WorldWideScience

Sample records for selected freshwater biota

  1. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  2. Selected chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants in Bjornoya (Bear Island) freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levels of selected sparsely investigated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been measured in organisms from two Arctic lakes on Bjornoya (Bear Island). Elevated levels of chlorobornanes (CHBs) (up to 46.7 ng/g wet weight=ww), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (up to 27.2 ng/g ww), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) (up to 1.1 ng/g ww) and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs, only 4 congeners) (up to 62.7 pg/g ww), were measured in biota from Lake Ellasjoen. In Lake Oyangen, located only 5 km north of Ellasjoen, levels of these contaminants were significantly lower. ?15N-values were 7-10%o higher in organisms from Ellasjoen as compared to Oyangen. This is attributed to biological inputs related to seabird activities. The present study illustrates that contaminants such as CHBs, brominated flame retardants and PCNs accumulate in the Ellasjoen food web in a manner similar to PCBs and conventional organochlorine pesticides. Transport mechanisms that control PCB and DDT distributions, i.e. atmospheric long-range transport and biotransport by seabirds, are also relevant for the contaminants investigated in the present study. - Elevate levels of chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants have been measured in biota from a Norwegian Arctic lake

  3. Bioaccumulation factors for radionuclides in freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report analyzes over 200 carefully selected papers to provide concise data sets and methodology for estimation of bioaccumulation factors for tritium and isotopes of strontium, cesium, iodine, manganese, and cobalt in major biotic components of freshwater environments. Bioaccumulation factors of different tissues are distinguished where significant differences occur. Since conditions in the laboratory are often unnatural in terms of chemical and ecological relationships, this review was restricted as far as possible to bioaccumulation factors determined for natural systems. Because bioaccumulation factors were not available for some shorter-lived radionuclides, a methodology for converting bioaccumulation factors of stable isotopes to those of shorter-lived radionuclides was derived and utilized. The bioaccumulation factor for a radionuclide in a given organism or tissue may exhibit wide variations among bodies of water that are related to differences in ambient concentrations of stable-element and carrier-element analogues. To account for these variations, simple models are presented that relate bioaccumulation factors to stable-element and carrier-element concentrations in water. The effects of physicochemical form and other factors in causing deviations from these models are discussed. Bioaccumulation factor data are examined in the context of these models, and bioaccumulation factor relations for the selected radionuclides are presented

  4. Radionuclide transfer to freshwater biota species: review of Russian language studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around 130 publications reporting studies on radionuclide transfer to freshwater biota species conducted in the former USSR were reviewed to provide the concentration ratio values. None of these studies were available up to now in the English language reviews or publications. The values derived have been compared with the CR values used for freshwater systems in the International reviews. For some radionuclides reviewed in this paper, the data are in good agreement with the mean CR values presented earlier, however for some of them, in particular, for 241Am (bivalve molluscs, gastropods and pelagic fish), 60Co (gastropods, benthic fish and insect larvae), 90Sr and 137Cs (benthic fish and zooplankton), the mean values given here are substantially different from those presented earlier. The data reported in this paper for thirty five radionuclides and eleven groups of freshwater species markedly improve the extent of available data for evaluation of radiation impact on freshwater species. - Research highlights: ? The paper provides information on concentration ratios to freshwater biota species for 35 radionuclides. Many of the data are for 90Sr and 137Cs. ? For the majority of radionuclides reviewed in this paper, the CR values are in good agreement with those given in the recent International reviews. ? For 241Am (bivalve molluscs, gastropods and pelagic fish), 60Co (gastropogic fish), 60Co (gastropods, benthic fish and insect larvae), 90Sr and 137Cs (benthic fish and zooplankton), the mean values based on review of the Russian language publications are substantially different from those presented in the International reviews. ? Information presented in the paper significantly increases the availability of data on radionuclide accumulation in freshwater species.

  5. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  6. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h-1 (1 rad d-1). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h-1 to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h-1 will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted

  7. Toxicological benchmarks for screening contaminants of potential concern for effects on freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important early step in the assessment of ecological risks at contaminated sites is the screening of chemicals detected on the site to identify those that constitute a potential risk. Part of this screening process is the comparison of measured ambient concentrations to concentrations that are believed to be nonhazardous, termed benchmarks. This article discusses 13 methods by which benchmarks may be derived for aquatic biota and presents benchmarks for 105 chemicals. It then compares them with respect to their sensitivity, availability, magnitude relative to background concentrations, and conceptual bases. This compilation is limited to chemicals that have been detected on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to benchmarks derived from studies of toxic effects on freshwater organisms. The list of chemicals includes 45 metals and 56 industrial organic chemicals but only four pesticides. Although some individual values can be shown to be too high to be protective and others are too low to be useful for screening, none of the approaches to benchmark derivation can be rejected without further definition of what constitutes adequate protection. The most appropriate screening strategy is to use multiple benchmark values along with background concentrations, knowledge of waste composition, and physicochemical properties to identify contaminants of potential concern

  8. Linking catchment and in-stream processes for an integrated simulation of freshwater biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Jens; Hering, Daniel; Jähnig, Sonja; Schmalz, Britta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Natural catchments, streams and aquatic diversity are globally degraded due to the impacts of industrial and urban development, as well as the intensification of agriculture. Degradation occurres at different spatial scales and rehabilitation measures are required in both streams and catchments, to improve conditions for the aquatic biota. Models, applied for planning restoration measures, are mostly targeting individual components of the complex chain linking the abiotic and biotic environment; e.g., models might be used just for predicting hydrological or hydraulic variables. Hereby, the cause-effect chain is compromised, which links drivers, pressures, state and impacts of the riverine system. We describe the design of an integrated, GIS-based model system considering the cause-effect chain from the catchment to the stream and aquatic biota. The models require data on climatic and physical catchment properties, and on the geometry and structure of the streams. This enables the assessment of the impact of global change as well as of more regional and local changes on the stream ecosystem on different scales. The approach is based on the Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-(Response) concept and includes the linkage of one ecohydrologic, two hydraulic and two habitat models: The ecohydrologic model SWAT was used for depicting the discharge regime and ero-sion processes controlled by land use and climate on the catchment scale. The discharge and sediment time series resulting from the hydrologic modelling were used for hydraulic simulations on the reach scale. Water depth, flow velocity, substrate changes and sediment transport were simulated in variable resolutions with the hydraulic models HEC-RAS one-dimensionally and with AdH two-dimensionally. Combined with structural river mapping, the temporally and spatially dynamic results of the hydraulic models were used for describing macroinvertebrate habitats. Two independent simulations were carried out: First, the distribution of the freshwater clam Sphaerium corneum was modelled with the species distribution model BIOMOD, based on parameters related to hydraulics and sediment transport. Second, the Habitat Evaluation Tool (HET) was developed. HET was used to simulate the prevailing macroinvertebrate community in the stream based on the river's substrates. Model results are maps and statistics of the spatial occurrence of species at different points in time which are connected to the prevailing environmental conditions. Results of the submodels show very good agreement with observed hydrological and hydraulic parameters and good agreement with observed spatio-temporal erosion. Simulated spatial species distributions are realistic when compared to observed distributions. The developed model system advances integrated modelling, but future improvements are necessary. This particularly concerns the simulation of abiotic parameters, investigation of organism preferences, the combined simulation of numerous organism groups and the simulation of interactions and feedback loops.

