioural and ASSR thresholds were obtained ac...

  16. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Patients with Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kolo, E. S.; Salisu, A. D.; Yaro, A. M.; Nwaorgu, O. G. B.

    2011-01-01

    Even though there are other complications of chronic suppurative otitis media, the aspect of hearing loss is often studied. Nevertheless, the occurrence of sensorineural hearing loss in patients with this disease is still controversial. This study aim (1) to assess the association between sensorineural hearing loss and chronic suppurative otitis media, (2) to investigate some clinical factors that might affect the sensorineural component in patients with this disease. This was a retrospective...

  17. Mouse Models of Age-related Mitochondrial Neurosensory Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitochondrial dysfunction play a central role in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and are a cause of age-related neurosensory hearing loss. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of how oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial dysfunction lead to hearing loss during aging remain unclear, and currently there is no treatment for this age-dependent disorder. Several mouse models of aging and age-related diseases have been linked to age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss. Evaluation of these animal models has offered basic knowledge of the mechanism underlying hearing loss associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and aging. Here we review the evidence that specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that affect mitochondrial function result in increased oxidative damage and associated loss of sensory hair cells and/or spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea during aging, thereby causing hearing loss in these mouse models. Future studies comparing these models will provide further insight into fundamental knowledge about the disordered process of hearing and treatments to improve the lives of individuals with communication disorders. PMID:22820179

  18. Bone Conduction Improvement After Surgery for Conductive Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayendra, H.; Parikh, Bhavin

    2011-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate change in post-operative bone conduction in patients who underwent surgery for conductive/mixed hearing loss due to various reasons. The study design is of retrospective case review and tertiary referral center setting. Five-hundred patients with unilateral conductive/mixed hearing loss were divided into five equal groups (each representing different causes for pre-operative hearing loss), who underwent appropriate surgical correction and had a follow-up audiogra...

  19. Eye color as a risk factor for acquired sensorineural hearing loss: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujica-Mota, Mario A; Schermbrucker, Jonah; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-02-01

    Eye color may be an indicator of inner ear melanin content and has been associated with hearing loss. There is controversy as to whether eye color has an effect on acquired causes of sensorineural hearing loss. This review was conducted to analyze the literature evaluating the relationship between eye color and causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Six databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Included articles were independently assessed for quality by two authors. Eighteen articles were eligible for review. Eye color was not found to have an effect in the non-exposed population or in presbycusis. In noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss, light-eyed patients had more significant loss following noise exposure, although the variability reported due to eye color was modest (r(2) = 0.01-0.14). Two out of three studies reported that dark eye color is associated with cisplatin ototoxicity. In one study, green-eyed patients were found to be at higher risk of radiation-induced hearing loss. Eye color does not appear to play a role in hearing loss in non-exposed individuals or presbycusis. It is possible that dark-eyed individuals, with greater inner ear melanin content, are better protected against noise-induced hearing loss. Evidence suggests that melanin can be protective against radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss, but may predispose individuals to cisplatin ototoxicity. Future studies are required to support these conclusions. PMID:25529530

  20. Cumulative Lead Exposure and Age-related Hearing Loss: The VA Normative Aging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Kyun; Elmarsafawy, Sahar; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Spiro, Avron; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Nie, Huiling; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Although lead has been associated with hearing loss in occupational settings and in children, little epidemiologic research has been conducted on the impact of cumulative lead exposure on age-related hearing loss in the general population. We determined whether bone lead levels, a marker of cumulative lead exposure, are associated with decreased hearing ability in 448 men from the Normative Aging Study, seen between 1962 and 1996 (2,264 total observations). Air conduction hearing thresholds were measured at 0.25 to 8 kHz and pure tone averages (PTA) (mean of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) were computed. Tibia and patella lead levels were measured using K x-ray fluorescence between 1991 and 1996. In cross-sectional analyses, after adjusting for potential confounders including occupational noise, patella lead levels were significantly associated with poorer hearing thresholds at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz and PTA. The odds of hearing loss significantly increased with patella lead levels. We also found significant positive associations between tibia lead and the rate change in hearing thresholds at 1, 2, and 8 kHz and PTA in longitudinal analyses. Our results suggest that chronic low-level lead exposure may be an important risk factor for age-related hearing loss and reduction of lead exposure could help prevent or delay development of age-related hearing loss. PMID:20638461

  1. Age-Related Hearing Loss: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela E.; Hoyer, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Examines adaptation strategies used by hearing-impaired listeners and considers the implications of age-related hearing loss for counseling, intervention, and self-management. Outlines information on hearing aids and on practical communication strategies and the growing importance of these strategies as the population grows increasingly older.…

  2. Noise Exposure and Hearing Loss in Rural Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Charles M.; Lass, Norman J.

    1993-01-01

    A high level of work-related and recreational noise has led to a high prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in rural students. Teachers can help prevent this problem by integrating hearing conservation education with existing curricula. Educators could be trained about hearing conservation by professional audiologists. (LP)

  3. Hearing Loss Due to Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Statin Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Oylumlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that high cholesterol levels might have adverse effects on hearing and interest- ingly statins may have beneficial effects on hearing loss. Herein, we share a dramatic improvement in acute hearing loss by statin administration in a young patient with familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating the possible role of statins in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss in the context of familial hypercholesterolemia. Although the statin administra- tion as a therapeutic option for sudden hearing loss needs to be clarified in prospective studies, this case report might shed more light for possible association of dyslipidemia and hearing loss and role of statins in such cases.

  4. Head Position Comparison between Students with Normal Hearing and Students with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Renato de Souza, Melo; Polyanna Waleska Amorim da, Silva; Robson Arruda, Souza; Maria Cristina Falcao, Raposo; Karla Monica, Ferraz.

    Full Text Available Introduction ?Head sense position is coordinated by sensory activity of the vestibular system, located in the inner ear. Children with sensorineural hearing loss may show changes in the vestibular system as a result of injury to the inner ear, which can alter the sense of head position in this popu [...] lation. Aim ?Analyze the head alignment in students with normal hearing and students with sensorineural hearing loss and compare the data between groups. Methods ?This prospective cross-sectional study examined the head alignment of 96 students, 48 with normal hearing and 48 with sensorineural hearing loss, aged between 7 and 18 years. The analysis of head alignment occurred through postural assessment performed according to the criteria proposed by Kendall et al. For data analysis we used the chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results ?The students with hearing loss had a higher occurrence of changes in the alignment of the head than normally hearing students (p?

  5. Studying VEMP in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rajati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL has a prevalence of 10 in 100,000. Viral infections, vascular obstruction and rupture of the intracochlear membranes are supposed to be its most common etiologies. About 40% of patients experience vertigo or imbalance. The VEMP (vestibular evoked myogenic potentials test is a known approach for detailed study of the labyrinth. The advantage of this test in comparison to other tests is the selected study of sacculus and sacculocochlear pathways. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study all patients with SSNHL diagnosis were admitted and underwent routine standard treatments and diagnostic tests. Clinical symptoms and paraclinic findings were recorded in especially designed forms and VEMP test was performed on admission. Results: Among the 43 cases with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, 14 (32.6% had vertigo. Thirteen patients (39.2% out of 43 had a negative (abnormal VEMP, 6 of which (42.9% had vertigo, while in the 30 VEMP positive (normal cases, vertigo was detected in 8 (26.6%. Discussion: Saccular dysfunction seems to be an important finding in SSNHL. Although it is more prevalent in the patients with vertigo, it can be found in the non-dizzy cases. VEMP disturbance in SSNHL shows more extensive pathological involvement. Conclusion: In SSNHL the pathology isn’t limited to the cochlea and even in patients with no vestibular symptoms sacculus might be involved.

  6. Pediatric hearing loss: common causes, diagnosis and therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, M; Tabet, P; Saliba, I

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric hearing loss limits the child ability to develop effective auditory and speech capabilities. Early rehabilitation of hearing loss results in higher levels of linguistic, academic and social skills. To achieve the best outcomes, proper and timely diagnosis is essential. The etiology of hearing loss can be classified according to its nature as sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), conductive hearing loss (CHL) or mixed hearing loss (MHL). Congenital hearing loss could be genetic or non genetic (acquired), syndromic or non-syndromic. Hearing loss can be classified according to the severity into mild (26-40 dB HL), moderate (41-70 dB HL), severe (71-90dB HL) and profound (more than 90 dB HL). Management of hearing loss is mainly influenced by the nature, the bilaterality, the severity and the age at diagnosis. Severe to profound bilateral SNHL can be managed by cochlear implantation (unilateral or bilateral), if picked up at early age while mild to moderate bilateral SNHL are easier to manage with conventional hearing aids. CHL has less impact on the speech development of the child. It is usually managed by correcting the underlying etiology such as otitis media with effusion or even surgically in cases of external ear atresia or ossicular malformations. Unilateral SNHL have fortunately no impact on the language development of the child and can be passed undiagnosed until preschool-aged children. The implementation of national newborn hearing screening programs has improved the management of affected children by rehabilitating them at early stages to allow for normal speech development. In this review article, we aim to highlight the most common causes of pediatric hearing loss, their character and presentation and to review the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of a deaf child. PMID:25312238

  7. What are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible for the hearing complaint in the hearing loss for ototoxicity after the oncological treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberman, Patricia Helena Pecora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The neurosensory bilateral simetric hearing loss resulting of the oncological treatment is underestimated, because the patients has the hearing detection preserved, reporting complaints in determined situation, or the not comprehension of part of the message. Objective: Investigate which are the audiometric frequencies affected are the responsible by the presence of hearing complaints. Method: Prospective study evaluating 200 patients with cancer in the childhood out of the oncological treatment in at least 8 years, with average age to the diagnosis of 6,21 years (4,71. Was applied anamnesis to investigate the presence of hearing complaints and performed a tonal threshold audiometry. To check the association between the complaint and the hearing loss, was applied the Exact test of Fisher, with one error a=5%, the patients were split into: normal hearing, hearing loss in 8kHz, loss in 6-8 kHz, loss in 4-8 kHz, loss in 2-8 kHz and loss in < 1-8 kHz. Results: We found 125 patients with hearing loss, 10 presented hearing complaints. Between the patients with hearing loss, 16 presented loss only at 8kHz, and 1 with complaint; 22 with loss in 6-8 kHz, being 3 with complaint; 16 with loss in 4-8 kHz, from them 10 with complaint; 15 with loss 2-8 kHz, being 14 with complaint and 6 with loss in < 1-8 kHz all with complaints. There were a significant relationship between the loss and hearing complaint (p<0,001, when the frequency of 4 kHz was involved. Conclusion: The bigger the number of affected frequencies the bigger the occurrence of hearing complaint, most of all when the speech frequencies are involved, and the involvement of 4 kHz already determines the appearing of the complaints.

  8. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  9. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Monisha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant finding to date has been the discovery of mutations in GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 as the major cause of profound prelingual deafness. This was first reported in a Tunisian family in 1994 and thereafter in many different countries. GJB2 gene encodes the gap-junction protein, connexin 26 (Cx26, mutations in which have become the first genetic marker of inherited hearing loss. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR, single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP and sequencing methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in Cx26 gene. In India as well, the Cx26 mutations are being screened in families with hearing impaired children using these molecular methods. Therefore, in order to create awareness among the clinicians and the affected families; we have attempted to review the Cx26 gene mutations responsible for autosomal recessive type of non-syndromic hearing loss. The efficacy and utility of Cx26 gene analysis might open the path to proper counseling of families for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. It may even facilitate the development of strategies in future for the treatment of this common genetic disorder.

  10. Age-Related Hearing Loss and the Factors Determining Continued Usage of Hearing Aids among Elderly Community-Dwelling Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikawa, Takehiro; Saito, Hideyuki; Okamoto, Yasuhide; Enomoto, Chieko; Takebayashi, Toru; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    While hearing aids are recommended for people with age-related hearing loss, many with impaired hearing do not use them. In this study, we investigated how many elderly people in the study area needed hearing aids, and the factors that determined continued wearing of the devices. The study area was Kurabuchi Town, Japan, where 1,437 residents (those aged 65 years or over) were eligible for participation in the study; 1,414 participated, of whom, 103 (7.3%) were already using hearing aids at the start of the study. After the primary screening, hearing aids were lent to 68 participants (4.8%) who did not already have one, 38 of whom (60.3% of the borrowers, representing 2.7% of the total aged population) went on to wear the hearing aid continuously. The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) score was significantly elevated among these 38 participants. This study indicated that hearing aids are of potential benefit to many local residents. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that HHIE scores were associated with the extent of HA usage. The adjusted odds ratio for a 1-unit increase in HHIE score was 1.08 (95% confidence interval: 1.02–1.14). Programs like this, in which people with impaired hearing are identified at the local level and given appropriate assistance, are useful models for future use in societies with aging populations. PMID:24086287

  11. The relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Zohre Mousavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Oral stereognosis is the ability to recognize the objects placed in the mouth; this plays a significant role in speech sounds production. Since the children with hearing loss have articulation disorders, this study aimed to clear the relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children.Methods: In this cross-sectional non-invasive study, 40 children of 5-year-old (30 children with different degrees of hearing loss and 10 normal children were involved. Oral steriognostic test was done for all of them and the Mann-Whitney U was used for statistical analysis.Results: There were significant differences between the mean of oral stereognostic ability between the normal children and the children with severe (p<0.01 or profound hearing loss (p=0.05. There was no significant difference between the mean of oral stereognostic ability among the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss compared with together. Besides, there was no significant difference between the mean of the time of diagnosis among all of hearing loss and normal children.Conclusion: The study shows that the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss have inefficient oral stereognosis in comparison with the normal children.

  12. Hearing Aids Communication : Integrating Social Interaction, Audiology and User Centered Design to Improve Communication with Hearing Loss and Hearing Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Globally, hearing loss is the second most frequent disability. About 80% of the persons affected by hearing loss do not use hearing aids. The goal of this edited volume is to present a theoretically founded, interdisciplinary approach geared at understanding and improving social interaction impacted by hearing loss and (non-) use of hearing technologies. The researchers report on pilot studies from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Switzerland and the USA. Using Conversation Analysis, the studies identify problems and serve as points of departure for possible solutions. Researchers and practitioners from the different disciplines (medicine, audiology, hearing rehabilitation, User Centered Design, Conversation Analysis, change business) as well as users of hearing technologies comment on this approach.

  13. Hearing Loss and Cognition: The Role of Hearing Aids, Social Isolation and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Emsley, Richard; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Moore, David R.; Fortnum, Heather; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Munro, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770) of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally. PMID:25760329

  14. Hearing loss and cognition: the role of hearing AIDS, social isolation and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Emsley, Richard; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Moore, David R; Fortnum, Heather; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Munro, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770) of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally. PMID:25760329

  15. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a cause of sensorineural hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Peckham, C. S.; Stark, O.; Dudgeon, J A; Martin, J. A.; Hawkins, G.

    1987-01-01

    Prospective studies have suggested that about 108 children with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss are born each year in England and Wales; this represents about 12% of all children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Over a nine year period 1644 children aged between 6 months and 4 years who were attending the Nuffield Hearing and Speech Centre were screened for CMV infection. The prevalence of CMV in the urine of children with sensori...

  16. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Andréa Cintra Lopes; Vanessa Guioto Otowiz2; Patrícia Monteiro de Barros Lopes3; José Roberto Pereira Lauris4; Cibele Carméllo Santos5

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type o...

  17. Post operative sensorineural hearing loss after middle ear surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, A. A.; Aiyer, R. G.; Pandya, V. K.; Nair, Unnikrishnan

    2004-01-01

    Mild Sensorineural hearing loss subsequent to middle ear surgery has till today been an important complication to middle ear surgery inspite of advances in surgical techniques, operative instruments, monitoring devices and better treatment options. Lack of proper knowledge about this problem is because of under reporting of exact magnitude of hearing loss on account of difficulty in measuring hearing threshold of patients in immediate postoperative period as it may lead to post operative infe...

  18. Head Position Comparison between Students with Normal Hearing and Students with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Renato de Souza; Amorim da Silva, Polyanna Waleska; Souza, Robson Arruda; Raposo, Maria Cristina Falcão; Ferraz, Karla Mônica

    2013-01-01

    Introduction?Head sense position is coordinated by sensory activity of the vestibular system, located in the inner ear. Children with sensorineural hearing loss may show changes in the vestibular system as a result of injury to the inner ear, which can alter the sense of head position in this population. Aim?Analyze the head alignment in students with normal hearing and students with sensorineural hearing loss and compare the data between groups. Methods?This prospective cross-sectional study examined the head alignment of 96 students, 48 with normal hearing and 48 with sensorineural hearing loss, aged between 7 and 18 years. The analysis of head alignment occurred through postural assessment performed according to the criteria proposed by Kendall et al. For data analysis we used the chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results?The students with hearing loss had a higher occurrence of changes in the alignment of the head than normally hearing students (p?hearing loss (p?hearing loss showed more changes in the head posture compared with children with normal hearing.

  19. Disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada Immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada (DNSI é caracterizada geralmente por uma disacusia neurossensorial bilateral, progressiva e assimétrica, acompanhada ou não por outros sintomas da orelha interna. Três pacientes com DNSI cujo quadro clínico e audiométrico eram sugestivos de doença auto-imune, e apresentaram resposta positiva à terapia imunossupressora ou pesquisa positiva de anticorpo anti hsp-70 68kD, foram estudados com relação às características clínicas, testes diagnósticos, alternativas terapêuticas e evolução da doença. Dois pacientes apresentaram quadro de disacusia neurossensorial rapidamente progressiva, associado a quadro vestibular, e outro, quadro de surdez súbita unilateral. Nenhum paciente apresentou positividade às provas reumatológicas, e apenas um paciente apresentou aumento na velocidade de hemossedimentação. Nenhum paciente obteve resposta adequada sustentada à corticoterapia, mas dois deles melhoraram com outras terapias imunossupressoras. O diagnóstico da DNSI é clínico e baseado na resposta positiva ao teste terapêutico com imunossupressores. A pesquisa de anticorpo anti-hsp70 de 68 kD pelo Western Blot é o único exame laboratorial específico para seu diagnóstico, possuindo sensibilidade de 42% e especificidade de 90%. Apenas 1 paciente apresentou positividade para este teste e não respondeu à terapia imunossupressora. Os dois pacientes com teste negativo responderam satisfatoriamente ao tratamento. A baixa sensibilidade do Western Blot e seu alto custo dificultam sua difusa utilização em nosso meio. A introdução precoce do tratamento é de suma importância por auxiliar no diagnóstico e por proporcionar um melhor prognóstico auditivo.The immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss (ISHL is characterized as an asymmetric and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Tree patients with ISHL were studied, regarding clinical aspects, diagnostic tests, treatment options and disease evolution. They presented whether positive response to immunosuppressive therapy or positiviness to Western Blot test for hsp 70-68kD. Two patients presented rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss, associated to vestibular symptoms and the other presented unilateral sudden deafness. No patient reacted to rheumatological testes, and one presented increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. None satisfactorily responded to corticotherapy, but two presented clinical improvement with other immunosuppressive therapies. The ISHL diagnosis is based on clinical aspects and on the positive response to therapeutic testes with immunosupressor drugs. The Western Blot test for hsp 70-68 kD, with 42% sensitivity and 90% specificity, is the only specific laboratorial exam for ISHL. One patient presented positiviness to this exam and did not responded to immunosuppressive therapy. Two patients with negative tests satisfactorily responded to immunosuppressive therapy. The low sensitivity and high costs of Western Blot test represent difficulties to the spread use of it. The early introduction of treatment has a major importance in the diagnosis of ISHL and to increase the auditory prognosis.

  20. Disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada / Immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Norma de Oliveira, Penido; Mariana Dantas, Aumond; Fernando Danelon, Leonhardt; Carlos Eduardo Cesário de, Abreu; Ronaldo Nunes, Toledo.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada (DNSI) é caracterizada geralmente por uma disacusia neurossensorial bilateral, progressiva e assimétrica, acompanhada ou não por outros sintomas da orelha interna. Três pacientes com DNSI cujo quadro clínico e audiométrico eram sugestivos de doença auto-imune [...] , e apresentaram resposta positiva à terapia imunossupressora ou pesquisa positiva de anticorpo anti hsp-70 68kD, foram estudados com relação às características clínicas, testes diagnósticos, alternativas terapêuticas e evolução da doença. Dois pacientes apresentaram quadro de disacusia neurossensorial rapidamente progressiva, associado a quadro vestibular, e outro, quadro de surdez súbita unilateral. Nenhum paciente apresentou positividade às provas reumatológicas, e apenas um paciente apresentou aumento na velocidade de hemossedimentação. Nenhum paciente obteve resposta adequada sustentada à corticoterapia, mas dois deles melhoraram com outras terapias imunossupressoras. O diagnóstico da DNSI é clínico e baseado na resposta positiva ao teste terapêutico com imunossupressores. A pesquisa de anticorpo anti-hsp70 de 68 kD pelo Western Blot é o único exame laboratorial específico para seu diagnóstico, possuindo sensibilidade de 42% e especificidade de 90%. Apenas 1 paciente apresentou positividade para este teste e não respondeu à terapia imunossupressora. Os dois pacientes com teste negativo responderam satisfatoriamente ao tratamento. A baixa sensibilidade do Western Blot e seu alto custo dificultam sua difusa utilização em nosso meio. A introdução precoce do tratamento é de suma importância por auxiliar no diagnóstico e por proporcionar um melhor prognóstico auditivo. Abstract in english The immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss (ISHL) is characterized as an asymmetric and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Tree patients with ISHL were studied, regarding clinical aspects, diagnostic tests, treatment options and disease evolution. They presented whether positive response to [...] immunosuppressive therapy or positiviness to Western Blot test for hsp 70-68kD. Two patients presented rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss, associated to vestibular symptoms and the other presented unilateral sudden deafness. No patient reacted to rheumatological testes, and one presented increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. None satisfactorily responded to corticotherapy, but two presented clinical improvement with other immunosuppressive therapies. The ISHL diagnosis is based on clinical aspects and on the positive response to therapeutic testes with immunosupressor drugs. The Western Blot test for hsp 70-68 kD, with 42% sensitivity and 90% specificity, is the only specific laboratorial exam for ISHL. One patient presented positiviness to this exam and did not responded to immunosuppressive therapy. Two patients with negative tests satisfactorily responded to immunosuppressive therapy. The low sensitivity and high costs of Western Blot test represent difficulties to the spread use of it. The early introduction of treatment has a major importance in the diagnosis of ISHL and to increase the auditory prognosis.

  1. Living with Hearing and Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Usher Syndrome Having trouble with this video? Try one of these: Living with Hearing and Vision Loss ... Vision Loss Due to Usher Syndrome Video NARRATOR 1: A woman with short gray hair. NARRATOR 2: ...

  2. Effective Identification of Functional Hearing Loss Using Behavioral Threshold Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlauch, Robert S.; Koerner, Tess K.; Marshall, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Four functional hearing loss protocols were evaluated. Method: For each protocol, 30 participants feigned a hearing loss first on an audiogram and then for a screening test that began a threshold search from extreme levels (-10 or 90 dB HL). Two-tone and 3-tone protocols compared thresholds for ascending and descending tones for 2 (0.5…

  3. Pathophysiology of Age-Related Hearing Loss (Peripheral and Central)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyu-yup

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Ext...

  4. Comparing the bone conduction auditory steady state response in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss and normal hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Afifian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The auditory steady state response is a modern test for estimating hearing thresholds, especially in difficult to test individuals . However, there are few bone conduction auditory steady state response data, particularly for individuals with hearing loss. The objective of this study was to investigate bone conduction auditory steady state response thresholds in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss and normal hearing.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 10 individuals with normal hearing and 10 with sensorineural hearing loss at the age of 15-30 years were selected by non-probability sampling. Auditory steady state response and pure tone audiometry to bone conduction stimuli in 500 and 2000 Hz were recorded in two groups. Paired and independent t-test were used to compare data between the groups.Results: There was low correlation between bone conduction auditory steady state response and pure tone audiometry in both groups (p>0.05 for both. The difference of behavioral thresholds and auditory steady state response in 500 Hz was higher than 2000 Hz in both groups (p=0.033 for normal hearing and p=0.017 for sensorineural hearing loss groups. Comparison of these results showed significant differences between the two groups (p<0.001.Conclusion: In both groups, there was low correlation between bone conduction auditory steady state response and pure tone audiometry thresholds. In individuals with sensorineural hearing loss and in higher frequencies , bone conduction auditory steady state response thresholds was closer to pure tone audiometery thresholds.

  5. 29 CFR 1904.10 - Recording criteria for cases involving occupational hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...for cases involving occupational hearing loss. 1904.10 Section 1904...for cases involving occupational hearing loss. (a) Basic requirement. If...previously experienced a recordable hearing loss, you must compare the...

  6. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Kawasaki Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Tanimoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is an acute systemic vasculitis of children characterized by fever, rash, conjunctival hyperemia, oropharyngeal erythema, edema and erythema of the hands and feet, and cervical adenopathy [1]. A variety of other features are also characteristics of this syndrome, including coronary artery aneurysms, urethritis, anterior uveitis, mild hepatobiliary dysfunction, and gallbladder hydrops. Coronary artery abnormalities, including aneurysms and ectasia, occur in approximately 20% of untreated patients [2]. Neurologic involvement is rare. Cranial nerve palsy, especially involving the seventh nerve, has been reported [3], as well as hemiparesis caused by cerebral thrombosis and infarction, and convulsions. Although about 30% of patients with acute KD in the United States have been reported to suffer mild sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL [4], only a few such cases have been reported in Japan. On the other hand, in both countries, a few cases of severe or profound SNHL in children who were in the acute phase of KD have been documented [5].

  7. Occupational Noise-induced Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Azizi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a well-known entity in daily practice of otolaryngology. A wide variety of NIHLs are work-related. Occupational noise is the most common cause of NIHL in adults which is up to now considered incurable and the best approach to it is to utilize maximal protection. An effective noise exposure prevention program consists of identification of sources of noise and implementation of controlling measures and regulations at working environments as well as performing periodic audiologic evaluation of those who are working at noisy environments. The present paper, briefly reviews occupational NIHL mainly based on the related data available on PubMed up to early 2010.

  8. Minocycline Protection of Neomycin Induced Hearing Loss in Gerbils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alan M.; Vujanovic, Irena; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    This animal study was designed to determine if minocycline ameliorates cochlear damage is caused by intratympanic injection of the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Baseline auditory-evoked brainstem responses were measured in gerbils that received 40?mM intratympanic neomycin either with 0, 1.2, or 1.5?mg/kg intraperitoneal minocycline. Four weeks later auditory-evoked brainstem responses were measured and compared to the baseline measurements. Minocycline treatments of 1.2?mg/kg and 1.5?mg/kg resulted in significantly lower threshold increases compared to 0?mg/kg, indicating protection of hearing loss between 6?kHz and 19?kHz. Cochleae were processed for histology and sectioned to allow quantification of the spiral ganglion neurons and histological evaluation of organ of Corti. Significant reduction of spiral ganglion neuron density was demonstrated in animals that did not receive minocycline, indicating that those receiving minocycline demonstrated enhanced survival of spiral ganglion neurons, enhanced survival of sensory hairs cells and spiral ganglion neurons, and reduced hearing threshold elevation correlates with minocycline treatment demonstrating that neomycin induced hearing loss can be reduced by the simultaneous application of minocycline. PMID:25950003

  9. Prevalence of hearing loss among people aged 65 years and over: screening and hearing aid provision.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, P S; Fleming, D.M.; Donaldson, I.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of hearing loss among people aged 65 years and over and to offer hearing aids where necessary. The study was carried out in a large health centre practice in Birmingham with a computerized record system. All patients aged 65 years, and a 20% random sample of patients aged 66 years and over were invited for interview. They were questioned about hearing loss and examined audiometrically. All patients with a hearing loss in the better ear of 35 ...

  10. Comparison of Different Levels of Reading Comprehension between Hearing-Impaired Loss and Normal-Hearing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Sharifi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skill is one of the most important necessities of students' learning in everyday life. This skill is referred to the ability of comprehension, comment and conclusion from texts and receiving the meaning of the massage which is composed. Educational development in any student has a direct relation with the ability of the comprehension. This study is designed to investigate the effects of hearing loss on reading comprehension in hearing-impaired students compared to normal-hearing ones.Methods: Seventeen hearing-impaired students in 4th year of primary exceptional schools in Karaj, Robatkarim and Shahriyar, Iran, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Seventeen normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to exceptional ones as control group. They were compared for different levels of reading comprehension using the international standard booklet (PIRLS 2001. Results: There was a significant difference in performance between hearing-impaired and normal- hearing students in different levels of reading comprehension (p<0.05.Conclusion: Hearing loss has negative effects on different levels of reading comprehension, so in exceptional centers, reconsideration in educational planning in order to direct education from memorizing to comprehension and deeper layers of learning seems necessary.

  11. Apoptosis-related genes change their expression with age and hearing loss in the mouse cochlea

    OpenAIRE

    Tadros, Sherif F.; D’souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand possible causative roles of apoptosis gene regulation in age-related hearing loss (presbycusis), apoptotic gene expression patterns in the CBA mouse cochlea of four different age and hearing loss groups were compared, using GeneChip and real-time (qPCR) microarrays. GeneChip transcriptional expression patterns of 318 apoptosis-related genes were analyzed. Thirty eight probes (35 genes) showed significant differences in expression. The significant gene families include Caspases, ...

  12. Application of an implantable bone conduction hearing device to patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B A; Roush, J; McElveen, J T

    1992-05-01

    This investigation, comprised of five studies, was undertaken to determine if individuals with newly acquired profound unilateral hearing losses would benefit from an implantable bone-conduction hearing device. The bone conductor was implanted on the side of the deaf ear at the time of translabyrinthine acoustic tumor resection. Two areas greatly affected by unilateral hearing loss, speech recognition in noise and sound localization, were examined. No improvement in aided performance could be documented in either area. PMID:1573951

  13. Screening of Connexin 26 in Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Danielle, Moreira; Daniela da, Silva; Priscila, Lopez; Jair Cortez, Mantovani.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The first locus for nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss is on chromosome 13q11-22. The 35delGmutation is present in 80% of cases in which GJB2 is involved, which makes the study of this mutation very important. The viability and benefits of screening for mutations in the conn [...] exin 26 gene are now beginning to change the diagnostic evaluation and identification of the etiology of hearing loss. Objective To investigate the occurrence of the 35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and their first degree relatives. Methods This transversal study included 72 patients from the local hospital. The patients were divided into three groups: group A, sensorineural hearing loss (n = 58); group B, first-degree relatives of group A with sensorineural hearing loss (n = 09); and group C, first-degree relatives of patients from group A without hearing loss (n = 05). All patients had audiological evaluation and genetic testing of the 35delG mutation. Results The 35delG mutation was found in four heterozygous mutations (three of them found in the same family). The other heterozygous mutation was found in a female patient with bilateral, moderate, prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss. A single homozygous mutation was found in a male patient, with severe sensorineural hearing loss in his right ear and profound hearing loss in the left ear. Conclusions The 35delG mutation was found in 7% of the cases. The test is easy to perform and inexpensive, but it is necessary to investigate other genes related to hearing loss.

  14. Prognostic effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time for sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y?ld?r?m, Erol; Murat Özcan, K; Palal?, Mehmet; Cetin, Mehmet Ali; Ensari, Serdar; Dere, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is one of the otological emergencies whose pathogenesis is uncertain and associated with total or partial loss of hearing function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time affects the management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Fifty-nine patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss admitted to our clinic between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In addition, each patient received intravenous piracetam and 37 patients received steroid therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was initiated between 1 and 7 days with 20 patients determined as Group A, between 8 and 14 days with 25 patients determined as Group B and between 15 and 28 days with 14 patients determined as Group C. Hearing gains of these three groups were statistically evaluated. Each of them showed statistically significant improvement. Lowest hearing gain was observed in Group C and the gain of this group was statistically less than the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the hearing gains of the Group A and Group B. Starting hyperbaric oxygen therapy in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss within the first 14 days has positive effect on the prognosis of the disease. PMID:24272206

  15. Cochlear implantation for progressive hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, R.; Jones, S.; Court, I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows that a subgroup of congenitally deaf children exists, who, having made good progress with conventional hearing aids, suffer a sudden or progressive hearing deterioration which arrests the speech development.

  16. Tinnitus and Patterns of Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Christine M.; Lecluyse, Wendy; Mcferran, Don; Meddis, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is strongly linked with the presence of damaged hearing. However, it is not known why tinnitus afflicts only some, and not all, hearing-impaired listeners. One possibility is that tinnitus patients have specific inner ear damage that triggers tinnitus. In this study, differences in cochlear function inferred from psychophysical measures were measured between hearing-impaired listeners with tinnitus and hearing-impaired listeners without tinnitus. Despite having similar average hearin...

  17. Ten Ways to Recognize Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social life? Yes No 10. Does a hearing problem cause you difficulty when in a restaurant with relatives or friends? Yes No If you answered “yes” to three or more of these questions, you may want to see an ... hearing problems. American Speech- Language-Hearing Association, 25, 37-42. ...

