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Sample records for significant hearing loss

  1. Hearing Loss

    ... hearing loss may have poor communication skills. Low self-esteem . Children may have low self-esteem (feel badly about ... hearing loss may have poor communication skills. Low self-esteem . Children may have low self-esteem (feel badly about ...

  2. Hearing Loss in Children: Types of Hearing Loss

    ... America Information For... Media Policy Makers Types of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... of our hearing. There are four types of hearing loss: Conductive Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by ...

  3. Hearing Loss in Children

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss can affect a childâ??s ability to develop ... language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting services, the more likely they ...

  4. Genes and Hearing Loss

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  5. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  6. Occupational hearing loss

    Hearing loss - occupational; Noise-induced hearing loss ... Lonsbury-Martin BL, Martin GK. Noise-induced hearing loss. In: Cummings CW, Flint PW, Haughey BH, et al, eds. Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap ...

  7. What's Hearing Loss?

    ... pathologists to help them develop their hearing and speaking skills. Some people with hearing loss may need to use special techniques like these to communicate: speechreading, which ... without speaking Cued Speech and Signed Exact English, which use ...

  8. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Kuhn, Maggie; Heman-Ackah, Selena E.; Shaikh, Jamil A.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is commonly encountered in audiologic and otolaryngologic practice. SSNHL is most commonly defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies occurring within a 72-hr period. Although the differential for SSNHL is vast, for the majority of patients an etiologic factor is not identified. Treatment for SSNHL of known etiology is directed toward that agent, with poor hearing outcomes characteristic for discoverable etiologies that cause inner ear hair cell loss. Steroid therapy is the current mainstay of treatment of idiopathic SSNHL in the United States. The prognosis for hearing recovery for idiopathic SSNHL is dependent on a number of factors including the severity of hearing loss, age, presence of vertigo, and shape of the audiogram. PMID:21606048

  9. What's Hearing Loss?

    ... parts of the ear or ears ("impairment" means something is not working correctly or as well as it should). Someone who has hearing loss might be able to hear some sounds or nothing at all. People also may use the words ...

  10. Non-organic hearing loss.

    Nelson, Sarah C

    2012-12-01

    Annual hearing tests are compulsory in the British Armed Forces. This case report presents a 24-year old soldier who was found to have severe deterioration on her annual audiogram without any significant noise exposure. After two years of specialist audiological investigations she was diagnosed with non-organic hearing loss; further interrogation of her social circumstances suggested potential psychosocial triggers. This diagnosis should be considered early in military primary care in those with objective hearing loss on audiogram where there has been no exposure to significant noise. PMID:23402072

  11. Fluctuant hearing loss

    Jaiswal, S. K.

    1997-01-01

    122 cases of fluctuant hearing loss were studied. Serous otitis media was commonest followed by Meniere’s disease, Acoustic neuroma, fistula of round and oval window, oto-mandibular syndrome, Congenital cholesteatoma and maxillary sinusitis. Cases of Arachnoid cyst, Multiple sclerosis, abnormalities of base of skull and craniocervical region and cervical rib causing fluctuant hearing loss could not be detected. Aetio pathophysiology of all discussed.

  12. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    ... loud noise. This condition is known as noise-induced hearing loss. Many construction workers, farmers, musicians, airport workers, yard ... fact sheets Age-Related Hearing Loss and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss for more information.) Hearing loss can also be ...

  13. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    ... such as long-term exposure to noise. Noise-induced hearing loss is caused by long-term exposure to sounds ... of both age-related hearing loss and noise-induced hearing loss. Can I prevent age-related hearing loss? At ...

  14. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    ... hearing loss. Here are the most common ones: Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Hearing aids ... list of organizations, contact: NIDCD Information Clearinghouse 1 Communication Avenue Bethesda, MD 20892-3456 Toll-free Voice: ( ...

  15. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... find additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  16. Experimental autoimmune hearing loss

    Billings, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) has been hindered by the inaccessibility of the inner ear to biopsy and the lack of workable animal models. A report in this issue of the JCI describes a mouse model of CD4+ T cell–mediated ASNHL induced by immunization with peptides from the inner ear–specific proteins cochlin and β-tectorin.

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    Wormald, R

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the aetiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a paediatric population presenting to the National Centre of Medical Genetics. A retrospective chart review from 1998 to 2006. One hundred and twenty nine children were investigated for SNHL. The average age of diagnosis of hearing loss was 36 months. The degree of hearing loss was mild in 8 children, moderate in 33 children, severe in 31 children and profound in 57 children. Eighty-five children (66%) were diagnosed with a hereditary hearing loss, 11 (8%) children had an acquired hearing loss and no cause found in 33 (26%) children. This is the first report of the causes of hearing loss in Irish children. The mean age of diagnosis in our cohort is high and emphasises the need for a neonatal screening programme. There remains a number of children for whom the cause of hearing loss remains unknown.

  18. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    ... million is spent annually on worker’s compensation for hearing loss disability. NIOSH recommends removing hazardous noise from the workplace whenever possible and using hearing protectors in those situations where dangerous noise exposures ...

  19. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    ... find additional information about hearing loss and older adults? The NIDCD maintains a directory of organizations that provide information on the normal and disordered processes of hearing, balance, taste, smell, voice, speech, and language. Use the ...

  20. Occupational Hearing Loss in Korea

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-01-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases ...

  1. Hearing loss due to mumps.

    Hall, R.; Richards, H.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of mumps was considered in 33 children with profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown origin. Fifteen gave a history of mumps, of whom 12 contracted the infection between the last normal and first abnormal hearing tests. Hearing should be tested after mumps infection.

  2. Age-related hearing loss

    ... the nerve signals that the brain interprets as sound. Hearing loss occurs when the tiny hair cells are damaged or die. The hair cells do not regrow, so most hearing loss caused by hair cell damage is permanent. There is no known single cause ...

  3. Hearing loss at work? Hearing loss from leisure activities?

    2006-01-01

    The nurses of the Medical Service would like invite all persons working on the CERN site to take part in a: HEARING LOSS DETECTION WEEK From 28 August to 1st September 2006 At the Infirmary, Building 57 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hearing tests - advice - information - documentation - protective equipment

  4. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic hearing loss

    ... Encyclopedia: Audiology Encyclopedia: Hearing loss Encyclopedia: Hearing or speech impairment - resources Health Topic: Hearing Disorders and Deafness Health Topic: Hearing Problems in Children Health Topic: Newborn Screening Additional NIH Resources (1 ...

  5. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    ... extensive information about cochlear implants.(Formerly known as Self Help for the Hard of Hearing.) 6 League for the Hard of Hearing 50 Broadway 6 th Floor New York, NY 10004 (917) 305-7700 www.lhh.org Publishes pamphlets, and books for consumers and for health care professionals. For ...

  6. Resounding Facts on Hearing Loss

    Apfel, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Provides a brief description of the physiology of the human ear. The effect of sustained noise levels on hearing loss is discussed, as well as the establishment of maximum noise levels for American industries. (CP)

  7. Pre-enlistment hearing loss and hearing loss disability among US soldiers and marines

    Marlene E Gubata; Elizabeth R Packnett; Xiaoshu Feng; Cowan, David N.; Niebuhr, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common condition among US adults, with some evidence of increasing prevalence in young adults. Noise-induced hearing loss attributable to employment is a significant source of preventable morbidity world-wide. The US military population is largely comprised of young adult males serving in a wide variety of occupations, many in high noise-level conditions, at least episodically. To identify accession and service-related risk factors for hearing-related disability, matched cas...

  8. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    ... Contact Us | Login OIF Resources Especially For Parents Adults Youth Medical Professionals Media About OI Information & Support Research & Studies Donate How to Help The ... Adults with borderline hearing should have yearly testing and ...

  9. Hearing loss and music

    ... The risk of damage to your hearing when listening to music depends on: How loud the music is How ... time you use headphones. Turn down the volume. Listening to music at level 5 or above for just 15 ...

  10. Hearing loss in shipyard employees

    Evangelos C Alexopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is one of the most prevalent occupational illnesses, with a higher incidence in the heavy industry. Objectives of the Study: The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of NIHL in Greece and explore its correlations with other job and individual-related factors. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were administered, and audiograms were conducted to 757 employees of a shipyard company in Greece, both white- and blue-collar, during the period 2006-2009. A modification of the 1979′ equation of the American Academy of Otolaryngology was used to calculate hearing loss. Statistical analysis was conducted by means of the SPSS v. 17. Results: A 27.1% of the employees were hearing handicap. Hearing loss was correlated with age, past medical history of ear disease (Meniere′s disease, acoustic neuroma, otosclerosis or injury, hyperlipidemia, job title and level of education. A few questions on subjective hearing ability and symptoms showed strong discriminatory power of hearing pathology. Conclusions: The results of this study emphasize the burden of disease in the shipyard industry, and the need for continuous monitoring, implementation of preventive measures and hearing conservation programs.

  11. Types of Hearing Loss

    ... 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech- ... Read more Connect with ASHA Information For Audiologists Speech-Language Pathologists Students Faculty Contact Us The ASHA Action Center ...

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska; Adrian Davis

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medic...

  13. Prevalence of occupational noise induced hearing loss amongst traffic police personnel

    Singh, V. K.; A K Mehta

    1999-01-01

    Traffic branch personnel of Pune traffic police were screened for presence of noise induced hearing loss. A very significant number (81.2%) showed sensorineural hearing loss. The various factors responsible for noise induced hearing loss are discussed.

  14. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Minimal Hearing Impairment

    Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Chin Saeng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of patients who did not match the audiometric criteria of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) but complained of acute hearing loss. Methods By thorough medical chart reviews, historical cohort study was performed with consecutive data of 589 patients complaining of acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss without identifiable causes between 2005 and 2013. Those patients demonstrating a hearing loss of at ...

  15. Auditory Memory deficit in Elderly People with Hearing Loss

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in elderly people. Functional side effects of hearing loss are various. Due to the fact that hearing loss is the common impairment in elderly people; the importance of its possible effects on auditory memory is undeniable. This study aims to focus on the hearing loss effects on auditory memory.   Materials and Methods: Dichotic Auditory Memory Test (DVMT was performed on 47 elderly people, aged 60 to 80; that were divided in two groups, the first group consisted of elderly people with hearing range of 24 normal and the second one consisted of 23 elderly people with bilateral symmetrical ranged from mild to moderate Sensorineural hearing loss in the high frequency due to aging in both genders.   Results: Significant difference was observed in DVMT between elderly people with normal hearing and those with hearing loss (P

  16. Noise-induced hearing loss and hearing aids requirement

    Giordano, C.; Garzaro, M; Nadalin, J; Pecorari, G; Boggero, R; Argentero, P; ALBERA, R.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective disturbances, due to hearing loss, are auditory disability and handicap which can be evaluated with a questionnaire. The present study refers to a population of industrial workers affected by noise-induced hearing loss. Aim of the study is to identify the minimal level of hearing loss over which the patient felt changes in his quality of life, and the average auditory threshold at which the patient considered the application of a hearing aid useful or necessary. The sample comprise...

  17. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English, which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  18. Prognostic Factors in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Atay, Gamze; Kayahan, Bahar; çınar, Betül çiçek; Saraç, Sarp; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is still a complex and challenging process which requires clinical evidence regarding its etiology, treatment and prognostic factors. Therefore, determination of prognostic factors might aid in the selection of proper treatment modality. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze whether there is correlation between SSNHL outcomes and (1) systemic steroid therapy, (2) time gap between onset of symptoms and initiation of therapy and (3) audiological pattern of hearing loss. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Methods: Patients diagnosed at our clinic with SSNHL between May 2005 and December 2011 were reviewed. A detailed history of demographic features, side of hearing loss, previous SSNHL and/or ear surgery, recent upper respiratory tract infection, season of admission, duration of symptoms before admission and the presence of co-morbid diseases was obtained. Radiological and audiological evaluations were recorded and treatment protocol was assessed to determine whether systemic steroids were administered or not. Treatment started ≤5 days was regarded as “early” and >5 days as “delayed”. Initial audiological configurations were grouped as “upward sloping”, “downward sloping”, “flat” and “profound” hearing loss. Significant recovery was defined as thresholds improved to the same level with the unaffected ear or improved ≥30 dB on average. Slight recovery was hearing improvement between 10–30dB on average. Hearing recovery less than 10 dB was accepted as unchanged. Results: Among the 181 patients who met the inclusion criteria, systemic steroid was administered to 122 patients (67.4%), whereas 59 (32.6%) patients did not have steroids. It was found that steroid administration did not have any statistically significant effect in either recovered or unchanged hearing groups. Early treatment was achieved in 105 patients (58%) and 76 patients (42%) had delayed treatment. Recovery rates were no different in these two groups; however, when unchanged hearing rates were compared, it was statistically significantly lower in the early treatment group (paudiological pattern, significant recovery and unchanged hearing rates did not differ between groups; however, slight recovery rate was highest in the “flat” type audiological configuration (p<0.05). Conclusion: According to this patient series, oral steroid therapy does not have any influence on the outcomes of SSNHL. However, mid-frequency hearing loss of flat type and initiation of treatment earlier than 5 days from the onset of symptoms, seem to have positive prognostic effects. Further randomized controlled subject groups might contribute to determine prognostic factors of SSNHL. PMID:26966623

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Nonsyndromic hearing loss

    ... include treatment providers. Baby's First Test: Hearing Loss Gene Review: Deafness and Hereditary Hearing Loss Overview Genetic Testing Registry: ... recessive ; bilateral ; cell ; chromosome ; congenital ; connexin ; DNA ; egg ; embryo ; ... inheritance ; inherited ; maternal ; maternal inheritance ; mitochondria ; mutation ; ...

  20. Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers Page Content Article ... temporary or permanent hearing loss. This is called acoustic trauma. How loud is 85 decibels? Surprisingly, not ...

  1. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    ... EVA and Hearing Loss Otosclerosis Pendred Syndrome Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis Why NIDCD Does Research: ... inner ear: Researchers discover new mechanism of vestibular schwannoma that causes hearing loss, introduce new direction for ...

  2. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Amir Houshang Mehrparvar; Mohammad Hossein Davari; Abolfazl Mollasadeghi; Mohammad Reza Vahidi; Mehrdad Mostaghaci; Maryam Bahaloo; Pedram Shokouh

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months...

  3. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Vahidi, Mohammad Reza; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Bahaloo, Maryam; Shokouh, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...

  4. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss

    ... Could you or a loved one have noise-induced hearing loss? Millions of Americans areexperiencing hearing loss due to ... EARS!® is a national campaign to prevent noise-induced hearing loss. The NIDCD Information Clearinghouse is a service of ...

  5. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = - .60, p self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  6. Relationship Between Hair Cell Loss and Hearing Loss in Fishes.

    Smith, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to intense sound or ototoxic chemicals can damage the auditory hair cells of vertebrates, resulting in hearing loss. Although the relationship between such hair cell damage and auditory function is fairly established for terrestrial vertebrates, there are limited data available to understand this relationship in fishes. Although investigators have measured either the morphological damage of the inner ear or the functional deficits in the hearing of fishes, very few have directly measured both in an attempt to find a relationship between the two. Those studies that have examined both auditory hair cell damage in the inner ear and the resulting hearing loss in fishes are reviewed here. In general, there is a significant linear relationship between the number of hair cells lost and the severity of hearing threshold shifts, although this varies between species and different hair cell-damaging stimuli. After trauma to the fish ear, auditory hair cells are able to regenerate to control level densities. With this regeneration also comes a restoration of hearing. Thus there is also a significant relationship between hair cell recovery and hearing recovery in fishes. PMID:26611069

  7. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Suzanne El-Sayegh; Iskandar Barakat; Daniel Glass; Chadi Saifan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiomet...

  8. Psychosocial Aspects of Hearing Loss in Children.

    Sorkin, Donna L; Gates-Ulanet, Patricia; Mellon, Nancy K

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric hearing loss changed more in the past two decades than it had in the prior 100 years with children now identified in the first weeks of life and fit early with amplification. Dramatic improvements in hearing technology allow children the opportunity to listen, speak and read on par with typically hearing peers. National laws mandate that public and private schools, workplaces, and anywhere people go must be accessible to individuals with disabilities. In 2015, most children with hearing loss attended mainstream schools with typically hearing peers. Psychosocial skills still present challenges for some children with hearing loss. PMID:26429333

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in Kawasaki disease.

    Aggarwal, Varun; Etinger, Veronica; Orjuela, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a common nonspecific vasculitis seen in childhood. The most significant long-term sequela is coronary artery aneurysm. However, the spectrum of complications involves not only the heart, but also other organs such as the eyes, skin, kidneys, gallbladder, liver, and central nervous system. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a relatively unrecognized complication of the disease. Although most of the complications (except coronary artery aneurysm) are self-limiting, SNHL can be persistent. It is, especially important in infants and young children who might not be able to report the hearing deficits and are most likely to have cognitive and speech delays if this hearing loss is not addressed in a timely manner. We report a child with Kawasaki disease who had SNHL during the 2(nd) week of the illness. The aim of this article is to briefly review the pathophysiology behind this hearing loss and strongly emphasize the importance of universal hearing evaluation in all children diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. This screening in children with Kawasaki disease may provide some timely intervention if needed. Since most Kawasaki disease patients will be seen by cardiologists, we hope to create more awareness about this complication to the cardiology community as well. PMID:27011703

  10. Navigating Your Child's Hearing Loss Diagnosis

    Trapp Petty, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    For hearing parents, receiving a hearing loss diagnosis for their child can be a shocking event. For some parents, the diagnosis is the fulfillment of a hunch; confirmation of the suspected, but still scary verdict. Recent research finds that the period directly after hearing loss diagnosis is the most stressful and burdensome for parents,…

  11. IDIOPATHIC SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS

    Ufuk Derinsu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to present our patients with ISSHL and to assess the shape of the audiogram and the recovery incidence of the patients.Methods: 28 patients who were referred to our clinic under diagnosis as idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss during two years (between 2004 - 2006 were included in the study. Routine audiological evaluation was performed to all patients. Shape of initial audiograms was classified in 3 groups: (1 flat audiogram; (2 upsloping audiogram; (3 downsloping audiogram. Differences in PTA and WDS between pre and post-treatment were calculated to assess the recovery of hearing.Results: In this study, recovery rate was high in each of the three groups. There was no difference in the recovery rate between the groups. There was no relation between recovery and early referral to therapy. The groups were very small for statistical analysis.Conclusion: It is necessary to enlarge the study group to compare the effects of the factors on idiophatic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  12. Hearing aid-related satisfaction based on type and degree of hearing loss in elderly

    Farzad FarajiKhiavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the elderly; using a hearing aid to alleviate auditory impairment can positively affect their quality of life. This research aimed to determine the level of satisfaction concerning hearing aids in elderly people with hearing impairment based on the type and degree of hearing loss.Methods: An analytic cross-sectional research design was used ; the sample included 40 elderly people who used hearing aids. According to the World Health Organization (WHO age classification, participants were divided into two age groups: 65-74 years (n=20 and 75-90 years (n=20. Satisfaction levels were assessed using a standard satisfaction with amplification in daily life (SADL questionnaire.Results: Satisfaction levels in the 65-74 age group were significantly higher than that in the 75-90 age group (p=0.02. Participants with mixed hearing loss revealed higher satisfaction levels than participants with sensorineural hearing loss (p=0.02. On the negative effects dimension, participants with severe hearing loss exhibited significantly higher satisfaction levels than participants with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss (p=0.01.Conclusion: Total satisfaction mean scores were relatively high in the elderly participants . Negative features could be reduced via careful consultation regarding the aids’ amplifying capabilities and limitations in groups with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss.

  13. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Shokouh, Pedram; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Bahaloo, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup....

  14. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Bruna Natália Freire Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: This is the first case report that brings together DHF and sudden hearing loss. In the development of this case no other cause to sudden hearing loss was found and the correlation between dengue and hearing loss was questioned. In the literature review was found that some viruses, as mumps virus, varicella-zoster virus and HSV-1 and HSV-2 are related to sudden hearing loss, all of them fit in the viral theory. Besides the viral theory of sudden hearing loss, there is the vascular theory that is the occlusion of the end artery that supplies the cochlea. DHF has a vascular commitment, and the hypothesis of a vascular cause could be elicited in this case. Many studies in this area are needed and this article has the objective of elicit the discussion about the subject. Could dengue be associated with sensorineural hearing loss?

  15. (De)stigmatizing the silent epidemic: representations of hearing loss in entertainment television.

    Foss, Katherine A

    2014-01-01

    The number of adolescents, young adults, and senior citizens experiencing hearing loss has significantly increased over the last 30 years. Despite this prevalence, hearing loss receives little attention in popular and political discourse, except in its connection to aging. Thus, hearing loss and the use of hearing aids have been stigmatized, discouraging adults from seeking hearing evaluation and screening, and justifying the lack of insurance coverage for hearing devices. This research explored how and why hearing loss continues to be stigmatized through a study of media messages about hearing loss. A textual analysis was conducted on 276 television episodes that involved d/Deaf characters and/or storylines about hearing loss and deafness from 1987 through 2013 (see Table 1). Only 11 fictional programs addressed the experience of hearing loss through 47 episodes, including Criminal Minds, Switched at Birth, House, M.D., and New Girl. Contrary to the assumption that hearing loss exclusively impacts older people, characters were typically young, attractive, working professionals who held prominent roles in the programs. For most characters, hearing loss developed suddenly and was restored by the end of the episode, with only four characters using hearing aids. Hearing loss was depicted as comical, embarrassing, lonely, and threatening to one's work. The scarcity of hearing loss portrayals, combined with the negative representations of hearing loss, could help explain why hearing loss continues to be stigmatized and overlooked, even though almost half of all Americans will eventually experience difficulty hearing. PMID:24299187

  16. Introduction to audiology: Some basics about hearing loss, hearing technologies and barriers to hearing aid use

    Mourtou, Eleni; Meis, Markus

    loss and their various effects on communication, (3) the different degrees of hearing loss as defined by different national and international organizations, (4) statistics on the preva- lence of hearing loss worldwide, (5) some technological aspects of hearing instruments, (6) sta- tistics on non......-usage of hearing instruments worldwide, and (7) barriers to using hearing aids. Since hearing loss is a worldwide pervasive phenomenon which is likely to increase even further in the future, the authors point out that an understanding of the non-use of hearing aids is crucial....

  17. Ages of hearing loss diagnosis and cochlear implantation in hearing impaired children

    Zahra Jafari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Early diagnosis of hearing loss lead to early intervention and improvement of developmental skills of children with hearing loss. The present study aimed to determine the mean age of hearing loss diagnosis and cochlear implantation (CI in hearing impaired children and to compare the age of performing cochlear implantation in children who were identified by newborn hearing screening with those who were not.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 96 children with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss who received cochlear implantation in Amir-e-Alam cochlear implantation center between the years 2008 and 2010. For data gathering, we assessed subjects' medical archives, interviewed with their parents and took medical history including demographic information, birth history and hearing loss history.Results: Mean age of hearing loss suspicion, diagnosis, hearing aids administration, Initiation of rehabilitation program, performing cochlear implantation and mean age when cochlear implantation was utilized were 6.73 (SD=5.79, 9.35 (SD=5.79, 13.41 (SD=6.10, 16 (SD=6.36, 41.25 (SD=11.12, and 42.15 (SD=11.00 months, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between them (p<0.05. 43.8% of hearing impaired children had been identified by newborn hearing screening. There was statistically significant difference between cochlear implantation operation age of children who were identified by newborn hearing screening with those who were not (p<0.0001.Conclusion: In spite of notable reduction in the age of hearing loss diagnosis and intervention during recent years, compared to international indices it is still tardy. Conducting newborn hearing screening can significantly reduce these ages.

  18. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss; Prognostic Factors

    Arjun, Dass; Neha, Goel; Surinder K, Singhal; Ravi, Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a frightening and frustrating symptom for the patient as well as the physician. Prognosis is affected by multiple factors including duration of hearing loss, presence of associated vertigo and tinnitus, and co-morbidities such as hypertension and diabetes. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects presenting to our department with features of sudden hearing loss were included in the study. Detailed otological history and examination, seri...

  19. Noise and Hearing Loss: A Review

    Daniel, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss is a major cause of deafness and hearing impairment in the United States. Though genetics and advanced age are major risk factors, temporary and permanent hearing impairments are becoming more common among young adults and children especially with the increased exposure to portable music players. Though…

  20. The prevalence of hearing loss in children in Colombia

    Elfa Janeth Vargas-Díaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. According to the Colombia National Statistics Administration (2005 in Colombia it is estimated that 17.3% of the registered population has permanent hearing limitations, of which 24 547 are under 10. Objective. This study aimed to determine the national prevalence of hearing loss in the population under 10 years of age between 2009 and 2011, identifying the variations in rates by type of hearing loss, unilateral or bilateral loss, age, and sex. Materials and methods. This descriptive, cross-sectional study, used data from the Individual Records of Health Procedures that was reported to the Colombian Ministry of Health during the period of observation and that was related to the diagnostic categories of hearing loss at discharge laid out in the ICD-10. Results. The analysis identified a hearing loss rate of 4.3 cases per 1,000 individuals under 10 years of age. The rate of sensorineural hearing loss cases was 5.1, 2.4 for conductive hearing loss and 1.2 for mixed hearing loss. Rates of 5.7 for bilateral hearing loss and 0.6 for unilateral losses were identified. A higher rate was found in children aged 5 to 10 years (2.4, than in children of 0-4 years of age (1.9. Conclusions. The evidence shows a high rate of hearing loss in children under 10 years of age. No significant differences between males and females are identified. Similar behavior was observed for both sexes in terms of sensorineural and conductive losses. However, there was a greater presence of mixed loss in females than in males.

  1. Treatment efficacy: hearing loss in children.

    Carney, A E; Moeller, M P

    1998-02-01

    This article provides a review of the topic of treatment efficacy for children with hearing loss. Efficacy is related to a wide range of treatment goals in the areas of sensory and perceptual skill development, language development (regardless of communication modality), speech-production skill development, academic performance, and social-emotional growth. Topics addressed in this article include (a) the definition of hearing loss in children; (b) incidence and prevalence data; (c) the effects of childhood hearing loss on daily life, including language and literacy, speech perception and production, socialization and family dynamics; (d) the role of audiologists and speech-language pathologists in managing children with hearing loss; and (e) a summary of pertinent efficacy research for children with hearing loss. The analysis of the available research suggests that (a) early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing has long-term positive effects on overall development; (b) a variety of communication modalities exist for this population, and research to date has been more descriptive than prognostic on the choice of modality; (c) sensory aids (hearing aids, tactile aids, and cochlear implants) provide different degrees of benefit for children in the areas of speech perception, production, and language development, depending upon the extent of their hearing loss; (d) few studies have addressed rates of learning and long-term outcomes, but existing data suggest that enriched programs provide some children with hearing loss with the ability to overcome developmental lags in language and academic skills. PMID:9493747

  2. Noise Induced Hearing Loss: A Review

    Vishwambhar Singh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Noise induced hearing loss is one of most common hearing deficit which is almost completely preventable.The hearing loss incurred would depend on the sound qualities,duration of exposure and individual susceptibility and protection.Thereby it can be prevented as we have some set norms for the noise at work places and recreational activities.Once suspected, screening and preventive measures to prevent further progression is taken. There are legislative guidelines for noise at work places for the employers, preventive measures to be taken by employee and role of health professional in screening,assessing the hearing loss and accordingly advise for rehabilitative measures

  3. Noise Induced Hearing Loss: A Review

    Akhil Sareen; Vishwambhar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss is one of most common hearing deficit which is almost completely preventable. The hearing loss incurred would depend on the sound qualities, duration of exposure and individual susceptibility and protection. Thereby it can be prevented as we have some set norms for the noise at work places and recreational activities. Once suspected, screening and preventive measures to prevent further progression is taken. There are legislative guidelines for noise at w...

  4. Hearing Loss Protection Using Vitamins

    Mojtaba Khazaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Machine-made life along with the industrialization of the societies has caused the human to deal with a kind of stressful environment made up of aching sound and vibration sources. Noisiness has been one of the biggest problems of today’s world that the people are in danger of its painful effects. Auditory disorder is the most common reason for Adult Acquired Hearing Loss. As a result, protection against auditory disorders seems to be necessary. Method: In accordance with the importance of this idea, a number of researches in the field of nutrition which resulted in finding the relation between NIHL and vitamins have been carried out. Through the assessment the fact that vitamins can have both preventative and curing influence on NIHL has been evident. Furthermore, it has been discovered that the deficiency of above-mentioned instances can in a way increase the sensitivity of auditory system to noise. Result: There are various mechanisms for NIHL, and each vitamin in a way can go against the destructive affection of it (NIHL. For instance, vitamins A,C and E along with Magnesium can wipe out the free radicals produced by noise exposure. Making use of Antioxidants combinations like vitamin E can prevent auditory cells from death and Noise Induced Hearing Loss from coming about.Conclusion: Vitamin A deficiency increases the sensitivity of auditory system to noise and as a result increases the susceptibility to NIHL. Vitamin C by preventing DNA Oxidation and Lipid Peroxidation in Cochlea has preventive and therapeutic effects on NIHL. Vitamin B12, B6 Deficiency and Folic Acid by damaging Stereo Vascular increase the vulnerability to NIHl. The mechanism and how vitamins affect each of above-mentioned instances will be covered within the article in details.

  5. Sudden (reversible) sensorineural hearing loss in pregnancy.

    Kenny, R

    2011-03-01

    Sudden hearing loss directly associated with pregnancy or birth is a little known and rare occurrence. The temporary, unilateral, low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in this case was reported after the birth of the patient\\'s first child, and again during the third trimester of her second pregnancy.

  6. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL).

    Seidman, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    This article provides an overview of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the leading cause of occupationally induced hearing loss in industrialized countries. It discusses causes of NIHL and compelling evidence that reactive oxygen metabolites and cochlear hypoprefusion are responsible for the destruction of cochlear hair cells. Prevention is also…

  7. Hearing in young adults. Part I: The effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices

    Hannah Keppler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is great concern regarding the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL in youth caused by high sound levels during various leisure activities. Health-orientated behavior of young adults might be linked to the beliefs and attitudes toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices (HPDs. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and HPDs on young adults? hearing status. A questionnaire and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years. The questionnaire contained the Youth Attitude to Noise Scale (YANS and Beliefs about Hearing Protection and Hearing Loss (BAHPHL. A more positive attitude or belief represented an attitude where noise or hearing loss is seen as unproblematic and attitudes and beliefs regarding HPDs is worse. Hearing was evaluated using (high frequency pure tone audiometry (PTA, transient evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. First, mean differences in hearing between the groups with different attitudes and beliefs were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Second, a ?2 test was used to examine the usage of HPDs by the different groups with different attitudes and beliefs. Young adults with a positive attitude had significantly more deteriorated hearing and used HPDs less than the other subjects. Hearing conservation programs (HCPs for young adults should provide information and knowledge regarding noise, hearing loss, and HPDs. Barriers wearing HPDs should especially be discussed. Further, those campaigns should focus on self-experienced hearing related symptoms that might serve as triggers for attitudinal and behavioral changes.

  8. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    Jill B Firszt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g. cochlear implants, less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, and cortical organization following hearing recovery. Hearing in the congenitally affected ear of a 41 year old female improved significantly after stapedotomy and reconstruction. Pre-operative hearing threshold levels showed unilateral, mixed, moderately-severe to profound hearing loss. The contralateral ear had hearing threshold levels within normal limits. Testing was completed prior to, and three and nine months after surgery. Measurements were of sound localization with intensity-roved stimuli and speech recognition in various noise conditions. We also evoked magnetic resonance signals with monaural stimulation to the unaffected ear. Activation magnitudes were determined in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex regions via an interrupted single event design. Hearing improvement following 40 years of congenital unilateral hearing loss resulted in substantially improved sound localization and speech recognition in noise. Auditory cortex also reorganized. Contralateral auditory cortex responses were increased after hearing recovery and the extent of activated cortex was bilateral, including a greater portion of the posterior superior temporal plane. Thus, prolonged predominant monaural stimulation did not prevent auditory system changes consequent to restored binaural hearing. Results support future research of unilateral auditory deprivation effects and plasticity, with consideration for length of deprivation, age at hearing correction, degree and type of hearing loss.

  9. Genetic Effects on Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Evidence-based Treatment for Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Yu, Yong-qiang; Yang, Huai-an; Xiao, Ming; Wang, Jing-wei; Huang, Dong-yan; Bhambhani, Yagesh; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Clark, Brenda; Jin, Yuan-zhe; Fu, Wei-neng; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Qian; Liang, Xue-ting; Zhang, Ming

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the mechanism of inheritance behind inherited hearing loss and genetic susceptibility in noise-induced hearing loss are reviewed. Conventional treatments for sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), i.e. hearing aid and cochlear implant, are effective for some cases, but not without limitations. For example, they provide little benefit for patients of profound SNHL or neural hearing loss, especially when the hearing loss is in poor dynamic range and with low frequency resolution. We emphasize the most recent evidence-based treatment in this field, which includes gene therapy and allotransplantation of stem cells. Their promising results have shown that they might be options of treatment for profound SNHL and neural hearing loss. Although some treatments are still at the experimental stage, it is helpful to be aware of the novel therapies and endeavour to explore the feasibility of their clinical application. PMID:26564418

  10. Occupational noise induced hearing loss and hearing threshold profile at high frequencies

    Jayesh D Solanki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The textile workers exposed to industrial noise are prone to develop hearing loss concentrated mainly at high audible frequencies. It is affected by duration of exposure and type of noise. Aims: Present study was conducted to (a investigate hearing thresholds of textile workers by pure tone audiometry, (b correlate thresholds at 4 kHz, 6 kHz and 8 kHz between noise exposed and unexposed group and (c study effect of duration of exposure on hearing profile. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on 50 weavers of plastic industries exposed to high levels of constant noise. Objectively, hearing defects were inquired by self-administered questionnaires. Subjectively, pure tone audiometry was carried out to measure hearing thresholds at various frequencies. It was simultaneously compared with the similar data of matched control group. Results: Prevalence of hearing loss symptom and hearing thresholds were more in exposed group than in control group. There was significant hearing loss at high frequency as compared to lower ones. Audiometry revealed notch at 4 kHz with less effect at 6 or 8 kHz, cumulative effect of duration of exposure. Conclusion: Textile weavers are more at risk to develop Occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss (ONIHL mainly affecting higher frequencies concentrated at 4 kHz. Despite least effects on hearing, this disease silently progresses and there is a definite scope of prevention by appropriate protective measures.

  11. Self Reported Hearing Loss Among Elderly Malaysians

    MAJMIN SH; AZIMAH MN; LEE VKM; ZAITUN A; Leelavathi, M; ROSDINA AK; MOHD KA

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on patients attending a primary care facility to determine the prevalence of self reported hearing loss using a single question, “Do you have hearing loss?” Pure tone audiometry was performed to compare the accuracy of the self report. A total of 111 patients were recruited. The prevalence of self reported hearing loss using a single question and pure tone audiometry was 24.3% and 36.9% respectively. By using pure tone audiometry at a cut-off-level of 25 ...

  12. SELF REPORTED HEARING LOSS AMONG ELDERLY MALAYSIANS

    MAJMIN SH

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted on patients attending a primary care facility to determine the prevalence of self reported hearing loss using a single question, “Do you have hearing loss?” Pure tone audiometry was performed to compare the accuracy of the self report. A total of 111 patients were recruited. The prevalence of self reported hearing loss using a single question and pure tone audiometry was 24.3% and 36.9% respectively. By using pure tone audiometry at a cut-off-level of 25 dBHL (decibels Hearing level, the single question yielded a sensitivity of 41.4% and specificity of 85.0%. The single question performed better at 40 dBHL pure tone audiometry with sensitivity of 55.0% and specificity of 82.0%. In conclusion, the prevalence of hearing loss in elderly was high and the single question self reported hearing loss performed satisfactorily with moderate hearing loss.

  13. Hearing Loss in Children: Data and Statistics

    ... look at newborn hearing screening, diagnostic and intervention data. EHDI DASH uses maps, bar charts, line graphs and other tools to ... and family out-of-pocket expenses. The actual economic costs of hearing loss, therefore, will ... existing public health data programs for newborn screening and birth defects tracking ...

  14. Determination of Hearing Loss Prevalence in Preschool Children of Ahwaz

    Mozafar Sarafraz; Mahmood Hekmat-Shoar; Sara Zaheri

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Children learn to communicate by hearing sounds. If there is hearing loss, the cognitive and speaking abilities and language learning will deteriorate. Early detection and intervention are important factors in the successful treatment of hearing loss in children. Hearing loss (HL) is divided into two main groups: conductive hearing loss (CHL) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), the prevalence of the former being higher in children, many whose causes are easy to detect and ...

  15. Gd enhanced MRI in sensorineural hearing loss

    The enhanced MRI hearing findings of the inner ear in 124 patients with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. MR images were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium (0.1 mmol/kg). In three out of seventy-nine patients with unilateral healing loss, cochlear and/or the vestibular enhancement was noted on the symptomatic side. The positive cases included those with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, mumps and so-called sudden deafness. Forty-five patients with bilateral hearing loss showed no enhancement within the inner ear. Although positive gadolinium enhancement of the inner ear may detect inflammatory lesions due to a viral infection, its incidence in sensorineural hearing loss, including cases of sudden deafness. seems to be extremely rare. (author)

  16. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey

    Carl Christian Lein Størmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of TromsØ. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians.

  17. Leupeptin reduces impulse noise induced hearing loss

    Gavriel Haim; Shulman Abraham; Stracher Alfred; Sohmer Haim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to continuous and impulse noise can induce a hearing loss. Leupeptin is an inhibitor of the calpains, a family of calcium-activated proteases which promote cell death. The objective of this study is to assess whether Leupeptin could reduce the hearing loss resulting from rifle impulse noise. Methods A polyethelene tube was implanted into middle ear cavities of eight fat sand rats (16 ears). Following determination of auditory nerve brainstem evoked response (ABR) ...

  18. Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents With Hearing Loss

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Loy, Betty A.; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty chil...

  19. Hearing Screening and Diagnostic Evaluation of Children With Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss

    Ross, Danielle S.; Holstrum, W. June; Gaffney, Marcus; Green, Denise; Oyler, Robert F.; Gravel, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    More than 90% of newborns in the United States are now being screened for hearing loss. A large fraction of cases of unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss are not currently identified through newborn hearing screening. This is of concern because a preponderance of research has demonstrated that unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss can lead to developmental delays and educational problems for some children. To help address this probable underidentification ...

  20. An Auditory Model with Hearing Loss

    Nielsen, Lars Bramsløw

    An auditory model based on the psychophysics of hearing has been developed and tested. The model simulates the normal ear or an impaired ear with a given hearing loss. Based on reviews of the current literature, the frequency selectivity and loudness growth as functions of threshold and stimulus...... level have been found and implemented in the model. The auditory model was verified against selected results from the literature, and it was confirmed that the normal spread of masking and loudness growth could be simulated in the model. The effects of hearing loss on these parameters was also in...... qualitative agreement with recent findings. The temporal properties of the ear have currently not been included in the model. As an example of a real-world application of the model, loudness spectrograms for a speech utterance were presented. By introducing hearing loss, the speech sounds became less audible...

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hearing Loss

    Teru Kamogashira; Chisato Fujimoto; Tatsuya Yamasoba

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is involved in several apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways in auditory tissues. These pathways are the major causes of most types of sensorineural hearing loss, including age-related hearing loss, hereditary hearing loss, ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss, and noise-induced hearing loss. ROS production can be triggered by dysfunctional mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increases or decreases in ROS-related enzymes. Although apoptotic ...

  2. Delayed-onset hearing loss in pediatric candidates for cochlear implantation.

    Jeong, Sung-Wook; Kang, Min-Young; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Kim, Lee-Suk

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of delayed-onset hearing loss in children. Seventy-three children who underwent cochlear implantation (CI) were included. They were divided into a congenital hearing loss group (n = 50) and a delayed-onset hearing loss group (n = 23). The age at diagnosis of hearing loss, age at the beginning of auditory habilitation, the age at CI, and the postimplant speech perception abilities were compared between the two groups. Children in the congenital hearing loss group were confirmed to have hearing loss at a mean age of 0.3 years, and those in the delayed-onset hearing loss group were diagnosed with hearing loss at a mean age of 2.0 years. Auditory habilitation began at a mean age of 0.4 and 2.0 years, and CI was performed at a mean age of 1.4 and 2.6 years, respectively. Children in the congenital hearing loss group had better scores on speech perception tests than those in the delayed-onset hearing loss group, but the differences were not significant. About half of the children with delayed-onset hearing loss (57 %) had risk factors associated with delayed-onset hearing loss. A high prevalence of delayed-onset hearing loss was noted in the group of children who underwent CI. Risk factors for hearing loss were not found in 43 % of children with delayed-onset hearing loss. Universal screening for delayed-onset hearing loss needs to be performed during early childhood. PMID:25956615

  3. Acquired Hearing Loss and Psychiatric Symptoms

    Mehmet Emin CEYLAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: World Health Organization (WHO defines hearing loss as an impairment in perception, attention and organisation as well as in speaking, In this study, on the base of biopsychosocial theory, we aimed to determine both psychiatric symptoms of the patients who have acquired (but ideopathic hearing impairment/loss, and also, if there was, an association between this physical illness and psychiatric symptoms. Methods: The groups of patients with mild, moderate and severe hearing impairment and a healthy control group were enrolled in the study. Each group contained 30 persons. A sociodemographic questionnaire, the Symptom Check List 90-Revised Form (SCL-90-R and the Non-Patients Form of Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (SCID-NP were used. Results: The psychopathology that have been found in our study was 35.6% in patients group versus 20% in controls. 30-50% of patients with hearing loss reported both social and psychological problems. According to SCL-90-R, in the patients’ groups who had especially moderate and severe hearing loss were more paranoid and depressive; they had more eating and sleeping difficulties; also they complained more from musical hallucinations (25% and their scores of positive symptoms and of additional scales in SCL-90-R were higher than the controls (p< 0.001. In SCID-NP, especially the hallucination, the paranoia and the depression scores were higher in patients with hearing loss. Conclusion: The reasons for psychiatric symptoms in the patients with hearing impairment or loss are multiethiological and it is known that disability is the major ethiological factor. The results of our study showed us that the psychiatry and the other medical disciplines should always work together. (Archives of Neuropsychiatry 2009; 46: 149-56

  4. Childhood hearing health: educating for prevention of hearing loss.

    Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Lacerda, Giselle; Lobato, Diolén Conceição Barros; Santos, Luciana; Moreira, Aline Carlezzo; Ribas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction?The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective?To describe the results of three strategies for awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods?The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results?The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1%) presented hearing alterations. Conclusion?The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential. PMID:25992146

  5. Viral Causes of Hearing Loss: A Review for Hearing Health Professionals

    Cohen, Brandon E.; Durstenfeld, Anne; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    A number of viral infections can cause hearing loss. Hearing loss induced by these viruses can be congenital or acquired, unilateral or bilateral. Certain viral infections can directly damage inner ear structures, others can induce inflammatory responses which then cause this damage, and still others can increase susceptibility or bacterial or fungal infection, leading to hearing loss. Typically, virus-induced hearing loss is sensorineural, although conductive and mixed hearing losses can be ...

  6. Prevalence and Factors Associated With Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Use in Korean Elders

    Ji-Su Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid usage rates among Korean elders by comparing the differences between those with and without hearing loss, and between those who used and did not use hearing aids. Methods: This study was based on data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010–2012). The study sample consisted of 5,447 Koreans aged ≥60 years who received a hearing assessment. Hearing loss was measured using a pure...

  7. Hearing loss in the elderly: History of occupational noise exposure

    Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise exposure is one of the most common health risk factors, and workers are exposed to sound pressure levels capable of producing hearing loss. Aim: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in the elderly and its possible association with a history of occupational noise exposure and with sex. Methods: A prospective study in subjects aged over 60 years. The subjects underwent anamnesis and audiological assessment. The Mann-Whitney test and multiple logistic regression, with 95% confidence interval and p < 0.05, were used for statistical analysis. Results: There were 498 subjects from both sexes, and the median age was 69 years. From the comparison between men and women, we obtained the medium hearing I (500, 1000, and 2000 Hz p = 0.8318 and the mean hearing II (3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz; p < 0.0001. Comparing the thresholds of individuals with and without a history of occupational noise exposure, we obtained the medium hearing I (p = 0.9542 and the mean hearing II (p = 0.0007. Conclusion: There was a statistically significant association between hearing loss at high frequencies and the risk factors being male and occupational noise exposure.

  8. The Importance of Hearing: A Review of the Literature on Hearing Loss for Older People with Learning Disabilities

    Bent, Sarah; McShea, Lynzee; Brennan, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hearing loss has a significant impact on living well and on communication in all adults, with the numbers affected increasing with age, and adults with learning disabilities being at particular risk. Methods: A review of the literature on hearing loss in older adults with learning disabilities was completed. Results: A significant…

  9. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Shahin Yazdani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine hearing thresholds at sound frequencies important for speech comprehension in subjects with ocular pseudoexfoliation (PXF and to compare them with that of controls without PXF. METHODS: Eighty-three subjects with ocular PXF and 83 age and sex matched controls without PXF were enrolled in this case-control study. Pure tone audiometry (bone conduction was performed at 1, 2 and 3 kilohertz (KHz in all subjects. Thresholds were compared to an age and sex stratified standard (ISO7029 and between study groups. Hearing loss was defined as sum of tested hearing thresholds (HTL-1,2,3 lower than the ISO7029 standard median. RESULTS: The study included 60 male and 23 female subjects in each group. Hearing loss was present in 147 of 166 (88.6% of examined ears in the case group vs 89 of 166 (53.6% in the control group (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.49-11.79. Overall 78 subjects (94.0% in the case group vs 58 subjects (69.9% in the control group had hearing loss in one or both ears (P < 0.001; OR=6.72; 95%CI, 2.42-18.62. Hearing thresholds at each of the examined frequencies and the HTL-1,2,3 were also significantly higher in individuals with PXF. Although glaucoma was significantly more common in subjects with PXF (51.8% vs 22.9%, P < 0.001, it was not associated with hearing loss in any of the study groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hearing thresholds at frequencies which are important for speech comprehension are significantly worse in individuals with ocular PXF as compared to matched controls. This finding may support the multi-organ nature of PXF syndrome.

  10. Sensorineural hearing loss in insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    Koosha A.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among patients who have sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology, diabetes is one of the diseases to be routinely investigated. The relationship between diabetes mellitus and hearing loss is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM compared to control group.Methods: In a cross-sectional study pure tone audiometry (PTA and speech audiometry was performed in 62 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM, aged under 40 years, and in 62 randomly selected age-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Subjects with otological and other metabolic diseases were excluded from the study. We applied the SPSS.10 statistical analysis software Chi-square and student's test. Results: Statistical analysis showed that the hearing of the diabetic patients were significantly worsen than the control subjects. The hearing level tended to be worsen in the diabetic patients than that in control subjects, but the differences were statistically significant only at frequencies of 250,500, 4000 and 8000 Hz p>0.05(. There wasn't statistical significant difference between sex in two study groups p>0.05(. The mean duration of diabetes was no statistically significant with hearing loss p>0.05(. The frequency of complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy in the diabetic groups had no correlation with speech threshold (p>0.05(.‏ There were no significant differences between speech reception threshold, speech discrimination score and acoustic reflex in two groups.Conclusions: We conclude that type I diabetes mellitus can cause sensorineural hearing loss.

  11. Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis

    ... takes two steps: Hearing screening Full hearing test Hearing Screening Hearing screening is a test to tell ... full hearing test as soon as possible. Full Hearing Test All children who do not pass a ...

  12. SOX10 mutations mimic isolated hearing loss.

    Pingault, V; Faubert, E; Baral, V; Gherbi, S; Loundon, N; Couloigner, V; Denoyelle, F; Noël-Pétroff, N; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Bondurand, N; Marlin, S

    2015-10-01

    Ninety genes have been identified to date that are involved in non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 300 different forms of syndromic hearing impairment have been described. Mutations in SOX10, one of the genes contributing to syndromic hearing loss, induce a large range of phenotypes, including several subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome and Kallmann syndrome with deafness. In addition, rare mutations have been identified in patients with isolated signs of these diseases. We used the recent characterization of temporal bone imaging aspects in patients with SOX10 mutations to identify possible patients with isolated hearing loss due to SOX10 mutation. We selected 21 patients with isolated deafness and temporal bone morphological defects for mutational screening. We identified two SOX10 mutations and found that both resulted in a non-functional protein in vitro. Re-evaluation of the two affected patients showed that both had previously undiagnosed olfactory defects. Diagnosis of anosmia or hyposmia in young children is challenging, and particularly in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SOX10 mutations can mimic non-syndromic hearing impairment. MRI should complete temporal bones computed tomographic scan in the management of congenital deafness as it can detect brain anomalies, cochlear nerve defects, and olfactory bulb malformation in addition to inner ear malformations. PMID:25256313

  13. Classification and hearing evolution of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    N.O. Penido

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze clinical aspects, hearing evolution and efficacy of clinical treatment of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL. This was a prospective clinical study of 136 consecutive patients with SSNHL divided into three groups after diagnostic evaluation: patients with defined etiology (DE, N = 13, 10%, concurrent diseases (CD, N = 63, 46.04% and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL, N = 60, 43.9%. Initial treatment consisted of prednisone and pentoxifylline. Clinical aspects and hearing evolution for up to 6 months were evaluated. Group CD comprised 73% of patients with metabolic decompensation in the initial evaluation and was significantly older (53.80 years than groups DE (41.93 years and ISSHL (39.13 years. Comparison of the mean initial and final hearing loss of the three groups revealed a significant hearing improvement for group CD (P = 0.001 and group ISSHL (P = 0.001. Group DE did not present a significant difference in thresholds. The clinical classification for SSNHL allows the identification of significant differences regarding age, initial and final hearing impairment and likelihood of response to therapy. Elevated age and presence of coexisting disease were associated with a greater initial hearing impact and poorer hearing recovery after 6 months. Patients with defined etiology presented a much more limited response to therapy. The occurrence of decompensated metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and the possibility of first manifestation of auto-immune disease and cerebello-pontine angle tumors justify an adequate protocol for investigation of SSNHL.

  14. [Reversible hearing loss in acute salicylate intoxication].