  9. Toxicity of 35 trace elements in coal to freshwater biota: a data base with automated retrieval capabilities. [313 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R. M.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Strand, R. H.; Anderson, R. M.

    1977-06-01

    Data are tabulated on the toxicity to freshwater biota of 35 trace elements with the potential for release to the environment from coal conversion effluents. The entire data base is presented on a microfiche appended to the document, in the interest of portability and accessibility. The data were gathered from a variety of research papers, compendia, and reviews. Details of water chemistry and test conditions are presented when available from the documents consulted. The data base may be used by referring directly to the tabulated data as they appear on the microfiche, or, with appropriate computer facilities, by manipulation (sorting, subsetting, or merging) of the data to meet the particular needs of the investigator. The data may be used as they appear in the data base, or the data base may be used to index the cited original papers.

  10. An international model validation exercise on radionuclide transfer and doses to freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) programme, activity concentrations of 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs and 3H in Perch Lake at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site were predicted, in freshwater primary producers, invertebrates, fishes, herpetofauna and mammals using eleven modelling approaches. Comparison of predicted radionuclide concentrations in the different species types with measured values highlighted a number of areas where additional work and understanding is required to improve the predictions of radionuclide transfer. For some species, the differences could be explained by ecological factors such as trophic level or the influence of stable analogues. Model predictions were relatively poor for mammalian species and herpetofauna compared with measured values, partly due to a lack of relevant data. In addition, concentration ratios are sometimes under-predicted when derived from experiments performed under controlled laboratory conditions representative of conditions in other water bodies.

  11. Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial, freshwater and brackish environments Results from the NKS project GAPRAD (Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, R.; Brown, J.; Holm, E.; Roos, P.; Saxen, R.; Outola, I.

    2012-01-15

    The background and rationale to filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for biota are presented. Concentrations of Po-210 and Pb-210 are reported for biota sampled in Dovrefjell, Norway and selected lake and brackish ecosystems in Finland. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental studies are recounted. (Author)

  12. Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial, freshwater and brackish environments Results from the NKS project GAPRAD (Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background and rationale to filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for biota are presented. Concentrations of Po-210 and Pb-210 are reported for biota sampled in Dovrefjell, Norway and selected lake and brackish ecosystems in Finland. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental studies are recounted. (Author)

  13. Terrestrial and freshwater radioecology. A selected bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation of data on terrestrial and freshwater radioecology contains some 1400 references and is based on publications for which abstracts appeared in Volumes 29 and 30 of Nuclear Science Abstracts and references obtained from other sources. Many were obtained from reviews and other publications. A number of more general references have been included which are not basically on ecology but may be related, and it is hoped of interest to ecologists, e.g. use of tracers in pesticide studies. While compilation of a list in an area broad in scope is often somewhat arbitrary, an attempt was made to reference publications which were related to field or laboratory studies of wild species of plants and animals with respect to radiation effects or metabolic studies involving radionuclides, including parasites. Studies of laboratory or domestic organisms have not in general been included unless such studies are ecological in nature, e.g., on population growth or synergistic. References are included to brackish water and brackish water organisms. Environmental monitoring was included only when natural waters and wild animals or plants were involved. Other kinds of material are included such as nuclear power plant thermal pollution and reports concerning organisms at nuclear energy ins

  14. Transitions in ancient inland freshwater resource management in Sri Lanka affect biota and human populations in and around coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh-Guebas, F; Hettiarachchi, S; Lo Seen, D; Batelaan, O; Sooriyarachchi, S; Jayatissa, L P; Koedam, N

    2005-03-29

    The increasing anthropogenic pressure on natural environments results in impacts that affect tropical forest areas and their biodiversity. Adverse impacts on terrestrial and oceanic environments often compound in the intertidal area, where mangrove forest ecosystems thrive. In tropical coastal areas of many developing countries where people depend on wood and other mangrove forest products and services, forest degradation leads to socioeconomic problems. At the same time, increasing freshwater needs in these areas are expected to cause additional problems. On the basis of remote sensing and ground truthing complemented by colonial archival material from the Dutch East India Company (1602-1800), we report that changes to the historic system of inland freshwater management have increased dramatically in recent times. Hydrological changes, such as interbasin transfers, have resulted in a qualitative ecological and socioeconomic degradation in three coastal lagoons in southern Sri Lanka. Variations in river hydrology have caused changes in the areas suitable as mangrove habitat and, thus, have resulted in an altered distribution. However, increases in mangrove area can mask the degradation of the site in terms of floristic composition, significance of the species, and biodiversity (this effect is termed "cryptic ecological degradation"). It is important that such changes be carefully monitored to ensure biological and socioeconomic sustainability. PMID:15797030

  15. A review and model assessment of 32P and 33P uptake to biota in freshwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioaccumulation of key short-lived radionuclides such as 131I and 32,33P may be over-estimated since concentration ratios (CRs) are often based on values for the corresponding stable isotope which do not account for radioactive decay during uptake via the food chain. This study presents estimates for bioaccumulation of radioactive phosphorus which account for both radioactive decay and varying ambient levels of stable P in the environment. Recommended interim CR values for radioactive forms of P as a function of bioavailable stable phosphorus in the water body are presented. Values of CR are presented for three different trophic levels of the aquatic food chain; foodstuffs from all three trophic levels may potentially be consumed by humans. It is concluded that current recommended values of the CR are likely to be significantly over-estimated for radioactive phosphorus in many freshwater systems, particularly lowland rivers. Further research is recommended to field-validate these models and assess their uncertainty. The relative importance of food-chain uptake and direct uptake from water are also assessed from a review of the literature. It can be concluded that food-chain uptake is the dominant accumulation pathway in fish and hence accumulation factors for radioactive phosphorus in farmed fish are likely to be significantly lower than those for wild fish. - Highlights: ? A model is developed for radiophosphorus uptake to fish. ? Concentrathosphorus uptake to fish. ? Concentration ratios for 32,33P in fish may be over-estimated in freshwater systems. ? New recommended values for 32,33P concentration ratios are given. ? Farmed fish are likely to have much lower 32,33P uptake than wild fish.

  16. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Anisa; Hamzah, Zaini; Saat, Ahmad; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been intensively studied due to the accumulation of radionuclides in marine ecosystem. Manjung area is affected by rapid population growth and socio-economic development such as heavy industrial activities including coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development and factories, agricultural runoff, waste and toxic discharge from factories.It has radiological risk and toxic effect when effluent from the industries in the area containing radioactive materials either being transported to the atmosphere and deposited back over the land or by run off to the river and flow into coastal area and being absorbed by marine biota. Radionuclides presence in the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health when it enters the food chain. This study is focusing on the radionuclides [thorium (Th), uranium (U), radium-226 (226Ra), radium-228 (228Ra) and potassium-40 (40K)] content in marine biota and sea water from Manjung coastal area. Five species of marine biota including Johnius dussumieri (Ikan Gelama), Pseudorhombus malayanus (Ikan Sebelah), Arius maculatus (Ikan Duri), Portunus pelagicus (Ketam Renjong) and Charybdis natator (Ketam Salib) were collected during rainy and dry seasons. Measurements were carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICPMS). The results show that the concentration of radionuclides varies depends on ecological environment of respective marine biota species. The concentrations and activity concentrations are used for the assessment of potential internal hazard index (Hin), transfer factor (TF), ingestion dose rate (D) and health risk index (HRI) to monitor radiological risk for human consumption.