  18. Clinical study on unilateral hearing loss in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of 60 children was studied (aged 0 to 10 years, 32 boys, 28 girls) with severe unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology. There were two peaks, at 0 and 6 years. In 19 children, hearing loss was identified during a conservative general health checkup for school or preschool children. In 21 children aged 0 years, 16 were suspected of hearing loss by newborn hearing screening. Temporal bone computed tomography scans were examined in 51 patients. Sixteen ears (31.4%) with hearing loss had inner ear and/or internal auditory canal abnormalities. In one patient, the anomaly was the presence of a bony wall dividing the internal auditory canal into two separate compartments associated with severe inner ear hypoplasia. Two patients had a common cavity. In one of these patients, the anomaly was revealed because of severe bacterial meningitis, and another was detected by newborn hearing screening. Six patients had a narrow internal auditory canal, 4 had a narrow internal auditory canal and hypoplastic cochlea, and 1 had a narrow internal auditory canal and cystic vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. Two patients had a cystic vestibule and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. One case showed fluctuation of the hearing level in the contralateral ear with normal hearing during the observation period at an average of 20 months. The number of children whose unilateral hearing loss is detected early by newborn hearing screening has enormously newborn hearing screening has enormously increased. Strategies for follow-up, early intervention, and support for families are necessary for young children with unilateral hearing impairment. (author)

  19. Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: cardiovascular risk factors do not influence hearing threshold recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, A; Hatzopoulos, S; Bianchini, C; Iannini, V; Rosignoli, M; Skarzynski, H; Aimoni, C

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that risk factors for ischaemic vascular disease, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, can also be considered risk factors for the development of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). In this study, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these factors can influence hearing threshold recovery in patients affected by ISSNHL. A total of 141 subjects who suffered an episode of ISSNHL were included. All subjects were assessed with tonal audiometry, auditory brainstem responses and MRI to exclude retrocochlear pathology. Hearing tests were conducted at ISSNHL onset (t = 0) and after 30 days. Patients were divided into three classes according to the presence/absence of one or more cardiovascular risk factors including: history of smoking, total serum cholesterol/triglycerides, history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Values of hearing threshold recovery were estimated and comparisons were conducted across the three risk factor classes. 75% of patients affected by ISSNHL showed a threshold recovery. However, the threshold recovery was found to be class-independent (average recovery value of 18 dB HL per classes) and also independent of age and gender. Even if cardiovascular risk factors have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of ISSNHL, the present study suggests that these factors do not have any significant influence on the threshold recovery in ISSNHL. PMID:26019394

  20. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Occupational Noise Exposure: Effects of Age-Corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurti, Sridhar

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (NIPTS) were computed from retrospective audiometric analyses by subtracting aging effects on hearing sensitivity in sixty-eight patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who reported significant occupational noise exposure histories. There were significant effects of age on NIPTS but no significant gender- or ear- differences in terms of NIPTS. The NIPTS at 2,000 Hz was found to be significantly greater than NIPTS at frequencies 500 Hz, 1,000...

  1. Effects of record music on hearing loss among young workers in a shipyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, T

    1985-01-01

    Effects of record music on hearing were studied by measuring the hearing loss among 175 shipyard workers ranging from 20 to 29 years, who did not have any history of ear or nose diseases, familial hearing loss or ingestion of oto-toxic drugs. There were 120 record-listeners and 55 non-listeners. It was found that there were more high frequency hearing impairments among the ears of record-listeners than non-listeners. Means of hearing losses of the record-listeners' ears were 4.73 dB and at 4000 Hz and 9.24 dB at 6000 Hz. Failure rates (percentage of ears which had 20 dB or more hearing loss) were 8.4% at 4000 Hz and 18.8% at 6000 Hz. Three factors, "monthly listening hours", "duration of listening to records" and "favourite type of music", contributed to the high frequency hearing loss. The young shipyard workers should be warned against non-occupational noise exposure, such as record music outside of the workplace, because this will significantly worsen hearing impairment due to the occupational noise exposure. PMID:4055074

  2. Lifelong occupational exposures and hearing loss among elderly Latino Americans aged 65–75 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, OiSaeng; Chin, Dal Lae; Kerr, Madeleine J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between occupational exposures and hearing among elderly Latino Americans. Design A descriptive, correlational design used for this secondary analysis with the data from the Sacramento Area Latino Study of Aging (SALSA). Study sample A total of 547 older adults were included. Results A majority of participants (58%) reported occupational exposures to loud noise and/or ototoxic chemicals. About 65% and over 90% showed hearing loss at low and high frequencies, respectively. Participants with occupational exposure to loud noise and/or ototoxic chemicals were, significantly, two times more likely to have hearing loss at high frequencies compared to those without exposure (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.17 – 4.51, p = .016), after controlling for other risk factors of hearing loss such as age, gender, household income, current smoking, and diabetes. However, lifelong occupational exposure was not significantly associated with hearing loss at low frequencies (OR = 1.43; 95% CI: 0.94 – 2.18, p = .094). Conclusion Lifelong occupational exposure to loud noise and/or ototoxic chemicals was significantly associated with hearing loss among elderly Latino Americans. Healthy work life through protection from harmful auditory effects of occupational exposures to noise and chemicals will have a positive impact on better hearing in later life. PMID:25549170

  3. Improvements in Speech Understanding With Wireless Binaural Broadband Digital Hearing Instruments in Adults With Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kreisman, Brian M.; Mazevski, Annette G.; Schum, Donald J.; Sockalingam, Ravichandran

    2010-01-01

    This investigation examined whether speech intelligibility in noise can be improved using a new, binaural broadband hearing instrument system. Participants were 36 adults with symmetrical, sensorineural hearing loss (18 experienced hearing instrument users and 18 without prior experience). Participants were fit binaurally in a planned comparison, randomized crossover design study with binaural broadband hearing instruments and advanced digital hearing instruments. Following an adjustment peri...

  4. Neuroanatomical Changes due to Hearing Loss and Chronic Tinnitus: A Combined VBM and DTI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Husain, Fatima T; Medina, Roberto E.; Davis, Caroline W.; Szymko-Bennett, Yvonne; Simonyan, Kristina; Pajor, Nathan M.; Horwitz, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. Tinnitus is often accompanied by hearing loss but not everyone with hearing loss experiences tinnitus. We examined neuroanatomical alterations associated with hearing loss and tinnitus in three groups of subjects: those with hearing loss with tinnitus, those with hearing loss without tinnitus and normal hearing controls without tinnitus. To examine changes in gray matter we used structural MRI scans and voxel...

  5. Infants and Children with Hearing Loss Need Early Language Access

    OpenAIRE

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Moreland, Christopher J.; Napoli, Donna Jo; Osterling, Wendy; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Around 96 percent of children with hearing loss are born to parents with intact hearing,1 who may initially know little about deafness or sign language. Therefore, such parents will need information and support in making decisions about the medical, linguistic, and educational management of their child. Some of these decisions are time-sensitive and irreversible and come at a moment of emotional turmoil and vulnerability (when some parents grieve the toss of a normally hearing child).2 Clinic...

  6. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okokhere Peter O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response.

  7. Epidemiology of Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss with Universal Newborn Hearing Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghogomu, Nsangou; Umansky, Amy; Lieu, Judith E. C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Compare the epidemiology of pediatric Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss before and after implementation of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening in Missouri. Study Design Inception cohort Methods Charts of 134 children born between January 1 1990 and December 31 2007 diagnosed with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss at a single institution in Missouri were reviewed to determine the effects of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening on age of detection and etiology of hearing loss. Results Mean age of detection declined from 4.4 (SD 1.8) to 2.6 (SD 2.6) years of age while rate of detection by six months of age increased from 3% to 42%. The majority (58%) of cases had normal hearing at birth. The most common etiological category was unknown (41%) before screening and congenital (45%) after screening. The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging has increased by 21% (2-fold) while use of Computed Tomography has declined by 8% since 2002. Yields of Connexin, Pendred, electrocardiogram, and syphilis testing were 0/48 and 2/31 before and after screening respectively. Conclusion Implementation of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening in Missouri is associated with a decrease in age of detection of Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss. The majority of cases are either not present or not detectable at birth. The combination of hearing status at birth and imaging findings suggests that the majority of cases are congenital rather than of unknown etiology. PMID:23553416

  8. Genetics of hearing loss: focus on DFNA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominguez LM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Laura M Dominguez, Kelley M DodsonDepartment of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VAAbstract: The purpose of this review is to assess the current literature on deafness nonsyndromic autosomal dominant 2 (DFNA2 hearing loss and the mutations linked to this disorder. Hearing impairment, particularly nonsyndromic hearing loss, affects multiple families across the world. After the identification of the DFNA2 locus on chromosome 1p34, multiple pathogenic mutations in two genes (GJB3 and KCNQ4 have been reported. The overwhelming majority of pathogenic mutations linked to this form of nonsyndromic hearing loss have been identified in the KCNQ4 gene encoding a voltage-gated potassium channel. It is believed that KCNQ4 channels are present in outer hair cells and possibly inner hair cells and the central auditory pathway. This form of hearing loss is both phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous and there are still DFNA2 pedigrees that have not been associated with changes in either GJB3 or KCNQ4, suggesting that a possible third gene exists at this locus. Further studies of the DFNA2 locus will lead to a better understanding of progressive hearing loss and provide a better means of early detection and treatment.Keywords: deafness nonsyndromic autosomal dominant 2, nonsyndromic deafness, genetic hearing loss, GJB3, KCNQ4

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in sporadic congenital hypothyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderschueren-lodeweyckx, M.; Debruyne, F.; Dooms, L.; Eggermont, E.; Eeckels, R.

    1983-01-01

    Hearing acuity was assessed in 45 children with sporadic congenital hypothyroidism during adequate long-term treatment. Otoscopy was performed in each and additional tympanometry in some of them. Secretory otitis media was found in 6 and was treated medically or by inserting grommets in the eardrum. In these children, hearing acuity was assessed after the otitis had been cured. Hearing acuity was measured either by conventional monoaural pure-tone audiometry (125-8000 Hz) or by binaural free ...

  10. A Case of Heroin Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Mario Aulet; Daniel Flis; Jonathan Sillman

    2014-01-01

    A case of a 31-year-old male who developed profound sensorineural hearing loss following a heroin overdose is presented. The patient subsequently had a full recovery of his hearing. Other cases of this rare phenomenon are reviewed and management options are discussed.

  11. Identifying Hearing Loss in Young Children: Technology Replaces the Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiserman, William; Shisler, Lenore

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss can too easily be misdiagnosed or overlooked by providers serving young children. Parents and professionals may observe a language delay--an "invisible" condition--while failing to identify the underlying cause. Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) hearing screening technology, used extensively with newborns, is becoming an essential tool,…

  12. Hearing loss in relation to physical properties of middle ear effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, M L; Zajtchuk, J T; Vap, J G; Paggi, R E

    1980-01-01

    Hearing loss was measured in cats after ligation of the eustachian tube (ET) on one side to produce middle ear effusions. Auditory nerve responses to broad-band clicks were recorded from the ear canal. Plots of N1 response amplitude and latency versus click sound pressure level (SPL) were constructed. Hearing loss was determined as the average displacement along the SPL axis of the latency plot, relative to a previously recorded control series. Viscosity of effusion was measured with a cone and plate viscometer. Specific gravity was measured using a 1 cc pycnometer. Middle ear pressure was assessed tympanographically. After ET ligation, all cats developed negative middle ear pressure within three days and flat (type B) tympanograms within seven days. Hearing loss also developed early and became maximal at about three weeks. Tympanocentesis yielded either thin fluid or glue-like effusions in nearly equal numbers. The data indicate there is not a significant difference between the amount of hearing loss associated with thin fluids or with glue. Viscosity is not clearly related to the duration of time the fluid is present in the middle ear. There is a significant positive correlation between the amount of hearing loss and the volume of fluid present in the middle ear. Thus, the amount of hearing loss appears to depend only on the volume of effusion and is not significantly dependent on other physical properties of the fluid. PMID:6778303

  13. Factors associated with hearing loss among workers of the airline industry in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, O S; Kim, M J

    2001-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major occupational hazard. Occupational noise exposure threatens the hearing of many workers. In addition to noise exposure in the workplace, multiple factors affect individual susceptibility to NIHL. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with hearing loss in airport workers. A cross-sectional epidemiological design was used. Study subjects were 255 high noise-exposed full-time male workers at a large metropolitan airport in Korea. Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, audiological assessment, and a record review of baseline hearing and noise levels of locations where the employee worked. The result of multivariate analysis showed that both occupational noise exposure (noise exposure level, years of noise exposure) and personal risk factors including non-occupational noise exposure, history of ear disease, ototoxic drug use, cigarette smoking, hypertension, and use of hearing protective devices (HPDs) were significantly associated with hearing loss. An aggressive hearing conservation program is needed at the airport, emphasizing both job-related noise exposure and personal risk factors for hearing loss. PMID:12024523

  14. Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Newborns Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Pourarian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing is essential for humans to communicate with one another. Early diagnosis of hearing loss and intervention in neonates and infants can reduce developmental problems. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of hearing impairment in newborns admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU and analyze the associated risk factors.   Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of hearing loss in neonates who were admitted to the NICU at Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between January 2006 and January 2007. Auditory function was examined using otoacoustic emission (OAE followed by auditory brainstem response (ABR tests. Relevant potential risk factors were considered and neonates with a family history of hearing loss and craniofacial abnormality were excluded. For statistical analysis logistic regression, the chi-squared test, and Fisher’s exact test were used.    Results: Among the 124 neonates included in the study, 17 (13.7% showed hearing loss in the short term. There was a significant statistical relationship between gestational age of less than 36 weeks (P=0.013, antibiotic therapy (P= 0.033, oxygen therapy (P=0.04, and hearing loss. On the contrary, there was no significant relationship between hearing loss and use of a ventilator, or the presence of sepsis, hyperbilirubinemia, congenial heart disease, transient tachypnea of newborn, congenital pneumonia, or respiratory distress syndrome.  Conclusion: Auditory function in neonates who are admitted to a NICU, especially those treated with oxygenor antibiotics and those born prematurely, should be assessed during their stay in hospital. The importance of early diagnosis of hearing loss and intervention in these neonates and avoidance of any unnecessary oxygenor antibiotic therapy needs to be further promoted.

  15. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Its Relationship With Hearing Loss in Children: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sharifian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA, a substantial fraction of the patients have progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This coexistence is due to the mutations of a gene expressed both in the kidney and in the cochlea. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between hearing loss and DRTA.Materials and Methods. In this study, 51 children diagnosed with renal tubular acidosis were evaluated. Diagnosis of DRTA was based on clinical manifestations and detection of normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, urine pH higher than 5.5, and positive urinary anion gap. Audiometry was performed in children with DRTA and sequencing of the ATP6V1B1 gene was done for those with sensorineural hearing loss.Results. Twenty-seven patients (52.9% had DRTA, of whom 51.9% were younger than 1 year old, 55.6% were boys, and 44.4% were girls. Eleven patients (40.7% had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, consisting of 5 of 15 boys (33.3% and 6 of 12 girls (50.0%. There was no correlation between hearing loss and gender. Three patients with hearing loss had mutation in the ATP6V1B1 gene (11.1% of patients with DRTA and 27.3% of patients with DRTA and hearing loss.Conclusions. This study indicated that a significant percentage of the children with DRTA had sensorineural hearing loss and mutation in ATP6V1B1 gene. It is recommended to investigate hearing impairment in all children with DRTA.

  16. Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Zojaji

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXS occurs due to the deposition of extracellular fibrillar materials on the anterior chamber of the eye. This syndrome has been considered to be part of a systemic disease with the potential involvement of the inner ear called sensoroneural hearing loss (SNHL.  In this study, we aimed on evaluating SNHL within PXS patients in Iran to compare them with other international reports. Materials and Methods: In total, 33 patients with PXS and 33 age and sex matched controls were enrolled prospectively in a case-control study. Both groups underwent complete ophthalmologic and otorhinolaryngologic examinations and pure tone audiometry (PTA testing. Six frequencies (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 KHz were evaluated for PTA in the same ethnic group in order to select the case and control individuals. Data were analyzed using t-test and chi-square test. Results: Forty-nine out of 66 ears (75.2% in the PXS group and 27 ears (40.9% in the control group had SNHL (P

  17. Efficient estimates of cochlear hearing loss parameters in individual listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Jepsen, Morten LØve

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the level corresponding to the knee-point of the basilar membrane (BM) input/output (I/O) function can be used to estimate the amount of inner- and outer hair-cell loss (IHL, OHL) in listeners with a moderate cochlear hearing impairment Plack et al. (2004). According to Jepsen and Dau (2011) IHL + OHL = HLT [dB], where HLT stands for total hearing loss. Hence having estimates of the total hearing loss and OHC loss, one can estimate the IHL. In the present study, results from forward masking experiments based on temporal masking curves (TMC; Nelson et al., 2001) are presented and used to estimate the knee-point level and the compression ratio of the I/O function. A time-efficient paradigm based on the single-interval-up-down method (SIUD; Lecluyse and Meddis (2009)) was used. In contrast with previous studies, the present study used only on-frequency TMCs to derive estimates of the knee-point level. Further, it is explored whether it is possible to estimate the compression ratio using only on-frequency TMCs. 10 normal-hearing and 10 hearing-impaired listeners (with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss) were tested at 1, 2 and 4 kHz. The results showed a reasonable reliability and may be applicable to individualized hearing-aid fitting. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

  18. Epistemics in audiological consultations : Divergent conceptualizations of 'hearing' in healthcare encounters between hearing aid acoustitians and patients with hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria

    Adult-onset hearing loss affects more than 20% of citizens in the US and in the EU. This second most frequent disability (World Health Organization 2001) is mostly due to aging and noise exposure ('sensorineural'). Although usage of hearing aids effectively increases life quality (Joore et al. 2003; Anteunis 2002), in many western countries, only 15% of those who could benefit from this technology use it, e.g. in the USA, Switzerland, and Finland (Bisgaard 2009). Technological innovation has not helped improve uptake. A longitudional interview study indicates that one barrier to hearing aid acceptance seems to lie in healthcare interactions: 88% of patients with hearing loss accessing the German healthcare system do not complete rehabilitation; the average time between first diagnosis and use of hearing aids is 8-10 years (Meis & Gabriel 2006). The present study contributes to an emering body of CA work on healthcare encounters with hearing loss which show that communication problems occur frequently between healthcare professionals and patients (e.g. Skelt 2006, Laakso 2011-2014, Ruusuvuori 2011-2014; Brouwer 2012, Heinemann et al. 2012, Egbert 2013). The presentation, based on 12 hours of naturally-occurring, video-taped audiological interactions in German, focuses on a specific communication problem which is due to an asymmetricity in "epistemic domains" (Stivers & Rossano 2010:8) in that divergences in the professional's and the patients' conceptualizations of hearing emerge and are frequently not resolved. The goal of these audiological consulations is to select and fit the best possible hearing aid for clients with hearing loss. In order to achieve this goal, audiologists routinely rely on their technological and medical knowledge, the results of a pure-tone audiogram, and the clients' subjective descriptions of hearing experiences in different environments. In these consultations, the institutional conceptualization of hearing (and thus of hearing loss) is that of an objectively measurable functioning of the ear, categorized in an audiogram by decibels and hertz. In contrast, persons with hearing loss perceive of their hearing, even during audiograms, as less precise and more varied. When asked by the audiologist about hearing experiences in different settings (e.g. dyadic conversation, multiperson interaction, telephone, outdoors, train station), the descriptions by clients are diffuse, broad, and metaphorical. Compared to visual impairment, describing hearing seems to be more difficult, and frequently, persons with hearing impairment resort to visual metaphors. A CA examination of conversational order in the areas of turn-taking, sequence, repair, topic, multimodality, and linguistic resources yields partial results for these audiological data, and including epistemics in the analysis achieves to 'grasp' the phenomenon more fully. CA research "into epistemics focuses on the knowledge claims that interactants assert, contest and defend in and through turns-at-talk and sequences of interaction” (Heritage 2013:370). Given that the audiologist and the patient frequently do not achieve a shared knowledge of the patient's hearing loss, these institutional encounters appear to be highly problematic in that the imbalance is not resolved. “(W)hen a speaker indicates that there is an imbalance of information between speaker and hearer, this indication is sufficient to motivate and warrant a sequence of interaction that will be closed when the imbalance is acknowledged as equalized for all practical purposes” (Heritage 2012: 32). The presentation concludes with connecting the interactional problems at the micro-level of direct healthcare encounters to the macro-level and globel problems of the impact of untreated hearing loss. The social repercussions are stigmatization, miscommunication, loss of work, social isolation, depression, and suicide (Carmen 2001). The financial loss per person dropping out of work due to hearing loss is estimated at 200,000 US Dollars (World Health Organization 2001). In Europe, the econmi

  19. Auditory Evoked Potential Response and Hearing Loss: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulraj, M. P; Subramaniam, Kamalraj; Yaccob, Sazali Bin; Adom, Abdul H. Bin; Hema, C. R

    2015-01-01

    Hypoacusis is the most prevalent sensory disability in the world and consequently, it can lead to impede speech in human beings. One best approach to tackle this issue is to conduct early and effective hearing screening test using Electroencephalogram (EEG). EEG based hearing threshold level determination is most suitable for persons who lack verbal communication and behavioral response to sound stimulation. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is a type of EEG signal emanated from the brain scalp by an acoustical stimulus. The goal of this review is to assess the current state of knowledge in estimating the hearing threshold levels based on AEP response. AEP response reflects the auditory ability level of an individual. An intelligent hearing perception level system enables to examine and determine the functional integrity of the auditory system. Systematic evaluation of EEG based hearing perception level system predicting the hearing loss in newborns, infants and multiple handicaps will be a priority of interest for future research. PMID:25893012

  20. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  1. Audiological issues and hearing loss among Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oleksiak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prevalence, severity, etiology, and treatment of audiology problems among Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI. A retrospective chart review was performed of 250 Veterans with mild TBI. Results of a comprehensive second-level mild TBI evaluation and subsequent visits to audiology were evaluated. We found the vast majority (87% of Veterans reported some level of hearing disturbance and those involved in blast injuries reported a higher incidence of hearing disturbance than those with other injury etiologies. Audiology referrals were given to 75 Veterans and 37 attended. At this visit, Veterans reported tinnitus (75.7% and hearing loss (59.8%. Nearly half (48.6% of Veterans were diagnosed with conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, or central auditory dysfunction. An additional 24.3% of Veterans had subclinical levels of auditory dysfunction. Our study has highlighted the increased prevalence of hearing loss among OIF/OEF Veterans and, thus, the need for appropriate referrals and treatment. Strategies to address perceived stigma associated with hearing loss may increase attendance at follow-up visits. Additionally, while only a third of audiograms were found to be abnormal, advanced testing resulted in a significant percentage of our population being diagnosed with auditory dysfunction.

  2. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    OpenAIRE

    Plontke, S.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined...

  3. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory

  4. Urografin in the Treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Totonchi, Javad S.; Mohammad Nejadkazem; Kamyar Ghabili; Seyed Esmail Ayat; Rad, Shabnam R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to find out whether combined treatment of intravenous urografin and corticosteroid has a therapeutic advantage over oral corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL). The design of the study was an interventional and controlled clinical trial. Between 2003 and 2005, patients with SSNHL were treated in our center in Tabriz, Iran. Patients were selected if they had a hearing loss of at least 30 dB in at least 3 freque...

  5. Molecular Investigation of Pediatric Portuguese Patients with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Amp Lia Nogueira, C.; Miguel Coutinho; Cristina Pereira; Alessandra Tessa; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Laura Vilarinho

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is one of the most common disabilities in human, and genetics is an important aspect in research and clinical practice for SNHL. One in 1000 children is born with bilateral SNHL, and 50-70% of them have monogenic causes for their deafness. Hereditary hearing loss can be classified into syndromic and nonsyndromic depending on the associated features. Whilst over 400 genetic syndromes have been described in association with mono- or bilatera...

  6. Temporal bone computed tomography findings in bilateral sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Bamiou, D.; Phelps, P.; Sirimanna, T.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To examine the yield of computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bones when investigating sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and to identify factors associated with CT findings.?METHODS—Retrospective analysis of 116 consecutively investigated children with bilateral SNHL at the audiology department of Great Ormond Street Hospital, London. Main outcome measures were CT results, hearing loss parameters, history, and clinical examination.?RESULTS—A total of 33 (...

  7. Streptococcus suis Meningitis with Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Hee Jae; Park, Kyoung-jin; Jang, Ja-hyun; Lee, Mina; Lee, Jang Ho; Ahn, Yoon Hee; Kang, Cheol-in; Ki, Chang-seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis infection is an emerging zoonosis in Asia. The most common disease manifestation is meningitis, which is often associated with hearing loss and cochleovestibular signs. S. suis infection in humans mainly occurs among risk groups that have frequent exposure to pigs or raw pork. Here, we report a case of S. suis meningitis in a 67-yr-old pig carcass handler, who presented with dizziness and sensorineural hearing loss followed by headaches. Gram-positive diplococci were isolat...

  8. Early detection of infant hearing loss in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, Wet

    2009-01-01

    Every day close to 2 000 babies are born with or acquire permanent bilateral hearing loss within the first few weeks of life, and at least 90% of them live in developing countries like South Africa. Infant hearing loss is undetectable by routine clinical examination, and if screening is not provided it is only identified after critical developmental periods for language acquisition have passed. The far-reaching effect of late identification is evident in poor linguistic, cognitive and socio-e...

  9. Challenges and successes in recruiting firefighters for hearing loss prevention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, OiSaeng; Fiola, Lauren Ann; Feld, Jamie

    2013-06-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a significant occupational health problem in the United States, affecting more than 1 million firefighters. Noise hazards include vehicles, sirens, and power tools. Additionally, firefighters are commonly exposed to ototoxic chemicals. Because the use of hearing protection is not universally required for firefighters, firefighters must be educated about NIHL to ensure they take personal responsibility for hearing loss prevention. This study discusses challenges associated with recruiting firefighters to participate in a randomized, controlled trial testing a web-based hearing protection training program. Successful recruitment strategies included collaboration with key stakeholders, a flexible and convenient computer-based intervention, expansion to multiple recruitment sites, and interactive outreach to potential participants. Future research should use quantitative methods to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of specific recruitment strategies to facilitate firefighter enrollment in research studies. Developing and testing effective hearing protection interventions for firefighters is a crucial first step toward preventing NIHL in this population. PMID:23701004

  10. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Cintra Lopes1, , , ,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type of hearing loss, it is evident the importance of preventive and conferences aimed at preserving hearing and health as a whole. Objective: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in audiometry admission of drivers. Methods: Retrospective study. By 76 charts of professional drivers in leased transport companies. We analyzed data from specific interview and pure tone audiometry. Results: The prevalence of abnormal tests was 22.36% with the lowest thresholds for tritonal average of 3,000, 4,000 and 6,000 Hz. The higher the age, the higher thresholds. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the occurrence of hearing in the absence of complaints. Considering that PAIR is preventable, justifies the importance of coordinated and multidisciplinary involving not only health teams and safety, but also the institutions involved in preserving the health of workers, as the team SESMET, unions or prosecutors.

  11. Progressive hearing loss and increased susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in mice carrying a Cdh23 but not a Myo7a mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Ralph H; Steel, Karen P

    2004-03-01

    Exposure to intense noise can damage the stereocilia of sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Since stereocilia play a vital role in the transduction of sound from a mechanical stimulus into an electrical one, this pathology is thought to contribute to noise-induced hearing loss. Mice homozygous for null mutations in either the myosin VIIa ( Myo7a) or cadherin 23 ( Cdh23) genes are deaf and have disorganized stereocilia bundles. We show that mice heterozygous for a presumed null allele of Cdh23 ( Cdh23(v)) have low- and high-frequency hearing loss at 5-6 weeks of age, the high-frequency component of which worsens with increasing age. We also show that noise-induced hearing loss in 11-12-week-old Cdh23(v) heterozygotes is two times greater than for wild-type littermates. Interestingly, these effects are dependent upon the genetic background on which the Cdh23(v) mutation is carried. Noise-induced hearing loss in 11-12-week-old mice heterozygous for a null allele of Myo7a ( Myo7a(4626SB)) is not significantly different from wild-type littermates. CDH23 is the first gene known to cause deafness in the human population to be linked with predisposition to noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:14648237

  12. Hearing loss as an unusual consequence of metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CE Owers

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A sixty-one year old man was referred with a history of progressive dysphagia, vomiting and weight loss with some back pain. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsies revealed a gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Despite the absence of metastatic disease on computed tomography, positron emission tomography demonstrated multiple vertebral and sternal deposits. He was reviewed in an ENT clinic with a sudden onset of hearing loss accompanied by dizziness, but no focal neurology. Magnetic resonance imaging identified bilateral 2cm lesions at the internal auditory meatus, consistent with a diagnosis of bilateral acoustic neuromas. The patient subsequently died of carcinomatosis and, because of the potential familial significance of bilateral acoustic neuromas, a limited post-mortem examination was carried out. Unexpectedly, this revealed bilateral adenocarcinoma metastases infiltrating the internal auditory meatus affecting the acoustic nerves. The authors believe this a very rare presentation of metastatic gastric disease.

  13. Word Recognition for Temporally and Spectrally Distorted Materials : The Effects of Age and Hearing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Sherri L.; Pichora-Fuller, Margaret Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of Experiment 1 was to measure word recognition in younger adults with normal hearing when speech or babble was temporally or spectrally distorted. In Experiment 2, older listeners with near-normal hearing and with hearing loss (for pure tones) were tested to evaluate their susceptibility to changes in speech level and distortion types. The results across groups and listening conditions were compared to assess the extent to which the effects of the distortions on word recognition resembled the effects of age-related differences in auditory processing or pure-tone hearing loss. Design: In Experiment 1, word recognition was measured in 16 younger adults with normal hearing using Northwestern University Auditory Test No. 6 words in quiet and the Words-in-Noise test distorted by temporal jittering, spectral smearing, or combined jittering and smearing. Another 16 younger adults were evaluated in four conditions using the Words-in-Noise test in combinations of unaltered or jittered speech and unaltered or jittered babble. In Experiment 2, word recognition in quiet and in babble was measured in 72 older adults with near-normal hearing and 72 older adults with hearing loss in four conditions: unaltered, jittered, smeared, and combined jittering and smearing. Results: For the listeners in Experiment 1, word recognition was poorer in the distorted conditions compared with the unaltered condition. The signal to noise ratio at 50% correct word recognition was 4.6 dB for the unaltered condition, 6.3 dB for the jittered, 6.8 dB for the smeared, 6.9 dB for the double-jitter, and 8.2 dB for the combined jitter-smear conditions. Jittering both the babble and speech signals did not significantly reduce performance compared with jittering only the speech. In Experiment 2, the older listeners with near-normal hearing and hearing loss performed best in the unaltered condition, followed by the jitter and smear conditions, with the poorest performance in the combined jitter-smear condition in both quiet and noise. Overall, listeners with near-normal hearing performed better than listeners with hearing loss by similar to 30% in quiet and similar to 6 dB in noise. In the quiet distorted conditions, when the level of the speech was increased, performance improved for the hearing loss group, but decreased for the older group with near-normal hearing. Recognition performance of younger listeners in the jitter-smear condition and the performance of older listeners with near-normal hearing in the unaltered conditions were similar. Likewise, the performance of older listeners with near-normal hearing in the jitter-smear condition and the performance of older listeners with hearing loss in the unaltered conditions were similar. Conclusions: The present experiments advance our understanding regarding how spectral or temporal distortions of the fine structure of speech affect word recognition in older listeners with and without clinically significant hearing loss. The Speech Intelligibility Index was able to predict group differences, but not the effects of distortion. Individual differences in performance were similar across all distortion conditions with both age and hearing loss being implicated. The speech materials needed to be both spectrally and temporally distorted to mimic the effects of age-related differences in auditory processing and hearing loss.

  14. Comparação entre critérios de recuperação auditiva na perda neurossensorial súbita Comparison of hearing recovery criteria in sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paganini Inoue

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inúmeros métodos de análise da recuperação auditiva na perda auditiva neurossensorial súbita idiopática (PANSI dificultam a comparação adequada dos diversos tratamentos encontrados na Literatura. OBJETIVO: Comparar diversos critérios de recuperação auditiva na PANSI, baseados na Literatura. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo clínico observacional de coorte, a partir de um protocolo prospectivo, em pacientes com PANSI, atendidos entre 2000 e 2010. Foram comparados cinco critérios de recuperação auditiva significativa e quatro critérios para recuperação completa, pela audiometria tonal, por meio de teste não paramétrico e de comparações múltiplas, ambos com um nível de significância de 5%. Após determinação do critério de recuperação auditiva mais rígido, foram adicionados parâmetros da audiometria vocal. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença significativa, entre esses critérios (p The countless methods available to analyze hearing recovery in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL cases hinder the comparison of the various treatments found in the literature. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to compare the different criteria for hearing recovery in ISSHL found in the literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is an observational clinical cohort study from a prospective protocol in patients with ISSHL, treated between 2000 and 2010. Five criteria were considered for significant hearing recovery and four for complete recovery by pure tone audiometry, using non-parametric tests and multiple comparisons at a significance level of 5%. After determining the stricter criteria for hearing recovery, vocal audiometry parameters were added. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the criteria (p < 0.001 as they were analyzed together. Mild auditory recovery occurred in only 35 (27.6% patients. When speech audiometry was added, only 34 patients (26.8% showed significant improvement. CONCLUSIONS: There is a lack of consistency among the criteria used for hearing recovery. The criterion of change of functional category by one degree into at least mild hearing recovery was the stricter. Speech audiometry did not prove essential to define significant hearing recovery.

  15. User Centered Design : From understanding hearing loss and hearing technologies towards understanding interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria; Matthews, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary approach of User Centered Design is presented here with a focus on innovation in the design and use of hearing technologies as well as on the potential of innovation in interaction. This approach is geared towards developing new products, systems, technologies and practices based on an understanding of why so few persons with hearing loss use the highly advanced hearing technologies. In integrating Conversation Analysis (“CA”), audiology and User Centered Design, three disciplines which are collaborating together for the first time, we are addressing the following questions: Who is the user? What are the interactional situations in which hearing loss and hearing aids are relevant? How can Conversation Analysis contribute to innovation? What are the challenges in such a collaboration?