    Wecker, H; Laubert, A

    2004-04-01

    Acetylic acid, such as aspirin, is one of the most commonly used medication in Western societies. Aspirin overdosage causes ototoxic side effects in some patients, such as bilateral mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Recent literature describes, that salicylates act as competitive inhibitors of Cl- anions at the anion-binding site of prestin, the motor protein of the outer hair cell. This molecular mechanism correlates well with the clinical audiological mainstays of aspirin-induced hearing loss, dose dependency, cochlear site of hearing loss and reversibility. We report about a young man with an acute moderate aspirin intoxication resulting in asymmetric hearing loss of 50 dB HL and tinnitus for five days. Otoacoustic emissions were absent on the first day of intoxication but could be measured again on the fifth day after the intoxication. As the ototoxic side effects resolve with in two or three days, no specific treatment is necessary for ototoxicity. Medical treatment of acute or chronic aspirin intoxications aims to decrease further drug absorption by gastrointestinal decontamination and to accelerate elimination by alkaline diuresis. Only in severe intoxications hemodialysis may be considered to treat neurologic, pulmonal, renal or cardial complications. PMID:15143764

  15. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a “wait-and-scan” group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  16. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  17. Murine CMV-induced hearing loss is associated with inner ear inflammation and loss of spiral ganglia neurons.

    Bradford, Russell D; Yoo, Young-Gun; Golemac, Mijo; Pugel, Ester Pernjak; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J

    2015-04-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) occurs in 0.5-1% of live births and approximately 10% of infected infants develop hearing loss. The mechanism(s) of hearing loss remain unknown. We developed a murine model of CMV induced hearing loss in which murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection of newborn mice leads to hematogenous spread of virus to the inner ear, induction of inflammatory responses, and hearing loss. Characteristics of the hearing loss described in infants with congenital HCMV infection were observed including, delayed onset, progressive hearing loss, and unilateral hearing loss in this model and, these characteristics were viral inoculum dependent. Viral antigens were present in the inner ear as were CD(3+) mononuclear cells in the spiral ganglion and stria vascularis. Spiral ganglion neuron density was decreased after infection, thus providing a mechanism for hearing loss. The lack of significant inner ear histopathology and persistence of inflammation in cochlea of mice with hearing loss raised the possibility that inflammation was a major component of the mechanism(s) of hearing loss in MCMV infected mice. PMID:25875183

  18. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl’s gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl’s gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain’s plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  19. Mobile phone induced sensorineural hearing loss

    The increased use of mobile phones worldwide has focused interest on the biological effects and possible health outcomes of exposure to radiofrequency fields from mobile phones, and their base stations. Various reports suggest that mobile phone use can cause health problems like fatigue, headache, dizziness, tension and sleep disturbances, however, only limited research data is available in medical literature regarding interaction between electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones and auditory function and the possible impact on hearing. We report a case of sensorineural hearing loss due to Global System for Mobile Communication mobile phone use in a 42-year-old male. (author)

  20. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention: Facts and Statistics

    ... the recommended amount of exposure time. Facts and Statistics Four million workers go to work each day ... Hearing Loss DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2010-136 Statistics on hearing loss in the manufacturing industry. Surveys ...

  1. Mechanisms and Treatment of Blast Induced Hearing Loss

    Choi, Chul-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to provide an overview of the basic mechanisms of blast induced hearing loss and review pharmacological treatments or interventions that can reduce or inhibit blast induced hearing loss. The mechanisms of blast induced hearing loss have been studied in experimental animal models mimicking features of damage or injury seen in human. Blast induced hearing loss is characterized by perforation and rupture of the tympanic membrane, ossicular damage, basilar memb...

  2. Hearing in young adults. Part I: The effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices

    Hannah Keppler; Ingeborg Dhooge; Bart Vinck

    2015-01-01

    There is great concern regarding the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in youth caused by high sound levels during various leisure activities. Health-orientated behavior of young adults might be linked to the beliefs and attitudes toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices (HPDs). The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and HPDs on young adults′ hearing status. A questionnaire and an audi...

  3. Hearing loss in stranded odontocete dolphins and whales.

    Mann, David; Hill-Cook, Mandy; Manire, Charles; Greenhow, Danielle; Montie, Eric; Powell, Jessica; Wells, Randall; Bauer, Gordon; Cunningham-Smith, Petra; Lingenfelser, Robert; DiGiovanni, Robert; Stone, Abigale; Brodsky, Micah; Stevens, Robert; Kieffer, George; Hoetjes, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The causes of dolphin and whale stranding can often be difficult to determine. Because toothed whales rely on echolocation for orientation and feeding, hearing deficits could lead to stranding. We report on the results of auditory evoked potential measurements from eight species of odontocete cetaceans that were found stranded or severely entangled in fishing gear during the period 2004 through 2009. Approximately 57% of the bottlenose dolphins and 36% of the rough-toothed dolphins had significant hearing deficits with a reduction in sensitivity equivalent to severe (70-90 dB) or profound (>90 dB) hearing loss in humans. The only stranded short-finned pilot whale examined had profound hearing loss. No impairments were detected in seven Risso's dolphins from three different stranding events, two pygmy killer whales, one Atlantic spotted dolphin, one spinner dolphin, or a juvenile Gervais' beaked whale. Hearing impairment could play a significant role in some cetacean stranding events, and the hearing of all cetaceans in rehabilitation should be tested. PMID:21072206

  4. Diclofenac induced sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    M Bhanukumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A few cases of mild to moderate, gradual and reversible sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL with prolonged doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported. We present a case of sudden irreversible SNHL in a 60-year-old female after taking a single dose of diclofenac. The patient was a known case of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and was on regular treatment. We postulate that the patient's hearing loss was the result of diclofenac's ototoxic effects which may have been potentiated as a result of her long standing diabetes, hypertension and old age. Accordingly, we recommend the cautious use of diclofenac in patients with underlying diseases where diclofenac induced ototoxicity could potentially result in adverse otologic consequences.

  5. Bilateral Pial siderosis and hearing loss

    Seven adult patients with bilateral progressive hearing loss (six male, one female; aged 40-74 years) were studied with a high-field strength (1.5-T) magnetic resonance (MR) system after previous negative workup with either air contrast or intravenous contrast medium-enhanced computed tomography (CT). In all instances, the patients showed extensive evidence of pial siderosis outlining the posterior fossa subarachnoid space. The siderosis was manifested (on long repetition time images) as an increasing susceptibility effect (hypointensity) with a prolongation of echo time. The results of this study indicate that a negative CT examination is inadequate in patients with bilateral hearing loss and that when evidence of siderosis is found on MR images, an etiology for prior subarachnoid hemorrhage must be pursued

  6. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter; Wagner, Niels; Asal, Korhan; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Thomsen, Jens

    Noise-induced hearing loss may result from excessive release of glutamate, nitrogen oxide and reactive oxygen species. The effects of these factors on the inner ear may potentially be prevented or reduced by erythropoietin (EPO), as indicated by previously demonstrated neuro-protective effects of...... EPO upon damage to the central nervous system and the retina. This paper reports three separate trials, conducted to investigate the hypothesis that noise-induced hearing loss is prevented or reduced by erythropoietin. The trials employed three different modes of drug application, different...... administration time windows and different rodent species. In trial 1, guinea pigs were exposed to 110dB SPL, 4-20kHz wide band noise (WBN) for 8h. EPO was administered to the round window membrane 24h after noise exposure, either sustained by pump for a week or by single dose middle ear instillation. In trial 2...

  7. Noise Induced Hearing Loss of Forest Workers in Turkey

    M. Tunay

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a total number of 114 workers who were in 3 different groups in terms of age and work underwent audiometric analysis. In order to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the hearing loss levels of the workers who were included in the study, variance analysis was applied with the help of the data obtained as a result of the evaluation. Correlation and regression analysis were applied in order to determine the relations between hearing loss and their age and their time of work. As a result of the variance analysis, statistically significant differences were found at 500, 2000 and 4000 Hz frequencies. The most specific difference was observed among chainsaw machine operators at 4000 Hz frequency, which was determined by the variance analysis. As a result of the correlation analysis, significant relations were found between time of work and hearing loss in 0.01 confidence level and between age and hearing loss in 0.05 confidence level. Forest workers using chainsaw machines should be informed, they should wear or use protective materials and less noising chainsaw machines should be used if possible and workers should undergo audiometric tests when they start work and once a year.

  8. Noise induced hearing loss of forest workers in Turkey.

    Tunay, M; Melemez, K

    2008-09-01

    In this study, a total number of 114 workers who were in 3 different groups in terms of age and work underwent audiometric analysis. In order to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the hearing loss levels of the workers who were included in the study, variance analysis was applied with the help of the data obtained as a result of the evaluation. Correlation and regression analysis were applied in order to determine the relations between hearing loss and their age and their time of work. As a result of the variance analysis, statistically significant differences were found at 500, 2000 and 4000 Hz frequencies. The most specific difference was observed among chainsaw machine operators at 4000 Hz frequency, which was determined by the variance analysis. As a result of the correlation analysis, significant relations were found between time of work and hearing loss in 0.01 confidence level and between age and hearing loss in 0.05 confidence level. Forest workers using chainsaw machines should be informed, they should wear or use protective materials and less noising chainsaw machines should be used if possible and workers should undergo audiometric tests when they start work and once a year. PMID:19266930

  9. Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss in Japan

    Nakashima, Tsutomu; Sato, Hiroaki; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Hato, Naohito; Yoshida, Tadao; SHIMONO, MARIKO; Teranishi, Masaaki; Sone, Michihiko; Fukunaga, Yukari; Kobashi, Gen; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Matsui, Shigeyuki; OGAWA, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion An epidemiological survey of hospitals and private clinics in Japan regarding idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) revealed that the incidence of SSNHL was 60.9 per 100 000 population. There were more females than males in the younger generation. Objective The incidence of SSNHL varies largely by country. Because the Japanese criteria for diagnosing SSNHL have changed in accordance with those widely used in other parts of the world, a clinicoepidemiological study wa...

  10. Studying VEMP in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Mohsen Rajati; Mehdi Bakhshaee; Ebrahim Naghavi; Faezeh Hoseinnejad; Hamid Reza Rouhi; Rahman Movahhed

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has a prevalence of 10 in 100,000. Viral infections, vascular obstruction and rupture of the intracochlear membranes are supposed to be its most common etiologies. About 40% of patients experience vertigo or imbalance. The VEMP (vestibular evoked myogenic potentials) test is a known approach for detailed study of the labyrinth. The advantage of this test in comparison to other tests is the selected study of sacculus and sacculocochlear p...

  11. Complex Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Aleksandruk, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    Recent data on use of Ginkgo Biloba extract in otorhinolaryngological practice were presented. The mechanism of the curative action of Ginkgo Biloba extract (vasoprotective, antioxidative, rheological, and edematous) was described. Effectiveness of Ginkgo Biloba as a part of complex treatment of sensorineural hearing loss in children was elucidated. Results of the research proved effectiveness of treatment with Ginkgo Biloba and showed perspectives of Ginkgo Biloba use in treatment programs f...

  12. Occupational hearing loss of market mill workers in the city of Accra, Ghana.

    Kitcher, Emmanuel D; Ocansey, Grace; Abaidoo, Benjamin; Atule, Alidu

    2014-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is an irreversible sensorineural hearing loss associated with exposure to high levels of excessive noise. Prevention measures are not well established in developing countries. This comparative cross sectional study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in both a group of high risk workers and a control group and to assess their knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. A total of 101 market mill workers and 103 controls employed within markets in the city of Accra, Ghana, were evaluated using a structured questionnaire and pure tone audiometry. The questionnaire assessed factors including self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus, knowledge on the effects of noise on hearing health and the use of hearing protective devices. Pure tone audiometric testing was conducted for both mill workers and controls. Noise levels at the work premises of the mill workers and controls were measured. Symptoms of hearing loss were reported by 24 (23.76%) and 8 (7.7%) mill workers and controls respectively. Fifty-five (54.5%) and fifty-four (52.37%) mill workers and controls exhibited knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. Five (5.0%) mill workers used hearing protective devices. There was significant sensorineural hearing loss and the presence of a 4 kHz audiometric notch among mill workers when compared with controls for the mean thresholds of 2 kHz, 3 kHz and 4 kHz (P = 0. 001). The prevalence of hearing loss in the better hearing ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively (P < 0.5). The prevalence of hearing loss, which may be characteristic of NIHL in the better hearing ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively. The majority of mill workers did not use hearing protection. PMID:24953884

  13. Occupational hearing loss of market mill workers in the city of Accra, Ghana

    Emmanuel D Kitcher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL is an irreversible sensorineural hearing loss associated with exposure to high levels of excessive noise. Prevention measures are not well established in developing countries. This comparative cross sectional study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in both a group of high risk workers and a control group and to assess their knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. A total of 101 market mill workers and 103 controls employed within markets in the city of Accra, Ghana, were evaluated using a structured questionnaire and pure tone audiometry. The questionnaire assessed factors including self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus, knowledge on the effects of noise on hearing health and the use of hearing protective devices. Pure tone audiometric testing was conducted for both mill workers and controls. Noise levels at the work premises of the mill workers and controls were measured. Symptoms of hearing loss were reported by 24 (23.76% and 8 (7.7% mill workers and controls respectively. Fifty-five (54.5% and fifty-four (52.37% mill workers and controls exhibited knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. Five (5.0% mill workers used hearing protective devices. There was significant sensorineural hearing loss and the presence of a 4 kHz audiometric notch among mill workers when compared with controls for the mean thresholds of 2 kHz, 3 kHz and 4 kHz (P = 0. 001. The prevalence of hearing loss in the better hearing ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively (P < 0.5. The prevalence of hearing loss, which may be characteristic of NIHL in the better hearing ears of the mill workers and controls was 24.8% and 4.8% respectively. The majority of mill workers did not use hearing protection.

  14. Prevalence of hearing loss and accuracy of self-report among factory workers

    Marjorie C McCullagh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise represents one of the most common occupational health hazards. A Healthy People 2020 objective aims to reduce hearing loss in the noise-exposed public. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare perceived and measured hearing, and to determine the prevalence of hearing loss among a group of factory workers. Data collected as part of an intervention study promoting hearing protector use among workers at an automotive factory in the Midwest were used. Plant employees (n=2691 provided information regarding their perceived hearing ability, work role, and other demographics. The relationships among audiograms, a single-item measure of perceived hearing ability, and demographic data were explored using chi-square, McNemar?s test, Mann-Whitney U-test, sensitivity, and specificity. The prevalence of hearing loss among noise-exposed factory workers was 42% (where hearing loss was defined as >25 dB loss at the OSHA-recommended frequencies of 2, 3, and 4 kHz in either ear. However, 76% of workers reported their hearing ability as excellent or good. The difference in perceived hearing ability was significant at each tested frequency between those with and without measured hearing loss. Self-reported hearing ability was poorly related to results of audiometry. Although this group of workers was employed in a regulated environment and served by a hearing conservation program, hearing loss was highly prevalent. These findings, together with national prevalence estimates, support the need for evaluation of hearing conservation programs and increased attention to the national goal of reducing adult hearing loss.

  15. Urografin in the Treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Javad S. Totonchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to find out whether combined treatment of intravenous urografin and corticosteroid has a therapeutic advantage over oral corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL. The design of the study was an interventional and controlled clinical trial. Between 2003 and 2005, patients with SSNHL were treated in our center in Tabriz, Iran. Patients were selected if they had a hearing loss of at least 30 dB in at least 3 frequencies on audiometric testing. Audiograms were performed before admission, 1 and 2 weeks and 1 and 2 months after treatment. Patients who were put on bed rest and received intravenous urografin and hydrocortisone were compared with outpatients treated with oral steroid alone. Various descriptive analytical calculations and both Chi-square and t-test were used to analyze the data. Sixty patients were included in this study. Fifty-one patients referred to the otological clinics for the appropriate treatment within the first two weeks after the onset of hearing loss. The overall improvement of both groups was 53.3%. Seventeen (56.6% of 30 patients treated in the inpatient group who received intravenous urografin and intravenous corticosteroid had hearing improvement, while half of the outpatient group received oral corticosteroid responded positively to the treatment (p>0.05. This study revealed no significant difference in hearing improvement between the hospitalized patients who received intravenous urografin and corticosteroid and the patients who received oral corticosteroid alone.

  16. Weather conditions and sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Kateri Maria

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climatic or meteorological condition changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL. We investigated the seasonal distribution of ISSHL and evaluated the influence of meteorological parameters (such as temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure, their variation and covariation on the incidence of the disease. Methods A total of 82 cases of ISSHL, admitted to our department over a five-year period, were enrolled in the study. Seasonal distribution of the disease was investigated by dividing the year in four seasons. Meteorological data included daily values of 13 distinct parameters recorded at the meteorological station of the University of Ioannina during this period. A relationship between each meteorological variable and the incidence of ISSHL was investigated by applying (χ2 test on data from 13 contingency tables as well as by using logistic regression and t-test approaches. In addition, the influence of different weather types on the incidence of ISSHL was investigated using Cluster Analysis in order to create eight clusters (weather types characteristic for the prefecture of Ioannina. Results The results of the study could not indicate any seasonal distribution of the disease. The incidence of ISSHL could not be significantly correlated either to any distinct meteorological parameter or to any specific weather type. Conclusions Meteorological conditions, such as those dominating in the Northwestern Greece, and/or their changes, have no proven effect on the incidence of ISSHL.

  17. CORRELATION BETWEEN TYMPANIC MEMBRANE PERFORATION AND HEARING LOSS

    Lidija RISTOVSKA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Perforation of the tympanic membrane primarily results from middle ear infections, trauma or iatrogenic causes. The perforation causes conductive hearing loss by reducing the surface area available for sound transmission to the ossicular chain. Objective: The objective was to analyze the characteristics of tympanic membrane perforations in relation to hearing loss and to determine the type and degree of hearing loss. Materials and methods: We analyzed audiometric, otoscopic findings and medical reports of 218 patients, 114 males (52.3% and 104 females (47.7%, aged 9 to 75 years (mean age of 47.9 years, examined during the period of November 2012 to October 2015. For statistical data analysis we used Chi-square test with level of significance p<0.05. Results: Most of the patients had unilateral perforations (89% with right ear predominance and involvement of two quadrants of pars tensa (37.2%. Mean air-bone gap was 23.9 dB. The largest air-bone gap was at frequency of 250 Hz. Most of the patients (73.1% had mixed hearing loss (p=0.032, and average hearing thresholds from 21 to 40 dB. Conclusion: Mean air-bone gap is largest at the lower frequencies, and decreases as frequency increases. Size of the perforation has effect on hearing loss. Mean air-bone gap increases with increasing size of the perforation. There is no big difference between the mean air-bone gap in posterior versus anterior perforations.

  18. Vision loss and hearing loss in painting and musical composition.

    Marmor, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    This article considers the impact of vision and hearing loss on great painters and musical composers. The visual work of Mary Cassatt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edgar Degas, and Claude Monet all showed alterations as their vision failed. In contrast, Gabriel Fauré, Bed?ich Smetana, and Ludwig von Beethoven wrote many of their best compositions while totally deaf, and Georg Friedrich Handel and Frederick Delius struggled to compose late in life when they lost their vision (although their hearing remained excellent). There are 2 major distinctions between the role of vision and hearing for these artistic disciplines. First, there is a surrogate means of "hearing" music, through the musical score, which allows composers to write and edit music while totally deaf. The greatest problem with deafness for a skilled composer is interference from internal noise (tinnitus). There is no surrogate for vision to allow a painter to work when the subject is a blur or the colors on the canvas cannot be distinguished. Second, although the appreciation of art is visual and that of music is auditory, the transcription of both art and musical composition is visual. Thus, visual loss does pose a problem for a composer accustomed to working with good sight, because it disrupts habitual methods of writing and editing music. PMID:24565744

  19. Introduction to auditory perception in listeners with hearing losses

    Florentine, Mary; Buus, Søren

    2003-04-01

    Listeners with hearing losses cannot hear low-level sounds. In addition, they often complain that audible sounds do not have a comfortable loudness, lack clarity, and are difficult to hear in the presence of other sounds. In particular, they have difficulty understanding speech in background noise. The mechanisms underlying these complaints are not completely understood, but hearing losses are known to alter many aspects of auditory processing. This presentation highlights alterations in audibility, loudness, pitch, spectral and temporal processes, and binaural hearing that may result from hearing losses. The changes in these auditory processes can vary widely across individuals with seemingly similar amounts of hearing loss. For example, two listeners with nearly identical thresholds can differ in their ability to process spectral and temporal features of sounds. Such individual differences make rehabilitation of hearing losses complex. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  20. Personal Sound Amplifiers for Adults with Hearing Loss.

    Mamo, Sara K; Reed, Nicholas S; Nieman, Carrie L; Oh, Esther S; Lin, Frank R

    2016-03-01

    Age-related hearing loss is highly prevalent and often untreated. Use of hearing aids has been associated with improvements in communication and quality of life, but such treatment is unaffordable or inaccessible for many adults. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical guide for physicians who work with older adults who are experiencing hearing and communication difficulties. Specifically, we review direct-to-consumer amplification products that can be used to address hearing loss in adults. Helping adults with hearing loss navigate hearing loss treatment options ranging from being professionally fitted with hearing aids to using direct-to-consumer amplification options is important for primary care clinicians to understand given our increasing understanding of the impact of hearing loss on cognitive, social, and physical functioning. PMID:26498713

  1. Correlating the site of tympanic membrane perforation with Hearing loss

    Ijaduola Taiwo G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recognized that the size of tympanic membrane(TM perforation is proportional to the magnitude of hearing loss, however, there is no clear consensus on the effect of the location (site of the perforation on the hearing loss. Hence the study is set to investigate the relationship between the location of perforation on TM and hearing loss. Methods A cross-sectional prospective study of consecutive adult patients with perforated TM conducted in the ENT clinic of University College Hospital Ibadan between January 1st 2005 and July 31st 2006. Instruments used for data collection/processing include questionnaires, video and micro-otoscopy, Pure tone audiometer, image J and SPSS packages. Results Sixty-two patients (22-males, 40-females, aged 16–75 years (mean = 35.4 +/- 4 with 77 perforated ear drums were studied and 15(24.2% had bilateral TM perforations, 21 (33.9% right unilateral and 26(41.9% left unilateral. The locations of the TM perforations were 60(77.9% central, 6(9.6% antero-inferior, 4(5.2% postero-inferior, 4(5.2% antero-superior and 3(3.9% postero-superior respectively with sizes ranging from 1.51%–89.05%, and corresponding hearing levels 30 dB – 80 dB (59% conductive and 41% mixed. Fifty-nine percent had pure conductive hearing loss and the rest mixed. Hearing losses (dBHL increased with the size of perforations (P = 0.01, r = 0.05. Correlation of location of perforations with magnitude of hearing loss in acute TM perorations was (P = 0.244, r = 0.273 and for chronic perforations (p = 0.047 & r = 0.31. Conclusion The location of perforation on the tympanic membrane (TM has no effect on the magnitude of hearing loss in acute TM perforations while it is significant in chronic ones.

  2. Compensatory changes in cortical resource allocation in adults with hearing loss

    Julia Campbell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss has been linked to many types of cognitive decline in adults, including an association between hearing loss severity and dementia. However, it remains unclear whether cortical re-organization associated with hearing loss occurs in early stages of hearing decline and in early stages of auditory processing. In this study, we examined compensatory plasticity in adults with mild-moderate hearing loss using obligatory, passively-elicited, cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP. High density EEG elicited by speech stimuli was recorded in adults with hearing loss and age-matched normal hearing controls. Latency, amplitude and source localization of the P1, N1, P2 components of the CAEP were analyzed. Adults with mild-moderate hearing loss showed increases in latency and amplitude of the P2 CAEP relative to control subjects. Current density reconstructions revealed decreased activation in temporal cortex and increased activation in frontal cortical areas for hearing-impaired listeners relative to normal hearing listeners. Participants’ behavioral performance on a clinical test of speech perception in noise was significantly correlated with the increases in P2 latency. Our results indicate that changes in cortical resource allocation are apparent in early stages of adult hearing loss, and that these passively-elicited cortical changes are related to behavioral speech perception outcome.

  3. Efficient estimates of cochlear hearing loss parameters in individual listeners

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Jepsen and Dau (2011) IHL + OHL = HLT [dB], where HLT stands for total hearing loss. Hence having estimates of the total hearing loss and OHC loss, one can estimate the IHL. In the present study, results from forward masking experiments based on temporal masking curves (TMC; Nelson et al., 2001) are...... estimates of the knee-point level. Further, it is explored whether it is possible to estimate the compression ratio using only on-frequency TMCs. 10 normal-hearing and 10 hearing-impaired listeners (with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss) were tested at 1, 2 and 4 kHz. The results showed a...

  4. The pathogenesis of Noise Induced Hearing Loss

    Seyyed Abbas Mir Vakili

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available NIHL occurs when too much sound intensity is transmitted into and through the auditory system and can be occur following a shot gun or the exposure to a moderately intense sound for a long period of time. NIHL caused by acoustic trauma refers to permanent cochlear damage from a one-time exposure to excessive sound pressure. This form of NIHL commonly results from exposure to high-intensity sounds such as explosions, gunfire, a large drum hit loudly and firecrackers. Meanwhile the sound intensity, duration of exposure and personal hearing thresholds as the effective factors in the amount of noise induced hearing loss should not be overlooked.  Since numerous investigations have been performed about intense sudden sound we will discuss it in detail in the current article.

  5. Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention Services

    ... with hearing loss hear in background noise. FM stands for frequency modulation . It is the same type ... ear infections are managed with medication or careful monitoring. Infections that don't go away with medication ...

  6. A Review of Hearing Loss in Cleft Palate Patients

    Bilal Gani; Kinshuck, A. J.; R. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cleft palate is associated with recurrent otitis media with effusion and hearing loss. This study analysed the way these patients’ hearing is managed in Alder Hey Children’s Hospital. Method. A retrospective audit was carried out on cleft palate patients in Alder Hey Children’s Hospital. Audiology assessment and treatment options were reviewed. Comparisons were made between the use of ventilation tubes (VTs) and hearing aids (HAs). The types of cleft, types of hearing loss, and th...

  7. Evidence for hearing loss in amblyopsid cavefishes.

    Niemiller, Matthew L; Higgs, Dennis M; Soares, Daphne

    2013-06-23

    The constant darkness of caves and other subterranean habitats imposes sensory constraints that offer a unique opportunity to examine evolution of sensory modalities. Hearing in cavefishes has not been well explored, and here we show that cavefishes in the family Amblyopsidae are not only blind but have also lost a significant portion of their hearing range. Our results showed that cave and surface amblyopsids shared the same audiogram profile at low frequencies but only surface amblyopsids were able to hear frequencies higher than 800 Hz and up to 2 kHz. We measured ambient noise in aquatic cave and surface habitats and found high intensity peaks near 1 kHz for streams underground, suggesting no adaptive advantage in hearing in those frequencies. In addition, cave amblyopsids had lower hair cell densities compared with their surface relative. These traits may have evolved in response to the loud high-frequency background noise found in subterranean pools and streams. This study represents the first report of auditory regression in a subterranean organism. PMID:23536444

  8. Satisfaction of Hearing Aids Users With Hearing Loss of Severe and Deep Degree

    Lessa, Alexandre Hundertmarck; Costa, Maristela Julio; Becker, Karine Thais; Vaucher, Ana Valéria Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is necessary to analyze the efficiency of the hearing aids use, considering the necessity of enlargement and communication difficulty. Objective: To analyze the satisfaction of adults and elders, users of hearing aids with hearing loss of severe and deep degree, using a questionnaire and searching factors that can difficult the adaptation. Method: A retrospective study of 56 patients, with age group between 18 and 86 years old, hearing loss of severe and deep degree and users...

  9. Prevalence and factors associated with hearing loss and hearing aid use in korean elders.

    Ji-Su Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid usage rates among Korean elders by comparing the differences between those with and without hearing loss, and between those who used and did not use hearing aids.This study was based on data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010-2012. The study sample consisted of 5,447 Koreans aged ≥60 years who received a hearing assessment. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiometry test and classified according to the World Health Organization's criteria. Hearing aid use was assessed by self-report. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between hearing loss, hearing aid use, and related variables.Hearing loss was found in 16.8% of the elders and only 15.9% of them used a hearing aid. Male (95% CI: 1.27-2.15, tinnitus (95% CI: 1.58-2.32, dizziness (95% CI: 1.05-1.73, and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.32-2.38 were the variables most strongly associated with hearing loss after multivariate adjustment. Tinnitus (95% CI: 1.34-4.13 and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.01-5.02 were strongly associated with hearing aid use after multivariate adjustment.More than half of South Korean elders aged ≥60 and older have hearing loss but the rate of hearing aid use is very low. An aural public health program should address modifiable risk factors, such as tinnitus and noise exposure, and non-modifiable risk factors associated with hearing loss in the elderly.

  10. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential in sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Feroze Kancharu Khan; Achamma Balraj; Anjali Lepcha

    2013-01-01

    Aim and Objective: To investigate saccular damage in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) with or without vertigo and to evaluate the saccular damage according to the hearing loss and presence or absence of vertigo. Materials and Methods: All tests done in this study were performed in the audio vestibular unit of ENT department from September 2009 to November 2010. Statistical Analysis Used: The association between the severity of hearing loss and changes in the vestibular ...

  11. Studying VEMP in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Mohsen Rajati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL has a prevalence of 10 in 100,000. Viral infections, vascular obstruction and rupture of the intracochlear membranes are supposed to be its most common etiologies. About 40% of patients experience vertigo or imbalance. The VEMP (vestibular evoked myogenic potentials test is a known approach for detailed study of the labyrinth. The advantage of this test in comparison to other tests is the selected study of sacculus and sacculocochlear pathways. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study all patients with SSNHL diagnosis were admitted and underwent routine standard treatments and diagnostic tests. Clinical symptoms and paraclinic findings were recorded in especially designed forms and VEMP test was performed on admission. Results: Among the 43 cases with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, 14 (32.6% had vertigo. Thirteen patients (39.2% out of 43 had a negative (abnormal VEMP, 6 of which (42.9% had vertigo, while in the 30 VEMP positive (normal cases, vertigo was detected in 8 (26.6%. Discussion: Saccular dysfunction seems to be an important finding in SSNHL. Although it is more prevalent in the patients with vertigo, it can be found in the non-dizzy cases. VEMP disturbance in SSNHL shows more extensive pathological involvement. Conclusion: In SSNHL the pathology isn’t limited to the cochlea and even in patients with no vestibular symptoms sacculus might be involved.

  12. Sound preconditioning therapy inhibits ototoxic hearing loss in mice

    Roy, Soumen; Ryals, Matthew M.; Van den Bruele, Astrid Botty; Fitzgerald, Tracy S.; Cunningham, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs with ototoxic side effects cause significant hearing loss for thousands of patients annually. Two major classes of ototoxic drugs are cisplatin and the aminoglycoside antibiotics, both of which are toxic to mechanosensory hair cells, the receptor cells of the inner ear. A critical need exists for therapies that protect the inner ear without inhibiting the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. The induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) inhibits both aminoglycoside- and cispla...

  13. Hearing Loss Due to Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Statin Treatment

    Muhammed Oylumlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that high cholesterol levels might have adverse effects on hearing and interest- ingly statins may have beneficial effects on hearing loss. Herein, we share a dramatic improvement in acute hearing loss by statin administration in a young patient with familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating the possible role of statins in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss in the context of familial hypercholesterolemia. Although the statin administra- tion as a therapeutic option for sudden hearing loss needs to be clarified in prospective studies, this case report might shed more light for possible association of dyslipidemia and hearing loss and role of statins in such cases.

  14. Communication Assessment and Intervention: Implications for Pediatric Hearing Loss.

    Bobsin, Lori L; Houston, K Todd

    2015-12-01

    Historically, children with hearing loss have fallen well behind their hearing peers in the areas of speech and language development, which has often limited their participation in a range of social, educational, and vocational activities. However, with early identification and appropriate intervention coupled with current hearing technology, children with hearing loss can achieve speech and language milestones at rates commensurate with hearing peers. To attain the best outcomes for these children, an early intervention system that provides thorough and unbiased information to families and allows for the efficient and coordinated efforts of qualified professionals must be present. PMID:26443489

  15. Pediatric hearing loss: common causes, diagnosis and therapeutic approach.

    Alzahrani, M; Tabet, P; Saliba, I

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric hearing loss limits the child ability to develop effective auditory and speech capabilities. Early rehabilitation of hearing loss results in higher levels of linguistic, academic and social skills. To achieve the best outcomes, proper and timely diagnosis is essential. The etiology of hearing loss can be classified according to its nature as sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), conductive hearing loss (CHL) or mixed hearing loss (MHL). Congenital hearing loss could be genetic or non genetic (acquired), syndromic or non-syndromic. Hearing loss can be classified according to the severity into mild (26-40 dB HL), moderate (41-70 dB HL), severe (71-90 dB HL) and profound (more than 90 dB HL). Management of hearing loss is mainly influenced by the nature, the bilaterality, the severity and the age at diagnosis. Severe to profound bilateral SNHL can be managed by cochlear implantation (unilateral or bilateral), if picked up at early age while mild to moderate bilateral SNHL are easier to manage with conventional hearing aids. CHL has less impact on the speech development of the child. It is usually managed by correcting the underlying etiology such as otitis media with effusion or even surgically in cases of external ear atresia or ossicular malformations. Unilateral SNHL have fortunately no impact on the language development of the child and can be passed undiagnosed until preschool-aged children. The implementation of national newborn hearing screening programs has improved the management of affected children by rehabilitating them at early stages to allow for normal speech development. In this review article, we aim to highlight the most common causes of pediatric hearing loss, their character and presentation and to review the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of a deaf child. PMID:25312238

  16. Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive abilities in elderly persons with hearing aids fitted at the initial stages of hearing loss

    C. Obuchi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the relation between the use of hearing aids at the initial stages of hearing loss and age-related changes in the auditory and cognitive abilities of elderly persons. 12 healthy elderly persons participated in an annual auditory and cognitive longitudinal examination for three years. According to their hearing level, they were divided into 3 subgroups - the normal hearing group, the hearing loss without hearing aids group, and the hearing loss with hearing aids group. All the subjects underwent 4 tests: pure-tone audiometry, syllable intelligibility test, dichotic listening test (DLT, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R Short Forms. Comparison between the 3 groups revealed that the hearing loss without hearing aids group showed the lowest scores for the performance tasks, in contrast to the hearing level and intelligibility results. The other groups showed no significant difference in the WAIS-R subtests. This result indicates that prescription of a hearing aid during the early stages of hearing loss is related to the retention of cognitive abilities in such elderly people. However, there were no statistical significant correlations between the auditory and cognitive tasks.

  17. Tinnitus: Characterization of associated hearing loss and modalities of treatment

    Natashya H Rent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the characteristics of hearing loss with respect to tinnitus and to study the efficacy of various modalities of treatment of tinnitus. Design: Prospective study. Materials and Methods: Patients were assigned into three groups. All patients underwent a complete ENT examination, followed by pure tone audiometry, tinnitus matching, and tinnitus handicap inventory (THI score. Patients were treated with gingko biloba, gabapentin, or tinnitus-retraining therapy (TRT for a period of 6 weeks following which above investigations were repeated. Results: The study showed a positive correlation between tinnitus loudness matches and frequency of maximum hearing threshold (r = 0.687, P = 0.001 and a significant relation between tinnitus loudness matching and THI score (r = 0.383, P = 0.001. However, no correlations were observed between pitch match frequency and THI scores. Gingko biloba and TRT were found to be effective in the management of tinnitus (P < 0.01, but no improvement was observed with gabapentin therapy (P = 0.051. Conclusion: Tinnitus loudness matches near the threshold of frequency of maximum hearing loss, thus indicating that as threshold of hearing increases, the perception of tinnitus loudness increases. However, pitch match frequency does not affect severity of tinnitus. Gingko biloba and TRT are useful in the treatment of tinnitus.

  18. Eye color as a risk factor for acquired sensorineural hearing loss: a review.

    Mujica-Mota, Mario A; Schermbrucker, Jonah; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-02-01

    Eye color may be an indicator of inner ear melanin content and has been associated with hearing loss. There is controversy as to whether eye color has an effect on acquired causes of sensorineural hearing loss. This review was conducted to analyze the literature evaluating the relationship between eye color and causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Six databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Included articles were independently assessed for quality by two authors. Eighteen articles were eligible for review. Eye color was not found to have an effect in the non-exposed population or in presbycusis. In noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss, light-eyed patients had more significant loss following noise exposure, although the variability reported due to eye color was modest (r(2) = 0.01-0.14). Two out of three studies reported that dark eye color is associated with cisplatin ototoxicity. In one study, green-eyed patients were found to be at higher risk of radiation-induced hearing loss. Eye color does not appear to play a role in hearing loss in non-exposed individuals or presbycusis. It is possible that dark-eyed individuals, with greater inner ear melanin content, are better protected against noise-induced hearing loss. Evidence suggests that melanin can be protective against radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss, but may predispose individuals to cisplatin ototoxicity. Future studies are required to support these conclusions. PMID:25529530

  19. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    Mukherjee Monisha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant finding to date has been the discovery of mutations in GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 as the major cause of profound prelingual deafness. This was first reported in a Tunisian family in 1994 and thereafter in many different countries. GJB2 gene encodes the gap-junction protein, connexin 26 (Cx26, mutations in which have become the first genetic marker of inherited hearing loss. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR, single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP and sequencing methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in Cx26 gene. In India as well, the Cx26 mutations are being screened in families with hearing impaired children using these molecular methods. Therefore, in order to create awareness among the clinicians and the affected families; we have attempted to review the Cx26 gene mutations responsible for autosomal recessive type of non-syndromic hearing loss. The efficacy and utility of Cx26 gene analysis might open the path to proper counseling of families for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. It may even facilitate the development of strategies in future for the treatment of this common genetic disorder.

  20. Contributing Factors in Inducing Noise Induced Hearing Loss

    Saeid Farahani

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common contributing factors in inducing hearing loss in adults are aging, exposure to noise and the interaction among these factors with other parameters. Individual parameters are also effective in the extent of hearing loss which is produced. Being aware of Vulnerability factors such as physical parameters, Auditory and non-auditory factors can be useful in considering a good hearing conservation program for noise induced hearing losses.In the current article we are aimed at introducing three important parameters and their sub-divisions pertaining to this issue.

  1. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  2. Issues in early identification of hearing loss.

    Alberti, P W; Hyde, M L; Riko, K; Corbin, H; Fitzhardinge, P M

    1985-04-01

    In a general hospital, an early detection research program based on a high risk register and brain stem electric response audiometry (BERA) using click and frequency-specific stimuli identified 631 at-risk neonates from the well baby nursery and the neonatal intensive care nursery (ICN). BERA tests were done before discharge and four months later; comparison of outcomes revealed substantial discrepancies. From the follow-up test, 51 cases of mild to severe hearing loss were identified. Experience from the research program has raised some issues relevant for establishment of service programs. Evaluation of all babies (general nursery and ICN) is justified on the basis of yield but is resource consuming; strategies for minimizing work load are discussed. Risk factor criterion levels affect case loading and yield. Frequency-specific BERA identifies cases which would not be detected by click stimuli and which raise management questions. Deferral of testing to four months is feasible and desirable. PMID:3982181

  3. Medication for hearing loss after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for vestibular schwannoma

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of corticosteroid treatments for patients showing decreases in hearing levels after stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients experienced a hearing loss in pure-tone average at greater than 20 dB or less than 10 dB within 1 year after irradiation administration of 44 Gy/22 fractions followed by a 4 Gy boost. Eight received oral prednisone at a daily dose of 30 mg, which was gradually decreased (medicated group), and 13 received none (nonmedicated group). The average observation period was 26.7±16.6 (range: 6-69) months. Results: Hearing recovery was seen after initial onset of the hearing loss in all 8 patients in the medicated group and in 2 of 13 patients in the nonmedicated group (p=0.001). The hearing recovery, that is, the change in pure-tone average (dB) at the last follow-up from the onset of hearing loss, was 9.8±6.9 dB (recovery) in the medicated group and -9.4±12.8 dB (further loss) in the nonmedicated group (p=0.0013). The hearing recovery rate, normalizing to the degree of the hearing loss before medication, was also significantly higher in the medicated group than in the nonmedicated group (p=0.0014). Conclusions: Corticosteroidal intake is suggested to be effective in improving hearing loss after stereotactic radiotherapy, at least in young patients having a useful pretreatment hearing level, if the treatment for hearing loss is administered immediately after the hearing loss is first detected

  4. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss in India

    Nandi Subroto; Dhatrak Sarang

    2008-01-01

    Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss in every country in the world. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Worldwide, 16% of the disabling hearing loss in adults is attributed to occupational noise, ranging from 7 to 21% in the various subregions. The estimated cost of noise to developed countries ranges from 0.2 to 2% of the gross domestic product (...

  5. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    Andréa Cintra Lopes; Vanessa Guioto Otowiz2; Patrícia Monteiro de Barros Lopes3; José Roberto Pereira Lauris2; Cibele Carméllo Santos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type o...

  6. The impact of hyperacusis and hearing loss on tinnitus perception in German teachers

    Sandra P Meuer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that a notable number of teachers are concerned with conditions of auditory impairment such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss. Studies focussing on characteristics and interdependencies of single hearing disorders (HD are rare. This explorative study examines tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss, and all possible combinations (tinnitus + hyperacusis; tinnitus + hearing loss; hyperacusis + hearing loss; tinnitus, hyperacusis + hearing loss in German teachers. The impact of single HD on perceived distress, depending on the number and kind of comorbid HD, was of special interest. Information was collected via online survey and includes self-reported data as well as data from the Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (Mini-TQ. Results show that most of the 1468 participants (45% suffered from two HD in different combinations, and the fewest (25% were afflicted with only one HD. Considering the seven HD groups, most teachers (30% suffered from all three HD. Across all groups, tinnitus was present in 1096, hyperacusis in 988, and hearing loss in 937 teachers. Multiple intergroup comparisons revealed that self-rated tinnitus-related distress rose significantly with the increasing number of HD. No significant differences were found for distress ratings of hyperacusis between the four groups including hyperacusis and between the four groups with hearing loss. In the Mini-TQ, groups including hyperacusis scored considerably higher than those excluding hyperacusis. The frequent prevalence of HD in German teachers points to a need of better noise prevention in German schools as one priority of occupational safety.

  7. Call centers and noise-induced hearing loss.

    Beyan, Ayse Coskun; Demiral, Yucel; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Ergor, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Noise is defined as unwelcome sound. It has been estimated that 16% of adult hearing loss in the world is due to noise exposure at the workplace. This report offers a case that diagnosed with hearing loss of whom working as a call center operator at home. Home agent operators should be explored. PMID:26960789

  8. Noise Induced Hearing Loss among School Band Directors.

    Cutietta, Robert A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a study that examined noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among school band directors. Finds that 41 percent of band directors in the sample had characteristic NIHL curves indicating that their experience as band directors played a role in the hearing loss. Recommends further study into the causes of NIHL among school band directors. (LS)

  9. Tinnitus and Patterns of Hearing Loss

    Tan, Christine M.; Lecluyse, Wendy; McFerran, Don; Meddis, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is strongly linked with the presence of damaged hearing. However, it is not known why tinnitus afflicts only some, and not all, hearing-impaired listeners. One possibility is that tinnitus patients have specific inner ear damage that triggers tinnitus. In this study, differences in cochlear function inferred from psychophysical measures were measured between hearing-impaired listeners with tinnitus and hearing-impaired listeners without tinnitus. Despite having similar average hearin...

  10. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist...

  11. Head Position Comparison between Students with Normal Hearing and Students with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Melo, Renato de Souza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Head sense position is coordinated by sensory activity of the vestibular system, located in the inner ear. Children with sensorineural hearing loss may show changes in the vestibular system as a result of injury to the inner ear, which can alter the sense of head position in this population. Aim: Analyze the head alignment in students with normal hearing and students with sensorineural hearing loss and compare the data between groups. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study examined the head alignment of 96 students, 48 with normal hearing and 48 with sensorineural hearing loss, aged between 7 and 18 years. The analysis of head alignment occurred through postural assessment performed according to the criteria proposed by Kendall et al. For data analysis we used the chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results: The students with hearing loss had a higher occurrence of changes in the alignment of the head than normally hearing students (p < 0.001. Forward head posture was the type of postural change observed most, occurring in greater proportion in children with hearing loss (p < 0.001, followed by the side slope head posture (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Children with sensorineural hearing loss showed more changes in the head posture compared with children with normal hearing.

  12. The relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children

    Seyede Zohre Mousavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Oral stereognosis is the ability to recognize the objects placed in the mouth; this plays a significant role in speech sounds production. Since the children with hearing loss have articulation disorders, this study aimed to clear the relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children.Methods: In this cross-sectional non-invasive study, 40 children of 5-year-old (30 children with different degrees of hearing loss and 10 normal children were involved. Oral steriognostic test was done for all of them and the Mann-Whitney U was used for statistical analysis.Results: There were significant differences between the mean of oral stereognostic ability between the normal children and the children with severe (p<0.01 or profound hearing loss (p=0.05. There was no significant difference between the mean of oral stereognostic ability among the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss compared with together. Besides, there was no significant difference between the mean of the time of diagnosis among all of hearing loss and normal children.Conclusion: The study shows that the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss have inefficient oral stereognosis in comparison with the normal children.

  13. The effects of a hearing education program on recreational noise exposure, attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices in young adults

    Hannah Keppler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive recreational noise exposure in young adults might result in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL and tinnitus. Inducing behavioral change in young adults is one of the aims of a hearing conservation program (HCP. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effect of a hearing education program after 6 months in young adults in relation to knowledge regarding their individual hearing status. The results of a questionnaire regarding the weekly equivalent recreational noise exposure, attitudes and beliefs toward noise, and hearing loss and hearing protector devices (HPDs were compared between both sessions. Seventy-eight young adults completed the questionnaire concerning recreational noise exposure, youth attitude to noise scale (YANS, and beliefs about hearing protection and hearing loss (BAHPHL. Their hearing status was evaluated based on admittance measures, audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs, and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs. The main analysis consisted of a mixed model analysis of variance with dependent variables of either the noise exposure or the scores on (subscales of YANS and BAHPHL. The independent variables were hearing status and session one versus session two. There was a significant decrease in recreational noise exposure and several (sub scales of YANS and BAHPHL between both the sessions. This behavioral change resulted in a more frequent use of HPDs in 12% of the participants. However, the behavioral change was not completely related to the knowledge of young adults′ individual hearing status. To prevent hearing damage in young people, investing in HCPs is necessary, apart from regulating sound levels and its compliance at various leisure-time activities. Also, the long-term effect of HCPs and their most cost-efficient repetition rates should be further investigated.

  14. Scleroderma and sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Ravinder Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is an emergency in otolaryngological practice. The exact cause, in most of the cases cannot be found. A triad of vascular, viral, and membrane rupture are the known theories for the causation of sudden SNHL. Now various autoimmune disorders have also been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis. Autoimmune inner ear disease in human being is an uncommon, but a distinct clinical entity. The diagnosis of the inner ear autoimmune disorder depends mainly on relatively distinct clinical course, immune laboratory tests and treatment response. The clinical picture usually consists of bilateral SNHL, bilateral reduced vestibular loss and symptoms of pressure with tinnitus and rarely tissue destruction of middle and external ear. Systemic scleroderma is an aggressive multi-system and multistage connective tissue disorder with high mortality. It is characterized by proliferative vascular lesion and marked deposition of collagen in various tissues and organs. Responses to immunosuppressive drugs are cited as evidence of an autoimmune process.

  15. Risk of hearing loss in small for gestational age neonates

    Melani Rakhmi Mantu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Small for gestational age (SGA neonates often have intrauterine growth restriction due to placental insufficiency and chronic hypoxia. These conditions may cause developmental impairment, psychosocial disabilities, or metabolic dysfunction in later life. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of speech and language disabilities, learning impairment, and ncuromotor dysfunction in term SGA infants compared to term appropriate for gestational age (AGA infants. Objective To compare hearing loss in SGA and AGA neonates using otoacoustic emission (OAE tests and to study correlations between maternal risk factors and hearing loss in SGA neonates. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in St. Borromeus Hospital, Limijati Hospital, and Melinda Hospital in Bandung from February to May 2010. Study subjects consisted of full-term neonates born in these three hospitals. A retrospective medical record review was performed for this Study. Statistical analysis was done by multivariable logistic-regression. Results There was a total of 4279 subjects in our study, including 100 SGA neonates and 4179 AGA neonates. We observed a greater percentage of OAE 'refer' (indicating abnormal OAE results in the SGA group compared to the AGA group (P<0.001, Z=1.3.247. For subjects with OAE ,refer' results, we also analyzed the correlation to the following maternal risk factors: smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma. We also found significant differences between those with and without each of the four maternal risk factors studied (P<0.001. By using multivariant analysis to compare SGA and AGA neonates, we found the odds ratio (OR to be 4.34 (95% CI 2.52 to'7.49, P = 0.001, meaning the SGA group had a 4.34 times higher risk of hearing loss than the AGA group. Conclusion SGA neonates had a higher risk of hearing loss than A(3A neonates. In addition, maternal smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma significantly correlated to hearing loss in all newborns. [Paediatr Indones. 2011;51:52-7].

  16. High-frequency audiometry: A means for early diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss

    Amir H Mehrparvar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL, an irreversible disorder, is a common problem in industrial settings. Early diagnosis of NIHL can help prevent the progression of hearing loss, especially in speech frequencies. For early diagnosis of NIHL, audiometry is performed routinely in conventional frequencies. We designed this study to compare the effect of noise on high-frequency audiometry (HFA and conventional audiometry. In a historical cohort study, we compared hearing threshold and prevalence of hearing loss in conventional and high frequencies of audiometry among textile workers divided into two groups: With and without exposure to noise more than 85 dB. The highest hearing threshold was observed at 4000 Hz, 6000 Hz and 16000 Hz in conventional right ear audiometry, conventional left ear audiometry and HFA in each ear, respectively. The hearing threshold was significantly higher at 16000 Hz compared to 4000. Hearing loss was more common in HFA than conventional audiometry. HFA is more sensitive to detect NIHL than conventional audiometry. It can be useful for early diagnosis of hearing sensitivity to noise, and thus preventing hearing loss in lower frequencies especially speech frequencies.