  17. Natural selection in the water: freshwater invasion and adaptation by water colour in the Amazonian pufferfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, G M; Chao, N L; Beheregaray, L B

    2012-07-01

    Natural selection and ecological adaptation are ultimately responsible for much of the origin of biodiversity. Yet, the identification of divergent natural selection has been hindered by the spatial complexity of natural systems, the difficulty in identifying genes under selection and their relationship to environment, and the confounding genomic effects of time. Here, we employed genome scans, population genetics and sequence-based phylogeographic methods to identify divergent natural selection on population boundaries in a freshwater invader, the Amazonian pufferfish, Colomesus asellus. We sampled extensively across markedly different hydrochemical settings in the Amazon Basin and use 'water colour' to test for ecological isolation. We distinguish the relative contribution of natural selection across hydrochemical gradients from biogeographic history in the origin and maintenance of population boundaries within a single species and across a complex ecosystem. We show that spatially distinct population structure generated by multiple forces (i.e. water colour and vicariant biogeographic history) can be identified if the confounding effects of genetic drift have not accumulated between selective populations. Our findings have repercussions for studies aimed at identifying engines of biodiversity and assessing their temporal progression in understudied and ecologically complex tropical ecosystems. PMID:22551113

  18. A low-density SNP array for analyzing differential selection in freshwater and marine populations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferchaud, Anne-Laure; Pedersen, Susanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) has become an important model species for studying both contemporary and parallel evolution. In particular, differential adaptation to freshwater and marine environments has led to high differentiation between freshwater and marine stickleback populations at the phenotypic trait of lateral plate morphology and the underlying candidate gene Ectodysplacin (EDA). Many studies have focused on this trait and candidate gene, although other genes involved in marine-freshwater adaptation may be equally important. In order to develop a resource for rapid and cost efficient analysis of genetic divergence between freshwater and marine sticklebacks, we generated a low-density SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) array encompassing markers of chromosome regions under putative directional selection, along with neutral markers for background. Results: RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) sequencing of sixty individuals representing two freshwater and one marine population led to the identification of 33,993 SNP markers. Ninety-six of these were chosen for the low-density SNP array, among which 70 represented SNPs under putatively directional selection in freshwater vs. marine environments, whereas 26 SNPs were assumed to be neutral. Annotation of these regions revealed several genes that are candidates for affecting stickleback phenotypic variation, some of which have been observed in previous studies whereas others are new. Conclusions: We have developed a cost-efficient low-density SNP array that allows for rapid screening of polymorphisms in threespine stickleback. The array provides a valuable tool for analyzing adaptive divergence between freshwater and marine stickleback populations beyond the well-established candidate gene Ectodysplacin (EDA).

  19. A comparison of selected ecosystem attributes of three South African estuaries with different freshwater inflow regimes, using network analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharler, Ursula M.; Baird, Dan

    2005-06-01

    Carbon flow networks of the Kromme, Swartkops and Sundays estuaries, situated on the south coast of South Africa, were analysed using ecological network analysis. A major difference between the three estuaries is the freshwater inflow regimes: The Kromme Estuary receives very little freshwater (annual mean 0.07 m -3 s -1), the Swartkops Estuary receives annually about 0.82 m -3 s -1 while the Sundays Estuary receives on average about 2.74 m -3 s -1 annually. Ecological network analysis revealed differences between most ecosystem attributes such as the cycling of carbon, trophic structure, the organisational and developmental status in terms of ascendency and redundancy, and regarding the contribution to and dependencies of compartments to and on one another in the network. Due to the lack of frequent freshwater inflow and consequently the renewal of the nutrient pool, the Kromme Estuary recycles most of its material and showed the highest detritivory/herbivory ratio (57:1), whereas the Sundays recycles the least proportion and had the lowest detritivory/herbivory ratio at 10:1. The Sundays Estuary, hitherto believed to be dominated by pelagic production, was found to rely more on the benthic biota in terms of carbon throughput as inferred from the contribution and dependency coefficients, than on pelagic communities. Due to the low rate of fresh water inflow into the Kromme Estuary, the absence of an axial salinity gradient, a comparatively high Finn Cycling Index of 40%, and the long water exchange time, this system appears to have developed into an "arm" of the sea. System level properties such as the A/ C ratio, the Average Mutual Information index, and the food web connectance index, increase from the lowest values calculated for the Kromme Estuary, intermediate for the Swartkops Estuary, and highest for the Sundays Estuary, while the FCI followed an inverse trend between the three systems.

  20. Initial Evidence for Adaptive Selection on the NADH Subunit Two of Freshwater Dolphins by Analyses of Mitochondrial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Susana; Duchêne, Sebastian; Garavito, Manuel F.; Slikas, Beth; Baker, C. Scott

    2015-01-01

    A small number of cetaceans have adapted to an entirely freshwater environment, having colonized rivers in Asia and South America from an ancestral origin in the marine environment. This includes the ‘river dolphins’, early divergence from the odontocete lineage, and two species of true dolphins (Family Delphinidae). Successful adaptation to the freshwater environment may have required increased demands in energy involved in processes such as the mitochondrial osmotic balance. For this reason, riverine odontocetes provide a compelling natural experiment in adaptation of mammals from marine to freshwater habitats. Here we present initial evidence of positive selection in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 of riverine odontocetes by analyses of full mitochondrial genomes, using tests of selection and protein structure modeling. The codon model with highest statistical support corresponds to three discrete categories for amino acid sites, those under positive, neutral, and purifying selection. With this model we found positive selection at site 297 of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (dN/dS>1.0,) leading to a substitution of an Ala or Val from the ancestral state of Thr. A phylogenetic reconstruction of 27 cetacean mitogenomes showed that an Ala substitution has evolved at least four times in cetaceans, once or more in the three ‘river dolphins’ (Families Pontoporidae, Lipotidae and Inidae), once in the riverine Sotalia fluviatilis (but not in its marine sister taxa), once in the riverine Orcaella brevirostris from the Mekong River (but not in its marine sister taxa) and once in two other related marine dolphins. We located the position of this amino acid substitution in an alpha-helix channel in the trans-membrane domain in both the E. coli structure and Sotalia fluviatilis model. In E. coli this position is located in a helix implicated in a proton translocation channel of respiratory complex 1 and may have a similar role in the NADH dehydrogenases of cetaceans. PMID:25946045

  1. Initial Evidence for Adaptive Selection on the NADH Subunit Two of Freshwater Dolphins by Analyses of Mitochondrial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Susana; Duchêne, Sebastian; Garavito, Manuel F; Slikas, Beth; Baker, C Scott