  16. Determinants of Conductive Hearing Loss in Tympanic Membrane Perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanaro; Hong, Seung No; Kim, Hyo Sang; Han, Jae Joon; Chung, Juyong; Seo, Myung-Whan; Oh, Seung-Ha; Chang, Sun-O

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tympanic membrane perforations are common, but there have been few studies of the factors determining the extent of the resulting conductive hearing loss. The aims of this study were to determine whether the size of tympanic membrane perforation, pneumatization of middle ear & mastoid cavity, and location of perforation were correlated with air-bone gap (ABG) of patients. Methods Forty-two patients who underwent tympanoplasty type I or myringoplasty were included and preoperative audiometry were analyzed. Digital image processing was applied in computed tomography for the estimation of middle ear & mastoid pneumatization volume and tympanic membrane photograph for the evaluation of perforation size and location. Results Preoperative mean ABG increased with perforation size (P=0.018), and correlated inversely with the middle ear & mastoid volume (P=0.005). However, perforations in anterior versus posterior locations showed no significant differences in mean ABG (P=0.924). Conclusion The degree of conductive hearing loss resulting from a tympanic membrane perforation would be expected with the size of perforation and pneumatization of middle ear and mastoid. PMID:26045905

  17. Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive abilities in elderly persons with hearing aids fitted at the initial stages of hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    M. Shiroma; Harashima, T; C. Obuchi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relation between the use of hearing aids at the initial stages of hearing loss and age-related changes in the auditory and cognitive abilities of elderly persons. 12 healthy elderly persons participated in an annual auditory and cognitive longitudinal examination for three years. According to their hearing level, they were divided into 3 subgroups - the normal hearing group, the hearing loss without hearing aids group, and the hearing loss with hearing aids ...

  18. Survey on hearing aid outcome in Switzerland: associations with type of fitting (bilateral/unilateral), level of hearing aid signal processing, and hearing loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli, S; Bodmer, D.; Probst, R

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation further analysed results of a previously reported survey with a large sample of hearing aid owners (Bertoli et al, 2009) to determine the individual and technological factors related to hearing aid outcome. In particular the associations of hearing loss, level of signal processing, and fitting type (bilateral versus unilateral fitting) with hearing aid use, satisfaction with and management of the aid were evaluated. A sub-group with symmetrical hearing loss was analy...

  19. Perda auditiva induzida pelo ruído em trabalhadores de metalúrgica / Noise induced hearing loss in metallurgical workers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Simone Adad, Araújo.

    2002-05-13

    Full Text Available Introdução: A perda auditiva induzida pelo ruído é uma patologia insidiosa cumulativa, que cresce ao longo dos anos de exposição ao ruído associado ao ambiente de trabalho. Objetivos: Identificar e quantificar a ocorrência de alterações auditivas sugestivas de Perda Auditiva Induzida pelo Ruído e os [...] principais sintomas otorrinolaringológicos referidos pelos trabalhadores. Forma de estudo: prospectivo clínico randomizado. Casuística e métodos: Pesquisa realizada no período de janeiro a março de 2000 com 187 trabalhadores de indústria metalúrgica no município de Goiânia, avaliados por médicos otorrinolaringologistas através de roteiro de entrevista e audiometria ocupacional. Resultados: Foram obtidas audiometrias ocupacionais sendo: 21% sugestivas de PAIR, 72%, normais e 7%, sugestivas de outras doenças auditivas. Os sintomas auditivos mais freqüentes foram: dificuldade de compreensão da fala, 12%; hipoacusia, 7%; tinitus, 13%; sensação de plenitude auricular, 4%; otorreia, 6%; tonturas, 12%. Conclusão: Concluímos que em metalúrgica há ocorrência de alterações auditivas sugestivas de Perda Auditiva Induzida pelo Ruído e queixa de sintomas otorrinolaringológicos significativos. Abstract in english Introduction: Noise induced hearing loss is a cumulative pathological disease that increases over the years with exposure to noise associated with the work atmosphere. Objectives: To identify and quantify the occurrence of hearing loss suggestive of Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) and the principl [...] e otolaryngological symptoms referred to by workers. Study design: prospective clinical randomized. Material and method: Research was carried out from January to March of 2000 with 187 metallurgical workers in the city of Goiânia, who were evaluated by otolaryngologists by means of a combination of interviews and occupational hearing exams. Results: Occupational hearing tests results were: 21% suggestive of NIHL, 72% normal, and 7% suggestive of other hearing impairments. The most frequent hearing symptoms were: difficulty of comprehension in speaking 12%, Hearing loss 7%, Tinnitus 13%, Auricular fullness feeling 4%, Effusion 6%, and Dizziness 12%. Conclusion: We concluded that in metallurgist exists an occurrence of hearing loss suggestive of NIHL and complaints of significant otolaryngological symptoms.

  20. Hearing loss in otitis media with effusion- types and management- a study of hundred cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction- Serous Ottis media or otitis media with effusion is a common cause of hearing loss of acute onset. The common presentation will be a block or reduced hearing possible after a travel or flight. Most of the cases present with conductive hearing loss while some may present with mixed or even pure sensory hearing loss. Background- we study hundred patients diagnosed with serous otitis media for the type of hearing loss and characterize the management strategy. Conclusion- Serous otitis media is a common cause of hearing loss which is mostly conductive and is amenable to treatment while some rare cases which may persist may require assistive hearing with amplification. Although sensorineral hearing loss is rare in otitis media, it is seen in practice along with mixed hearing loss. The pathophysiology of the neural affection of hearing loss remains a mystery although many theories exist.

  1. Optimization of frequency lowering algorithms for getting the highest speech intelligibility improvement by hearing loss simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ar?öz, Umut; Günel, Banu

    2015-06-01

    High frequency hearing loss is a growing problem for both children and adults. To overcome this impairment, different frequency lowering methods (FLMs) were tried from 1930s, however no satisfaction was provided up to now. In this study, for getting higher speech intelligibility, eight combinations of FLMs which were designed originally were tried with simulated sounds onto normal hearing subjects. These improvements were calculated by the difference with standard hearing aid method, amplification. High frequency hearing loss was simulated with the combined suprathreshold effects. An offline study was carried out for each subject for determining the significant methods used in modified rhyme test (MRT) (Subjective measure for intelligibility). Significant methods were determined according to their speech intelligibility index (SII) (Objective measure for intelligibility). All different cases were tried under four noisy environments and a noise free environment. Twelve hearing impaired subjects were simulated by hearing loss simulation (HLS). MRT was developed for Turkish language as a first time. As the results of improvements, total 71 cases were statistically significant for twelve subjects. Eighty-three percent success of FLMs was achieved against amplification for being an alternative method of amplification in noisy environments. For four subjects, all significant methods gave higher improvements than amplification. As conclusion, specific method recommendations for different noisy environments were done for each subject for getting more speech intelligibility. PMID:25894599

  2. Prevalence and mechanisms of hearing loss in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker-Davis, F; Skarulis, M C; Pikus, A; Ishizawar, D; Mastroianni, M A; Koby, M; Weintraub, B D

    1996-08-01

    Hearing impairment was anecdotally reported in resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH), a condition caused by mutations in the beta-thyroid hormone receptor (beta TR) gene. Because of its ontogenic distribution in the cochlea, the beta TR may have a pivotal role in the development of auditory function. To assess the prevalence and mechanisms of hearing impairment in RTH, 82 RTH-positive (RTH+) patients and 55 unaffected relatives (RTH-) underwent systematic audiological examination, including puretone and speech reception thresholds, and tests studying middle ear (tympanometry and acoustic reflexes), cochlear (otoacoustic emissions), and retrocochlear integrity (brain stem auditory evoked potentials). Significant hearing loss was present in 21% of RTH+ patients vs. none in RTH- patients. More RTH+ patients had abnormal tympanometry (34% vs. 12%) and abnormal acoustic reflexes (39% vs. 19%). Isolated conductive deficit was found in 7 of 17 RTH+ patients with hearing loss, isolated sensorineural deficit in 7 cases, and mixed deficit in 3 cases. Cochlear dysfunction was found in 50% of all RTH+ patients, with or without hearing loss. Retrocochlear function was normal. No morphological cochlear abnormalities were detected on computed tomography of the temporal bone. In conclusion, hearing loss is a significant problem in RTH, with an equal frequency of conductive (probably related to the frequent ear infections) and sensorineural deficits. Abnormal otoacoustic emissions suggest that the mutant beta TR has a specific negative impact on cochlear function. PMID:8768826

  3. Age-Related Hearing Loss in Rhesus Monkeys Is Correlated with Cochlear Histopathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Engle, James R.; Tinling, Steve; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Audiometric hearing deficits are a common symptom of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), as are specific histopathological changes in the cochlea; however, very little data have been collected in non-human primates. To examine this relationship further, we collected auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) from rhesus monkeys spanning in age from 10 to 35 years old, and examined four different morphological features of their cochleae. We found significant correlations between ABR thresholds and the l...

  4. First Information Parents Receive After UNHS Detection of Their Baby???s Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Matthijs, Liesbeth; Loots, Gerrit; Mouvet, Kimberley; Van Herreweghe, Mieke; Hardonk, Stefan; Van Hove, Geert; Van Puyvelde, Martine; Leigh, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The first information parents receive after referral through Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) has significant consequences for later care-related decisions they take and thus for the future of the child with a hearing loss. In this study, 11 interviews were conducted with a representative sample of Flemish service providers to discover (a) the content of the information provided to parents and (b) the service providers??? assumptions and beliefs concerning deafness and care. To do t...

  5. Ear Infection and Hearing Loss Amongst Headphone Users

    OpenAIRE

    Mazlan, R.; Saim, L.; Thomas, A.; Said, R.; Liyab, B.

    2002-01-01

    The use of headphone has been thought to cause infection in the ear canal and contribute to hearing loss. In this study, we examined 136 Customer Service Representative from Celcom (Malaysia) Sdn. Bhd. who use headphone throughout their working hours. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of ear canal infection and other related diseases of the ear, nose and throat. Their hearing thresholds were also determined using the Amplaid 309 Clinical Audiometer. We found no inciden...

  6. Auditory Cortex Signs of Age-Related Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Eckert, Mark A.; Cute, Stephanie L.; Vaden, Kenneth I.; Kuchinsky, Stefanie E.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss, or presbyacusis, is a major public health problem that causes communication difficulties and is associated with diminished quality of life. Limited satisfaction with hearing aids, particularly in noisy listening conditions, suggests that central nervous system declines occur with presbyacusis and may limit the efficacy of interventions focused solely on improving audibility. This study of 49 older adults (M?=?69.58, SD?=?8.22 years; 29 female) was designed t...

  7. Hearing Loss Raises Excitability in the Auditory Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Kotak, Vibhakar C; Fujisawa, Sho; Lee, Fanyee Anja; Karthikeyan, Omkar; AOKI, CHIYE; Sanes, Dan H.

    2005-01-01

    Developmental hearing impairments compromise sound discrimination, speech acquisition, and cognitive function; however, the adjustments of functional properties in the primary auditory cortex (A1) remain unknown. We induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in developing gerbils and then reared the animals for several days. The intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons were subsequently examined in a thalamocortical brain slice preparation with whole-cell recor...

  8. Hearing loss in otitis media with effusion- types and management- a study of hundred cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram Nathan; Minutha R

    2012-01-01

    Introduction- Serous Ottis media or otitis media with effusion is a common cause of hearing loss of acute onset. The common presentation will be a block or reduced hearing possible after a travel or flight. Most of the cases present with conductive hearing loss while some may present with mixed or even pure sensory hearing loss. Background- we study hundred patients diagnosed with serous otitis media for the type of hearing loss and characterize the management strategy. Conclusion- Serous oti...

  9. Resolution of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Following a Roller Coaster Ride

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Aman; Sinha, Amrita; Al-waa, Ahmad M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset during an aeroplane flight, which completely resolved during a roller coaster ride at Alton Towers theme park. A review of the literature concerning sudden idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and spontaneous resolution are discussed. Initially, pure-tone audiometry showed a profound sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and mild sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear (of note, the hearing was normal p...

  10. Compensatory changes in cortical resource allocation in adults with hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    JuliaCampbell

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss has been linked to many types of cognitive decline in adults, including an association between hearing loss severity and dementia. However, it remains unclear whether cortical re-organization associated with hearing loss occurs in early stages of hearing decline and in early stages of auditory processing. In this study, we examined compensatory plasticity in adults with mild-moderate hearing loss using obligatory, passively-elicited, cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP). H...

  11. Intratympanic injection of dexamethasone for treatment of tinnitus in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Nakashima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe tinnitus in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL. We studied 37 patients who received intratympanic dexamethasone injections and 14 control patients who did not receive it, with severe tinnitus after onset of unilateral sudden SNHL. Hearing level did not change during this study in any patient. The relationship between the duration of tinnitus and effectiveness of treatment was investigated in sudden SNHL. We used a visual analogue scale to evaluate 51 patients with severe tinnitus at the stage of stable hearing level after idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Forty-one per cent of patients showed significant improvement after treatment. The average period between onset of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and initiation of intratympanic dexamethasone injection was significantly shorter (207 days in the improved group than in the unchanged group (482 days (P<0.001. In control group, one of 14 patients presented significant improvement spontaneously. Intratympanic dexamethasone treatment may be effective in treatment of severe tinnitus after sudden SNHL at the stage of stable hearing level, and the shorter the period from onset of sudden deafness to the start of intratympanic dexamethasone treatment, the greater the improvement in tinnitus that can be expected.

  12. Correlation between hearing loss and the results of the following questionnaires: Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Adults - Screening Version HHIA-S and Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly - Screening Version - HHIE-S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menegotto, Isabela Hoffmeister

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The self-assessment questionnaires are useful to measure the emotional and social/transient consequences resulting from hearing loss, and they can be used in a wide range of situations in the clinical routine, such as auditory screening. Objective: Check the sensitivity and specificities of HHIA-S and HHIE-S questionnaires to identify a hearing loss and their usages in auditory screenings, as well as analyze the ability of these questionnaires to detect different degrees of hearing impairments in the studied people. Method: Retrospective study with 51 individuals aged between 18 and 88, who filled out the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults Screening Version - HHIA-S and Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly Screening Version - HHIE-S questionnaires at the waiting room of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS's otorhinolaryngology infirmary. Results: The instruments showed a low sensitivity (47%, not identifying individuals with a hearing loss; however, they showed a high specificity (75%, accurately identifying individuals with no hearing disorder. Moreover, no significant association between the degree of hearing loss and the constraint degree for participation was found. Conclusion: the aforementioned questionnaires revealed a low sensitivity and a high specificity, proving to be ineffective for auditory screenings in a group with previous hearing complaints in addition to being unable to detect different types and degrees of hearing impairment.

  13. Pegylated interferon/ribavirin-associated sudden hearing loss in a patient with chronic hepatitis C in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cassia Jacintho Mendes-Corrêa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden hearing loss is defined as a sensorineural hearing loss, equal to or greater than 30 dB, at three or more consecutive frequencies, which takes place within 72 hours. Both peginterferon and ribavirin are well-known to be associated with significant adverse effects, but sudden hearing loss is uncommon. We report a 65-year-old male patient who developed sudden-onset hearing loss during combination therapy with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Peginterferon and ribavirin may cause sudden hearing loss that may not recover after discontinuation of therapy. Immediate treatment for all possible etiologies is essential, along with targeted investigations and early referral for an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist. Physicians should be aware of the possible ototoxic effects of peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy requiring appropriate surveillance.

  14. Pegylated interferon/ribavirin-associated sudden hearing loss in a patient with chronic hepatitis C in Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria Cassia Jacintho, Mendes-Corrêa; Roseli Saraiva Moreira, Bittar; Norma, Salmito; Jeanne, Oiticica.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden hearing loss is defined as a sensorineural hearing loss, equal to or greater than 30 dB, at three or more consecutive frequencies, which takes place within 72 hours. Both peginterferon and ribavirin are well-known to be associated with significant adverse effects, but sudden hearing loss is u [...] ncommon. We report a 65-year-old male patient who developed sudden-onset hearing loss during combination therapy with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Peginterferon and ribavirin may cause sudden hearing loss that may not recover after discontinuation of therapy. Immediate treatment for all possible etiologies is essential, along with targeted investigations and early referral for an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist. Physicians should be aware of the possible ototoxic effects of peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy requiring appropriate surveillance.

  15. Sensorineural hearing loss after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thongyai Kanthong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is one of the major long term side effects from radiation therapy (RT in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC patients. This study aims to review the incidences of SNHL when treating with different radiation techniques. The additional objective is to determine the relationship of the SNHL with the radiation doses delivered to the inner ear. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 134 individual ears from 68 NPC patients, treated with conventional RT and IMRT in combination with chemotherapy from 2004-2008 was performed. Dosimetric data of the cochlea were analyzed. Significant SNHL was defined as > 15 dB increase in bone conduction threshold at 4 kHz and PTA (pure tone average of 0.5, 1, 2 kHz. Relative risk (RR was used to determine the associated factors with the hearing threshold changes at 4 kHz and PTA. Results Median audiological follow up time was 14 months. The incidence of high frequency (4 kHz SNHL was 44% for the whole group (48.75% in the conventional RT, 37% with IMRT. Internal auditory canal mean dose of > 50 Gy had shown a trend to increase the risk of high frequency SNHL (RR 2.02 with 95% CI 1.01-4.03, p = 0.047. Conclusion IMRT and radiation dose limitation to the inner ear appeared to decrease SNHL.

  16. Hearing loss and cognitive decline in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank R; Yaffe, Kristine; Xia, Jin; Xue, Qian-Li; Harris, Tamara B; Purchase-Helzner, Elizabeth; Satterfield, Suzanne; Ayonayon, Hilsa N; Ferrucci, Luigi; Simonsick, Eleanor M

    2013-02-25

    BACKGROUND Whether hearing loss is independently associated with accelerated cognitive decline in older adults is unknown. METHODS We studied 1984 older adults (mean age, 77.4 years) enrolled in the Health ABC Study, a prospective observational study begun in 1997-1998. Our baseline cohort consisted of participants without prevalent cognitive impairment (Modified Mini-Mental State Examination [3MS] score, ?80) who underwent audiometric testing in year 5. Participants were followed up for 6 years. Hearing was defined at baseline using a pure-tone average of thresholds at 0.5 to 4 kHz in the better-hearing ear. Cognitive testing was performed in years 5, 8, 10, and 11 and consisted of the 3MS (measuring global function) and the Digit Symbol Substitution test (measuring executive function). Incident cognitive impairment was defined as a 3MS score of less than 80 or a decline in 3MS score of more than 5 points from baseline. Mixed-effects regression and Cox proportional hazards regression models were adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. RESULTS In total, 1162 individuals with baseline hearing loss (pure-tone average >25 dB) had annual rates of decline in 3MS and Digit Symbol Substitution test scores that were 41% and 32% greater, respectively, than those among individuals with normal hearing. On the 3MS, the annual score changes were -0.65 (95% CI, -0.73 to -0.56) vs -0.46 (95% CI, -0.55 to -0.36) points per year (P = .004). On the Digit Symbol Substitution test, the annual score changes were -0.83 (95% CI, -0.94 to -0.73) vs -0.63 (95% CI, -0.75 to -0.51) points per year (P = .02). Compared to those with normal hearing, individuals with hearing loss at baseline had a 24% (hazard ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.05-1.48) increased risk for incident cognitive impairment. Rates of cognitive decline and the risk for incident cognitive impairment were linearly associated with the severity of an individual's baseline hearing loss. CONCLUSIONS Hearing loss is independently associated with accelerated cognitive decline and incident cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults. Further studies are needed to investigate what the mechanistic basis of this association is and whether hearing rehabilitative interventions could affect cognitive decline. PMID:23337978

  17. Comparação entre critérios de recuperação auditiva na perda neurossensorial súbita / Comparison of hearing recovery criteria in sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Daniel Paganini, Inoue; Eduardo Amaro, Bogaz; Flávia, Barros; Norma de Oliveira, Penido.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inúmeros métodos de análise da recuperação auditiva na perda auditiva neurossensorial súbita idiopática (PANSI) dificultam a comparação adequada dos diversos tratamentos encontrados na Literatura. OBJETIVO: Comparar diversos critérios de recuperação auditiva na PANSI, baseados na Literatura. MATERIA [...] L E MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo clínico observacional de coorte, a partir de um protocolo prospectivo, em pacientes com PANSI, atendidos entre 2000 e 2010. Foram comparados cinco critérios de recuperação auditiva significativa e quatro critérios para recuperação completa, pela audiometria tonal, por meio de teste não paramétrico e de comparações múltiplas, ambos com um nível de significância de 5%. Após determinação do critério de recuperação auditiva mais rígido, foram adicionados parâmetros da audiometria vocal. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença significativa, entre esses critérios (p Abstract in english The countless methods available to analyze hearing recovery in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) cases hinder the comparison of the various treatments found in the literature. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to compare the different criteria for hearing recovery in ISSHL found in the l [...] iterature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is an observational clinical cohort study from a prospective protocol in patients with ISSHL, treated between 2000 and 2010. Five criteria were considered for significant hearing recovery and four for complete recovery by pure tone audiometry, using non-parametric tests and multiple comparisons at a significance level of 5%. After determining the stricter criteria for hearing recovery, vocal audiometry parameters were added. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the criteria (p

  18. Hearing loss and dementia in the aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracino, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    For some years, policy makers and medical scientists have both begun to focus more on chronic noncommunicable diseases. It is well known that cardio-cerebrovascular disease, tumors, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are considered areas of major interest in many scientific projects and health programs. The economic impact of cardio-cerebrovascular disease in EU alone is more than EUR 200 billion, while tumors have an impact of EUR 150 billion. The direct and indirect cost of brain disorders exceeds EUR 700 billion a year. Among the brain disorders, the devastating impact of dementia on affected individuals and the burden imposed on their families and society has made prevention and treatment of dementia a public health priority. Interventions that could merely delay the onset of dementia by 1 year would result in a more than 10% decrease in the global prevalence of dementia in 2050. Unfortunately, there are no known interventions that currently have such effectiveness. The manifestations of age-related hearing loss in many older adults are subtle and, thus, hearing loss is often perceived as an unfortunate but inconsequential part of aging. Researchers report that hearing loss seems to speed up age-related cognitive decline. Researchers suggest that treating hearing loss more aggressively could help delay cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest in better understanding the pathophysiologic correlations between hearing loss and dementia. Hearing loss in older adults, in fact, is associated independently with poorer cognitive functioning, incident dementia, and falls. Further research investigating the basis of this connection as well as the pathomechanism of the two diseases will further our ability to treat dementia. PMID:25733359

  19. Sensorineural hearing loss following irradiation to the malignant tumor of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observed sensorineural hearing loss following X-ray irradiation to the malignant tumor of head and neck. There were 24 patients whose auditory organs lied within the irradiation field. Ten of these patients were affected by sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss occurred at a high frequency in elderly patients, epipharynx tumor and high dose of irradiation. Many cases revealed high tone hearing loss. Most cases showed about a 20?30 dB hearing loss, so their impediment seemed not severe in daily life. In some of these cases, we could have temporal bone findings, but there were no particular findings relevant to sensorineural hearing loss. (author)

  20. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Occupational Noise Exposure: Effects of Age-Corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (NIPTS were computed from retrospective audiometric analyses by subtracting aging effects on hearing sensitivity in sixty-eight patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who reported significant occupational noise exposure histories. There were significant effects of age on NIPTS but no significant gender- or ear- differences in terms of NIPTS. The NIPTS at 2,000 Hz was found to be significantly greater than NIPTS at frequencies 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, and 8,000 Hz. Defined noise notches were seen in the audiograms of 38/136 (27% ears with SNHL. Results support models that suggest interactive effects of aging and noise on sensorineural hearing loss in ears with occupational noise exposure.

  1. Sensorineural Hearing Loss due to Air Bag Deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Tahara; Jyunichi Ishikawa; Masafumi Ohki

    2012-01-01

    Deployment of the air bag in a passenger vehicle accident rarely causes otologic injuries. However, sensorineural hearing loss induced by air bag deployment is extremely rare, with only a few cases reported in the English literature. A 38-year-old man involved in a traffic accident while driving his car at 40?km/hour presented with right sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, without associated vertigo. Pure-tone audiometry demonstrated elevated thresholds of 30?dB and 25?dB at 4?kH...

  2. Hearing loss in the elderly: History of occupational noise exposure

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Caroline Luiz, Meneses-Barriviera; Juliana Jandre, Melo; Luciana Lozza de Moraes, Marchiori.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Noise exposure is one of the most common health risk factors, and workers are exposed to sound pressure levels capable of producing hearing loss. AIM: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in the elderly and its possible association with a history of occupational noise exposure and [...] with sex. METHODS: A prospective study in subjects aged over 60 years. The subjects underwent anamnesis and audiological assessment. The Mann-Whitney test and multiple logistic regression, with 95% confidence interval and p

  3. Language Characteristics of Preschool Children with Hearing Loss in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Younes Lotfi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing impairment affects all aspect of individual life, specially language and communication skills. When hearing impairment is congenital or occurs early in life, the child’s ability to learn optimally through audition, will be affected. The aim of this study was to evaluate linguistic skills of preschool hearing impaired children and compare these skills with normal peers.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 38 preschool hearing impaired children that the main handicap was severe to profound hearing loss with ability to communicate orally and 28 normal children with the same cultural and social context. Twenty four non linguistic variables including age, gender, the age of entrance of preschool center, number of hearing aids, etc. were obtained by filling a questionnaire and fifteen linguistics variables including number of utterance, morphemes, correct utterance, noun phrase, ambiguous utterance, correct sentences, compound sentences, etc. were collected by some part of TOLD-P-3 test and three complementary questions. Then we compared the data from two groups.Results: There were significant differences between number of utterance, number of correct mean length utterance, number of well-formed sentences in normal and hearing impaired group (p0.05.Conclusion: This study showed a severe deficit in linguistic skills in preschool hearing impaired children.

  4. Changes in the default mode networks of individuals with long-term unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Y; Yang, M; Liu, B; Huang, Z-C; Chen, H; Zhang, P-P; Li, J; Chen, J-Y; Liu, L-J; Wang, J; Teng, G-J

    2015-01-29

    Hearing impairment contributes to cognitive dysfunction. Previous studies have found changes of functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) associated with cognitive processing in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Whereas the changes in the DMN in patients with long-term unilateral SNHL (USNHL) is still not entirely clear. In this work, we analyzed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and neuropsychological test scores from normal hearing subjects (n = 11) and patients (n = 21) with long-term USNHL. Functional connectivity and nodal topological properties were computed for every brain region in the DMN. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and post hoc analyses were conducted to identify differences between normal controls and patients for each measure. Results indicated that the left USNHL presented enhanced connectivity (p < 0.05, false discovery rate (FDR) corrected), and significant changes (p < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected) of the nodal topological properties in the DMN compared with the control. More changes in the DMN have been found in the left than right long-term USNHL (RUSNHL). However, the neuropsychological tests did not show significant differences between the USNHL and the control. These findings suggest that long-term USNHL contributes to changes in the DMN, and these changes might affect cognitive abilities in patients with long-term USNHL. Left hearing loss affects the DMN more than the right hearing loss does. The fMRI measures might be more sensitive for observing cognitive changes in patients with hearing loss than clinical neuropsychological tests. This study provides some insights into the mechanisms of the association between hearing loss and cognitive function. PMID:25463518

  5. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandi Subroto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss in every country in the world. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Worldwide, 16% of the disabling hearing loss in adults is attributed to occupational noise, ranging from 7 to 21% in the various subregions. The estimated cost of noise to developed countries ranges from 0.2 to 2% of the gross domestic product (GDP. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is bilateral and symmetrical, usually affecting the higher frequencies (3k, 4k or 6k Hz and then spreading to the lower frequencies (0.5k, 1k or 2k Hz. Other major health effects are lack of concentration, irritation, fatigue, headache, sleep disturbances, etc. The major industries responsible for excessive noise and exposing workers to hazardous levels of noise are textile, printing, saw mills, mining, etc. Hearing protectors should be used when engineering controls and work practices are not feasible for reducing noise exposure to safe levels. Earmuffs, ear plugs and ear canal caps are the main types of hearing protectors. In India, NIHL has been a compensable disease since 1948. It is only in 1996 that the first case got compensation. Awareness should be created among workers about the harmful effects of noise on hearing and other body systems by implementing compulsory education and training programs. There are very few published studies of NIHL in India. More extensive studies are needed to know the exact prevalence of NIHL among the various industries in India.

  6. Pathology Case Study: Progressive Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böker, Dieter-Karsten

    This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which a woman sought help for an progressive eight-year diminished sense of hearing, which developed with vertigo and left-side tinnitus. Visitors can view both microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and have the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to introduce or test students of Neuropathology.

  7. Hearing loss raises excitability in the auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotak, Vibhakar C; Fujisawa, Sho; Lee, Fanyee Anja; Karthikeyan, Omkar; Aoki, Chiye; Sanes, Dan H

    2005-04-13

    Developmental hearing impairments compromise sound discrimination, speech acquisition, and cognitive function; however, the adjustments of functional properties in the primary auditory cortex (A1) remain unknown. We induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in developing gerbils and then reared the animals for several days. The intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons were subsequently examined in a thalamocortical brain slice preparation with whole-cell recordings and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. SNHL neurons displayed a depolarized resting membrane potential, an increased input resistance, and a higher incidence of sustained firing. They also exhibited significantly larger thalamocortically and intracortically evoked excitatory synaptic responses, including a greater susceptibility to the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 and the NR2B subunit antagonist ifenprodil. This correlated with an increase in NR2B labeling of asymmetric synapses, as visualized ultrastructurally. Furthermore, decreased frequency and increased amplitude of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) in SNHL neurons suggest that a decline in presynaptic release properties is compensated by an increased excitatory response. To verify that the increased thalamocortical excitation was elicited by putative monosynaptic connections, minimum amplitude ventral medial geniculate nucleus-evoked EPSCs were recorded. These minimum-evoked responses were of larger amplitude, and the NMDAergic currents were also larger and longer in SNHL neurons. These findings were supported by significantly longer AP-5-sensitive durations and larger amplitudes of mEPSCs. Last, the amplitudes of intracortically evoked monosynaptic and polysynaptic GABAergic inhibitory synaptic responses were significantly smaller in SNHL neurons. These alterations in cellular properties after deafness reflect an attempt by A1 to sustain an operative level of cortical excitability that may involve homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:15829643

  8. Occupational Noise Exposure and Hearing Loss Among Car Smoothers in Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zarei

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackgrounds and Objectives:Indusrial noise exposure is the most common hazardous agent in the world.This study has been done to determine the prevalence associated with occupational noise in car smoothers at qazvin."nMaterials and Methods: The study group composed of 50 subjects who were selected out of a total of 218 car smoothing workshops.Background information,exposure time and...with a questionnaire collected.Noise exposure and hearing loss were measured by noise dosimeter model CEL-280 and audiometer model OB 288 Madsen."nResults: The mean of age and work experience were 38.7 and 21.5 respectively.Noise exposure and total hearing loss were measured 98.2±3.4 dB(90-104dB and 22.1±9.16 dB respectively. Spireman correlation was significant between right and left ears(P<0.05 ,R=0.87.Total hearing loss were measured natural(NIHL!25 in 64 percent(32 person,slight(26! NIHL!40in 34 percent(17 person and moderate (41! NIHL!60 in 2 percent (1 person.The most and the least hearing loss were measured 42.4(4000 HZ and 37.1(8000 HZ dB in left and right ear respectively. The chi square analysis was significant between hearing loss,work experience and age(P=0.015.ANOVA analysis was not significant between noise exposure and hearing loss(P=0.09."nConclusion:Considering NIHL and severe noise exposure , the necessity for improvement of controlling and protection measures has prime importance.

  9. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss. Forty consecutive patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (20 males and 20 females; age range 11-82 years), 40 age-matched control subjects, and 5 patients with Meniere's disease were examined using the same imaging protocol on a 1.5-T MR system. Pre- and post-contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3D SPGR; TR/TE=23/10 ms, no. of excitations=1, flip angle=30 ) images were obtained using a voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm3. Contrast enhancement in the area of the endolymphatic sac was assessed by two radiologists, and the frequency of contrast enhancement was compared between the three study groups. Enhancement of the ipsilateral endolymphatic sac was observed in 30 of the 40 patients with sudden hearing loss (75%). Twenty of these 30 patients also showed enhancement on the contralateral side, and 1 patient showed enhancement only on the contralateral side. Only 1 of the 5 patients with Meniere's disease showed enhancement. Nine of the 40 control subjects (22.5%) showed enhancement (bilateral enhancement in 5 subjects, unilateral in 4). The frequency of enhancement in patients with sudden hearing loss was significantly higher than that in control subjects (P<0.0001) or patients with Meniere's disease (P<0.05). The frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac is significantly increasendolymphatic sac is significantly increased in patients with sudden hearing loss, but further study is necessary to clarify the relationship between this finding and the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. (orig.)

  10. Vowel Perception in Listeners With Normal Hearing and in Listeners With Hearing Loss: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lauren; Street, Nicole Drakopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the influence of hearing loss on perception of vowel slices. Methods Fourteen listeners aged 20-27 participated; ten (6 males) had hearing within normal limits and four (3 males) had moderate-severe sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Stimuli were six naturally-produced words consisting of the vowels /i a u æ ? ?/ in a /b V b/ context. Each word was presented as a whole and in eight slices: the initial transition, one half and one fourth of initial transition, full central vowel, one-half central vowel, ending transition, one half and one fourth of ending transition. Each of the 54 stimuli was presented 10 times at 70 dB SPL (sound press level); listeners were asked to identify the word. Stimuli were shaped using signal processing software for the listeners with SNHL to mimic gain provided by an appropriately-fitting hearing aid. Results Listeners with SNHL had a steeper rate of decreasing vowel identification with decreasing slice duration as compared to listeners with normal hearing, and the listeners with SNHL showed different patterns of vowel identification across vowels when compared to listeners with normal hearing. Conclusion Abnormal temporal integration is likely affecting vowel identification for listeners with SNHL, which in turn affects vowel internal representation at different levels of the auditory system. PMID:25729492

  11. Effects of Treatment of Hearing Loss in Middle-Aged Persons with Down Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, Heleen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Twelve middle-aged Dutch adults with Down's syndrome and hearing loss received tympanic ventilation tubes or hearing aids and habituation training. Staff members reported subtle positive reactions to treatment in five subjects, but no statistically significant changes were found in social involvement and nonverbal reactions, verbal reactions,…

  12. The impact of hearing loss on the quality of life of elderly adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastore A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Ciorba, Chiara Bianchini, Stefano Pelucchi, Antonio PastoreENT and Audiology Department, University Hospital of Ferrara, Ferrara, ItalyAbstract: Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in the elderly, and it is becoming a severe social and health problem. Especially in the elderly, hearing loss can impair the exchange of information, thus significantly impacting everyday life, causing loneliness, isolation, dependence, and frustration, as well as communication disorders. Due to the aging of the population in the developed world, presbycusis is a growing problem that has been reported to reduce quality of life (QoL. Progression of presbycusis cannot be remediated; therefore, optimal management of this condition not only requires early recognition and rehabilitation, but it also should include an evaluation of QoL status and its assessment.Keywords: hearing loss, presbycusis, quality of life, elderly

  13. Ahl2, a Second Locus Affecting Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2002-01-01

    Inbred mouse strains with age-related hearing loss (AHL) provide valuable models for studying the genetic basis of human presbycusis. Here we report the genetic mapping of a second AHL locus in mice (designated Ahl2) that is a major contributor to the 8- to 10-month difference in hearing loss onset times between NOD/LtJ and C57BL/6J mice. A whole-genome linkage scan of 110 progeny from a (C57BL/6J × NOD/LtJ) × NOD/LtJ backcross revealed statistically significant associations of ABR threshol...