  17. Classification and hearing evolution of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    N.O. Penido; O.L.M. Cruz; A. Zanoni; D.P. Inoue

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze clinical aspects, hearing evolution and efficacy of clinical treatment of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). This was a prospective clinical study of 136 consecutive patients with SSNHL divided into three groups after diagnostic evaluation: patients with defined etiology (DE, N = 13, 10%), concurrent diseases (CD, N = 63, 46.04%) and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL, N = 60, 43.9%). Initial treatment consisted of pr...

  18. Genes and lifestyle in normal hearing function and age-related hearing loss

    Girotto, Giorgia

    1984-01-01

    The auditory system is a complex machinery, constituted by many molecules involving hair cells, cochlear neurons, the stria vascularis, and combinations thereof. The analysis of complex genetic traits/diseases such as normal hearing function and Age-Related Hearing Loss has long been an enigma of genetic biology, whether in the animal or in medical sciences. In particular, Age-Related Hearing Loss is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly affecting 30% of peopl...

  19. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.; Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Thomsen, J.; Caye-Thomasen, P.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...

  20. Sudden hearing loss: Our experience in treatment with vasoactive therapy

    Živić Ljubica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A specific title "sudden hearing loss" refers to illness which is characterized by a sudden, rapid sensoneural hearing loss mostly in one ear without obvious causes, accompanied with dizziness, and without vestibular symptomatology. It is defined as a hearing loss for more than 30 dB on 3 or more successive frequencies which appear in 72 hours. Objective The main goal of our paper was to estimate success of implementation of vasoactive method in patients with sudden hearing loss of senso-neural type in different ranges in hospital conditions. METHOD Our research covered 37 patients hospitalized because of a sudden hearing loss of sensoneural type in different ranges. Diagnosis, in all patients, was established by clinical ORL examination, audiology and vestibular examination. R including CT and MR, neurological, internist and laboratory examinations were used in order to exclude other aetiology. In monitored patients, we started treatment with vasoactive therapy, ampules of xanthinol nicotinate (one ampule of 2 ml, 300 mg or ampules of pentoxiphylline (one ampule of 5 ml, 100 mg in form of infusions with addition of vitamins with an everyday gradual increase of dosage up to 12 ampules of xanthinol nicotinate and up to 5 ampules of pentoxiphylline. Then we started with an everyday decrease of dosage down to the first one. Results After the complete curing protocol, we found out that in patients with light and medium senso-neural damages of hearing sense (23 or 62%, hearing recovery was complete. In patients with heavy damage of hearing (9 or 24%, partial success was evidenced. The most difficult cases, with complete hearing loss, heavy buzzing and vertiginous problem (5 or 14% responded to therapy, so buzzing and vertiginous problems disappeared but hearing was not improved. Conclusion Usage of vasoactive medicaments in hospital conditions in treatment of sudden hearing loss gives good results and it is the closest to aetiological therapy. .

  1. Disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada Immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss

    Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada (DNSI é caracterizada geralmente por uma disacusia neurossensorial bilateral, progressiva e assimétrica, acompanhada ou não por outros sintomas da orelha interna. Três pacientes com DNSI cujo quadro clínico e audiométrico eram sugestivos de doença auto-imune, e apresentaram resposta positiva à terapia imunossupressora ou pesquisa positiva de anticorpo anti hsp-70 68kD, foram estudados com relação às características clínicas, testes diagnósticos, alternativas terapêuticas e evolução da doença. Dois pacientes apresentaram quadro de disacusia neurossensorial rapidamente progressiva, associado a quadro vestibular, e outro, quadro de surdez súbita unilateral. Nenhum paciente apresentou positividade às provas reumatológicas, e apenas um paciente apresentou aumento na velocidade de hemossedimentação. Nenhum paciente obteve resposta adequada sustentada à corticoterapia, mas dois deles melhoraram com outras terapias imunossupressoras. O diagnóstico da DNSI é clínico e baseado na resposta positiva ao teste terapêutico com imunossupressores. A pesquisa de anticorpo anti-hsp70 de 68 kD pelo Western Blot é o único exame laboratorial específico para seu diagnóstico, possuindo sensibilidade de 42% e especificidade de 90%. Apenas 1 paciente apresentou positividade para este teste e não respondeu à terapia imunossupressora. Os dois pacientes com teste negativo responderam satisfatoriamente ao tratamento. A baixa sensibilidade do Western Blot e seu alto custo dificultam sua difusa utilização em nosso meio. A introdução precoce do tratamento é de suma importância por auxiliar no diagnóstico e por proporcionar um melhor prognóstico auditivo.The immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss (ISHL is characterized as an asymmetric and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Tree patients with ISHL were studied, regarding clinical aspects, diagnostic tests, treatment options and disease evolution. They presented whether positive response to immunosuppressive therapy or positiviness to Western Blot test for hsp 70-68kD. Two patients presented rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss, associated to vestibular symptoms and the other presented unilateral sudden deafness. No patient reacted to rheumatological testes, and one presented increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. None satisfactorily responded to corticotherapy, but two presented clinical improvement with other immunosuppressive therapies. The ISHL diagnosis is based on clinical aspects and on the positive response to therapeutic testes with immunosupressor drugs. The Western Blot test for hsp 70-68 kD, with 42% sensitivity and 90% specificity, is the only specific laboratorial exam for ISHL. One patient presented positiviness to this exam and did not responded to immunosuppressive therapy. Two patients with negative tests satisfactorily responded to immunosuppressive therapy. The low sensitivity and high costs of Western Blot test represent difficulties to the spread use of it. The early introduction of treatment has a major importance in the diagnosis of ISHL and to increase the auditory prognosis.

  2. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas : Mechanism of Hearing Loss and How to Preserve Hearing.

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    The use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) expanded to include the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in 1969; since then, efforts to increase tumour control and to reduce cranial neuropathy have continued. Using the currently recommended marginal dose of 12-13 Gy, long-term reported outcomes after SRS include not only excellent tumour control rates of 92-100 % but also outstanding functional preservation of the trigeminal and facial nerves, with values of 92-100 % and 94-100 %, respectively. Nonetheless, hearing preservation remains in the range of 32-81 %. Previous studies have suggested possible prognostic factors of hearing preservation such as the Gardner-Robertson grade, radiation dose to the cochlea, transient volume expansion (TVE) after SRS, length of irradiated cochlear nerve, marginal dose to the tumour, and age. However, we still do not clearly understand why patients lose their hearing after SRS for VS.Relevant to these considerations, one study recently reported that the auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave V latency and waves I and V interval (IL_I-V) correlated well with intracanalicular pressure values and even with hearing level. The demonstration that ABR values, especially wave V latency and IL_I-V, correlate well with intracanalicular pressure suggests that patients with previously elevated intracanalicular pressure might have an increased chance of hearing loss on development of TVE, which has been recognised as a common phenomenon after SRS or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for intracranial schwannomas.In our experience, the ABR IL_I-V increased during the first 12 months after SRS for VSs in patients who lost their serviceable hearing. The effect of increased ABR IL_I-V on hearing outcome also became significant over time, especially at 12 months after SRS, and was more prominent in patients with poor initial pure-tone average (PTA) and/or ABR values. We hypothesise that patients with considerable intracanalicular pressure at the time of SRS are prone to lose their serviceable hearing due to the added intracanalicular pressure induced by TVE, which usually occurs within the first 12 months after SRS for VSs. Using these findings, we suggested a classification system for the prediction of hearing outcomes after SRS for VSs. This classification system could be useful in the proper selection of management modalities for hearing preservation, especially in patients with only hearing ear schwannoma or neurofibromatosis type 2.Advances in diagnostic tools, treatment modalities, and optimisation of radiosurgical dose have improved clinical outcomes, including tumour control and cranial neuropathies, in patients with VSs. However, the preservation of hearing function still falls short of our expectation. A prediction model for hearing preservation after each treatment modality will guide the proper selection of treatment modalities and permit the appropriate timing of active treatment, which will lead to the preservation of hearing function in patients with VSs. PMID:26508404

  3. Comparison of Different Levels of Reading Comprehension between Hearing-Impaired Loss and Normal-Hearing Students

    Azam Sharifi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skill is one of the most important necessities of students' learning in everyday life. This skill is referred to the ability of comprehension, comment and conclusion from texts and receiving the meaning of the massage which is composed. Educational development in any student has a direct relation with the ability of the comprehension. This study is designed to investigate the effects of hearing loss on reading comprehension in hearing-impaired students compared to normal-hearing ones.Methods: Seventeen hearing-impaired students in 4th year of primary exceptional schools in Karaj, Robatkarim and Shahriyar, Iran, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Seventeen normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to exceptional ones as control group. They were compared for different levels of reading comprehension using the international standard booklet (PIRLS 2001. Results: There was a significant difference in performance between hearing-impaired and normal- hearing students in different levels of reading comprehension (p<0.05.Conclusion: Hearing loss has negative effects on different levels of reading comprehension, so in exceptional centers, reconsideration in educational planning in order to direct education from memorizing to comprehension and deeper layers of learning seems necessary.

  4. Outcomes of Severe to Profound Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Jo, Si-Young; Lee, Sungsu; Eom, Tae-Ho; Jeun, Eun-Sun; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Cho, Yong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Objectives While a severe to profound sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) may cause serious disability in verbal communication, there have been little studies focusing on this high degree SSNHL. The present study was aimed to investigate the characteristics of hearing recovery in a high degree SSNHL (>70 dB). Methods Three hundred and two SSNHL patients were enrolled. For a long-term follow-up, 46 patients were evaluated. Hearing level was examined by pure tone audiometry on day 1, week...

  5. Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss in Japan

    Sato, Hiroaki; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Hato, Naohito; Yoshida, Tadao; Shimono, Mariko; Teranishi, Masaaki; Sone, Michihiko; Fukunaga, Yukari; Kobashi, Gen; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Matsui, Shigeyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion An epidemiological survey of hospitals and private clinics in Japan regarding idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) revealed that the incidence of SSNHL was 60.9 per 100 000 population. There were more females than males in the younger generation. Objective The incidence of SSNHL varies largely by country. Because the Japanese criteria for diagnosing SSNHL have changed in accordance with those widely used in other parts of the world, a clinicoepidemiological study was undertaken using the new criteria. Methods Ehime, Aichi, and Iwate Prefectures were selected from the western, central, and northeastern regions of Japan, respectively. The subjects for this study were patients who suffered SSNHL between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2013. Questionnaires were mailed to all hospitals and private clinics in which ENT doctors were working. Initial and final audiograms were requested for 10% of the patients. Results In all, 78 of 90 hospitals (87%) and 303 of 407 private clinics (74%) responded. It was reported that 1663 patients visited hospitals and 3090 patients visited only private clinics. It was estimated that 6205 SSNHL patients visited hospitals or private clinics in 1 year from a population of 10 145 000. Also, 23% of patients suffered acute low-tone SNHL (female to male ratio; 3:1 in definite cases). PMID:25315915

  6. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    Okokhere Peter O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response.

  7. [Incidence of coexisting sensorineural hearing loss and secretory otitis media].

    Skotnicka, Bozena; Topolska, Ma?gorzata; Hassmann-Pozna?ska, Elzbieta

    2002-01-01

    There are currently no standard guidelines for assessing hearing in children who are evaluated for tympanostomy tubes. We describe the results of audiologic testing on 587 children, age 2 months to 17 years admitted to Pediatric Otolaryngology Department Bia?ystok for treatment of secretory otitis media. Ten children (1.7%) were found to have previously unrecognized sensorineural hearing loss. In four cases total unilateral deafness, in six others moderate to severe sensorineural bilateral hearing loss was diagnosed. Three other children referred to our clinic as sensorineural hearing loss were found to have secretory otitis media as the only or coexisting cause of deafness. Results of our study show the importance of age--appropriate hearing assessment as part of diagnostic procedure for secretory otitis media. PMID:12094645

  8. Sudden hearing loss: Our experiences in treatment with vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy

    Živić Ljubica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sudden hearing loss is a clinical entity of ambiguously defined aetiology manifested by hearing loss of more than 30 dB on three contiguous frequencies occurring within 72 hours. The lack of standard therapy protocol led to the use of variety of different therapies, thus making difficult objective quantification of their effect. Objective. The aim of the study was to present our experience in the treatment of sudden hearing loss with administration of vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy. Methods. Our research included 59 hospitally treated patients with a sudden hearing loss. During the period 1995-2004, 37 patients were treated using vasoactive agents (xanthinol nicotinate and pentoxifylline, and from 2004-2009, 22 patients were treated using parenteral corticosteroids (dexamethasone. All patients had unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of different level at frequencies from 500-4000 Hz, while other diagnostic procedures (laboratory tests, internist and neurology examinations, X-ray were within normal limits. Evaluation of therapy effect was done by follow-up of hearing threshold changes and subjective complaints. Results. The results showed that full recovery was achieved in patients with a mild and not fully severe hearing loss, with the majority of those (73% under corticosteroid treatment. In these patients recovery was also achieved more rapidly. A partial recovery of hearing was detected in patients with hearing loss of more than 80 dB, and mostly in patients treated with corticosteroids. Conclusion. Although statistical evaluation does not indicate significant differences between the application of vasoactive drugs or corticosteroids, clinical findings support advantages of corticosteroid therapy. Treatment of hearing loss, although controversial, requires change of some up-to-now used agents. Advantages should go in favour of contricosteroids.

  9. Genetics of hearing loss: focus on DFNA2

    Dominguez LM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Laura M Dominguez, Kelley M DodsonDepartment of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VAAbstract: The purpose of this review is to assess the current literature on deafness nonsyndromic autosomal dominant 2 (DFNA2 hearing loss and the mutations linked to this disorder. Hearing impairment, particularly nonsyndromic hearing loss, affects multiple families across the world. After the identification of the DFNA2 locus on chromosome 1p34, multiple pathogenic mutations in two genes (GJB3 and KCNQ4 have been reported. The overwhelming majority of pathogenic mutations linked to this form of nonsyndromic hearing loss have been identified in the KCNQ4 gene encoding a voltage-gated potassium channel. It is believed that KCNQ4 channels are present in outer hair cells and possibly inner hair cells and the central auditory pathway. This form of hearing loss is both phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous and there are still DFNA2 pedigrees that have not been associated with changes in either GJB3 or KCNQ4, suggesting that a possible third gene exists at this locus. Further studies of the DFNA2 locus will lead to a better understanding of progressive hearing loss and provide a better means of early detection and treatment.Keywords: deafness nonsyndromic autosomal dominant 2, nonsyndromic deafness, genetic hearing loss, GJB3, KCNQ4

  10. Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis

    ... known as ‘feedback’ because it’s not a proper fit in the ear canal. These are all issues a hearing health care professional will work through with you.” back to top Aids Versus Amplifiers Mann adds that consumers should not confuse hearing aids with the personal ...

  11. A Case of Heroin Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Ricardo Mario Aulet; Daniel Flis; Jonathan Sillman

    2014-01-01

    A case of a 31-year-old male who developed profound sensorineural hearing loss following a heroin overdose is presented. The patient subsequently had a full recovery of his hearing. Other cases of this rare phenomenon are reviewed and management options are discussed.

  12. Effects of record music on hearing loss among young workers in a shipyard.

    Mori, T

    1985-01-01

    Effects of record music on hearing were studied by measuring the hearing loss among 175 shipyard workers ranging from 20 to 29 years, who did not have any history of ear or nose diseases, familial hearing loss or ingestion of oto-toxic drugs. There were 120 record-listeners and 55 non-listeners. It was found that there were more high frequency hearing impairments among the ears of record-listeners than non-listeners. Means of hearing losses of the record-listeners' ears were 4.73 dB and at 4000 Hz and 9.24 dB at 6000 Hz. Failure rates (percentage of ears which had 20 dB or more hearing loss) were 8.4% at 4000 Hz and 18.8% at 6000 Hz. Three factors, "monthly listening hours", "duration of listening to records" and "favourite type of music", contributed to the high frequency hearing loss. The young shipyard workers should be warned against non-occupational noise exposure, such as record music outside of the workplace, because this will significantly worsen hearing impairment due to the occupational noise exposure. PMID:4055074

  13. Improvements in Speech Understanding With Wireless Binaural Broadband Digital Hearing Instruments in Adults With Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Brian M Kreisman; Mazevski, Annette G.; Schum, Donald J.; Sockalingam, Ravichandran

    2010-01-01

    This investigation examined whether speech intelligibility in noise can be improved using a new, binaural broadband hearing instrument system. Participants were 36 adults with symmetrical, sensorineural hearing loss (18 experienced hearing instrument users and 18 without prior experience). Participants were fit binaurally in a planned comparison, randomized crossover design study with binaural broadband hearing instruments and advanced digital hearing instruments. Following an adjustment peri...

  14. Loudness perception affected by early age hearing loss.

    Sun, Wei; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Chao; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Kumaraguru, Anand; Li, Ji

    2014-07-01

    Tinnitus and hyperacusis, commonly seen in adults, are also reported in children. Although clinical studies found children with tinnitus and hyperacusis often suffered from recurrent otitis media, there is no direct study on how temporary hearing loss in the early age affects the sound loudness perception. In this study, sound loudness changes in rats affected by perforation of the tympanic membranes (TM) have been studied using an operant conditioning based behavioral task. We detected significant increases of sound loudness and susceptibility to audiogenic seizures (AGS) in rats with bilateral TM damage at postnatal 16 days. As increase to sound sensitivity is commonly seen in hyperacusis and tinnitus patients, these results suggest that early age hearing loss is a high risk factor to induce tinnitus and hyperacusis in children. In the TM damaged rats, we also detected a reduced expression of GABA receptor ? and ?6 subunits in the inferior colliculus (IC) compared to the controls. Treatment of vigabatrin (60 mg/kg/day, 7-14 days), an anti-seizure drug that inhibits the catabolism of GABA, not only blocked AGS, but also significantly attenuated the loudness response. Administration of vigabatrin following the early age TM damage could even prevent rats from developing AGS. These results suggest that TM damage at an early age may cause a permanent reduction of GABA tonic inhibition which is critical towards the maintenance of normal loudness processing of the IC. Increasing GABA concentration during the critical period may alleviate the impairment in the brain induced by early age hearing loss. PMID:24747532

  15. Sudden Hearing Loss Treated With Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO – Case Study

    Fal Micha?

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case study of a 32-year-old patient admitted to the Mazowia Hyperbaric Therapy Centre due to a sudden loss of hearing. In an interview the patient reported an abrupt hearing deterioration in his right ear and the feeling of congestion in the left ear with bilateral tinnitus present for over 2 months. The patient was qualified to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO. After 15 treatment sessions in a pressure chamber a noticeable improvement of hearing in his right-ear was noted (proved by pure tone audiometry and subjective hearing upswing in his left ear.

  16. Double Jeopardy: Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Among Noise-Exposed Workers.

    Hong, OiSaeng; Chin, Dal Lae; Phelps, Stephanie; Joo, Yoonmee

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus and assess the relationship between tinnitus and hearing loss among firefighters and operating engineers, who are exposed to noise on-the-job. The study analyzed existing data from two different populations (154 firefighters and 769 operating engineers) who completed a survey and audiometric tests as part of a hearing loss prevention intervention study. Approximately 40% of both groups reported tinnitus; 34% of firefighters and 59% of operating engineers showed hearing loss at noise-sensitive frequencies (4 kHz and 6 kHz). Firefighters with high frequency hearing loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.05, 5.11]) and those with perceived impaired hearing status (OR = 3.53; 95% CI = [1.27, 9.80]) were significantly more likely to report tinnitus. Similarly, operating engineers who had hearing loss at both low (OR = 2.10; 95% CI = [1.40, 3.15]) and high frequencies (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = [1.37, 2.90]), and perceived impaired hearing status (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = [1.55, 3.05]) were twice as likely to report tinnitus. This study demonstrated that tinnitus is a considerable problem for noise-exposed workers. Workers with hearing loss demonstrated significantly higher rates of tinnitus. Comprehensive workplace hearing conservation programs should include tinnitus management for noise-exposed workers, along with other key elements such as noise control and hearing protection. PMID:26968456

  17. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Occupational Noise Exposure: Effects of Age-Corrections

    Krishnamurti, Sridhar

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (NIPTS) were computed from retrospective audiometric analyses by subtracting aging effects on hearing sensitivity in sixty-eight patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who reported significant occupational noise exposure histories. There were significant effects of age on NIPTS but no significant gender- or ear- differences in terms of NIPTS. The NIPTS at 2,000 Hz was found to be significantly greater than NIPTS at frequencies 500 Hz, 1,000...

  18. Factors associated with Hearing Loss in a Normal-Hearing Guinea Pig Model of Hybrid Cochlear Implants

    Tanaka, Chiemi; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh; Loera, Katherine; Stark, Gemaine; Reiss, Lina

    2014-01-01

    The Hybrid cochlear implant (CI), also known as Electro- Acoustic Stimulation (EAS), is a new type of CI that preserves residual acoustic hearing and enables combined cochlear implant and hearing aid use in the same ear. However, 30-55% of patients experience acoustic hearing loss within days to months after activation, suggesting that both surgical trauma and electrical stimulation may cause hearing loss.

  19. 76 FR 62093 - Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting

    2011-10-06

    ... of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published in the Federal Register (FR... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of public meeting.......

  20. Urografin in the Treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Javad S. Totonchi; Mohammad Nejadkazem; Kamyar Ghabili; Seyed Esmail Ayat; Shabnam R. Rad

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to find out whether combined treatment of intravenous urografin and corticosteroid has a therapeutic advantage over oral corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL). The design of the study was an interventional and controlled clinical trial. Between 2003 and 2005, patients with SSNHL were treated in our center in Tabriz, Iran. Patients were selected if they had a hearing loss of at least 30 dB in at least 3 freque...

  1. Vestibular function in families with inherited autosomal dominant hearing loss

    Street, Valerie A.; Kallman, Jeremy C.; Strombom, Paul D.; Bramhall, Naomi F; Phillips, James O.

    2008-01-01

    The inner ear contains the developmentally related cochlea and peripheral vestibular labyrinth. Given the similar physiology between these two organs, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction may be expected to occur simultaneously in individuals segregating mutations in inner ear genes. Twenty-two different genes have been discovered that when mutated lead to non-syndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss. A review of the literature indicates that families segregating mutations in 13 of these ...

  2. Hearing loss in the elderly: History of occupational noise exposure

    Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Melo, Juliana Jandre; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Noise exposure is one of the most common health risk factors, and workers are exposed to sound pressure levels capable of producing hearing loss. Aim: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in the elderly and its possible association with a history of occupational noise exposure and with sex. Methods: A prospective study in subjects aged over 60 years. The subjects underwent anamnesis and audiological assessment. The Mann–Whitney test and multiple logistic regression, ...

  3. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Aldonate, J; Mercuri, C; Reta, J; Biurrun, J; Bonell, C; Gentiletti, G; Escobar, S; Acevedo, R [Laboratorio de Ingenieria en Rehabilitacion e Investigaciones Neuromusculares y Sensoriales (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Ruta 11 - Km 10, Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  4. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory

  5. Factors associated with hearing loss among workers of the airline industry in Korea.

    Hong, O S; Kim, M J

    2001-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major occupational hazard. Occupational noise exposure threatens the hearing of many workers. In addition to noise exposure in the workplace, multiple factors affect individual susceptibility to NIHL. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with hearing loss in airport workers. A cross-sectional epidemiological design was used. Study subjects were 255 high noise-exposed full-time male workers at a large metropolitan airport in Korea. Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, audiological assessment, and a record review of baseline hearing and noise levels of locations where the employee worked. The result of multivariate analysis showed that both occupational noise exposure (noise exposure level, years of noise exposure) and personal risk factors including non-occupational noise exposure, history of ear disease, ototoxic drug use, cigarette smoking, hypertension, and use of hearing protective devices (HPDs) were significantly associated with hearing loss. An aggressive hearing conservation program is needed at the airport, emphasizing both job-related noise exposure and personal risk factors for hearing loss. PMID:12024523

  6. Cross-modal re-organization in adults with early stage hearing loss.

    Campbell, Julia; Sharma, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Cortical cross-modal re-organization, or recruitment of auditory cortical areas for visual processing, has been well-documented in deafness. However, the degree of sensory deprivation necessary to induce such cortical plasticity remains unclear. We recorded visual evoked potentials (VEP) using high-density electroencephalography in nine persons with adult-onset mild-moderate hearing loss and eight normal hearing control subjects. Behavioral auditory performance was quantified using a clinical measure of speech perception-in-noise. Relative to normal hearing controls, adults with hearing loss showed significantly larger P1, N1, and P2 VEP amplitudes, decreased N1 latency, and a novel positive component (P2') following the P2 VEP. Current source density reconstruction of VEPs revealed a shift toward ventral stream processing including activation of auditory temporal cortex in hearing-impaired adults. The hearing loss group showed worse than normal speech perception performance in noise, which was strongly correlated with a decrease in the N1 VEP latency. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that visual cross-modal re-organization not only begins in the early stages of hearing impairment, but may also be an important factor in determining behavioral outcomes for listeners with hearing loss, a finding which demands further investigation. PMID:24587400

  7. Hearing Loss: Communicating With the Patient Who Is Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    McKee, Michael M; Moreland, Christopher; Atcherson, Samuel R; Zazove, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss impairs health care communication and adversely affects patient satisfaction, treatment adherence, and use of health services. Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition among older patients after hypertension and arthritis, but only 15% to 18% of older adults are screened for hearing loss during health maintenance examinations. Patients with hearing loss may be reluctant to disclose it because of fear of ageism, perceptions of disability, and vanity. Lipreading and note writing often are ineffective ways to communicate with deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) patients who use American Sign Language; use of medical sign language interpreters is preferred. A variety of strategies can improve the quality of health care communication for DHH patients, such as the physician facing the patient, listening attentively, and using visual tools. Physicians should learn what hearing loss means to the DHH patient. Deaf American Sign Language users may not perceive hearing loss as a disability but as a cultural identity. Patients' preferred communication strategies will vary. Relay services, electronic communication, and other telecommunications methods can be helpful, but family physicians and medical staff should learn from each DHH patient about which communication strategies will work best. PMID:26161525

  8. Annual rate of hearing loss falls after fractionated stereotactic irradiation for vestibular schwannoma

    Purpose: The rate of hearing loss in a population before and after irradiation was investigated to determine the effect of irradiation on hearing impairment. Methods and materials: In 72 patients with vestibular schwannoma who received fractionated stereotactic irradiation from 1992 to 1999, 21 had had their hearing levels examined 3 months or more before the treatment. The mean time between the initial examination and treatment was 18.6 months (range: 3-89 months), and the mean time between treatment and the last follow-up was 24.2 months (12-69 months). Thirty-six to 50 Gy in 20-25 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks was given using an X-ray beam from a linear accelerator. Pure tone average (PTA) was measured using the mean hearing level at five frequencies, and the annual rate of hearing loss was defined as [(hearing loss in PTA(dB))/(follow-up period (months)x12)]. Results: The actual cumulative curve of decrease in tumor size of 2 mm or more was 38.3% at 2 years and 80.0% at 3 years. The mean of hearing loss in PTA was 11.6±10.3 dB (-1 to 35 dB) from the initial examination to the start of irradiation and 11.9±14.4 dB (-14 to 37 dB) from the start of irradiation to the last follow-up. The mean annual rates of hearing loss before irradiation and in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years after irradiation were, respectively, 18.6, 11.2, 6.2, 5.1, and 5.0 dB/year. The annual rates of hearing loss in the 2nd year (P=0.025) and 3rd year (P=0.018) were significantly slower than the rate before irradiation. Conclusions: The mean annual rate of hearing loss was higher before irradiation than after irradiation, and hearing loss slowed rather than accelerated after irradiation. Although hearing loss after the treatment was usually permanent, fractionated stereotactic irradiation was suggested to be effective to lower the rate of hearing loss

  9. Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Newborns Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Shahnaz Pourarian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing is essential for humans to communicate with one another. Early diagnosis of hearing loss and intervention in neonates and infants can reduce developmental problems. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of hearing impairment in newborns admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU and analyze the associated risk factors.   Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of hearing loss in neonates who were admitted to the NICU at Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between January 2006 and January 2007. Auditory function was examined using otoacoustic emission (OAE followed by auditory brainstem response (ABR tests. Relevant potential risk factors were considered and neonates with a family history of hearing loss and craniofacial abnormality were excluded. For statistical analysis logistic regression, the chi-squared test, and Fisher’s exact test were used.    Results: Among the 124 neonates included in the study, 17 (13.7% showed hearing loss in the short term. There was a significant statistical relationship between gestational age of less than 36 weeks (P=0.013, antibiotic therapy (P= 0.033, oxygen therapy (P=0.04, and hearing loss. On the contrary, there was no significant relationship between hearing loss and use of a ventilator, or the presence of sepsis, hyperbilirubinemia, congenial heart disease, transient tachypnea of newborn, congenital pneumonia, or respiratory distress syndrome.  Conclusion: Auditory function in neonates who are admitted to a NICU, especially those treated with oxygenor antibiotics and those born prematurely, should be assessed during their stay in hospital. The importance of early diagnosis of hearing loss and intervention in these neonates and avoidance of any unnecessary oxygenor antibiotic therapy needs to be further promoted.

  10. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Its Relationship With Hearing Loss in Children: Preliminary Report

    Mostafa Sharifian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA, a substantial fraction of the patients have progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This coexistence is due to the mutations of a gene expressed both in the kidney and in the cochlea. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between hearing loss and DRTA.Materials and Methods. In this study, 51 children diagnosed with renal tubular acidosis were evaluated. Diagnosis of DRTA was based on clinical manifestations and detection of normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, urine pH higher than 5.5, and positive urinary anion gap. Audiometry was performed in children with DRTA and sequencing of the ATP6V1B1 gene was done for those with sensorineural hearing loss.Results. Twenty-seven patients (52.9% had DRTA, of whom 51.9% were younger than 1 year old, 55.6% were boys, and 44.4% were girls. Eleven patients (40.7% had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, consisting of 5 of 15 boys (33.3% and 6 of 12 girls (50.0%. There was no correlation between hearing loss and gender. Three patients with hearing loss had mutation in the ATP6V1B1 gene (11.1% of patients with DRTA and 27.3% of patients with DRTA and hearing loss.Conclusions. This study indicated that a significant percentage of the children with DRTA had sensorineural hearing loss and mutation in ATP6V1B1 gene. It is recommended to investigate hearing impairment in all children with DRTA.

  11. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    Andréa Cintra Lopes1, , , ,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type of hearing loss, it is evident the importance of preventive and conferences aimed at preserving hearing and health as a whole. Objective: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in audiometry admission of drivers. Methods: Retrospective study. By 76 charts of professional drivers in leased transport companies. We analyzed data from specific interview and pure tone audiometry. Results: The prevalence of abnormal tests was 22.36% with the lowest thresholds for tritonal average of 3,000, 4,000 and 6,000 Hz. The higher the age, the higher thresholds. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the occurrence of hearing in the absence of complaints. Considering that PAIR is preventable, justifies the importance of coordinated and multidisciplinary involving not only health teams and safety, but also the institutions involved in preserving the health of workers, as the team SESMET, unions or prosecutors.

  12. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  13. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  14. Hearing loss as an unusual consequence of metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma

    CE Owers

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A sixty-one year old man was referred with a history of progressive dysphagia, vomiting and weight loss with some back pain. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsies revealed a gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Despite the absence of metastatic disease on computed tomography, positron emission tomography demonstrated multiple vertebral and sternal deposits. He was reviewed in an ENT clinic with a sudden onset of hearing loss accompanied by dizziness, but no focal neurology. Magnetic resonance imaging identified bilateral 2cm lesions at the internal auditory meatus, consistent with a diagnosis of bilateral acoustic neuromas. The patient subsequently died of carcinomatosis and, because of the potential familial significance of bilateral acoustic neuromas, a limited post-mortem examination was carried out. Unexpectedly, this revealed bilateral adenocarcinoma metastases infiltrating the internal auditory meatus affecting the acoustic nerves. The authors believe this a very rare presentation of metastatic gastric disease.

  15. A causal relationship between hearing loss and cognitive impairment.

    Park, So Young; Kim, Min Jung; Sikandaner, Huerxidan; Kim, Dong-Kee; Yeo, Sang Won; Park, Shi Nae

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion Moderate hearing loss in young mice caused decreases in cognition associated with spatial working and recognition memories in 6 months. These results provide evidence for a causal relationship between hearing loss and cognitive impairment. Objectives Hypothesized mechanisms to connect sensory and cognitive functions include the sensory-deprivation, information-degradation, and common-cause hypotheses. This study intended to investigate the effect of hearing loss on cognitive function, as estimated by radial arm maze (RAM) and novel object recognition (NOR) tasks in mice through age- and hearing-matched longitudinal work during a 6-month period. Methods Twenty-four male C57BL/6 mice aged 1 month with normal ABR thresholds were used. Twelve mice in the hearing loss (HL) group were exposed to white noise at 110 dB SPL for 60 min every day for 20 days. At post-noise 6 months, all mice underwent RAM and one-trial NOR test. RAM performance measures and NOR discrimination index were compared between two groups. Results At 6 months after noise exposure, all mice in the experimental group had moderate hearing loss. Most of the RAM performances improved gradually within each group across five trials, probably due to learning effect. The HL group showed lower performance scores than the control group in several trial points in the RAM task. The contact time with the novel object was shorter in the HL group than in the control group. PMID:26808715

  16. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential in sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Feroze Kancharu Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective: To investigate saccular damage in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL with or without vertigo and to evaluate the saccular damage according to the hearing loss and presence or absence of vertigo. Materials and Methods: All tests done in this study were performed in the audio vestibular unit of ENT department from September 2009 to November 2010. Statistical Analysis Used: The association between the severity of hearing loss and changes in the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP recordings were assessed using descriptive statistics. The pattern of VEMP in different diseases and also the behavior of VEMP in presence or absence of vertigo were evaluated using SPSS 15. Results: Among 27 patients there were 11 cases of idiopathic SSNHL. Out of nine unaffected ears, 88% had normal and 12% had absent VEMP. Whereas out of 13 affected ears, only 53.9% had normal VEMP. Among all the 54 ears, 17 ears had normal hearing. In this group 76.47% had normal VEMP. The group with hearing loss > 90 dB had 61.53% absent VEMP. Conclusions: In patients with unilateral SSNHL, there was a tendency for the affected ear to have absent VEMP indicating the saccular involvement. The extent of saccular damage did not correspond to the amount of hearing loss or presence or absence of vertigo.

  17. Satisfaction of Hearing Aids Users With Hearing Loss of Severe and Deep Degree

    Lessa, Alexandre Hundertmarck

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is necessary to analyze the efficiency of the hearing aids use, considering the necessity of enlargement and communication difficulty. Objective: To analyze the satisfaction of adults and elders, users of hearing aids with hearing loss of severe and deep degree, using a questionnaire and searching factors that can difficult the adaptation. Method: A retrospective study of 56 patients, with age group between 18 and 86 years old, hearing loss of severe and deep degree and users of HA by a program of concession of hearing aids, submitted to the questionnaire: "Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life". The global average was calculated by sub scale and by question and it was given emphasis to the questions that resulted in best and worse averages. Results: 58,9% were women and 41,1% men, about of 55% of the patients presented hearing loss of severe degree and 45% deep degree. 87,5% referred use major than 8 hours daily. The users believe that the acquisition of the hearing aid was the best option and this aid very much in the speech understanding. They feel themselves trustful and able with the sounding amplification and refer a good service by professionals of the service. The performance to the telephone was the problem found. Conclusion:It was demonstrated high degree of satisfaction in the studied population. The hearing loss degree, as well as the incompatibility of systems between telephone and telecoils and the difficulty in the placement of telephone ate factors that difficult the good performance to the telephone. The accentuated hearing loss collaborate for the hearing aid be an integral part of the daily life and essential in the aid to the communication. ACTRN12610000424000

  18. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex an...

  19. Determinants of Conductive Hearing Loss in Tympanic Membrane Perforation

    Park, Hanaro; Hong, Seung No; Kim, Hyo Sang; Han, Jae Joon; Chung, Juyong; Seo, Myung-Whan; Oh, Seung-Ha; Chang, Sun-O

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tympanic membrane perforations are common, but there have been few studies of the factors determining the extent of the resulting conductive hearing loss. The aims of this study were to determine whether the size of tympanic membrane perforation, pneumatization of middle ear & mastoid cavity, and location of perforation were correlated with air-bone gap (ABG) of patients. Methods Forty-two patients who underwent tympanoplasty type I or myringoplasty were included and preoperative audiometry were analyzed. Digital image processing was applied in computed tomography for the estimation of middle ear & mastoid pneumatization volume and tympanic membrane photograph for the evaluation of perforation size and location. Results Preoperative mean ABG increased with perforation size (P=0.018), and correlated inversely with the middle ear & mastoid volume (P=0.005). However, perforations in anterior versus posterior locations showed no significant differences in mean ABG (P=0.924). Conclusion The degree of conductive hearing loss resulting from a tympanic membrane perforation would be expected with the size of perforation and pneumatization of middle ear and mastoid. PMID:26045905

  20. HEARING LOSS, ITS IMPLICATIONS AND PUBLIC HEALTH INTERVENTIONS

    Suneela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, over 5% of world’s population (More than 360 million population, have disabling hearing loss according to new global estimates on prevalence; 91% of these are adults and 9% of these are children. Overall, prevalence of disabling hearing loss in children all over the world is 1.7%.1 Prevalence of hearing loss in South Asia in pediatric age group is 2.4%. Consequences of hearing impairment include inability to interpret speech sounds, often producing a reduced ability to communicate, delay in language acquisition, economic and educational disadvantage, social isolation and stigmatization. Fifty percent of hearing loss is preventable through public health actions.1 From time to time, public and private sector enterprises plan at both, small and large scale to help people with hearing impairment. But still the services available and implementation status of actions to combat ear disorders is in naïve stage. The earlier the parent/family accept the fact of impairment and follow a well-planned rehabilitation program under professional supervision, the better are the chances for the child and the family to lead a more normal life.

  1. Quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others

    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane; Brännström, Jonas; Andersson, Gerhard; Lunner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. Design: Two keyword pairs (hearing loss and hearing aids) were entered into five country-specific versions of the most commonly used internet search engine in May 2011. Sample: For each of the 10 searches, the first 10 relevant websites were included. After removing duplicates, a total of 66 websites were assessed. Their origin (...

  2. Massively Parallel Sequencing for Genetic Diagnosis of Hearing Loss: The New Standard of Care

    Shearer, A. Eliot; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of new genetic sequencing techniques for comprehensive genetic testing for hearing loss. Data Sources Articles were identified from PubMed and Google Scholar databases using pertinent search terms. Review Methods Literature search identified 30 studies as candidates that met search criteria. Three studies were excluded and eight studies were found to be case reports. 20 studies were included for review analysis including seven studies that evaluated controls and 16 studies that evaluated patients with unknown causes of hearing loss; three studies evaluated both controls and patients. Conclusions In the 20 studies included in review analysis, 426 control samples and 603 patients with unknown causes of hearing loss underwent comprehensive genetic diagnosis for hearing loss using massively parallel sequencing. Control analysis showed a sensitivity and specificity > 99%, sufficient for clinical use of these tests. The overall diagnostic rate was 41% (range 10% to 83%) and varied based on several factors including inheritance and pre-screening prior to comprehensive testing. There were significant differences in platforms available in regards to number and type of genes included and whether copy number variations were examined. Based on these results, comprehensive genetic testing should form the cornerstone of a tiered approach to clinical evaluation of patients with hearing loss along with history, physical exam, and audiometry and can determine further testing that may be required, if any. Implications for Practice Comprehensive genetic testing has become the new standard of care for genetic testing for patients with sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26084827

  3. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist in the workplace and lead to workers' hearing damage. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCP in preventing further hearing loss in workers with audiograms suggestive of NIHL. The audiometric tests and medical records of 28 furniture company workers exposed to noise were reviewed and monitored for 2 years. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined five audiometric tests in the medical records (on admission and every semester) of 28 workers in a furniture company (totaling 140 audiometric exams) following the introduction of the HCP. Results Data analysis showed no differences between the audiometric tests conducted on admission and those performed every semester. Conclusions The HCP implemented was effective in preventing the worsening of hearing loss in workers already with NIHL when exposed to occupational noise. Therefore, such a measure could be useful for the employment of workers with hearing loss in job sectors that have noise exposure. PMID:26722345

  4. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program.

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist in the workplace and lead to workers' hearing damage. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCP in preventing further hearing loss in workers with audiograms suggestive of NIHL. The audiometric tests and medical records of 28 furniture company workers exposed to noise were reviewed and monitored for 2 years. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined five audiometric tests in the medical records (on admission and every semester) of 28 workers in a furniture company (totaling 140 audiometric exams) following the introduction of the HCP. Results Data analysis showed no differences between the audiometric tests conducted on admission and those performed every semester. Conclusions The HCP implemented was effective in preventing the worsening of hearing loss in workers already with NIHL when exposed to occupational noise. Therefore, such a measure could be useful for the employment of workers with hearing loss in job sectors that have noise exposure. PMID:26722345

  5. Audiology In The Sudden Hearing Loss Clinical Trial

    Halpin, Chris; Shi, Helen; Reda, Domenic; Antonelli, PJ; Babu, S; Carey, JP; Gantz, BJ; Goebel, JA; Hammerschlag, PE; Harris, JP; Isaacson, B; Lee, D; Linstrom, CJ; Parnes, LS; Slattery, WH; Telian, SA; Vrabec, JT; Rauch, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the pre- and post treatment population characteristics, and the overall stability of the audiologic outcomes found during the Sudden Hearing Loss Clinical Trial [ClinicalTrials.gov: Identifier NCT00097448]. Study Design Multi-center, prospective randomized non-inferiority trial of oral v. intratympanic (IT) steroid treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). Setting Fifteen academically-based otology practices Patients 250 patients with unilateral SSNHL presenting within 14 days of onset with ≥50 dBHL pure tone average hearing threshold in the affected ear. Intervention Either 60 mg/day oral prednisone for 14 days with a 5-day taper (121 patients) or four IT doses over 14 days of 40mg/ml methylprednisolone (129 patients). Main Outcome Measure Primary endpoint was change in hearing [dB PTA] at 2 months after treatment. Non-inferiority was defined as SSNHL. PMID:22805100

  6. Using the extended parallel process model to prevent noise-induced hearing loss among coal miners in Appalachia

    Murray-Johnson, L.; Witte, K.; Patel, D.; Orrego, V.; Zuckerman, C.; Maxfield, A.M.; Thimons, E.D. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (US)

    2004-12-15

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss is the second most self-reported occupational illness or injury in the United States. Among coal miners, more than 90% of the population reports a hearing deficit by age 55. In this formative evaluation, focus groups were conducted with coal miners in Appalachia to ascertain whether miners perceive hearing loss as a major health risk and if so, what would motivate the consistent wearing of hearing protection devices (HPDs). The theoretical framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model was used to identify the miners' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and current behaviors regarding hearing protection. Focus group participants had strong perceived severity and varying levels of perceived susceptibility to hearing loss. Various barriers significantly reduced the self-efficacy and the response efficacy of using hearing protection.

  7. Diversity in noise-induced temporary hearing loss in otophysine fishes

    Amoser, Sonja; Ladich, Friedrich

    2003-04-01

    The effects of intense white noise (158 dB re 1 μPa for 12 and 24 h) on the hearing abilities of two otophysine fish species-the nonvocal goldfish Carassius auratus and the vocalizing catfish Pimelodus pictus-were investigated in relation to noise exposure duration. Hearing sensitivity was determined utilizing the auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording technique. Measurements in the frequency range between 0.2 and 4.0 kHz were conducted prior and directly after noise exposure as well as after 3, 7, and 14 days of recovery. Both species showed a significant loss of sensitivity (up to 26 dB in C. auratus and 32 dB in P. pictus) immediately after noise exposure, with the greatest hearing loss in the range of their most sensitive frequencies. Hearing loss differed between both species, and was more pronounced in the catfish. Exposure duration had no influence on hearing loss. Hearing thresholds of C. auratus recovered within three days, whereas those of P. pictus only returned to their initial values within 14 days after exposure in all but one frequency. The results indicate that hearing specialists are affected differently by noise exposure and that acoustic communication might be restricted in noisy habitats.

  8. Determination of Hearing Loss Prevalence in Preschool Children of Ahwaz

    Mozafar Sarafraz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children learn to communicate by hearing sounds. If there is hearing loss, the cognitive and speaking abilities and language learning will deteriorate. Early detection and intervention are important factors in the successful treatment of hearing loss in children. Hearing loss (HL is divided into two main groups: conductive hearing loss (CHL and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, the prevalence of the former being higher in children, many whose causes are easy to detect and treat. Material and Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, 785 children, aged 6-7 years, entering elementary school Grade 1 in the school year 2010/2011, were randomly selected from 10% of Ahwaz Hearing Loss Screening Centers, and their audiograms were studied. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS and descriptive statistics. Results: Out of the 785 preschool children examined in this study, 77 children (9.8% suffered from HL (42.9% female and 57.1% male, 59.7% from CHL, and 40.3% from SNHL. Twenty-six percent suffered from bilateral HL and 74% from unilateral HL. Thirty-eight point ninety-six percent had abnormal tympanometry, 61% of whom were Type B. Most of the children (53% had mild HL. Thirty-one point two percent of parents were aware of their children's HL. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of HL, especially SNHL, in this study, which is usually permanent but detectable at the neonatal ages, raising public awareness and early screening of ear diseases, which can lead to the detection and treatment in most cases, seem to be vital.

  9. STUDY OF HEARING OUTCOMES IN SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS TREATED WITH TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR (TPA

    Rama Krishna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSHNL is a clinical condition that requires immediate management. There are many treatment options, which may not always revert the hearing to normal. Not only recording the degree of hearing loss, but also establishing the concurrent dysfunction of saccule by VEMP has facilitated a new approach to treatment strategy. Recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator ((rtPA proved its efficacy in stroke and subsequently considered an option in the management of ISSNHL. The curren t study, conducted at different centres, on 15 patients utilized rtPA. The results showed a promising trend when saccular pathology is also evident by VEMP in association with Hearing loss. We recommend use of rtPA as primary modality in cases of ISSNHL wi th Saccular involvement.

  10. Sudden Hearing Loss Treated With Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO) – Case Study

    Fal Micha?; Piechocki Jacek; Morawska-Kochman Monika; Micha?kiewicz Maria; Kr?cicki Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a case study of a 32-year-old patient admitted to the Mazowia Hyperbaric Therapy Centre due to a sudden loss of hearing. In an interview the patient reported an abrupt hearing deterioration in his right ear and the feeling of congestion in the left ear with bilateral tinnitus present for over 2 months. The patient was qualified to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO). After 15 treatment sessions in a pressure chamber a noticeable improvement of hearing in his right-ear...

  11. Auditory Cortex Signs of Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Eckert, Mark A.; Cute, Stephanie L.; Vaden, Kenneth I.; Kuchinsky, Stefanie E.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss, or presbyacusis, is a major public health problem that causes communication difficulties and is associated with diminished quality of life. Limited satisfaction with hearing aids, particularly in noisy listening conditions, suggests that central nervous system declines occur with presbyacusis and may limit the efficacy of interventions focused solely on improving audibility. This study of 49 older adults (M = 69.58, SD = 8.22 years; 29 female) was designed to examine...

  12. TMPRSS3 mutations in autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Battelino, Saba; Klancar, Gasper; Kovac, Jernej; Battelino, Tadej; Trebusak Podkrajsek, Katarina

    2016-05-01

    Nonsyndromic genetic deafness is highly heterogeneous in its clinical presentation, pattern of inheritance and underlying genetic causes. Mutations in TMPRSS3 gene encoding transmembrane serine protease account for Slovenia resulting in uniform phenotype with profound congenital hearing loss, and satisfactory hearing and speech recognition outcome after cochlear implantation. Consequently, TMPRSS3 gene analysis should be included in the first tier of genetic investigations of ARNSHL along with GJB2 and GJB6 genes. PMID:26036852

  13. Audiometric notch as a sign of noise induced hearing loss

    McBride, D.; Williams, S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the relation between different types of exposure to noise and a classic sign of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL), the audiometric notch.
METHODS—The study sample had exposure to both continuous and impulse noise and was drawn from a population of electrical transmission workers. Audiograms, taken as part of a hearing conservation programme, were read by three clinicians experienced in the assessment of NIHL. Working independently and using their clinical judgment, t...

  14. Research on Relationship Model of Social Adaptation,Social Support and Life Satisfaction of Tibetan Hearing Loss Children

    SHEN Ren-hong

    2014-01-01

    The paper takes 230 Tibetan hearing loss children sample to research on relationship model of social adaptation, social support and life satisfaction of Tibetan hearing loss children by hearing disabled children’s social adaptive behavior, social support assessment scale and life satisfaction rating scale. Results present that there be significant positive relationship between social support and social adaptation, between social adaptation and life satisfaction. Further more, the social suppo...

  15. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss posthypothyroidism: A case study

    Priya Karimuddanahally Premkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is defined as a loss of at least 30 dB in three contiguous frequencies over a period of three days or less. In the present study a client with sudden hearing loss post hypothyroidism is discussed. A 56 year old client reported of awakening from sleep due to ear fullness along with severe tinnitus and experienced reduced hearing sensitivity in the right ear. The client had a history of hypothyroidism and was under medication for the same. The successive audiological investigations revealed that there was no improvement from prescribed medications, even with early identification and intervention. For better treatment outcomes correct identification of the cause as well as application of cause based treatment procedure is essential. Endocrine disorder is said to be one of the causes for sudden sensorineural hearing loss and one among this disorder is hypothyroidism. The present study aimed to throw a light on this aspect by giving a detailed case report of the client who suffered sudden sensorineural hearing loss which is suspected to be a long term effect of hypothyroidism.

  16. Hearing loss associated with US military combat deployment

    Timothy S Wells

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to define the risk of hearing loss among US military members in relation to their deployment experiences. Data were drawn from the Millennium Cohort Study. Self-reported data and objective military service data were used to assess exposures and outcomes. Among all 48,540 participants, 7.5% self-reported new-onset hearing loss. Self-reported hearing loss showed moderate to substantial agreement (k = 0.57-0.69 with objective audiometric measures. New-onset hearing loss was associated with combat deployment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.49-1.77, as well as male sex and older age. Among deployers, new-onset hearing loss was also associated with proximity to improvised explosive devices (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.62-2.73 and with experiencing a combat-related head injury (AOR = 6.88, 95% CI = 3.77-12.54. These findings have implications for health care and disability planning, as well as for prevention programs.