    2015-01-01

    A small number of cetaceans have adapted to an entirely freshwater environment, having colonized rivers in Asia and South America from an ancestral origin in the marine environment. This includes the 'river dolphins', early divergence from the odontocete lineage, and two species of true dolphins (Family Delphinidae). Successful adaptation to the freshwater environment may have required increased demands in energy involved in processes such as the mitochondrial osmotic balance. For this reason, riverine odontocetes provide a compelling natural experiment in adaptation of mammals from marine to freshwater habitats. Here we present initial evidence of positive selection in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 of riverine odontocetes by analyses of full mitochondrial genomes, using tests of selection and protein structure modeling. The codon model with highest statistical support corresponds to three discrete categories for amino acid sites, those under positive, neutral, and purifying selection. With this model we found positive selection at site 297 of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (dN/dS>1.0,) leading to a substitution of an Ala or Val from the ancestral state of Thr. A phylogenetic reconstruction of 27 cetacean mitogenomes showed that an Ala substitution has evolved at least four times in cetaceans, once or more in the three 'river dolphins' (Families Pontoporidae, Lipotidae and Inidae), once in the riverine Sotalia fluviatilis (but not in its marine sister taxa), once in the riverine Orcaella brevirostris from the Mekong River (but not in its marine sister taxa) and once in two other related marine dolphins. We located the position of this amino acid substitution in an alpha-helix channel in the trans-membrane domain in both the E. coli structure and Sotalia fluviatilis model. In E. coli this position is located in a helix implicated in a proton translocation channel of respiratory complex 1 and may have a similar role in the NADH dehydrogenases of cetaceans. PMID:25946045

  2. The partial monitoring system BIOTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partial monitoring system BIOTA included three sub-systems: - plants; - animals; - biotopes. Monitoring aimed on 19 species of plants and 8 species of animals. All monitored species are classified in Red Red Data List of plants of the Slovak Republic and in Decree No. 24/2003 Coll. Laws, by which is realised the law No. 543/2002 Coll. Laws about the nature and landscape protection. This project comes out from implementation of European agreements and directives into national legislative. The subject of monitoring are selected plant and animal species which are significant from European or national aspect. They are mainly endemic, critically endangered, diminishing and rare species. Also species which are bio-indicating responsible were included into monitoring. From 50 monitored plant and animal species, 45 belong among European significant, included in some of supplements of Directive about birds or Directive about biotopes

  3. Sources and pathways of selected organochlorine pesticides to the Arctic and the effect of pathway divergence on HCH trends in biota: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historical global usage and emissions for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), toxaphene and endosulfan, are presented. Relationships between the air concentrations of these OCPs and their global emissions are also discussed. Differences between the pathways of ?- and ?-HCH to the Arctic Ocean are described in the context of environmental concentrating and diluting processes. These concentrating and diluting processes are shown to control the temporal and spatial loading of northern oceans and that the HCH burdens in marine biota from these oceans respond accordingly. The HCHs provide an elegant example of how hemispheric-scale solvent switching processes can alter the ocean into which an HCH congener partitions, how air-water partitioning controls the pathway for HCHs entering the Arctic, and how the various pathways impact spatial and temporal trends of HCH residues in arctic animals feeding out of marine and terrestrial foodwebs

  4. BIOACCUMULATION OF HEAVY AND ESSENTIAL METALS IN THE SELECTED FRESHWATER FISH SPECIES FROM PREUMAL LAKE CUDDALORE DISTRICT, TAMILNADU, INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AMBEDKAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the heavy and essential metals, chromium, cadmium, copper, lead, iron, zinc and manganese concentrations in gill, liver, kidney, intestine and muscle of the available freshwater fish Mystus vittatus, Heteropneustes fossilis, Glossogobius giuris, Notopterous notopterous and Tilapia mossambica of the Perumal lake Cuddalore district, Tamilnadu, India collected during the January 2011- December 2011. Heavy and essential metals concentrations varied in significantly depending upon the type of fish tissues and locations. In the selected freshwater fish, liver tissues appeared to have significantly higher tendency to bioaccumulation of chromium followed by Cd, Cu, Pb, Fe, Zn and Mn. The maximum level of chromium was found in the liver tissue of Heteropneustes fossilis, while the minimum level of zinc was observed in the muscle tissue of Notopterous notopterous. Among the analyzed metals chromium, cadmium, iron, zinc and manganese levels were exceed the WHO recommended limits. Copper and lead levels within the permissible limits for human consumption might be representing a risk for human health.

  5. Stable and selective scintillating anion-exchange sensors for quantification of 99TcO4? in natural freshwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New dual functionality scintillating anion-exchange resins were developed for selective determination of 99TcO4? in various natural freshwater samples. Stable scintillating particles were formed by preparing the vinyl monomer 2-[4-(4?-vinylbiphenylyl)]-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (vPBD), starting with the commercial organic flour TBut-PBD and its subsequent copolymerization with styrene, divinylbenzene, and p-chloromethylstyrene mixture. To integrate the radiochemical separation and radiometric detection steps within the same bead, the chloromethyl groups of the scintillating resins were subjected to amination reactions with dioctylamine (DOA) and trioctylamine (TOA). On-line quantification of 99TcO4? was achieved by packing the scintillating anion-exchange resin into Teflon tubing for quantification by a flow scintillation analyzer (FSA). The two functionalized resins were selective for pertechnetate over the common anions in natural freshwaters, especially Cl? and SO42? with up to 1000 ppm and with up to 10 ppm I? and Cr2O72?. The uptake efficiency of the TOA sensor decreased from 97.88% to 85.08% in well water and river water, respectively, while the counting efficiency was almost constant (69.50%). The DOA performance showed lower efficiency in the two water types relative to TOA. On the other hand, the DOA sensor could be regenerated by 5 M HNO3 for reuse at least four times without losing its chemical or optical performance. The detection limit was 1.45 Bq which could be achieved by loading 45 mL from well and tap water containing the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 99Tc (33 Bq/L). -- Highlights: • Two novel extractive scintillating sensors for monitoring 99TcO4? were developed. • The resins are selective for pertechnetate over the common anions and chromate ions. • The materials have high chemical and optical stability with good detection efficiency. • 99TcO4? was determined in three freshwaters contain different radioactivity levels

  6. A freshwater species wintering in a brackish environment: Habitat selection and diet of Slavonian grebes in the southern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Nicole; Garthe, Stefan; Adler, Sven

    2009-09-01

    After the breeding season, Slavonian grebes ( Podiceps auritus) leave their freshwater breeding habitats and migrate to wintering grounds in marine or brackish waters. The most important wintering area in northwestern Europe is located in the southern Baltic Sea, with the largest concentrations in the offshore area of the Pommeranian Bight. Analysis of ship-based surveys revealed that the habitat selection of Slavonian grebes in this brackish area is significantly influenced by water depth and bottom sediment type. The grebes prefer shallow waters of 4-14 m depth and occur only over sandy sediments. While the diving depths of endothermic animals is limited due to energetic constraints and thermoregulation, sediment type is regarded to be a proxy for food choice. The diet of Slavonian grebes in the Pomeranian Bight consists mainly of demersal gobies (Gobiidae) that frequently occur over sandy bottom substrates.

  7. Species richness of Odonata in selected freshwater systems in Zamboanga del Sur, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne D. Cayasan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Odonata is important in identifying the habitat health of freshwater ecosystems. In thisstudy, the species richness and relative abundance of Odonata were determined in 12 sampling sites inZamboanga del Sur. Field work was conducted in August-December, 2012 using the random samplingmethod. Thirty-six species belonging to 10 families were documented of which 16 (44% species arePhilippine endemic. High species richness was recorded in Cabilinan Stream which is considered to bethe most undisturbed site in the 12 sampling sites. Species richness was also considerably high in eightsampling sites despite habitat modification and water pollution from agricultural run-offs. The presenceof Oriental species which are indicators of degraded environments suggests that the streams aredisturbed. However, the presence of some endemic species indicates that these endemic fauna canthrive in disturbed habitats.