  14. Sensory Temporal Processing in Adults with Early Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heming, Joanne E.; Brown, Lenora N.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined tactile and visual temporal processing in adults with early loss of hearing. The tactile task consisted of punctate stimulations that were delivered to one or both hands by a mechanical tactile stimulator. Pairs of light emitting diodes were presented on a display for visual stimulation. Responses consisted of YES or NO…

  15. Role of cochlear efferents in noise induced hearing loss.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aran, J. M.; Popelá?, Ji?í; Smith, D. W.

    Cambridge : NOPHER, 2000, s. 10. [An International Symposium on noise induced hearing loss . Cambridge (GB), 07.07.2000-10.07.2000] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA309/97/0830; GA MZd NK4747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Professional Preparation: Developing Language in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muma, John; Perigoe, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are increasingly being identified at an early age and receiving family-centered intervention from infancy. This means that they are more likely to follow typical developmental sequences of learning. Therefore, professionals working with them need to be aware of developments in the scholarly literature that drive…

  17. Wordlikeness and Word Learning in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Derek J.; McGregor, Karla K.; Bentler, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The more a novel word conforms to the phonotactics of the language, the more wordlike it is and the easier it is to learn. It is unknown to what extent children with hearing loss (CHL) take advantage of phonotactic cues to support word learning. Aims: This study investigated whether CHL had similar sensitivities to wordlikeness during…

  18. Facilitating Emergent Literacy Skills in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupan, Barbra; Dempsey, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) familiarize readers with the components of emergent literacy and the impact hearing loss may have on the development of these skills; (b) demonstrate the importance of parent-professional collaboration and show how specific literacy-based activities can be integrated into existing daily routines and intervention programming; and…

  19. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: The Question of Perilymph Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backous, Douglas D.; Niparko, John K.

    1997-01-01

    Perilymph fistula (PLF) is an abnormal communication between the fluid-containing spaces of the inner ear and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone that can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, aural fullness, vertigo, and postural instability. Diagnosis of PLF and management of those with presumed PLF are discussed. (Contains extensive…

  20. Increasing Communication in Children with Concurrent Vision and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nancy C.; Bashinski, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    Nine children with complex communication needs and concurrent vision and hearing losses participated in an intervention program aimed at increasing intentional prelinguistic communication. The intervention constituted a pilot, descriptive study of an adapted version of prelinguistic milieu teaching, hence referred to as A-PMT. In A-PMT, natural…

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss in adult onset Still's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Markusse, H. M.; Stolk, B.; Mey, A. G.; Jonge-bok, J. M.; Heering, K. J.

    1988-01-01

    A 26 year old man with a nine year history of adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) developed sensorineural hearing loss during an exacerbation of his disease. This complication has not previously been described in association with adult onset Still's disease. He responded favourably to steroid treatment.

  2. Auditory Deprivation and Early Conductive Hearing Loss from Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, Adele D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews auditory deprivation effects on anatomy, physiology, and behavior in animals and discusses the sequelae of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. Focused on are central auditory processing disorders associated with early fluctuating hearing loss from OME. (DB)

  3. Children With Hearing Loss and Increased Risk of Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Joshua R.; Zhou, Li; Mckee, Michael; Mcdermott, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Few studies have tested the hypothesis that children with sensory disabilities such as deafness may be at increased risk of injuries. To test this hypothesis, this study compared rates of emergency department or hospital treatment for injury among Medicaid-insured South Carolina children with and without a diagnosis of hearing loss.

  4. Consensus on Hearing Aid Candidature and Fitting for Mild Hearing Loss, With and Without Tinnitus: Delphi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Derek J.; Nicholson, Richard; Smith, Sandra; Hall, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In many countries including the United Kingdom, hearing aids are a first line of audiologic intervention for many people with tinnitus and aidable hearing loss. Nevertheless, there is a lack of high quality evidence to support that they are of benefit for tinnitus, and wide variability in their use in clinical practice especially for people with mild hearing loss. The aim of this study was to identify a consensus among a sample of UK clinicians on the criteria for hearing aid candidature and clinical practice in fitting hearing aids specifically for mild hearing loss with and without tinnitus. This will allow professionals to establish clinical benchmarks and to gauge their practice with that used elsewhere. Design: The Delphi technique, a systematic methodology that seeks consensus amongst experts through consultation using a series of iterative questionnaires, was used. A three-round Delphi survey explored clinical consensus among a panel of 29 UK hearing professionals. The authors measured panel agreement on 115 statements covering: (i) general factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (ii) protocol-driven factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (iii) general practice, and (iv) clinical observations. Consensus was defined as a priori ?70% agreement across the panel. Results: Consensus was reached for 58 of the 115 statements. The broad areas of consensus were around factors important to consider when fitting hearing aids; hearing aid technology/features offered; and important clinical assessment to verify hearing aid fit (agreement of 70% or more). For patients with mild hearing loss, the greatest priority was given by clinicians to patient-centered criteria for fitting hearing aids: hearing difficulties, motivation to wear hearing aids, and impact of hearing loss on quality of life (chosen as top five by at least 64% of panelists). Objective measures were given a lower priority: degree of hearing loss and shape of the audiogram (chosen as top five by less than half of panelists). Areas where consensus was not reached were related to the use of questionnaires to predict and verify hearing aid benefit for both hearing and tinnitus; audiometric criteria for fitting hearing aids; and safety of using loud sounds when verifying hearing aid fitting when the patient has tinnitus (agreement of <70%). Conclusions: The authors identified practices that are considered important when recommending or fitting hearing aid for a patient with tinnitus. More importantly perhaps, they identified practical issues where there are divided opinions. Their findings inform the design of clinical trials and open up debate on the potential impact of practice differences on patient outcomes. PMID:25587668

  5. Have WISE EARS! for Life: Protect Yourself and Your Family from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protect yourself and your family from noise-induced hearing loss On this page: Who should worry about noise? ... exposure to loud sounds can cause noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) . At Home At Work NIHL is serious. ...

  6. Valproate-induced reversible sensorineural hearing loss: a case report with serial audiometry and pharmacokinetic modelling during a valproate rechallenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Li-Ling; Lim, Kheng-Seang; Lo, Yoke-Lin; Bakar, Mohd Zukiflee Abu; Tan, Chong-Tin

    2014-09-01

    Hearing loss has been reported with valproic acid (VPA) use. However, this is the first case of VPA-induced hearing loss that was tested and confirmed with a VPA rechallenge, supported by serial audiometry and pharmacokinetic modelling. A 39-year-old truck driver with temporal lobe epilepsy was treated with VPA at 400 mg, twice daily, and developed hearing loss after each dose, but recovered within three hours. Hearing loss fully resolved after VPA discontinuation. Audiometry performed five hours after VPA rechallenge showed significant improvement in hearing thresholds. Pharmacokinetic modelling during the VPA rechallenge showed that hearing loss occurred at a level below the therapeutic range. Brainstem auditory evoked potential at three months after VPA discontinuation showed bilateral conduction defect between the cochlear and superior olivary nucleus, supporting a pre-existing auditory deficit. VPA may cause temporary hearing threshold shift. Pre-existing auditory defect may be a risk factor for VPA-induced hearing loss. Caution should be taken while prescribing VPA to patients with pre-existing auditory deficit. PMID:25167568

  7. Hearing loss in relation to sound exposure of professional symphony orchestra musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, J. H.; Pedersen, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate the hearing status of classical symphony orchestra musicians and (2) investigate the hypothesis that occupational sound exposure of symphony orchestra musicians leads to elevated hearing thresholds. DESIGN: The study population comprised all the musicians from five symphony orchestras. Questionnaires were filled in by 337 subjects, and 212 subjects performed an audiometric test. For a group of 182 musicians (363 ears) the results of the audiometry was analyzed in relation to the individual exposure, which was estimated on the basis of sound measurements and questionnaire data regarding the exposure time. The mean hearing threshold at the frequencies 3, 4, and 6 kHz, corrected for age and sex, was used as outcome. RESULTS: The musician ears with the highest exposure (29 of 363) had an additional threshold shift of 6.3 dB compared with the 238 ears with lowest exposure. The observed hearing loss of musicians was smaller compared with the noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS) predicted from ISO1999. A remaining confounding effect of age after ISO7029 age corrections could be observed to explain the difference in observed and predicted NIPTS. However, the observed hearing loss difference between the left and the right ear of musicians was 2.5 dB (95% confidence interval 1.5-3.6), which was similar to the NIPTS predicted from ISO1999. Most of the musicians had better hearing at 3, 4, and 6 kHz for age than expected, however, 29 ears with the highest exposure above 90.4 dBA with a mean exposure time of 41.7 years had significantly elevated hearing thresholds. Trumpet players and the left ear of first violinists had significantly elevated hearing thresholds compared with other musicians. CONCLUSION: Most of the symphony orchestra musicians had better hearing than expected but they had a work-related risk of developing additional noise-induced hearing loss. The additional NITPS of the left ear compared with the right ear was at the expected level based on the cumulated sound exposure and ISO1999, indicating that performing music may induce hearing loss to the same extent as industrial noise.

  8. Health Seeking Behavior among Parents of Children with Hearing Loss: A Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiteshree C Patel, Mohua Moitra, Anjali Modi, Rahul Patel, S L Kantharia, Ishwar M Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevalence of hearing loss is 11.7% of the school going population (5-15 years. Such children fail to develop speech, language and cognitive skills unless proper habilitation is initiated. If detected early and managed suitably, will have a far better chance at a normal life than those who are habilitated late or not at all. Aims & objectives: To detect the age of suspicion, identification, intervention and treatment seeking behavior of children with hearing loss. Materials & methods: This was a cross- sectional study done in Children between 5 and 15 years age-group with hearing loss, coming to an ENT OPD, New Civil Hospital, Surat during the period of 1st August 2011 to 31 July 2012. Results: A total of 246 children were studied. Mean age of the study population was 9±3.46 years. Average age at first suspicion of hearing loss was 2.9±1.7 years, first consultation was 3.5±1.5 years and first intervention was 7.8±3.3 years. There was significant association between age of first suspicion of congenital hearing loss with father’s occupation (p=0.03. There was significant association between delay in diagnosis and gender (p= 0.04. As the level of education of parents and socio- economic status increased, preference for private set ups for first consultation also increased (p< 0.05. In 63.5% cases, advice of general practitioner resulted in the delay in referral to ENT specialist. Conclusion & Recommendations: Even after primary care, an average gap of 4.3 years is observed among parents for receiving intervention. Mother is the first person to suspect hearing loss among their children. Basic training of general practitioner/ MBBS doctors regarding primary ear care is required.

  9. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Koshikawa, Tokiko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine (Japan); Nakashima, Tsutomu [Department of Otolayngology, Nagoya University School of Medicine (Japan); Ichinose, Nobuyasu [Toshiba Nasu Operations, Tochigi (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss. Forty consecutive patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (20 males and 20 females; age range 11-82 years), 40 age-matched control subjects, and 5 patients with Meniere's disease were examined using the same imaging protocol on a 1.5-T MR system. Pre- and post-contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3D SPGR; TR/TE=23/10 ms, no. of excitations=1, flip angle=30 ) images were obtained using a voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm{sup 3}. Contrast enhancement in the area of the endolymphatic sac was assessed by two radiologists, and the frequency of contrast enhancement was compared between the three study groups. Enhancement of the ipsilateral endolymphatic sac was observed in 30 of the 40 patients with sudden hearing loss (75%). Twenty of these 30 patients also showed enhancement on the contralateral side, and 1 patient showed enhancement only on the contralateral side. Only 1 of the 5 patients with Meniere's disease showed enhancement. Nine of the 40 control subjects (22.5%) showed enhancement (bilateral enhancement in 5 subjects, unilateral in 4). The frequency of enhancement in patients with sudden hearing loss was significantly higher than that in control subjects (P<0.0001) or patients with Meniere's disease (P<0.05). The frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac is significantly increased in patients with sudden hearing loss, but further study is necessary to clarify the relationship between this finding and the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. (orig.)

  10. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arastou, Shima; Tajedini, Ardavan; Borghei, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) patients with poor prognostic factors. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay between the onset of hearing loss and initiation of therapy) were included in this study. Patients were randomized to the intervention group (combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy) or the control group (systemic steroid therapy alone). All patients received oral treatment with systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day for 10 days), acyclovir (2 g/day for 10 days, divided into four doses), triamterene H (daily), and omeprazole (daily, during steroid treatment), and were advised to follow a low salt diet. The intervention group also received intratympanic dexamethasone injections (0.4 ml of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone) two times a week for two consecutive weeks (four injections in total). A significant hearing improvement was defined as at least a 15-db decrease in pure tone average (PTA). Results: Among all participants,44 patients(57.14%) showed significant improvement in hearing evaluation. More patients showed hearing improvement in the intervention group than in the control group (27 patients (75%) versus 17 patients (41.4%), respectively; P=0.001). Conclusion: The combination of intratympanic dexamethasone and systemic prednisolone is more effective than systemic prednisolone alone in the treatment of poor-prognosis SSNHL. PMID:24303415

  11. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Arastou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL patients with poor prognostic factors.     Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay between the onset of hearing loss and initiation of therapy were included in this study. Patients were randomized to the intervention group (combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy or the control group (systemic steroid therapy alone. All patients received oral treatment with systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day for 10 days, acyclovir (2 g/day for 10 days, divided into four doses, triamterene H (daily, and omeprazole (daily, during steroid treatment, and were advised to follow a low salt diet. The intervention group also received intratympanic dexamethasone injections (0.4 ml of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone two times a week for two consecutive weeks (four injections in total. A significant hearing improvement was defined as at least a 15-db decrease in pure tone average (PTA.  Results: Among all participants, 44 patients (57.14% showed significant improvement in hearing evaluation. More patients showed hearing improvement in the intervention group than in the control group (27 patients (75% versus 17 patients (41.4%, respectively; P = 0.001.  Conclusion:  The combination of intratympanic dexamethasone and systemic prednisolone is more effective than systemic prednisolone alone in the treatment of poor-prognosis SSNHL.

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss in children: A ‘less than silent’ environmental danger

    OpenAIRE

    Robert V. Harrison

    2008-01-01

    A review of the problems of noise-induced hearing loss in children, especially related to recreational music and the use of personal entertainment devices. The pathophysiology of noise-induced hearing loss and its associated problems (eg, tinnitus) are discussed. The evidence for an increase in noise-induced hearing loss in children and young people is reviewed. Some practical advice (for clinicians, caregivers and children) on hearing loss prevention is provided.

  13. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WorsØe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have generated conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to determine whether systemic steroid treatment had an effect on hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  14. Classification of Hearing Loss Disorders Using Teoae-Based Descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzopoulos, Stavros Dimitris

    Transiently Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions (TEOAE) are signals produced by the cochlea upon stimulation by an acoustic click. Within the context of this dissertation, it was hypothesized that the relationship between the TEOAEs and the functional status of the OHCs provided an opportunity for designing a TEOAE-based clinical procedure that could be used to assess cochlear function. To understand the nature of the TEOAE signals in the time and the frequency domain several different analyses were performed. Using normative Input-Output (IO) curves, short-time FFT analyses and cochlear computer simulations, it was found that for optimization of the hearing loss classification it is necessary to use a complete 20 ms TEOAE segment. It was also determined that various 2-D filtering methods (median and averaging filtering masks, LP-FFT) used to enhance of the TEOAE S/N offered minimal improvement (less than 6 dB per stimulus level). Higher S/N improvements resulted in TEOAE sequences that were over-smoothed. The final classification algorithm was based on a statistical analysis of raw FFT data and when applied to a sample set of clinically obtained TEOAE recordings (from 56 normal and 66 hearing-loss subjects) correctly identified 94.3% of the normal and 90% of the hearing loss subjects, at the 80 dB SPL stimulus level. To enhance the discrimination between the conductive and the sensorineural populations, data from the 68 dB SPL stimulus level were used, which yielded a normal classification of 90.2%, a hearing loss classification of 87.5% and a conductive-sensorineural classification of 87%. Among the hearing-loss populations the best discrimination was obtained in the group of otosclerosis and the worst in the group of acute acoustic trauma.

  15. Analogous and Distinctive Patterns of Prelinguistic Communication in Toddlers with and without Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Dromi, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to compare the prelinguistic communicative abilities of toddlers with hearing loss and without hearing loss during the 2nd year of life and shortly before the emergence of productive single-word lexicons. Method: The participants were 28 toddlers with hearing loss who participated in an early intervention program…

  16. Phonological Awareness and Vocabulary Performance of Monolingual and Bilingual Preschool Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily; Werfel, Krystal L.; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study compared the phonological awareness skills and vocabulary performance of English monolingual and Spanish-English bilingual children with and without hearing loss. Preschool children with varying degrees of hearing loss (n = 18) and preschool children without hearing loss (n = 19) completed measures of phonological awareness and…

  17. Hearing loss and cochlear damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis, with special reference to the role of neutrophil granulytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, CT; Caye-Thomsen, P

    2006-01-01

    Hearing loss is a well-known sequelae from meningitis, affecting up to 25% of survivors. However, the principal components of the infectious and inflammatory reaction responsible for the sensorineural hearing loss remain to be identified. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of an augmented neutrophil response on the development of hearing loss and cochlear damage in a model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rats. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and histopathology in rats treated with ceftriaxone 28 h after infection. Rats were treated with Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) initiated prior to infection, 28 h after infection or with ceftriaxone only. Rats were followed for 7 days, and assessment of hearing was performed before infection and 24 h and day 8 after infection. Pretreatment with G-CSF increased hearing loss 24 h after infection and on day 8 compared to untreated rats (Mann-Whitney, P = 0.012 and P = 0.013 respectively). The increased sensorineural hearing loss at day 8 was associated with significantly decreased spiral ganglion cell counts (P = 0.0006), increased damage to the organ of Corti (P = 0.007), increased areas of inflammatory infiltrates (P = 0.02) and increased white blood cell (WBC) counts in cerebrospinal fluid on day 8 after infection (P = 0.0084). Initiation of G-CSF 28 h after infection did not significantly affect hearing loss or cochlear pathology compared to controls. In conclusion, the inflammatory host reaction contributes significantly to the development of hearing loss in experimental meningitis.

  18. "PARAMETERS AFFECTING NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS IN INDUSTRY"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Parvizpour

    1977-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on a study conducted in three different industries on 84.4 on their employees to determine the effect of over all noise intensity, length of employment and rest periods among them. It was found that the mentioned factors have direct effect on the induced hearing loss among the exposed workers. High noise level and long period of employment adversely affect the hearing ability while the breaks taken during daily working hours have prevented the expected defect.

  19. Antioxidant-enriched diet does not delay the progression of age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Su-Hua; Kanicki, Ariane; Halsey, Karin; Wearne, Kimberly Anne; Schacht, Jochen

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to noise- and drug-induced as well as age-related hearing loss. Antioxidants can attenuate the decline of cochlear structure and function after exposure to noise or drugs, but it is debated as to whether they can protect from age-related hearing loss. In a long-term longitudinal study, 10-month-old female CBA/J mice were placed on either a control or antioxidant-enriched diet and monitored through 24 months of age. Supplementation with vitamins A, C, and E, L-carnitine, and ?-lipoic acid significantly increased the antioxidant capacity of inner ear tissues. However, by 24 months of age, the magnitude of hearing loss was equal between the two groups. Likewise, there were no significant differences in hair cell loss or degeneration of spiral ganglion cells. We conclude that dietary manipulations can alter cochlear antioxidant capacity but do not ameliorate age-related sensorineural hearing loss in the CBA/J mouse. PMID:22154190

  20. Antioxidant-enriched diet does not delay the progression of age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Su-Hua; Kanicki, Ariane; Halsey, Karin; Wearne, Kimberly Anne; Schacht, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to noise- and drug-induced as well as age-related hearing loss. Antioxidants can attenuate the decline of cochlear structure and function after exposure to noise or drugs, but it is debated as to whether they can protect from age-related hearing loss. In a long-term longitudinal study, 10-month old female CBA/J mice were placed on either a control or antioxidant-enriched diet and monitored through 24 months of age. Supplementation with vitamins A, C, and E, L-carnitine and ?-lipoic acid significantly increased the antioxidant capacity of inner ear tissues. However, by 24 months of age, the magnitude of hearing loss was equal in both groups. Likewise, there were no significant differences in hair cell loss or degeneration of spiral ganglion cells. We conclude that dietary manipulations can alter cochlear antioxidant capacity but do not ameliorate age-related sensorineural hearing loss in the CBA/J mouse. PMID:22154190

  1. Pathophysiology of Age-Related Hearing Loss (Peripheral and Central)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Extrinsic factors include noise, ototoxic medication and diet. However, presbycusis may not be related to the intrinsic and extrinsic factors separately. Presbycusis affects not only the physical, cognitive and emotional activities of patients, but also their social functioning. As a result, patients' quality of life deteriorates, compounded by various symptoms including depression, social isolation and lower self-esteem. Presbycusis is classified into six categories, as based on results of audiometric tests and temporal bone pathology, established by Schuknecht (1993): sensory, neural, metabolic or strial, cochlear conductive, mixed and indeterminate types. Among these, metabolic presbycusis is the mainstay of presbycusis types. Age-related changes also develop in the central hearing system. Functional decline of the central auditory system, caused by aging, reduces speech-understanding in noisy background and increase temporal processing deficits in gap-detection measures. This study reviews the literature on the age-related hearing loss. PMID:24653905

  2. Pathophysiology of age-related hearing loss (peripheral and central).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2013-09-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Extrinsic factors include noise, ototoxic medication and diet. However, presbycusis may not be related to the intrinsic and extrinsic factors separately. Presbycusis affects not only the physical, cognitive and emotional activities of patients, but also their social functioning. As a result, patients' quality of life deteriorates, compounded by various symptoms including depression, social isolation and lower self-esteem. Presbycusis is classified into six categories, as based on results of audiometric tests and temporal bone pathology, established by Schuknecht (1993): sensory, neural, metabolic or strial, cochlear conductive, mixed and indeterminate types. Among these, metabolic presbycusis is the mainstay of presbycusis types. Age-related changes also develop in the central hearing system. Functional decline of the central auditory system, caused by aging, reduces speech-understanding in noisy background and increase temporal processing deficits in gap-detection measures. This study reviews the literature on the age-related hearing loss. PMID:24653905

  3. Loudness of brief tones in listeners with normal hearing and sensorineural hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, SØren; Florentine, Mary

    1997-01-01

    To investigate how hearing loss affects the loudness of brief tones, loudness matches between 5- and 200-ms tones were obtained as a function of level. Loudness functions derived from these data indicated that the gain required to restore loudness usually is the same for short and long sounds.

  4. Developmental plasticity of spatial hearing following asymmetric hearing loss: context-dependent cue integration and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndrewJKing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Under normal hearing conditions, comparisons of the sounds reaching each ear are critical for accurate sound localization. Asymmetric hearing loss should therefore degrade spatial hearing and has become an important experimental tool for probing the plasticity of the auditory system, both during development and adulthood. In clinical populations, hearing loss affecting one ear more than the other is commonly associated with otitis media with effusion, a disorder experienced by approximately 80% of children before the age of two. Asymmetric hearing may also arise in other clinical situations, such as after unilateral cochlear implantation. Here, we consider the role played by spatial cue integration in sound localization under normal acoustical conditions. We then review evidence for adaptive changes in spatial hearing following a developmental hearing loss in one ear, and argue that adaptation may be achieved either by learning a new relationship between the altered cues and directions in space or by changing the way different cues are integrated in the brain. We next consider developmental plasticity as a source of vulnerability, describing maladaptive effects of asymmetric hearing loss that persist even when normal hearing is provided. We also examine the extent to which the consequences of asymmetric hearing loss depend upon its timing and duration. Although much of the experimental literature has focused on the effects of a stable unilateral hearing loss, some of the most common hearing impairments experienced by children tend to fluctuate over time. We therefore argue that there is a need to bridge this gap by investigating the effects of recurring hearing loss during development, and outline recent steps in this direction. We conclude by arguing that this work points toward a more nuanced view of developmental plasticity, in which plasticity may be selectively expressed in response to specific sensory contexts, and consider the clinical implications of this.

  5. Brain-stem auditory evoked responses during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: Predicting post-operative hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarayan Ramachandran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The importance of brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring in reducing hearing loss during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia is now accepted. However the extent of the changes in the pattern of these potentials and the safe limits to which these changes are relevant in reducing postoperative hearing loss have not been established. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify these changes and relate these to the postoperative hearing loss. Settings and Design: This study was done at the Walton Centre for neurology and neurosurgery, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The study was designed to give a measure of the change in the wave pattern following microvascular decompression and relate it to postoperative hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia had preoperative and postoperative hearing assessments and intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square tests. Results: It was found that the wave V latency was increased by more than 0.9ms in nine patients, eight of whom suffered significant postoperative hearing loss as demonstrated by audiometry. It was also seen that progressive decrease in amplitude of wave V showed progressive hearing loss with 25% loss when amplitude fell by 50 and 100% loss when wave V was lost completely. However most of the patients did not have a clinically manifest hearing loss. Conclusions: A per-operative increase in the latency of wave V greater than 0.9 ms and a fall of amplitude of wave V of more than 50% indicates a risk to hearing.

  6. Altered cardiovascular coupling in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss in comparison to healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, S; Witt, K; Fischer, C; Bär, K J; Ritter, J; Guntinas-Lichius, O; Voss, A

    2013-01-01

    The causes of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) are still unclear while SSNHL seems to be a multicausal disease. To date limited information about autonomic regulation and, especially, cardiovascular coupling (CVC) are available for those patients. The objective of this study was to characterize short-term (30 min) CVC in 23 SSNHL patients in comparison to 23 healthy age and gender matched normal hearing control subjects (CON). Further on, the results from CVC should be compared with those from standard heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) analyses. The results showed that HRV is not affected by the disease whereas BPV analysis revealed significant differences between both groups (pnonlinear methods exhibit an increased short-term CVC in SSNHL patients (pnonlinear CVC in SSNHL patients. Our findings might help to improve diagnostic strategies for hearing loss caused by vascular factors. PMID:24110592

  7. Transforming growth factor ?1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Contreras, Julio; Celaya, Adelaida M.; Camarero, Guadalupe; Rivera, Teresa; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-? as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-?1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-?1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-?1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage. PMID:25852546

  8. Preliminary speech recognition results after cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral hearing loss: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Stelzig Yvonne; Jacob Roland; Mueller Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Cochlear implants known to provide support in individuals with bilateral hearing loss may also be of great benefit for individuals with unilateral hearing loss. This case report demonstrates the positive effects of cochlear implantation on speech understanding in noise conditions in patients with unilateral hearing loss and normal hearing on the contralateral side. To the best of our knowledge, the data presented here are from the first few cases to receive a cochlear im...

  9. Hearing loss in the developing world: Evaluating the iPhone mobile device as a screening tool

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    S, Peer; J J, Fagan.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developing countries have the world's highest prevalence of hearing loss, and hearing screening programmes are scarce. Mobile devices such as smartphones have potential for audiometric testing.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the uHear app using an Apple iPhone as a possible hearing screening too [...] l in the developing world, and to determine accuracy of certain hearing thresholds that could prove useful in early detection of hearing loss for high-risk populations in resource-poor communities.METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study design. Participants recruited from the Otolaryngology Clinic, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, completed a uHear test in three settings - waiting room (WR), quiet room (QR) and soundproof room (SR). Thresholds were compared with formal audiograms.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were tested (50 ears). The uHear test detected moderate or worse hearing loss (pure-tone average (PTA) >40 dB) accurately with a sensitivity of 100% in all three environments. Specificity was 88% (SR), 73% (QR) and 68% (WR). It was highly accurate in detecting high-frequency hearing loss (2 000, 4 000, 6 000 Hz) in the QR and SR with 'good' and 'very good' kappa values, showing statistical significance (p40 dB). It is highly sensitive for detecting threshold changes at high frequencies, making it reasonably well suited to detect presbycusis and ototoxic hearing loss from HIV, tuberculosis therapy and chemotherapy. Portability and ease of use make it appropriate to use in developing world communities that lack screening programmes.

  10. MR imaging of 495 consecutive cases with sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    495 consecutive patients with SNHL and 120 age-matched healthy controls were examined. Spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were used with 1.5 T equipment. An intracranial abnormality was found in 211 (42.6%) of the patients with 95 (19.2%) along the acoustic pathway. Eleven of the 95 patients had sensory hearing loss while 84 had neural hearing loss with the retrocochlear auditory pathway affected by lesions. In 62 of the 84 patients, the internal acoustic canal and cerebellopontine angle were involved. Twenty-two patients had intra-axial lesions. The controls had no pathologic changes along the auditory pathway. (orig./UG)

  11. Age-related hearing loss: Is it a preventable condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeld, Eric C.; Tanaka, Chiemi; Chen, Guang-di; Henderson, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Numerous techniques have been tested to attempt to prevent the onset or progression of age-related hearing loss (ARHL): raising the animals in an augmented acoustic environment (used successfully in mouse and rat models), enhancing the antioxidant defenses with exogenous antioxidant treatments (used with mixed results in mouse and rat models), raising the animals with a calorie restricted diet (used successfully in mouse and rat models), restoring lost endocochlear potential voltage with exogenous electrical stimulation (used successfully in the Mongolian gerbil model), and hypothetical enhancement of outer hair cell electromotility with salicylate therapy. Studies of human ARHL have revealed a set of unique hearing loss configurations with unique underlying pathologies. Animal research has developed models for the different forms of age-related peripheral pathology. Using the animal models, different techniques for prevention of ARHL have been developed and tested. The current review discusses ARHL patterns in humans and animal models, followed by discussions of the different prevention techniques. PMID:19735708

  12. Genetic background effects on age-related hearing loss associated with Cdh23 variants in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kelly L.; Longo-Guess, Chantal M.; Gagnon, Leona H.; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard J.; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Inbred strain variants of the Cdh23 gene have been shown to influence the onset and progression of age-related hearing loss (AHL) in mice. In linkage backcrosses, the recessive Cdh23 allele (ahl) of the C57BL/6J strain, when homozygous, confers increased susceptibility to AHL, while the dominant allele (Ahl+) of the CBA/CaJ strain confers resistance. To determine the isolated effects of these alleles on different strain backgrounds, we produced the reciprocal congenic strains B6.CBACa-Cdh23Ahl+and CBACa.B6-Cdh23ahl and tested 15-30 mice from each for hearing loss progression. ABR thresholds for 8 kHz, 16 kHz, and 32 kHz pure-tone stimuli were measured at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months of age and compared with age-matched mice of the C57BL/6J and CBA/CaJ parental strains. Mice of the C57BL/6N strain, which is the source of embryonic stem cells for the large International Knockout Mouse Consortium, were also tested for comparisons with C57BL/6J mice. Mice of the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N strains exhibited identical hearing loss profiles: their 32 kHz ABR thresholds were significantly higher than those of CBA/CaJ and congenic strain mice by 6 months of age, and their 16 kHz thresholds were significantly higher by 12 months. Thresholds of the CBA/CaJ, the B6.CBACa-Cdh23Ahl+, and the CBACa.B6-Cdh23ahl strain mice differed little from one another and only slightly increased throughout the 18-month test period. Hearing loss, which corresponded well with cochlear hair cell loss, was most profound in the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6NJ strains. These results indicate that the CBA/CaJ-derived Cdh23Ahl+ allele dramatically lessens hearing loss and hair cell death in an otherwise C57BL/6J genetic background, but that the C57BL/6J-derived Cdh23ahl allele has little effect on hearing loss in an otherwise CBA/CaJ background. We conclude that although Cdh23ahl homozygosity is necessary, it is not by itself sufficient to account for the accelerated hearing loss of C57BL/6J mice. PMID:22138310

  13. Conductive Hearing Loss with Present Acoustic Reflex: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Sakamoto; Shu Kikuta; Shinji Urata; Kazuo Yasuhara; Kikkawa, Yayoi S.; Tatsuya Yamasoba

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic reflex is a sensitive indicator of middle ear lesions when the tympanic membrane is in-tact and tympanometry is normal. Acoustic reflex is not usually observed in conductive hearing loss caused by disruption of the ossicular chain including ossicular discontinuity and fixation. Ossicular disruption can show at least partially intact acoustic reflex under a certain condition. Moreover, ossicular discontinuity with a nearly intact acoustic reflex is quite rare and there have been few r...

  14. Association between Ocular Pseudoexfoliation and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Nandini Vijaya Singham; Mimiwati Zahari; Mohammadreza Peyman; Narayanan Prepageran; Visvaraja Subrayan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Our study aimed to investigate an association between ocular pseudoexfoliation (PXF) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and to compare them with age and sex matched controls without pseudoexfoliation. Method. This was a case-control study of 123 patients which included 68 cases with PXF (at least one eye) and 55 controls without pseudoexfoliation. Pure-tone audiometry (PTA) was done for these patients at sound frequencies taken as important for speech comprehension, that is, 25...