  17. Sudden onset unilateral sensorineural hearing loss after rabies vaccination.

    Okhovat, Saleh; Fox, Richard; Magill, Jennifer; Narula, Antony

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old man developed profound sudden onset right-sided hearing loss with tinnitus and vertigo, within 24 h of pretravel rabies vaccination. There was no history of upper respiratory tract infection, systemic illness, ototoxic medication or trauma, and normal otoscopic examination. Pure tone audiograms (PTA) demonstrated right-sided sensorineural hearing loss (thresholds 90-100 dB) and normal left-sided hearing. MRI internal acoustic meatus, viral serology (hepatitis B, C, HIV and cytomegalovirus) and syphilis screen were normal. Positive Epstein-Barr virus IgG, viral capsid IgG and anticochlear antibodies (anti-HSP-70) were noted. Initial treatment involved a course of high-dose oral prednisolone and acyclovir. Repeat PTAs after 12 days of treatment showed a small improvement in hearing thresholds. Salvage intratympanic steroid injections were attempted but failed to improve hearing further. Sudden onset sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is an uncommon but frightening experience for patients. This is the first report of SSNHL following rabies immunisation in an adult. PMID:26670892

  18. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Rahman Movahhed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been shown that low levels of pigmentation increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in humans. For this reason, white populations develop more pronounced noise- induced hearing loss in comparison to black populations. Similarly, blue-eyed individuals exhibit greater temporary threshold shift than brown-eyed subjects; still, no strong correlation has been verified between the lightness of hair color and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. This study was performed with the purpose of investigating a possible association between hair color and the degree of hearing loss due to firing noise. Study Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: A tertiary referral center with an accredited otorhinolaryngology-head & neck surgery department.   Materials and Methods: A total of 57 military recruits were divided into two groups; light-colored (blond and light brown and dark-colored hair (dark brown and black. The two groups were matched based on history of firing noise exposure (number of rounds; type of weapon and the level of hearing loss at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz sound frequencies was compared between them.   Results: The results showed that the mean level of hearing loss of light-colored hair individuals (20.5±17dB was significantly greater than that of dark-haired subjects (13.5±11dB, (P=0.023.   Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended.

  19. Survey on hearing aid outcome in Switzerland: associations with type of fitting (bilateral/unilateral), level of hearing aid signal processing, and hearing loss.

    Bertoli, S; Bodmer, D.; Probst, R.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation further analysed results of a previously reported survey with a large sample of hearing aid owners (Bertoli et al, 2009) to determine the individual and technological factors related to hearing aid outcome. In particular the associations of hearing loss, level of signal processing, and fitting type (bilateral versus unilateral fitting) with hearing aid use, satisfaction with and management of the aid were evaluated. A sub-group with symmetrical hearing loss was analy...

  20. Smartphone-based audiometric test for screening hearing loss in the elderly.

    Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Handzel, Ophir; Ness, Lior; Ben-Artzi-Blima, Miri; Fait-Ghelbendorf, Karin; Himmelfarb, Mordechai

    2016-02-01

    Hearing loss is widespread among the elderly. One of the main obstacles to rehabilitation is identifying individuals with potentially correctable hearing loss. Smartphone-based hearing tests can be administered at home, thus greatly facilitating access to screening. This study evaluates the use of a smartphone application as a screening tool for hearing loss in individuals aged ≥65 years. Twenty-six subjects aged 84.4 ± 6.73 years (mean ± SD) were recruited. Pure-tone audiometry was administered by both a smartphone application (uHear for iPhone, v1.0 Unitron, Canada) and a standard portable audiometer by trained personnel. Participants also completed a questionnaire on their hearing. Pure-tone thresholds were compared between the two testing modalities and correlated with the questionnaire results. The cutoff point for failing screening tests was a pure tone average of 40 dB for the frequencies 250-6,000 Hz. The smartphone application's pure tone thresholds were higher (poorer hearing) than the audiometric thresholds, with a significant difference in all frequencies but 2,000 Hz. The application and the audiometric values were in agreement for 24 subjects (92 %). The application had a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 60 % for screening compared with the audiometer. The questionnaire was significantly less accurate, having assigned a passing score to three participants who failed both the application and audiometric tests. While a smartphone application may not be able to accurately determine the level of hearing impairment, it is useful as a highly accessible portable audiometer substitute for screening for hearing loss in elderly populations. PMID:25655259

  1. Hearing Loss: Issues in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities.

    Moreland, Christopher; Atcherson, Samuel R; Zazove, Philip; McKee, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss can lead to impairments in language and speech acquisition, educational attainment, social development, and reading achievement. More than 90% of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children are born to hearing parents who may lack the knowledge or experience to effectively care for a child with hearing loss. Family involvement is crucial for teaching self-advocacy and global communication skills, optimizing social development, and helping DHH individuals understand and manage external attitudes about deafness and hearing loss. American Sign Language is a naturally developed language with an always-expanding lexicon and grammatical structures different from those of English. Teaching spoken English and American Sign Language equally, often called bilingual bimodal education, can enhance academic and reading achievement as well as language and psychosocial development. Formal schooling options for a DHH child include enrollment in a public or private school system (often called inclusion, integration, or mainstreaming), a school for the deaf, or a bilingual school. Individuals with hearing loss experience stereotypes and biases that create disparities in health insurance coverage, health care access, and outcomes of mental and physical conditions. Family physicians should recognize and minimize biases to improve health care in the DHH community. PMID:26161526

  2. Acute unilateral hearing loss as an unusual presentation of cholesteatoma

    Bickerton Richard C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesteatomas are epithelial cysts that contain desquamated keratin. Patients commonly present with progressive hearing loss and a chronically discharging ear. We report an unusual presentation of the disease with an acute hearing loss suffered immediately after prolonged use of a pneumatic drill. Case presentation A 41 year old man with no previous history of ear problems presented with a sudden loss of hearing in his right ear immediately following the prolonged use of a pneumatic drill on concrete. The cause was found to be a fractured long process of incus which had been eroded by the presence of an attic cholesteatoma. A tympanomastoidectomy and ossiculoplasty was performed with good result. Conclusion Cholesteatomas may be asymptomatic and insidious in their onset. This case illustrates the point that an indolent disease such as this may present in unusual ways and the clinician must always have a high index of suspicion combined with thorough assessment and examination of every patient.

  3. Hearing loss and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: systematic review

    Eliene da Silva Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the occurrence of hearing loss in individuals with HIV/AIDS and their characterization regarding type and degree. RESEARCH STRATEGY: It was conducted a systematic review of the literature found on the electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, ADOLEC, IBECS, Web of Science, Scopus, Lilacs and SciELO. SELECTION CRITERIA: The search strategy was directed by a specific question: "Is hearing loss part of the framework of HIV/AIDS manifestations?", and the selection criteria of the studies involved coherence with the proposed theme, evidence levels 1, 2 or 3, and language (Portuguese, English and Spanish. DATA ANALYSIS: We found 698 studies. After an analysis of the title and abstract, 91 were selected for full reading. Out of these, 38 met the proposed criteria and were included on the review. RESULTS: The studies reported presence of conductive, sensorineural, and mixed hearing loss, of variable degrees and audiometric configurations, in addition to tinnitus and vestibular disorders. The etiology can be attributed to opportunistic infections, ototoxic drugs or to the action of virus itself. The auditory evoked potentials have been used as markers of neurological alterations, even in patients with normal hearing. CONCLUSION: HIV/AIDS patients may present hearing loss. Thus, programs for prevention and treatment of AIDS must involve actions aimed at auditory health.

  4. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss. PMID:26639015

  5. Sensorineural hearing loss after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    Thongyai Kanthong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is one of the major long term side effects from radiation therapy (RT in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC patients. This study aims to review the incidences of SNHL when treating with different radiation techniques. The additional objective is to determine the relationship of the SNHL with the radiation doses delivered to the inner ear. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 134 individual ears from 68 NPC patients, treated with conventional RT and IMRT in combination with chemotherapy from 2004-2008 was performed. Dosimetric data of the cochlea were analyzed. Significant SNHL was defined as > 15 dB increase in bone conduction threshold at 4 kHz and PTA (pure tone average of 0.5, 1, 2 kHz. Relative risk (RR was used to determine the associated factors with the hearing threshold changes at 4 kHz and PTA. Results Median audiological follow up time was 14 months. The incidence of high frequency (4 kHz SNHL was 44% for the whole group (48.75% in the conventional RT, 37% with IMRT. Internal auditory canal mean dose of > 50 Gy had shown a trend to increase the risk of high frequency SNHL (RR 2.02 with 95% CI 1.01-4.03, p = 0.047. Conclusion IMRT and radiation dose limitation to the inner ear appeared to decrease SNHL.

  6. Is BPPV a Prognostic Factor in Idiopathic Sudden Sensory Hearing Loss?

    Lee, No Hee; Ban, Jae Ho

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The prognostic significance of vertigo in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains a matter of debate because vertigo is associated with many different vestibular disorders. The purpose of this study is to determine the role of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) as a prognostic factor in patients with SSNHL. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 298 patients with SSNHL. Hearing outcomes were evaluated by assessments of pre-treatmen...

  7. Is BPPV a Prognostic Factor in Idiopathic Sudden Sensory Hearing Loss?

    Lee, No Hee

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The prognostic significance of vertigo in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains a matter of debate because vertigo is associated with many different vestibular disorders. The purpose of this study is to determine the role of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) as a prognostic factor in patients with SSNHL. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 298 patients with SSNHL. Hearing outcomes were evaluated by assessments of pre-treatment hearing and hearing gain. Comparative multivariate analyses between prognostic factors and hearing outcome were conducted. Results Thirty-eight (12.7%) SSNHL patients were found to also have BPPV. BPPV showed significant negative prognostic factors in hearing outcome on multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 0.15). In comparison to average pure tone audiometry (PTA), patients diagnosed with SSNHL with BPPV exhibited poorer hearing in pre- and post-treatment PTA compared to SSNHL without BPPV. Old age (>60 years), pre-treatment hearing, and canal paresis were significant outcome predictors. Conclusion BPPV in SSNHL patients, representing definitive vestibular damage, was closely related to poor prognosis. PMID:21217960

  8. Sensorineural Hearing Loss due to Air Bag Deployment

    Atsushi Tahara; Jyunichi Ishikawa; Masafumi Ohki

    2012-01-01

    Deployment of the air bag in a passenger vehicle accident rarely causes otologic injuries. However, sensorineural hearing loss induced by air bag deployment is extremely rare, with only a few cases reported in the English literature. A 38-year-old man involved in a traffic accident while driving his car at 40 km/hour presented with right sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, without associated vertigo. Pure-tone audiometry demonstrated elevated thresholds of 30 dB and 25 dB at 4 kHz and 8 ...

  9. Occupational noise induced hearing loss and hearing threshold profile at high frequencies

    Solanki, Jayesh D; Hemant B. Mehta; Shah, Chinmay J; Pradyna A Gokhale

    2012-01-01

    Background: The textile workers exposed to industrial noise are prone to develop hearing loss concentrated mainly at high audible frequencies. It is affected by duration of exposure and type of noise. Aims: Present study was conducted to (a) investigate hearing thresholds of textile workers by pure tone audiometry, (b) correlate thresholds at 4 kHz, 6 kHz and 8 kHz between noise exposed and unexposed group and (c) study effect of duration of exposure on hearing profile. Materials and Methods:...

  10. Risk factors for hearing loss in infants under universal hearing screening program in Northern Thailand

    Poonual, Watcharapol; Navacharoen, Niramon; Kangsanarak, Jaran; Namwongprom, Sirianong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To define the risk factors for hearing loss in infants (aged 3 months) under universal hearing screening program. Materials and methods A total of 3,120 infants (aged 3 months) who underwent hearing screening using a universal hearing screening program using automated otoacoustic emission test between November 1, 2010 and May 31, 2012 in Uttaradit Hospital, Buddhachinaraj Hospital, and Sawanpracharuk Hospital (tertiary hospitals) located in Northern Thailand were included in this prospective cohort study. Results Of the 3,120 infants, 135 (4.3%) were confirmed to have hearing loss with the conventional otoacoustic emission test. Five of these 135 infants (3.7%) with hearing loss showed test results consistent with auditory brainstem responses. From the univariable analysis, there were eleven potential risk factors associated with hearing deterioration. On multivariable analysis, the risk factors independently associated with hearing loss at 3 months were birth weight 1,500–2,500 g (risk ratio [RR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–2.6), APGAR score <6 at 5 minutes (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4), craniofacial anomalies (RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6–4.2), sepsis (RR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.2), and ototoxic exposure (RR 4.1, 95% CI 1.9–8.6). Conclusion This study concluded that low birth weight, APGAR score <6 at 5 minutes, craniofacial anomalies, sepsis, and ototoxic exposure are the risk factors for bilateral hearing loss in infants (aged 3 months) and proper tests should be performed to identify these risk factors. As an outcome, under the present circumstances, it is suggested that infirmary/physicians/general practitioners/health action centers/polyclinics should carry out universal hearing screening in all infants before 36 weeks. The public health policy of Thailand regarding a universal hearing screening program is important for the prevention of disability and to enhance people’s quality of life. PMID:26766912

  11. Intratympanic injection of dexamethasone for treatment of tinnitus in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Tadao Yoshida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe tinnitus in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL. We studied 37 patients who received intratympanic dexamethasone injections and 14 control patients who did not receive it, with severe tinnitus after onset of unilateral sudden SNHL. Hearing level did not change during this study in any patient. The relationship between the duration of tinnitus and effectiveness of treatment was investigated in sudden SNHL. We used a visual analogue scale to evaluate 51 patients with severe tinnitus at the stage of stable hearing level after idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Forty-one per cent of patients showed significant improvement after treatment. The average period between onset of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and initiation of intratympanic dexamethasone injection was significantly shorter (207 days in the improved group than in the unchanged group (482 days (P<0.001. In control group, one of 14 patients presented significant improvement spontaneously. Intratympanic dexamethasone treatment may be effective in treatment of severe tinnitus after sudden SNHL at the stage of stable hearing level, and the shorter the period from onset of sudden deafness to the start of intratympanic dexamethasone treatment, the greater the improvement in tinnitus that can be expected.

  12. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss in India

    Nandi Subroto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss in every country in the world. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Worldwide, 16% of the disabling hearing loss in adults is attributed to occupational noise, ranging from 7 to 21% in the various subregions. The estimated cost of noise to developed countries ranges from 0.2 to 2% of the gross domestic product (GDP. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is bilateral and symmetrical, usually affecting the higher frequencies (3k, 4k or 6k Hz and then spreading to the lower frequencies (0.5k, 1k or 2k Hz. Other major health effects are lack of concentration, irritation, fatigue, headache, sleep disturbances, etc. The major industries responsible for excessive noise and exposing workers to hazardous levels of noise are textile, printing, saw mills, mining, etc. Hearing protectors should be used when engineering controls and work practices are not feasible for reducing noise exposure to safe levels. Earmuffs, ear plugs and ear canal caps are the main types of hearing protectors. In India, NIHL has been a compensable disease since 1948. It is only in 1996 that the first case got compensation. Awareness should be created among workers about the harmful effects of noise on hearing and other body systems by implementing compulsory education and training programs. There are very few published studies of NIHL in India. More extensive studies are needed to know the exact prevalence of NIHL among the various industries in India.

  13. Pegylated interferon/ribavirin-associated sudden hearing loss in a patient with chronic hepatitis C in Brazil

    Maria Cassia Jacintho Mendes-Corrêa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden hearing loss is defined as a sensorineural hearing loss, equal to or greater than 30 dB, at three or more consecutive frequencies, which takes place within 72 hours. Both peginterferon and ribavirin are well-known to be associated with significant adverse effects, but sudden hearing loss is uncommon. We report a 65-year-old male patient who developed sudden-onset hearing loss during combination therapy with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Peginterferon and ribavirin may cause sudden hearing loss that may not recover after discontinuation of therapy. Immediate treatment for all possible etiologies is essential, along with targeted investigations and early referral for an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist. Physicians should be aware of the possible ototoxic effects of peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy requiring appropriate surveillance.

  14. Hearing loss in the mining industry: overview of the NIOSH hearing loss prevention program at the Pittsburgh Research Laboratory

    Matetic, R.J. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has recognised that noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the most common occupational illness in the United States. The Pittsburgh Research Laboratory at NIOSH has developed a hearing loss prevention program for overcoming these respective barriers in an attempt to reduce NIHL in the mining industry. The program is comprised of four key programmatic areas: noise dose/source relationships; availability of effective noise control; worker education and empowerment; and communication issues. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Incorporating Mythic and Interpretive Analysis in the Investigation of Hearing Loss on the Family Farm

    Meister, Mark; Hest, Theresa; Burnett, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Despite knowing about the dangers of hearing loss, farmers typically choose not to protect their hearing. Examining the myth of farm life, this study aims to discern whether rhetorical myths influence farmers' decisions to wear hearing protection. Researchers conducted 40 interviews with farmers regarding farm life and hearing loss. Results…

  16. Cognitive autonomy among adolescents with and without hearing loss: Associations with perceived social support.

    Michael, Rinat; Attias, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive autonomy is a skill which may help adolescents prepare for important decisions in adulthood. The current study examined the associations between cognitive autonomy and perceived social support among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Participants were 177 students: 55 were deaf and hard of hearing (dhh) and 122 were hearing. They completed the Cognitive Autonomy and Self-Evaluation Inventory, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and a demographic questionnaire. Significant positive correlations were found between some of the cognitive autonomy variables and some of the perceived social support variables. However, among the dhh group, they were fewer and weaker. Family support was found to be a significant predictor of three out of the five cognitive autonomy variables. In addition, significant differences were found between the dhh and hearing participants in some of the cognitive autonomy variables, but not in perceived social support. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:26874208

  17. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: The Question of Perilymph Fistula.

    Backous, Douglas D.; Niparko, John K.

    1997-01-01

    Perilymph fistula (PLF) is an abnormal communication between the fluid-containing spaces of the inner ear and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone that can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, aural fullness, vertigo, and postural instability. Diagnosis of PLF and management of those with presumed PLF are discussed. (Contains extensive…

  18. Role of cochlear efferents in noise induced hearing loss

    Aran, J. M.; Popelář, Jiří; Smith, D. W.

    Cambridge : NOPHER, 2000, s. 10. [An International Symposium on noise induced hearing loss. Cambridge (GB), 07.07.2000-10.07.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/97/0830; GA MZd NK4747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  19. Otoacoustic Emissions in an Adult with Severe Hearing Loss.

    Prieve, Beth A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the unexpected finding of evoked otoacoustic emissions from one ear of a subject with severe-to-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. It is suggested that the subject may have a group of surviving outer hair cells in some regions of the left cochlea with corresponding inner hair cell or neural damage. (Author/DB)

  20. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Occupational Noise Exposure: Effects of Age-Corrections

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (NIPTS were computed from retrospective audiometric analyses by subtracting aging effects on hearing sensitivity in sixty-eight patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who reported significant occupational noise exposure histories. There were significant effects of age on NIPTS but no significant gender- or ear- differences in terms of NIPTS. The NIPTS at 2,000 Hz was found to be significantly greater than NIPTS at frequencies 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, and 8,000 Hz. Defined noise notches were seen in the audiograms of 38/136 (27% ears with SNHL. Results support models that suggest interactive effects of aging and noise on sensorineural hearing loss in ears with occupational noise exposure.

  1. Management of Children with Mild, Moderate, and Moderately Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Tharpe, Anne Marie; Gustafson, Samantha

    2015-12-01

    Any degree of hearing loss can have a negative impact on child development. The amount of impact is largely determined by the type, quality, and timeliness of intervention. Early identification and management of hearing loss is essential for minimizing the impact of hearing loss and ensuring that children can reach their cognitive, linguistic, educational, and social potential. Advances in hearing technology and broadening of candidacy for same, have resulted in improved outcomes for many children with hearing loss. Through ongoing hearing monitoring throughout childhood, children with congenital, late-onset, or progressive losses can receive timely management from interprofessional, collaborative teams. PMID:26433444

  2. Factors increasing the risk for hearing loss in 'pop' musicians.

    Axelsson, A; Lindgren, F

    1977-01-01

    Hearing thresholds were determined in 83 'pop' musicians with an average age of 26 years, average exposure time of 9 years and average weekly exposure time of 18 hours. The following factors had a statistically significant influence (p 95) on hearing: ageing, brief exposure per session, long exposure time in years (2 kHz), participation in military service (250 Hz), listening to pop music with head phones (2 kHz). PMID:929089

  3. Functional Evaluation of GJB2 Variants in Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Kyu Yup; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Kyeong; Chang, Qing; Park, Hong-Joon; Jeon, Chang-Jin; Lin, Xi; Bok, Jinwoong; Kim, Un-kyung

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gap junction ?2 (GJB2) gene, encoding the connexin26 (CX26) protein, are the most common cause of non-syndromic hearing loss (HL) in many populations. In the East Asian population, two variants, p.V27I (c.79G>A) and p.E114G (c.341G>A), are considered benign polymorphisms since these variants have been identified in both HL patients and normal hearing controls. However, some studies have postulated that homozygotes carrying both p.V27I and p.E114G variants could cause HL. To e...

  4. "PARAMETERS AFFECTING NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS IN INDUSTRY"

    D. Parvizpour

    1977-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on a study conducted in three different industries on 84.4 on their employees to determine the effect of over all noise intensity, length of employment and rest periods among them. It was found that the mentioned factors have direct effect on the induced hearing loss among the exposed workers. High noise level and long period of employment adversely affect the hearing ability while the breaks taken during daily working hours have prevented the expected defect.

  5. Antioxidant vitamins and magnesium and the risk of hearing loss in the US general population1234

    Choi, Yoon-Hyeong; Miller, Josef M; Tucker, Katherine L; Hu, Howard; Park, Sung Kyun

    2013-01-01

    Background: The protective effects of antioxidant vitamins on hearing loss are well established in animal studies but in few human studies. Recent animal studies suggest that magnesium intake along with antioxidants may act in synergy to prevent hearing loss.

  6. Auditory Function and Hearing Loss in Children and Adults with Williams Syndrome: Cochlear Impairment in Individuals with Otherwise Normal Hearing

    Marler, Jeffrey A.; Sitcovsky, Jessica L.; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Kistler, Doris J.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss is common in school-age individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and extensive in adults. Prior studies with relatively small sample sizes suggest that hearing loss in WS has an early onset and may be progressive, yet the auditory phenotype and the scope of the hearing loss have not been adequately characterized. We used standard audiometric tools: Otoscopy, tympanometry, air-conduction (bone conduction when available) behavioral testing, and distortion product otoacoustic emissio...

  7. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL): literature review with a focus on occupational medicine

    Metidieri, Mirella Melo; Rodrigues, Hugo Fernandes Santos; Oliveira Filho, Francisco José Motta Barros de; Ferraz, Daniela Pereira; Almeida Neto, Antonio Fausto de; Torres, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    According to the Ministry of Health (2006), Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is hearing loss caused by prolonged exposure to noise. It is characterized as sensorineural hearing loss and is usually bilateral, irreversible, and progressive while the exposure to noise continues. A NIHL is a predictable and preventable disease with an epidemiologically relevant prevalence in urban communities. The hearing loss begins and predominates in the frequencies of 3, 4, and 6 kHz and eventually progresse...

  8. Noise-induced hearing loss in children: A ‘less than silent’ environmental danger

    Harrison, Robert V

    2008-01-01

    A review of the problems of noise-induced hearing loss in children, especially related to recreational music and the use of personal entertainment devices. The pathophysiology of noise-induced hearing loss and its associated problems (eg, tinnitus) are discussed. The evidence for an increase in noise-induced hearing loss in children and young people is reviewed. Some practical advice (for clinicians, caregivers and children) on hearing loss prevention is provided.

  9. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.; Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Thomsen, J.; Caye-Thomasen, P.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...... generated conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to determine whether systemic steroid treatment had an effect on hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis....

  10. Noise induced hearing loss risk assessment in truck drivers

    Ali Karimi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing sense is one of the key elements which may have impact on the driver′s task quality. This cross-sectional study investigates the hearing status of 500 truck drivers by pure tone audiometry (AC in one of the cities in Fars province, Iran. Hearing threshold levels of the subjects were measured in frequencies of 500Hz-8000Hz. Screening and determination of permanent threshold shift (PTS was the first aim of this study. Hence tests were done at least 16 hours after any exposure to noticeable sound. The effect of age as a confounding factor was considered using ISO equation and subtracted from whole hearing threshold. The threshold of 25 dB HL and above was considered abnormal but the calculation of hearing was also carried out using 0 dB HL as reference. Subjects were categorized into two groups on the basis of working experience and the hearing threshold of 25 dB was considered a boundary of normal hearing sense. The results of Pearson Chi-Square test showed that working experience as an independent variable has significant contributing effect on hearing thresholds of truck drivers in frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz (p greater than 0.05. Also, it was shown that currently nine and 12.6 % of truck drivers suffer from impaired hearing sense in left and right respectively (hearing threshold level greater than 25 dB in mid frequencies (500, 1000, 2000 Hz and 45% in high frequencies of both ears (4000 and 8000 Hz. The results indicated that hearing damage of professional drivers was expected to occur sooner at 4000 and 8000 Hz than lower frequencies. Finally it was deduced that the occupational conditions of truck drivers may have bilateral, symmetrical harmful effect on hearing threshold sense in all frequencies mainly in frequency of 4000 Hz, so health surveillance programs such as education and periodic medical examinations are emphasized for pre-diagnosing and prevention of any possible impairment and an urgent need to take up some interventions such as better maintenance of roads, automobile industry efforts to reduce the noise level emission of vehicles and reducing number of working hours per day of drivers are highlighted to improve the harmful working conditions of truck drivers.

  11. SOD1 gene polymorphisms in sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Kitoh, Ryosuke; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Ogawa, Kaoru; Okamoto, Makito; Kitamura, Ken; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Sato, Hiroaki; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Satoshi; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Hara, Akira; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion The results suggest that SOD1 rs4998557 could be associated with susceptibility to SSNHL in the Japanese population. Objectives To assess the gene association with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). Methods A two-stage case control study was conducted to explore the relationship of the candidate genes to SSNHL. The 192 gene samples from SSNHL patients registered in the intractable inner ear disease gene bank were enrolled. As the candidate genes, 39 SNPs from 31 genes were selected for the first stage study. The second stage study examined whether the SOD1 gene polymorphisms, defined by significant differences between cases and controls in the first stage study, are associated with SSNHL. Results Significant differences were observed in four SNPs from three genes, Glutathione-S-transferase pai 1 (GSTP1), proteine kinase C heta (PRKCH), and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), in terms of allele frequency between SSNHL patients and HapMap controls. In the SOD1 gene, a significant difference was observed in the dominant model study of the SNP rs4998557 in the second stage study. Furthermore, as a result of dividing SSNHL patients based on the clinical data, the difference was more apparent in the case of the over 60 dB group and the tinnitus-positive group. PMID:26882452

  12. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss. Forty consecutive patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (20 males and 20 females; age range 11-82 years), 40 age-matched control subjects, and 5 patients with Meniere's disease were examined using the same imaging protocol on a 1.5-T MR system. Pre- and post-contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3D SPGR; TR/TE=23/10 ms, no. of excitations=1, flip angle=30 ) images were obtained using a voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm3. Contrast enhancement in the area of the endolymphatic sac was assessed by two radiologists, and the frequency of contrast enhancement was compared between the three study groups. Enhancement of the ipsilateral endolymphatic sac was observed in 30 of the 40 patients with sudden hearing loss (75%). Twenty of these 30 patients also showed enhancement on the contralateral side, and 1 patient showed enhancement only on the contralateral side. Only 1 of the 5 patients with Meniere's disease showed enhancement. Nine of the 40 control subjects (22.5%) showed enhancement (bilateral enhancement in 5 subjects, unilateral in 4). The frequency of enhancement in patients with sudden hearing loss was significantly higher than that in control subjects (P<0.0001) or patients with Meniere's disease (P<0.05). The frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac is significantly increased in patients with sudden hearing loss, but further study is necessary to clarify the relationship between this finding and the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. (orig.)

  13. Health Seeking Behavior among Parents of Children with Hearing Loss: A Cross Sectional Study

    Hiteshree C Patel, Mohua Moitra, Anjali Modi, Rahul Patel, S L Kantharia, Ishwar M Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevalence of hearing loss is 11.7% of the school going population (5-15 years. Such children fail to develop speech, language and cognitive skills unless proper habilitation is initiated. If detected early and managed suitably, will have a far better chance at a normal life than those who are habilitated late or not at all. Aims & objectives: To detect the age of suspicion, identification, intervention and treatment seeking behavior of children with hearing loss. Materials & methods: This was a cross- sectional study done in Children between 5 and 15 years age-group with hearing loss, coming to an ENT OPD, New Civil Hospital, Surat during the period of 1st August 2011 to 31 July 2012. Results: A total of 246 children were studied. Mean age of the study population was 9±3.46 years. Average age at first suspicion of hearing loss was 2.9±1.7 years, first consultation was 3.5±1.5 years and first intervention was 7.8±3.3 years. There was significant association between age of first suspicion of congenital hearing loss with father’s occupation (p=0.03. There was significant association between delay in diagnosis and gender (p= 0.04. As the level of education of parents and socio- economic status increased, preference for private set ups for first consultation also increased (p< 0.05. In 63.5% cases, advice of general practitioner resulted in the delay in referral to ENT specialist. Conclusion & Recommendations: Even after primary care, an average gap of 4.3 years is observed among parents for receiving intervention. Mother is the first person to suspect hearing loss among their children. Basic training of general practitioner/ MBBS doctors regarding primary ear care is required.

  14. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss

    Naganawa, Shinji; Koshikawa, Tokiko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine (Japan); Nakashima, Tsutomu [Department of Otolayngology, Nagoya University School of Medicine (Japan); Ichinose, Nobuyasu [Toshiba Nasu Operations, Tochigi (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac in patients with sudden hearing loss. Forty consecutive patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (20 males and 20 females; age range 11-82 years), 40 age-matched control subjects, and 5 patients with Meniere's disease were examined using the same imaging protocol on a 1.5-T MR system. Pre- and post-contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3D SPGR; TR/TE=23/10 ms, no. of excitations=1, flip angle=30 ) images were obtained using a voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm{sup 3}. Contrast enhancement in the area of the endolymphatic sac was assessed by two radiologists, and the frequency of contrast enhancement was compared between the three study groups. Enhancement of the ipsilateral endolymphatic sac was observed in 30 of the 40 patients with sudden hearing loss (75%). Twenty of these 30 patients also showed enhancement on the contralateral side, and 1 patient showed enhancement only on the contralateral side. Only 1 of the 5 patients with Meniere's disease showed enhancement. Nine of the 40 control subjects (22.5%) showed enhancement (bilateral enhancement in 5 subjects, unilateral in 4). The frequency of enhancement in patients with sudden hearing loss was significantly higher than that in control subjects (P<0.0001) or patients with Meniere's disease (P<0.05). The frequency of contrast enhancement of the endolymphatic sac is significantly increased in patients with sudden hearing loss, but further study is necessary to clarify the relationship between this finding and the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. (orig.)

  15. Physiological assessment of speech and voice production of adults with hearing loss.

    Higgins, M B; Carney, A E; Schulte, L

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the impact of hearing loss on phonatory, velopharyngeal, and articulatory functioning using a comprehensive physiological approach. Electroglottograph (EGG), nasal/oral air flow, and intraoral air pressure signals were recorded simultaneously from adults with impaired and normal hearing as they produced syllables and words of varying physiological difficulty. The individuals with moderate-to-profound hearing loss had good to excellent oral communication skills. Intraoral pressure, nasal air flow, durations of lip, velum, and vocal fold articulations, estimated subglottal pressure, mean phonatory air flow, fundamental frequency, and EGG abduction quotient were compared between the two subject groups. Data from the subjects with hearing loss also were compared across aided and unaided conditions to investigate the influence of auditory feedback on speech motor control. The speakers with hearing loss had significantly higher intraoral pressures, subglottal pressures, laryngeal resistances, and fundamental frequencies than those with normal hearing. There was notable between-subject variability. All of the individuals with profound hearing loss had at least one speech/voice physiology measure that fell outside of the normal range, and most of the subjects demonstrated unique clusters of abnormal behaviors. Abnormal behaviors were more evident in the phonatory than articulatory or velopharyngeal systems and were generally consistent with vocal fold hyperconstriction. There was evidence from individual data that vocal fold posturing influenced articulatory timing. The results did not support the idea that the speech production skills of adults with moderate-to-profound hearing loss who are good oral communicators deteriorate when there are increased motoric demands on the velopharyngeal and phonatory mechanism. Although no significant differences were found between the aided and unaided conditions, 7 of 10 subjects showed the same direction of change for subglottal pressure, intraoral pressure, nasal air flow, and the duration of lip and vocal fold articulations. We conclude that physiological assessments provide important information about the speech/voice production abilities of individuals with moderate-to-profound hearing loss and are a valuable addition to standard assessment batteries. PMID:8084183

  16. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Shima Arastou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL patients with poor prognostic factors.     Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay between the onset of hearing loss and initiation of therapy were included in this study. Patients were randomized to the intervention group (combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy or the control group (systemic steroid therapy alone. All patients received oral treatment with systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day for 10 days, acyclovir (2 g/day for 10 days, divided into four doses, triamterene H (daily, and omeprazole (daily, during steroid treatment, and were advised to follow a low salt diet. The intervention group also received intratympanic dexamethasone injections (0.4 ml of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone two times a week for two consecutive weeks (four injections in total. A significant hearing improvement was defined as at least a 15-db decrease in pure tone average (PTA.  Results: Among all participants, 44 patients (57.14% showed significant improvement in hearing evaluation. More patients showed hearing improvement in the intervention group than in the control group (27 patients (75% versus 17 patients (41.4%, respectively; P = 0.001.  Conclusion:  The combination of intratympanic dexamethasone and systemic prednisolone is more effective than systemic prednisolone alone in the treatment of poor-prognosis SSNHL.

  17. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Shima Arastou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL patients with poor prognostic factors.     Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay between the onset of hearing loss and initiation of therapy were included in this study. Patients were randomized to the intervention group (combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy or the control group (systemic steroid therapy alone. All patients received oral treatment with systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day for 10 days, acyclovir (2 g/day for 10 days, divided into four doses, triamterene H (daily, and omeprazole (daily, during steroid treatment, and were advised to follow a low salt diet. The intervention group also received intratympanic dexamethasone injections (0.4 ml of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone two times a week for two consecutive weeks (four injections in total. A significant hearing improvement was defined as at least a 15-db decrease in pure tone average (PTA.  Results: Among all participants, 44 patients (57.14% showed significant improvement in hearing evaluation. More patients showed hearing improvement in the intervention group than in the control group (27 patients (75% versus 17 patients (41.4%, respectively; P = 0.001.  Conclusion:  The combination of intratympanic dexamethasone and systemic prednisolone is more effective than systemic prednisolone alone in the treatment of poor-prognosis SSNHL.

  18. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Arastou, Shima; Tajedini, Ardavan; Borghei, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) patients with poor prognostic factors. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay between the onset of hearing loss and initiation of therapy) were included in this study. Patients were randomized to the intervention group (combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy) or the control group (systemic steroid therapy alone). All patients received oral treatment with systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day for 10 days), acyclovir (2 g/day for 10 days, divided into four doses), triamterene H (daily), and omeprazole (daily, during steroid treatment), and were advised to follow a low salt diet. The intervention group also received intratympanic dexamethasone injections (0.4 ml of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone) two times a week for two consecutive weeks (four injections in total). A significant hearing improvement was defined as at least a 15-db decrease in pure tone average (PTA). Results: Among all participants,44 patients(57.14%) showed significant improvement in hearing evaluation. More patients showed hearing improvement in the intervention group than in the control group (27 patients (75%) versus 17 patients (41.4%), respectively; P=0.001). Conclusion: The combination of intratympanic dexamethasone and systemic prednisolone is more effective than systemic prednisolone alone in the treatment of poor-prognosis SSNHL. PMID:24303415

  19. Perda auditiva genética Genetic hearing loss

    Ricardo Godinho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O progresso das pesquisas relacionadas à perda auditiva genética tem provocado um importante avanço do entendimento dos mecanismos moleculares que governam o desenvolvimento, a função, a resposta ao trauma e o envelhecimento do ouvido interno. Em países desenvolvidos, mais de 50% dos casos de surdez na infância é causada por alterações genéticas e as perdas auditivas relacionadas à idade têm sido associadas com mecanismos genéticos. OBJETIVO: O objetivo desta revisão é relatar as informações mais recentes relacionadas às perdas audtivas de origem genética. FORAMA DE ESTUDO: Revisão sistemática. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: A revisão da literatura inclui artigos indexados à MEDLINE (Biblioteca Nacional de Saúde, NIH-USA e publicados nos últimos 3 anos, além das informações disponíveis na Hereditary Hearing Loss Home Page. CONCLUSÃO: Os recentes avanços no entendimento das perdas auditivas de origem genética têm favorecido a nossa compreensão da função auditiva e tornado o diagnóstico mais apurado. Possivelmente, no futuro, este conhecimento também proporcionará o desenvolvimento de novas terapias para o tratamento das causas genéticas das perdas auditivas.The progress in the research of genetic hearing loss has advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern inner ear development, function and response to injury and aging. In the developed world, over 50% of childhood deafness is attributable to genetic causes and even age-related hearing loss has been associated with genetic mechanisms. AIM: The objective of this review is to summarize recent knowledge in genetic hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Sistematic review. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The literature review included articles indexed at MEDLINE (The National Library of Medicine, The National Institute of Health - USA focusing on publications from the past 3 years plus the information available at the Hereditary Hearing Loss Home Page. CONCLUSION: Advances in the genetics of hearing loss have enhanced our comprehension of auditory function and have enabled more accurate diagnosis. Hopefully, as we further understand the molecular elements of the auditory system, this knowledge will help in the development of new therapies for the treatment of the underlying genetic defects.

  20. Prevention of Adolescents' Music-Induced Hearing Loss due to Discotheque Attendance: A Delphi Study

    Vogel, I.; Brug, J.; Van der Ploeg, C. P. B.; Raat, H.

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a significant social and public health problem, which is found in increasing numbers of adolescents. Young people are particularly likely to expose themselves to potentially damaging loud sounds during leisure activities. Visiting discotheques is one of the most popular leisure activities of young people. Only a few…

  1. Enhancing Theory-of-Mind Discourse among Deaf Parents of Children with Hearing Loss

    Ziv, Margalit; Meir, Irit; Malky, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Children with hearing loss often have difficulties in the socio-emotional domain that can be attributed to a significant delay in the development of theory of mind (ToM). The current article describes a workshop aimed at enhancing deaf parents' awareness of the importance of ToM development and enriching parent-child conversations with…

  2. Evaluation of the risk of noise-induced hearing loss among unscreened male industrial workers

    Prince, Mary M.; Gilbert, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall J.; Stayner, Leslie T.

    2003-02-01

    Variability in background risk and distribution of various risk factors for hearing loss may explain some of the diversity in excess risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). This paper examines the impact of various risk factors on excess risk estimates of NIHL using data from the 1968-1972 NIOSH Occupational Noise and Hearing Survey (ONHS). Previous analyses of a subset of these data focused on 1172 highly ``screened'' workers. In the current analysis, an additional 894 white males (609 noise-exposed and 285 controls), who were excluded for various reasons (i.e., nonoccupational noise exposure, otologic or medical conditions affecting hearing, prior occupational noise exposure) have been added (n=2066) to assess excess risk of noise-induced material impairment in an unscreened population. Data are analyzed by age, duration of exposure, and sound level (8-h TWA) for four different definitions of noise-induced hearing impairment, defined as the binaural pure-tone average (PTA) hearing threshold level greater than 25 dB for the following frequencies: (a) 1-4 kHz (PTA1234), (b) 1-3 kHz (PTA123), (c) 0.5, 1, and 2 kHz (PTA512), and (d) 3, 4, and 6 kHz (PTA346). Results indicate that populations with higher background risks of hearing loss may show lower excess risks attributable to noise relative to highly screened populations. Estimates of lifetime excess risk of hearing impairment were found to be significantly different between screened and unscreened population for noise levels greater than 90 dBA. Predicted age-related risk of material hearing impairment in the ONHS unscreened population was similar to that predicted from Annex B and C of ANSI S3.44 for ages less than 60 years. Results underscore the importance of understanding differential risk patterns for hearing loss and the use of appropriate reference (control) populations when evaluating risk of noise-induced hearing impairment among contemporary industrial populations.

  3. Survey of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Health in Professional Drivers

    Izadi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise from traffic is a major source of environmental pollution in different countries. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of noise on professional drivers’ health and hearing loss in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional descriptive and analytic study was performed on 1901 professional drivers referred to one of the authorized occupational health clinics in Tehran, Iran, in 2011. Basic demographic data including height, weight and age were recorded. Moreover, body mass index (BMI, cholesterol, triglycerides and audiometry tests were performed. Results The results of BMI showed that the 44.7% of professional drivers were overweight, 16.7 % moderately obese and 4.2% were severely obese. Cholesterol of drivers, 27.3% was border line high risk and 13.3% high-risk. Triglycerides of drivers, 19.5% were border line high risk and 25.8% high-risk. The mean age of the drivers, cholesterol, triglycerides and BMI were 41.56 ± 10.57, 193.12 ± 42.63, 176.21 ± 118.21 and 26.89 ± 4.29, respectively. The rates of hearing loss in high audiometric frequencies were more than at low audiometric frequencies. Hearing loss in older drivers was more and this was due to the long exposure to noise pollution. Conclusions Due to the long exposure to the loud noise during the day, hearing loss in drivers is significant. The left ear displays greater loss than the right ear. Therefore, strategies to prevent hearing loss in drivers could include education, lifestyle changes and compliance issues related to hearing health, use of personal protective equipment, conducting periodic examinations and early treatment .

  4. MR imaging of 495 consecutive cases with sensorineural hearing loss

    495 consecutive patients with SNHL and 120 age-matched healthy controls were examined. Spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were used with 1.5 T equipment. An intracranial abnormality was found in 211 (42.6%) of the patients with 95 (19.2%) along the acoustic pathway. Eleven of the 95 patients had sensory hearing loss while 84 had neural hearing loss with the retrocochlear auditory pathway affected by lesions. In 62 of the 84 patients, the internal acoustic canal and cerebellopontine angle were involved. Twenty-two patients had intra-axial lesions. The controls had no pathologic changes along the auditory pathway. (orig./UG)

  5. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with a factitious disorder.

    Maruyama, Ayako; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Ito, Taku; Narushima, Kenji; Kitamura, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Factitious disorders are characterized by intentionally abnormal physical and/or psychological behavior, and affected patients often make up their symptoms and clinical histories. The most serious and chronic type of factitious disorder is Munchausen syndrome. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman with a 2-year history of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) who later confessed to feigning her hearing loss. She was eventually diagnosed with a factitious disorder. During those 2 years, she was able to induce her SNHL by exposing herself to excessive noise or high doses of aspirin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing an association between a factitious disorder and SNHL. PMID:26670765

  6. Developmental plasticity of spatial hearing following asymmetric hearing loss: context-dependent cue integration and its clinical implications

    Andrew J King

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Under normal hearing conditions, comparisons of the sounds reaching each ear are critical for accurate sound localization. Asymmetric hearing loss should therefore degrade spatial hearing and has become an important experimental tool for probing the plasticity of the auditory system, both during development and adulthood. In clinical populations, hearing loss affecting one ear more than the other is commonly associated with otitis media with effusion, a disorder experienced by approximately 80% of children before the age of two. Asymmetric hearing may also arise in other clinical situations, such as after unilateral cochlear implantation. Here, we consider the role played by spatial cue integration in sound localization under normal acoustical conditions. We then review evidence for adaptive changes in spatial hearing following a developmental hearing loss in one ear, and argue that adaptation may be achieved either by learning a new relationship between the altered cues and directions in space or by changing the way different cues are integrated in the brain. We next consider developmental plasticity as a source of vulnerability, describing maladaptive effects of asymmetric hearing loss that persist even when normal hearing is provided. We also examine the extent to which the consequences of asymmetric hearing loss depend upon its timing and duration. Although much of the experimental literature has focused on the effects of a stable unilateral hearing loss, some of the most common hearing impairments experienced by children tend to fluctuate over time. We therefore argue that there is a need to bridge this gap by investigating the effects of recurring hearing loss during development, and outline recent steps in this direction. We conclude by arguing that this work points toward a more nuanced view of developmental plasticity, in which plasticity may be selectively expressed in response to specific sensory contexts, and consider the clinical implications of this.

  7. Acrylonitrile Potentiates Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Rat

    Fechter, Laurence D.; Gearhart, Caroline; Shirwany, Najeeb A

    2003-01-01

    Acrylonitrile, one of the 50 most commonly produced industrial chemicals, has recently been identified as a promoter of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). This agent has the potential to produce oxidative stress through multiple pathways. We hypothesize that acrylonitrile potentiates NIHL as a consequence of oxidative stress. The objectives of this study were to characterize acrylonitrile exposure conditions that promote permanent NIHL in rats and determine the ability of this nitrile to prod...

  8. A Clinical Analysis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Cases

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Lee, You Jae; Kang, Bo Sung; Lee, Byung Don; Lee, Ji Sung

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives High-dose systemic steroid therapy is the mainstay treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). Recovery rates from SSNHL range are about 47-63% and are influenced by various prognostic factors. To evaluate the prognostic value of specific clinical parameters, we reviewed 289 cases by clinical and statistical analysis. Subjects and Methods This study included 289 patients with SSNHL who visited the Department of Otolaryngology at Soonchunhyang University ...

  9. Vestibular Schwannoma in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal ...

  10. The Prevention of Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Children

    Harrison, Robert V

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, our acoustic environment is filled with amplified sound sources (e.g., MP3 players, video game stations, and sports/entertainment venues). There is serious concern and also some controversy about the risks of acoustic trauma in children. This overview provides some basic information on the physiological mechanisms that lead to noise induced hearing loss, a survey of various studies that, on balance, indicates that there is cause for concern, and finally a discussion on measures ...

  11. Gap-Junction Channels Dysfunction in Deafness and Hearing Loss

    MARTÍNEZ, Agustín D.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Figueroa, Vania; Maripillan, Jaime; Nicholson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Gap-junction channels connect the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, allowing the diffusion of ions and small metabolites. They are formed at the appositional plasma membranes by a family of related proteins named connexins. Mutations in connexins 26, 31, 30, 32, and 43 have been associated with nonsyndromic or syndromic deafness. The majority of these mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, but a few of them have been associated with dominantly inherited hearing loss. Mutations i...

  12. Munchausen Syndrome: A Case with Presenting Sudden Hearing Loss

    Murat Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Munchausen syndrome is a psychiatric disorder that patients direct professionals with plausible, feigned, factitious symptoms. It%u2019s uncommon in otolaryngology clinics. We present a patient, complaint with sudden hearing loss and vertigo, and who underwent additional medical and invasive treatment in this paper. Patients with Munchausen syndrome allow invasive medical care easily, and they can be very convincing. It has to be diagnosed and kept in mind because of avoiding from unnecessary treatment.

  13. Sensori-neural hearing loss following radiotherapy to the nasopharynx

    A retrospective study was done to ascertain the risks of cochlear damage from radiotherapy of the nasopharynx. Audiometric evaluation, pre- and post-radiotherapy, revealed that 7 out of 13 patients had sustained sensori-neural deafness. Contrary to what is generally believed of the resistance of the cochlea to radiotherapeutic damage, eventual loss of hearing can occasionally be expected in patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck tumors

  14. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    Okokhere Peter O; Ibekwe Titus S; Akpede George O

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented...

  15. Short-Term Outcomes of Acute Low-Tone Sensorineural Hearing Loss According to Treatment Modality

    Chang, Jinkyung; Yum, Gunhwee; Im, Ha-Young; Jung, Jong Yoon; Rah, Yoon Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We compared improvements in hearing thresholds in acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) patients after two different treatments: steroid alone and steroid and diuretic combined. We analyzed how the duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment affected hearing loss improvement and investigated the relation between presence of vertigo in ALHL patients and ALHL progression to Ménière's disease (MD). Subjects and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 47 ALHL patients aged 21 to 76 years. Patients received either orally administered steroid alone (n=12) or steroid and diuretic combined (n=35). We compared improvements in the two groups' hearing thresholds at three lower frequencies (125, 250, and 500 Hz) after participants had received one month of each respective treatment. Results Our two treatments did not show any statistical difference in hearing loss improvement after one month. Forty percent of ALHL patients with vertigo developed MD, which was a significantly higher rate than the 12.5% of ALHL patients without vertigo who developed MD. The shorter duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment significantly increased improvement in the sum of lower frequency hearing threshold after one month. Conclusions The current study suggests that steroid and diuretic administered together and steroid alone similarly improve the hearing threshold in ALHL patients after one month. We concluded that patients should initiate ALHL treatment as soon as they experience symptoms. ALHL patients should also be notified of their higher risk of developing MD.

  16. Occupational hearing loss of market mill workers in the city of Accra, Ghana

    Kitcher, Emmanuel D; Grace Ocansey; Benjamin Abaidoo; Alidu Atule

    2014-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is an irreversible sensorineural hearing loss associated with exposure to high levels of excessive noise. Prevention measures are not well established in developing countries. This comparative cross sectional study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in both a group of high risk workers and a control group and to assess their knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. A total of 101 market mill workers and 103 controls employed within m...

  17. Behavioral training promotes multiple adaptive processes following acute hearing loss

    Keating, Peter; Rosenior-Patten, Onayomi; Dahmen, Johannes C; Bell, Olivia; King, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The brain possesses a remarkable capacity to compensate for changes in inputs resulting from a range of sensory impairments. Developmental studies of sound localization have shown that adaptation to asymmetric hearing loss can be achieved either by reinterpreting altered spatial cues or by relying more on those cues that remain intact. Adaptation to monaural deprivation in adulthood is also possible, but appears to lack such flexibility. Here we show, however, that appropriate behavioral training enables monaurally-deprived adult humans to exploit both of these adaptive processes. Moreover, cortical recordings in ferrets reared with asymmetric hearing loss suggest that these forms of plasticity have distinct neural substrates. An ability to adapt to asymmetric hearing loss using multiple adaptive processes is therefore shared by different species and may persist throughout the lifespan. This highlights the fundamental flexibility of neural systems, and may also point toward novel therapeutic strategies for treating sensory disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12264.001 PMID:27008181

  18. Transforming growth factor ?1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Contreras, Julio; Celaya, Adelaida M.; Camarero, Guadalupe; Rivera, Teresa; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-? as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-?1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-?1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-?1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage. PMID:25852546

  19. Transforming growth factor β1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Silvia Murillo-Cuesta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor ß (TGF-ß is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-ß as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss, we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-ß1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-ß1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-ß1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage.