  8. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to organic matter in sediment and soils, it is particularly important to determine their effects on freshwater mussels and other freshwater benthic invertebrates in contact with sediments, as available toxicity studies with pelagic species, mainly Daphnia magna, may not be representative of these benthic organisms. Finally, there is a critical need for studies of the chronic effects of fungicides on reproduction, immunocompetence, and ecosystem function; sublethal endpoints with population and community-level relevance.

  9. Literature review of the concentration ratios of selected radionuclides in freshwater and marine fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1986-09-01

    Concentration ratios (CR's) used for modeling the uptake and food chain transport of radionuclides in fish have usually been conservative; that is, at the high end of reported values. This practice ensures that the dose to the consumer of contaminated fish will not be underestimated. In many models, however, conservative values have been used for all variables that have any uncertainty associated with them. As a result the dose to the consumer is overestimated. Realistic CR values need to be developed to establish model parameters that will accurately reflect tissue burdens in fish and resulting dose rates to consumers. This report reviews and summarizes published literature on the uptake and distribution of stable and radioactive isotopes of 26 elements. Based on this review, we have made recommendations on CR values to be used for modeling the accumulation of radionuclides in fish. Our recommendations are compared with CR values reported in other publications. A generic discussion of abiotic and biotic factors that influence CR values is provided so that CR values may be adjusted based on site-specific characteristics of the fishes habitat. Recommended CR values for freshwater fish and for marine fish are listed. Although this report emphasizes radionuclides, it is applicable to stable elements as well.

  10. Precision of age estimates from different ageing structures in selected freshwater teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahista; Khan, M Afzal; Miyan, Kaish; Lone, Faisal Ahmad

    2015-03-01

    The present study was undertaken with a view to compare the precision of age readings obtained from different ageing structures of some important freshwater teleosts viz., Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Mastacembelus armatus and Ompok pabda. Standard procedures were followed to study the ageing structures. Based on the highest percent agreement and lowest average percentage of error and coefficient of variation values, precise age estimates were exhibited by opercular bones in H. molitrix and vertebrae in the remaining two fish, M. armatus and O. pabda. When precise age estimates were compared among the age estimates of other ageing structures, highest percent agreement and lowest average percent error and coefficient of variation values were exhibited by vertebrae (versus opercular bones) in H. molitrix and opercular bones (versus vertebrae) in both M. armatus and O. pabda. When mean age estimates from different ageing structures were compared, vertebrae and opercular bones exhibited comparable values in H. molitrix. In M. armatus, mean values of precise age estimates from vertebrae were significantly different from the values of other ageing structures. However, in O. pabda, vertebrae as well as opercular bones showed insignificantly different age readings. PMID:25895277

  11. Literature review of the concentration ratios of selected radionuclides in freshwater and marine fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentration ratios (CR's) used for modeling the uptake and food chain transport of radionuclides in fish have usually been conservative; that is, at the high end of reported values. This practice ensures that the dose to the consumer of contaminated fish will not be underestimated. In many models, however, conservative values have been used for all variables that have any uncertainty associated with them. As a result the dose to the consumer is overestimated. Realistic CR values need to be developed to establish model parameters that will accurately reflect tissue burdens in fish and resulting dose rates to consumers. This report reviews and summarizes published literature on the uptake and distribution of stable and radioactive isotopes of 26 elements. Based on this review, we have made recommendations on CR values to be used for modeling the accumulation of radionuclides in fish. Our recommendations are compared with CR values reported in other publications. A generic discussion of abiotic and biotic factors that influence CR values is provided so that CR values may be adjusted based on site-specific characteristics of the fishes habitat. Recommended CR values for freshwater fish and for marine fish are listed. Although this report emphasizes radionuclides, it is applicable to stable elements as well

  12. Computerizing marine biota: a rational approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chavan, V.S; Chandramohan, D.; Parulekar, A.H

    1991-01-01

    Data on marine biota while being extensive are also patchy and scattered; thus making retrieval and dissemination of information time consuming. This emphasise the need for computerizing information on marine biota with the objective to collate...

  13. Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor Data

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor contains approximately 20,000 biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) from 20 locations (mostly Superfund sites) for...

  14. Biota and biological principles of the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey is presented. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy to understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected biota and biological principles of the aquatic environment. Briefing papers are included on Why biology in water quality studies , Stream biology, Phytoplankton, Periphyton, Drift organisms in streams, Family Chironomidae (Diptera), Influences of water temperature on aquatic biota, and Stream channelization: Effects on stream fauna

  15. The effects of increased freshwater inflow on metal enrichment in selected Eastern Cape estuaries, South Africa

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    KK, Orr; JE, Burgess; PW, Froneman.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of select metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni and Zn) within the water column and sediment of the permanently open Kariega Estuary and temporary open/closed Riet and East Kleinemonde Estuaries were investigated during a dry and a wet season. Enrichment factors (EFs), using Fe as a refe [...] rence element, and baseline linear regression models for metals vs Fe were used to assess the extent of metal enrichment in the sediments. The results of the study indicate that Cd, Co Ni and Pb were enriched above baseline concentrations (1.0

  16. Water Quality, Stocking Density and Parasites of Freshwater Fish in Four Selected Areas of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N.H. Banu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Stocking density, water quality (depth, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, total ammonia, hardness as CaCO3 and total alkalinity and parasites of fishes were investigated in four selected areas (Bogra, Chandpur, Jessore and Mymensingh for a period of three years. Stocking density varied from 15.74x103 to 34.38x103 ha-1. Water quality parameters (except ammonia varied significantly from one area to another. Among the parasites, the prevalence of Trichodinids was dominant followed by Monogenians, Chilodonella spp. and Myxosporidian. Correlation on physico-chemical parameters and incidence of parasites were studied.

  17. The selective breeding of the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for growth in salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takouridis, Simon J; Tribe, David E; Gras, Sally L; Martin, Gregory J O

    2015-05-01

    The potential for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be utilized for biofuel production was strengthened by developing it for growth in elevated salinity via the selective breeding method of genome shuffling. A population was constructed via random mutagenesis and subjected to multiple rounds of sex and growth in increasing salinity. This sexual line was capable of growth in up to 700mM NaCl, unlike its progenitor, which could only grow in 300mM NaCl. An asexual control line was capable of growth in 500mM NaCl. Palmelloid aggregations increased in size and the concentration of final biomass decreased as a function of NaCl concentration, which poses considerations for future strain development. The sexual line maintained sexual efficiencies of up to 50% over the course of selection. This investigation achieved significant strain improvement of C. reinhardtii and demonstrated the clear advantage of its ability to participate in laboratory controlled and reproducible high efficiency sex. PMID:25466995