  15. Vestibular Schwannoma in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal ...

  16. Multiple-ASSR Interactions in Adults with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Ieda M.; Stapells, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The multiple auditory steady-state response (multiple-ASSR) technique, where thresholds for up to 8 frequencies (4 in each ear) are obtained simultaneously, is currently of great interest for audiometric assessment of infants. Although threshold estimates using the multiple-ASSR appear to be reasonably accurate, it is not currently known whether it is more efficient to use multiple stimuli or single stimuli when testing individuals with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The current study inv...

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Okokhere Peter O; Ibekwe Titus S; Akpede George O

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented...

  18. Informational Masking in Listeners with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kidd, Jr; Arbogast, Tanya L.; Mason, Christine R.; Walsh, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Measures of energetic and informational masking were obtained from 46 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss. The task was to detect the presence of a sequence of eight contiguous 60-ms bursts of a pure tone embedded in masker bursts that were played synchronously with the signal. The masker was either a sequence of Gaussian noise bursts (energetic masker) or a sequence of random-frequency 2-tone bursts (informational masker). The 2-tone maskers were of two types: one type that normally te...

  19. Sensori-neural hearing loss following radiotherapy to the nasopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study was done to ascertain the risks of cochlear damage from radiotherapy of the nasopharynx. Audiometric evaluation, pre- and post-radiotherapy, revealed that 7 out of 13 patients had sustained sensori-neural deafness. Contrary to what is generally believed of the resistance of the cochlea to radiotherapeutic damage, eventual loss of hearing can occasionally be expected in patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck tumors

  20. Cortical Reorganization in Children with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Holland, Scott K.; Ret, Jennifer; Duggins, Angie; Arjmand, Ellis; Greinwald, John

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown evidence of cortical reorganization following unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL). In addition, subjects with right USNHL have shown greater deficits in academic and language performance compared to subjects with left USNHL. A preliminary functional MRI investigation was performed on a small cohort of subjects, 4 with left USNHL and 4 with right USNHL, using the paradigm of listening to random tones. While the subjects with left USNHL displayed greater ac...

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Thongyai Kanthong; Keskool Phawin; Thephamongkhol Kullathorn; Sermsree Achariyaporn; Petsuksiri Janjira; Chansilpa Yaowalak; Pattaranutaporn Pittayapoom

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is one of the major long term side effects from radiation therapy (RT) in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. This study aims to review the incidences of SNHL when treating with different radiation techniques. The additional objective is to determine the relationship of the SNHL with the radiation doses delivered to the inner ear. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 134 individual ears from 68 NPC patients, treated with conventional ...

  2. NAD+ Metabolism in Age-Related Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyung-jin; Oh, Gi-su; Choe, Seong-kyu; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-seob

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), a degenerative disorder characterized by age-dependent progressive increase in the threshold of auditory sensitivity, affects 40% of people over the age of 65, and it has emerged as an important social and public health problem. Various factors, including genetic and environmental components, are known to affect both the onset and severity of ARHL. In particular, age-dependent changes in cellular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses accompanied by alter...

  3. Age-related hearing loss: Is it a preventable condition?

    OpenAIRE

    Bielefeld, Eric C.; Tanaka, Chiemi; Chen, Guang-di; Henderson, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Numerous techniques have been tested to attempt to prevent the onset or progression of age-related hearing loss (ARHL): raising the animals in an augmented acoustic environment (used successfully in mouse and rat models), enhancing the antioxidant defenses with exogenous antioxidant treatments (used with mixed results in mouse and rat models), raising the animals with a calorie restricted diet (used successfully in mouse and rat models), restoring lost endocochlear potential voltage with exog...

  4. Acrylonitrile Potentiates Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Fechter, Laurence D.; Gearhart, Caroline; Shirwany, Najeeb A.

    2003-01-01

    Acrylonitrile, one of the 50 most commonly produced industrial chemicals, has recently been identified as a promoter of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). This agent has the potential to produce oxidative stress through multiple pathways. We hypothesize that acrylonitrile potentiates NIHL as a consequence of oxidative stress. The objectives of this study were to characterize acrylonitrile exposure conditions that promote permanent NIHL in rats and determine the ability of this nitrile to prod...

  5. Strategies for developing novel therapeutics for sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    TakayukiNakagawa

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a common disability in the world; however, at present, options for the pharmacological treatment of SNHL are very limited. Previous studies involving human temporal bone analyses have revealed that the degeneration of the cochlea is a common mechanism of SNHL. A major problem for the development of novel pharmacotherapy for SNHL has been the limited regeneration capacity in mammalian cochlear cells. However, recent progress in basic studies has led to seve...

  6. Cisplatin and Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Hearing Loss and Its Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Schacht, Jochen; Talaska, Andra E.; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2012-01-01

    This review introduces the pathology of aminoglycoside antibiotic and the cisplatin chemotherapy classes of drugs, discusses oxidative stress in the inner ear as a primary trigger for cell damage, and delineates the ensuing cell death pathways. Among potentially ototoxic (damaging the inner ear) therapeutics, the platinum-based anti-cancer drugs and the aminoglycoside antibiotics are of critical clinical importance. Both drugs cause sensorineural hearing loss in patients, a side effect that c...

  7. Sonar-induced temporary hearing loss in dolphins

    OpenAIRE

    Mooney, T. Aran; Nachtigall, Paul E.; Vlachos, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing concern that human-produced ocean noise is adversely affecting marine mammals, as several recent cetacean mass strandings may have been caused by animals' interactions with naval ‘mid-frequency’ sonar. However, it has yet to be empirically demonstrated how sonar could induce these strandings or cause physiological effects. In controlled experimental studies, we show that mid-frequency sonar can induce temporary hearing loss in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)....

  8. Sensorineural hearing loss in people with deletions of 18q

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Brian P.; Sebold, Courtney; Hasi, Minire; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Hill, Annice; Gelfond, Jonathon; Hale, Daniel E.; Cody, Jannine D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to characterize hearing loss in individuals with deletions of distal chromsome18q and to identify the smallest region of overlap of their deletions, thereby identifying potential causative genes. Study Design The clinical data were collected via a retrospective case study. Molecular data were obtained via high resolution chromosome microarray analysis. Setting The study was conducted as a component of the ongoing research protocols at the Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Patients Thirty-eight participants with a deletion of the distal portion of the long arm of chromosome 18 were recruited to this study. Interventions The participants underwent an otologic examination as well as a basic audiometry evaluation. Blood samples were obtained and high resolution chromosome microarray analysis was performed. Main Outcomes Measures Pure tone averages and speech discrimination scores were determined for each participant. The region of hemizygosity for each participant was determined to within 2 Kb each of their breakpoints. Results Twenty-four participants (63%) had high-frequency hearing loss, similar to the pattern seen in presbycusis. Comparison of microarray results allowed identification of eight genes, including the candidate gene for dysmyelination (MBP). Conclusions Individuals with a deletion of a 2.8 Mb region of 18q23 have a high probability (83%) of high frequency sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:24662633

  9. Age-Related Hearing Loss and the Factors Determining Continued Usage of Hearing Aids among Elderly Community-Dwelling Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Mizutari, Kunio; Michikawa, Takehiro; Saito, Hideyuki; Okamoto, Yasuhide; Enomoto, Chieko; Takebayashi, Toru; Ogawa, Kaoru; Nishiwaki, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    While hearing aids are recommended for people with age-related hearing loss, many with impaired hearing do not use them. In this study, we investigated how many elderly people in the study area needed hearing aids, and the factors that determined continued wearing of the devices. The study area was Kurabuchi Town, Japan, where 1,437 residents (those aged 65 years or over) were eligible for participation in the study; 1,414 participated, of whom, 103 (7.3%) were already using hearing aids at t...

  10. The Relationship between Language Development and Behaviour Problems in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jim; McCann, Donna; Watkin, Peter; Worsfold, Sarah; Kennedy, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Background: There are well-replicated findings that link poor development on a range of communication skills with increased behavioural problems. This paper examines this relationship in children with hearing loss. Method: One hundred and twenty children with hearing loss (67 boys, 53 girls) and 63 hearing children (37 boys, 26 girls) with a mean…

  11. Talker Differences in Clear and Conversational Speech: Vowel Intelligibility for Older Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the range of talker variability for vowel intelligibility in clear versus conversational speech for older adults with hearing loss and to determine whether talkers who produced a clear speech benefit for young listeners with normal hearing also did so for older adults with hearing loss. Method: Clear and conversational vowels…

  12. Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children with Peripheral Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koravand, Amineh; Jutras, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss. Method: Forty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task in which…

  13. Comparisons of Social Competence in Young Children with and without Hearing Loss: A Dynamic Systems Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael F.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5-5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that,…

  14. Research on Relationship Model of Social Adaptation,Social Support and Life Satisfaction of Tibetan Hearing Loss Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Ren-hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper takes 230 Tibetan hearing loss children sample to research on relationship model of social adaptation, social support and life satisfaction of Tibetan hearing loss children by hearing disabled children’s social adaptive behavior, social support assessment scale and life satisfaction rating scale. Results present that there be significant positive relationship between social support and social adaptation, between social adaptation and life satisfaction. Further more, the social support doesn’t affect on life satisfaction rating, but through the social adaptation as intermediary affect on life satisfaction.

  15. The Effect of Stimulus Bandwidth on Perception of Fricative /s/ among Individuals with Different Degrees of Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Yadav

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the speech sounds that contribute to speech intelligibility are dominated by high-frequency components. The phoneme /s/ is the third or fourth most frequently occurring phoneme in the English language and second most frequently occurring consonantal phoneme in Hindi language. Given the importance of the phoneme /s/, it is ironic that, this sound contains the highest frequency acoustic elements of any speech sound in English and most of the non-English languages ranging from 4500 Hz to more than 8000 Hz. The most common type of hearing impairment affecting speech perception is high-frequency sensorineural loss (SN and such individuals require good high frequency audibility in order to better perceive fricative cues, regardless of hearing status. While many studies appear to support the general notion that high-frequency amplification may not always be beneficial, the inter-subject variability in most studies precludes a clearly defined rule that would distinguish listeners who are likely to benefit from high-frequency amplification from those who are not. The current study is aimed to determine and compare the effective bandwidth required for the perception of fricative /s/ in individuals with normal hearing and hearing impairment as a function of degree of hearing loss. A total of 100 Hindi speaking subjects equally divided into four groups (Group I: Normal hearing, Group II: Moderate SN hearing loss, Group III: Moderately severe SN hearing loss, Group IV: Severe SN hearing loss participated in the study. Nonsense syllables containing the phonemes /s/, /f/, /?/ and /c/ in /i/ vowel context and low pass filtered at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 KHz produced by a female talker were used as stimulus. The results revealed that there was a statistically significant effect (p<0.05 of bandwidth for the perception /s/ between different groups at 1 KHz, 2 KHz, 3 KHz, 4 KHz, 5 KHz, 6 KHz, 7 KHz and 8 KHz and no significant effect (p>0.05 was seen at 9 KHz between groups. In addition, individuals with normal hearing required lower bandwidth for accurate fricative perception and there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05 in mean bandwidth between groups. Among the hearing impaired group, as the degree of hearing loss increased the subjects required higher bandwidth for accurate perception of fricative. This study has important implications in knowing the effective bandwidth required for the perception of high frequency speech sounds among individuals with hearing loss on individual basis which in turn helps in the selection of appropriate rehabilitative devices.

  16. Uni- and multivariate models for investigating potential prognostic factors in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionello, Marco; Staffieri, Claudia; Breda, Stefano; Turato, Chiara; Giacomelli, Luciano; Magnavita, Paola; de Filippis, Cosimo; Staffieri, Alberto; Marioni, Gino

    2015-08-01

    With a worldwide incidence estimated at 8-15 per 100,000 population a year, idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is a common clinical finding for otologists. There is a shortage of information on the clinical factors capable of predicting hearing recovery and response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the prognostic value of clinical variables in relation to hearing recovery, in a cohort of 117 consecutive patients with ISSHL. Clinical parameters (signs, symptoms, comorbidities and treatments) and audiometric data were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical approaches for prognostic purposes to identify any correlation with hearing recovery, also expressed according to the Wilson criteria. Univariate analysis showed that age and hypertension were significantly related to hearing outcome (p = 0.004 and p = 0.015, respectively). Elderly patients and those with hypertension were at higher risk of experiencing no hearing recovery (OR = 3.25 and OR = 2.89, respectively). Age was an independent prognostic factor on multivariate analysis (p = 0.007). Tinnitus as a presenting symptom showed a trend towards an association with hearing recovery (p = 0.07). The treatment regimen, the time elapsing between the onset of symptoms and the start of therapy (p = 0.34), and the duration of the treatment (p = 0.83) were unrelated to recovery on univariate analysis. Among the parameters considered, only age was significantly and independently related to hearing outcome. There is a need for well-designed, randomized clinical trials to enable an evidence-based protocol to be developed for the treatment of ISSHL. PMID:24664295

  17. Development of conductive hearing loss due to posterior semicircular canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Marie; Kubo, Kazuhiko; Yasui, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Komune, Shizuo

    2015-06-01

    We herein report a case of posterior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome who had been audiologically followed up for eight years. The patient originally had sensorineural hearing loss. The audiogram had gradually transformed to pure conductive hearing loss. The posterior SCD was identified in CT scan. The reported case showed the possibility to distinguish the mechanism at play underlying the typical conductive hearing loss in SCD patients by tracing the transition of the hearing loss pattern. This information is of much help to predict the hearing outcomes if surgical intervention were chosen for the treatment. PMID:25466358

  18. Effects of cigarette smoking on the evolution of hearing loss caused by industrial noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbate Carmelo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The few studies evaluating the changes caused by cigarette smoking on hearing loss induced by occupational exposure to noise have reached discordant conclusions. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions between cigarette smoking and occupational exposure to noise as risk factors in the onset and development of hearing loss. The study was performed on a sample of 557 shipyard workers exposed to noise at an Equivalent Level (Leq of 93 dBA. On the basis of their smoking habits, they were divided into three groups: group (A, non-smokers; group (B, smokers (15-30 cigarettes per day; and group (C, heavy smokers (over 30 cigarettes per day. The study focussed on the audiometric responses of the subjects at the frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 Hz. The results were then compared using statistical techniquees (Internal correlation coefficient, exponential model, ANCOVA, NPC test. Comparison of the audiometric responses showed statistically significant differences between the three groups. Non-parametric analysis, performed using the NPC test, highlighted that the interaction between smoking and exposure to noise has an influence on hearing loss at all frequencies, and particularly at high frequencies (3000-4000 Hz. The data obtained from the examined sample show that smoking and exposure to noise cause an increase in occupational hearing loss and that this is directly related to the number of cigarettes smoked.

  19. GRM7 variants associated with age-related hearing loss based on auditory perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dina L.; Fisher, Laurel M.; Ohmen, Jeffrey; Parody, Robert; Fong, Chin-To; Frisina, Susan T.; Mapes, Frances; Eddins, David A.; Frisina, D. Robert; Frisina, Robert D.; Friedman, Rick A.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is a common condition of the elderly that results in significant communication difficulties in daily life. Clinically, it has been defined as a progressive loss of sensitivity to sound, starting at the high frequencies, inability to understand speech, lengthening of the minimum discernable temporal gap in sounds, and a decrease in the ability to filter out background noise. The causes of presbycusis are likely a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Previous research into the genetics of presbycusis has focused solely on hearing as measured by pure-tone thresholds. A few loci have been identified, based on a best ear pure-tone average phenotype, as having a likely role in susceptibility to this type of hearing loss; and GRM7 is the only gene that has achieved genome-wide significance. We examined the association of GRM7 variants identified from the previous study, which used an European cohort with Z-scores based on pure-tone thresholds, in a European–American population from Rochester, NY (N = 687), and used novel phenotypes of presbycusis. In the present study mixed modeling analyses were used to explore the relationship of GRM7 haplotype and SNP genotypes with various measures of auditory perception. Here we show that GRM7 alleles are associated primarily with peripheral measures of hearing loss, and particularly with speech detection in older adults. PMID:23102807

  20. Quantification of autonomic regulation in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Steffen; Ritter, Julia; Oertel, Katrin; Witt, Katharina; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Voss, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have proposed varying causes for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), including vascular occlusion, ruptured inner ear membrane, acoustic tumours and circulatory disturbances in the inner ear. The objective of this study was to characterise the autonomic regulation in 19 SSNHL patients in comparison to 19 healthy age-gender matched normal-hearing control subjects (CON) in order to improve the diagnostics of vascular caused hearing loss in SSNHL patients. A high-resolution short-term electrocardiogram (ECG) and the continuous noninvasive blood pressure signal were simultaneously recorded under resting conditions (30min). Linear and nonlinear indices of heart rate- and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV) were calculated to characterise autonomic regulation. The results showed that HRV analysis did not produce significantly different results between SSNHL and CON, whereas linear and nonlinear BPV indices showed significant differences between both groups (pblood pressure analysis. This was characterised by reduced variability, complexity and dynamics of blood pressure time series in SSNHL. These findings may contribute to an improved classification of the controversially discussed causes of SSNHL and, in addition, may lead to improved diagnostic strategies for a subgroup of SSNHL patients whose hearing loss is caused by cardiovascular factors. PMID:23491325

  1. Drug screening for hearing loss: using the zebrafish lateral line to screen for drugs that prevent and cause hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Henry C.; Santos, Felipe; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Rubel, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    Several animal models have been used for the study of mechanosensory hair cells and hearing loss. Because of the difficulty of tissue acquisition and large animal size, these traditional models are impractical for high-throughput screening. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful animal model for screening drugs that cause or prevent hair cell death. The unique characteristics of the zebrafish enable rapid in vivo imaging of hair cells and hair cell death. We have used this model to screen fo...

  2. Combined effect of smoking and occupational exposure to noise on hearing loss in steel factory workers

    OpenAIRE

    MIZOUE, T.; MIYAMOTO, T; Shimizu, T.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Evidence has accumulated concerning the adverse effects of smoking on hearing acuity, but it is not clear whether smoking modifies the association between exposure to noise and hearing loss.

  3. Predictors of hearing loss in school entrants in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusanya Bola

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing loss is a prevalent and significant disability that impairs functional development and educational attainment of school children in developing countries. Lack of a simple and practical screening protocol often deters routine and systematic hearing screening at school entry. Aim: To identify predictors of hearing loss for a practical screening model in school-aged children. Settings and Design: Community-based, retrospective case-control study of school entrants in an inner city. Methods: Results from the audiologic and non-audiologic examination of 50 hearing impaired children in randomly selected mainstream schools were compared with those of a control group of 150 normal hearing children, matched for age and sex from the same population. The non-audiologic evaluation consisted of medical history, general physical examination, anthropometry, motor skills, intelligence and visual acuity while the audiologic assessment consisted of otoscopy, audiometry and tympanometry. Statistical Analysis: Multiple logistic regression analysis of significant variables derived from univariate analysis incorporating student t-test and chi-square. Results: Besides parental literacy (OR:0.3; 95% CI:0.16-0.68, non-audiologic variables showed no association with hearing loss. In contrast, most audiologic indicators, enlarged nasal turbinate (OR:3.3; 95% CI:0.98-11.31, debris or foreign bodies in the ear canal (OR:5.4; 95% CI:1.0-36.03, impacted cerumen (OR:6.2; 95% CI:2.12-14.33, dull tympanic membrane (OR:2.2; 95% CI:1.10-4.46, perforated ear drum (OR:24.3; 95% CI:2.93-1100.17 and otitis media with effusion OME (OR:14.2; 95% CI:6.22-33.09, were associated with hearing loss. However, only parental literacy (OR:0.3; 95% CI:0.16-0.69, impacted cerumen (OR:4.0; 95% CI:1.66-9.43 and OME (OR:11.0; 95% CI:4.74-25.62 emerged as predictors. Conclusion: Selective screening based on the identification of impacted cerumen and OME will facilitate the detection of a significant proportion of hearing impaired school entrants.

  4. Storytelling in different cultural context: Applications to hearing loss public awareness campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.; Zhao, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Hearing impairment is known to be one of the most frequent sensory impairments. This condition is known to be a hidden disorder which is under recognised and under treated all around the world. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates suggest that there are over 275 million people with hearing impairment and 80% of them living in low and middle income countries. Moreover, the estimates suggest that incidence and prevalence of hearing loss and also the number of people with hearing loss a...

  5. Cumulative Lead Exposure and Age-related Hearing Loss: The VA Normative Aging Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sung Kyun; Elmarsafawy, Sahar; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Spiro, Avron; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Nie, Huiling; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Although lead has been associated with hearing loss in occupational settings and in children, little epidemiologic research has been conducted on the impact of cumulative lead exposure on age-related hearing loss in the general population. We determined whether bone lead levels, a marker of cumulative lead exposure, are associated with decreased hearing ability in 448 men from the Normative Aging Study, seen between 1962 and 1996 (2,264 total observations). Air conduction hearing thresholds w...

  6. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plontke, S.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined exposure of noise and chemicals. Based on the epidemiological and pathophysiological findings and against the background of published animal-experimental, pre-clinical and clinical findings, the various approaches for prevention, protection and therapeutic intervention with acoustic trauma are discussed. Pharmacological strategies involving anti-oxidative, anti-excitotoxic and anti-apoptotic substances as well as non-pharmacological strategies like "sound conditioning" are given attention. Furthermore, systemic and local substance application as well as the therapy of acute acoustic trauma and chronic hearing problems (including modern therapy forms for comorbidities such as tinnitus shall be delved into.

  7. Long-term Assessment of Systemic Inflammation and the Cumulative Incidence of Age-related Hearing Impairment in the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Zhan, Weihai; Tsai, Michael Y.; Klein, Ronald; Chappell, Rick; Nieto, F. Javier; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Schubert, Carla R.; Dalton, Dayna S.; Tweed, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although research has linked systemic inflammation to various diseases of aging, few studies have examined the potential role it may play in the development of age-related hearing impairment. Methods. Among 1,073 participants free of hearing impairment (pure-tone average 0.5, 1, 2, 4kHz ? 25 dB HL) in the population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (1998–2000), serum C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 were measured at three time points (1988–1990, 1998–2000, and 2009–2010), and tumor necrosis factor-? was measured at one time point (1998–2000), whereas hearing impairment was measured again in 2003–2005 and 2009–2010 to determine the 10-year cumulative incidence. Results. Inflammatory marker levels from a single time point (1998–2000) were not associated with an increased risk of developing hearing impairment. Associations between long-term serum C-reactive protein levels and incident hearing impairment differed by age (p = .031). Participants less than 60 years with consistently high (>3 mg/L) or increasing levels of serum C-reactive protein over 10 years were nearly two times (hazard ratio: 1.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 3.23) as likely to develop hearing impairment over the subsequent 10-year period, an association not seen in participants more than or equal to 60 years. A statistically significant association (p-trend = .041) was also observed between number of markers in the highest group at baseline and incident hearing impairment in this younger age group. Conclusions. Associations between long-term serum C-reactive protein levels and incident hearing impairment were observed in the cohort as a whole, but differed significantly by age group, with statistically significant associations observed in adults less than 60 years, participants moving through the peak risk period for hearing impairment over the course of the study. PMID:23739996

  8. Hearing loss impacts neural alpha oscillations under adverse listening conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Eline B.; Wöstmann, Malte; Obleser, Jonas; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lunner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Degradations in external, acoustic stimulation have long been suspected to increase the load on working memory (WM). One neural signature of WM load is enhanced power of alpha oscillations (6–12 Hz). However, it is unknown to what extent common internal, auditory degradation, that is, hearing impairment, affects the neural mechanisms of WM when audibility has been ensured via amplification. Using an adapted auditory Sternberg paradigm, we varied the orthogonal factors memory load and background noise level, while the electroencephalogram was recorded. In each trial, participants were presented with 2, 4, or 6 spoken digits embedded in one of three different levels of background noise. After a stimulus-free delay interval, participants indicated whether a probe digit had appeared in the sequence of digits. Participants were healthy older adults (62–86 years), with normal to moderately impaired hearing. Importantly, the background noise levels were individually adjusted and participants were wearing hearing aids to equalize audibility across participants. Irrespective of hearing loss (HL), behavioral performance improved with lower memory load and also with lower levels of background noise. Interestingly, the alpha power in the stimulus-free delay interval was dependent on the interplay between task demands (memory load and noise level) and HL; while alpha power increased with HL during low and intermediate levels of memory load and background noise, it dropped for participants with the relatively most severe HL under the highest memory load and background noise level. These findings suggest that adaptive neural mechanisms for coping with adverse listening conditions break down for higher degrees of HL, even when adequate hearing aid amplification is in place. PMID:25745410

  9. Sex Differences in a Cross Sectional Study of Age-related Hearing Loss in Korean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Jung; Kim, Hak Soo; Park, Jun Ho; Jarng, Soon Suck; Lee, Sang Heun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to obtain sex- and age-specific reference level for hearing threshold of normal aging in Korean and to determine if the rate of change in pure-tone hearing thresholds differed by sex. Methods Subjects were clients who visited the Health Promotion Center, Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea, from January 2004 to September 2005. Pure-tone audiometric measures were obtained from 3,470 subjects who also completed a hearing questionnaire. The slope of a linear regression was used to estimate the rate of change in pure-tone thresholds at 0.25 to 8 kHz for each ear in 214 men and 902 women without past history of otorrhea, usage of ototoxic drugs, head injury, job in noisy environment, and military service. Results Hearing thresholds were elevated with age in all test frequencies. Significant sex differences were found in pure-tone thresholds at 4 and 8 kHz after adjusting for age using analysis of covariance. In those high frequencies, hearing was worse in men than in women. The average rate of change in threshold was 0.28 and 0.24 dB per year at 0.25 kHz, increasing gradually to 1.27 and 1.05 dB per year at 8 kHz for men and women, respectively. Men had significantly faster rates of threshold increase at 4 and 8 kHz than women. Conclusion These cross-sectional measures of hearing levels and rate of threshold increases at 4 and 8 kHz showed significant sex differences in Korean men and women with little evidence of noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:20379399

  10. Resolution of sudden sensorineural hearing loss following a roller coaster ride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aman; Sinha, Amrita; Al-Waa, Ahmad M

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset during an aeroplane flight, which completely resolved during a roller coaster ride at Alton Towers theme park. A review of the literature concerning sudden idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and spontaneous resolution are discussed. Initially, pure-tone audiometry showed a profound sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and mild sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear (of note, the hearing was normal prior to the episode). Following resolution of the patient's symptoms during a roller coaster ride, pure-tone audiometry showed normal hearing thresholds in both ears. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a symptom of cochlear injury and the mechanism of the patient's symptoms was attributed to a patent cochlear aqueduct. PMID:22754856

  11. Recent advances in the study of age-related hearing loss - A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ambrose R; Bao, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common age-associated affliction that can result from the loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the cochlea. Although hair cells and SGNs are typically lost in the same cochlea, recent analysis suggests that they can occur independently, via unique mechanisms. Research has identified both environmental and genetic factors that contribute to degeneration of cochlear cells. Additionally, molecular analysis has identified multiple cell signaling mechanisms that likely contribute to pathological changes that result in hearing deficiencies. These analyses should serve as useful primers for future work, including genomic and proteomic analysis, to elucidate the mechanisms driving cell loss in the aging cochlea. Significant progress in this field has occurred in the past decade. As our understanding of aging-induced cochlear changes continues to improve, our ability to offer medical intervention will surely benefit the growing elderly population. PMID:22710288

  12. A Study of the Combined Use of a Hearing Aid and Tactual Aid in an Adult with Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Charlotte M.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the benefits of the combined used of a hearing aid and tactual aid to supplement lip-reading in the reception of speech and for the recognition of environmental sounds in an adult with profound hearing loss. Speech conditions included lip-reading alone (L), lip-reading + tactual aid (L+TA) lip-reading + hearing aid (L+HA) and…

  13. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Taghi Heydari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran. Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg and audiometric variables was recorded. Findings:Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5% had normal hearing and 10 (3.5% sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion. Conclusion:We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity.

  14. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Faramarzi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran.Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg and audiometric variables was recorded.Findings:Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5% had normal hearing and 10 (3.5% sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion.Conclusion:We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity.

  15. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Abolhassan; Karimi, Mehran; Heydari, Seyed-Taghi; Shishegar, Mahmoud; Kaviani, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Objective The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran. Methods A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006–2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO) dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg) and audiometric variables was recorded. Findings Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5%) had normal hearing and 10 (3.5%) sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion. Conclusion We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity. PMID:23056722

  16. Age-related hearing loss and the ahl locus in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Canto, Cecilia; Zheng, Qing Yin; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    C57BL/6 (B6) mice experience hearing loss and cochlear degeneration beginning about mid-life, whereas CAST/Ei (CAST) mice retain normal hearing until old age. A locus contributing to the hearing loss of B6 mice, named age-related hearing loss (ahl), was mapped to Chromosome 10. A homozygous, congenic strain of mice (B6.CAST-+ahl), generated by crossing B6 (ahl/ahl) and CAST (+ahl/+ahl) mice has the same genomic material as the B6 mice except in the region of the ahl locus, which is derived from CAST. In this study, we have determined the extent of the CAST-derived region of Chromosome 10 in the congenic strain and have examined mice of all three strains for hearing loss and cochlear morphology between 9 and 25 months of age. Results for B6 mice were similar to those described previously. CAST mice showed no detectable hearing loss even at 24 months of age; however, they had a small amount of ganglion cell degeneration. B6.CAST-+ahl mice were protected from early onset hearing loss and basal turn degeneration, but older animals did show some hearing loss and ganglion cell degeneration. We conclude that loci in addition to ahl contribute to the differences in hearing loss between B6 and CAST mice. These results illustrate the complex inheritance of age-related hearing loss in mice and may have implications for the study of human presbycusis. PMID:14759567

  17. Hearing Loss among HIV-Seropositive and HIV-Seronegative Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Peter; Hoffman, Howard J.; Springer, Gayle; Cox, Christopher; Young, Mary A.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Plankey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Hearing sensitivity among adults has quality of life implications as individuals become older. There are limited data on hearing loss among aging HIV+ adults. OBJECTIVES 1) To evaluate pure-tone hearing thresholds among HIV+ and HIV- adults with similar demographic characteristics. 2) To determine if HIV disease variables and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are associated with pure-tone threshold levels. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS 262 men (117 HIV+) from the Baltimore/Washington, DC site of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and 134 women (105 HIV+) from the Washington, DC site of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) participated. Pure-tone air-conduction thresholds were collected in a sound-treated room at octave frequencies from 250 through 8000 Hz, along with interoctave frequencies of 750, 3000, and 6000 Hz. INTERVENTION(S) None. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES In each ear, a low-frequency pure-tone average (LPTA) was calculated using air-conduction thresholds at 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz and a high-frequency PTA (HPTA) was calculated using air-conduction thresholds at 3000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hz. Linear mixed regression models tested the effect of HIV on hearing after adjusting for age, sex, race, and noise exposure history. Differential HIV effects for LPTA and HPTA and better/worse ear were also examined. CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, log10 plasma HIV RNA concentrations, ever having had an AIDS-defining condition, and cumulative time on ART were included in the models for HIV+ participants only. RESULTS HPTA and LPTA were significantly higher (18% and 12%, respectively), for HIV+ participants compared to HIV- participants for the better ear. The direction of the effect was consistent across both the better and worse ear. There were no significant associations between HIV disease variables or treatment variables and LPTA or HPTA. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE HIV+ adults had significantly poorer lower and higher frequency hearing compared to HIV- adults. High frequency hearing loss is consistent with an accelerated aging (presbycusis); hearing loss in the low frequency range among middle-aged individuals is an unexpected finding. Since some vowels and consonants have predominantly low frequency acoustic energy, poorer hearing in lower frequencies may lead to increased communication difficulties in HIV+ individuals. PMID:25541676

  18. Postural control in children with typical development and children with profound hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro de Sousa AM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aneliza Maria Monteiro de Sousa,1 Jônatas de França Barros,2 Brígido Martins de Sousa Neto31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil; 2Department of Physical Education at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 3University Center UNIEURO, Brasilia, Federal District, BrazilPurpose: To describe the behavior of the postural control in children with profound sensorineural hearing loss and compare the results of experimental tests with hearing children aged 7 to 10 years.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional study where 100 children were divided into experimental and control groups. We used a force platform, AccuSway Plus, where the tests were conducted under the experimental conditions: open base, eyes open (OBEO; open base, eyes closed (OBEC; closed base, eyes open (CBEO; closed base, eyes closed (CBEC. The body sway velocity (V of the center of pressure, the displacement in the anteroposterior direction (COPap and mediolateral (COPml of the center of pressure were the parameters to evaluate the postural control. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test, with a significance level of 5%.Results: In comparisons of variables between the groups, the experimental group outperformed by at least 75% of the control group values. In terms of global trends, the experimental group shows higher values of body oscillations in all experimental conditions and variables evaluated. Children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing. The inferential analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the balance between deaf and hearing children in the OBEC experimental condition in relation to the COPml parameter (P = 0.04. There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons between the sexes when the groups were analyzed separately. The prevalence of unknown etiology showed 58% of cases and congenital rubella in 16%. The discovery of deafness occurred in 70% of children before the age of 3 years.Conclusion: In this study, children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing children. This finding confirms the need to investigate postural control through longitudinal studies to identify the area of sensory deficit causing poor balance performance and promote more specific early interventions.Keywords: postural control, hearing impairment, balance, children, sensory deprivation, early intervention

  19. Glycinergic synaptic transmission in the cochlear nucleus of mice with normal hearing and age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie (???), Ruili

    2013-01-01

    The principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cochlear nucleus (CN) is glycine. During age-related hearing loss (AHL), glycinergic inhibition becomes weaker in CN. However, it is unclear what aspects of glycinergic transmission are responsible for weaker inhibition with AHL. We examined glycinergic transmission onto bushy cells of the anteroventral CN in normal-hearing CBA/CaJ mice and in DBA/2J mice, a strain that exhibits an early onset AHL. Glycinergic synaptic transmission was examined in brain slices of mice at 10–15 postnatal days old, 20–35 days old, and at 6–7 mo old. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC) event frequency and amplitude were the same among all three ages in both strains of mice. However, the amplitudes of IPSCs evoked (eIPSC) from stimulating the dorsal CN were smaller, and the failure rate was higher, with increasing age due to decreased quantal content in both mouse strains, independent of hearing status. The coefficient of variation of the eIPSC amplitude also increased with age. The decay time constant (?) of sIPSCs and eIPSCs were constant in CBA/CaJ mice at all ages, but were significantly slower in DBA/2J mice at postnatal days 20–35, following the onset of AHL, and not at earlier or later ages. Our results suggest that glycinergic inhibition at the synapses onto bushy cells becomes weaker and less reliable with age through changes in release. However, the hearing loss in DBA/2J mice is accompanied by a transiently enhanced inhibition, which could disrupt the balance of excitation and inhibition. PMID:23904491

  20. Single-sided deafness & directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MartijnJohannes HermanusAgterberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Direction-specific interactions of sound waves with the head, torso and pinna provide unique spectral-shape cues that are used for the localization of sounds in the vertical plane, whereas horizontal sound localization is based primarily on the processing of binaural acoustic differences in arrival time (interaural time differences, or ITDs and sound level (interaural level differences, or ILDs. Because the binaural sound-localization cues are absent in listeners with total single-sided deafness (SSD, their ability to localize sound is heavily impaired. However, some studies have reported that SSD listeners are able, to some extent, to localize sound sources in azimuth, although the underlying mechanisms used for localization are unclear. To investigate whether SSD listeners rely on monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues of their hearing ear for directional hearing, we investigated localization performance for low-pass filtered (LP, 3 kHz and broadband (BB, 0.5 – 20 kHz noises in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We tested whether localization performance of SSD listeners further deteriorated when the pinna cavities of their hearing ear were filled with a mold that disrupted their spectral-shape cues. To remove the potential use of perceived sound level as an invalid azimuth cue, we randomly varied stimulus presentation levels over a broad range (45-65 dB SPL. Several listeners with SSD could localize HP and BB sound sources in the horizontal plane, but inter-subject variability was considerable. Localization performance of these listeners strongly reduced after diminishing of their spectral pinna-cues. We further show that inter-subject variability of SSD can be explained to a large extent by the severity of high-frequency hearing loss in their hearing ear.