  20. Pure tone audiograms and possible aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in belugas (Delphinapterus leucas)

    Finneran, James J.; Carder, Donald A.; Dear, Randall; Belting, Traci; McBain, Jim; Dalton, Les; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2005-06-01

    A behavioral response paradigm was used to measure pure-tone hearing sensitivities in two belugas (Delphinapterus leucas). Tests were conducted over a 20-month period at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, in Tacoma, WA. Subjects were two males, aged 8-10 and 9-11 during the course of the study. Subjects were born in an oceanarium and had been housed together for all of their lives. Hearing thresholds were measured using a modified up/down staircase procedure and acoustic response paradigm where subjects were trained to produce audible responses to test tones and to remain quiet otherwise. Test frequencies ranged from approximately 2 to 130 kHz. Best sensitivities ranged from approximately 40 to 50 dB re 1 μPa at 50-80 kHz and 30-35 kHz for the two subjects. Although both subjects possessed traditional ``U-shaped'' mammalian audiograms, one subject exhibited significant high-frequency hearing loss above 37 kHz compared to previously published data for belugas. Hearing loss in this subject was estimated to approach 90 dB for frequencies above 50 kHz. Similar ages, ancestry, and environmental conditions between subjects, but a history of ototoxic drug administration in only one subject, suggest that the observed hearing loss was a result of the aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin. .

  1. Childhood sensorineural hearing loss: effects of combined exposure with aging or noise exposure later in life.

    Aarhus, Lisa; Tambs, Kristian; Nafstad, Per; Bjørgan, Eskil; Engdahl, Bo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to examine childhood high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (HF-SNHL) and the effects of combined exposure with aging or noise exposure on HF hearing thresholds in adulthood. Population-based cohort study of 30,003 adults (mean age 40 years) underwent an audiometry and completed a hearing questionnaire. At age 7-13 years, the same people had participated in a longitudinal school hearing investigation, in which 283 participants were diagnosed with HF-SNHL [PTA 3-8 kHz ≥ 25 dB HL (mean 45 dB HL), worse hearing ear], and 29,720 participants had normal hearing thresholds. The effect of childhood HF-SNHL on adult hearing threshold was significantly moderated by age. Age stratified analyses showed that the difference in HF hearing thresholds between adults with and without childhood HF-SNHL was 33 dB (95 % CI 31-34) in young adults (n = 173, aged 20-39 years) and 37 dB (95 % CI 34-39) in middle-aged adults (n = 110, aged 40-56 years). The combined exposure of childhood HF-SNHL and noise exposure showed a simple additive effect. It appears to be a super-additive effect of childhood-onset HF-SNHL and aging on adult hearing thresholds. An explanation might be that already damaged hair cells are more susceptible to age-related degeneration. To exclude possible birth cohort effects, the finding should be confirmed by a study with several audiometries in adulthood. PMID:25975623

  2. Neuro-rehabilitation Approach for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Sekiya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing loss. The estimated incidence rate is 5-30 cases per 100,000 people per year. The causes of SSHL and the mechanisms underlying SSHL currently remain unknown. Based on several hypotheses such as a circulatory disturbance to the cochlea, viral infection, and autoimmune disease, pharmaco-therapeutic approaches have been applied to treat SSHL patients; however, the efficacy of the standard treatment, corticosteroid therapy, is still under debate. Exposure to intense sounds has been shown to cause permanent damage to the auditory system; however, exposure to a moderate level enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma may reduce hearing impairments. Several neuroimaging studies recently suggested that the onset of SSHL induced maladaptive cortical reorganization in the human auditory cortex, and that the degree of cortical reorganization in the acute SSHL phase negatively correlated with the recovery rate from hearing loss. This article reports the development of a novel neuro-rehabilitation approach for SSHL, "constraint-induced sound therapy (CIST)". The aim of the CIST protocol is to prevent or reduce maladaptive cortical reorganization by using an enriched acoustic environment. The canal of the intact ear of SSHL patients is plugged in order to motivate them to actively use the affected ear and thereby prevent progress of maladaptive cortical reorganization. The affected ear is also exposed to music via a headphone for 6 hr per day during hospitalization. The CIST protocol appears to be a safe, easy, inexpensive, and effective treatment for SSHL. PMID:26863274

  3. Neuro-rehabilitation Approach for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Sekiya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing loss. The estimated incidence rate is 5-30 cases per 100,000 people per year. The causes of SSHL and the mechanisms underlying SSHL currently remain unknown. Based on several hypotheses such as a circulatory disturbance to the cochlea, viral infection, and autoimmune disease, pharmaco-therapeutic approaches have been applied to treat SSHL patients; however, the efficacy of the standard treatment, corticosteroid therapy, is still under debate. Exposure to intense sounds has been shown to cause permanent damage to the auditory system; however, exposure to a moderate level enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma may reduce hearing impairments. Several neuroimaging studies recently suggested that the onset of SSHL induced maladaptive cortical reorganization in the human auditory cortex, and that the degree of cortical reorganization in the acute SSHL phase negatively correlated with the recovery rate from hearing loss. This article reports the development of a novel neuro-rehabilitation approach for SSHL, "constraint-induced sound therapy (CIST)". The aim of the CIST protocol is to prevent or reduce maladaptive cortical reorganization by using an enriched acoustic environment. The canal of the intact ear of SSHL patients is plugged in order to motivate them to actively use the affected ear and thereby prevent progress of maladaptive cortical reorganization. The affected ear is also exposed to music via a headphone for 6 hr per day during hospitalization. The CIST protocol appears to be a safe, easy, inexpensive, and effective treatment for SSHL. PMID:26863274

  4. Hearing loss in the developing world: Evaluating the iPhone mobile device as a screening tool

    S, Peer; J J, Fagan.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developing countries have the world's highest prevalence of hearing loss, and hearing screening programmes are scarce. Mobile devices such as smartphones have potential for audiometric testing.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the uHear app using an Apple iPhone as a possible hearing screening too [...] l in the developing world, and to determine accuracy of certain hearing thresholds that could prove useful in early detection of hearing loss for high-risk populations in resource-poor communities.METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study design. Participants recruited from the Otolaryngology Clinic, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, completed a uHear test in three settings - waiting room (WR), quiet room (QR) and soundproof room (SR). Thresholds were compared with formal audiograms.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were tested (50 ears). The uHear test detected moderate or worse hearing loss (pure-tone average (PTA) >40 dB) accurately with a sensitivity of 100% in all three environments. Specificity was 88% (SR), 73% (QR) and 68% (WR). It was highly accurate in detecting high-frequency hearing loss (2 000, 4 000, 6 000 Hz) in the QR and SR with 'good' and 'very good' kappa values, showing statistical significance (p40 dB). It is highly sensitive for detecting threshold changes at high frequencies, making it reasonably well suited to detect presbycusis and ototoxic hearing loss from HIV, tuberculosis therapy and chemotherapy. Portability and ease of use make it appropriate to use in developing world communities that lack screening programmes.

  5. Synergistic effects of free radical scavengers and cochlear vasodilators: a new otoprotective strategy for age-related hearing loss

    Juan Carlos Alvarado; Miller, Josef M

    2015-01-01

    The growing increase in age-related hearing loss (ARHL), with its dramatic reduction in quality of life and significant increase in health care costs, is a catalyst to develop new therapeutic strategies to prevent or reduce this aging-associated condition. In this regard, there is extensive evidence that excessive free radical formation along with diminished cochlear blood flow are essential factors involved in mechanisms of other stress-related hearing loss, such as that associated with nois...

  6. Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children with Peripheral Hearing Loss

    Koravand, Amineh; Jutras, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss. Method: Forty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task in which…

  7. The Relationship between Language Development and Behaviour Problems in Children with Hearing Loss

    Stevenson, Jim; McCann, Donna; Watkin, Peter; Worsfold, Sarah; Kennedy, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Background: There are well-replicated findings that link poor development on a range of communication skills with increased behavioural problems. This paper examines this relationship in children with hearing loss. Method: One hundred and twenty children with hearing loss (67 boys, 53 girls) and 63 hearing children (37 boys, 26 girls) with a mean…

  8. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    Plontke, S.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined exposure of noise and chemicals. Based on the epidemiological and pathophysiological findings and against the background of published animal-experimental, pre-clinical and clinical findings, the various approaches for prevention, protection and therapeutic intervention with acoustic trauma are discussed. Pharmacological strategies involving anti-oxidative, anti-excitotoxic and anti-apoptotic substances as well as non-pharmacological strategies like "sound conditioning" are given attention. Furthermore, systemic and local substance application as well as the therapy of acute acoustic trauma and chronic hearing problems (including modern therapy forms for comorbidities such as tinnitus shall be delved into.

  9. Improvement of sudden bilateral hearing loss after vertebral artery stenting.

    Kim, Ji Hwa; Roh, Kyung Jin; Suh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral deafness is a rare but possible symptom of vertebrobasilar ischemia. We report a case of sudden bilateral sensorineural hearing loss caused by bilateral vertebral artery (VA) occlusion which dramatically improved after stenting. A 54-year-old man was admitted with sudden onset of bilateral deafness, vertigo, and drowsy mental status. Brain diffusion-weighted MRI showed acute infarction involving both the posterior inferior cerebellar artery and left posterior cerebral artery territory. Cerebral angiography showed bilateral distal VA occlusion, and emergency intracranial stenting was performed in the left VA. After reperfusion therapy his symptoms gradually improved, including hearing impairment. Endovascular stenting may be helpful in a patient with sudden deafness caused by bilateral VA occlusion. PMID:25712982

  10. [Occupational hearing loss--problem of health and safety].

    Denisov, É I; Adeninskaia, E E; Eremin, A L; Kur'erov, N N

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the literature review the critical analysis of the recommendations (the letter of Ministry of Health of Russia from 6/11/2012 N 14-1/10/2-3508) on occupation noise-induced hearing loss (HL) assessment is presented. Need of more strict criteria of HL assessment for workers, than for the general population according to ICF (WHO, 2001), in order to avoid growth of accidents and injury rate is proved. The illegitimacy of a deduction of statistical presbiacusia values from individual audiograms as human rights violation is stressed. Some terminological defects are noted. It is necessary to cancel recommendations and to develop the sanitary norms or state standard with the program of hearing conservation at work. PMID:25282803

  11. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran.

    Mirvakili, Abbas; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechi, Saeid; Zand, Vahid; Ansari, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occurrence and severity of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. A case-control prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred-eight patients with SSNHL and an equal number of healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from the subjects, and the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width were measured with an automated blood cell counter. Analysis of the audiometry and hematological test results using SPSS22 software showed no statistical correlation between the platelet parameters and the occurrence of SSNHL, but correlation coefficients showed a significant correlation between PDW and hearing loss severity in patients group. However, further investigation is required to unequivocally establish the absence of correlation between the platelet parameters and occurrence of SSNHL. PMID:26829393

  12. Chronic Conductive Hearing Loss Leads to Cochlear Degeneration

    Liberman, M. Charles; Liberman, Leslie D.; Maison, Stéphane F.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses between cochlear nerve terminals and hair cells are the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear in both noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, and this neuropathy is exacerbated in the absence of efferent feedback from the olivocochlear bundle. If age-related loss is dominated by a lifetime of exposure to environmental sounds, reduction of acoustic drive to the inner ear might improve cochlear preservation throughout life. To test this, we removed the tympanic membrane unilaterally in one group of young adult mice, removed the olivocochlear bundle in another group and compared their cochlear function and innervation to age-matched controls one year later. Results showed that tympanic membrane removal, and the associated threshold elevation, was counterproductive: cochlear efferent innervation was dramatically reduced, especially the lateral olivocochlear terminals to the inner hair cell area, and there was a corresponding reduction in the number of cochlear nerve synapses. This loss led to a decrease in the amplitude of the suprathreshold cochlear neural responses. Similar results were seen in two cases with conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media. Outer hair cell death was increased only in ears lacking medial olivocochlear innervation following olivocochlear bundle cuts. Results suggest the novel ideas that 1) the olivocochlear efferent pathway has a dramatic use-dependent plasticity even in the adult ear and 2) a component of the lingering auditory processing disorder seen in humans after persistent middle-ear infections is cochlear in origin. PMID:26580411

  13. An Introduction to the Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss Study.

    Moeller, Mary Pat; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of service provision for young children with hearing loss has shifted in recent years as a result of newborn hearing screening and the early provision of interventions, including hearing technologies. It is expected that early service provision will minimize or prevent linguistic delays that typically accompany untreated permanent childhood hearing loss. The post-newborn hearing screening era has seen a resurgence of interest in empirically examining the outcomes of children with hearing loss to determine if service innovations have resulted in expected improvements in children's functioning. The Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss (OCHL) project was among these recent research efforts, and this introductory article provides background in the form of literature review and theoretical discussion to support the goals of the study. The Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss project was designed to examine the language and auditory outcomes of infants and preschool-age children with permanent, bilateral, mild-to-severe hearing loss, and to identify factors that moderate the relationship between hearing loss and longitudinal outcomes. The authors propose that children who are hard of hearing experience limitations in access to linguistic input, which lead to a decrease in uptake of language exposure and an overall reduction in linguistic experience. The authors explore this hypothesis in relation to three primary factors that are proposed to influence children's access to linguistic input: aided audibility, duration and consistency of hearing aid use, and characteristics of caregiver input. PMID:26731159

  14. Research on Relationship Model of Social Adaptation,Social Support and Life Satisfaction of Tibetan Hearing Loss Children

    SHEN Ren-hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper takes 230 Tibetan hearing loss children sample to research on relationship model of social adaptation, social support and life satisfaction of Tibetan hearing loss children by hearing disabled children’s social adaptive behavior, social support assessment scale and life satisfaction rating scale. Results present that there be significant positive relationship between social support and social adaptation, between social adaptation and life satisfaction. Further more, the social support doesn’t affect on life satisfaction rating, but through the social adaptation as intermediary affect on life satisfaction.

  15. Quantification of autonomic regulation in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Schulz, Steffen; Ritter, Julia; Oertel, Katrin; Witt, Katharina; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Voss, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have proposed varying causes for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), including vascular occlusion, ruptured inner ear membrane, acoustic tumours and circulatory disturbances in the inner ear. The objective of this study was to characterise the autonomic regulation in 19 SSNHL patients in comparison to 19 healthy age-gender matched normal-hearing control subjects (CON) in order to improve the diagnostics of vascular caused hearing loss in SSNHL patients. A high-resolution short-term electrocardiogram (ECG) and the continuous noninvasive blood pressure signal were simultaneously recorded under resting conditions (30min). Linear and nonlinear indices of heart rate- and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV) were calculated to characterise autonomic regulation. The results showed that HRV analysis did not produce significantly different results between SSNHL and CON, whereas linear and nonlinear BPV indices showed significant differences between both groups (pSSNHL patients when compared to CON subjects, based on continuous blood pressure analysis. This was characterised by reduced variability, complexity and dynamics of blood pressure time series in SSNHL. These findings may contribute to an improved classification of the controversially discussed causes of SSNHL and, in addition, may lead to improved diagnostic strategies for a subgroup of SSNHL patients whose hearing loss is caused by cardiovascular factors. PMID:23491325

  16. Prevalence and Parental Awareness of Hearing Loss in Children with Down Syndrome

    Lau, Wai-Ling; Ko, Chun-Hung; Cheng, Wai-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background: To establish the prevalence of hearing deficit in children with Down syndrome (DS) in Hong Kong as measured by brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP). The secondary objective is to examine the agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning in detecting hearing deficit in DS. Methods: Consecutive DS patients attending the Down's Clinic in a regional pediatric referral center were recruited into this cross-sectional study. BAEP data performed within 12 months were retrieved. The care-taker was interviewed with a structured questionnaire to detect any symptom of hearing impairment. BAEP findings and clinical questionings were compared in an agreement analysis using quadratic weighted kappa statistics. Results: Fifty DS patients (35 male, 15 female, mean age 11.70 years ± 5.74 standard deviation) were recruited. Eighteen patients (36.0%) were identified having hearing deficit by BAEP. Among patients with hearing impairment, 13 patients (72.2%) had a conductive deficit, and most have mild to moderate hearing loss. Five patients (27.8%) had sensorineural deficit and most have moderate to severe degree. Eight (44.4%) had bilateral hearing deficit. Care-takers of 13 patients (26.0%) reported symptoms of hearing impairment, with 9 (69.2%) having mild symptoms, 3 (23.1%) had moderate symptoms and 1 (7.7%) had severe symptoms. The weighted kappa was 0.045 (95.0% confidence interval − 0.138–0.229), indicating very poor strength of agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning. For patients with conductive hearing impairment, only 1 patients (7.7%) recalled history of otitis media. Conclusions: The estimated point prevalence of hearing impairment in Chinese DS children in Hong Kong is 36%. Our finding of poor strength of agreement between objective testing and symptom questioning reflects significant underestimation of hearing impairment by history taking alone. In view of the high prevalence and low parental awareness, continuous surveillance of hearing is mandatory for DS patients throughout childhood and adolescence. PMID:25881605

  17. Prevalence and Parental Awareness of Hearing Loss in Children with Down Syndrome

    Wai-Ling Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To establish the prevalence of hearing deficit in children with Down syndrome (DS in Hong Kong as measured by brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP. The secondary objective is to examine the agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning in detecting hearing deficit in DS. Methods: Consecutive DS patients attending the Down′s Clinic in a regional pediatric referral center were recruited into this cross-sectional study. BAEP data performed within 12 months were retrieved. The care-taker was interviewed with a structured questionnaire to detect any symptom of hearing impairment. BAEP findings and clinical questionings were compared in an agreement analysis using quadratic weighted kappa statistics. Results: Fifty DS patients (35 male, 15 female, mean age 11.70 years ± 5.74 standard deviation were recruited. Eighteen patients (36.0% were identified having hearing deficit by BAEP. Among patients with hearing impairment, 13 patients (72.2% had a conductive deficit, and most have mild to moderate hearing loss. Five patients (27.8% had sensorineural deficit and most have moderate to severe degree. Eight (44.4% had bilateral hearing deficit. Care-takers of 13 patients (26.0% reported symptoms of hearing impairment, with 9 (69.2% having mild symptoms, 3 (23.1% had moderate symptoms and 1 (7.7% had severe symptoms. The weighted kappa was 0.045 (95.0% confidence interval − 0.138-0.229, indicating very poor strength of agreement between BAEP and clinical questioning. For patients with conductive hearing impairment, only 1 patients (7.7% recalled history of otitis media. Conclusions: The estimated point prevalence of hearing impairment in Chinese DS children in Hong Kong is 36%. Our finding of poor strength of agreement between objective testing and symptom questioning reflects significant underestimation of hearing impairment by history taking alone. In view of the high prevalence and low parental awareness, continuous surveillance of hearing is mandatory for DS patients throughout childhood and adolescence.

  18. Noise Induced Hearing Loss Among Cotton Textile and Carpet Mill Workers

    Ertem, Melikşah

    1998-01-01

    In industry increased mechanisation results in increased noise levels. Operation of textile machines carries a high risk of hearing loss. In this study the evaluation of textile worker's noise induced hearing loss was reviewed cross sectionally. The hearing of 260 textile workers exposed to noise levels between 85-95 dB(A) in carpet and cotton textile factories was assessed by means of air and bone conductance audiograms obtained. The subjects were grouped into five hearing c...

  19. Noise induced hearing loss: Screening with pure-tone audiometry and speech-in-noise testing

    Leensen, M. C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a highly prevalent public health problem, caused by exposure to loud noises both during leisure time, e.g. by listening to loud music, and during work. In the past years NIHL was the most commonly reported occupational disease in the Netherlands. Hearing damage caused by noise is irreversible, but largely preventable. The early detection of hearing loss is of great importance, and is applied by preventative testing of hearing ability. This thesis investiga...

  20. Predictors of hearing loss in school entrants in a developing country

    Olusanya Bola

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing loss is a prevalent and significant disability that impairs functional development and educational attainment of school children in developing countries. Lack of a simple and practical screening protocol often deters routine and systematic hearing screening at school entry. Aim: To identify predictors of hearing loss for a practical screening model in school-aged children. Settings and Design: Community-based, retrospective case-control study of school entrants in an inner city. Methods: Results from the audiologic and non-audiologic examination of 50 hearing impaired children in randomly selected mainstream schools were compared with those of a control group of 150 normal hearing children, matched for age and sex from the same population. The non-audiologic evaluation consisted of medical history, general physical examination, anthropometry, motor skills, intelligence and visual acuity while the audiologic assessment consisted of otoscopy, audiometry and tympanometry. Statistical Analysis: Multiple logistic regression analysis of significant variables derived from univariate analysis incorporating student t-test and chi-square. Results: Besides parental literacy (OR:0.3; 95% CI:0.16-0.68, non-audiologic variables showed no association with hearing loss. In contrast, most audiologic indicators, enlarged nasal turbinate (OR:3.3; 95% CI:0.98-11.31, debris or foreign bodies in the ear canal (OR:5.4; 95% CI:1.0-36.03, impacted cerumen (OR:6.2; 95% CI:2.12-14.33, dull tympanic membrane (OR:2.2; 95% CI:1.10-4.46, perforated ear drum (OR:24.3; 95% CI:2.93-1100.17 and otitis media with effusion OME (OR:14.2; 95% CI:6.22-33.09, were associated with hearing loss. However, only parental literacy (OR:0.3; 95% CI:0.16-0.69, impacted cerumen (OR:4.0; 95% CI:1.66-9.43 and OME (OR:11.0; 95% CI:4.74-25.62 emerged as predictors. Conclusion: Selective screening based on the identification of impacted cerumen and OME will facilitate the detection of a significant proportion of hearing impaired school entrants.

  1. Evaluation of Hearing Loss and Changes in Blood Pressure of Welders in a 4 Year Period

    SOMAYEH RAHIMI-MOGHADAM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Improvements in science and technology and the use of modern machinery in manufacture have led to increase in the number of workers exposed to hazardous agents including noise. This study evaluated the effects of occupational noise on hearing loss and blood pressure in welders after 4 years.In this cohort study, all of the welders working at one of Neyshabur's water heater producing factories were studied. A questionnaire including demographic data, history of diseases and certain drug use was completed for each worker. Moreover the workers audiometry results and blood pressure measurements from 4 years ago were compared with recent results. Data analysis was performed using SPSS18software.The average age of the welders was of 35.6 ± 6.25 and the mean years of employment was 7.66 ± 2.18 years. The equivalent noise exposure of workers on one business day was 97.8 dB and varied between 90-110 dB. After 4 years, there was a significant increase in hearing loss (6.04 dB in the right ear of workers at 8000 Hz (p=0.0001 and in the left ear at 1000 (1.77 dB(p=0.04, 4000 (2.29 dB(p=0.02and 8000 Hz (4.89 dB(p=0.0001. During this time blood pressure also increased but was not significant. There was no significant relation between age, years of employment, smoking and education with individual hearing loss during these four years. Many neglected job groups such as welders are prone to hearing loss and possibly chronic increases in blood pressure due to noise exposure in their workplace and should use protective hearing equipment.

  2. Can Noise in Dental Clinic Produce Hearing Loss?

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sensorial hearing loss and irreversible noise induced is the major evitable occupational cause of hearing loss worldwide. The dentists are health professionals exposed to noises from equipment in their clinics and may suffer hearing losses. Objective: Measure the noise intensities emitted by the high rotation motors (mar used in public and private dental clinics, check whether they are harmful for the human ear and compare the results obtained in such services. Method: Serial, retrospective study with measures of the noise intensities in dBNA with a decibelimeter Minipa MSL-1352C, USA, in four dental clinics of the public service and four private clinics in Jundiaí-SP, initially from the basal environment noise in each clinic, during five minutes and then from the noise emitted by the high rotation motor (mar in operation during five minutes to obtain the averages. Results:Public clinics: 1basal medium=56.4dB;mar=77.2dB. 2basal medium=61.7dB;mar=73.7dB. 3basal medium=61.07dB;mar=75.04dB. 4basal medium=63.6dB;mar=77.3dB. Private clinics: 1basal medium=60,7dB;mar=79,1dB. 2basal=60,7dB;mar=83,1dB. 3basal=58,4dB;mar=75,5dB. 4basal=63dB;mar=76dB. Conclusion: The intensities measured of noise emitted by high rotation motors used in public and private dental clinics are below the limits harmful to the auditory health. In the public service, the basal medium noise intensity is higher than that of the private clinics, however the one of the high rotation motors is higher in the private clinics.

  3. PDZD7 and hearing loss: More than just a modifier.

    Booth, Kevin T; Azaiez, Hela; Kahrizi, Kimia; Simpson, Allen C; Tollefson, William T A; Sloan, Christina M; Meyer, Nicole C; Babanejad, Mojgan; Ardalani, Fariba; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Schnieders, Michael J; Najmabadi, Hossein; Smith, Richard J H

    2015-12-01

    Deafness is the most frequent sensory disorder. With over 90 genes and 110 loci causally implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss, it is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. Here, we investigate the genetic etiology of deafness in four families of Iranian origin segregating autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). We used a combination of linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping, and a targeted genomic enrichment platform to simultaneously screen 90 known deafness-causing genes for pathogenic variants. Variant segregation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping showed segregation with the DFNB57 locus on chromosome 10 in two families. Targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel sequencing identified causal variants in PDZD7: a homozygous missense variant (p.Gly103Arg) in one family and compound heterozygosity for missense (p.Met285Arg) and nonsense (p.Tyr500Ter) variants in the second family. Screening of two additional families identified two more variants: (p.Gly228Arg) and (p.Gln526Ter). Variant segregation with the hearing loss phenotype was confirmed in all families by Sanger sequencing. The missense variants are predicted to be deleterious, and the two nonsense mutations produce null alleles. This report is the first to show that mutations in PDZD7 cause ARNSHL, a finding that offers addition insight into the USH2 interactome. We also describe a novel likely disease-causing mutation in CIB2 and illustrate the complexity associated with gene identification in diseases that exhibit large genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26416264

  4. SENSORY HEARING LOSS IN CHILDREN WITH MUMPS INFECTION

    S. Noorbaksh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Mumps infection is endemic in Iran and mumps parotiditis is acommon disease in Iranian children. There has been a dramaticdecrease in the worldwide incidence of mumps since the introductionand use in 1968 of the very effective and inexpensive mumps vaccine.In Iran probably due to a higher percentage of unvaccinated youngpersons <15yr, the incidence rate of mumps infection and its sequelaare higher in comparison to corresponding data from developedcountries prior to comprehensive vaccination programs. The aim ofthe study was to investigate the effects of the mumps virus on cochlearfunction and to determine the frequency of related Sensory NeuralHearing Loss (SNHL in children.Material& Methods:This descriptive case-series study was conducted in 94children, agedless than 14 years, hospitalized between 1999 and 2001, in thepediatric ward of the Hazrat Rasool Hospital in Tehran. All patientswith documented mumps infection (specific mumps-IgM antibodywere evaluated twice for audiometeric function on the basis ofdiagnostic parameters for sensory neural hearing loss; the first evaluationwas done on admission and the second three weeks later. 54 patients(age range 1-14y, mean age 4.83±3.93, male: female ratio30:24were studied in two years.Results:The highest incidence of mumps was seen in winter (37% and spring(28% and the lowest in summer (13%. Specific IgM antibody formumps virus was detected in 74 children. Comprehensive audiologicevaluation was done in 54 patients at admission and again 3 weekslater. SNHL was detected in 7.2% of patients; the 4.4% incidence ofSNHL in this study was higher than in other studies in developedcountries prior to comprehensive vaccination programs.Conclusion:Implementation of comprehensive vaccination programs in youngIranians could dramatically reduce the burden and costs imposed bythe infection and its sequelae.Keywords: Mumps infection ;SNLH(sensorineural hearing loss;Mumpsvaccination

  5. Hearing loss in the Royal Norwegian Navy: A longitudinal study.

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Baste, Valborg; Bratveit, Magne; Lind, Ola; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Moen, Bente E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate a significant threshold shift (STS) among personnel working on board the Royal Norwegian Navy's (RNoN) vessels between 2012 and 2014 and to identify possible determinants of STS. Hearing thresholds were measured by pure tone audiometry in two consecutive examinations (n = 226). STS was defined as an average change in hearing thresholds ≥ + 10 dB at 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz in either ear. Determinants of STS were assessed through a questionnaire. The incidence of STS was 23.0%. Significant determinants of STS were the number of episodes of temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in the Navy, exposure to continuous loud noise during work on board, and the number of gun shots (in the Navy, hunting, and sports). This study indicated a significant association between noise exposure on board Navy vessels and development of STS. PMID:27157689

  6. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia.

    Vilhena, Ditza; Pereira, Luís; Duarte, Delfim; Oliveira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a poorly understood complication. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of this complication, although prompt treatment does not guarantee a good outcome. PMID:26904339

  7. Occupational hearing loss: tonal audiometry X high frequencies audiometry

    Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies on the occupational exposure show that noise has been reaching a large part of the working population around the world, and NIHL (noise-induced hearing loss is the second most frequent disease of the hearing system. Objective: To review the audiometry results of employees at the campus of the University of São Paulo, Bauru. Method: 40 audiometry results were analyzed between 2007 and 2008, whose ages comprised between 32 and 59 years, of both sexes and several professions: gardeners, maintenance technicians, drivers etc. The participants were divided into 2 groups: those with tonal thresholds within acceptable thresholds and those who presented auditory thresholds alterations, that is tonal thresholds below 25 dB (NA in any frequency (Administrative Rule no. 19 of the Ministry of Labor 1998. In addition to the Conventional Audiologic Evaluation (250Hz to 8.000Hz we also carried out High Frequencies Audiometry (9000Hz, 10000Hz, 11200Hz, 12500Hz, 14000Hz and 16000Hz. Results: According to the classification proposed by FIORINI (1994, 25.0% (N=10 they presented with NIHL suggestive audiometric configurations. The results of high frequencies Audiometry confirmed worse thresholds than those obtained in the conventional audiometry in the 2 groups evaluated. Conclusion: The use of high frequencies audiometry proved to be an important register as a hearing alteration early detection method.

  8. Interleukin-1β gene polymorphism and hearing loss related to the history of occupational noise exposure in Brazilian elderly

    Luiz C. L. Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the most common sensory impairment in older people, and may have social and psychological consequences, such as social isolation, frustration and depression. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is an interaction of both genetic and environmental factors. Some studies have led to the identification of possible NIHL susceptibility genes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the polymorphism of the interleukin (IL-1β gene at position + 3954 was associated with complaints of hearing loss due to occupational exposure. The sample was composed of elderly people with hearing loss (age ≥ 60 years divided into two groups: 99 with occupational exposure to noise and 193 without exposure. Information on occupational exposure to noise was obtained through interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire. Hearing acuity was measured from 500 to 6000 Hz and the IL-1β genotype was obtained by the polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Differences in allelic and genotypic frequencies, and the association between genotypic frequencies and complaints of hearing loss due to occupational exposure, were analyzed by the Chi-square test at the 5% significance level. Fifty-one percent of the elderly were homozygous for the ancestral allele (C, 17.2% were homozygous for the polymorphic allele (T and 31.8% were heterozygous. The frequency was found to be 67-33% C to allele T. There was no significant association between polymorphism in gene IL-1β and hearing loss associated with occupational exposure (χ2 = 0.538; P = 0.676. No association was found with the polymorphism of the IL-1β +3954 C/T gene and hearing loss associated with the occupational noise exposure history.

  9. The management of children with Down syndrome and profound hearing loss.

    Phelan, E; Pal, R; Henderson, L; Green, K M J; Bruce, I A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although, the association between Down syndrome (DS) and conductive hearing loss is well recognized, the fact that a small proportion of these children may have a severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss that could benefit from cochlear implantation (CI) is less well understood. The management of significant co-morbidities in children with DS can delay initial diagnosis of hearing impairment and assessment of suitability for CI can likewise be challenging, due to difficulties conditioning to behavioural hearing tests. Methods We performed a retrospective case note review of three children with DS referred to the Manchester Cochlear Implant Programme. Results Three illustrative cases are described including CI in a 4 years old. Using conventional outcome measurement instruments, the outcome could be considered to be suboptimal with a Categories of Auditory Performance score of 4 at 6 months post-op and at last follow up. In part, this is likely to reflect the delay in implantation, but the role of cognitive impairment must be considered. The cases described emphasize the importance of comprehensive radiological and audiological assessment in children with DS being considered for CI. Conclusion The influence of cognitive impairment upon outcome of CI must be taken into account, but should not be considered a contra-indication to implantation in children with DS. Benefit that might be considered limited when quantified using existing general outcome measurement instruments, may have a significant impact upon psychosocial development and quality of life in children with significant cognitive impairment, or other additional needs. PMID:26252564

  10. Single-sided deafness & directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear

    MartijnJohannes HermanusAgterberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Direction-specific interactions of sound waves with the head, torso and pinna provide unique spectral-shape cues that are used for the localization of sounds in the vertical plane, whereas horizontal sound localization is based primarily on the processing of binaural acoustic differences in arrival time (interaural time differences, or ITDs and sound level (interaural level differences, or ILDs. Because the binaural sound-localization cues are absent in listeners with total single-sided deafness (SSD, their ability to localize sound is heavily impaired. However, some studies have reported that SSD listeners are able, to some extent, to localize sound sources in azimuth, although the underlying mechanisms used for localization are unclear. To investigate whether SSD listeners rely on monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues of their hearing ear for directional hearing, we investigated localization performance for low-pass filtered (LP, 3 kHz and broadband (BB, 0.5 – 20 kHz noises in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We tested whether localization performance of SSD listeners further deteriorated when the pinna cavities of their hearing ear were filled with a mold that disrupted their spectral-shape cues. To remove the potential use of perceived sound level as an invalid azimuth cue, we randomly varied stimulus presentation levels over a broad range (45-65 dB SPL. Several listeners with SSD could localize HP and BB sound sources in the horizontal plane, but inter-subject variability was considerable. Localization performance of these listeners strongly reduced after diminishing of their spectral pinna-cues. We further show that inter-subject variability of SSD can be explained to a large extent by the severity of high-frequency hearing loss in their hearing ear.

  11. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Abolhassan Faramarzi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran.Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg and audiometric variables was recorded.Findings:Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5% had normal hearing and 10 (3.5% sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion.Conclusion:We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity.

  12. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid prevents hearing loss and hair cell death in Cdh23(erl/erl) mice.

    Hu, J; Xu, M; Yuan, J; Li, B; Entenman, S; Yu, H; Zheng, Q Y

    2016-03-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss has long been the subject of experimental and clinical research for many years. The recently identified novel mutation of the Cadherin23 (Cdh23) gene, Cdh23(erl/erl), was proven to be a mouse model of human autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB12). Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a taurine-conjugated bile acid, has been used in experimental research and clinical applications related to liver disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and other diseases associated with apoptosis. Because hair cell apoptosis was implied to be the cellular mechanism leading to hearing loss in Cdh23(erl/erl) mice (erl mice), this study investigated TUDCA's otoprotective effects in erl mice: preventing hearing impairment and protecting against hair cell death. Our results showed that systemic treatment with TUDCA significantly alleviated hearing loss and suppressed hair cell death in erl mice. Additionally, TUDCA inhibited apoptotic genes and caspase-3 activation in erl mouse cochleae. The data suggest that TUDCA could be a potential therapeutic agent for human DFNB12. PMID:26748055

  13. Frequency of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Major Beta-Thalassemias in Southern Iran

    Seyed-Taghi Heydari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The thalassemias are among the most common genetic disorders worldwide, occurring more frequently in the Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to determined frequency of sensory-neural hearing loss in major ß- thalassemias transfusion dependent patients in south of Iran. Methods:A cross sectional study on 308 cases of major beta-thalassemia patients referring to Thalassemia Center of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between 2006-2007 years. The diagnosis of ß- thalassemia major was based on clinical history, complete blood count and hemoglobine electrophoresis. Clinical data such as serum ferritin level, deferoxamine (DFO dose, mean daily doses of DFO (mg/kg and audiometric variables was recorded. Findings:Out of 308 cases, 283 (96.5% had normal hearing and 10 (3.5% sensorineural hearing loss. There was no statically significant difference between two groups regarding mean age, weight, age at the first blood transfusion, age at the first DFO infusion. Conclusion:We found the lowest incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in a large population of patients suffered from major thalassemia who received DFO. We show that DFO is not ototoxic at a low dose. When considering all related literature, as a whole there has been much critical misrepresentation about DFO ototoxicity.

  14. A pilot study of telepractice delivery for teaching listening and spoken language to children with hearing loss.

    Constantinescu, Gabriella; Waite, Monique; Dornan, Dimity; Rushbrooke, Emma; Brown, Jackie; McGovern, Jane; Ryan, Michelle; Hill, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Telemedicine ("telepractice") allows improved access to specialised early intervention services such as Auditory-Verbal Therapy (AVT) for children with hearing loss. We investigated the effectiveness of a tele-AVT programme (eAVT) in the spoken language development of a group of young children with hearing loss. In a retrospective study we compared the language outcomes of children with bilateral hearing loss receiving eAVT with a control group who received therapy In Person. Seven children in each group (mean age 2.4 years) were matched on pre-amplification hearing level for the better hearing ear, age at optimal amplification and enrolment in the AVT programme. The eAVT sessions were conducted via Skype. Results on the Preschool Language Scale-4 were compared at 2 years post optimal amplification. There were no significant differences in language scores between the two groups. Language scores for the children in the eAVT group were within the normal range for children with normal hearing. The results suggest that early intervention AVT via telepractice may be as effective as delivery In Person for children with hearing loss. PMID:24643949

  15. Postural control in children with typical development and children with profound hearing loss

    Monteiro de Sousa AM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aneliza Maria Monteiro de Sousa,1 Jônatas de França Barros,2 Brígido Martins de Sousa Neto31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil; 2Department of Physical Education at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 3University Center UNIEURO, Brasilia, Federal District, BrazilPurpose: To describe the behavior of the postural control in children with profound sensorineural hearing loss and compare the results of experimental tests with hearing children aged 7 to 10 years.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional study where 100 children were divided into experimental and control groups. We used a force platform, AccuSway Plus, where the tests were conducted under the experimental conditions: open base, eyes open (OBEO; open base, eyes closed (OBEC; closed base, eyes open (CBEO; closed base, eyes closed (CBEC. The body sway velocity (V of the center of pressure, the displacement in the anteroposterior direction (COPap and mediolateral (COPml of the center of pressure were the parameters to evaluate the postural control. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test, with a significance level of 5%.Results: In comparisons of variables between the groups, the experimental group outperformed by at least 75% of the control group values. In terms of global trends, the experimental group shows higher values of body oscillations in all experimental conditions and variables evaluated. Children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing. The inferential analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the balance between deaf and hearing children in the OBEC experimental condition in relation to the COPml parameter (P = 0.04. There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons between the sexes when the groups were analyzed separately. The prevalence of unknown etiology showed 58% of cases and congenital rubella in 16%. The discovery of deafness occurred in 70% of children before the age of 3 years.Conclusion: In this study, children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing children. This finding confirms the need to investigate postural control through longitudinal studies to identify the area of sensory deficit causing poor balance performance and promote more specific early interventions.Keywords: postural control, hearing impairment, balance, children, sensory deprivation, early intervention

  16. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Perceptions of Emotions by Young Children with Hearing Loss versus Children with Normal Hearing

    Most, Tova; Michaelis, Hilit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effect of hearing loss (HL) on emotion-perception ability among young children with and without HL. Method: A total of 26 children 4.0-6.6 years of age with prelingual sensory-neural HL ranging from moderate to profound and 14 children with normal hearing (NH) participated. They were asked to identify…

  17. Evaluating long-latency auditory evoked potentials in the diagnosis of cortical hearing loss in children.

    Lopez-Soto, Teresa; Postigo-Madueno, Amparo; Nunez-Abades, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In centrally related hearing loss, there is no apparent damage in the auditory system, but the patient is unable to hear sounds. In patients with cortical hearing loss (and in the absence of communication deficit, either total or partial, as in agnosia or aphasia), some attention-related or language-based disorders may lead to a wrong diagnosis of hearing impairment. The authors present two patients (8 and 11 years old) with no anatomical damage to the ear, the absence of neurological damage or trauma, but immature cortical auditory evoked potentials. Both patients presented a clinical history of multiple diagnoses over several years. Because the most visible symptom was moderate hearing loss, the patients were recurrently referred to audiological testing, with no improvement. This report describes the use of long-latency evoked potentials to determine cases of cortical hearing loss, where hearing impairment is a consequence of underdevelopment at the central nervous system. PMID:27006780

  18. Hearing.

    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The main hazard for hearing in the workplace is noise. Organic solvents and heavy metals may increase the danger of developing occupational hearing loss, particularly in the case of co-exposure with noise. While noise produces damage predominantly to the cochlea, chemicals may be responsible for pathologic changes in both peripheral and central parts of the auditory pathway. Noise-induced hearing loss develops slowly over the years, although its progression is most dynamic during the first 10-15 years of exposure. Pure-tone audiometry indicates a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, affecting predominantly high frequencies, with typical notch at 3-6kHz in the early stages of the disease. Where there is co-exposure to noise and chemicals, the noise effect on hearing threshold shifts is dominant; however chemicals seem to increase the vulnerability of the cochlea to the damage by noise, particularly at its low and moderate levels. According to European Directive 2003/10/EC, the employer is obliged to implement hearing prevention programs when the A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level of noise (LAEX8hr) exceeds 80dB. Since chemicals may impair intelligibility of speech despite a lack of audiometric hearing threshold shift, implementation of speech audiometry, particularly speech in noise tests, is recommended in prevention programs. PMID:26563797

  19. Combined Intratympanic and Systemic Steroid Therapy for Poor-Prognosis Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Shima Arastou; Ardavan Tajedini; Pedram Borghei

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combined intratympanic and systemic steroid therapy compared with systemic steroid therapy alone in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) patients with poor prognostic factors.     Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) who had at least one poor prognostic factor (age greater than 40 years, hearing loss more than 70 db, or greater than a 2-week delay betwee...

  20. Subclinical Hearing Loss, Longer Sleep Duration, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Japanese General Population

    Kei Nakajima; Eiichiro Kanda; Ami Hosobuchi; Kaname Suwa

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss leads to impaired social functioning and quality of life. Hearing loss is also associated with sleeping disorders and cardiometabolic risk factors. Here, we determined whether subclinical hearing loss is associated with sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross-sectional and longitudinal study of healthy Japanese general population. 48,091 men and women aged 20–79 years who underwent medical checkups were included in a cross-sectional study, and 6,674 were includ...

  1. Potassium Channel Activator Attenuates Salicylate-Induced Cochlear Hearing Loss Potentially Ameliorating Tinnitus

    Sun, Wei; Liu, Jun; zhang, chao; Zhou, Na; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Winchester, Wendy; Miranda, Jason A.; Salvi*, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    High dose sodium salicylate causes moderate, reversible hearing loss and tinnitus. Salicylate-induced hearing loss is believed to arise from a reduction in the electromotile response of outer hair cells (OHCs) and/or reduction of KCNQ4 potassium currents in OHCs, which decreases the driving force for the transduction current. Therefore, enhancing OHC potassium currents could potentially prevent salicylate-induced temporary hearing loss. In this study, we tested whether opening voltage-gated p...

  2. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Amir Hossain Ghazizadeh; Mehdi Bakhshaee; Ebrahim Mahdavi; Rahman Movahhed

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: It has been shown that low levels of pigmentation increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in humans. For this reason, white populations develop more pronounced noise- induced hearing loss in comparison to black populations. Similarly, blue-eyed individuals exhibit greater temporary threshold shift than brown-eyed subjects; still, no strong correlation has been verified between the lightness of hair color and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. This st...

  3. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss – A Common Hereditary Deafness

    Wingard, Jeffrey C.; ZHAO, HONG-BO

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate th...

  4. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Hong-Bo Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that ...

  5. Anosmia associated with hearing loss and benign positional vertigo after head trauma

    Ottaviano, G.; Marioni, G; MARCHESE-RAGONA, R.; Trevisan, CP; De Filippis, C; Staffieri, A

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that head trauma may cause hearing loss, which can be either conductive or sensorineural. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and olfactory dysfunction due to head trauma are also well known. The association between sensorineural hearing loss and anosmia, following head trauma, is extremely rare. Two rare cases of post-traumatic occurrence of hearing loss, olfactory dysfunction and benign positional vertigo are reported and the pathophysiology of the association between sens...

  6. Conductive and Mixed Hearing Losses: A Comparison between Summer and Autumn

    Nickbakht, Mansoureh; Borzoo, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Conductive hearing loss is common among children and adults. This study aims at comparing the results of conductive hearing loss in summer and autumn. Subjects and Methods Puretone audiometry and tympanometry tests were done for all patients who referred to the Iranian-based audiology center of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Ahvaz. Data on the patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss were analyzed. The impacts of season, age, and etiology of the disease were analyze...

  7. ¿Hipoacusia súbita? Sudden Hearing Loss?

    Santiago Cornejo Sch

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de paciente mujer sin antecedentes mórbidos que consulta a nuestro servicio por síntomas sugerentes de hipoacusia súbita. La evaluación audiométrica y prueba calórica era compatible con una parálisis cocleovestibular y dado que no presentaba contraindicaciones, se decide iniciar tratamiento con corticoides y antiviral oral. La evolución inicial fue favorable sin embargo al control del mes presentó un nuevo deterioro audiométrico. Esto motivó mayor estudio con el cual se pudo llegara un diagnóstico etiológico. Este caso es presentado para recordar que hay otras patologías que pueden simular una hipoacusia súbita idiopática, lo cual no se debe olvidaren el manejo de estos pacientes.Clinical case of female patient without morbid background who consults due to sudden hearing loss symptoms. The audiometric and caloric tests were compatible with a cochleo vestibular paralysis and because there were no contraindications, oral steroids and antiviral, treatment was indicated. Although the initial response was favorable, at the first month check up an audiometric deterioration was found. This led to further study achieving an etiological diagnosis. This case is presented to remind that there are other pathologies that can simulate an idiopathic sudden hearing loss, which should not be forgotten in the management of these patients.

  8. Vestibular Schwannoma in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2010-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal MRI as a screening method. Of the 295 patients with SSNHL, VS was found in 12 (4%). All patients had intrameatal or small to medium-sized tumors. There were three cases with SSNHL in one ear and an incidental finding of intracanalicular VS in the contralateral ear. There were four cases of VS that showed good recovery from SSNHL with corticosteroid treatment. There were two cases that mimicked labyrinthitis with hearing loss and vertigo. A greater number of cases than expected of VS were detected in patients with SSNHL, as a result of increasing widespread use of MRI. Various unusual findings in these patients were identified. MRI would seem to be mandatory in all cases of SSNHL. PMID:22451804

  9. High frequency hearing loss in students used to ear phone music: A randomized trial of 1,000 students

    Kiran Naik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss is often thought of as a natural phenomenon of the aging process. However, studies are beginning to show that hearing loss is becoming increasingly more common amongst younger people. Approximately, 20-30 million people between the ages of 20 and 69 years have high frequency hearing loss due to chronic exposure to loud noise above 90 decibels (dB thanks to the advent of MP3 players and cellphones, according to the National Institute of Deafness. [1] If you are one of the millions who enjoys listening to a MP3 player or cellphone music to allay boredom or to pass time, then you might be at risk for hearing loss from headphones or earphones. Studies have shown that most MP3 players today can produce sounds up to 120 dB and that long-term cell phone use to hear music may cause damage in the inner ear. In today′s society, these devices are indispensible and are part of day-to-day life. Hence, this study was conducted to create awareness regarding prolonged exposure to loud noise either through an MP3 player or cell phone music. Materials and Methods: A total of 1,000 students from Shri Adichunchanagiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Adichunchanagiri Institute of Technology and Adichunchanagiri Pre-university College were chosen as part of the study. They were divided into four groups, Group A comprising 250 students who had a habit of listening to music through ear phones at least 2 h a day, Group B comprising 250 students who are used to earphone music less than 1 h per day and Group C comprising of 250 students who very occasionally use ear phones, but hear music mostly through speakers and Group D comprising of 250 students who are usually unaware of ear phone music and are not used to it. All the groups were subjected to pure tone audiometry and the audiogram obtained. Results and Observations: The study revealed high frequency hearing loss in 8% of Group A and 2% in Group B; whereas, in there were no hearing impairment in Groups C and D indicating a significant role of prolonged ear phone music as a cause of high frequency hearing loss in students. The thin percentage and absence of hearing loss in Groups B, C, and D suggests the impact of the duration of exposure also has a role in the pathology. Conclusion: This study proves beyond doubt that the prolonged usage of loud ear phone music is harmful to the ears and a simple way of pass time by hearing to ear phone music might cause hearing loss.

  10. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Hong-Bo Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  11. Sudden Hearing Loss Associated with High Levels of Calcineurin Inhibitors after Liver Transplantation

    Ch. P. Strassburg

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment in patients after liver transplantation (OLT has only been reported sporadically. However, potential ototoxic side effects may be related to immunsuppression. We report a series of 5 patients who developed sudden hearing loss after OLT and presented high levels of calcineurin inhibitors at the same time. In 4/5 patients, sudden hearing loss was bilateral. Patients` main characteristic were very heterogenous (e.g. age, time since OLT, underlying liver disease. Sudden hearing loss occured under high levels of tacrolimus (n=3, mean serum levels at the time of hearing loss: 24 ng/ml and cyclosporine A (n=2, 343 ng/ml, respectively. Further immunosuppression consisted of prednisolone (n=4 and azathioprine (n=1. There were no other risk factors such as administration of ototoxic drugs. Levels of immunsuppressants were rapidly corrected after the event. Nevertheless, in 4/5 patients hearing aids (3/4 bilateral became necessary during follow-up. Furthermore, two patients suffer from tinnitus since the hearing loss. In conclusion, high levels of calcineurin-inhibitors after OLT seem to be a risk factor for sudden hearing loss. In most cases, hearing loss was irreversible and resulted in need of a hearing aid. Neurotoxicity may be a probable mechanism. Further evaluations are necessary to allow a better understanding of the problem.