  18. Growth responses of selected freshwater algae to trace elements and scrubber ash slurry generated by coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vocke, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The development and implementation of standard toxicity tests is a necessity if consistent and reliable data are to be obtained for water quality criteria. The adapted EPA AAPBT is an ideal static algal toxicity test system. The algal test medium has a chemical composition similar to natural unpolluted waters of low ionic strength. It is appropriate to use MATC water quality criteria when assessing the potential impact of pollutants generated by coal-fired power stations because these energy-generated pollutants typically enter aquatic systems in small quantities over long periods. The MATC water quality criteria are estimates of trace element and SASE levels, based on the most sensitive alga investigated, that will not cause significant changes in naturally-functioning algal populations. These levels are 0.016f mg L/sup -1/ As(V), 0.001 mg L/sup -1/ Cd(II), 0.004 mg L/sup -1/ Hg(II), 0.006 mg L/sup -1/ Se(VI), and 0.344% SASE. To provide viable working water quality criteria, an extrapolation from the laboratory to the natural environment must be made. Therefore, those oxidation states of the trace elements were selected which are the dominant states occurring in natural, unpolluted, slightly alkaline freshwaters. It must be pointed out that these MATC values are based on algal responses to single toxicants and no allowance is made for synergistic, additive, or antagonistic relationships which could occur in natural aquatic systems. Additionally, natural chelation may influence toxicity. The highly toxic nature of potential pollutants from coal-fired generating plants emphasizes the need for minimizing stack effluent pollutants and retaining scrubber ash slurry for proper disposal in an effort to maintain trace elements in concentration ranges compatible with naturally-functioning ecosystems.

  19. Ediacaran biota from Sonora, Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Mcmenamin, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Ediacaran biota is the earliest diverse community of macroscopic animals and protoctists. Body and trace fossils in the Clemente Formation of northwestern Sonora extend downward the geologic range of Ediacaran forms. Taxa present in the Clemente Formation include cf. Cyclomedusa plana, Sekwia sp., an erniettid (bearing an air mattress-like "pneu" body construction), and the trace fossils Lockeia ichnosp. and Palaeophycus tubularis. The trace fossils confirm the presence of sediment-dwelli...

  20. ENANTIOMERIC COMPOSITION OF CHIRAL POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL ATROPISOMERS IN AQUATIC AND RIPARIAN BIOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The enantiomeric composition of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) atropisomers was measured in river and riparian biota (fish, bivalves, crayfish, water snakes, barn swallows) from selected sites throughout the United States by using chiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Nonr...

  1. A freshwater biodiversity hotspot under pressure – assessing threats and identifying conservation needs for ancient Lake Ohrid

    OpenAIRE

    G. Kostoski; Albrecht, C.; S. Trajanovski; Wilke, T

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater habitats and species living in freshwater are generally more prone to extinction than terrestrial or marine ones. Immediate conservation measures for world-wide freshwater resources are thus of eminent importance. This is particularly true for so called ancient lakes. While these lakes are famous for being evolutionary theatres, often displaying an extraordinarily high degree of biodiversity and endemism, in many cases these biota are also experiencing extreme anthropogenic impact....

  2. Investigation of metal toxicity to tropical biota. Recommendations for revision of Australian water quality guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific objectives of this study were to: review available data on the toxicity of metals to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; identify metals considered to be priority toxicants to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; and employ previously developed toxicity testing protocols for two tropical freshwater species to obtain preliminary toxicity data for two priority metals. From the literature review, it was concluded that insufficient metal toxicity data exist for Australian tropical species. Data were absent for a range of metals (eg Ag, As, Al, Cr, Hg, Ni, Sb and Se) listed in the current Australian water quality guidelines. Aluminium, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, U, V and Zn were identified as priority metals of potential ecotoxicological concern in aquatic ecosystems of tropical Australia, largely as a consequence of mining activities, but also from urban impacts. Instead of testing the toxicity of the priority metals for which data do not currently exist (ie Al, Co, Ni and V), it was deemed more important to conduct further experimental work on Cu and U, in the context of elucidating the relatively high variability in the toxic response of these two metals. As a result, Cu and U were selected and toxicity tests conducted using two tropical freshwater species (green hydra (Hydra viridissima) and gudgeon fish (Mogurnda mogurnda)) from the Australian wet/dry tropics using test protocols designed to maximise the greatest sensitivity of metal response in the shortesnsitivity of metal response in the shortest period of time. Hydra viridissima was about eight times more sensitive to Cu than U, whereas M. mogurnda was about twenty times more sensitive. Once differences between the sublethal and lethal endpoints of the two organisms were corrected by statistical extrapolation, H. viridissima was approximately seven times more sensitive than M. mogurnda to U, but only about three times more sensitive to Cu. Both species were more sensitive to Cu than U. These results are generally consistent with those from previous studies when differences in key water quality variables, including water hardness, alkalinity, pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are considered

  3. Acute sensitivity of freshwater mollusks and commonly tested invertebrates to select chemicals with different toxic models of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies indicate that freshwater mollusks are more sensitive than commonly tested organisms to some chemicals, such as copper and ammonia. Nevertheless, mollusks are generally under-represented in toxicity databases. Studies are needed to generate data with which to comp...

  4. Bioconcentration of TNT and RDX in coastal marine biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballentine, Mark; Tobias, Craig; Vlahos, Penny; Smith, Richard; Cooper, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    The bioconcentration factor (BCF) was measured for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in seven different marine species of varying trophic levels. Time series and concentration gradient treatments were used for water column and tissue concentrations of TNT, RDX, and their environmentally important derivatives 2-amino-4,6-dintrotoluene (2-ADNT) and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT). BCF values ranged from 0.0031 to 484.5 mL g(-1) for TNT and 0.023 to 54.83 mL g(-1) for RDX. The use of log K ow value as an indicator was evaluated by adding marine data from this study to previously published data. For the munitions in this study, log K ow value was a good indicator in the marine environment. The initial uptake and elimination rates of TNT and RDX for Fucus vesiculosus were 1.79 and 0.24 h(-1) for TNT and 0.50 and 0.0035 h(-1) for RDX respectively. Biotransformation was observed in all biota for both TNT and RDX. Biotransformation of TNT favored 4-ADNT over 2-ADNT at ratios of 2:1 for F. vesiculosus and 3:1 for Mytilus edulis. Although RDX derivatives were measureable, the ratios of RDX derivatives were variable with no detectable trend. Previous approaches for measuring BCF in freshwater systems compare favorably with these experiments with marine biota, yet significant gaps on the ultimate fate of munitions within the biota exist that may be overcome with the use stable isotope-labeled munitions substrates. PMID:25451633

  5. Comparative analysis of doses to aquatic biota in water bodies impacted by radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative analysis of doses to the reference species of freshwater biota was performed for the following water bodies in Russia or former USSR: Chernobyl NPPs cooling pond, Lakes Uruskul and Berdenish located in the Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace, Techa River, Yenisei River. It was concluded that the doses to biota were considerably different in the acute and chronic periods of radioactive contamination. The most vulnerable part of all considered aquatic ecosystems was benthic trophic chain. A numerical scale on the “dose rate – effects” relationships for fish was formulated. Threshold dose rates above which radiation effects can be expected in fish were evaluated to be the following: 1 mGy d?1 for appearance of the first morbidity effects in fish; 5 mGy d?1 for the first negative effects on reproduction system; 10 mGy d?1 for the first effects on life shortening of fish. The results of dose assessment to biota were compared with the scale “dose rate – effects” and the literature data on the radiobiological effects observed in the considered water bodies. It was shown that in the most contaminated water bodies the dose rates were high enough to cause the radiobiological effects in fish. - Highlights: ? Comparative analysis of dose rates to biota in different water bodies was performed. ? A numerical scale on the dose rates – effects relationships for fish was formulated. ? Results of assessment of exposure ent of exposure to biota were compared with the dose rates – effects scale. ? In the most contaminated water bodies the doses were high enough to cause radiobiological effects in fish. ? Current dose rates to biota in all considered water bodies are below the safety level of 1 mGy/day.