  1. Can Noise in Dental Clinic Produce Hearing Loss?

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    Lourenço, Edmir Américo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sensorial hearing loss and irreversible noise induced is the major evitable occupational cause of hearing loss worldwide. The dentists are health professionals exposed to noises from equipment in their clinics and may suffer hearing losses. Objective: Measure the noise intensities emitted by the high rotation motors (mar used in public and private dental clinics, check whether they are harmful for the human ear and compare the results obtained in such services. Method: Serial, retrospective study with measures of the noise intensities in dBNA with a decibelimeter Minipa MSL-1352C, USA, in four dental clinics of the public service and four private clinics in Jundiaí-SP, initially from the basal environment noise in each clinic, during five minutes and then from the noise emitted by the high rotation motor (mar in operation during five minutes to obtain the averages. Results:Public clinics: 1basal medium=56.4dB;mar=77.2dB. 2basal medium=61.7dB;mar=73.7dB. 3basal medium=61.07dB;mar=75.04dB. 4basal medium=63.6dB;mar=77.3dB. Private clinics: 1basal medium=60,7dB;mar=79,1dB. 2basal=60,7dB;mar=83,1dB. 3basal=58,4dB;mar=75,5dB. 4basal=63dB;mar=76dB. Conclusion: The intensities measured of noise emitted by high rotation motors used in public and private dental clinics are below the limits harmful to the auditory health. In the public service, the basal medium noise intensity is higher than that of the private clinics, however the one of the high rotation motors is higher in the private clinics.

  2. SENSORY HEARING LOSS IN CHILDREN WITH MUMPS INFECTION

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    S. Noorbaksh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Mumps infection is endemic in Iran and mumps parotiditis is acommon disease in Iranian children. There has been a dramaticdecrease in the worldwide incidence of mumps since the introductionand use in 1968 of the very effective and inexpensive mumps vaccine.In Iran probably due to a higher percentage of unvaccinated youngpersons <15yr, the incidence rate of mumps infection and its sequelaare higher in comparison to corresponding data from developedcountries prior to comprehensive vaccination programs. The aim ofthe study was to investigate the effects of the mumps virus on cochlearfunction and to determine the frequency of related Sensory NeuralHearing Loss (SNHL in children.Material& Methods:This descriptive case-series study was conducted in 94children, agedless than 14 years, hospitalized between 1999 and 2001, in thepediatric ward of the Hazrat Rasool Hospital in Tehran. All patientswith documented mumps infection (specific mumps-IgM antibodywere evaluated twice for audiometeric function on the basis ofdiagnostic parameters for sensory neural hearing loss; the first evaluationwas done on admission and the second three weeks later. 54 patients(age range 1-14y, mean age 4.83±3.93, male: female ratio30:24were studied in two years.Results:The highest incidence of mumps was seen in winter (37% and spring(28% and the lowest in summer (13%. Specific IgM antibody formumps virus was detected in 74 children. Comprehensive audiologicevaluation was done in 54 patients at admission and again 3 weekslater. SNHL was detected in 7.2% of patients; the 4.4% incidence ofSNHL in this study was higher than in other studies in developedcountries prior to comprehensive vaccination programs.Conclusion:Implementation of comprehensive vaccination programs in youngIranians could dramatically reduce the burden and costs imposed bythe infection and its sequelae.Keywords: Mumps infection ;SNLH(sensorineural hearing loss;Mumpsvaccination

  3. Risk Factors for Hearing Loss in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment of head-and-neck carcinoma. The objective of this study was to perform a prospective multivariate assessment of the dose-effect relationship between intensity-modulated RT and hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Pure tone audiometry at 0.250-16 kHz was obtained before and after treatment in 101 patients (202 ears). All patients received full-course intensity-modulated RT (range, 56-70 Gy), with a median cochlear dose of 11.4 Gy (range, 0.2-69.7). Results: Audiometry was performed 1 week before and a median of 9 weeks (range, 1-112) after treatment. The mean hearing deterioration at pure tone average air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz was small (from 28.6 dB HL to 30.1 dB HL). However, individual patients showed clinically significant hearing loss, with 10-dB threshold shift incidences of 13% and 18% at pure tone averages air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz and 8-10-12.5 kHz, respectively. Post-treatment hearing capability was unfavorable in the case of greater inner ear radiation doses (p <0.0001), unfavorable baseline hearing capability (p <0.0001), green-eyed patients (p <0.0001), and older age (p <0.0001). Using multivariate analysis, a prediction of individual hearing capabiltity after treatment was made. Conclusion: RT-induced hearing loss in the mean population is modest. However, clinically significant hearing loss was observed in older patients with green eyes and unfavorable pretreatment hearing. In these patients, the intended raearing. In these patients, the intended radiation dose may be adjusted according to the proposed predictive model, aiming to decrease the risk of ototoxicity.

  4. Cues for Diotic and Dichotic Detection of a 500-Hz Tone in Noise Vary with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junwen; Koch, Kelly-Jo; Doherty, Karen A; Carney, Laurel H

    2015-08-01

    Hearing in noise is a challenge for all listeners, especially for those with hearing loss. This study compares cues used for detection of a low-frequency tone in noise by older listeners with and without hearing loss to those of younger listeners with normal hearing. Performance varies significantly across different reproducible, or "frozen," masker waveforms. Analysis of these waveforms allows identification of the cues that are used for detection. This study included diotic (N0S0) and dichotic (N0S?) detection of a 500-Hz tone, with either narrowband or wideband masker waveforms. Both diotic and dichotic detection patterns (hit and false alarm rates) across the ensembles of noise maskers were predicted by envelope-slope cues, and diotic results were also predicted by energy cues. The relative importance of energy and envelope cues for diotic detection was explored with a roving-level paradigm that made energy cues unreliable. Most older listeners with normal hearing or mild hearing loss depended on envelope-related temporal cues, even for this low-frequency target. As hearing threshold at 500 Hz increased, the cues for diotic detection transitioned from envelope to energy cues. Diotic detection patterns for young listeners with normal hearing are best predicted by a model that combines temporal- and energy-related cues; in contrast, combining cues did not improve predictions for older listeners with or without hearing loss. Dichotic detection results for all groups of listeners were best predicted by interaural envelope cues, which significantly outperformed the classic cues based on interaural time and level differences or their optimal combination. PMID:25976088

  5. GRM7 variants associated with age-related hearing loss based on auditory perception

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Dina L.; Fisher, Laurel M.; Ohmen, Jeffrey; Parody, Robert; Fong, Chin-to; Frisina, Susan T.; Mapes, Frances; Eddins, David A.; Frisina, D. Robert; Frisina, Robert D.; Friedman, Rick A.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is a common condition of the elderly that results in significant communication difficulties in daily life. Clinically, it has been defined as a progressive loss of sensitivity to sound, starting at the high frequencies, inability to understand speech, lengthening of the minimum discernable temporal gap in sounds, and a decrease in the ability to filter out background noise. The causes of presbycusis are likely a combination of environment...

  6. An Internet Survey of Individuals With Hearing Loss Regarding Assistive Listening Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Harkins, Judith; Tucker, Paula

    2007-01-01

    An Internet survey of individuals with hearing loss was conducted to determine their use of assistive listening devices for face-to-face conversation and, while part of an audience, their satisfaction with assistive listening devices, their interest in the concept of a universal assistive listening device receiver, and their interest in receiving audiologic information and services through the Internet. The 423 respondents who used assistive listening devices found them to be of significant b...

  7. Enhancing Theory-of-Mind Discourse among Deaf Parents of Children with Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Margalit Ziv; Irit Meir; Lucy Malky

    2013-01-01

    Children with hearing loss often have difficulties in the socio-emotional domain that can be attributed to a significant delay in the development of theory of mind (ToM). The current article describes a workshop aimed at enhancing deaf parents' awareness of the importance of ToM development and enriching parent-child conversations with developmentally appropriate mental state contents. Eight deaf mothers from mid- low SES background participated in six sessions and were guided to enrich their...

  8. High-Frequency Hearing Loss Among Mobile Phone Users

    OpenAIRE

    P.Velayutham; Govindasamy, Gopala Krishnan; R. Raman; Prepageran, N.; Ng, K H

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess high frequency hearing (above 8 kHz) loss among prolonged mobile phone users is a tertiary Referral Center. Prospective single blinded study. This is the first study that used high-frequency audiometry. The wide usage of mobile phone is so profound that we were unable to find enough non-users as a control group. Therefore we compared the non-dominant ear to the dominant ear using audiometric measurements. The study was a blinded study wherein the audi...

  9. Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence Mimicking Otosclerotic Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Saumil N.; Rosowski, John J.; McKenna, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A puzzling aspect of middle ear surgery is the presence of an air-bone gap in a small number of cases with no apparent cause. We believe that some of these cases are due to unrecognized superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD). We have now gathered experience from 20 patients with SSCD presenting with apparent conductive hearing loss without vestibular symptoms. All affected ears had SSCD on high-resolution CT scan. The common findings in these patients were: (1) the air-bone gaps occurr...

  10. Occupational hearing loss: tonal audiometry X high frequencies audiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies on the occupational exposure show that noise has been reaching a large part of the working population around the world, and NIHL (noise-induced hearing loss is the second most frequent disease of the hearing system. Objective: To review the audiometry results of employees at the campus of the University of São Paulo, Bauru. Method: 40 audiometry results were analyzed between 2007 and 2008, whose ages comprised between 32 and 59 years, of both sexes and several professions: gardeners, maintenance technicians, drivers etc. The participants were divided into 2 groups: those with tonal thresholds within acceptable thresholds and those who presented auditory thresholds alterations, that is tonal thresholds below 25 dB (NA in any frequency (Administrative Rule no. 19 of the Ministry of Labor 1998. In addition to the Conventional Audiologic Evaluation (250Hz to 8.000Hz we also carried out High Frequencies Audiometry (9000Hz, 10000Hz, 11200Hz, 12500Hz, 14000Hz and 16000Hz. Results: According to the classification proposed by FIORINI (1994, 25.0% (N=10 they presented with NIHL suggestive audiometric configurations. The results of high frequencies Audiometry confirmed worse thresholds than those obtained in the conventional audiometry in the 2 groups evaluated. Conclusion: The use of high frequencies audiometry proved to be an important register as a hearing alteration early detection method.

  11. Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss in Children: Past and Current Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, audiologists have become increasingly aware of the potential effect of even mild degrees of hearing loss on the psychoeducational and psychosocial outcomes of children. This review describes some of the key research findings during the past several decades that have led us to our current thinking about unilateral and mild bilateral hearing loss in children. The first section addresses unilateral hearing loss. This is followed by a review of the literature on mild bilate...

  12. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Shima Arastou; Ardavan Tajedini; Pedram Borghei

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) patients with poor prognostic factors.     Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay be...

  13. A case of sensorineural hearing loss involving a fibroepithelial polyp of the middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Daniel; Sweeney, Alex D; Eisenberg, Rosana; Wanna, George B

    2015-01-01

    Primary middle ear neoplasms are rare, and commonly cause conductive hearing loss. When aural masses result in sensorineural hearing loss, malignant etiologies are often suspected. Fibroepithelial polyps are benign lesions commonly found in the skin and genitourinary tract and are not commonly identified as primary lesions of the middle ear. Here, we present a case of a benign fibroepithelial polyp of the middle ear causing sensorineural hearing loss and describe its surgical management. Imaging and histologic characteristics are reviewed. PMID:25701460

  14. Classifying Human Audiometric Phenotypes of Age-Related Hearing Loss from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dubno, Judy R.; Eckert, Mark A.; Lee, Fu-shing; Matthews, Lois J.; Schmiedt, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbyacusis) has a complex etiology. Results from animal models detailing the effects of specific cochlear injuries on audiometric profiles may be used to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss in older humans and predict cochlear pathologies associated with certain audiometric configurations (“audiometric phenotypes”). Patterns of hearing loss associated with cochlear pathology in animal models were used to define schematic boundaries of human audiog...

  15. Risk of hearing loss from combined exposure to hand-arm vibrations and noise

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersson, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss from noise exposure is one of the most common occupational injuries, and exposure to vibrations may increase the risk of noise-induced hearing loss. Earlier cross-sectional and longitudinal studies found an increased risk of noise-induced hearing loss among workers with vibration-induced white fingers (VWF) symptoms compared to workers without such symptoms. It has been suggested that vibrations to the hand stimulate the sympathetic nervous system and cause vasoconstriction in bo...

  16. Anosmia associated with hearing loss and benign positional vertigo after head trauma

    OpenAIRE

    OTTAVIANO, G.; Marioni, G; Marchese-Ragona, R; Trevisan, CP; De Filippis, C; Staffieri, A

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that head trauma may cause hearing loss, which can be either conductive or sensorineural. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and olfactory dysfunction due to head trauma are also well known. The association between sensorineural hearing loss and anosmia, following head trauma, is extremely rare. Two rare cases of post-traumatic occurrence of hearing loss, olfactory dysfunction and benign positional vertigo are reported and the pathophysiology of the association between sens...

  17. The impact of hearing loss on language performance in older adults with different stages of cognitive function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodeiro-Fernández, Leire; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Maseda, Ana; Núñez-Naveira, Laura; Rodríguez-Villamil, José Luis; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The possible relationship between audiometric hearing thresholds and cognitive performance on language tests was analyzed in a cross-sectional cohort of older adults aged ?65 years (N=98) with different degrees of cognitive impairment. Materials and methods Participants were distributed into two groups according to Reisberg’s Global Deterioration Scale (GDS): a normal/predementia group (GDS scores 1–3) and a moderate/moderately severe dementia group (GDS scores 4 and 5). Hearing loss (pure-tone audiometry) and receptive and production-based language function (Verbal Fluency Test, Boston Naming Test, and Token Test) were assessed. Results Results showed that the dementia group achieved significantly lower scores than the predementia group in all language tests. A moderate negative correlation between hearing loss and verbal comprehension (r=?0.298; P<0.003) was observed in the predementia group (r=?0.363; P<0.007). However, no significant relationship between hearing loss and verbal fluency and naming scores was observed, regardless of cognitive impairment. Conclusion In the predementia group, reduced hearing level partially explains comprehension performance but not language production. In the dementia group, hearing loss cannot be considered as an explanatory factor of poor receptive and production-based language performance. These results are suggestive of cognitive rather than simply auditory problems to explain the language impairment in the elderly. PMID:25914528

  18. Effects of auditory training in individuals with high-frequency hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renata Beatriz Fernandes; Marangoni, Andrea Tortosa; de Andrade, Adriana Neves; Prestes, Raquel; Gil, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a formal auditory training program on the behavioral, electrophysiological and subjective aspects of auditory function in individuals with bilateral high-frequency hearing loss. METHOD: A prospective study of seven individuals aged 46 to 57 years with symmetric, moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging from 3 to 8 kHz was conducted. Evaluations of auditory processing (sound location, verbal and non-verbal sequential memory tests, the speech-in-noise test, the staggered spondaic word test, synthetic sentence identification with competitive ipsilateral and contralateral competitive messages, random gap detection and the standard duration test), auditory brainstem response and long-latency potentials and the administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaire were performed in a sound booth before and immediately after formal auditory training. RESULTS: All of the participants demonstrated abnormal pre-training long-latency characteristics (abnormal latency or absence of the P3 component) and these abnormal characteristics were maintained in six of the seven individuals at the post-training evaluation. No significant differences were found between ears in the quantitative analysis of auditory brainstem responses or long-latency potentials. However, the subjects demonstrated improvements on all behavioral tests. For the questionnaire, the difference on the background noise subscale achieved statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Auditory training in adults with high-frequency hearing loss led to improvements in figure-background hearing skills for verbal sounds, temporal ordination and resolution, and communication in noisy environments. Electrophysiological changes were also observed because, after the training, some long latency components that were absent pre-training were observed during the re-evaluation. PMID:25627996

  19. Effects of auditory training in individuals with high-frequency hearing loss

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Renata Beatriz Fernandes, Santos; Andrea Tortosa, Marangoni; Adriana Neves de, Andrade; Raquel, Prestes; Daniela, Gil.

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a formal auditory training program on the behavioral, electrophysiological and subjective aspects of auditory function in individuals with bilateral high-frequency hearing [...] loss. METHOD: A prospective study of seven individuals aged 46 to 57 years with symmetric, moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging from 3 to 8 kHz was conducted. Evaluations of auditory processing (sound location, verbal and non-verbal sequential memory tests, the speech-in-noise test, the staggered spondaic word test, synthetic sentence identification with competitive ipsilateral and contralateral competitive messages, random gap detection and the standard duration test), auditory brainstem response and long-latency potentials and the administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaire were performed in a sound booth before and immediately after formal auditory training. RESULTS: All of the participants demonstrated abnormal pre-training long-latency characteristics (abnormal latency or absence of the P3 component) and these abnormal characteristics were maintained in six of the seven individuals at the post-training evaluation. No significant differences were found between ears in the quantitative analysis of auditory brainstem responses or long-latency potentials. However, the subjects demonstrated improvements on all behavioral tests. For the questionnaire, the difference on the background noise subscale achieved statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Auditory training in adults with high-frequency hearing loss led to improvements in figure-background hearing skills for verbal sounds, temporal ordination and resolution, and communication in noisy environments. Electrophysiological changes were also observed because, after the training, some long latency components that were absent pre-training were observed during the re-evaluation.

  20. Sensori-neural hearing loss in patients treated with irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation has been carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the inner ear to irradiation. Cochlear function was tested in a cohort of 22 patients before and 7-84 months after receiving external irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The pre-irradiation sensori-neural hearing threshold at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz was used as a baseline for the individual patient, and the observed sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) was calculated as the difference between pre- and post-irradiation values. The pre-irradiation hearing level or patient age was not correlated with the actual SNHL. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between the total radiation dose to the inner ear and the observed hearing impairment. SNHL was most pronounced in the high frequencies, with values up to 35 dB (4000 Hz) and 25 dB (2000 Hz) in some patients. The latent period for the complication appeared to be 12 months or more. The deleterious effect of irradiation on the hearing should be kept in mind both in treatment planning and in the follow-up after radiotherapy

  1. Auditory training during development mitigates a hearing loss-induced perceptual deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Sarro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory experience during early development can shape the central nervous system and this is thought to influence adult perceptual skills. In the auditory system, early induction of conductive hearing loss (CHL leads to deficits in central auditory coding properties in adult animals, and this is accompanied by diminished perceptual thresholds. In contrast, a brief regimen of auditory training during development can enhance the perceptual skills of animals when tested in adulthood. Here, we asked whether a brief period of training during development could compensate for the perceptual deficits displayed by adult animals reared with CHL. Juvenile gerbils with CHL, and age-matched controls, were trained on a frequency modulation (FM detection task for 4 or 10 days. The performance of each group was subsequently assessed in adulthood, and compared to adults with normal hearing or adults raised with CHL that did not receive juvenile training. We show that as juveniles, both CHL and NH animals display similar FM detection thresholds that are not immediately impacted by the perceptual training. However, as adults, detection thresholds and psychometric function slopes of these animals were significantly improved. Importantly, CHL adults with juvenile training displayed thresholds that approached normal hearing adults. Additionally, we found that hearing impaired animals trained for 10 days displayed adult thresholds closer to untrained adults than those trained for 4 days. Thus, a relatively brief period of auditory training may compensate for the deleterious impact of hearing deprivation on auditory perception on the trained task.

  2. Sensori-neural hearing loss in patients treated with irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Cai; MØller, K

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation has been carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the inner ear to irradiation. Cochlear function was tested in a cohort of 22 patients before and 7-84 months after receiving external irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The pre-irradiation sensori-neural hearing threshold at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz was used as a baseline for the individual patient, and the observed sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) was calculated as the difference between pre- and post-irradiation values. The pre-irradiation hearing level or patient age was not correlated with the actual SNHL. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between the total radiation dose to the inner ear and the observed hearing impairment. SNHL was most pronounced in the high frequencies, with values up to 35 dB (4000 Hz) and 25 dB (2000 Hz) in some patients. The latent period for the complication appeared to be 12 months or more. The deleterious effect of irradiation on the hearing should be kept in mind both in treatment planning and in the follow-up after radiotherapy.

  3. The importance of MRI examination for sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is commonly knwon as inner ear disease, although little is known about its cause in most cases. We evaluated 383 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 8.1% of the patients, MRI examination revealed some abnormal findings that may be associated with sudden sensorineural hearing loss: acoustic tumor was noted in 1%, abnormality of the vertebral-basilar artery in 1%, and infarction around the brainstem in 0.8%. In these cases, using MRI at an early stage of examination, we can establish the correct diagnosis of and treatment for hearing loss. (author)

  4. The Nature of Victimization among Youths with Hearing Loss in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Janet C.

    2010-01-01

    The author profiles the prevalence, severity, and characteristics of victimization among a group of youths with hearing loss presenting to substance abuse treatment. Intake data on 111 deaf and hard of hearing youths (42% female) were analyzed and compared with data from a weighted, gender-matched sample of hearing youths. After gender is…

  5. Synaptic Transmission at the Cochlear Nucleus Endbulb Synapse during Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Manis, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Age-related hearing loss (AHL) typically starts from high frequency regions of the cochlea and over time invades lower frequency regions. During this progressive hearing loss, sound-evoked activity in spiral ganglion cells is reduced. DBA mice have an early onset of AHL. In this study, we examined synaptic transmission at the endbulb of Held synapse between auditory nerve fibers and bushy cells in the anterior ventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Synaptic transmission in hearing-impaired high frequency areas of the AVCN was altered in old DBA mice. The spontaneous mEPSC frequency was greatly reduced (?60%), and mEPSCs were significantly slower (?115%) and smaller (?70%) in high frequency regions of old (average age 45d) DBA mice compared to tonotopically matched regions of young (average age 22d) DBA mice. Moreover, synaptic release probability was about 30% higher in high frequency regions of young DBA than that in old DBA mice. Auditory nerve-evoked EPSCs showed less rectification in old DBA mice, suggesting recruitment of GluR2 subunits into the AMPA receptor complex. No similar age-related changes in synaptic release or EPSCs were found in age matched, normal hearing young and old CBA mice. Taken together, our results suggest that auditory nerve activity plays a critical role in maintaining normal synaptic function at the endbulb of Held synapse after the onset of hearing. Auditory nerve activity regulates both presynaptic (release probability) and postsynaptic (receptor composition and kinetics) function at the endbulb synapse after the onset of hearing. PMID:15901757

  6. Loss of osteoprotegerin expression in the inner ear causes degeneration of the cochlear nerve and sensorineural hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan; Kempfle, Judith S.; Jensen, Jane B.; Perez-Fernandez, Deborah; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Edge, Albert S.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a key regulator of bone remodeling. Mutations and variations in the OPG gene cause many human diseases that are characterized by not only skeletal abnormalities but also poorly understood hearing loss: Paget’s disease, osteoporosis, and celiac disease. To gain insight into mechanisms of hearing loss in OPG deficiency, we studied OPG knockout (Opg ?/?) mice. We show that they develop sensorineural hearing loss, in addition to conductive hearing loss due to abnormal middle-ear bones. OPG deficiency caused demyelination and degeneration of the cochlear nerve in vivo. It also activated ERK, sensitized spiral ganglion cells (SGC) to apoptosis, and inhibited proliferation and survival of cochlear stem cells in vitro, which could be rescued by treatment with exogenous OPG, an ERK inhibitor, or bisphosphonate. Our results demonstrate a novel role for OPG in the regulation of SGC survival, and suggest a mechanism for sensorineural hearing loss in OPG deficiency. PMID:23607938

  7. Temporal and spectral resolution of hearing in patients with precipitous hearing loss: Gap release of masking (GRM) and the role of cognitive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin David

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to measure temporal acuity and spectral resolution of hearing in new hearing-aid users over a period of time post-fitting, and to demonstrate the extent to which performance might change over time. For one-octave wide maskers with and without spectral and temporal gaps, masking was measured repeatedly over 3 months post-fitting. GRM was characterized as the release from masking under the gap conditions. The cognitive skills of the participants were assessed with two tests for measuring working memory capacity and lexical vigilance. The results showed that while the masking by one-octave wide noise maskers without any gaps was constant over time, GRM increased over time for maskers involving a temporal gap. Moreover, at low frequencies where the subjects had normal hearing-threshold levels, they performed as hearing-impaired for the spectral-gap condition. For the temporal-gap condition, they performed as normally hearing at both low and high frequencies. These results suggest that patients with precipitous hearing loss do not maintain normal spectral resolution through the low-frequency region, in which the hearing threshold levels are otherwise normal. Surprisingly, the results also showed moderate though highly significant correlation between lexical vigilance and GRM. [Work supported by the William Demant Foundation.] a)Currently at CNBH, Dept. Physiol., University of Cambridge, CB2 3EG Cambridge, UK.

  8. Age-related hearing loss: how to screen for it, and when to intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, B E

    1994-08-01

    Hearing loss is prevalent among older adults and is associated with depression, cognitive decline, reduction in functional status, and emotional and social handicaps. Screening by physicians is important, because older adults tend to underestimate the degree of their hearing impairment. The most important predictor of hearing aid candidacy is not the severity of hearing loss but rather the patient's motivation and perception of the handicapping effects of his/her hearing impairment. A variety of hearing aid styles is available. In-the-ear units and in-the-canal hearing aids are the most popular. New digitally programmable aids are often acoustically superior, but they cost more and require considerable training. Assistive listening devices may be used with or without a hearing aid to amplify sound, television, or telephone conversations. PMID:8039728

  9. Targeting Cholesterol Homeostasis to Fight Hearing Loss: A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgrange, Brigitte; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; de Medina, Philippe; Paillasse, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a major pathology of the inner ear that affects nearly 600 million people worldwide. Despite intensive researches, this major health problem remains without satisfactory solutions. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in SNHL include oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and ischemia, resulting in synaptic loss, axonal degeneration, and apoptosis of spiral ganglion neurons. The mechanisms associated with SNHL are shared with other neurodegenerative disorders. Cholesterol homeostasis is central to numerous pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases and cholesterol regulates major processes involved in neurons survival and function. The role of cholesterol homeostasis in the physiopathology of inner ear is largely unexplored. In this review, we discuss the findings concerning cholesterol homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases and whether it should be translated into potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of SNHL. PMID:25688206

  10. Risk of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Patients with Common Preexisting Sensorineural Hearing Impairment: A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Malcolm; Hwang, Juen-Haur

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of preexisting sensorineural hearing impairment on the risk for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to assess the risk of SSHL in patients with common preexisting sensorineural hearing impairment using population-based data. Methods A population-based case-control study design was used to analyze claims data between January 2001 and December 2011 obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The cases consisted of 514 patients with SSHL and the controls were frequency matched to 2,570 cases by sex, 10-year age group, and year of index date. Common sensorineural hearing impairments were retrospectively assessed in the cases and controls. Associations between sensorineural hearing impairment and risk of SSHL were evaluated using unconditional univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The mean age for the 3,084 study subjects was 53.1 years (standard deviation, S.D. = 15.6). Of the 514 cases, 49 (9.5%) had sensorineural hearing impairment while only 44 (1.7%) of the 2,570 controls had the same condition. Univariate logistic regression analyses indicated that preexisting sensorineural hearing impairment was significantly associated with SSHL (odds ratio, OR = 6.05, p < 0.001). Other comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia also showed significant associations with SSHL. Similar results were obtained when the association between SSHL and sensorineural hearing impairment was adjusted with either all the covariates (adjusted OR = 6.22, p < 0.001) or with only those selected using a backward elimination procedure (adjusted OR = 6.20, p < 0.001). Conclusions Results from this population-based case-control study revealed that common sensorineural hearing impairment might be a novel risk factor for SSHL. PMID:25815507

  11. Hair Cell Overexpression of Islet1 Reduces Age-Related and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingqian; Kantardzhieva, Albena; Scheffer, Deborah; Liberman, M. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Isl1 is a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor that is critical in the development and differentiation of multiple tissues. In the mouse inner ear, Isl1 is expressed in the prosensory region of otocyst, in young hair cells and supporting cells, and is no longer expressed in postnatal auditory hair cells. To evaluate how continuous Isl1 expression in postnatal hair cells affects hair cell development and cochlear function, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the Pou4f3 promoter drives Isl1 overexpression specifically in hair cells. Isl1 overexpressing hair cells develop normally, as seen by morphology and cochlear functions (auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emissions). As the mice aged to 17 months, wild-type (WT) controls showed the progressive threshold elevation and outer hair cell loss characteristic of the age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in the background strain (C57BL/6J). In contrast, the Isl1 transgenic mice showed significantly less threshold elevation with survival of hair cells. Further, the Isl1 overexpression protected the ear from noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL): both ABR threshold shifts and hair cell death were significantly reduced when compared with WT littermates. Our model suggests a common mechanism underlying ARHL and NIHL, and provides evidence that hair cell-specific Isl1 expression can promote hair cell survival and therefore minimize the hearing impairment that normally occurs with aging and/or acoustic overexposure. PMID:24048839

  12. Ahl2, a Second Locus Affecting Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2010-01-01

    Inbred mouse strains with age-related hearing loss (AHL) provide valuable models for studying the genetic basis of human presbycusis. Here we report the genetic mapping of a second AHL locus in mice (designated Ahl2) that is a major contributor to the 8- to 10-month difference in hearing loss onset times between NOD/LtJ and C57BL/6J mice. A whole-genome linkage scan of 110 progeny from a (C57BL/6J × NOD/LtJ) × NOD/LtJ backcross revealed statistically significant associations of ABR thresholds with markers on chromosome 5, with a peak lod score of 5.5 for D5Mit309. At 6 months of age, backcross progeny that inherited two copies of the recessive NOD/LtJ-derived allele at this locus (genotype ahl2/ahl2) exhibited ABR thresholds that were on average 26 decibels above those of heterozygous mice. Analysis of a (CAST/Ei × NOD/LtJ) × NOD/LtJ backcross, which segregates strain-specific alleles at both Ahl2 and the Ahl locus on chromosome 10, showed that the hearing loss attributable to Ahl2 is dependent on a predisposing Ahl genotype. The statistically significant effect of Ahl2 observed in crosses with NOD/LtJ was not seen in crosses involving three other strains with early onset AHL: A/J, BUB/BnJ, and SKH2/J. PMID:12408962

  13. Relating age and hearing loss to monaural, bilateral, and binaural temporal sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FrederickJ.Gallun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Older listeners are more likely than younger listeners to have difficulties in making temporal discriminations among auditory stimuli presented to one or both ears. In addition, the performance of older listeners is often observed to be more variable than that of younger listeners. The aim of this work was to relate age and hearing loss to temporal processing ability in a group of younger and older listeners with a range of hearing thresholds. Seventy-eight listeners were tested on a set of three temporal discrimination tasks (monaural gap discrimination, bilateral gap discrimination, and binaural discrimination of interaural differences in time. To examine the role of temporal fine structure in these tasks, four types of brief stimuli were used: tone bursts, broad-frequency chirps with rising or falling frequency contours, and random-phase noise bursts. Between-subject group analyses conducted separately for each task revealed substantial increases in temporal thresholds for the older listeners across all three tasks, regardless of stimulus type, as well as significant correlations among the performance of individual listeners across most combinations of tasks and stimuli. Differences in performance were associated with the stimuli in the monaural and binaural tasks, but not the bilateral task. Temporal fine structure differences among the stimuli had the greatest impact on monaural thresholds. Threshold estimate values across all tasks and stimuli did not show any greater variability for the older listeners as compared to the younger listeners. A linear mixed model applied to the data suggested that age and hearing loss are independent factors responsible for temporal processing ability, thus supporting the increasingly accepted hypothesis that temporal processing can be impaired for older compared to younger listeners with similar hearing and/or amounts of hearing loss.