  12. Effects of auditory training in individuals with high-frequency hearing loss

    Renata Beatriz Fernandes, Santos; Andrea Tortosa, Marangoni; Adriana Neves de, Andrade; Raquel, Prestes; Daniela, Gil.

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a formal auditory training program on the behavioral, electrophysiological and subjective aspects of auditory function in individuals with bilateral high-frequency hearing [...] loss. METHOD: A prospective study of seven individuals aged 46 to 57 years with symmetric, moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging from 3 to 8 kHz was conducted. Evaluations of auditory processing (sound location, verbal and non-verbal sequential memory tests, the speech-in-noise test, the staggered spondaic word test, synthetic sentence identification with competitive ipsilateral and contralateral competitive messages, random gap detection and the standard duration test), auditory brainstem response and long-latency potentials and the administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaire were performed in a sound booth before and immediately after formal auditory training. RESULTS: All of the participants demonstrated abnormal pre-training long-latency characteristics (abnormal latency or absence of the P3 component) and these abnormal characteristics were maintained in six of the seven individuals at the post-training evaluation. No significant differences were found between ears in the quantitative analysis of auditory brainstem responses or long-latency potentials. However, the subjects demonstrated improvements on all behavioral tests. For the questionnaire, the difference on the background noise subscale achieved statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Auditory training in adults with high-frequency hearing loss led to improvements in figure-background hearing skills for verbal sounds, temporal ordination and resolution, and communication in noisy environments. Electrophysiological changes were also observed because, after the training, some long latency components that were absent pre-training were observed during the re-evaluation.

  13. Hearing loss in workers exposed to epoxy adhesives and noise: a cross-sectional study

    Yang, Hsiao-Yu; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Epoxy adhesives contain organic solvents and are widely used in industry. The hazardous effects of epoxy adhesives remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of hearing loss among workers exposed to epoxy adhesives and noise. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 182 stone workers who were exposed to both epoxy adhesives and noise, 89 stone workers who were exposed to noise only, and 43 workers from the administrative staff who had not been exposed to adhesives or noise. We obtained demographic data, occupational history and medical history through face-to-face interviews and arranged physical examinations and pure-tone audiometric tests. We also conducted walk-through surveys in the stone industry. A total of 40 representative noise assessments were conducted in 15 workplaces. Air sampling was conducted at 40 workplaces, and volatile organic compounds were analysed using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TO-15 method. Results The mean sound pressure level was 87.7?dBA (SD 9.9). The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss was considerably increased in the stone workers exposed to epoxy adhesives (42%) compared with the stone workers who were not exposed to epoxy adhesives (21%) and the administrative staff group (9.3%). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that exposure to epoxy adhesives significantly increased the risk of hearing loss between 2 and 6?kHz after adjusting for age. Significant interactions between epoxy adhesives and noise and hearing impairment were observed at 3, 4 and 6?kHz. Conclusions Epoxy adhesives exacerbate hearing impairment in noisy environments, with the main impacts occurring in the middle and high frequencies. PMID:26892792

  14. FVB/NJ mice demonstrate a youthful sensitivity to noise-induced hearing loss and provide a useful genetic model for the study of neural hearing loss

    Ho, Maria K.; LI Xin; Wang, Juemei; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Friedman, Rick A.

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid mouse diversity panel (HMDP), a panel of 100 strains, has been employed in genome wide association studies (GWAS) to study complex traits in mice. Hearing is a complex trait and the CBA/CaJ mouse strain is a widely used model for age-related hearing loss (ARHI) and noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). The CBA/CaJ strain's youthful sensitivity to noise and limited age-related loss led us to attempt to identify additional strains segregating a similar phenotype for our panel. FVB/NJ is...

  15. Combination Therapy with Systemic Steroids, an Antiviral Agent, Anticoagulants, and Stellate Ganglion Block for Treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Lee, Chi-Kyou; Lee, Jong Dae; Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Byung Don

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is commonly defined as a loss of at least 30 dB in three contiguous frequencies occurring within 3 days. Systemic steroid administration has become the most widely accepted treatment option for SSNHL. Since viral infection and vascular compromise are considered specific causes of SSNHL, antiviral agents, anticoagulants, and stellate ganglion block have been used for its treatment, although the evidence of their effectiveness is weak. The present study evaluated the hearing recovery rate in the combination therapy group (systemic steroids, antiviral agent, anticoagulants, and stellate ganglion block) in comparison with patients treated with systemic steroids alone. Subjects and Methods A total of 85 patients diagnosed with SSNHL were treated with combination therapy (group A, 46 patients) or systemic steroids only (group B, 39 patients). Hearing improvement was defined as a hearing gain of more than slight improvement using Siegel's criteria. All patients were treated with a 10-day course of systemic steroids (10-mg dexamethasone for 5 days, followed by tapering for 5 days). Acyclovir, heparin, and stellate ganglion block were included in the group A treatment regimen. Results The overall rate of hearing improvement was 60.9% (28/46 patients) in group A, which was significantly higher than that (38.5%, 15/39 patients) in group B. The distribution of prognostic factors was not significantly different between the two groups with the exception of the degree of initial hearing loss, which was more severe in group A. Upon analysis according to prognostic factors, group A showed a better hearing improvement recovery rate than group B in patients with hearing loss >70 dB, age >41 years, dizziness, and early treatment (SSNHL patients treated with combination therapy have a higher likelihood of hearing improvement than those treated with systemic steroids alone. PMID:24653874

  16. Risk Factors for Hearing Loss in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment of head-and-neck carcinoma. The objective of this study was to perform a prospective multivariate assessment of the dose-effect relationship between intensity-modulated RT and hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Pure tone audiometry at 0.250-16 kHz was obtained before and after treatment in 101 patients (202 ears). All patients received full-course intensity-modulated RT (range, 56-70 Gy), with a median cochlear dose of 11.4 Gy (range, 0.2-69.7). Results: Audiometry was performed 1 week before and a median of 9 weeks (range, 1-112) after treatment. The mean hearing deterioration at pure tone average air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz was small (from 28.6 dB HL to 30.1 dB HL). However, individual patients showed clinically significant hearing loss, with 10-dB threshold shift incidences of 13% and 18% at pure tone averages air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz and 8-10-12.5 kHz, respectively. Post-treatment hearing capability was unfavorable in the case of greater inner ear radiation doses (p <0.0001), unfavorable baseline hearing capability (p <0.0001), green-eyed patients (p <0.0001), and older age (p <0.0001). Using multivariate analysis, a prediction of individual hearing capabiltity after treatment was made. Conclusion: RT-induced hearing loss in the mean population is modest. However, clinically significant hearing loss was observed in older patients with green eyes and unfavorable pretreatment hearing. In these patients, the intended radiation dose may be adjusted according to the proposed predictive model, aiming to decrease the risk of ototoxicity.

  17. Sensori-neural hearing loss in patients treated with irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    The present investigation has been carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the inner ear to irradiation. Cochlear function was tested in a cohort of 22 patients before and 7-84 months after receiving external irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The pre-irradiation sensori-neural hearing threshold at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz was used as a baseline for the individual patient, and the observed sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) was calculated as the difference between pre- and post-irradiation values. The pre-irradiation hearing level or patient age was not correlated with the actual SNHL. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between the total radiation dose to the inner ear and the observed hearing impairment. SNHL was most pronounced in the high frequencies, with values up to 35 dB (4000 Hz) and 25 dB (2000 Hz) in some patients. The latent period for the complication appeared to be 12 months or more. The deleterious effect of irradiation on the hearing should be kept in mind both in treatment planning and in the follow-up after radiotherapy

  18. Effects of hearing loss on the subcortical representation of speech cues.

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Drehobl, Sarah; Kraus, Nina

    2013-05-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss often report frustration with speech being loud but not clear, especially in background noise. Despite advanced digital technology, hearing aid users may resort to removing their hearing aids in noisy environments due to the perception of excessive loudness. In an animal model, sensorineural hearing loss results in greater auditory nerve coding of the stimulus envelope, leading to a relative deficit of stimulus fine structure. Based on the hypothesis that brainstem encoding of the temporal envelope is greater in humans with sensorineural hearing loss, speech-evoked brainstem responses were recorded in normal hearing and hearing impaired age-matched groups of older adults. In the hearing impaired group, there was a disruption in the balance of envelope-to-fine structure representation compared to that of the normal hearing group. This imbalance may underlie the difficulty experienced by individuals with sensorineural hearing loss when trying to understand speech in background noise. This finding advances the understanding of the effects of sensorineural hearing loss on central auditory processing of speech in humans. Moreover, this finding has clinical potential for developing new amplification or implantation technologies, and in developing new training regimens to address this relative deficit of fine structure representation. PMID:23654406

  19. Dexamethasone loaded nanoparticles exert protective effects against Cisplatin-induced hearing loss by systemic administration.

    Sun, Changling; Wang, Xueling; Chen, Dongye; Lin, Xin; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao

    2016-04-21

    Ototoxicity is one of the most important adverse effects of cisplatin chemotherapy. As a common treatment of acute sensorineural hearing loss, systemic administration of steroids was demonstrated ineffective against cisplatin-induced hearing loss (CIHL) in published studies. The current study aimed to evaluate the potential protective effect of dexamethasone (DEX) encapsulated in polyethyleneglycol-coated polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles (DEX-NPs) against cisplatin-induced hearing loss following systemic administration. DEX was fabricated into PEG-PLA nanoparticles using emulsion and evaporation technique as previously reported. DEX or DEX-NPs was administered intraperitoneally to guinea pigs 1h before cisplatin administration. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold shifts were measured at four frequencies (4, 8, 16, and 24kHz) 1 day before and three days after cisplatin injection. Cochlear morphology was examined to evaluate inner ear injury induced by cisplatin exposure. A single dose of DEX-NPs 1h before cisplatin treatment resulted in a significant preservation of the functional and structural properties of the cochlea, which was equivalent to the effect of multidose (3 days) DEX injection. In contrast, no significant protective effect was observed by single dose injection of DEX. The results of histological examination of the cochleae were consistent with the functional measurements. In conclusion, a single dose DEX-NPs significantly attenuated cisplatin ototoxicity in guinea pigs after systemic administration at both histological and functional levels indicating the potential therapeutic benefits of these nanoparticles for enhancing the delivery of DEX in acute sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26971701

  20. Genetic mutation susceptibility of hearing loss in child with severe neonatal jaundice

    This case report demonstrates a case of 5-year-old non-syndromic Malay boy who passed the hearing screening test however he was confirmed has bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed at 3 months of age by brain stem evoked response (BSER). He has background history of severe neonatal jaundice and male siblings of hearing impairment. The antenatal and birth history was uneventful apart from maternal hypothyroidism. His other two elder brothers have bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and history of severe neonatal jaundice as well. The ear examinations, computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed normal findings. Right sided cochlear implantation was done at the age of 3 years old and he is still under audiology follow-up. Conclusion: Genetic studies are important to determine the cause of genetic mutation in susceptibility to hearing impairment that run in his family after severe neonatal jaundice. Those baby with risk of developing hearing loss required diagnostic hearing assessment. (author)

  1. THE INCIDENCE OF HEARING LOSS IN DOWN’S SYNDROME: A CLINICOAUDIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Satish S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT : Ear, nose, and throat (ENT problems are common in individuals with Down syndrome. High prevalence of ENT disease in Down syndrome is observed due to structural and functional abnormalities of ear, nose and throat and immune system of which hearing loss is one Hearing loss early in l ife leads to language disabilities. Appropriate screening would allow hearing losses to be detected early so that early treatment can be initiated. AIM : To assess type and degree of hearing loss in cases of Down syndrome. SETTING AND DESIGN : Cros s sectional study at tertiary referral centre. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Children clinically diagnosed as Down Syndrome (DS aged between 3 to 20 years were evaluated. A detailed history, clinical examinations and hearing assessments such as audiogram, tympanom etry and brainstem evoke response audiometry (BERA were used to evaluate these patients. RESULTS : A total of 60 patients (120 ears were enrolled for this study. This study showed that the commonest type of hearing loss were conductive in 68 ears (56.7%, mixed in 4 ears (3.3%. The other 48ears (40% had normal hearing. Most of them fall in the mild level of conductive hearing loss. CONCLUSION : Conductive hearing loss is a common feature (56.7%of ears in DS children.

  2. Sudden Hearing Loss as the Initial Manifestation of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in a Child.

    Ching-Chung Tsai

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss and blindness rarely occur in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia(CML. In this article, we present a 12-year-old girl who had right-side hearing loss as theinitial manifestation of CML, followed by left-side hearing loss and blindness of the left eyeseveral days after initiating treatment. The initial white cell count was 181,700/mm3.Audiometry showed severe sensorineural hearing loss of her right ear and moderate mixedhearing loss of the left ear. An ophthalmic examination showed optic neuropathy with subhyaloidhemorrhage in the left eye. A brain magnetic resonance image showed minor hemorrhagingin the right lower frontal area and anterior thalamus. These findings might haveimplied leukostasis with hyperviscosity syndrome. She died on the 9th hospital day. Thiscase illustrates that CML should be considered 1 of the rare diagnoses in a patient with suddenonset of hearing loss.

  3. Coronary artery bypass grafting and sensorineural hearing loss, a cohort study

    Ashraf Omer

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is routinely encountered by the otologist. The etiology is varied and often identifiable. One of the relatively less frequent causes is surgery. Apart from being an established entity with otological surgeries, sensorineural hearing loss has also been known to occur after non-otological procedures under general anesthesia. Commonest amongst these procedures is cardiopulmonary bypass, an association that has long been recognized. However, despite the proposition of diverse hypotheses in the past, the pathophysiology remains unclear. Methods The study is a prospective matched cohort study that will be carried out in Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Participants among exposed would include all those patients who would be undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery in the hospital who fall under the criteria for inclusion. Unexposed group would comprise of patients undergoing a non-bypass procedure of similar duration under the same type of anesthesia who meet the selection criteria. Both these groups will undergo audiometric testing at our hospital on three different occasions during the course of this study. Initially before the procedure to test the baseline hearing capacity; then one week after the procedure to assess any changes in hearing ability following the surgery; and finally a third audiogram at six weeks follow-up to assess further changes in any hearing deficits noted during the second phase of testing. Certain variables including the subjects' demographics and those concerning the procedure itself will be noted and used later for risk factors analysis. A detailed past medical and surgical history will also be obtained. Data analysis would include calculation of relative risk and significance of the results, by running the chi-square test. Other statistical tests like Fisher exact test may then be employed to facilitate data interpretation. Continuous scale may then be employed and multivariate linear regression used. Discussion This study is planned to obtain a better understanding of the correlation between sudden sensorineural hearing loss and cardiopulmonary bypass. Being the first major cohort trial in this line of investigation, the project is designed to identify the existence of any significant relationship between cardiopulmonary bypass and sensorineural hearing deficit.

  4. Protection from impulse noise-induced hearing loss with novel Src-protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Bielefeld, Eric C.; Hangauer, David; Henderson, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a significant mechanism of cochlear hair cell loss from noise. Molecules that inhibit apoptotic intracellular signaling reduce cochlear damage and hearing loss from noise. The current study is an extension of a previous study of the protective value of Src-protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors against noise (Harris et al., 2005). The current study tested three Src-inhibitors: the indole-based KX1-141, the biaryl-based KX2-329, and the ATP-competitive KX2-328. Each of the three drugs...

  5. Strategies for developing novel therapeutics for sensorineural hearing loss

    TakayukiNakagawa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a common disability in the world; however, at present, options for the pharmacological treatment of SNHL are very limited. Previous studies involving human temporal bone analyses have revealed that the degeneration of the cochlea is a common mechanism of SNHL. A major problem for the development of novel pharmacotherapy for SNHL has been the limited regeneration capacity in mammalian cochlear cells. However, recent progress in basic studies has led to several effective strategies for the induction of regeneration in the mammalian cochlea, in accordance with the stage of degeneration. In addition, recent advances in the identification of human deafness genes and their characterization in mouse models have elucidated cellular and/or molecular mechanisms of SNHL, which will contribute to clarify molecular targets of pharmacotherapy for treatment of SNHL.

  6. Audiometric Profiles in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Does Subclinical Hearing Loss Impact Communication?

    Demopoulos, Carly; Lewine, Jeffrey David

    2016-01-01

    Rates of hearing impairment in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are higher than those reported in the general population. Although ASD is not caused by hearing impairment, it may exacerbate symptomatology. Participants with ASD (N = 60) and typically developing peers (N = 16) aged 5-18 years underwent a comprehensive audiological screening (pure tone audiometry, uncomfortable loudness level, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, distortion product otoacoustic emissions, and auditory brainstem response) and assessment of communication abilities (expressive/receptive language, articulation, phonological awareness, and vocal affect recognition). Incidence of abnormal findings on at least one measure of audiological functioning was higher for the ASD group (55%) than controls (14.9%) or the general population estimate (6%). The presence of sound sensitivity was also considerably higher for the ASD group (37%) compared with controls (0%) or general population estimates (8-15%). When participants with ASD were dichotomized into groups with and without evidence of clinical audiological abnormality, no significant differences were identified on measures of communication; however, results of correlational analyses indicated that variability in hearing thresholds at middle range frequencies (2000 Hz) was significantly related to performance on all measures of speech articulation and language after correction for multiple comparisons (r = -0.48 to r = -0.53, P <  0.0045). These findings suggest that dichotomized classification of clinical audiology may not be sufficient to understand the role of subclinical hearing loss in ASD symptomatology and that treatment studies for mild/subclinical hearing loss in this population may be worthwhile. Autism Res 2015. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25962745

  7. Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Clinical Populations with Hearing Loss

    Anu Sharma; Hannah Glick

    2016-01-01

    We review evidence for cross-modal cortical re-organization in clinical populations with hearing loss. Cross-modal plasticity refers to the ability for an intact sensory modality (e.g., vision or somatosensation) to recruit cortical brain regions from a deprived sensory modality (e.g., audition) to carry out sensory processing. We describe evidence for cross-modal changes in hearing loss across the age-spectrum and across different degrees of hearing impairment, including children with profou...

  8. Constraint-induced sound therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss – behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes

    Hidehiko Okamoto; Munehisa Fukushima; Henning Teismann; Lothar Lagemann; Tadashi Kitahara; Hidenori Inohara; Ryusuke Kakigi; Christo Pantev

    2014-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing deterioration. We report here the development and evaluation of “constraint-induced sound therapy”, which is based on a well-established neuro-rehabilitation approach, and which is characterized by the plugging of the intact ear (“constraint”) and the simultaneous, extensive stimulation of the affected ear with music. The sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients who received the constraint-induced sound therapy ...

  9. The Need for Improved Detection and Management of Adult-Onset Hearing Loss in Australia

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Bamini Gopinath; Julie Schneider; Jennifer Reath; Louise Hickson; Leeder, Stephen R; Paul Mitchell; Robert Cowan

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset hearing loss is insidious and typically diagnosed and managed several years after onset. Often, this is after the loss having led to multiple negative consequences including effects on employment, depressive symptoms, and increased risk of mortality. In contrast, the use of hearing aids is associated with reduced depression, longer life expectancy, and retention in the workplace. Despite this, several studies indicate high levels of unmet need for hearing health services in older ...

  10. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review of Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prognosis

    Kuhn, Maggie; Heman-Ackah, Selena E.; Shaikh, Jamil A.; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is commonly encountered in audiologic and otolaryngologic practice. SSNHL is most commonly defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies occurring within a 72-hr period. Although the differential for SSNHL is vast, for the majority of patients an etiologic factor is not identified. Treatment for SSNHL of known etiology is directed toward that agent, with poor hearing outcomes characteri...

  11. Altered Contralateral Auditory Cortical Morphology in Unilateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Fan, Wenliang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xueyan; Mella, Grace; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong; Xu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral gray matter volume alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period by the voxel-based morphometry method, and to determine if hearing impairment is associated with regional gray matter alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Study Design: Prospective case study. Setting: Tertiary class A teaching hospital. Patients: Thirty-nine patients with left-side unilateral sudden sensorineur...

  12. Isolated Contralateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: An Unusual Manifestation of Pontine Infarct

    Eluvathingal Muttikkal, Thomas Jose; Kesser, Bradley W; Mukherjee, Sugoto

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral, acute onset sensorineural hearing loss (“sudden sensorineural hearing loss” [SSNHL]) as an isolated event without other associated neurological deficits usually results from a lesion of the cochlea. Lesions in the ascending central auditory pathways cranial to the cochlear nucleus seldom result in unilateral hearing loss due to decussation of the central auditory pathways at multiple levels. We describe a patient with a tiny acute infarct in the right pons resulting in isolated ac...

  13. Transforming growth factor β1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Silvia Murillo-Cuesta; Julio Contreras; Teresa Rivera

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-β a...

  14. High-frequency audiometry: A means for early diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss

    Amir H Mehrparvar; Seyyed J Mirmohammadi; Abbas Ghoreyshi; Abolfazl Mollasadeghi; Ziba Loukzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), an irreversible disorder, is a common problem in industrial settings. Early diagnosis of NIHL can help prevent the progression of hearing loss, especially in speech frequencies. For early diagnosis of NIHL, audiometry is performed routinely in conventional frequencies. We designed this study to compare the effect of noise on high-frequency audiometry (HFA) and conventional audiometry. In a historical cohort study, we compared hearing threshold and prevalence...

  15. Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Iran: (1997-2012): Systematic Review Article.

    Ahmad Soltanzadeh; Hossein Ebrahimi; Majid Fallahi; Mojtaba Kamalinia; Shadi Ghassemi; Rostam Golmohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss, which is one of the 10 leading occupational diseases, is a debilitating and irreversible disease. During the recent 15-years period (1997–2012), several studies have investigated the association between noise, hearing damage and other side effects of noise in Iran. The aim of this study was to review systematically the relevant literature related to noise-induced hearing loss, lead to developing noise exposure limits. In this systematic review, two researchers inde...

  16. A Case of Bilateral Sudden Hearing Loss and Tinnitus after Salicylate Intoxication

    Kim, Sang Min; Jo, Joon-Man; Baek, Moo Jin; Jung, Kyu Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Salicylate, the active ingredient of aspirin can cause sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus when plasma concentrations reach a critical level. The ototoxic mechanisms of salicylate remain unclear but hearing and tinnitus usually recovers a few days after intoxication. There have been few reports of salicylate-induced ototoxicity in Korea, and the majority is caused by a low dose of aspirin. Herein, we report a case of sudden hearing loss and tinnitus after acute salicylate intoxication and...

  17. Hearing Loss as a Function of Aging and Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

    Oh, In-Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Park, Dong Choon; Kim, MyungGu; Chung, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2014-01-01

    Background Although hearing loss may be caused by various factors, it is also a natural phenomenon associated with the aging process. This study was designed to assess the contributions of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension, both chronic diseases associated with aging, as well as aging itself, to hearing loss in health screening examinees. Methods This study included 37,773 individuals who underwent health screening examinations from 2009 to 2012. The relationships between hearing thresh...

  18. SENSORY HEARING LOSS IN CHILDREN WITH MUMPS WITH MUMPS INFECTION

    S. Noorbaksh MD

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Mumps infection is endemic in Iran and mumps parotiditis is a common disease in Iranian children. There has been a dramatic decrease in the worldwide incidence of mumps since the introduction and use in 1968 of the very effective and inexpensive mumps vaccine.In Iran probably due to a higher percentage of unvaccinated young persons Material& Methods:This descriptive case-series study was conducted in 94children, aged less than 14 years,  hospitalized between 1999 and 2001, in the pediatric ward of the Hazrat Rasool Hospital in Tehran. All patients with documented mumps infection (specific mumps-IgM antibody were evaluated twice for audiometeric function on the basis of diagnostic parameters for sensory neural hearing loss; the first evaluation was done on admission and the second three weeks later. 54 patients (age range 1-14y, mean age 4.83±3.93, male: female ratio30:24 were studied in two years.Results:The highest incidence of mumps was seen in winter (37% and spring (28% and the lowest in summer (13%. Specific IgM antibody for mumps virus was detected in 74 children. Comprehensive audiologic evaluation was done in 54 patients at admission and again 3 weeks later. SNHL was detected in 7.2% of patients; the 4.4% incidence of SNHL in this study was higher than in other studies in developed countries prior to comprehensive vaccination programs.Conclusion:Implementation of comprehensive vaccination programs in young Iranians could dramatically reduce the burden and costs imposed by the infection and its sequelae.Keywords: Mumps infection ;SNLH(sensorineural hearing loss;Mumps vaccination

  19. Identifying Minimal Hearing Loss and Managing Its Effects on Literacy Learning

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Hendricks, Alison Eisel

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that students who have moderate to profound hearing loss may experience difficulty in learning how to read and write and can benefit from modifications to the classroom environment and curriculum, however, minimal hearing loss often goes undiagnosed, and its negative impact on literacy acquisition is less widely known.…

  20. Thyroid carcinoma, cataract and hearing loss in a patient after irradiation for facial hemangioma

    A rare case of a patient irradiated on the right side of the face for a large hemangioma during early childhood is reported. This patient suffers from sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and a cataract of the right eye, and she underwent surgery for Hurtle cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland. The literature discussing radiation-induced hearing loss is reviewed. (author)

  1. Curing Hearing Loss: Patient Expectations, Health Care Practitioners, and Basic Science

    Oshima, Kazuo; Suchert, Steffen; Blevins, Nikolas H.; Heller, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Millions of patients are debilitated by hearing loss, mainly caused by degeneration of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. The underlying reasons for hair cell loss are highly diverse, ranging from genetic disposition, drug side effects, traumatic noise exposure, to the effects of aging. Whereas modern hearing aids offer some relief of the symptoms…

  2. Preliminary speech recognition results after cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral hearing loss: a case series

    Stelzig Yvonne

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cochlear implants known to provide support in individuals with bilateral hearing loss may also be of great benefit for individuals with unilateral hearing loss. This case report demonstrates the positive effects of cochlear implantation on speech understanding in noise conditions in patients with unilateral hearing loss and normal hearing on the contralateral side. To the best of our knowledge, the data presented here are from the first few cases to receive a cochlear implant for unilateral hearing loss. Case presentation Four Caucasian German men, two aged 48 and the others aged 51 and 57 years old, with post-lingual unilateral hearing loss and normal hearing on the contralateral side were implanted with a cochlear implant. All our patients were members of the German army. Before and after implantation, they were given a battery of speech tests in different hearing conditions to assess the effect of unilateral cochlear implantation on speech understanding in noise conditions. Test results showed that all patients benefited from unilateral cochlear implantation, particularly in terms of speech understanding in noise conditions. Conclusions Unilateral cochlear implantation might be a successful treatment method for patients with unilateral hearing loss not benefiting from alternative treatment options. The results of this case report open up the field of cochlear implantation for expanded criteria and new areas of research.

  3. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Roed, Henrik; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Thomasen, Per Caye; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and...

  4. Anosmia associated with hearing loss and benign positional vertigo after head trauma

    Ottaviano, G; Marioni, G; Marchese-Ragona, R; Trevisan, CP; De Filippis, C; Staffieri, A

    2009-01-01

    Summary It is well known that head trauma may cause hearing loss, which can be either conductive or sensorineural. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and olfactory dysfunction due to head trauma are also well known. The association between sensorineural hearing loss and anosmia, following head trauma, is extremely rare. Two rare cases of post-traumatic occurrence of hearing loss, olfactory dysfunction and benign positional vertigo are reported and the pathophysiology of the association between sensorineural hearing loss, anosmia and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, after head injury, are briefly discussed. ENT specialists should, in the Authors’ opinion, be aware of the possible association between anosmia, sensorineural hearing loss and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after head injury, even in the absence of skull fracture. PMID:20162029

  5. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Caye-Thomasen, P.; Brandt, C.T.; Thomsen, J.; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the pneumoco...... common after pneumococcal meningitis, and audiometry should be performed on all those who survive pneumococcal meningitis. Important risk factors for hearing loss are advanced age, female sex, severity of meningitis, and bacterial serotype......Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the...... pneumococcal serotype) for development of hearing loss. Methods. Results of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry, bacterial serotyping, follow-up audiological examinations, and medical records were collected, and disease-related risk factors for hearing loss were identified. The mean pure...

  6. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss.

  7. Exposure smart hearing protector for reducing noise-induced hearing loss

    Nykaza, Ed; Frank, Tom

    2003-10-01

    The Exposure Smart Hearing Protector (ESHP) is a new device that can be used for measuring noise exposure levels (NELs) and the prevention of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). The ESHP consists of two microphones, located in a right and left earplug, that are connected to a dosimeter. In practice, the user wears the ESHP. When the noise level exceeds a safe dose a warning light comes on. The user then inserts the earplugs. If the earplugs are correctly inserted and the noise level in the user's earcanal is below a safe level the warning lights go off. As a result, the ESHP measures the user's total daily noise exposure (unprotected and protected). To increase the efficiency of using the ESHP for preventing NIHL, the user downloads the information stored in the ESHP via a scanner into user friendly-software. The software can be used not only to record a user's daily NELs, but more importantly to determine if the user needs intervention because the NELs exceed a safe level. The purpose of this poster session is to demonstrate the ESHP and software, and to report the results of a pilot study. [Work supported by NIOSH/CDC Grant No. U60/CCU 315855.

  8. Hearing loss in children with very low birth weight: current review of epidemiology and pathophysiology.

    Cristobal, R; Oghalai, J S

    2008-11-01

    An association between birth weight weight (VLBW)) and hearing loss has been long recognised. As universal hearing screening programmes have become widely implemented and the survival rate of VLBW babies in modern intensive care units has increased, we have gained a substantially better understanding of the nature of this problem. However, many gaps in our knowledge base exist. This review describes recent data on hearing loss in the VLBW population and explains the current level of understanding about the physiological basis underlying the auditory deficits in these patients. Although VLBW alone may not have a severe impact on hearing, it is commonly associated with multiple other risk factors that can alter hearing in a synergistic fashion. Therefore, the risk of hearing loss is substantially higher than in the general newborn population. Also, it is important to perform a more comprehensive audiometric evaluation than standard otoacoustic emission screening for infants who are in the neonatal intensive care unit in order not to miss hearing loss due to retrocochlear pathology. Furthermore, children with VLBW are also at increased risk of experiencing progressive or delayed-onset hearing loss, and thus should continue to have serial hearing evaluations after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:18941031

  9. Effects of Korean Red Ginseng on Hearing and Blood Glucose Levels in Steroid Therapy for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Park, So-Young; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Jun-Kyu; Park, Kyoung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Korean red ginseng (KRG) has hypoglycemic, antioxidant, antithrombotic, and other beneficial effects in human. The present study evaluate the therapeutic effects of KRG on hearing recovery and glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycemia in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) undergoing systemic steroid therapy. Methods The patients were divided into 2 groups: the steroid, and the combination of steroid and red ginseng. Pure tone averages (PTA) were assessed ...

  10. Relationships among hearing loss, cognition and balance ability in community-dwelling older adults

    Koh, Da Hyun; Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Hee Joong

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among hearing loss, cognition, and balance ability in elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 46 elderly individuals over 65 years of age who were attending senior welfare centers participated in this study. Through a hearing test, the speech frequency pure tone average in the better ear was checked. We set a criterion of hearing loss if the better ear hearing level (BEHL) value was 25 dB or more. Cognition a...

  11. Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Clinical Populations with Hearing Loss.

    Sharma, Anu; Glick, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    We review evidence for cross-modal cortical re-organization in clinical populations with hearing loss. Cross-modal plasticity refers to the ability for an intact sensory modality (e.g., vision or somatosensation) to recruit cortical brain regions from a deprived sensory modality (e.g., audition) to carry out sensory processing. We describe evidence for cross-modal changes in hearing loss across the age-spectrum and across different degrees of hearing impairment, including children with profound, bilateral deafness with cochlear implants, single-sided deafness before and after cochlear implantation, and adults with early-stage, mild-moderate, age-related hearing loss. Understanding cross-modal plasticity in the context of auditory deprivation, and the potential for reversal of these changes following intervention, may be vital in directing intervention and rehabilitation options for clinical populations with hearing loss. PMID:26821049

  12. Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Clinical Populations with Hearing Loss

    Anu Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review evidence for cross-modal cortical re-organization in clinical populations with hearing loss. Cross-modal plasticity refers to the ability for an intact sensory modality (e.g., vision or somatosensation to recruit cortical brain regions from a deprived sensory modality (e.g., audition to carry out sensory processing. We describe evidence for cross-modal changes in hearing loss across the age-spectrum and across different degrees of hearing impairment, including children with profound, bilateral deafness with cochlear implants, single-sided deafness before and after cochlear implantation, and adults with early-stage, mild-moderate, age-related hearing loss. Understanding cross-modal plasticity in the context of auditory deprivation, and the potential for reversal of these changes following intervention, may be vital in directing intervention and rehabilitation options for clinical populations with hearing loss.

  13. Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Clinical Populations with Hearing Loss

    Sharma, Anu; Glick, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    We review evidence for cross-modal cortical re-organization in clinical populations with hearing loss. Cross-modal plasticity refers to the ability for an intact sensory modality (e.g., vision or somatosensation) to recruit cortical brain regions from a deprived sensory modality (e.g., audition) to carry out sensory processing. We describe evidence for cross-modal changes in hearing loss across the age-spectrum and across different degrees of hearing impairment, including children with profound, bilateral deafness with cochlear implants, single-sided deafness before and after cochlear implantation, and adults with early-stage, mild-moderate, age-related hearing loss. Understanding cross-modal plasticity in the context of auditory deprivation, and the potential for reversal of these changes following intervention, may be vital in directing intervention and rehabilitation options for clinical populations with hearing loss. PMID:26821049

  14. Mild hearing loss can cause apparent memory failures which increase with age and reduce with IQ.

    Rabbitt, P

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit (1968) tested the accuracy with which young adults with excellent hearing could repeat lists of numbers, words or continuous text which they heard over a system which maintained a constant ratio of white noise to speech signal irrespective of signal strength. Noise levels which allowed individual subjects correctly to repeat every word as they heard it (i.e. shadow without errors) nevertheless reduced their ability to remember what they had heard. This appeared to be because increased effort necessary to recognise words through low levels of noise prevented adequate rehearsal or elaborative encoding of material to be remembered. This finding that slight degradation of sensory input had secondary consequences on memory and comprehension of spoken material led to an interpretation of findings that 960 individuals aged from 50 to 82 years, in contrast to young adults, showed markedly better recall for word lists presented visually than for word lists presented auditorally, even when each word in each list was correctly read or repeated aloud. Audiometric screening of a sub-set of this population allowed 30 individuals with mild hearing losses (35 to 50 db) in each of the three age-decades 50 to 59, 60 to 69 and 70 to 79 years to be compared with matched controls who had pure-tone hearing losses of less than 35 db on memory for lists of 30 words presented visually or over a good-quality sound system. In both presentation modes lists were only scored if all words were correctly read or repeated. Individuals with slight hearing loss recalled visually presented words as well, but recalled auditorally presented words significantly less well, than their controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2087959

  15. Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after ototoxic hearing loss

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; He, Peijie; Jung, Jae Yun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Lee, Min Young; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2013-12-01

    The primary cause of hearing loss includes damage to cochlear hair cells. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has become a popular treatment for damaged nervous systems. Based on the idea that cochlea hair cells and neural cells are from same developmental origin, the effect of LLLT on hearing loss in animal models is evaluated. Hearing loss animal models were established, and the animals were irradiated by 830-nm diode laser once a day for 10 days. Power density of the laser treatment was 900 mW/cm2, and the fluence was 162 to 194 J. The tympanic membrane was evaluated after LLLT. Thresholds of auditory brainstem responses were evaluated before treatment, after gentamicin, and after 10 days of LLLT. Quantitative scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations were done by counting remaining hair cells. Tympanic membranes were intact at the end of the experiment. No adverse tissue reaction was found. On SEM images, LLLT significantly increased the number of hair cells in middle and basal turns. Hearing was significantly improved by laser irradiation. After LLLT treatment, both the hearing threshold and hair-cell count significantly improved.

  16. Biophysical Mechanisms Underlying Hearing Loss Associated with a Shortened Tectorial Membrane

    Oghalai, John S.; Xia, Anping; Liu, Christopher C.; Gao, Simon S.; Applegate, Brian E.; Puria, Sunil; Rousso, Itay; Steele, Charles

    2011-11-01

    The tectorial membrane (TM) connects to the stereociliary bundles of outer hair cells (OHCs). Herein, we summarize key experimental data and modeling analyses that describe how biophysical alterations to these connections underlie hearing loss. The heterozygous C1509G mutation in alpha tectorin produces partial congenital hearing loss that progresses in humans. We engineered this mutation in mice, and histology revealed that the TM was shortened. DIC imaging of freshly-dissected cochlea as well as imaging with optical coherence tomography indicated that the TM is malformed and only stimulates the first row of OHCs. Noise exposure produced acute threshold shifts that fully recovered in Tecta+/+ mice although there was some OHC loss within all three rows at the cochlear base. In contrast, threshold shifts only partially recovered in TectaC1509G/+ mice. This was associated with OHC loss more apically and nearly entirely within the first row. Young's modulus of the TM, measured using atomic force microscopy, was substantially reduced at the middle and basal regions. Both the wild-type and heterozygous conditions were simulated in a computational model. This demonstrated that the normalized stress distribution levels between the TM and the tall cilia were significantly elevated in the middle region of the heterozygous cochlea. Another feature of the TectaC1509G/+ mutation is higher prestin expression within all three rows of OHCs. This increased electricallyevoked movements of the reticular lamina and otoacoustic emissions. Furthermore, electrical stimulation was associated with an increased risk of OHC death as measured by vital dye staining. Together, these findings indicate that uncoupling of the TM from some OHCs not only leads to partial hearing loss, but also puts the OHCs that remain coupled at higher risk. Both the mechanics of the malformed TM and increased electromotility contribute to this higher risk profile.

  17. A stepwise approach to the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary hearing loss.

    Tomaski, S M; Grundfast, K M

    1999-02-01

    What To Do Do suspect a genetic cause in all cases of hearing loss. Do develop a working knowledge of common types of HHI that you may draw on to aid in diagnosis. Do think of HHI when the audiogram reveals a hearing loss with a "cookie bite" configuration. Do refer the infant to a geneticist in cases where you suspect a syndromic HHI, a nonsyndromic HHI, and in cases of "cryptogenic" hearing loss where an underlying HHI may be present. Often, the associated symptoms are subtle and best detected by a professional who deals with these issues on a daily basis. Do get the infant or family plugged into an audiologist or otolaryngologist and speech pathologist who will preferably work as a team to maximize aural rehabilitation and ensure serial follow-up. It is never too early to fit a child with hearing aids. Do refer to the HHIRR center at Boys Town. Do refer to the correct "deaf" organization or "blind-deaf" organization. Do think about working up other siblings or family members. Do keep in mind that some members of the "deaf society" may regard deafness as an alternative lifestyle and may not be amenable to their child's referral for additional workup and aural rehabilitation. What Not To Do Do not assume the child is deaf and nothing can be done. Do not wait until the child is older to refer to an otolaryngologist, speech therapist, and audiologist. Do not order a sonogram. Do not order a temporal bone CT scan on newborns. Do not forget about other siblings who may have a similar pathology. Do not forget that some forms of HHI can present beyond infancy. The pediatrician is the front line and can play a major role in the diagnosis, workup, and treatment of HHI. Armed with the proper degree of suspicion, careful elicitation of family history, meticulous physical examination, evaluation of the audiogram, and adequate fund of knowledge of common types of genetic deafness, the pediatrician can make a timely diagnosis and appropriate referrals. This avoids delay in detection of significant hearing impairment and the associated lack of essential skills in speech, language, and social interaction. No child is too young to have some type of hearing assessment. Early detection and intervention are best done with a multidisciplinary team approach with a neonatologist or pediatrician, audiologist, speech therapist, and otolaryngologist. In the future, blood tests using genetic probes may be available to screen for many types of HHI. PMID:10079788

  18. How Hearing Loss Impacts Communication. Tipsheet: Serving Students Who Are Hard of Hearing

    Atcherson, Samuel R.; Johnson, Marni I.

    2009-01-01

    Hearing, or auditory processing, involves the use of many hearing skills in a single or combined fashion. The sounds that humans hear can be characterized by their intensity (loudness), frequency (pitch), and timing. Impairment of any of the auditory structures from the visible ear to the central auditory nervous system within the brain can have a…

  19. Large-scale phenotyping of noise-induced hearing loss in 100 strains of mice.

    Myint, Anthony; White, Cory H; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Li, Xin; Wang, Juemei; Lavinsky, Joel; Salehi, Pezhman; Crow, Amanda L; Ohyama, Takahiro; Friedman, Rick A

    2016-02-01

    A cornerstone technique in the study of hearing is the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR), an electrophysiologic technique that can be used as a quantitative measure of hearing function. Previous studies have published databases of baseline ABR thresholds for mouse strains, providing a valuable resource for the study of baseline hearing function and genetic mapping of hearing traits in mice. In this study, we further expand upon the existing literature by characterizing the baseline ABR characteristics of 100 inbred mouse strains, 47 of which are newly characterized for hearing function. We identify several distinct patterns of baseline hearing deficits and provide potential avenues for further investigation. Additionally, we characterize the sensitivity of the same 100 strains to noise exposure using permanent thresholds shifts, identifying several distinct patterns of noise-sensitivity. The resulting data provides a new resource for studying hearing loss and noise-sensitivity in mice. PMID:26706709

  20. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with unilateral safe chronic suppurative otitis media

    Manpreet Singh Nanda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM is the major cause of hearing impairment, mainly conductive type of hearing loss. The occurrence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in CSOM is controversial and the controversy is more for safe mucosal type. This study aims to assess the association between SNHL and safe mucosal CSOM and its relation to patient's age, sex, duration of disease, active or inactive disease and speech frequencies. Methods: 100 patients with unilateral mucosal type of CSOM with normal contralateral ear were included in the study. The infected ear was taken as study ear and normal ear as control ear in all patients. All patients underwent hearing assessment by pure tone audiometry for both ears. In case of active disease, ear discharge was first cleared and then audiometric assessment done. Results were statistically compared in all patients for both study and control ears using parameters of patient's age, sex, duration of disease, speech frequency and active or inactive disease. Results: There was significant higher number of study ears with CSOM having average bone conduction threshold of all frequencies above 25 decibels which implies SNHL (21% compared to control contralateral ears without infection (5%. There was higher incidence of SNHL at higher speech frequencies. The incidence also increased with age of patient and duration of disease. The incidence was higher in active stage than inactive or quiescent stage. There was no difference among males and females. Conclusion: Safe mucosal CSOM can cause significant SNHL and risk increases with increasing age, duration of disease, higher speech frequencies and presence of active disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 551-555

  1. Tracking occupational hearing loss across global industries: A comparative analysis of metrics

    Peter M Rabinowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational hearing loss is one of the most prevalent occupational conditions; yet, there is no acknowledged international metric to allow comparisons of risk between different industries and regions. In order to make recommendations for an international standard of occupational hearing loss, members of an international industry group (the International Aluminium Association submitted details of different hearing loss metrics currently in use by members. We compared the performance of these metrics using an audiometric data set for over 6000 individuals working in 10 locations of one member company. We calculated rates for each metric at each location from 2002 to 2006. For comparison, we calculated the difference of observed-expected (for age binaural high-frequency hearing loss (in dB/year for each location over the same time period. We performed linear regression to determine the correlation between each metric and the observed-expected rate of hearing loss. The different metrics produced discrepant results, with annual rates ranging from 0.0% for a less-sensitive metric to more than 10% for a highly sensitive metric. At least two metrics, a 10dB age-corrected threshold shift from baseline and a 15dB nonage-corrected shift metric, correlated well with the difference of observed-expected high-frequency hearing loss. This study suggests that it is feasible to develop an international standard for tracking occupational hearing loss in industrial working populations.

  2. Is there a risk to safety when working in the New South Wales underground coal-mining industry while having binaural noise-induced hearing loss?

    Viljoen, D.A.; Nie, V.; Guest, M. [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2006-03-15

    This study is designed to investigate the possible association between hearing loss and accidents in the New South Wales underground coal-mining industry. The study was conducted, gathering data over a 10-year period from 1994 to 2003, which identified 97 cases that have had accidents and 983 controls that have had no accidents. Hearing loss levels were noted and compared in the cases and controls. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine whether the variables were significant risk factors in the occurrence of accidents. Hearing loss levels in the total cohort varied from 0 to 54%. The proportion of cases with hearing loss appeared to be significantly higher in the young age group of {lt} 29 years than in the controls, but was not significantly different in the older age groups. This study indicates that workers who have lost up to 54% binaural high tone hearing and are older than 29 years do not appear to have an increased risk to safety when compared with workers who do not have hearing loss. However, workers in the young age group of {lt} 29 years who have high tone hearing loss may be at an increased risk of accident.

  3. Socioeconomic Position and Health-Seeking Behavior for Hearing Loss Among Older Adults in England.

    Benova, L; Grundy, E.; Ploubidis, GB

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether socioeconomic position (SEP) is associated with progression in the health-seeking process for hearing loss. Method. Logistic regression of data from a cross-sectional survey representative of noninstitutionalized, 50 years and older population of England (ELSA wave 2, 2004). Using self-reported hearing difficulty as starting point, we examined the association between SEP and health-seeking behaviors in 6 stages leading to hearing aid acquisition and use. ...

  4. Assessment of the risk factors for hearing loss in adult Nigerian population

    Olusola Ayodele Sogebi

    2013-01-01

    Background: A reduction in hearing sensitivity is common in adults and was previously considered to be normal as age increases. However, other health variables may play a role in the sensory changes. This prospective, comparative, hospital-based study assessed the risk factors (RFs) associated with sensorineural hearing losses (SNHL) in adult patients in a specialized tertiary hospital clinic in South-western Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Patients with clinical diagnosis of hearing impairme...

  5. Prospective study of inner ear radiation dose and hearing loss in head-and-neck cancer patients

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between the radiation dose to the inner ear and long-term hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those receiving curative radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer. After enrollment, patients underwent three-dimensional conformal RT planning and delivery (180-200 cGy/fraction) appropriate for their disease site and stage. The inner ear was contoured on axial CT planning images. Dose-volume histograms, as well as the mean and maximal dose for each structure, were calculated. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry at baseline (before treatment) and 1, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after RT. The threshold level (the greater the value, the more hearing loss) in decibels was recorded for 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz. For patients receiving predominantly unilateral RT, the contralateral ear served as the de facto control. The differences in threshold level between the ipsilateral and contralateral ears were calculated, and the temporal pattern and dose-response relation of hearing loss were analyzed using statistical methods that take into account the correlation between two ears in the same subject and repeated, sequential measurements of each subject. Results: Of the 40 patients enrolled in this study, 35 qualified for analysis. Four patients who received concurrent chemotherapy and RT were analyzed separately. The 31 unilaterally treated patients received a median dose of 47.4 Gy (range, 14.1-68.8 Gy) to the ipsilateral inner ear and 4.2 Gy (range, 0.5-31.3 Gy) to the contralateral inner ear. Hearing loss was associated with the radiation dose received by the inner ear (loss of 210dB was observed in ears receiving ≥45 Gy) and was most appreciable in the higher frequencies (≥2000 Hz). For a 60-year-old patient with no previous hearing loss in either ear, after receiving 45 Gy, the ipsilateral ear, according to our clinical model, would have a 19.3-dB (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.5-23.0) and 5.4-dB (95% CI, 3.5-7.5) hearing decrement compared with the contralateral ear for 8000 Hz and 1000 Hz, respectively. Age and an initial hearing difference within an ear pair also affected hearing loss. The baseline hearing threshold was inversely related to radiation-induced hearing loss. The degree of hearing loss was dependent on the frequency tested, age, baseline hearing, and baseline difference in hearing between a patient's two ears. Conclusion: High-frequency (≥2000 Hz) hearing acuity worsens significantly after RT in a dose-dependent fashion. A larger number of patients needs to be studied to validate these results. This knowledge can be applied to create guidelines regarding future dose limits to the auditory apparatus for patients undergoing head-and-neck RT

  6. Toy weapons and firecrackers: a source of hearing loss.

    Gupta, D; Vishwakarma, S K

    1989-03-01

    Although acoustic injury as a result of exposure to noisy toys and firecrackers has been reported previously, most of these studies have been conducted on adults. The purpose of this prospective study, conducted at the time of Deepawali, an Indian festival of fireworks, was two-fold: 1. to measure the acoustic output of representative samples of toy weapons and firecrackers and the intensity level at critical spectator points from the site of emission; and 2. to determine the auditory status of a cross section of the target population, involving 600 participants from various age groups, before and after exposure to firecracker noise at Deepawali. The average sound level at a distance of 3 m was 150 dB, thus exceeding the damage risk criterion for adults (i.e., 130 dB peak level). An average 30 dB persistent sensorineural hearing loss was found in 2.5% of the target population as a result of toy weapon/firecracker noise during Deepawali. The 9- to 15-year-old age group was most affected. A judicious approach in the manufacture and use of toy weapons and firecrackers, in addition to legal restraints, is advocated. PMID:2918804

  7. Acute sensorineural hearing loss and severe otalgia due to scrub typhus

    Kim Dong-Min

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Case presentations We encountered a patient with sensorineural hearing loss complicating scrub typhus, and three patients with scrub typhus who complained of otalgia, which was sudden onset, severe, paroxysmal, intermittent yet persistent pain lasting for several seconds, appeared within 1 week after the onset of fever and rash. The acute sensorineural hearing loss and otalgia were resolved after antibiotic administration. Conclusion When patients in endemic areas present with fever and rash and have sensorineural hearing loss or otalgia without otoscopic abnormalities, clinicians should suspect scrub typhus and consider empirical antibiotic therapy.

  8. Isolated contralateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss: an unusual manifestation of pontine infarct.

    Muttikkal, Thomas Jose Eluvathingal; Kesser, Bradley W; Mukherjee, Sugoto

    2014-09-01

    Unilateral, acute onset sensorineural hearing loss ("sudden sensorineural hearing loss" [SSNHL]) as an isolated event without other associated neurological deficits usually results from a lesion of the cochlea. Lesions in the ascending central auditory pathways cranial to the cochlear nucleus seldom result in unilateral hearing loss due to decussation of the central auditory pathways at multiple levels. We describe a patient with a tiny acute infarct in the right pons resulting in isolated acute onset left-sided SSHNL, without any other associated acute neurological deficits. PMID:25196624

  9. Sudden hearing loss subsequent to diarrhea: what is the missing link?

    Jafari, Gholamali; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammadreza; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a debilitating condition with an incidence of nearly 20 per 100,000 in populations. Metronidazole-induced ototoxicity is an extremely rare etiology of SSNHL. In this report, we describe a young female with bilateral SSNHL due to oral use of metronidazole. A 23 years old female presented to the emergency department with acute bilateral hearing loss. We found out that her hearing loss had started 4 days after initiation of metronidazole which was adm...