  6. Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marter, W.L.

    2001-03-28

    At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

  7. Working group 2: Freshwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group at a Canada-USA symposium on climate change in the Arctic addressed freshwater issues from the perspective of water resource planning and management. Two issues were selected for discussion and identification of relationships with resource management: hydroelectric production and waste disposal. Gaps in knowledge about climate and water resources were identified along with potential actions for response and adaptation to climate change. Recommendations are offered to improve knowledge of Arctic climate and hydrology

  8. New evidence suggests pyroclastic flows are responsible for the remarkable preservation of the Jehol biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baoyu; Harlow, George E; Wohletz, Kenneth; Zhou, Zhonghe; Meng, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The lower Cretaceous Yixian and Jiufotang formations contain numerous exceptionally well-preserved invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils that comprise the Jehol Biota. Freshwater and terrestrial fossils of the biota usually occur together within some horizons and have been interpreted as deposits of mass mortality events. The nature of the events and the mechanisms behind the exceptional preservation of the fossils, however, are poorly understood. Here, after examining and analysing sediments and residual fossils from several key horizons, we postulate that the causal events were mainly phreatomagmatic eruptions. Pyroclastic density currents were probably responsible for the major causalities and for transporting the bulk of the terrestrial vertebrates from different habitats, such as lizards, birds, non-avian dinosaurs and mammals, into lacustrine environments for burial. Terrestrial vertebrate carcasses transported by and sealed within the pyroclastic flows were clearly preserved as exceptional fossils through this process. PMID:24495913

  9. Effects of selection and drift on G matrix evolution in a heterogeneous environment: a multivariate Qst-Fst Test with the freshwater snail Galba truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Elodie; Martin, Guillaume; Goudet, Jérôme

    2008-12-01

    Unraveling the effect of selection vs. drift on the evolution of quantitative traits is commonly achieved by one of two methods. Either one contrasts population differentiation estimates for genetic markers and quantitative traits (the Q(st)-F(st) contrast) or multivariate methods are used to study the covariance between sets of traits. In particular, many studies have focused on the genetic variance-covariance matrix (the G matrix). However, both drift and selection can cause changes in G. To understand their joint effects, we recently combined the two methods into a single test (accompanying article by Martin et al.), which we apply here to a network of 16 natural populations of the freshwater snail Galba truncatula. Using this new neutrality test, extended to hierarchical population structures, we studied the multivariate equivalent of the Q(st)-F(st) contrast for several life-history traits of G. truncatula. We found strong evidence of selection acting on multivariate phenotypes. Selection was homogeneous among populations within each habitat and heterogeneous between habitats. We found that the G matrices were relatively stable within each habitat, with proportionality between the among-populations (D) and the within-populations (G) covariance matrices. The effect of habitat heterogeneity is to break this proportionality because of selection for habitat-dependent optima. Individual-based simulations mimicking our empirical system confirmed that these patterns are expected under the selective regime inferred. We show that homogenizing selection can mimic some effect of drift on the G matrix (G and D almost proportional), but that incorporating information from molecular markers (multivariate Q(st)-F(st)) allows disentangling the two effects. PMID:18854589

  10. Vulnerability of stream biota to climate change in mediterranean climate regions: a synthesis of ecological responses and conservation challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe, A. F.; Lawrence, J. E.; Bonada I Caparro?s, Nu?ria

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater species worldwide are experiencing dramatic declines partly attributable to ongoing climate change. It is expected that the future effects of climate change could be particularly severe in mediterranean climate (med-) regions, which host many endemic species already under great stress from the high level of human development. In this article, we review the climate and climate-induced changes in streams of med-regions and the responses of stream biota, focusing on both observed and ...

  11. Assessment of marine biota doses arising from radioactive discharges to the sea by the COGEMA La Hague facility: A comprehensive case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an assessment of radiation doses to marine biota arising from the radioactive sea discharges (as liquid effluents) of the COGEMA La Hague facility. The primary objective of this study was to select a representative set of marine biota for the study area (i.e. the Nord-Cotentin Peninsula coast) and to assess the potential radiological impacts, in terms of biota dose rates and their related potential health effects on marine biota, arising from the radioactive sea discharges of the COGEMA La Hague facility. For assessing potential effects to biota, the predicted biota dose rates were compared to the available guidance for the protection of populations of non-human biota. The guidance values are based on published data by international organizations (e.g. UNSCEAR and IAEA) and on a screening review of a recent database (by FASSET) on biological effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota. The major conclusion of the case study was that the predicted dose rates to marine biota attributable to radioactive sea discharges from the La Hague facility are small, and in general, well below comparison guidance levels at which deleterious and observable health effects to populations of marine biota might, according to current knowledge, be expected. The predicted incremental dose rates arising from the La Hague facility are also, in general, well below those caused by the background radioactivity in the region. (author)hor)

  12. Freshwater fish of the Wilderness National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fish in the Wilderness National Park. Fish assemblages in the Touw and Duiwe rivers were sampled in 1997 and 1998, with a total of 327 fish from nine species recorded. Indigenous species included two freshwater species (Pseudobarbus afer, Sandelia capensis, two catadromous species (Anguilla mossambicus, Myxus capensis, and two estuarine species (Monodactylusfalciformis, Caffrogobius multifasciatus. Three of the nine recorded species were alien (Micropterus dolomieu, Micropterus salmoides, Gambusia affinis, with the Micropterus spp., in particular, likely to have a substantial negative influence on indigenous species. A further one indigenous species, two translocated indigenous species, and five estuarine species could potentially be recorded in these rivers. River catchment management actions to restore perennial flow to the Duiwe River, to prevent the attenuation of floods, and to prevent further establishment and spread of alien and translocated biota are required to conserve indigenous fish assemblages.

  13. Molecular analysis of human forearm superficial skin bacterial biota

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhan; Tseng, Chi-hong; Pei, Zhiheng; Blaser, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The microbial ecology of human skin is complex, but little is known about its species composition. We examined the diversity of the skin biota from the superficial volar left and right forearms in six healthy subjects using broad-range small subunit rRNA genes (16S rDNA) PCR-based sequencing of randomly selected clones. For the initial 1,221 clones analyzed, 182 species-level operational taxonomic units (SLOTUs) belonging to eight phyla were identified, estimated as 74.0% [95% confidence inte...