  14. Associação entre perda auditiva e sintomatologia depressiva em idosos / Association between hearing loss and depressive symptoms in elderly

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adriane Ribeiro, Teixeira; Andréa Krüger, Gonçalves; Cíntia de La Rocha, Freitas; Cristina Loureiro Chaves, Soldera; Ângelo José Gonçalves, Bós; Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos, Santos; Sílvia, Dornelles.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A perda auditiva provoca dificuldades na compreensão da fala, o que origina afastamento do meio familiar e social. Este isolamento pode estar associado a quadros depressivos. Tipo de estudo: clínico prospectivo. OBJETIVO: Verificar a associação entre perda auditiva e depressão em um grup [...] o de idosos não institucionalizados. MÉTODO: A amostra foi composta por indivíduos com idade igual ou superior a 60 anos, submetidos à avaliação audiológica completa e rastreio de sintomatologia depressiva com a escala de depressão geriátrica (GDS). RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 54 idosos, sendo 26 (48,1%) do sexo feminino e 28 (51,9%) do sexo masculino. Constatou-se que 39 (72,2%) apresentaram limiares auditivos alterados, sendo 17 (31,5%) com perda auditiva leve e 22 (40,7%) com perda auditiva moderada. Foram evidenciados sinais de depressão em 25 idosos (46,3%), sendo que 22 (40,7%) apresentavam perda auditiva. A análise dos dados evidenciou associação entre a presença de perda auditiva e depressão (p=0,016). Apesar de não significativa (p=0,18), a associação entre o grau de perda auditiva foi positiva em relação à gravidade dos sinais de depressão. CONCLUSÃO: Nos idosos pesquisados, ocorreu forte associação entre a perda auditiva e os sinais de depressão e tendência a existir associação entre o grau de perda auditiva e a gravidade dos sinais de depressão. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: Hearing loss causes difficulties in speech understanding, which leads away from the family and social environment. This isolation may be associated with depressive disorders. Type of study: clinical prospective. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between hearing loss and depressio [...] n in a group of non-institutionalized elderly. METHOD: The sample consisted of individuals aged over 60 years, undergoing complete audiological evaluation and screening for depressive symptoms with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). RESULTS: We evaluated 54 elderly, 26 (48.1%) were female and 28 (51.9%) males. It was found that 39 (72.2%) had hearing thresholds change, and 17 (31.5%) with mild hearing loss and 22 (40.7%) with moderate hearing loss. Were evident signs of depression in 25 elderly (46.3%), and 22 (40.7%) had hearing loss. Data analysis showed an association between hearing loss and depression (p = 0.016). Although not significant (p = 0.18), the association between the degree of hearing loss was positive in relation to the severity of the signs of depression. CONCLUSION: In elderly people surveyed, there was a strong association between hearing loss and signs of depression and tendency to be an association between the degree of hearing loss and the severity of the signs of depression.

  15. Coronary artery bypass grafting and sensorineural hearing loss, a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Omer

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is routinely encountered by the otologist. The etiology is varied and often identifiable. One of the relatively less frequent causes is surgery. Apart from being an established entity with otological surgeries, sensorineural hearing loss has also been known to occur after non-otological procedures under general anesthesia. Commonest amongst these procedures is cardiopulmonary bypass, an association that has long been recognized. However, despite the proposition of diverse hypotheses in the past, the pathophysiology remains unclear. Methods The study is a prospective matched cohort study that will be carried out in Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Participants among exposed would include all those patients who would be undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery in the hospital who fall under the criteria for inclusion. Unexposed group would comprise of patients undergoing a non-bypass procedure of similar duration under the same type of anesthesia who meet the selection criteria. Both these groups will undergo audiometric testing at our hospital on three different occasions during the course of this study. Initially before the procedure to test the baseline hearing capacity; then one week after the procedure to assess any changes in hearing ability following the surgery; and finally a third audiogram at six weeks follow-up to assess further changes in any hearing deficits noted during the second phase of testing. Certain variables including the subjects' demographics and those concerning the procedure itself will be noted and used later for risk factors analysis. A detailed past medical and surgical history will also be obtained. Data analysis would include calculation of relative risk and significance of the results, by running the chi-square test. Other statistical tests like Fisher exact test may then be employed to facilitate data interpretation. Continuous scale may then be employed and multivariate linear regression used. Discussion This study is planned to obtain a better understanding of the correlation between sudden sensorineural hearing loss and cardiopulmonary bypass. Being the first major cohort trial in this line of investigation, the project is designed to identify the existence of any significant relationship between cardiopulmonary bypass and sensorineural hearing deficit.

  16. Co-morbidities of hearing loss and occupational therapy in preschool children

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Varsha, Sewpersad.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Many children with hearing impairment present with one or more health-related conditions defined as a co-morbidity in addition to hearing loss. Families and professionals are then faced with various challenges that often complicate the assessment, management and educational placement o [...] f these children. Appropriate holistic intervention is essential for the development and quality of life of the child. This study describes the co-morbidities within the field of occupational therapy, speech therapy and physiotherapy that pre-school children with hearing loss present with at the Centre for Language and Hearing Impaired Children (CLAHIC) and its implications for management. METHOD: A descriptive, retrospective research design was employed. Using a non-probability, purposive sampling strategy the records of 62 children diagnosed with a hearing loss that attended the CLAHIC from 1999 to 2010, were reviewed. RESULTS: The prevalent co-morbidities identified in this study were found mostly within the field of Occupational Therapy and included fine and gross motor delay, visual motor integration disorders and bilateral integration disorders. Further findings indicated that co-morbidities of hearing loss are independent of the degree of the hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that pre-school children with hearing loss, irrespective of the etiology and degree of hearing loss, should be screened for prevalent co-morbidities, such as fine and gross motor difficulties

  17. Comparison of Occlusion Effect in Normal Hearing Individuals and those with Slight and Mild Sensory Neural Hearing Loss Via Real Ear Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meymaneh Jafari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing aid users complain about a phenomenon called "occlusion effect". The aim of this study was to compare the occlusion effect in normal hearing individuals and those with slight and mild sensory neural hearing loss via Real Ear Measurement.Methods: Sixty volunteers (30 male, 30 female aged 18-55 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects were instructed to vocalize /e/ and /i/ for 5 seconds. Sound pressure level was measured by a probe- microphone and recorded in the ear canal. Occlusion effect and the frequency in which maximum occlusion effect occurs were obtained for each individuals for further analysis.Results: The peak of occlusion effect for /e/ was 10.25 dB and 9.77 dB respectively in 751.9 Hz and 542.98 Hz frequencies in female and male individuals. The maximum occlusion effect occurred with 19.03 dB and 19.10 dB for /i/ and in 518.88 Hz and 440.28 Hz in female and male individuals, in respect. In addition, no significant difference was seen among hearing levels and between genders.Conclusion: The peak of occlusion effect varies significantly among hearing aid users so that the hearing aid must be tuned. Probe-microphone measures will assist in determination where frequency- specific adjustments are needed.

  18. Age-related hearing loss and the ahl locus in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Canto, Cecilia; Zheng, Qing Yin; Fischel-ghodsian, Nathan; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    C57BL/6 (B6) mice experience hearing loss and cochlear degeneration beginning about mid-life, whereas CAST/Ei (CAST) mice retain normal hearing until old age. A locus contributing to the hearing loss of B6 mice, named age-related hearing loss (ahl), was mapped to Chromosome 10. A homozygous, congenic strain of mice (B6.CAST-+ahl), generated by crossing B6 (ahl/ahl) and CAST (+ahl/+ahl) mice has the same genomic material as the B6 mice except in the region of the ahl locus, which is derived fr...

  19. Information about Support Services for Families of Young Children with Hearing Loss: A Review of Some Useful Outcomes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleweke, C. Jonah; Gilbert, Sharon; Bays, Debbie; Austin, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with reviewing some useful effects of information about support services provided to families of young children with hearing loss and the challenges of providing this information to families. Evidence indicates that 95 percent of young children with hearing loss have hearing parents. With no previous experience of hearing

  20. Genetic studies of two inherited human phenotypes : Hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Balciuniene, Jorune

    2001-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the identification of genetic factors underlying two inherited human phenotypes: hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity. Non-syndromic hearing loss segregating in a Swedish family was tested for linkage to 13 previously reported candidate loci for hearing disabilities. Linkage was found to two loci: DFNA12 (llq22-q24) and DFNA2 (lp32). A detailed analysis of the phenotypes and haplotypes shared by the affected individuals supported the hypothesis of digenic inheri...

  1. Effects of Sensorineural Hearing Loss on Visually Guided Attention in a Multitalker Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Best, Virginia; Marrone, Nicole; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald; Shinn-cunningham, Barbara G.

    2008-01-01

    This study asked whether or not listeners with sensorineural hearing loss have an impaired ability to use top–down attention to enhance speech intelligibility in the presence of interfering talkers. Listeners were presented with a target string of spoken digits embedded in a mixture of five spatially separated speech streams. The benefit of providing simple visual cues indicating when and/or where the target would occur was measured in listeners with hearing loss, listeners with normal hear...

  2. Synaptic Transmission at the Cochlear Nucleus Endbulb Synapse during Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong; Manis, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL) typically starts from high frequency regions of the cochlea and over time invades lower frequency regions. During this progressive hearing loss, sound-evoked activity in spiral ganglion cells is reduced. DBA mice have an early onset of AHL. In this study, we examined synaptic transmission at the endbulb of Held synapse between auditory nerve fibers and bushy cells in the anterior ventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Synaptic transmission in hearing-impaired high fre...

  3. Neonatal screening for hearing loss: pilot study from a tertiary care centre

    OpenAIRE

    John, M.; Balraj, A.; Kurien, M.

    2009-01-01

    Many developed countries have well established universal neonatal hearing screening programs. In India, the viability of such a program, in an already overburdened health system is indeed a challenge. This cross sectional study was undertaken to evaluate the possible burden of hearing loss among neonates born at a tertiary care hospital in Southern India. Five hundred neonates were screened with automated distortion product otoacoustic emission (aDPOAE) for hearing loss, 9.2% of whom had one ...

  4. Age-Related Hearing Loss in Rhesus Monkeys Is Correlated with Cochlear Histopathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, James R.; Tinling, Steve; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Audiometric hearing deficits are a common symptom of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), as are specific histopathological changes in the cochlea; however, very little data have been collected in non-human primates. To examine this relationship further, we collected auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) from rhesus monkeys spanning in age from 10 to 35 years old, and examined four different morphological features of their cochleae. We found significant correlations between ABR thresholds and the loss of outer hair cells and spiral ganglion cells, but not with the loss of inner hair cells or a reduced thickness of the stria vascularis. The strongest correlation with ABR thresholds was the number of different pathologies present. These findings show that while aged rhesus monkeys experience audiometric hearing deficits similar to that seen in humans, they are not correlated with a single peripheral deficit, but instead with a number of different underlying cochlear histopathologies, indicating that similar histopathologies may exist in geriatric humans as well. PMID:23390514

  5. Objective comparison between perforation and hearing loss / Comparação objetiva entre perfuração timpânica e perda auditiva

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fernando de Andrade Quintanilha, Ribeiro; Verônica Reche Rodrigues, Gaudino; Caio Dinelli, Pinheiro; Gil Junqueira, Marçal; Edson Ibrahim, Mitre.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Parece não haver relação entre o tamanho das perfurações timpânicas e a perda auditiva. Alguns trabalhos na literatura estudaram esta relação, com dados conflitantes e sem uso adequado da metodologia empregada, principalmente quanto à medição do tamanho da perfuração que se faz de modo [...] subjetivo. OBJETIVO: Analisar através de um método objetivo o tamanho dessas perfurações e relacioná-las com perdas auditivas em quatro frequências sonoras. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo de corte transversal. Foram avaliadas 187 perfurações timpânicas através de digitalização de imagem, medidas porcentualmente com o uso do software ImageScope Version 11.1.2.760 e correlacionadas com os limiares auditivos em quatro frequências. RESULTADOS: Os dados foram avaliados estatisticamente pelo teste de correlação de Pearson, que não demonstrou correlação entre o tamanho da perfuração timpânica e o grau de perda auditiva. CONCLUSÃO: Não há relação significativa entre o tamanho das perfurações timpânicas e as quatro frequências estudadas. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: There appears to be no relationship between the size of tympanic perforations and hearing loss. Some studies in the literature have assessed this connection, with conflicting data and without proper methodology, especially concerning the measurement of the size of the perforation, wh [...] ich was performed in a subjective manner. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the size of tympanic perforations and to relate them to hearing loss in four different sound frequencies through the use of an objective method. METHODS: Transversal retrospective study. The present study evaluated 187 perforations through digital imaging, calculated the percentages of the tympanic membrane that was perforated using ImageScope software version 11.1.2.760 and correlated perforations size with hearing loss at four frequencies. RESULTS: Data were statistically analyzed using Pearson's correlation test. CONCLUSION: There was no significant relationship between the size of tympanic perforations and hearing loss in the four analyzed frequencies.

  6. Thyroid carcinoma, cataract and hearing loss in a patient after irradiation for facial hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rare case of a patient irradiated on the right side of the face for a large hemangioma during early childhood is reported. This patient suffers from sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and a cataract of the right eye, and she underwent surgery for Hurtle cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland. The literature discussing radiation-induced hearing loss is reviewed. (author)

  7. Curing Hearing Loss: Patient Expectations, Health Care Practitioners, and Basic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kazuo; Suchert, Steffen; Blevins, Nikolas H.; Heller, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Millions of patients are debilitated by hearing loss, mainly caused by degeneration of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. The underlying reasons for hair cell loss are highly diverse, ranging from genetic disposition, drug side effects, traumatic noise exposure, to the effects of aging. Whereas modern hearing aids offer some relief of the symptoms…

  8. Vowel Production in 7- to 12-Month-Old Infants with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Rebecca; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Rothpletz, Ann; Sedey, Allison

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine vowel production in 7- to 12-month-old infants with hearing loss. Fifty-four infants were divided into three groups according to degree of hearing loss (mild-to-moderate, moderately severe-to-severe, profound), and their vocalizations were phonetically transcribed from 30-minute videotaped samples. These…

  9. The Cultural and Linguistic Diversity of 3-Year-Old Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y. C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their…

  10. Hearing loss diagnosis followed by meningitis in Danish children, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parner, Erik T; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2007-01-01

    A higher risk of meningitis associated with cochlear implants may be explained in part by a generally higher risk of meningitis in children with severe to profound hearing loss. We investigated whether children with hearing loss have an increased risk of meningitis.

  11. Profound Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Nigerian Children: Any Shift in Etiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunmade, A. D.; Segun-Busari, S.; Olajide, T. G.; Ologe, F. E.

    2007-01-01

    Deafness, profound hearing loss, is a global problem. However, the causes of, attitudes toward, and management options for deafness differ considerably from region to region. This study seeks to identify the present causes of profound sensorineural hearing loss in Nigeria, which in our environment is almost synonymous to a life sentence of silence…

  12. Outlining the Concerns of Children Who Have Hearing Loss and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathos, Kimberly K.; Broussard, Elsie R.

    2005-01-01

    Nationwide, there are some 1,055,000 young people under the age of 18 who have hearing loss according to statistics from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (http://www.nidcd.nih.gov). Reported rates of psychiatric disorders for children who have hearing loss range from 15.4% to 54% (Hindley, 1997). Selected…

  13. NAD+ Metabolism in Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), a degenerative disorder characterized by age-dependent progressive increase in the threshold of auditory sensitivity, affects 40% of people over the age of 65, and it has emerged as an important social and public health problem. Various factors, including genetic and environmental components, are known to affect both the onset and severity of ARHL. In particular, age-dependent changes in cellular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses accompanied by altered cellular signaling and gene expression progressively affect the function of the auditory system and eventually lead to hearing impairment. Recent findings suggest that a disturbance of intracellular NAD+ levels is clinically related to the progression of age-associated disorders. Therefore, maintenance of optimal intracellular NAD+ levels may be a critical factor for cellular senescence, and thus, understanding its molecular signaling pathways would provide critical insights into the prevention and treatment of ARHL as well as other age-related diseases. In this review, we describe the role of NAD+ metabolism in aging and age-related diseases, including ARHL, and discuss a potential strategy for prevention or treatment of ARHL with a particular interest in NAD+-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:24729940

  14. Vitamins A, C, and E and selenium in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hakan; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Say?n, ?brahim; Güne?, Selçuk; Alt?nta?, Ahmet; Ye?in, Yakup; Kayhan, Fatma Tülin

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of vitamins A, C, and E, with selenium, in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). This was a prospective, controlled study performed at a tertiary teaching and research hospital. Over a 32-month period, patients were treated with either our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen plus vitamins A, C, and E and selenium (ACE+ group) or with only our standard ISSNHL treatment regimen (ACE- group). The demographics, additional symptoms, mean initial and final hearing levels, mean hearing gain, and recovery data were compared between the two groups. The ACE+ group, consisting of 70 (55.5 %) patients, received vitamin A (natural beta-carotene, 26,000 IU), vitamin C (ascorbic acid, 200 mg), vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol, 200 IU), and selenium (50 ?g) twice daily for 30 days in addition to our ISSNHL treatment regimen: methylprednisolone at an initial dose of 1 mg/kg body weight per day, tapered over 14 days; Rheomacrodex(®) [(10 g of dextran and 0.9 g of NaCl)/100 ml] 500 ml daily for 5 days; Vastarel(®) 20-mg tablet (20 mg of trimetazidine dihydrochloride) three times daily for 30 days; and ten 60-min hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) sessions (2.5 absolute atmospheres of 100 % O2), once daily, starting the day of hospitalization. The ACE- group comprised 56 (44.4 %) patients, who received only our ISSNHL treatment regimen. The mean hearing gains were 36.2 ± 20.3 dB in the ACE+ group and 27.1 ± 20.6 dB in the ACE- group. The mean hearing gain rates were significantly higher in the ACE+ group than in the ACE- group (p = 0.014). Treatment with vitamins A, C, and E and selenium was effective in ISSNHL patients undergoing treatment with methylprednisolone, dextran, trimetazidine dihydrochloride, and HBO, and might be more effective when the initial hearing level is below 46 dB. PMID:24519034

  15. Hearing loss associated with the modifier of deaf waddler (mdfw) locus corresponds with age-related hearing loss in 12 inbred strains of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing Yin; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    The modifier of deaf waddler (mdfw) and age-related hearing loss (Ahl) loci were both discovered as inbred strain polymorphisms that affect hearing loss in mice. Both loci map to the same position on chromosome (Chr) 10. The mdfw locus interacts epistatically with the deaf waddler (dfw) mutation on Chr 6, and the Ahl locus is a major contributor to AHL in several inbred strains. To investigate the possibility of allelism, we examined the correspondence of mdfw and Ahl phenotypes among 12 inbred mouse strains. The effects of strain-specific mdfw alleles on hearing loss were assessed in dfw2J/+ F1 hybrids produced from mating BALB-dfw2J/+ mice with mice from each of 12 inbred strains. F1 hybrids were then assessed for hearing by auditory-evoked brainstem response threshold analysis and classified as dfw2J/+ or +/+ by polymerase chain reaction typing. Heterozygosity for dfw2J accelerated hearing loss in F1 hybrids derived from all strains tested, except those produced with the B6.CAST +Ahl congenic strain. dfw2J/+ F1 hybrids derived from parental strains 129P1/ReJ, A/J, BUB/BnJ, C57BR/cdJ, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ and SKH2/J exhibited a severe hearing loss by 12 weeks of age. Those derived from strains 129T2/SvEmsJ, C3H/HeJ, CBA/CaJ and NON/LtJ exhibited only a slight to intermediate hearing loss at that age. The hearing loss associated with these strain-specific mdfw alleles corresponds with previously determined Ahl allele effects, providing additional evidence that mdfw and Ahl are manifestations of the same gene. A functional relationship therefore may exist between the Ca2+ transporting activity of the dfw gene (Atp2b2) and AHL. PMID:11423214

  16. Identification of hearing loss among residents with dementia: perceptions of health care aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Susan E; Hopper, Tammy; Ickert, Carla; Erin, Daniel F

    2014-01-01

    Effective communication can be difficult when working with individuals with dementia and hearing loss. Given the high prevalence of both dementia and hearing loss among individuals in long term care, direct care providers in this setting, will almost certainly confront frequent communication challenges. To understand health care aide perspectives of caring for residents with dementia and hearing loss, 12 health care aides from five nursing homes participated in audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews. Transcripts were coded and themes were identified. Health care aides reported the difficulties in distinguishing the relative contributions of hearing loss and dementia to communication breakdowns. They reported that familiarity with residents helped them differentiate between sensory versus cognitive impairments in conversations with residents. Although able to identify strategies to support communication, communication difficulty complicated both their provision of care and support of quality of life for residents with dementia and hearing loss. Suggestions for practice and education are provided. PMID:25212262

  17. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL): literature review with a focus on occupational medicine

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mirella Melo, Metidieri; Hugo Fernandes Santos, Rodrigues; Francisco José Motta Barros de, Oliveira Filho; Daniela Pereira, Ferraz; Antonio Fausto de, Almeida Neto; Sandro, Torres.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the Ministry of Health (2006), Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is hearing loss caused by prolonged exposure to noise. It is characterized as sensorineural hearing loss and is usually bilateral, irreversible, and progressive while the exposure to noise continues. A NIHL is a predictabl [...] e and preventable disease with an epidemiologically relevant prevalence in urban communities. The hearing loss begins and predominates in the frequencies of 3, 4, and 6 kHz and eventually progresses to 8, 2, 1, 5, and 25 kHz. In Brazil, regulatory standard 15 limits the exposure to continuous noise to no more than 4 hours' exposure to 90 dBA and a maximum level of 85 dB for a full 8-hour working period. As NIHL is a preventable and predictable disease, preventive action by professionals may be able to change the prevalence of hearing loss in noisy environments.

  18. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL: literature review with a focus on occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metidieri, Mirella Melo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available According to the Ministry of Health (2006, Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL is hearing loss caused by prolonged exposure to noise. It is characterized as sensorineural hearing loss and is usually bilateral, irreversible, and progressive while the exposure to noise continues. A NIHL is a predictable and preventable disease with an epidemiologically relevant prevalence in urban communities. The hearing loss begins and predominates in the frequencies of 3, 4, and 6 kHz and eventually progresses to 8, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 kHz. In Brazil, regulatory standard 15 limits the exposure to continuous noise to no more than 4 hours' exposure to 90 dBA and a maximum level of 85 dB for a full 8-hour working period. As NIHL is a preventable and predictable disease, preventive action by professionals may be able to change the prevalence of hearing loss in noisy environments.

  19. Strategies for developing novel therapeutics for sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TakayukiNakagawa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a common disability in the world; however, at present, options for the pharmacological treatment of SNHL are very limited. Previous studies involving human temporal bone analyses have revealed that the degeneration of the cochlea is a common mechanism of SNHL. A major problem for the development of novel pharmacotherapy for SNHL has been the limited regeneration capacity in mammalian cochlear cells. However, recent progress in basic studies has led to several effective strategies for the induction of regeneration in the mammalian cochlea, in accordance with the stage of degeneration. In addition, recent advances in the identification of human deafness genes and their characterization in mouse models have elucidated cellular and/or molecular mechanisms of SNHL, which will contribute to clarify molecular targets of pharmacotherapy for treatment of SNHL.

  20. Hipertensão como fator associado à perda auditiva Hypertension as a factor associated with hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lozza de Moraes Marchiori

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar possível associação entre hipertensão arterial e perda auditiva. Foi realizado um estudo do tipo caso-controle não pareado, na Universidade Norte do Paraná, no Sul do Brasil. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: 154 casos e 154 controles, de ambos os sexos com idade variando de 45 a 64 anos foram incluídos na pesquisa após o cálculo da amostra. A hipertensão foi verificada por medição da pressão arterial e de questionário sistematizado sobre hipertensão e uso de medicamentos para pressão arterial. A audição foi avaliada por audiometria e anamnese audiológica. A técnica de regressão logística não-condicional foi utilizada com o objetivo de controlar a possível ação de confusão ou modificação de efeito exercida por outras variáveis sobre as associações de interesse. RESULTADOS : Pode-se verificar que existe associação significativa entre hipertensão arterial e presença de perda auditiva e que a perda auditiva observada nesta população sugere que a hipertensão arterial age como fator de aceleração da degeneração do aparelho auditivo proveniente da idade. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados da presente pesquisa, através da constatação da associação entre hipertensão e perda auditiva, servirão de base a uma integração entre cardiologistas, nefrologistas, otorrinolaringologistas, fonoaudiólogos e outros profissionais da área de com alterações provenientes da hipertensão.AIM: To identify likely association between blood hypertension and hearing loss. Design: A non-paired case-control study. Setting: Institutional work carried out at Universidade Norte do Paraná, in South Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 154 cases and 154 controls, both genders, aged 45 to 64, included in the research after sample estimation. Methodology: Hypertension was verified through blood pressure readings and by a systematized questionnaire about hypertension and the use of medication for blood pressure. Hearing was assessed through tonal threshold audiometrics and audiologic anamneses. Non-conditional logistic regression was used in order to control likely confusion or modification of effect of other variables on interest associations. RESULTS: There is a significant association between blood hypertension and hearing loss. Hearing loss in the population under study suggests that hypertension is an accelerating factor of degeneration of the hearing apparatus due to aging. CONCLUSIONS: The results in this research, through evidence of association between blood hypertension and hearing loss, can allow for an integrated work of cardiologists, nephrologists, otorhinolaryngologists, audiologists and other health professionals concerned with alterations caused by blood hypertension.

  1. Glycinergic synaptic transmission in the cochlear nucleus of mice with normal hearing and age-related hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Ruili; Manis, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cochlear nucleus (CN) is glycine. During age-related hearing loss (AHL), glycinergic inhibition becomes weaker in CN. However, it is unclear what aspects of glycinergic transmission are responsible for weaker inhibition with AHL. We examined glycinergic transmission onto bushy cells of the anteroventral CN in normal-hearing CBA/CaJ mice and in DBA/2J mice, a strain that exhibits an early onset AHL. Glycinergic synaptic transmission wa...

  2. Hearing loss among among classical musicians needs, means and attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Noise is usually defined either unwanted sound or sound that is harmful to the hearing. Earlier studies have shown that musicians are exposed to sound levels that can be harmful to hearing, and thus music can be considered as noise. Studies have also shown that musicians have hearing problems due to prolonged music exposure. This is also the case among classical musicians. According to the new noise directive, hearing conservation programs directed to entertainment sector are needed. However ...

  3. The effect of mild-to-moderate hearing loss on auditory and emotion processing networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima T Husain

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of hearing loss on emotional processing using task- and rest-based functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two age-matched groups of middle-aged participants were recruited: one with bilateral high-frequency hearing loss (HL and a control group with normal hearing (NH. During the task-based portion of the experiment, participants were instructed to rate affective stimuli from the International Affective Digital Sounds database as pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral. In the resting state experiment, participants were told to fixate on a '+' sign on a screen for five minutes. The results of both the task-based and resting state studies suggest that NH and HL patients differ in their emotional response. Specifically, in the task-based study, we found slower response to affective but not neutral sounds by the HL group compared to the NH group. This was reflected in the brain activation patterns, with the NH group employing the expected limbic and auditory regions including the left amygdala, left parahippocampus, right middle temporal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus to a greater extent in processing affective stimuli when compared to the HL group. In the resting state study, we observed no significant differences in connectivity of the auditory network between the groups. In the dorsal attention network, HL patients exhibited decreased connectivity between seed regions and left insula and left postcentral gyrus compared to controls. The default mode network was also altered, showing increased connectivity between seeds and left middle frontal gyrus in the HL group. Further targeted analysis revealed increased intrinsic connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right precentral gyrus. The results from both studies suggest neuronal reorganization as a consequence of hearing loss, most notably in networks responding to emotional sounds.

  4. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated.

  5. Aminoglycoside: induced hearing loss in HIV-positive and HIV-negative multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tashneem, Harris; Soraya, Bardien; H Simon, Schaaf; Lucretia, Petersen; Greetje, de Jong; Johannes J, Fagan.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ototoxicity following aminoglycoside treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), is a significant problem. This study documents the incidence of ototoxicity in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB and presents clinical guidelines relating to ototoxicity. METHOD [...] S: A prospective cohort study of 153 MDR-TB patients with normal hearing and middle ear status at baseline controlling for 6 mitochondrial mutations associated with aminoglycosiderelated ototoxicity, at Brooklyn Chest Hospital in Cape Town. Pure tone audiometry was performed monthly for 3 months to determine hearing loss. HIV status was recorded, as was the presence of 6 mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene. RESULTS: Fifty-seven per cent developed high-frequency hearing loss. HIV-positive patients (70%) were more likely to develop hearing loss than HIV-negative patients (42%). Of 115 patients who were genetically screened, none had MT-RNR1 mutations. CONCLUSION: Ototoxic hearing loss is common in MDR-TB patients treated with aminoglycosides. HIV-positive patients are at increased risk of ototoxicity. Auditory monitoring and auditory rehabilitation should be an integral part of the package of care of MDR-TB patients.

  6. Congenital hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  7. Congenital hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, Caroline D. [Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  8. Adjusting to Hearing Loss during High School: Preparing Students for Successful Transition to Postsecondary Education or Training. Tipsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Completion of postsecondary education frequently builds upon a student's successful academic and personal experience during high school. For students with hearing loss, healthy adjustment to hearing loss is a key lifelong developmental process. The vast majority (94%) of approximately 1.1 million K-12 students with hearing loss are educated in…

  9. Reading Intervention to Improve Narrative Production, Narrative Comprehension, and Motivation and Interest of Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulski, Lori A.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a reading intervention on narrative production, narrative comprehension, and reading motivation interest in children with hearing loss. Seven school children between the ages of 9 and 11 were paired with younger "reading buddies" (without hearing loss). The children with hearing loss read storybooks to an…

  10. Biophysical Mechanisms Underlying Hearing Loss Associated with a Shortened Tectorial Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghalai, John S.; Xia, Anping; Liu, Christopher C.; Gao, Simon S.; Applegate, Brian E.; Puria, Sunil; Rousso, Itay; Steele, Charles

    2011-11-01

    The tectorial membrane (TM) connects to the stereociliary bundles of outer hair cells (OHCs). Herein, we summarize key experimental data and modeling analyses that describe how biophysical alterations to these connections underlie hearing loss. The heterozygous C1509G mutation in alpha tectorin produces partial congenital hearing loss that progresses in humans. We engineered this mutation in mice, and histology revealed that the TM was shortened. DIC imaging of freshly-dissected cochlea as well as imaging with optical coherence tomography indicated that the TM is malformed and only stimulates the first row of OHCs. Noise exposure produced acute threshold shifts that fully recovered in Tecta+/+ mice although there was some OHC loss within all three rows at the cochlear base. In contrast, threshold shifts only partially recovered in TectaC1509G/+ mice. This was associated with OHC loss more apically and nearly entirely within the first row. Young's modulus of the TM, measured using atomic force microscopy, was substantially reduced at the middle and basal regions. Both the wild-type and heterozygous conditions were simulated in a computational model. This demonstrated that the normalized stress distribution levels between the TM and the tall cilia were significantly elevated in the middle region of the heterozygous cochlea. Another feature of the TectaC1509G/+ mutation is higher prestin expression within all three rows of OHCs. This increased electricallyevoked movements of the reticular lamina and otoacoustic emissions. Furthermore, electrical stimulation was associated with an increased risk of OHC death as measured by vital dye staining. Together, these findings indicate that uncoupling of the TM from some OHCs not only leads to partial hearing loss, but also puts the OHCs that remain coupled at higher risk. Both the mechanics of the malformed TM and increased electromotility contribute to this higher risk profile.

  11. P300 em sujeitos com perda auditiva P300 in subjects with hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Mirândola Barbosa Reis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: as avaliações comportamentais e eletrofisiológicas contribuem para o entendimento do sistema auditivo e do processo de intervenção. OBJETIVO: estudar P300 em sujeitos com perda auditiva neurossensorial congênita, segundo as variáveis gênero, idade e grau da perda auditiva. MÉTODO: a presente investigação consiste em um estudo descritivo, transversal. Foram examinados 29 sujeitos, sendo 15 do gênero masculino e 14 do gênero feminino, com idade entre 11 a 42 anos. Os critérios de elegibilidade para composição da amostra foram: idade superior a 11 anos e inferior a 45 anos; ser portador de deficiência auditiva congênita severa ou profunda; não apresentar outro tipo de distúrbio; não apresentar perda auditiva central e/ou comprometimento condutivo. A primeira etapa caracterizou-se por avaliação comportamental auditiva e fisiológica que incluiu: audiometria tonal limiar (via aérea e via óssea, logoaudiometria - LDV e medidas do ganho funcional para os sujeitos que faziam uso de próteses auditivas, Imitanciometria: curva timpanométrica e pesquisa dos reflexos ipsi e contra-laterais, registro das emissões otoacústicas (EOA - emissões otoacústicas transitórias (EOAT e emissões otoacústicas por produto de distorção (EOAPD. A avaliação eletrofisiológica constituiu a quarta etapa do procedimento de coleta de dados e incluiu: potenciais auditivos evocados de tronco encefálico (PEATE e de longa latência (P300. RESULTADOS: o P300 foi registrado em 17 sujeitos, com latência e amplitude média de 326,97ms e 3,76V, respectivamente. Apresentou diferenças significantes da latência em relação à idade (p BACKGROUND: behavioral and electrophysiological evaluations contribute to the understanding of the hearing system and to the intervention process. AIM: to investigate the occurrence of P300 in subjects with congenital severe to profound hearing loss, according to the variables of gender, age and hearing loss level. METHOD: the design of this research is a descriptive transversal study. Twenty-nine subjects, 15 male and 14 female, ranging in age from 11 to 42 years, were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were: to have at least 11 years of age and no more than 45 years; to have the diagnosis of congenital severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss; to have no other disorder; and absence of central hearing loss or any other auditory conductive disorder. The first stage consisted of an auditory behavioral and physiological evaluation, including: pure tone audiometry (air and bone conduction measures, speech audiometry, SDT (Speech Detection Threshold and functional gain measures for the subjects using hearing aids, and immittance measures - tympanometry and acoustic reflexes thresholds; transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE; distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE. The electrophysiological evaluation was the fourth stage of the study and included: auditory brainstem response (ABR and late latency response (P300. RESULTS: P300 was obtained for 17 out of the 29 subjects. Mean latency and amplitude were 326.97 ms and 3.76 V, respectively. A statistical significant difference was observed for latency when considering the variable age (electrode CzA2 p < 0.003 and CzA1 p < 0.02 and for amplitude when considering the variable hearing loss level (p < 0.0015. CONCLUSION: P300 can be recorded in subjects with hearing loss.