  10. Hearing loss in the royal Norwegian navy:a cross-sectional study

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Sunde, Erlend; Bråtveit, Magne; Baste, Valborg; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Lind, Ola; Moen, Bente Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prior studies have indicated a high prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among Navy personnel; however, it is not clear whether this is caused by work on board. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of hearing loss among Navy personnel in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN), and to investigate whether there is an association between work on board RNoN vessels and occurrence of hearing loss.

    Methods Navy personnel currently working on board RNoN...

  11. Case report: Unilateral conduction hearing loss due to central venous occlusion.

    Ribeiro, Phillip; Patel, Swetal; Qazi, Rizwan A

    2016-01-01

    Central venous stenosis is a well-known complication in patients with vascular access for hemodialysis. We report two cases involving patients on hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistulas who developed reversible unilateral conductive hearing loss secondary to critical stenosis of central veins draining the arteriovenous dialysis access. A proposed mechanism for the patients' reversible unilateral hearing loss is pterygoid venous plexus congestion leading to decreased Eustachian tube patency. Endovascular therapy was conducted to treat the stenosis and the hearing loss of both patients was returned to near normal after successful central venous angioplasty. PMID:27079669

  12. Hearing loss - non genetic etiology of newborns diagnosed in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Domuta, EM; Marginean, E; V. Sala; Valenas, O; Venter, C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to assess the newborns hospitalized in The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Emergency County Clinical Hospital Oradea with positive screening for hearing loss and to identify non-genetic causes of the hearing loss.Materials and Methods: This prospective study was presented in NICU in the period January 2008 to June 2012, on a number of 139 newborns with positive screening for hearing loss at the second test (AABR+TEOAE). Were excluded from the study newb...

  13. The Frequency of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Prescription in the Clients of the Avesina Education and Health Center, Audiometry Clinic, 1377

    Abbas Bastani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determining the frequency of hearing disorders and hearing aid using in the clients referring to the Avesina education and health center, audiometry clinic, 1377. Method and Material: This is an assesive-descriptive survey that conducted on more than 2053 (1234 males and 819 females who referred for audiometry after examination by a physician. Case history, otoscopy, PTA, speech and immittance audiometry were conducted for all the clients. The findings were expressed in tables and diagrams of frequency. The age and sex relationship. All types of hearing losses and the number of the hearing-impaired clients need a hearing aid were assessed. Findings: 56% of this population were hearing-impaired and 44% had normal hearing were hearing. 60% were males and 40% females. Of the hearing-impaired, 44% had SNHL, 35.6% CHL and 8.2% mixed hearing loss. The hearing aid was prescribed for 204 (83 females and121 males if they need that only 20 females and 32 males wear it. Conclusion: It this sample, SNHL is of higher frequency. According to this survey, the more the age, the more the hearing aid is accepted (85% of wearer are more than 49 the prevalence of the hearing impaired males are more than females (60% versus 40%. Only 25% of the hearing-impaired wear hearing aids.

  14. The association between low levels of lead in blood and occupational noise-induced hearing loss in steel workers

    As the use of leaded gasoline has ceased in the last decade, background lead exposure has generally been reduced. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level lead exposure on human hearing loss. This study was conducted in a steel plant and 412 workers were recruited from all over the plant. Personal information such as demographics and work history was obtained through a questionnaire. All subjects took part in an audiometric examination of hearing thresholds, for both ears, with air-conducted pure tones at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. Subjects' blood samples were collected and analyzed for levels of manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead with inductive couple plasma-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, noise levels in different working zones were determined using a sound level meter with A-weighting network. Only subjects with hearing loss difference of no more than 15 dB between both ears and had no congenital abnormalities were included in further data analysis. Lead was the only metal in blood found significantly correlated with hearing loss for most tested sound frequencies (p < 0.05 to p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and noise level, the logistic regression model analysis indicated that elevated blood lead over 7 μg/dL was significantly associated with hearing loss at the sound frequencies of 3000 through 8000 Hz with odds ratios raging from 3.06 to 6.26 (p < 0.05 ∼ p < 0.005). We concluded that elevated blood lead at level below 10 μg/dL might enhance the noise-induced hearing loss. Future research needs to further explore the detailed mechanism.

  15. Fabry disease presenting with sudden hearing loss and otosclerosis: a case report

    Felisati Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting in a multiple-system disorder with a wide spectrum of physical signs and symptoms, predominantly affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems, skin, heart, kidneys, and eyes. Case presentation We describe the case of a 26-year-old European Caucasian man who had Fabry disease and who presented with episodic sudden unilateral hearing loss and was treated with glucocorticoids, pentoxifylline, hyperbaric oxygen, and fluoride because of concomitant audiometric evidence of otosclerosis. This case demonstrates the partial and transient beneficial effect of standard treatment for sudden hearing loss not related to Fabry disease and analyzes the possible connection between typical Fabry disease inner-ear lesions and otosclerosis. Whereas hearing loss has been described in connection with Fabry disease, otosclerosis-associated hearing loss in Fabry disease has not yet been described. Conclusions Although progressive hearing loss in patients with Fabry disease seems to be influenced by replacement therapy, few data concerning treatment of sudden hearing loss are available. The lack of literature concerning the pathogenesis of the otological involvement in Fabry disease makes it impossible to identify a connection between the latter and otosclerosis. Therefore, this report may help to reinforce the importance of a thorough evaluation of hearing in patients with Fabry disease and may be of help with therapeutic decision-making.

  16. Hearing Loss Severity: Impaired Processing of Formant Transition Duration

    Coez, A.; Belin, P.; Bizaguet, E.; Ferrary, E.; Zilbovicius, M.; Samson, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Normal hearing listeners exploit the formant transition (FT) detection to identify place of articulation for stop consonants. Neuro-imaging studies revealed that short FT induced less cortical activation than long FT. To determine the ability of hearing impaired listeners to distinguish short and long formant transitions (FT) from vowels of the…

  17. Hearing Loss Severity: Impaired Processing of Formant Transition Duration

    Coez, A.; Belin, P.; Bizaguet, E.; Ferrary, E.; Zilbovicius, M.; Samson, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Normal hearing listeners exploit the formant transition (FT) detection to identify place of articulation for stop consonants. Neuro-imaging studies revealed that short FT induced less cortical activation than long FT. To determine the ability of hearing impaired listeners to distinguish short and long formant transitions (FT) from vowels of the…

  18. Are open-fit hearing aids a possible alternative to bone-anchored hearing devices in patients with mild to severe hearing loss? A preliminary trial

    Amberley V. Ostevik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Open-fit hearing aids (OFHAs may be of benefit for some individuals with chronic outer and middle ear conditions for which boneanchored hearing devices (BAHDs are normally recommended. The purpose of this study was to compare performance between OFHAs and BAHDs. A Starkey Destiny 800 OFHA was fit on eight adult BAHD users and speech perception measures in quiet and in background noise were compared under two different test conditions: i BAHD only and ii OFHA only. Equivalent outcome measure performance between these two conditions suggests that the OFHA was able to provide sufficient amplification for mild to moderate degrees of hearing loss (pure-tone averages (PTAs less than 47 dB HL. The improved speech perception performances and increased loudness ratings observed for several of the participants with moderately-severe to severe degrees of hearing loss (PTAs of 47 dB HL or greater in the BAHD only condition suggest that the OFHA did not provide sufficient amplification for these individuals. Therefore, OFHAs may be a successful alternative to the BAHD for individuals with no more than a moderate conductive hearing loss who are unable or unwilling to undergo implant surgery or unable to wear conventional hearing aids due to allergies, irritation, or chronic infection associated with the ear being blocked with a shell or earmold.

  19. Is sensorineural hearing loss a possible side effect of nasopharyngeal and parotid irradiation? A systematic review of the literature

    Background and purpose: Little has been published about permanent hearing loss due to radiotherapy, thus making it a rather unknown phenomenon. Therefore, we performed a study of the literature over the last 20 years. Materials and methods: Sixteen relevant clinical studies were found, reporting mostly on nasopharyngeal or parotid gland treatments. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiogram. Studies were assessed using a simple scoring list. Nine studies were used for further analysis. Data on the pure tone audiogram were pooled. Results: Results showed that, especially in the higher frequencies (?4 kHz), loss can be measured. When data were pooled, in 42±3% of the patients a hearing loss was found of 10 dB or more at 4 kHz. Averaged over all measured frequencies the effect is less prominent but still statistically significant (18±2%). No significant difference between nasopharyngeal and parotid gland treatment was found (P<0.05). Conclusion: Only a few studies, mostly concerning small patient numbers, have investigated hearing damage due to radiotherapy. So far there has been no consensus on the subject. However, in this systematic review we found a significant effect. Dose to the inner ear therefore deserves more attention, especially in dose escalation studies and inverse planning

  20. Early Hearing Loss and Language Abilities in Children with Down Syndrome

    Laws, Glynis; Hall, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although many children with Down syndrome experience hearing loss, there has been little research to investigate its impact on speech and language development. Studies that have investigated the association give inconsistent results. These have often been based on samples where children with the most severe hearing impairments have…

  1. The Impact of Childhood Hearing Loss on the Family: Mothers' and Fathers' Stress and Coping Resources

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Most, Tova; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Haddad-eid, Eliana; Brand, Devora

    2016-01-01

    Parenting children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) presents unique long-term challenges that can place the parents at a greater risk for elevated levels of parenting stress. Adaptation of families to the various challenges presented by childhood hearing loss is influenced by their personal and social coping resources available for managing…

  2. HEARING LOSS IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE - AN ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS

    Suja Sreedharan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic renal failure is believed to be of multifactorial etiology. Associated hypertension and diabetes mellitus, use of ototoxic drugs, hemodialysis and the changes in metabolic parameters are the various reasons quoted for the hearing loss. Objectives: Our study attempts to correlate the hearing thresholds with the multiple parameters like blood levels of urea, serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium and hemoglobin values incriminated in decreased hearing in CRF patients. Materials and methods:Prospective study of 25 patients receiving treatment for CRF. The threshold of the worsen ear was considered for statistical analysis. Results:18% of the patients at low frequencies (250 and 500 Hz, 32% of the patients at mid-frequencies (1000 and 2000 Hz, and 72% of the patients at high frequencies (4000 and 8000 Hz had decreased hearing for both bone and air conduction hearing. We found a positive correlation between hearing loss and increasing number of hemodialysis sessions, the levels of blood urea, serum creatinine, serum sodium and use of ototoxic drugs; while serum calcium, serum potassium and hemoglobin levels had a negative correlation. Conclusion:Though the management of CRF including hemodialysis has been refined, hearing loss continues to cause disability in CRF patients.

  3. Auditory Sequential Organization among Children with and without a Hearing Loss.

    Jutras, Benoit; Gagne, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Forty-eight children, either with or without a sensorineural hearing loss and either young (6 and 7 years old) or older (9 and 10 years old) reproduced sequences of acoustic stimuli that varied in number, temporal spacing, and type. Results suggested that the poorer performance of the hearing-impaired children was due to auditory processing…

  4. The Incidence of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss among Music Teachers.

    Cutietta, Robert A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports on a study to compare the hearing acuity of three groups of music teachers: (1) vocal; (2) elementary instrumental; and (3) high school instrumental. Finds some risk of hearing loss among high school band directors, but that the degree of risk varies widely among individuals. (CFR)

  5. School Nurses' Role in Identifying and Referring Children at Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Hendershot, Candace; Pakulski, Lori A.; Thompson, Amy; Dowling, Jamie; Price, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Young people are likely to experience noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), as the use of personal listening devices and other damaging factors (e.g., video games) increases. Little research has examined the role of school health personnel in the prevention and early identification of hearing impairment. A 32-item, valid and reliable survey was…

  6. Effect of Minimal Hearing Loss on Children's Ability to Multitask in Quiet and in Noise

    McFadden, Brittany; Pittman, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of minimal hearing loss (HL) on children's ability to perform simultaneous tasks in quiet and in noise. Method: Ten children with minimal HL and 11 children with normal hearing (NH) participated. Both groups ranged in age from 8 to 12 years. The children categorized common words…

  7. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Amir Hossain Ghazizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended.

  8. Children's Performance in Complex Listening Conditions: Effects of Hearing Loss and Digital Noise Reduction

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of hearing loss (HL) on children's performance for an auditory task under demanding listening conditions and to determine the effect of digital noise reduction (DNR) on that performance. Method: Fifty children with normal hearing (NH) and 30 children with HL (8-12 years of age) categorized words in the presence of…

  9. Parental Support for Language Development during Joint Book Reading for Young Children with Hearing Loss

    DesJardin, Jean L.; Doll, Emily R.; Stika, Carren J.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Johnson, Karen J.; Ganguly, Dianne Hammes; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.

    2014-01-01

    Parent and child joint book reading (JBR) characteristics and parent facilitative language techniques (FLTs) were investigated in two groups of parents and their young children; children with normal hearing (NH; "n" = 60) and children with hearing loss (HL; "n" = 45). Parent-child dyads were videotaped during JBR interactions,…

  10. Sensori-neural hearing loss after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: individualized risk estimation

    Background and purpose: Sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) is a common complication to radiation therapy in the upper head and neck region. In this study, we estimated the dose response relationship for SNHL with adjustment for pre-therapeutic risk factors. Patients and methods: The pre- and post-therapeutic hearing levels were recorded in a previously published study of 20 patients receiving radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, the dose to the inner ear of these patients was estimated with a computed tomography (CT) based treatment planning system. CT data from a 'proxy patient' were used for patients with no available CT scan. SNHL was analyzed as a function of radiation dose and potential risk factors were tested. Results: The incidence of SNHL increased significantly with increasing dose to the cochlea. Increasing patient's age, and decreasing pre-therapeutic hearing level were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of SNHL. A nomogram is presented for estimating individualized dose constraints of potential use in treatment planning. Conclusions: The inner ear is a critical structure in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the dose to the inner ear should be carefully considered when planning radiation treatment in this region

  11. Assessment of the risk factors for hearing loss in adult Nigerian population

    Olusola Ayodele Sogebi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A reduction in hearing sensitivity is common in adults and was previously considered to be normal as age increases. However, other health variables may play a role in the sensory changes. This prospective, comparative, hospital-based study assessed the risk factors (RFs associated with sensorineural hearing losses (SNHL in adult patients in a specialized tertiary hospital clinic in South-western Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Patients with clinical diagnosis of hearing impairment (bilateral SNHL were the test subjects and age and sex-matched comparable group without SNHL were the Controls. Using a structured questionnaire, variables assessed included current and past medical history, family and social history, use of medications including ototoxic drugs, and prolonged medications. Results: One hundred and twenty-seven patients participated in the study comprising of 76 test subjects with SNHL (including 14 with suspected ARHL and 51 controls. 59.8% of the participants were males. Univariate analysis revealed statistically-significant differences in family history, alcohol consumption, smoking, exposure to noise, previous ear discharge, previous head injury, hypertension, diabetes, osteoarthritis, ototoxic drugs usage, prolonged medication and obesity between the two categories of subjects. Logistic regression analysis revealed family history, smoking, noise exposure, head injury, hypertension had significantly increased odds of developing SNHL. Conclusion: It was concluded that the RFs for SNHL in adult Nigerians were multifactorial while some of the RFs may be amenable to primary prevention. Legislation and public health education could facilitate reduction of SNHL in our community.

  12. Effects of Hearing Loss and Cognitive Load on Speech Recognition with Competing Talkers.

    Meister, Hartmut; Schreitmüller, Stefan; Ortmann, Magdalene; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Everyday communication frequently comprises situations with more than one talker speaking at a time. These situations are challenging since they pose high attentional and memory demands placing cognitive load on the listener. Hearing impairment additionally exacerbates communication problems under these circumstances. We examined the effects of hearing loss and attention tasks on speech recognition with competing talkers in older adults with and without hearing impairment. We hypothesized that hearing loss would affect word identification, talker separation and word recall and that the difficulties experienced by the hearing impaired listeners would be especially pronounced in a task with high attentional and memory demands. Two listener groups closely matched for their age and neuropsychological profile but differing in hearing acuity were examined regarding their speech recognition with competing talkers in two different tasks. One task required repeating back words from one target talker (1TT) while ignoring the competing talker whereas the other required repeating back words from both talkers (2TT). The competing talkers differed with respect to their voice characteristics. Moreover, sentences either with low or high context were used in order to consider linguistic properties. Compared to their normal hearing peers, listeners with hearing loss revealed limited speech recognition in both tasks. Their difficulties were especially pronounced in the more demanding 2TT task. In order to shed light on the underlying mechanisms, different error sources, namely having misunderstood, confused, or omitted words were investigated. Misunderstanding and omitting words were more frequently observed in the hearing impaired than in the normal hearing listeners. In line with common speech perception models, it is suggested that these effects are related to impaired object formation and taxed working memory capacity (WMC). In a post-hoc analysis, the listeners were further separated with respect to their WMC. It appeared that higher capacity could be used in the sense of a compensatory mechanism with respect to the adverse effects of hearing loss, especially with low context speech. PMID:26973585

  13. COMPARISON OF PROMONTORY STIMULATION TEST RESULTS BETWEEN DIFFERENT SUBSETS OF PATIENTS WITH HEARING LOSS: A NEW APPROACH IN NEUROTOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS

    H. Borghei.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Promontory stimulation testing is both a valuable diagnosic tool and a crucial step in candidate selection for cochlear implantation. In this study we have compared the promontory stimulation test results between different subsets of patients with hearing loss in order to clarify the aspects of promontory stimulation which correlate best with the patients'characierisiics. Patients with severe to profound hearing loss underwent Promontory Stimulation as well as a number of other diagnostic tests. One hundred and eighty eight ears comprised the study population and were grouped into congenital, non-congenital, cochlear, reirocochlear, sudden, and progressive hearing loss groups. The congenital group (CG (n =36 had lower hearing thresholds and greater dynamic ranges than the non-congenital group (NG (n = 71. Gap detection and temporal difference limen results were also significantly better in this group. The cochlear group (CO (n = 15 had better hearing thresholds than reirocochlear (RC (n=20. The sudden-onset (SN (n = 14 group had worse dynamic ranges as compared to progressive group (PR (n=22 but did better on gap detection and temporal difference limen. Dynamic ranges decreased with age in all groups.

  14. The Treatment of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Using Phle-botomy: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    Mohammad Taghi Goodarzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This randomized clinical trial aimed to assess the efficacy of phlebotomy on improvement of hearing loss. 71 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss were enrolled in this randomized clinical trial study. They were divided into two groups: group A received steroid and hydration therapy plus phlebotomy, while group B received the same regimen without phlebotomy. They were matched according to sex, age, Hb, and Htc. Pure tone audiometries were administered to examine the hearing levels before and after treatment. Statistical analysis showed higher improvement in 250-1000 Hz in patients whit phlebotomy (P<0.001. However, there was noticed no significant difference in hearing improvement in 2000-8000 Hz between two methods. The number (% of patients who had improvement was 29(85.3% in phlebotomy group and 21(56.8% in non-phlebotomy group. On the other hand, the number (% of patients who showed no improvement in A and B group was 5(14.7% and 16(43.2%, respectively (P=0.008. Using phlebotomy accompanied by steroid and hydration therapy leads to higher improvement in hearing loss especially in 250-1000 Hz. We think that this method has the ability to achieve better result in the management of patients with SSNHL.

  15. Clinical and experimental studies on the sensorineural hearing loss caused by irradiation

    In our study, 43 patients whose ears were presumably irradiated, were examined periodically before and after the irradiation; 10 were found to be affected by the sensorineural hearing loss, and these 10 were classified into two types. Type I; Patients of this group had a hearing impairment during or soon after irradiation and usually revealed marked deterioration of bone conduction in high frequencies accompanied by worsening of air conduction in low frequencies. The impaired hearing of this group soon recovered to the pre-treatment level. Type II; Patients of this group developed a slow progressive sensorineural hearing loss. They noticed the deafness with tinnitus several months after irradiation. To clarify the mechanism of the sensorineural hearing loss, histopathological investigations were done using nembutal anesthetized guinea pigs which were irradiated in the confined ear region unilaterally. We also examined histopathologically one human temporal bone belonging to a patient who had been irradiated for middle ear carcinoma. The histopathology of the guinea pigs and human case revealed the following conclusions: Type I hearing loss may be caused by toxic labyrinthitis secondary to the radiation otitis media or by the aseptic labyrinthitis as the result of hyperemia and increased permeability of the irradiated blood vessels in the cochlea. Type II hearing loss may be caused by the late rediation response of the cochleal blood vessels i.e. by the vasculitis which gives rise to obliteration of the vascular lumen and affects the blood supply of the hair cells. (author)

  16. Sensori-neural hearing loss after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: individualized risk estimation

    Honoré, Henriette B; Bentzen, Søren; Møller, Kitty; Grau, Cai

    2002-01-01

    Sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) is a common complication to radiation therapy in the upper head and neck region. In this study, we estimated the dose response relationship for SNHL with adjustment for pre-therapeutic risk factors....

  17. Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, and Cleft Lip-Palate Syndrome; Its Association with Conductive Hearing Loss

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss associated with the ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip palate syndrome was reported in one sporadic case and in a pedigree with four cases in three generations. (GW)

  18. Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as

    2005-01-01

    Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as part of a Cleveland Institute of Art, Bachelor of Fine Arts thesis project in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory

  19. Model for noise-induced hearing loss using support vector machine

    Qiu, Wei; Ye, Jun; Liu-White, Xiaohong; Hamernik, Roger P.

    2005-09-01

    Contemporary noise standards are based on the assumption that an energy metric such as the equivalent noise level is sufficient for estimating the potential of a noise stimulus to cause noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Available data, from laboratory-based experiments (Lei et al., 1994; Hamernik and Qiu, 2001) indicate that while an energy metric may be necessary, it is not sufficient for the prediction of NIHL. A support vector machine (SVM) NIHL prediction model was constructed, based on a 550-subject (noise-exposed chinchillas) database. Training of the model used data from 367 noise-exposed subjects. The model was tested using the remaining 183 subjects. Input variables for the model included acoustic, audiometric, and biological variables, while output variables were PTS and cell loss. The results show that an energy parameter is not sufficient to predict NIHL, especially in complex noise environments. With the kurtosis and other noise and biological parameters included as additional inputs, the performance of SVM prediction model was significantly improved. The SVM prediction model has the potential to reliably predict noise-induced hearing loss. [Work supported by NIOSH.

  20. Endothelial dysfunction in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Nezamoddin Berjis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial dysfunction probably has a role in the etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL. The aim of this study was determining of the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and SSNHL. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, 30 patients with SSNHL and 30 otherwise healthy age and sex-matched controls were studied. Demographic data gathered included age, gender, family history of SSNHL, and history of smoking, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Laboratory data included measurement of hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS and lipid profile. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD. Results: The two groups were the same in age (47.9 ± 9.3 and 48.1 ± 9.6 years, P = 0.946 with female/male ratio of 1:1 in both groups. Diabetes and dyslipidemia were more frequent in patients than controls (20% vs. 0%, P = 0.024. Brachial artery diameter was greater in patients than controls before (4.24 ± 0.39 vs. 3.84 ± 0.23 mm, P < 0.001 and after ischemia (4.51 ± 0.43 vs. 4.28 ± 0.27 mm, P = 0.020, but FMD was lower in patients than controls (6.21 ± 3.0 vs. 11.52 ± 2.30%, P < 0.001. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that FMD was associated with SSNHL independent from FBS and lipid profile (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =0.439 [0.260-0.740], P = 0.002. Conclusion: Endothelial dysfunction, among other cardiovascular risk factors, is associated with SSNHL. This association is independent from other cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and dyslipidemia.

  1. The impact of hearing loss on language performance in older adults with different stages of cognitive function

    Lodeiro-Fernández L

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leire Lodeiro-Fernández, Laura Lorenzo-López, Ana Maseda, Laura Núñez-Naveira, José Luis Rodríguez-Villamil, José Carlos Millán-Calenti Gerontology Research Group, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of A Coruña, Campus of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain Purpose: The possible relationship between audiometric hearing thresholds and cognitive performance on language tests was analyzed in a cross-sectional cohort of older adults aged ?65 years (N=98 with different degrees of cognitive impairment.Materials and methods: Participants were distributed into two groups according to Reisberg’s Global Deterioration Scale (GDS: a normal/predementia group (GDS scores 1–3 and a moderate/moderately severe dementia group (GDS scores 4 and 5. Hearing loss (pure-tone audiometry and receptive and production-based language function (Verbal Fluency Test, Boston Naming Test, and Token Test were assessed.Results: Results showed that the dementia group achieved significantly lower scores than the predementia group in all language tests. A moderate negative correlation between hearing loss and verbal comprehension (r=-0.298; P<0.003 was observed in the predementia group (r=-0.363; P<0.007. However, no significant relationship between hearing loss and verbal fluency and naming scores was observed, regardless of cognitive impairment.Conclusion: In the predementia group, reduced hearing level partially explains comprehension performance but not language production. In the dementia group, hearing loss cannot be considered as an explanatory factor of poor receptive and production-based language performance. These results are suggestive of cognitive rather than simply auditory problems to explain the language impairment in the elderly. Keywords: auditory impairment, verbal function, aging, cognition

  2. P300 in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss / P300 em indivíduos com perda auditiva sensorioneural

    Ana Cláudia Mirandola Barbosa, Reis; Ana Claudia Figueiredo, Frizzo; Myriam de Lima, Isaac; Cristiane Fregonesi Dutra, Garcia; Carolina Araújo Rodrigues, Funayama; Maria Cecília Martinelli, Iório.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As avaliações comportamentais e eletrofisiológicas auditivas contribuem para o entendimento do sistema auditivo e do processo de intervenção. OBJETIVO: Estudar P300 em indivíduos com perda auditiva sensorioneural severa ou profunda. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo transversal descritivo. Par [...] ticiparam 29 indivíduos, de ambos os sexos, com idade entre 18 e 45 anos com perda auditiva sensorioneural, congênita severa ou profunda e sem comorbidades, avaliados por meio de avaliação audiológica comportamental e potencial evocado auditivo de longa latência. RESULTADOS: O registro da onda P3 foi obtido em 17 indivíduos, com latência e amplitude média de 326,97 ms e 3,76V, respectivamente. Houve diferenças significativas da medida de latência em relação à idade e da amplitude segundo o grau da perda auditiva. Evidenciou-se associação do resultado do P300 aos graus de perda auditiva (p = 0,04) e ao canal de comunicação auditiva predominante (p = 0,0001) e ao tempo de privação auditiva (teste exato de Fisher). CONCLUSÕES: P300 pode ser registrado em indivíduos com perda auditiva sensorioneural congênita e colaborar para a compreensão do desenvolvimento cortical auditivo e ser preditor do resultado da intervenção. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: Behavioral and electrophysiological auditory evaluations contribute to the understanding of the auditory system and of the process of intervention. OBJECTIVE: To study P300 in subjects with severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss. METHODS: This was a descriptive cross-sectional [...] prospective study. It included 29 individuals of both genders with severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss without other type of disorders, aged 11 to 42 years; all were assessed by behavioral audiological evaluation and auditory evoked potentials. RESULTS: A recording of the P3 wave was obtained in 17 individuals, with a mean latency of 326.97 ms and mean amplitude of 3.76 V. There were significant differences in latency in relation to age and in amplitude according to degree of hearing loss. There was a statistically significant association of the P300 results with the degrees of hearing loss (p = 0.04), with the predominant auditory communication channels (p

  3. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran

    Mirvakili, Abbas; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechi, Saeid; Zand, Vahid; Ansari, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occur...

  4. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Sweden : Diagnostic Protocol and Treatment in Relation to Outcome

    Nosrati-Zarenoe, Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL) is a rapid loss of hearing caused by damage to the cochlea (inner ear) or auditory nerve. Spontaneous recovery has been seen in 32% - 81%. The incidence of the ISSNHL has been estimated to be between 5 and 20 per 100,000 per year. Different theories (infections, vascular catastrophes, immunologic damage or intracochlear membrane break) about the etiology have resulted in different treatment policies. The effect of therapy is difficult to e...

  5. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss : Corticosteroid Treatment, the Diagnostic Protocol and Outcome

    Nosrati-Zarenoe, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL) is a rapid loss of hearing caused by damage to the cochlea or auditory nerve. Spontaneous recovery has been seen in 32%–81%. The incidence of the ISSNHL has been estimated to be between 5 and 20 per 100,000 per year. Different theories (vascular catastrophes, immunologic damage, infections or intracochlear membrane break) about the etiology have resulted in different treatment policies. The effect of therapy is difficult to evaluate for a ...

  6. Noise induced hearing loss impairs spatial learning/memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

    Lijie Liu; Pei Shen; Tingting He; Ying Chang; Lijuan Shi; Shan Tao; Xiaowei Li; Qingying Xun; Xiaojing Guo; Zhiping Yu; Jian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss has been associated with cognitive decline in the elderly and is considered to be an independent risk factor for dementia. One of the most common causes for acquired sensorineural hearing loss is exposure to excessive noise, which has been found to impair learning ability and cognitive performance in human subjects and animal models. Noise exposure has also been found to depress neurogenesis in the hippocampus. However, the effect is mainly attributed to the oxidant stress of noi...

  7. Guest Editorial: Computer-based hearing loss prevention education program for Veterans and military personnel

    Robert L. Folmer, PhD; Gabrielle H. Saunders, PhD; Serena M. Dann, AuD; Susan E. Griest, MPH; Edward Porsov, MS; Stephen A. Fausti, PhD; Marjorie R. Leek, PhD

    2012-01-01

    According to the Veterans Benefits Administration, more than 672,000 Veterans were service-connected for hearing loss and more than 744,000 Veterans were service-connected for tinnitus as of fiscal year 2010 [1]. Hearing loss and tinnitus are the most prevalent disabilities experienced by Veterans who served during peacetime, Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom, World War II, and the Korean war. In fiscal year 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provided 561,212 heari...

  8. Prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    Das, V K

    1990-01-01

    A cohort of 164 children born within the defined boundaries of greater Manchester during the years 1981 to 1984 inclusive were identified as having bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, giving a prevalence of 1.2/1000 population of 1/817 births. Ninety three children developed an additional conductive hearing loss secondary to otitis media with effusion lasting more than three months and 39 of these (42%) required surgical treatment. Those with congenital infections, adverse perinatal factors...

  9. Postural Evaluation of Vertebral Column in Children and Teenagers with Hearing Loss

    Toscano, Carla Fabiana da Silva; Silva, Polyanna Waleska Amorim da; Silva, Lícia Vasconcelos Carvalho da; Melo, Renato de Souza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Posture is determined by the performance of the visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems. Children with hearing loss can present problems in their posture or postural control, enabling postural deviations and alterations to appear in their vertebral column, possibly provoked by a hypoactivity of the vestibular system as a result of deafness. Objective: To evaluate the posture of the vertebral column in children and teenagers with hearing loss at school age, taking into consi...

  10. Hearing Loss After Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors: Effect of Cochlear Dose

    Purpose: To determine the effect of cochlear dose on sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor treated by using conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: We studied 78 pediatric patients (155 ears) with localized brain tumors treated in 1997-2001 who had not received platinum-based chemotherapy and were followed up for at least 48 months. They were evaluated prospectively by means of serial pure-tone audiograms (250 Hz-8 kHz) and/or auditory brainstem response before and every 6 months after CRT. Results: Hearing loss occurred in 14% (11 of 78) of patients and 11% (17 of 155) of cochleae, with onset most often at 3-5 years after CRT. The incidence of hearing loss was low for a cochlear mean dose of 30 Gy or less and increased at greater than 40-45 Gy. Risk was greater at high frequencies (6-8 kHz). In children who tested abnormal for hearing, average hearing thresholds increased from a less than 25 decibel (dB) hearing level (HL) at baseline to a mean of 46 ± 13 (SD) dB HL for high frequencies, 41 ± 7 dB HL for low frequencies, and 38 ± 6 dB HL for intermediate frequencies. Conclusions: Sensorineural hearing loss is a late effect of CRT. In the absence of other factors, including ototoxic chemotherapy, increase in cochlear dose correlates positively with hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor. To minimize the risk of hearing loss for children treated with radiation therapy, a cumulative cochlear dose less than 35 Gy is recommended for patients planned to receive 54-59.4 Gy in 30-33 treatment fractions

  11. Significant Neonatal Weight Loss Related to Idiopathic Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    Hassan Boskabadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Inadequate intake of breast milk in the first days of life leads to weight loss in neonates. Jaundice is also more prominent in these infants. In this cross-sectional study, we tried to evaluate the extent of weight loss in term breastfed infants who were hospitalized for idiopathic hyperbilirubinemia. Methods: This prospective study involved 1072 infants >48 hours old, who were admitted to Ghaem hospital of Mashhad with idiopathic hyperbilirubinemia, between may 2007 - 2013. Infants were divided into two groups based on the amount of weight loss. Case groups (> 7% weight loss and control (weight loss ≤ 7%. The profile of maternal and neonatal risk factors were  compared between them. Main outcome measure: to find out if there is any relation between significant neonatal weight loss and idiopathic hyperbilirubinemia.   Results: Average birth weight, gestational age, mode of delivery, maternal age, duration of mother's stay at hospital did not show any significant difference between two groups. (P>0.05.Age at presentation, weight on admission , extent of weight loss, percentage of daily weight loss, duration of neonatal hospitalization , age at onset of hyperbilirubinemia ,  serum bilirubin and hematocrit levels were significantly different between two groups ( p 20 mg/dl was three times that of moderate hyperbilirubinemia (< 20 mg/dl.

  12. Significant Neonatal Weight Loss Related to Idiopathic Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    Hassan Boskabadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Inadequate intake of breast milk in the first days of life leads to weight loss in neonates. Jaundice is also more prominent in these infants. In this cross-sectional study, we tried to evaluate the extent of weight loss in term breastfed infants who were hospitalized for idiopathic hyperbilirubinemia. Methods: This prospective study involved 1072 infants >48 hours old, who were admitted to Ghaem hospital of Mashhad with idiopathic hyperbilirubinemia, between may 2007 - 2013. Infants were divided into two groups based on the amount of weight loss. Case groups (> 7% weight loss and control (weight loss ? 7%. The profile of maternal and neonatal risk factors were  compared between them. Main outcome measure: to find out if there is any relation between significant neonatal weight loss and idiopathic hyperbilirubinemia.   Results: Average birth weight, gestational age, mode of delivery, maternal age, duration of mother's stay at hospital did not show any significant difference between two groups. (P>0.05.Age at presentation, weight on admission , extent of weight loss, percentage of daily weight loss, duration of neonatal hospitalization , age at onset of hyperbilirubinemia ,  serum bilirubin and hematocrit levels were significantly different between two groups ( p 20 mg/dl was three times that of moderate hyperbilirubinemia (< 20 mg/dl.

  13. Hearing loss in relation to sound exposure of professional symphony orchestra musicians

    Schmidt, J. H.; Pedersen, E. R.; Paarup, H. M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Andersen, T; Poulsen, T.; Bælum, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate the hearing status of classical symphony orchestra musicians and (2) investigate the hypothesis that occupational sound exposure of symphony orchestra musicians leads to elevated hearing thresholds. DESIGN: The study population......B compared with the 238 ears with lowest exposure. The observed hearing loss of musicians was smaller compared with the noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS) predicted from ISO1999. A remaining confounding effect of age after ISO7029 age corrections could be observed to explain the difference in...... symphony orchestra musicians had better hearing than expected but they had a work-related risk of developing additional noise-induced hearing loss. The additional NITPS of the left ear compared with the right ear was at the expected level based on the cumulated sound exposure and ISO1999, indicating that...

  14. Hearing Loss Associated with Retinitis Pigmentosa. Short Reports.

    Karp, Adrienne

    1985-01-01

    The article describes a variation of Usher's Syndrome, a genetic condition characterized by visual and auditory impairments, in which moderate, postlingual, and sometimes progressive hearing impairments may go undetected. Identification guidelines are offered. (Author/CL)

  15. Spontaneous improvement in sensorineural hearing loss developed as a complication of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Khalid, Sameen; Qadir, Maqbool; Salat, Muhammad Sohail

    2015-09-01

    Icterus neonatorum, or neonatal jaundice, is defined as a total serum bilirubin level above 5mg/dl. Acute bilirubin encephalopathy and kernicterus are known to be the two major complications associated with it, resulting in neurotoxic effects, including sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, delayed motor skills and intellectual deficits. We report two similar cases of neonatal jaundice requiring exchange transfusion that subsequently developed sensorineural hearing loss. Follow-up at the end of 1year revealed spontaneous recovery of hearing with normal speech. This report aims at increasing awareness of this condition among physicians to allow early detection of risk factors and prompt management and follow-up. PMID:26338755

  16. Pivotal role of Harakiri in the induction and prevention of gentamicin-induced hearing loss

    Kalinec, Gilda M.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Urrutia, Raul; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora; Chen, Shanping; Kalinec, Federico

    2005-01-01

    Gentamicin is a widely used ototoxic agent. In this study, we shed light on the mechanisms underlying gentamicin-induced hearing loss. More importantly, we demonstrate in vivo and in vitro the effectiveness of a strategy for preventing drug-induced hearing loss using l-carnitine (LCAR), a safe micronutrient that plays a key role in energy metabolism and detoxification [Rebouche, C. J. & Seim, H. (1998) Annu. Rev. Nutr. 18, 39-61]. We show that LCAR prevents changes in hearing threshold and co...

  17. Asymmetry in noise-induced hearing loss: Evaluation of two competing theories

    Richard L. Berg; William Pickett; Linneman, James G; Wood, Douglas J; Barbara Marlenga

    2014-01-01

    Competing theories exist about why asymmetry is observed in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). We evaluated these theories using a cohort of young workers studied over 16 years. The study aim was to describe and evaluate patterns of hearing loss and asymmetry by gender, agricultural exposure and gunfire exposure. This was a secondary analysis of data collected from young adults during follow-up of a randomized controlled trial. This follow-up study evaluated long-term effects of a hearing con...

  18. A case of bilateral sudden hearing loss and tinnitus after salicylate intoxication.

    Kim, Sang Min; Jo, Joon-Man; Baek, Moo Jin; Jung, Kyu Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Salicylate, the active ingredient of aspirin can cause sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus when plasma concentrations reach a critical level. The ototoxic mechanisms of salicylate remain unclear but hearing and tinnitus usually recovers a few days after intoxication. There have been few reports of salicylate-induced ototoxicity in Korea, and the majority is caused by a low dose of aspirin. Herein, we report a case of sudden hearing loss and tinnitus after acute salicylate intoxication and review recent updates on salicylate ototoxicity. PMID:24653899

  19. Independent impacts of age and hearing loss on spatial release in a complex auditory environment

    FrederickJeromeGallun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Listeners in complex auditory environments can benefit from the ability to use a variety of spatial and spectrotemporal cues for sound source segregation. Probing these abilities is an essential part of gaining a more complete understanding of why listeners differ in navigating the auditory environment. Two fundamental processes that can impact the auditory systems of individual listeners are aging and hearing loss. One difficulty with uncovering the independent effects of age and hearing loss on spatial release is the commonly observed phenomenon of age-related hearing loss. In order to reveal the effects of aging on spatial hearing, it is essential to develop testing methods that reduce the influence of hearing loss on the outcomes. The statistical power needed for such testing generally requires a larger number of participants than can easily be tested using traditional behavioral methods. This work describes the development and validation of a rapid method by which listeners can be categorized in terms of their ability to use spatial and spectrotemporal cues to separate competing speech streams. Results show that when age and audibility are not covarying, age alone can be shown to substantially reduce spatial release from masking. These data support the hypothesis that aging, independent of an individual’s hearing threshold, can result in changes in the cortical and/or subcortical structures essential for spatial hearing.

  20. Sleep Disturbance and Altered Expression of Circadian Clock Genes in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Hwang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Pai-Mei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Hsu, Cheng-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Yang, Ming-Yu

    2015-07-01

    The cause of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear and therefore it is often considered as idiopathic. Sleep disturbance has been linked to SSNHL and circadian rhythm disruption, but the link between circadian rhythm disruption and SSNHL has never been investigated.In this study, we surveyed the sleep quality of 38 patients with SSNHL using a simple insomnia sleep questionnaire. The expression of circadian clock genes in peripheral blood (PB) leukocytes from 38 patients with SSNHL and 71 healthy subjects was accessed using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and validated using immunocytochemical staining.We found that 61.8% of patients with SSNHL suffered from insomnia before the insult of hearing loss. Besides, significantly decreased expression of PER1, CRY1, CRY2, CLOCK, BMAL1, and CKlε was found in PB leukocytes of patients with SSNHL when compared with healthy subjects. SSNHL patients with vertigo had significantly lower expression of CRY1 and CKlε than patients without vertigo symptoms. Our results imply the association of sleep disturbance and disrupted circadian rhythm in SSNHL. PMID:26131842

  1. Significant weight loss in breastfed term infants readmitted for hyperbilirubinemia

    De-Villegas Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight loss of greater than 7% from birth weight indicates possible feeding problems. Inadequate oral intake causes weight loss and increases the bilirubin enterohepatic circulation. The objective of this study was to describe the association between total serum bilirubin (TSB levels and weight loss in healthy term infants readmitted for hyperbilirubinemia after birth hospitalization. Methods We reviewed medical records of breastfed term infants who received phototherapy according to TSB levels readmitted to Caja Petrolera de Salud Clinic in La Paz, Bolivia during January 2005 through October 2008. Results Seventy-nine infants were studied (64.6% were males. The hyperbilirubinemia readmission rate was 5% among breastfed infants. Term infants were readmitted at a median age of 4 days. Mean TSB level was 18.6 ± 3 mg/dL. Thirty (38% had significant weight loss. A weak correlation between TSB levels and percent of weight loss was identified (r = 0.20; p 20 mg/dL was notably higher among infants with significant weight loss (46.7% vs. 18.4%; p Conclusions Significant weight loss could be a useful parameter to identify breastfed term infants at risk of severe hyperbilirubinemia either during birth hospitalization or outpatient follow-up visits in settings where routine pre-discharge TSB levels have not been implemented yet.

  2. Sarcopenia and Hearing Loss in Older Koreans: Findings from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2010.

    Lee, Jieun; Han, Kyungdo; Song, Jae Jun; Im, Gi Jung; Chae, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is becoming a more significant issue as geriatric population increases. Sarcopenia in older people is known to have a diverse health problem in various circumstances in recent studies. We assessed whether the decrease in muscle mass is related to ARHI. We used the 2010 data of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) to examine the associations between sarcopenia and ARHI. A total number of participants was 1,622 including 746 males and 876 females aged 60 years or older. Muscle mass was assessed as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass, and hearing loss was defined as the pure-tone averages (PTA) of test frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz at a threshold of 40 dB or higher in worse hearing side of the ear. Among 1,622 participants, 298 men and 256 women had hearing loss. Appendicular muscle mass (ASM), expressed as kg, was categorized in tertiles. In female population, after adjusting for age, smoking, drinking, amount of exercise, total body fat, education level, income level, and tinnitus, the odds ratio (OR) for hearing loss was 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.92-2.68) in the middle tertile and 1.79 (1.03-3.08) in the lowest tertile, compared with the highest tertile. P for trend in this model was 0.036. Controlling further for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and three types of noise exposure did not change the association. Larger muscle mass is associated with lower prevalence of hearing loss in elderly Korean females. PMID:26978776

  3. Air blast circuit breaker noise and hearing loss: a multifactorial model for risk assessment.

    McBride, D I; Williams, S

    2000-04-01

    The assessment of the risk to hearing from impulse noise exposure may be a problem for the occupational physician because existing legislative and international noise exposure standards deal primarily with continuous noise, and are not valid in excess of the peak exposure limit of 200 pa (140 dB). Noise exposure in excess of this level, for example that due to firearms, is frequently perceived as harmful, but this is not necessarily the case, as impulse noise standards do, in fact, allow exposure with a maximum in the order of 6.3 kPa (170 dB). To illustrate this, a cross-sectional group of electrical transmission workers have been studied who were exposed to significant levels of impulse noise from air blast circuit breakers and firearms. Important hearing loss factors have been identified by means of a specially designed questionnaire. Using the Health & Safety Executive definition, the risk of hearing loss was determined by calculating prevalence odds ratios (ORs) for exposure to these factors. The OR for those with fewer than eight unprotected air blast circuit breaker exposures was 2.27 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-5.08), whilst for those with more than eight exposures the OR was 2.10 (95% CI, 0.97-4.54). For firearm exposure, ORs of 1.61 (95% CI, 0.95-2.74) were noted in the medium exposure group and 2.05 (95% CI, 1.08-3.86) in the high exposure group. When all the factors were included in the model, the most significant factor was age. The study gives support to the impulse noise exposure criteria, confirming the borderline risk from air blast circuit breaker noise exposure and the relative safety of moderate gunfire exposure. PMID:10912360

  4. An Evaluation of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Thalassaemic Patients Treated with Desferrioxamine and Its Risk Factors

    M Sonbolestan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: In major thalassaemia patients who need blood transfusion, iron overload is a major therapeutic disadvantage that leads to heart failure which is the major cause of death in such patients. Desferrioxamine (DFO is the most efficient factor for iron chelation, but it carries adverse effects such sensory-neural hearing loss. Methods: The study began in March 2002 and continued untill March 2003, on 160 cases of thalassaemia to determine the incidence of sensory – neural hearing loss and its risk factors in patients who received Desferrioxamine (DFO. All cases underwent audiometric tests. Retrospectively, other needed information were either obtained through interview or extracted from the medical files. Results were analyzed with ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: Seventy-six patients of the total 156 patients showed impairment in PTA (48.7% with 24 of them suffering significant involvement (15.4%. These abnormalities generally affected high frequencies including, 4000 and 8000 Hz. Male gender, increased serum billirubin level and fasting blood sugar were statistically correlated with hearing loss (p.v = 0.038, p.v = 0.38, p.v = 0.002 respectively. There was no significant correlation between hearing loss and other factors. Mean DFO administration in patients, was 29.69 mg/kg/day and mean therapeutic index of DFO was 0.01 mg/kg/day/mg/lit. Both of them were below the critical level (<40mg/kg/day and <0.025mg/kg/day/mg/lit respectively, however hearing loss had developed. Conclusion: Controlling DFO dosage per se does not seem to be enough for decreasing ototoxicity rate. Periodic audiometric tests are highly recommended to detect hearing loss as soon as possible. There are some other factors such as male gender, increased billirubin and FBS, which contribute to DFO ototoxicity. Looking for these risk factors and controlling them, would help identifying susceptible patients and preventing this complication. Key words: Desferrioxamine (DFO, Sensory-neural hearing loss (SNHL, Thalassaemia therapeutic index (TI

  5. Auditory Perceptual Learning in Adults with and without Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Karawani, Hanin; Bitan, Tali; Attias, Joseph; Banai, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Speech recognition in adverse listening conditions becomes more difficult as we age, particularly for individuals with age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Whether these difficulties can be eased with training remains debated, because it is not clear whether the outcomes are sufficiently general to be of use outside of the training context. The aim of the current study was to compare training-induced learning and generalization between normal-hearing older adults and those with ARHL. Methods : Fifty-six listeners (60–72 y/o), 35 participants with ARHL, and 21 normal hearing adults participated in the study. The study design was a cross over design with three groups (immediate-training, delayed-training, and no-training group). Trained participants received 13 sessions of home-based auditory training over the course of 4 weeks. Three adverse listening conditions were targeted: (1) Speech-in-noise, (2) time compressed speech, and (3) competing speakers, and the outcomes of training were compared between normal and ARHL groups. Pre- and post-test sessions were completed by all participants. Outcome measures included tests on all of the trained conditions as well as on a series of untrained conditions designed to assess the transfer of learning to other speech and non-speech conditions. Results : Significant improvements on all trained conditions were observed in both ARHL and normal-hearing groups over the course of training. Normal hearing participants learned more than participants with ARHL in the speech-in-noise condition, but showed similar patterns of learning in the other conditions. Greater pre- to post-test changes were observed in trained than in untrained listeners on all trained conditions. In addition, the ability of trained listeners from the ARHL group to discriminate minimally different pseudowords in noise also improved with training. Conclusions : ARHL did not preclude auditory perceptual learning but there was little generalization to untrained conditions. We suggest that most training-related changes occurred at higher level task-specific cognitive processes in both groups. However, these were enhanced by high quality perceptual representations in the normal-hearing group. In contrast, some training-related changes have also occurred at the level of phonemic representations in the ARHL group, consistent with an interaction between bottom-up and top-down processes. PMID:26869944

  6. Evaluation of intratympanic dexamethasone for treatment of refractory sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Wang, Yao-wen; Ren, Ji-hao; Lu, Yong-de; Yin, Tuan-fang; Xie, Ding-hua

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe and compare the efficacy of intratympanic application of dexamethasone (DXM) for the treatment of refractory sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), the DXM was given in three different ways: by tympanic membrane injection, by drip through a ventilation tube, and by perfusion through a round window catheter. Methods: We conducted a nonrandomized retrospective clinical trial involving 55 patients with refractory SSNHL. For 21 patients (the perfusion group), DXM (2.5 mg/0.5 ml) was perfused transtympanically through a round window catheter using an infusion pump for 1 h twice a day for 7 d giving a total amount of 35.0 mg. For 23 patients (the injection group), DXM (2.5 mg/time) was injected by tympanic membrane puncture at intervals of 2 d on a total of four occasions giving a total amount of 10.0 mg. For 11 patients (the drip group), DXM (2.5 mg/0.5 ml) was dripped via a ventilation tube placed by myringotomy, once on the first day and twice a day for the remaining 6 d giving a total amount of 32.5 mg. Thirty-two patients with refractory SSNHL who refused to undertake further treatments were defined as the control group. Hearing recovery and complications were compared among the groups. Hearing results were evaluated based on a four-frequency (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 kHz) pure tone average (PTA). Results: Post-treatment audiograms were obtained one month after treatments were completed. The improvements in average PTA for the perfusion, injection, and drip groups were 9.0, 8.6, and 1.7 dB, respectively. Hearing improvement was significantly greater in the perfusion and injection groups than in the control group (1.4 dB) (PSSNHL cases that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:22374612

  7. Localization of biotinidase in the brain: implications for its role in hearing loss in biotinidase deficiency.

    Heller, Andrew J; Stanley, Christine; Shaia, Wayne T; Sismanis, Aristides; Spencer, Robert F; Wolf, Barry

    2002-11-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by neurological and cutaneous features, including sensorineural hearing loss. Although many of the features of the disorder are reversible following treatment with biotin, the hearing loss appears to be irreversible. To better characterize the nature of the hearing loss in this disorder, location of the expression and presence of biotinidase within the brain was examined using Northern blot analysis, in vitro hybridization of a cDNA panel, and immunohistochemical staining. Results indicate low, but detectable expression of biotinidase throughout the brain, but increased concentrations of biotinidase within the dorsal cochlear nucleus, ventral cochlear nucleus, and superior olivary complex of the brainstem, as well as, in the hair cells and spiral ganglion of the cochlea. These findings suggest that biotinidase and possibly biotin plays an important role in hearing. PMID:12372635

  8. Effect of cigarette smoking on noise-induced hearing loss in workers exposed to occupational noise in China

    Liyuan Tao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to high noise level environments has the potential to cause noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL, and cigarette smoking has also been shown to have a potential adverse effect on hearing. The aim of this study was to determine whether smoking interacts with noise in the development of hearing loss, and if so, the extent of the contribution from smoking on NIHL. A cross-sectional study was designed to assess the effect of smoking on NIHL in 517 male workers (non-smokers: N = 199; smokers: N = 318 exposed to a high-level industrial noise environment in China. Shift-long temporal waveforms of the noise that workers were exposed to for evaluation of noise exposures, and audiometric threshold measures were obtained on all selected subjects. The subjects used hearing protection devices only within the last 1-2 years. The results suggest that smoking has an adverse effect on NIHL in workers exposed to high level industrial noise, i.e., the median high frequency hearing thresholds were significantly greater in smokers than non-smokers exposed to noise for more than 10 years. This effect was observed at 4.0 and 6.0 kHz. Smoking did not have an adverse effect on NIHL in workers exposed to noise less than 10 years. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR for high frequency hearing loss (i.e., hearing threshold greater than 40 dB at 4.0 kHz were 1.94 for smokers in comparison to non-smokers. The results suggest that: (1 smokers have a higher risk of developing high frequency hearing loss than non-smokers with a similar occupational noise exposure, and (2 the interaction between cigarette smoking and high-level noise exposure may be additive. There is a need to develop and analyze a larger database of workers with well-documented exposures and smoking histories for better understanding of the effect of smoking on NIHL incurred from high-level industrial noise exposures. A better understanding of the role of smoking may lead to its incorporation into hearing risk assessment for noise exposure.