  12. Clinical analysis of post-irradiation sensorineural hearing loss in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of post-irradiation sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to evaluate its potentially contributing factors. Methods: Pure tonetest and impedance audiography were carried out in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a post-irradiation follow-up time over 1 year. Additionally, the test results were combined with clinical data and analyzed retrospectively. Results: The follow-up time of all patients ranged from 12 to 94 months (median 53 months). The incidences of SNHL at low and high frequencies were 8% and 42% respectively. Univariate analysis showed that patient's age and follow-up time affected the incidence of SNHL at high frequencies (t=2.051, P=0.0269; t=2.978, P=0.0011), but sex, preirradiation subjective hearing loss, irradiation dose and chemotherapy including cisplatin had no significance. Multivariate analysis by Binary Logistic Regression revealed that the risk of SNHL was correlated with patient's age and follow-up time (P=0.02; P=0.009). Conclusion: Post-irradiation SNHL at high frequencies in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma is more common than that at low frequencies. The independent prognostic factors for development of SNHL at high frequencies are patient's age and follow-up time. But the role of preirradiation hearing level ,irradiation dose and chemotherapy including cisplatin are not conclusive and further research is needed. (nclusive and further research is needed. (authors)

  13. Evolução da perda auditiva no decorrer do envelhecimento / Hearing loss in aging

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Giovana dos Santos, Baraldi; Lais Castro de, Almeida; Alda Cristina de Carvalho, Borges.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A perda auditiva associada ao envelhecimento refere-se à soma de perdas auditivas resultantes da degeneração fisiológica causada por exposição ao ruído, agentes ototóxicos e prejuízos causados por desordens e tratamentos médicos. Afeta cerca de 60% de todas as pessoas com idade acima de 65 anos. OBJ [...] ETIVO: Verificar a degeneração do sistema auditivo no decorrer da idade através de medidas supraliminares e de sensibilidade auditiva. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo de coorte contemporânea com corte transversal. Foram avaliados 211 idosos, com idade média de 75,24 anos, sendo 61 do sexo masculino e 150 do sexo feminino. Os indivíduos foram submetidos a uma anamnese e à avaliação audiológica básica e divididos em quatro grupos, de acordo com a faixa etária. RESULTADOS: Declínio significativo do limiar nas 4 faixas etárias estabelecidas, diminuição do índice percentual de reconhecimento de fala, diferença significante com relação ao gênero. CONCLUSÃO: Com o avanço da idade, ocorreu um aumento gradual no grau da perda auditiva, os homens apresentaram limiares mais rebaixados na freqüência de 4000Hz em comparação com as mulheres e na inteligibilidade de fala observou-se decréscimo gradativo com o aumento da idade. Abstract in english Aging is a natural consequence of a society developing process. The city of São Paulo has almost one million people who are above sixty years of age. Age-related hearing loss equals the total hearing loss resulted from cell degeneration caused by noise exposure, ototoxic agents and the loss caused b [...] y disorders and medical treatments. AIM: To study age-related hearing degeneration by means of higher thresholds and hearing sensitivity measures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional contemporary cohort study in which we assessed 211 elderly patients with mean age of 75.24 years, of whom 61 were females and 150 were males. The subjects were submitted to an interview and a conventional audiometric assessment; and later divided into four groups according to age range. RESULTS: Significant threshold drop in the four established age groups, decrease in speech recognition ratio, and a significant difference regarding gender. CONCLUSION: As age advanced there was a gradual increase in hearing loss, men showed a lower threshold in the 4000Hz frequency when compared to women, and in the speech intelligibility test thre was also a gradual decrease with aging.

  14. Auditory lifestyles and beliefs related to hearing loss among college students in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawool, Vishakha W; Colligon-Wayne, Lynda A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the auditory life styles and beliefs of college students with reference to exposure to loud sounds in the context of the health belief model. A survey was administered to 238 (40 men, 198 women) students in the USA. Results suggest that 44% of the students use noisy equipment without ear protection and 29% (69/238) of the students work in noisy environments. Of the 69 who worked in noisy surroundings, only ten reported wearing hearing protection devices although 50 (72.46%) reported tinnitus. The use of hearing protection devices (HPDs) was associated with previous experience with hearing loss and tinnitus. Although 75% of the students were aware that exposure to loud sounds could cause hearing loss, 50% of the students appeared to be exposing themselves to potentially harmful loud music. Furthermore, 46% of the students reported not using HPDs during loud musical activities because they felt that the music was difficult to hear with HPDs. Most students in this study considered hearing loss to be serious but 76% of the students believed that they would not lose their hearing until a greater age. Although 66% of the students had experienced tinnitus, 58% of these students reported not being concerned about it. These results suggest a critical need for promoting healthy hearing behavior among college students. Possible strategies could include improved education, experience with simulated hearing loss for extended periods and availability of cosmetically appealing or invisible HPDs with uniform attenuation across the frequency range. PMID:18270402

  15. A stepwise approach to the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaski, S M; Grundfast, K M

    1999-02-01

    What To Do Do suspect a genetic cause in all cases of hearing loss. Do develop a working knowledge of common types of HHI that you may draw on to aid in diagnosis. Do think of HHI when the audiogram reveals a hearing loss with a "cookie bite" configuration. Do refer the infant to a geneticist in cases where you suspect a syndromic HHI, a nonsyndromic HHI, and in cases of "cryptogenic" hearing loss where an underlying HHI may be present. Often, the associated symptoms are subtle and best detected by a professional who deals with these issues on a daily basis. Do get the infant or family plugged into an audiologist or otolaryngologist and speech pathologist who will preferably work as a team to maximize aural rehabilitation and ensure serial follow-up. It is never too early to fit a child with hearing aids. Do refer to the HHIRR center at Boys Town. Do refer to the correct "deaf" organization or "blind-deaf" organization. Do think about working up other siblings or family members. Do keep in mind that some members of the "deaf society" may regard deafness as an alternative lifestyle and may not be amenable to their child's referral for additional workup and aural rehabilitation. What Not To Do Do not assume the child is deaf and nothing can be done. Do not wait until the child is older to refer to an otolaryngologist, speech therapist, and audiologist. Do not order a sonogram. Do not order a temporal bone CT scan on newborns. Do not forget about other siblings who may have a similar pathology. Do not forget that some forms of HHI can present beyond infancy. The pediatrician is the front line and can play a major role in the diagnosis, workup, and treatment of HHI. Armed with the proper degree of suspicion, careful elicitation of family history, meticulous physical examination, evaluation of the audiogram, and adequate fund of knowledge of common types of genetic deafness, the pediatrician can make a timely diagnosis and appropriate referrals. This avoids delay in detection of significant hearing impairment and the associated lack of essential skills in speech, language, and social interaction. No child is too young to have some type of hearing assessment. Early detection and intervention are best done with a multidisciplinary team approach with a neonatologist or pediatrician, audiologist, speech therapist, and otolaryngologist. In the future, blood tests using genetic probes may be available to screen for many types of HHI. PMID:10079788

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as salvage treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, M; Magnano, M; Maffi, L; Pezzoli, L; Marcato, P; Orione, M; Cupi, D; Bongioannini, G

    2015-07-01

    The most commonly used treatment for sensorineural sudden hearing loss (SSHL) in clinical practice is the administration of steroids; however, a favorable result is not always obtained. We studied 58 patients who failed to recover after primary treatment with IV steroids, 44 of these met our inclusion criteria (mean age 50.7, 27 males, range 30-74). We treated 23 patients (mean age 47.3, 16 males, age range 22-74) with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) (2.5 ATA for 60 min for 15 treatments), while 21 (mean age 54.5, 11 males, age range 22-71) patients refused to be treated and served as a non-randomized control group. Patients treated with HBO had a mean improvement of 15.6 dB (SD ± 15.3), with 1 of them completely healed, 5 with a good recovery, 10 with a fair recovery and 7 unchanged. Patients who were not treated had a spontaneous mean improvement of 5.0 dB (SD ± 11.4) with 3 patients with a good recovery, 1 patient with a fair recovery and 17 patients unchanged. Mean improvement was significantly better in patients treated with HBO compared to controls (p = 0.0133). Patients with worst hearing had the greater degree of improvement whether or not they were treated in the first 10 days after the onset of the hearing loss or between 11 and 30 days. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy can lead to significant improvement of pure tone hearing thresholds in patients with SSHL who failed primary corticosteroid treatment and are within 4 weeks of the onset of deafness. PMID:25318685

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with unilateral safe chronic suppurative otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Singh Nanda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM is the major cause of hearing impairment, mainly conductive type of hearing loss. The occurrence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in CSOM is controversial and the controversy is more for safe mucosal type. This study aims to assess the association between SNHL and safe mucosal CSOM and its relation to patient's age, sex, duration of disease, active or inactive disease and speech frequencies. Methods: 100 patients with unilateral mucosal type of CSOM with normal contralateral ear were included in the study. The infected ear was taken as study ear and normal ear as control ear in all patients. All patients underwent hearing assessment by pure tone audiometry for both ears. In case of active disease, ear discharge was first cleared and then audiometric assessment done. Results were statistically compared in all patients for both study and control ears using parameters of patient's age, sex, duration of disease, speech frequency and active or inactive disease. Results: There was significant higher number of study ears with CSOM having average bone conduction threshold of all frequencies above 25 decibels which implies SNHL (21% compared to control contralateral ears without infection (5%. There was higher incidence of SNHL at higher speech frequencies. The incidence also increased with age of patient and duration of disease. The incidence was higher in active stage than inactive or quiescent stage. There was no difference among males and females. Conclusion: Safe mucosal CSOM can cause significant SNHL and risk increases with increasing age, duration of disease, higher speech frequencies and presence of active disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 551-555

  18. Prospective study of inner ear radiation dose and hearing loss in head-and-neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between the radiation dose to the inner ear and long-term hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those receiving curative radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer. After enrollment, patients underwent three-dimensional conformal RT planning and delivery (180-200 cGy/fraction) appropriate for their disease site and stage. The inner ear was contoured on axial CT planning images. Dose-volume histograms, as well as the mean and maximal dose for each structure, were calculated. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry at baseline (before treatment) and 1, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after RT. The threshold level (the greater the value, the more hearing loss) in decibels was recorded for 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz. For patients receiving predominantly unilateral RT, the contralateral ear served as the de facto control. The differences in threshold level between the ipsilateral and contralateral ears were calculated, and the temporal pattern and dose-response relation of hearing loss were analyzed using statistical methods that take into account the correlation between two ears in the same subject and repeated, sequential measurements of each subject. Results: Of the 40 patients enrolled in this study, 35 qualified for analysis. Four patients who received concurrent chemotherapy and RT were analyzed separately. The 31 unilaterally treated patients received a median dose of 47.4 Gy (range, 14.1-68.8 Gyedian dose of 47.4 Gy (range, 14.1-68.8 Gy) to the ipsilateral inner ear and 4.2 Gy (range, 0.5-31.3 Gy) to the contralateral inner ear. Hearing loss was associated with the radiation dose received by the inner ear (loss of 210dB was observed in ears receiving ?45 Gy) and was most appreciable in the higher frequencies (?2000 Hz). For a 60-year-old patient with no previous hearing loss in either ear, after receiving 45 Gy, the ipsilateral ear, according to our clinical model, would have a 19.3-dB (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.5-23.0) and 5.4-dB (95% CI, 3.5-7.5) hearing decrement compared with the contralateral ear for 8000 Hz and 1000 Hz, respectively. Age and an initial hearing difference within an ear pair also affected hearing loss. The baseline hearing threshold was inversely related to radiation-induced hearing loss. The degree of hearing loss was dependent on the frequency tested, age, baseline hearing, and baseline difference in hearing between a patient's two ears. Conclusion: High-frequency (?2000 Hz) hearing acuity worsens significantly after RT in a dose-dependent fashion. A larger number of patients needs to be studied to validate these results. This knowledge can be applied to create guidelines regarding future dose limits to the auditory apparatus for patients undergoing head-and-neck RT

  19. The association between low levels of lead in blood and occupational noise-induced hearing loss in steel workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, Han-Yueh [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yen-Jean, Mei-Chu [Division of Family Medicine, E-Da Hospital, Taiwan, ROC 1, E-Da Rd., Jiau-Shu Tsuen, Yan-Chau Shiang, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan, ROC (China); I-Shou University, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan, ROC 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Da-Shu Shiang, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Jung-Der, E-mail: jdwang@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC No. 1, Chang-Teh St., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2009-12-15

    As the use of leaded gasoline has ceased in the last decade, background lead exposure has generally been reduced. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level lead exposure on human hearing loss. This study was conducted in a steel plant and 412 workers were recruited from all over the plant. Personal information such as demographics and work history was obtained through a questionnaire. All subjects took part in an audiometric examination of hearing thresholds, for both ears, with air-conducted pure tones at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. Subjects' blood samples were collected and analyzed for levels of manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead with inductive couple plasma-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, noise levels in different working zones were determined using a sound level meter with A-weighting network. Only subjects with hearing loss difference of no more than 15 dB between both ears and had no congenital abnormalities were included in further data analysis. Lead was the only metal in blood found significantly correlated with hearing loss for most tested sound frequencies (p < 0.05 to p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and noise level, the logistic regression model analysis indicated that elevated blood lead over 7 {mu}g/dL was significantly associated with hearing loss at the sound frequencies of 3000 through 8000 Hz with odds ratios raging from 3.06 to 6.26 (p < 0.05 {approx} p < 0.005). We concluded that elevated blood lead at level below 10 {mu}g/dL might enhance the noise-induced hearing loss. Future research needs to further explore the detailed mechanism.

  20. The association between low levels of lead in blood and occupational noise-induced hearing loss in steel workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the use of leaded gasoline has ceased in the last decade, background lead exposure has generally been reduced. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level lead exposure on human hearing loss. This study was conducted in a steel plant and 412 workers were recruited from all over the plant. Personal information such as demographics and work history was obtained through a questionnaire. All subjects took part in an audiometric examination of hearing thresholds, for both ears, with air-conducted pure tones at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. Subjects' blood samples were collected and analyzed for levels of manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead with inductive couple plasma-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, noise levels in different working zones were determined using a sound level meter with A-weighting network. Only subjects with hearing loss difference of no more than 15 dB between both ears and had no congenital abnormalities were included in further data analysis. Lead was the only metal in blood found significantly correlated with hearing loss for most tested sound frequencies (p < 0.05 to p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and noise level, the logistic regression model analysis indicated that elevated blood lead over 7 ?g/dL was significantly associated with hearing loss at the sound frequencies of 3000 through 8000 Hz with odds ratios raging from 3.06 to 6.26 (p < 0.05 ? p < 0.005). We concluded that el0.05 ? p < 0.005). We concluded that elevated blood lead at level below 10 ?g/dL might enhance the noise-induced hearing loss. Future research needs to further explore the detailed mechanism.

  1. An introduction to hearing loss and screening procedures for behavioral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jamie; Troiani, Vanessa; Grossman, Murray; Wingfield, Arthur

    2007-08-01

    Hearing loss is a confounding variable that is rarely addressed in behavioral research despite its prevalence across the life span. Currently, the most common method of experimental control over hearing acuity is through self report of perceived impairment. We argue that this technique may lack sensitivity and that researchers should more commonly utilize standardized hearing screening procedures. Distinctive patterns of hearing loss are reviewed with attention to populations that commonly participate in behavioral research. We explain standard techniques for conducting pure tone hearing screening using a conventional portable audiometer and outline a procedure for how researchers can modify a conventional laptop computer for audiometric screening when a standard audiometer is unavailable. We offer a sample hearing screening program that researchers may use toward the development of their own protocol. This program is freely available for download at www .psychonomic.org/archive. PMID:17958180

  2. Is sensorineural hearing loss a possible side effect of nasopharyngeal and parotid irradiation? A systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Little has been published about permanent hearing loss due to radiotherapy, thus making it a rather unknown phenomenon. Therefore, we performed a study of the literature over the last 20 years. Materials and methods: Sixteen relevant clinical studies were found, reporting mostly on nasopharyngeal or parotid gland treatments. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiogram. Studies were assessed using a simple scoring list. Nine studies were used for further analysis. Data on the pure tone audiogram were pooled. Results: Results showed that, especially in the higher frequencies (?4 kHz), loss can be measured. When data were pooled, in 42±3% of the patients a hearing loss was found of 10 dB or more at 4 kHz. Averaged over all measured frequencies the effect is less prominent but still statistically significant (18±2%). No significant difference between nasopharyngeal and parotid gland treatment was found (P<0.05). Conclusion: Only a few studies, mostly concerning small patient numbers, have investigated hearing damage due to radiotherapy. So far there has been no consensus on the subject. However, in this systematic review we found a significant effect. Dose to the inner ear therefore deserves more attention, especially in dose escalation studies and inverse planning

  3. The Frequency of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Prescription in the Clients of the Avesina Education and Health Center, Audiometry Clinic, 1377

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bastani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determining the frequency of hearing disorders and hearing aid using in the clients referring to the Avesina education and health center, audiometry clinic, 1377. Method and Material: This is an assesive-descriptive survey that conducted on more than 2053 (1234 males and 819 females who referred for audiometry after examination by a physician. Case history, otoscopy, PTA, speech and immittance audiometry were conducted for all the clients. The findings were expressed in tables and diagrams of frequency. The age and sex relationship. All types of hearing losses and the number of the hearing-impaired clients need a hearing aid were assessed. Findings: 56% of this population were hearing-impaired and 44% had normal hearing were hearing. 60% were males and 40% females. Of the hearing-impaired, 44% had SNHL, 35.6% CHL and 8.2% mixed hearing loss. The hearing aid was prescribed for 204 (83 females and121 males if they need that only 20 females and 32 males wear it. Conclusion: It this sample, SNHL is of higher frequency. According to this survey, the more the age, the more the hearing aid is accepted (85% of wearer are more than 49 the prevalence of the hearing impaired males are more than females (60% versus 40%. Only 25% of the hearing-impaired wear hearing aids.

  4. Age-related hearing loss in sea lions and their scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schusterman, Ronald J.; Southall, Brandon; Kastak, David; Reichmuth Kastak, Colleen

    2002-05-01

    Interest in the hearing capabilities of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) was first stimulated by the echolocation hypothesis and more recently by rising concern about coastal noise pollution. During a series of audiometric tests, we measured the absolute hearing sensitivity of two sea lions and two of their human investigators. Aerial hearing curves for each subject were obtained with a go/no-go procedure and standard psychophysics. Additionally, underwater hearing curves were obtained for the sea lions using the same procedures. Underwater, the older sea lion (22-25 years of age) showed hearing losses relative to the younger sea lion (13-16 years) that ranged from 10 dB at lower frequencies to 50 dB near the upper frequency limit. The older sea lions' hearing losses in air were consistent with those measured underwater. The older human (69 years) tested also showed losses relative to the younger human (22 years). These differences ranged from 15 dB at lower frequencies up to 35 dB at the highest frequency tested. The results obtained in this study document age-related hearing losses in sea lions and humans. The findings are consistent with data on presbycusis in other mammalian species, showing that maximum hearing loss occurs at the highest frequencies.

  5. Inferred basilar-membrane response functions for listeners with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plack, Christopher J.; Drga, Vit; Lopez-Poveda, Enrique A.

    2004-04-01

    Psychophysical estimates of cochlear function suggest that normal-hearing listeners exhibit a compressive basilar-membrane (BM) response. Listeners with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss may exhibit a linearized BM response along with reduced gain, suggesting the loss of an active cochlear mechanism. This study investigated how the BM response changes with increasing hearing loss by comparing psychophysical measures of BM compression and gain for normal-hearing listeners with those for listeners who have mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Data were collected from 16 normal-hearing listeners and 12 ears from 9 hearing-impaired listeners. The forward masker level required to mask a fixed low-level, 4000-Hz signal was measured as a function of the masker-signal interval using a masker frequency of either 2200 or 4000 Hz. These plots are known as temporal masking curves (TMCs). BM response functions derived from the TMCs showed a systematic reduction in gain with degree of hearing loss. Contrary to current thinking, however, no clear relationship was found between maximum compression and absolute threshold.

  6. How Hearing Loss Impacts Communication. Tipsheet: Serving Students Who Are Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atcherson, Samuel R.; Johnson, Marni I.

    2009-01-01

    Hearing, or auditory processing, involves the use of many hearing skills in a single or combined fashion. The sounds that humans hear can be characterized by their intensity (loudness), frequency (pitch), and timing. Impairment of any of the auditory structures from the visible ear to the central auditory nervous system within the brain can have a…

  7. Risk Factors for Hearing Loss in Children following Bacterial Meningitis in a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Karanja, Benson Wahome; Oburra, Herbert Ouma; Masinde, Peter; WAMALWA, DALTON

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to examine hearing function in children admitted with bacterial meningitis to determine the risk factors for sensorineural hearing loss. Setting. The study was conducted in the audiology unit and paediatric wards of Kenyatta National Hospital. Subjects and Methods. The study involved 83 children between the ages of six months and twelve years admitted with bacterial meningitis. The median age for the children examined was 14. On discharge they underwent hearing tes...

  8. Are open-fit hearing aids a possible alternative to bone-anchored hearing devices in patients with mild to severe hearing loss? A preliminary trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amberley V. Ostevik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Open-fit hearing aids (OFHAs may be of benefit for some individuals with chronic outer and middle ear conditions for which boneanchored hearing devices (BAHDs are normally recommended. The purpose of this study was to compare performance between OFHAs and BAHDs. A Starkey Destiny 800 OFHA was fit on eight adult BAHD users and speech perception measures in quiet and in background noise were compared under two different test conditions: i BAHD only and ii OFHA only. Equivalent outcome measure performance between these two conditions suggests that the OFHA was able to provide sufficient amplification for mild to moderate degrees of hearing loss (pure-tone averages (PTAs less than 47 dB HL. The improved speech perception performances and increased loudness ratings observed for several of the participants with moderately-severe to severe degrees of hearing loss (PTAs of 47 dB HL or greater in the BAHD only condition suggest that the OFHA did not provide sufficient amplification for these individuals. Therefore, OFHAs may be a successful alternative to the BAHD for individuals with no more than a moderate conductive hearing loss who are unable or unwilling to undergo implant surgery or unable to wear conventional hearing aids due to allergies, irritation, or chronic infection associated with the ear being blocked with a shell or earmold.

  9. Acute sensorineural hearing loss and severe otalgia due to scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Min

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Case presentations We encountered a patient with sensorineural hearing loss complicating scrub typhus, and three patients with scrub typhus who complained of otalgia, which was sudden onset, severe, paroxysmal, intermittent yet persistent pain lasting for several seconds, appeared within 1 week after the onset of fever and rash. The acute sensorineural hearing loss and otalgia were resolved after antibiotic administration. Conclusion When patients in endemic areas present with fever and rash and have sensorineural hearing loss or otalgia without otoscopic abnormalities, clinicians should suspect scrub typhus and consider empirical antibiotic therapy.

  10. Acceleration of Age-Related Hearing Loss by Early Noise Exposure: Evidence of a Misspent Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Kujawa, Sharon G.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Age-related and noise-induced hearing losses in humans are multifactorial, with contributions from, and potential interactions among, numerous variables that can shape final outcome. A recent retrospective clinical study suggests an age-noise interaction that exacerbates age-related hearing loss in previously noise-damaged ears (Gates et al., 2000). Here, we address the issue in an animal model by comparing noise-induced and age-related hearing loss (NIHL; AHL) in groups of CBA/CaJ mice expos...

  11. Phonological processing, language, and literacy: a comparison of children with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss and those with specific language impairment.

    OpenAIRE

    Briscoe, J; Bishop, DV; Norbury, CF

    2001-01-01

    Phonological skills, language ability, and literacy scores were compared for four groups: 19 children with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (SNH), 20 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 20 controls matched on chronological age to the SNH group (CA), and 15 controls matched on receptive vocabulary level to a subset of the SLI group (CB). In common with the SLI group, mean scores of children with mild-to-moderate hearing loss were significantly poorer on tests of phonol...

  12. Acrylonitrile potentiates hearing loss and cochlear damage induced by moderate noise exposure in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diversity of chemical and drugs that can potentiate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has impeded efforts to predict such interactions. We have hypothesized that chemical contaminants that disrupt intrinsic antioxidant defenses hold significant risk for potentiating NIHL. If this is true, then acrylonitrile (ACN) would be expected to potentiate NIHL. ACN, one of the 50 most commonly used chemicals in the United States, is metabolized via two pathways that are likely to disrupt intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) buffering systems: (1) it conjugates glutathione, depleting this important antioxidant rapidly; (2) a second pathway involves the formation of cyanide, which can inhibit superoxide dismutase. We hypothesized that moderate noise exposure, that does not produce permanent hearing loss by itself, could initiate oxidative stress and that ACN could render the inner ear more sensitive to noise by disrupting intrinsic antioxidant defenses. Temporary and persistent effects of ACN alone (50 mg/kg, sc 5 days), noise alone (95 or 97 dB octave band noise, 4 h/day for 5 days), or ACN in combination with noise were determined using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and compound action potential (CAP) amplitudes. Histopathological damage to hair cells resulting from these treatments was also investigated using surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Individually, neither ACN nor noise exposures caused any permanent hearing or hair cell loss; only aermanent hearing or hair cell loss; only a reversible temporary threshold shift was measured in noise-exposed animals. However, when given in combination, ACN and noise induced permanent threshold shifts (13-16 dB between 7 and 40 kHz) and a decrease in DPOAE amplitudes (up to 25 dB at 19 kHz), as well as significant outer hair cell (OHC) loss (up to 20% in the first row between 13 and 47 kHz). This investigation demonstrates that ACN can potentiate NIHL at noise levels that are realistic in terms of human exposure, and that the OHCs are the main target of toxicity. While the exact mechanism is unknown, the results are consistent with the hypothesis of ROS involvement in NIHL at moderate levels

  13. Alteration of frequency range for binaural beats in acute low-tone hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karino, Shotaro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Ito, Ken; Kaga, Kimitaka

    2005-01-01

    The effect of acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) on the interaural frequency difference (IFD) required for perception of binaural beats (BBs) was investigated in 12 patients with unilateral ALHL and 7 patients in whom ALHL had lessened. A continuous pure tone of 30 dB sensation level at 250 Hz was presented to the contralateral, normal-hearing ear. The presence of BBs was determined by a subjective yes-no procedure as the frequency of a loudness-balanced test tone was gradually adjusted around 250 Hz in the affected ear. The frequency range in which no BBs were perceived (FRNB) was significantly wider in the patients with ALHL than in the controls, and FRNBs became narrower in the recovered ALHL group. Specifically, detection of slow BBs with a small IFD was impaired in this limited (10 s) observation period. The significant correlation between the hearing level at 250 Hz and FRNBs suggests that FRNBs represent the degree of cochlear damage caused by ALHL. PMID:15809499

  14. Sensori-neural hearing loss after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: individualized risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) is a common complication to radiation therapy in the upper head and neck region. In this study, we estimated the dose response relationship for SNHL with adjustment for pre-therapeutic risk factors. Patients and methods: The pre- and post-therapeutic hearing levels were recorded in a previously published study of 20 patients receiving radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, the dose to the inner ear of these patients was estimated with a computed tomography (CT) based treatment planning system. CT data from a 'proxy patient' were used for patients with no available CT scan. SNHL was analyzed as a function of radiation dose and potential risk factors were tested. Results: The incidence of SNHL increased significantly with increasing dose to the cochlea. Increasing patient's age, and decreasing pre-therapeutic hearing level were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of SNHL. A nomogram is presented for estimating individualized dose constraints of potential use in treatment planning. Conclusions: The inner ear is a critical structure in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the dose to the inner ear should be carefully considered when planning radiation treatment in this region

  15. Characteristics of sensorineural hearing loss secondary to inner ear acoustic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spremo Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cochlear damage secondary to exposure to acoustic trauma is the consequence of the acoustic energy effects on the hearing cells in Korti's organ. OBJECTIVE The objective was to assess the correlation between the degree of sensorineural hearing loss and the type of audiogram registered in acoustic trauma exposed patients. METHOD We analyzed 262 audiograms of patients exposed to acoustic trauma in correlation to 146 audiograms of patients with cochlear damage and hearing loss not related to acoustic trauma. "A" group consisted of acoustic trauma cases, while "B" group incorporated cases with hearing loss secondary to cochlear ischaemia or degeneration. All audiograms were subdivided with regard to the mean hearing loss into three groups: mild (21-40 dB HL, moderate (41-60 dB HL and severe (over 60 dB HL hearing loss. Based on audiogram configuration five types of audiogram were defined: type 1 flat; type 2 hearing threshold slope at 2 kHz, type 3 hearing threshold slope at 4 kHz; type 4 hearing threshold notch at 2 kHz; type 5 notch at 4 kHz. RESULTS Mild hearing loss was recorded in 163 (62.2% ears in the acoustic trauma group, while in 78 (29.8% ears we established moderate hearing loss with the maximum threshold shift at frequencies ranging from 4 kHz to 8 kHz. The least frequent was profound hearing loss, obtained in 21 (8% audiograms in the acoustic trauma group. Characteristic audiogram configurations in the acoustic trauma patient group were: type 1 (N=66; 25.2%, type 2 (N=71; 27.1%, and type 3 (N=68; 25.9%. Audiogram configurations were significanly different in the acoustic trauma group in comparison to the cochlear ischaemia group of patients (p=0.0005. CONCLUSION Cochlear damage concomitant to acoustic trauma could be assessed by the audiogram configuration. Preserved hearing acuity at low and mild frequency range indicates the limited damage to the hearing cells in Korti's organ in the apical cochlear turn.

  16. The Treatment of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Using Phle-botomy: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Goodarzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This randomized clinical trial aimed to assess the efficacy of phlebotomy on improvement of hearing loss. 71 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss were enrolled in this randomized clinical trial study. They were divided into two groups: group A received steroid and hydration therapy plus phlebotomy, while group B received the same regimen without phlebotomy. They were matched according to sex, age, Hb, and Htc. Pure tone audiometries were administered to examine the hearing levels before and after treatment. Statistical analysis showed higher improvement in 250-1000 Hz in patients whit phlebotomy (P<0.001. However, there was noticed no significant difference in hearing improvement in 2000-8000 Hz between two methods. The number (% of patients who had improvement was 29(85.3% in phlebotomy group and 21(56.8% in non-phlebotomy group. On the other hand, the number (% of patients who showed no improvement in A and B group was 5(14.7% and 16(43.2%, respectively (P=0.008. Using phlebotomy accompanied by steroid and hydration therapy leads to higher improvement in hearing loss especially in 250-1000 Hz. We think that this method has the ability to achieve better result in the management of patients with SSNHL.

  17. Fabry disease presenting with sudden hearing loss and otosclerosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felisati Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting in a multiple-system disorder with a wide spectrum of physical signs and symptoms, predominantly affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems, skin, heart, kidneys, and eyes. Case presentation We describe the case of a 26-year-old European Caucasian man who had Fabry disease and who presented with episodic sudden unilateral hearing loss and was treated with glucocorticoids, pentoxifylline, hyperbaric oxygen, and fluoride because of concomitant audiometric evidence of otosclerosis. This case demonstrates the partial and transient beneficial effect of standard treatment for sudden hearing loss not related to Fabry disease and analyzes the possible connection between typical Fabry disease inner-ear lesions and otosclerosis. Whereas hearing loss has been described in connection with Fabry disease, otosclerosis-associated hearing loss in Fabry disease has not yet been described. Conclusions Although progressive hearing loss in patients with Fabry disease seems to be influenced by replacement therapy, few data concerning treatment of sudden hearing loss are available. The lack of literature concerning the pathogenesis of the otological involvement in Fabry disease makes it impossible to identify a connection between the latter and otosclerosis. Therefore, this report may help to reinforce the importance of a thorough evaluation of hearing in patients with Fabry disease and may be of help with therapeutic decision-making.

  18. Hearing loss and risk of early retirement. The HUNT study

    OpenAIRE

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Krokstad, Steinar; TAMBS, KRISTIAN

    2012-01-01

    Background: We explore the possible consequences of measured hearing impairment (HI) and perceived hearing difficulties for early retirement in a large population-based study. Furthermore, we study whether having a part-time position was associated with measured HI and perceived hearing difficulties in the same population. Methods: This study included 25 740 persons from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) aged 20–54 years at baseline in HUNT1 (1984–1986) who also participated in the ...

  19. Parents of Deaf Children Seeking Hearing Loss-Related Information on the Internet: The Australian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ann; Edirippulige, Sisira

    2007-01-01

    Parents whose children are diagnosed in an infant screening program are required to make some difficult choices about the management of the hearing loss at a time when they are emotionally vulnerable. They are required to evaluate information and outcomes regarding issues such as technology for hearing impairment, communication options, education,…

  20. School Nurses' Role in Identifying and Referring Children at Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Candace; Pakulski, Lori A.; Thompson, Amy; Dowling, Jamie; Price, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Young people are likely to experience noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), as the use of personal listening devices and other damaging factors (e.g., video games) increases. Little research has examined the role of school health personnel in the prevention and early identification of hearing impairment. A 32-item, valid and reliable survey was…