  9. Cochlea hair cell rescue after a noise-induced hearing loss using a low level laser therapy (LLLT)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Bahk, Chan Woong; Jung, Jae Yun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To see the effect of LLLT on noise-induced hearing loss. Methods: Eleven rats were exposed to noise (120 dB, 16 kHz, 6 h) and left ears were irradiated at 60J/cm2, 830 nm laser for 12 days. Right ears were control. Hearing levels were measured at frequencies of 4, 8, 12, 16, 32 kHz before noise exposure and after 12th irradiations. Results: The initial hearing levels were 26.5+/-4.7, 24.5+/-5.0, 24.0+/-5.2, 24.0+/-3.2, 24.5+/-5.5 dB SPL. After noise exposure, thresholds were 63.5+/-15.1, 64+/-16.8, 71.5+/-11.3, 73.5+/-15.6, 67.5+/-14.4 dB SPL in 4, 8, 12, 16, 32 kHz. After 12th irradiation, thresholds of treated ears recovered significantly 21+/-4.2, 20+/-3.5, 24+/-11.9, 24+/-12.9, 21+/-2.2 dB SPL and that of the untreated right ears measured 36.3+/-22.9, 45+/-15.8, 66.3+/-22.9, 50+/-16.8, 43.8+/-21.4 dB SPL. Conclusion: LLLT may promote recovery of hearing after noiseinduced hearing loss.

  10. The effects of sign language on spoken language acquisition in children with hearing loss: a systematic review protocol

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M; Stevens, Adrienne; Garritty, Chantelle; Moher, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Permanent childhood hearing loss affects 1 to 3 per 1000 children and frequently disrupts typical spoken language acquisition. Early identification of hearing loss through universal newborn hearing screening and the use of new hearing technologies including cochlear implants make spoken language an option for most children. However, there is no consensus on what constitutes optimal interventions for children when spoken language is the desired outcome. Intervention and educational ...

  11. A systematic review on noise-induced hearing loss prevention and conservation programs in children and adolescents

    He, Chenjin; 何晨瑾

    2013-01-01

    Children suffering from noise-induced hearing loss could have disease burden such as communication difficulties, frustration, isolation as well as impaired self-cognition due to different degrees of hearing loss. Lack of hearing protection was the easiest way to tackle among the risk factors. Hence, the aim of this review is to review and synthesize existing evidence to show the effects of hearing conservation programs targeted on children and adolescents. Six studies included meeting strict ...

  12. A DPOAE assessment of outer hair cell integrity in ears with age-related hearing loss.

    Ueberfuhr, Margarete A; Fehlberg, Hannah; Goodman, Shawn S; Withnell, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were used to assess outer hair cell (OHC) integrity in human ears with age-related hearing loss. Sound pressure measurements were made in the ear canal over the stimulus range 40-90 dB SPL (L2), with L1 = 0.45*L2 + 44 with F2 = 2 and 3 or 4 kHz. Model-generated DPOAE I/O functions were fit to DPOAE data to quantify the contribution of loss of nonlinearity (OHC loss) to the hearing loss. Results suggest OHC loss as a contributing cause of age-related hearing, regardless of audiogram configuration. It seems likely that OHC and strial pathology co-exist in ears with AHL. PMID:26631688

  13. Medical surveillance of occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) at RAPS hospital

    Full text: One of the most challenging roles of a Certifying Surgeon is to act as catalyst for change. This paper is a presentation of the impact of such an effort. Noise is the insidious of all industrial pollutants, involving every industry and causing severe hearing loss. Exposure to excessive noise is the major avoidable cause of permanent hearing impairment. Noise - induced hearing loss (NIHL) is bilateral and symmetrical, usually affecting the higher frequencies 3 k, 4 k or 6 kHz ) and then spreading to the lower frequencies (0.5 k,1 k or 2 kHz). The major health effects are lack of concentration, irritation, fatigue, headache, sleep disturbances etc. Hearing protectors should be used when engineering controls and work practices are not feasible for reducing noise exposure to safe levels. Ear muffs, ear plugs and ear canal caps are the main types of hearing protectors. Awareness should be created among workers about the harmful effects of noise on hearing and other body systems by implementing compulsory education noise conservation programmes. The practice followed at RAPS Hospital for medical surveillance of Occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss is being briefed

  14. White Matter Changes in Tinnitus: Is It All Age and Hearing Loss?

    Yoo, Hye Bin; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-02-01

    Tinnitus is a condition characterized by the perception of auditory phantom sounds. It is known as the result of complex interactions between auditory and nonauditory regions. However, previous structural imaging studies on tinnitus patients showed evidence of significant white matter changes caused by hearing loss that are positively correlated with aging. Current study focused on which aspects of tinnitus pathologies affect the white matter integrity the most. We used the diffusion tensor imaging technique to acquire images that have higher contrast in brain white matter to analyze how white matter is influenced by tinnitus-related factors using voxel-based methods, region of interest analysis, and deterministic tractography. As a result, white matter integrity in chronic tinnitus patients was both directly affected by age and also mediated by the hearing loss. The most important changes in white matter regions were found bilaterally in the anterior corona radiata, anterior corpus callosum, and bilateral sagittal strata. In the tractography analysis, the white matter integrity values in tracts of right parahippocampus were correlated with the subjective tinnitus loudness. PMID:26477359

  15. Dosing study on the effectiveness of salicylate/N-acetylcysteine for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss

    John Coleman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of three different doses of sodium salicylate (SAL in combination with one dose of N-acetylcysteine (NAC to prevent noise-induced hearing loss was studied in chinchillas. After obtaining baseline-hearing thresholds, the chinchillas were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: three sets were injected intraperitoneally with 325 mg/kg NAC combined with 25, 50, or 75 mg/kg SAL, and a separate control group was injected with an equal volume of saline. Animals were injected twice daily for 2 days prior to and 1 hour before the noise exposure (6 hours to a 105-dB Standard Pressure Level octave band noise centered at 4 kHz. Immediate post-noise hearing thresholds were obtained followed by post-noise treatments at 1 hour then twice-daily for 2 days. Hearing tests continued at 1, 2, and 3 weeks post-noise, and immediately after the last hearing test, animals′ cochleae were stained for hair cell counts. All the groups showed hearing improvement until week 2. However, at week 3, saline treated animals demonstrated a 17-33 dB SPL permanent threshold shift (PTS across the test frequencies. Hearing loss was lowest in the 50 SAL/325 NAC mg/kg group (all frequencies, P < 0.001, and although PTS was reduced in the 25 and 75 mg/kg SAL dosage groups compared to the saline group, only the 75 mg/kg SAL group was significantly different at all but 2 kHz frequency. Coupled with the hearing loss, outer hair cell (OHC loss was maximal in the 4-8 kHz cochlear region of saline treated animals. However, there was a substantial reduction in the mean OHC loss of the NAC plus 50 or 75 mg/kg (but not the 25 mg/kg SAL groups. These findings suggest that SAL in combination with NAC is effective in reducing noise damage to the cochlea, but SAL has a relatively narrow therapeutic dosing window.

  16. Effects of fundamental frequency and vocal-tract length cues on sentence segregation by listeners with hearing loss

    Mackersie, Carol L.; Dewey, James; Guthrie, Lesli A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of hearing loss on the ability to separate competing talkers using talker differences in fundamental frequency (F0) and apparent vocal-tract length (VTL). Performance of 13 adults with hearing loss and 6 adults with normal hearing was measured using the Coordinate Response Measure. For listeners with hearing loss, the speech was amplified and filtered according to the NAL-RP hearing aid prescription. Target-to-competition ratios varied from 0 to 9 dB. T...

  17. Risk factors and prevalence of newborn hearing loss in a private health care system of Porto Velho, Northern Brazil

    de Oliveira, Juliana Santos; Rodrigues, Liliane Barbosa; Aurélio, Fernanda Soares; da Silva, Virgínia Braz

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of hearing loss and to analyze the results of newborn hearing screening and audiological diagnosis in private health care systems. METHODS Cross-sectional and retrospective study in a database of newborn hearing screening performed by a private clinic in neonates born in private hospitals of Porto Velho, Rondônia, Northern Brazil. The screening results, the risk for hearing loss, the risk indicators for hearing loss and the diagnosis were descriptively analyzed. Newborns cared in rooming in with their mothers were compared to those admitted to the Intensive Care Unit regarding risk factors for hearing loss. RESULTS: Among 1,146 (100%) enrolled newborns, 1,064 (92.8%) passed and 82 (7.2%) failed the hearing screening. Among all screened neonates, 1,063 (92.8%) were cared in rooming and 83 (7.2%) needed intensive care; 986 (86.0%) were considered at low risk and 160 (14.0%) at high risk for hearing problems. Of the 160 patients identified as having high risk for hearing loss, 83 (37.7%) were admitted to an hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit, 76 (34.5%) used ototoxic drugs and 38 (17.2%) had a family history of hearing loss in childhood. Hearing loss was diagnosed in two patients (0.2% of the screened sample). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hearing loss in newborns from private hospitals was two cases per 1,000 evaluated patients. The use of ototoxic drugs, admission to Intensive Care Unit and family history of hearing loss were the most common risk factors for hearing loss in the studied population. PMID:24142311

  18. Comprehensive genetic testing in the clinical evaluation of 1119 patients with hearing loss.

    Sloan-Heggen, Christina M; Bierer, Amanda O; Shearer, A Eliot; Kolbe, Diana L; Nishimura, Carla J; Frees, Kathy L; Ephraim, Sean S; Shibata, Seiji B; Booth, Kevin T; Campbell, Colleen A; Ranum, Paul T; Weaver, Amy E; Black-Ziegelbein, E Ann; Wang, Donghong; Azaiez, Hela; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-04-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans, affecting 1 in 500 newborns. Due to its genetic heterogeneity, comprehensive diagnostic testing has not previously been completed in a large multiethnic cohort. To determine the aggregate contribution inheritance makes to non-syndromic hearing loss, we performed comprehensive clinical genetic testing with targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing on 1119 sequentially accrued patients. No patient was excluded based on phenotype, inheritance or previous testing. Testing resulted in identification of the underlying genetic cause for hearing loss in 440 patients (39 %). Pathogenic variants were found in 49 genes and included missense variants (49 %), large copy number changes (18 %), small insertions and deletions (18 %), nonsense variants (8 %), splice-site alterations (6 %), and promoter variants (history of hearing loss or when the loss was congenital and symmetric. The spectrum of implicated genes showed wide ethnic variability. These findings support the more efficient utilization of medical resources through the development of evidence-based algorithms for the diagnosis of hearing loss. PMID:26969326

  19. Mommy, Speak Clearly: Induced Hearing Loss Shapes Vowel Hyperarticulation

    Lam, Christa; Kitamura, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Talkers hyperarticulate vowels when communicating with listeners that require increased speech intelligibility. Vowel hyperarticulation is said to be motivated by knowledge of the listener's linguistic needs because it typically occurs in speech to infants, foreigners and hearing-impaired listeners, but not to non-verbal pets. However, the degree…

  20. Prestin regulation and function in residual outer hair cells after noise-induced hearing loss.

    Xia, Anping; Song, Yohan; Wang, Rosalie; Gao, Simon S; Clifton, Will; Raphael, Patrick; Chao, Sung-il; Pereira, Fred A; Groves, Andrew K; Oghalai, John S

    2013-01-01

    The outer hair cell (OHC) motor protein prestin is necessary for electromotility, which drives cochlear amplification and produces exquisitely sharp frequency tuning. Tecta(C1509G) transgenic mice have hearing loss, and surprisingly have increased OHC prestin levels. We hypothesized, therefore, that prestin up-regulation may represent a generalized response to compensate for a state of hearing loss. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on prestin expression. After noise exposure, we performed cytocochleograms and observed OHC loss only in the basal region of the cochlea. Next, we patch clamped OHCs from the apical turn (9-12 kHz region), where no OHCs were lost, in noise-exposed and age-matched control mice. The non-linear capacitance was significantly higher in noise-exposed mice, consistent with higher functional prestin levels. We then measured prestin protein and mRNA levels in whole-cochlea specimens. Both Western blot and qPCR studies demonstrated increased prestin expression after noise exposure. Finally, we examined the effect of the prestin increase in vivo following noise damage. Immediately after noise exposure, ABR and DPOAE thresholds were elevated by 30-40 dB. While most of the temporary threshold shifts recovered within 3 days, there were additional improvements over the next month. However, DPOAE magnitudes, basilar membrane vibration, and CAP tuning curve measurements from the 9-12 kHz cochlear region demonstrated no differences between noise-exposed mice and control mice. Taken together, these data indicate that prestin is up-regulated by 32-58% in residual OHCs after noise exposure and that the prestin is functional. These findings are consistent with the notion that prestin increases in an attempt to partially compensate for reduced force production because of missing OHCs. However, in regions where there is no OHC loss, the cochlea is able to compensate for the excess prestin in order to maintain stable auditory thresholds and frequency discrimination. PMID:24376553

  1. A Link Loss Model for the On-body Propagation Channel for Binaural Hearing Aids

    Chandra, Rohit; Johansson, Anders J

    2013-01-01

    Binaural hearing aids communicate with each other through a wireless link for synchronization. A propagation model is needed to estimate the ear-to-ear link loss for such binaural hearing aids. The link loss is a critical parameter in a link budget to decide the sensitivity of the transceiver. In this paper, we have presented a model for the deterministic component of the ear-to-ear link loss. The model takes into account the dominant paths having most of the power of the creeping wave from t...

  2. Acrylonitrile potentiates hearing loss and cochlear damage induced by moderate noise exposure in rats

    The diversity of chemical and drugs that can potentiate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has impeded efforts to predict such interactions. We have hypothesized that chemical contaminants that disrupt intrinsic antioxidant defenses hold significant risk for potentiating NIHL. If this is true, then acrylonitrile (ACN) would be expected to potentiate NIHL. ACN, one of the 50 most commonly used chemicals in the United States, is metabolized via two pathways that are likely to disrupt intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) buffering systems: (1) it conjugates glutathione, depleting this important antioxidant rapidly; (2) a second pathway involves the formation of cyanide, which can inhibit superoxide dismutase. We hypothesized that moderate noise exposure, that does not produce permanent hearing loss by itself, could initiate oxidative stress and that ACN could render the inner ear more sensitive to noise by disrupting intrinsic antioxidant defenses. Temporary and persistent effects of ACN alone (50 mg/kg, sc 5 days), noise alone (95 or 97 dB octave band noise, 4 h/day for 5 days), or ACN in combination with noise were determined using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and compound action potential (CAP) amplitudes. Histopathological damage to hair cells resulting from these treatments was also investigated using surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Individually, neither ACN nor noise exposures caused any permanent hearing or hair cell loss; only a reversible temporary threshold shift was measured in noise-exposed animals. However, when given in combination, ACN and noise induced permanent threshold shifts (13-16 dB between 7 and 40 kHz) and a decrease in DPOAE amplitudes (up to 25 dB at 19 kHz), as well as significant outer hair cell (OHC) loss (up to 20% in the first row between 13 and 47 kHz). This investigation demonstrates that ACN can potentiate NIHL at noise levels that are realistic in terms of human exposure, and that the OHCs are the main target of toxicity. While the exact mechanism is unknown, the results are consistent with the hypothesis of ROS involvement in NIHL at moderate levels

  3. Effect of Intratympanic Dexamethasone on Controlling Tinnitus and Hearing loss in Meniere’s Disease

    Memari, Faramarz; Hassannia, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the effect of intratympanic dexamethasone on control of tinnitus and hearing loss in patients with Meniere’s disease. Materials and Methods: 100 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of Menier's disease according to the 1995 criteria of The American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery (AAO–HNS) who remained symptomatic despite medical therapy were assigned to receive intratympanic dexamethasone. The results were assessed with respect to changes in hearing symptoms and tinnitus. Results: Hearing improvement and improvement in SDS was observed in 52% and 35% of patients, respectively. Tinnitus score was improved in 57% of patients. There was no relationship between age, sex, duration of disease, unilaterality of disease, or response to therapy. Conclusion: Intratympanic dexamethasone may be effective in the symptomatic control of hearing loss and tinnitus in Meniere’s disease. PMID:25009802

  4. Effects of Age and Hearing Loss on the Processing of Auditory Temporal Fine Structure.

    Moore, Brian C J

    2016-01-01

    Within the cochlea, broadband sounds like speech and music are filtered into a series of narrowband signals, each of which can be considered as a relatively slowly varying envelope (ENV) imposed on a rapidly oscillating carrier (the temporal fine structure, TFS). Information about ENV and TFS is conveyed in the timing and short-term rate of nerve spikes in the auditory nerve. There is evidence that both hearing loss and increasing age adversely affect the ability to use TFS information, but in many studies the effects of hearing loss and age have been confounded. This paper summarises evidence from studies that allow some separation of the effects of hearing loss and age. The results suggest that the monaural processing of TFS information, which is important for the perception of pitch and for segregating speech from background sounds, is adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, the former being more important. The monaural processing of ENV information is hardly affected by hearing loss or by increasing age. The binaural processing of TFS information, which is important for sound localisation and the binaural masking level difference, is also adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, but here the latter seems more important. The deterioration of binaural TFS processing with increasing age appears to start relatively early in life. The binaural processing of ENV information also deteriorates somewhat with increasing age. The reduced binaural processing abilities found for older/hearing-impaired listeners may partially account for the difficulties that such listeners experience in situations where the target speech and interfering sounds come from different directions in space, as is common in everyday life. PMID:27080640

  5. Treatment for Progressive Hearing Loss Due to Paget's Disease of Bone - A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Tanahashi, Shigeaki; Mizuta, Keisuke; Kato, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Paget's disease is a common bone remodeling disorder that typically begins with excessive bone resorption in the elderly. Bilateral progressive hearing loss is the most frequently encountered complication of Paget's disease. The types of hearing loss identified by audiometry are conductive, sensorineural, or both. However, the precise mechanism of hearing loss remains unclear, and the treatment has been controversial. We present a 73-year-old man who suffered from bilateral progressive hearing loss due to Paget's disease. Potent bisphosphonates, oral risedronate in daily adjusted dosages for 6 months, did not decrease or suppress the worsening of the hearing loss. The Nucleus CI24 Contour electrode array was successfully inserted on the left side without surgical and postoperative complications. The Japanese open set monosyllable word recognition test in a sound field at 65 dB had a result of 74%. This cochlear implantation can be an indication for cases of profound hearing loss due to Paget's disease. PMID:26915163

  6. Hearing loss in Pompe disease revisited: results from a study of 24 children

    van Capelle, Carine I.; Goedegebure, Andre; Homans, Nienke C.; Hoeve, Hans L. J.; Reuser, Arnold J.; van der Ploeg, Ans T.

    2010-01-01

    Little information is available regarding the auditory function in Pompe patients. Hearing loss has been reported in classic infantile patients, but it is still unknown whether central nervous system involvement interferes with auditory function and whether enzyme replacement therapy can improve hearing. Auditory function has not been studied in children with milder forms of the disease. We analyzed repetitive auditory brainstem response measurements and pure tone audiometry in 24 children wi...

  7. The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss among Tanzanian miners

    Musiba, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tanzania has a young mining history with several operating open pit and underground mines. No prevalence studies of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) have been conducted among mine workers to provide an impetus for the development of comprehensive hearing protection programmes. Aims To determine the prevalence of NIHL and associated factors among miners in a major gold mining company operating in Tanzania. Associated risk factors such as age, sex and duration of exposure were exami...

  8. Genetics of Non Syndromic Hearing Loss in the Republic of Macedonia

    Sukarova Stefanovska, E; Cakar, M; Filipce, I; Plaseska Karanfilska, D

    2012-01-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory deficit in humans affecting 1 in 1000 newborns. When present in an infant, deafness may have dramatic effects on language acquisition, seriously compromising the quality of their life. Deafness is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, with inherited causes as the most prominent etiological factor in deafness in developed countries. The genetic basis of hearing loss is complex with numerous loci and genes underlying hereditary senso...

  9. Lipid Profiles and Obesity as Potential Risk Factors of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Lee, Joong Seob; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Hyung Jong; Koo, Ja Won; Choi, Hyo Geun; Park, Bumjung; Hong, Sung Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of our study was to establish whether increased lipid profiles and obesity affect the prevalence and prognosis of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). Methods This was a case-controlled study with a longitudinal design. According to our criteria, 324 patients with SSNHL were included in this study. To manage potential covariates, 972 subjects with normal hearing from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were matched as control group accord...

  10. Musicians′ ability to judge the risk of acquiring noise induced hearing loss

    Björn Hagerman

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study musicians′ abilities to estimate the risk to obtain a hearing loss. Twenty-two professional musicians mainly playing classical music wore dosimeters during 2 working weeks. They also wrote a diary describing all their musical activities and tried to judge the percentage of time that every activity was harmful to their hearing. Half of the musicians seemed to be capable to reasonably judge the harmfulness of the music that they were exposed to. They ...

  11. Pitch, loudness and frequency selectivity in low-frequency hearing loss

    Brännström, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Ménière's disease and cochlear hydrops show fluctuating low-frequency hearing loss (FLFHL). At present these changes are followed as patients' subjective reports and occasional measurements. Consecutive long-term measurements should provide more comprehensive information on the hearing fluctuations than the occasional audiogram used today and constitute an approach to quantify the fluctuations. Quantifications could potentially be used to define disease subgroups and to...

  12. Noise induced hearing loss impairs spatial learning/memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    Liu, Lijie; Shen, Pei; He, Tingting; Chang, Ying; Shi, Lijuan; Tao, Shan; Li, Xiaowei; Xun, Qingying; Guo, Xiaojing; Yu, Zhiping; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss has been associated with cognitive decline in the elderly and is considered to be an independent risk factor for dementia. One of the most common causes for acquired sensorineural hearing loss is exposure to excessive noise, which has been found to impair learning ability and cognitive performance in human subjects and animal models. Noise exposure has also been found to depress neurogenesis in the hippocampus. However, the effect is mainly attributed to the oxidant stress of noise on the cognitive brain. In the present study, young adult CBA/CAJ mice (between 1.5 and 2 months of age) were briefly exposed a high sound level to produce moderate-to-severe hearing loss. In both the blood and hippocampus, only transient oxidative stress was observed after noise exposure. However, a deficit in spatial learning/memory was revealed 3 months after noise exposure. Moreover, the deficit was correlated with the degree of hearing loss and was associated with a decrease in neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We believe that the observed effects were likely due to hearing loss rather than the initial oxidant stress, which only lasted for a short period of time. PMID:26842803

  13. The benefits of Square dancing as a means of physical activity for Czech dancers with hearing loss

    Petra Kurková

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing, a strong line of communication that enables individuals to learn about the world around them, is a major factor contributing to the psychomotor development of every individual. Hearing loss can also affect the conception and perception of sounds and rhythm. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse the benefits of Square and Round dancing for persons with hearing loss. Methods: The present study is an analytic-descriptive qualitative research. The sample was constituted non-probabilistically based on the following features: a a participant had to have hearing problems (hearing loss and b had to have participated regularly in Square dance for at least two years. Each participant was asked to name possible people to be interviewed (snowball technique. We analysed the data of 7 individuals (6 males and 1 female with hearing loss. The mean age of the dancers with hearing loss was 51.3 years. The participants had no cochlear implants or any other physical or vision related impairments. Results: The present findings constitute the first published survey regarding Czech Square dancers' status, their family's hearing status, hearing aid use, communication preference, education in integrated or segregated settings, the influence of family background on dance initiation, coach preference (hearing or deaf, and the environment for participation in Square dance as a mode of physical activity with regular dancers and with dancers with hearing loss as well. In the present sample of dancers with hearing loss, most were from hearing families and had hearing siblings. The degree to which individuals with hearing loss feel comfortable with the hearing world appears to influence their later preference for participating in regular, as opposed to segregated, physical activities. More than half of the dancers with hearing loss who participated in this research study would like to meet with the deaf minority. One of the main reasons for this is to get to know new people and to share experiences with those who have the same problems with hearing. Conclusion: The present study emphasizes the need for the additional support and promotion of the accessibility to their chosen physical activities for individuals with hearing loss. This will be best accomplished if both the deaf and hearing communities work together.    

  14. Sensorineural hearing loss in homozygous sickle cell disease in Qatif, Saudi Arabia.

    Al-Dabbous, I A; Al Jam'a, A H; Obeja, S K; Murugan, A N; Hammad, H A

    1996-11-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a known complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). There is a paucity of information on this problem in Sausi SCD patients. A prospective controlled study was conducted over 27 months in Qatif Central Hospital. One hundred patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), aged five to 40 years, were studied. The control group consisted of 100 healthy individuals. A detailed history, otologic and audiologic examinations were carried out on both groups. Further investigations to rule out local retrocochlear pathology were performed on those having unilateral SNHL. No case of SNHL was detected in the control group, while it was recorded in 19 (19%) of SCA patients, 13 males and six females. There was a significant association between the SNHL and the onset of first vaso-occlusive crisis at six years of age or less. There was no significant difference in the frequency of SNHL between children and adults. Twenty-one percent of patients who had SNHL completely recovered. Patients with SCD need a careful regular hearing assessment. Those detected to have SNHL need a careful plan implemented by both the clinician and otolaryngologist for proper care of this important complication. PMID:17429245

  15. Pattern of Noise Induced Hearing Loss and its Relation with Duration of Exposure in Traffic Police Personnel

    Mrityunjay Gupta; Vijay Khajuria; Monica Manhas; Kasturi Lal Gupta; Onkar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occupational noise exposure is a major and preventable cause of hearing loss. Traffic policemen are constantly exposed to noise pollution. Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) denotes a selective 4000 Hz hearing loss (unilateral or bilateral). Objective: To assess the prevalence pattern of NIHL and its relation with duration of exposure to noise in traffic policemen. Material and methods: Otoscopy, tuning fork tests and Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA) were performed in 150 apparently heal...

  16. The More the Worse: the Grade of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Associates with the Severity of Tinnitus

    Szczepek, Agnieszka J.; Heidi Olze; Heidemarie Haupt; Birgit Mazurek

    2010-01-01

    Tinnitus disturbs lives and negatively affects the quality of life of about 2% of the adult world population. Research has shown that the main cause of tinnitus is hearing loss. To analyze a possible association of the degree of hearing loss with the severity of tinnitus, we have performed a retrospective study using admission data on 531 patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. We have found that 83% of our tinnitus patients had a high frequency hearing loss corresponding to a noise-induced...

  17. Hearing Loss in Stranded Odontocete Dolphins and Whales

    Mann, David; Hill-Cook, Mandy; Manire, Charles; Greenhow, Danielle; Montie, Eric; Powell, Jessica; Wells, Randall; Bauer, Gordon; Cunningham-Smith, Petra; Lingenfelser, Robert; DiGiovanni, Robert; Stone, Abigale; Brodsky, Micah; Stevens, Robert; Kieffer, George

    2010-01-01

    The causes of dolphin and whale stranding can often be difficult to determine. Because toothed whales rely on echolocation for orientation and feeding, hearing deficits could lead to stranding. We report on the results of auditory evoked potential measurements from eight species of odontocete cetaceans that were found stranded or severely entangled in fishing gear during the period 2004 through 2009. Approximately 57% of the bottlenose dolphins and 36% of the rough-toothed dolphins had signif...

  18. Hearing Loss Is Negatively Related to Episodic and Semantic Long-Term Memory but Not to Short-Term Memory

    Ronnberg, Jerker; Danielsson, Henrik; Rudner, Mary; Arlinger, Stig; Sternang, Ola; Wahlin, Ake; Nilsson, Lars-Goran

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the relationship between degree of hearing loss and different memory systems in hearing aid users. Method: Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to study the relationship between auditory and visual acuity and different cognitive and memory functions in an age-hetereogenous subsample of 160 hearing aid users without…

  19. Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Prevent Noise-Induced Hearing Loss among Coal Miners in Appalachia

    Murray-Johnson, Lisa; Witte, Kim; Patel, Dhaval; Orrego, Victoria; Zuckerman, Cynthia; Maxfield, Andrew M.; Thimons, Edward D.

    2004-01-01

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss is the second most self-reported occupational illness or injury in the United States. Among coal miners, more than 90% of the population reports a hearing deficit by age 55. In this formative evaluation, focus groups were conducted with coal miners in Appalachia to ascertain whether miners perceive hearing…

  20. Identification of Copy Number Variants Through Whole-Exome Sequencing in Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Bademci, Guney; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Guo, Shengru; Duman, Duygu; Van Booven, Derek; Foster II, Joseph; Cengiz, Filiz Basak; Blanton, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants account for more than half of the cases with congenital or prelingual onset hearing loss. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) is the most common subgroup. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been shown to be effective detecting deafness-causing single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletions (INDELs). After analyzing the WES data for causative SNVs or INDELs involving previously reported deafness genes in 78 families with ARNSHL, we searched for copy number variants (CNVs) through two different tools in 24 families that remained unresolved. We detected large homozygous deletions in STRC and OTOA in single families. Thus, causative CNVs in known deafness genes explain 2 out of 78 (2.6%) families in our sample set. We conclude that CNVs can be reliably detected through WES and should be the part of pipelines used to clarify genetic basis of hearing loss. PMID:25062256

  1. Detection of Left-Sided and Right-Sided Hearing Loss via Fractional Fourier Transform

    Shuihua Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect hearing loss more efficiently and accurately, this study proposed a new method based on fractional Fourier transform (FRFT. Three-dimensional volumetric magnetic resonance images were obtained from 15 patients with left-sided hearing loss (LHL, 20 healthy controls (HC, and 14 patients with right-sided hearing loss (RHL. Twenty-five FRFT spectrums were reduced by principal component analysis with thresholds of 90%, 95%, and 98%, respectively. The classifier is the single-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network (SFN trained by the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. The results showed that the accuracies of all three classes are higher than 95%. In all, our method is promising and may raise interest from other researchers.

  2. Relation between temporal envelope coding, pitch discrimination, and compression estimates in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss

    Bianchi, Federica; Santurette, Sébastien; Fereczkowski, Michal; Dau, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Recent physiological studies in animals showed that noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) increased the amplitude of envelope coding in single auditory-nerve fibers. The present study investigated whether SNHL in human listeners was associated with enhanced temporal envelope coding...... resolvability. For the unresolved conditions, all five HI listeners performed as good as or better than NH listeners with matching musical experience. Two HI listeners showed lower amplitude-modulation detection thresholds than NH listeners for low modulation rates, and one of these listeners also showed a loss......, whether this enhancement affected pitch discrimination performance, and whether loss of compression following SNHL was a potential factor in envelope coding enhancement. Envelope processing was assessed in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners in a behavioral amplitude...

  3. Sudden hearing loss subsequent to diarrhea: what is the missing link?

    Jafari, Gholamali; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammadreza; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a debilitating condition with an incidence of nearly 20 per 100,000 in populations. Metronidazole-induced ototoxicity is an extremely rare etiology of SSNHL. In this report, we describe a young female with bilateral SSNHL due to oral use of metronidazole. A 23 years old female presented to the emergency department with acute bilateral hearing loss. We found out that her hearing loss had started 4 days after initiation of metronidazole which was administered for treatment of diarrhea. This case report shows that physicians should be aware of the uncommon side effects while prescribing metronidazole to patients in order to manage the possible adverse events on time. PMID:24401329

  4. Prevalence of Auditory Neuropathy in a Population of Children with Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

    Nader Saki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this investigation is to determine auditory neuropathy in the students with severe to profound hearing losses in Ahwaz.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 212 children of 7-11 year old with severe to profound hearing loss performed ordinary audiometric evaluations as well as ABR and OAE. The patients with normal DPOAE who had no record of acoustic reflex having normal ABR, were considered as the patients with auditory neuropathy. Results: The neuropathic complication found in 14 children was appeared in 8 ones as one-sided (57.14% and in 6 ones (42.86% as two-sided. 68% of the patients as diagnosed had a very low Speech Discrimination Score (SDS.Conclusion: we must be very vigilant in auditory neuropathy diagnosis for the purpose to be successful in appropriate treatment of severe to profound hearing losses.

  5. Denervation of the Eustachian Tube and Hearing Loss Following Trigeminal Schwannoma Resection

    Ito, Christopher J.; Malone, Alexander K.; Wong, Ricky H.; van Loveren, Harry R.; Boyev, K. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To discuss eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) as a cause of hearing loss and to discuss its pathogenesis following resection of trigeminal schwannomas. Methods Presented herein are two cases of trigeminal schwannoma that were resected surgically with sacrifice of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve. Neither of the cases had evidence of extracranial extension nor preoperative ETD. Both patients developed ETD and have been followed without evidence of schwannoma recurrence. Conclusions Trigeminal schwannomas are rare tumors that typically require surgical resection. Hearing loss is a potential postsurgical deficit and warrants evaluation by an otolaryngologist with consideration given to a preoperative audiogram. ETD as a result of trigeminal motor branch sacrifice should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative hearing loss in this patient subset as it may be reversed with placement of a tympanostomy tube. PMID:26937336

  6. Developmental hearing loss impairs signal detection in noise: putative central mechanisms

    Jennifer D. Gay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeners with hearing loss have difficulty processing sounds in noisy environments. This is most noticeable for speech perception, but is reflected in a basic auditory processing task: detecting a tonal signal in a noise background, i.e. simultaneous masking. It is unresolved whether the mechanisms underlying simultaneous masking arise from the auditory periphery or from the central auditory system. Poor detection in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is attributed to cochlear hair cell damage. However, hearing loss alters neural processing in the central auditory system. Additionally, both psychophysical and neurophysiological data from normally hearing and impaired listeners suggest that there are additional contributions to simultaneous masking that arise centrally. With SNHL, it is difficult to separate peripheral from central contributions to signal detection deficits. We have thus excluded peripheral contributions by using an animal model of early conductive hearing loss (CHL that provides auditory deprivation but does not induce cochlear damage. When tested as adults, animals raised with CHL had increased thresholds for detecting tones in simultaneous noise. Furthermore, intracellular in vivo recordings in control animals revealed a cortical correlate of simultaneous masking: local cortical processing reduced tone-evoked responses in the presence of noise. This raises the possibility that altered cortical responses which occur with early CHL can influence even simple signal detection in noise.

  7. Cell Phone Exposures and Hearing Loss in Children in the Danish National Birth Cohort

    Sudan, Madhuri; Kheifets, Leeka; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Olsen, Jorn

    2013-01-01

    Background Children today are exposed to cell phones early in life, and may be the most vulnerable if exposure is harmful to health. We investigated the association between cell phone use and hearing loss in children. Methods The Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) enrolled pregnant women between 1996 and 2002. Detailed interviews were conducted during gestation, and when the children were 6 months, 18 months, and 7 years of age. We used multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, marginal structural models (MSM) with inverse-probability weighting, and doubly-robust estimation (DRE) to relate hearing loss at age 18 months to cell phone use at age seven years, and to investigate cell phone use reported at age seven in relation to hearing loss at age seven. Results Our analyses included data from 52,680 children. We observed weak associations between cell phone use and hearing loss at age seven, with odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals from the traditional logistic regression, MSM, and DRE models being 1.21 [0.99–1.46], 1.23 [1.01–1.49], and 1.22 [1.00–1.49], respectively. Conclusions Our findings could have been affected by various biases and are not sufficient to conclude that cell phone exposures have an effect on hearing. This is the first large-scale epidemiologic study to investigate this potentially important association among children, and replication of these findings is needed. PMID:23574412

  8. Study the Age of Hearing Loss Diagnosis and the Related Factors in a Group of School-Age Children in Baghch-e-Ban School of Hard of Hearing

    Mahnaz Ahmadi

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Estimation of the age of hearing loss diagnosis in every society is recommended to be compared with standard criteria to establish common dirth in management and rehabilitation. This study was conducted in order to determine the age of hearing loss diagnosis with respect to common criteria in Baghche-Ban school of hard of hearing children in Tehran.Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 445 children in stages 2, 6 and 10 of Baghche-Ban school of hard of hearing participated. the research was performed by means of the three-stages questionaires that children filled with help of their parents.Results: The mean age of detection of hearing loss in both acquired and congenital hearing loss in children was 3.5 year-old. while the age in which hearing loss was doubted was 1.8 year-old. In another word the mean age of hearing loss detection decreased as the hearing loss increases(in moderate- profound hearing loss(P<0.01. Conclusion: among the refrence sources for refering children with hearing loss the least refering was related to physicians. Adversly the mean age of doubting and detection of hearing loss increased in children with family history of hearing loss.(P<0.01. Meanwhile no relationship was detected between the age of diagnosis of hearing loss and the number of deaf members in the family(P<0.02.

  9. Non-flat audiograms in sensorineural hearing loss and speech perception

    Kelly Cristina Lira de Andrade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The audibility thresholds for the sound frequency of 137 upward- and downward-sloping audiograms showing sensorineural hearing loss were selected and analyzed in conjunction with speech recognition thresholds obtained from individuals seen at a public otolaryngology clinic to determine which frequencies in slope audiograms best represent speech recognition thresholds. METHOD: The linear regression model and mean square error were used to determine the associations between the threshold values. RESULT: The mean square error identified larger errors when using thresholds of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz than when using audibility thresholds of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. The linear regression model showed a higher correlation (91% between the audiogram thresholds for frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz than for the frequencies of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (88%. CONCLUSION: Frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were the most significant in predicting the speech recognition threshold.

  10. High Frequency Hearing Loss and Hyperactivity in DUX4 Transgenic Mice.

    Dandapat, Abhijit; Perrin, Benjamin J; Cabelka, Christine; Razzoli, Maria; Ervasti, James M; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Lowe, Dawn A; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by mutations leading to ectopic expression of the transcription factor DUX4, and encompasses both muscle-related and non-muscle phenotypes. Mouse models bearing this gene represent valuable tools to investigate which pathologies are due to DUX4 expression, and how DUX4 leads to these pathologies. The iDUX4(2.7) mouse contains an X-linked doxycycline-inducible DUX4 gene that shows low level basal expression in the absence of doxycycline, leading to male lethality, generally in embryo, but always before 8 weeks of age. Here, we describe additional non-muscle phenotypes in this animal model. We find that iDUX4(2.7) female carriers are extremely hyperactive, spending large amounts of time ambulating and much less time resting. Rare 3-week old males, although hypophagic, runted and extremely fragile, are capable of high activity, but show periods of catatonic torpor in which animals appear dead and respiration is virtually absent. We also examine a non-muscle phenotype of interest to FSHD, high frequency hearing loss. We find that young iDUX4(2.7) females are significantly impaired in their ability to hear at frequencies above 8 kHz. These phenotypes make the iDUX4(2.7) mouse an attractive model in which to study non-muscle activities of DUX4. PMID:26978271

  11. Personal listening devices and the prevention of noise induced hearing loss in children: the Cheers for Ears Pilot Program.

    Taljaard, Dunay Schmulian; Leishman, Natalie F; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether the Cheers for Ears Program on noise induced hearing loss prevention was effective in improving current knowledge of noise impact of personal listening devices on hearing, and in changing self-reported listening behavior of primary school students aged between 9 years and 13 years. A survey study was implemented at participating primary schools. Schools represented various levels of socio-economic status. Informed consent (parents and teachers) and informed assent (pupils) were obtained. All pupils participated in two interactive sessions (the second 6 weeks after first) and only those who provided assent and consent were surveyed at three points during the study: Prior to the first session (baseline), directly post-session and at 3 months post-session. A total of 318 pupils were surveyed. The median age of the participants was 11 years (nearly 50% of the total cohort). Significant changes are reported in their knowledge about hearing and in listening behavior of the participants as measured by pre- and post-measurement. The changes in behaviors were stable and sustained at 3 months post-intervention survey point and the success of the program can be attributed to the multimodal interactive nature of the sessions, the spacing of the sessions and the survey points. Wide-ranging support from schools and departments also played a role. The pilot Cheers for Ears Program is effective in increasing knowledge on the harmful effects of noise and therefore, it may prevent future noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:23771425

  12. Personal listening devices and the prevention of noise induced hearing loss in children: The cheers for ears pilot program

    Dunay Schmulian Taljaard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether the Cheers for Ears Program on noise induced hearing loss prevention was effective in improving current knowledge of noise impact of personal listening devices on hearing, and in changing self-reported listening behavior of primary school students aged between 9 years and 13 years. A survey study was implemented at participating primary schools. Schools represented various levels of socio-economic status. Informed consent (parents and teachers and informed assent (pupils were obtained. All pupils participated in two interactive sessions (the second 6 weeks after first and only those who provided assent and consent were surveyed at three points during the study: Prior to the first session (baseline, directly post-session and at 3 months post-session. A total of 318 pupils were surveyed. The median age of the participants was 11 years (nearly 50% of the total cohort. Significant changes are reported in their knowledge about hearing and in listening behavior of the participants as measured by pre- and post-measurement. The changes in behaviors were stable and sustained at 3 months post-intervention survey point and the success of the program can be attributed to the multimodal interactive nature of the sessions, the spacing of the sessions and the survey points. Wide-ranging support from schools and departments also played a role. The pilot Cheers for Ears Program is effective in increasing knowledge on the harmful effects of noise and therefore, it may prevent future noise-induced hearing loss.

  13. Independent Validation of an Existing Model Enables Prediction of Hearing Loss after Childhood Bacterial Meningitis

    Terwee, Caroline B.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; Koomen, Irene; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van Furth, A. Marceline

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed external validation of a formerly developed prediction model identifying children at risk for hearing loss after bacterial meningitis (BM). Independent risk factors included in the model are: duration of symptoms prior to admission, petechiae, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) glucose level, Streptococcus pneumoniae and ataxia. Validation helps to evaluate whether the model has potential in clinical practice. Study design 116 Dutch school-age BM survivors were included in the validation cohort and screened for sensorineural hearing loss (>25 dB). Risk factors were obtained from medical records. The model was applied to the validation cohort and its performance was compared with the development cohort. Validation was performed by application of the model on the validation cohort and by assessment of discrimination and goodness of fit. Calibration was evaluated by testing deviations in intercept and slope. Multiple imputation techniques were used to deal with missing values. Results Risk factors were distributed equally between both cohorts. Discriminative ability (Area Under the Curve, AUC) of the model was 0.84 in the development and 0.78 in the validation cohort. Hosmer-Lemeshow test for goodness of fit was not significant in the validation cohort, implying good fit concerning the similarity of expected and observed cases. There were no significant differences in calibration slope and intercept. Sensitivity and negative predicted value were high, while specificity and positive predicted value were low which is comparable with findings in the development cohort. Conclusions Performance of the model remained good in the validation cohort. This prediction model might be used as a screening tool and can help to identify those children that need special attention and a long follow-up period or more frequent auditory testing. PMID:23536814

  14. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hearing Loss

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Fiffer, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Genetic testing for heritable hearing loss involves a mix of patented and unpatented genes, mutations and testing methods. More than half of all hearing loss is linked to inherited mutations, and five genes are most commonly tested in the United States. There are no patents on three of these genes, but Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses to test for a common mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with about 50% of all cases, as well as mutations in the MTRNR1 gene. This fragmented intel...

  15. Aberrant Cx26 hemichannels and keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome: insights into syndromic hearing loss

    Verselis, Vytas K.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation of the GJB2 gene, which encodes the connexin Cx26 gap junction (GJ) protein, is the most common cause of hereditary, sensorineural hearing loss. Cx26 is not expressed in hair cells, but is widely expressed throughout the non-sensory epithelial cells of the cochlea. Most GJB2 mutations produce non-syndromic deafness, but a subset produces syndromic deafness in which profound hearing loss is accompanied by a diverse array of infectious and neoplastic cutaneous disorders that can be f...

  16. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a case report supporting the immunologic theory

    Werneck Antonio Luiz dos Santos; Gurgel Luiz Carlos do Amaral; Mello Laurinda Moura de; Albuquerque Gabriella Queiroz de

    2003-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is one of the autoimmune diseases of the inner ear (AIED), which is characterized by a hearing loss of above 30 decibels in at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies over a time course of 72 hours or shorter. Its cause can be found in only 10% to 15% of patients. Histopathologic findings have reported retrograde neuronal degeneration and atrophy of Corti's organ and of the vascular stria. This paper describes a case of a middle-aged female pat...

  17. Secondary superficial siderosis of the central nervous system in a patient presenting with sensorineural hearing loss

    We present a 50-year-old man who was investigated for sensorineural hearing loss. On MRI of the brain superficial siderosis of the central nervous system was seen, while MRI of the spine revealed an ependymoma of the cauda equina. This case illustrates the importance of performing T2-weighted imaging of the brain and posterior fossa when sensorineural hearing loss is present. Spine imaging is mandatory when superficial siderosis of the brain is diagnosed without identification of a bleeding source in the brain. (orig.)

  18. Secondary superficial siderosis of the central nervous system in a patient presenting with sensorineural hearing loss

    Lemmerling, M.; De Praeter, G.; Mollet, P.; Mortele, K.; Kunnen, M. [Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium). Dept. of Radiol.; Dhooge, I. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium); Mastenbroek, G. [Department of Neurology, Streekziekenhuis De Honte, Terneuzen (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    We present a 50-year-old man who was investigated for sensorineural hearing loss. On MRI of the brain superficial siderosis of the central nervous system was seen, while MRI of the spine revealed an ependymoma of the cauda equina. This case illustrates the importance of performing T2-weighted imaging of the brain and posterior fossa when sensorineural hearing loss is present. Spine imaging is mandatory when superficial siderosis of the brain is diagnosed without identification of a bleeding source in the brain. (orig.) With 5 figs., 10 refs.

  19. Prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among people working with sound systems and general population in Brazil: A cross-sectional study

    Trevisani Virgínia FM

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Music is ever present in our daily lives, establishing a link between humans and the arts through the senses and pleasure. Sound technicians are the link between musicians and audiences or consumers. Recently, general concern has arisen regarding occurrences of hearing loss induced by noise from excessively amplified sound-producing activities within leisure and professional environments. Sound technicians' activities expose them to the risk of hearing loss, and consequently put at risk their quality of life, the quality of the musical product and consumers' hearing. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among sound technicians in Brazil and compare this with a control group without occupational noise exposure. Methods This was a cross-sectional study comparing 177 participants in two groups: 82 sound technicians and 95 controls (non-sound technicians. A questionnaire on music listening habits and associated complaints was applied, and data were gathered regarding the professionals' numbers of working hours per day and both groups' hearing complaint and presence of tinnitus. The participants' ear canals were visually inspected using an otoscope. Hearing assessments were performed (tonal and speech audiometry using a portable digital AD 229 E audiometer funded by FAPESP. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the sound technicians and controls regarding age and gender. Thus, the study sample was homogenous and would be unlikely to lead to bias in the results. A statistically significant difference in hearing loss was observed between the groups: 50% among the sound technicians and 10.5% among the controls. The difference could be addressed to high sound levels. Conclusion The sound technicians presented a higher prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure than did the general population, although the possibility of residual confounding due to unmeasured factors such as socioeconomic status cannot be ruled out.

  20. The Sustained-Exposure Dexamethasone Formulation OTO-104 Offers Effective Protection against Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.

    Harrop-Jones, Anne; Wang, Xiaobo; Fernandez, Rayne; Dellamary, Luis; Ryan, Allen F; LeBel, Carl; Piu, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The otoprotective effects of OTO-104 were investigated both prior to and following acute acoustic trauma. Guinea pigs received a single intratympanic injection of OTO-104 and were assessed in a model of acute acoustic trauma. Doses of at least 2.0% OTO-104 offered significant protection against hearing loss induced by noise exposure when administered 1 day prior to trauma and up to 3 days thereafter. Otoprotection remained effective even with higher degrees of trauma. In contrast, the administration of a dexamethasone sodium phosphate solution did not protect against noise-induced hearing loss. Activation of the classical nuclear glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor pathways was required for otoprotection by OTO-104. The sustained exposure properties of OTO-104 were also superior to a steroid solution. PMID:26655654