  14. Comparative Hydrology, Water Quality, and Ecology of Selected Natural and Augmented Freshwater Wetlands in West-Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.M.; Haag, K.H.; Metz, P.A.; Sacks, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Comparing altered wetlands to natural wetlands in the same region improves the ability to interpret the gradual and cumulative effects of human development on freshwater wetlands. Hydrologic differences require explicit attention because they affect nearly all wetland functions and are an overriding influence on other comparisons involving wetland water quality and ecology. This study adopts several new approaches to quantify wetland hydrologic characteristics and then describes and compares the hydrology, water quality, and ecology of 10 isolated freshwater marsh and cypress wetlands in the mantled karst landscape of central Florida. Four of the wetlands are natural, and the other six have water levels indirectly lowered by ground-water withdrawals on municipally owned well fields. For several decades, the water levels in four of these altered wetlands have been raised by adding ground water in a mitigation process called augmentation. The two wetlands left unaugmented were impaired because their water levels were lowered. Multifaceted comparisons between the altered and natural wetlands are used to examine differences between marshes and cypress wetlands and to describe the effects of augmentation practices on the wetland ecosystems. In the karstic geologic setting, both natural and altered wetlands predominantly lost water to the surficial aquifer. Water leaking out of the wetlands created water-table mounds below the wetlands. The smallest mounds radiated only slightly beyond the vegetated area of the wetlands. The largest and steepest mounds occurred below two of the augmented wetlands. There, rapid leakage rates regenerated a largely absent surficial aquifer and mounds encompassed areas 7-8 times as large as the wetlands. Wetland leakage rates, estimated using a daily water-budget analysis applied over multiple years and normalized as inches per day, varied thirtyfold from the slowest leaking natural wetland to the fastest leaking augmented wetland. Leakage rates increased as the size of the flooded area decreased and as the downward head difference between the wetland and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer increased. Allowing one of the augmented wetlands to dry up for about 2.5 months in the spring of 2004, and then refilling it, generated a net savings of augmentation water despite the amount of water required to recreate the water-table mound beneath the wetland. Runoff from the surrounding uplands was an important component of the water budget in all of the unaugmented wetlands and two of the augmented wetlands. At a minimum, runoff contributed from half (45 percent) to twice (182 percent) as much water as direct rainfall at individual wetlands. Wetland flooded areas, derived using wetland water levels and bathymetric data and presented as a percentage of total wetland area, were used to compare and contrast hydrologic conditions among the 10 wetlands. The percentages of the natural wetland areas that flooded during the study were comparable, despite differences in the sizes of the wetlands. The percent flooded area in each wetland was calculated daily over the study period and monthly for up to 16 years using historical water-level data. Historical flooding in the natural wetlands spanned a greater range in area and had more pronounced seasonality than historical flooding at either the impaired or augmented wetlands. Flooding in the impaired and natural wetlands was similar, however, during 2 years of the study with substantially reduced well-field pumping and above average rainfall. Comparisons indicated several hydrologic differences between the marsh and cypress wetlands in this study. The natural and impaired marshes leaked at about half the rate of the natural and impaired cypress wetlands, and the marshes collectively were underlain by geologic material with lower vertical leakance values than the cypress wetlands. The natural marshes had higher evaporation rates compared to cypress

  15. Temporal trends of Hg in Arctic biota, an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigét, Frank; Braune, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    A statistically robust method was applied to 83 time-series of mercury in Arctic biota from marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems with the purpose of generating a 'meta-analysis' of temporal trend data collected over the past two to three decades, mostly under the auspices of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP). Sampling locations ranged from Alaska in the west to northern Scandinavia in the east. Information from recently published temporal trend studies was tabulated to supplement the results of the statistical analyses. No generally consistent trend was evident across tissues and species from the circumpolar Arctic during the last 30years or so. However, there was a clear west-to-east gradient in the occurrence of recent increasing Hg trends, with larger numbers and a higher proportion of biotic datasets in the Canadian and Greenland region of the Arctic showing significant increases than in the North Atlantic Arctic. Most of the increasing datasets were for marine species, especially marine mammals. A total of 16 (19%) out of the 83 time-series could be classified as "adequate", where adequate is defined as the number of actual monitoring years in a time-series being equal to or greater than the number of years of sampling required to detect a 5% annual change in Hg concentrations, with a significance level of P

  16. The RESRAD-BIOTA code for application in biota dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RESRAD-BIOTA code was developed through a partnership involving offices of the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. RESRAD-BIOTA is designed to provide a full spectrum of analysis capabilities, from practical conservative screening methods to more realistic organism-specific dose assessments. The RESRAD-BIOTA code has many advanced features such as dose conversion factors for eight ellipsoid organism geometries, sensitivity analysis capability for studying parameter sensitivities, and text and graphic reports for easy interpretation of results. An improved version of the RESRAD-BIOTA code is currently available for test and evaluation. (author)

  17. The size selectivity of the main body of a sampling pelagic pair trawl in freshwater reservoirs during the night.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ?íha, Milan; J?za, Tomáš; Prchalová, Marie; Mrkvi?ka, Tomáš; ?ech, Martin; Draštík, Vladislav; Muška, Milan; Kratochvíl, Michal; Peterka, Ji?í; Tušer, Michal; Vašek, Mojmír; Kube?ka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 127, September (2012), s. 56-60. ISSN 0165-7836 R&D Projects: GA MZe(CZ) QH81046 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : quantitative sampling * gear selectivity * trawl * reservoirs Subject RIV: GL - Fishing Impact factor: 1.695, year: 2012

  18. Freshwater ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straskraba, M.; Gnauck, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    Ecosystem analysis and ecological modelling is a rapidly developing interdisciplinary branch of science used in theoretical developments in ecology and having practical applications in environmental protection. In this book, the authors introduce new holistic, particularly cybernetic, concepts into ecosystem theory and modelling, and provide a concise treatment of mathematical modelling of freshwater ecosystems which covers methods, subsystem models, applications and theoretical developments. Part 1 begins with a brief introduction to the principles of systems theory and their applications to ecosystems, and provides a summary of various methods of systems analysis. In Part 11 emphasis is laid on the pelagic processes in standing water, characterised by relatively uninvolved structures from which models can be readily developed. Part 111 describes applications of the technique of modelling to solutions of theoretical and practical problems, with different modelling methods and objectives being used in the various chapters. More recent developments in the methods and theory of ecosystem modelling are covered in Part 1V which also includes a discussion of future trends.

  19. Understanding ecosystem dynamics for conservation of biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A R E; Byrom, Andrea E

    2006-01-01

    1. Ecosystems have higher-order emerging properties that can affect the conservation of species. We identify some of these properties in order to facilitate a better understanding of them. 2. Nonlinear, indirect effects of food web interactions among species can produce counterintuitive changes in populations. 3. Species differ in their roles and linkages with other species in the system. These roles are a property of the system. Such differences in roles influence how we conserve individual species. 4. Ecosystems operate at a multitude of interacting spatial and temporal scales, which together structure the system and affect the dynamics of individual populations. 5. Disturbance also structures an ecosystem, producing both long-term slow changes and sudden shifts in ecosystem dynamics. 6. Ecosystems therefore can have multiple states, determined both by disturbance regimes and biotic interactions. Conservation should recognize a possible multiplicity of natural states while avoiding aberrant (human-induced) states. 7. Ecosystem processes are influenced by the composition of the biota they contain. Disturbances to the biota can distort processes and functions, which in turn can endanger individual species. 8. The goal of ecosystem conservation is the long-term persistence of the biota in the system. There are two paradigms: community-based conservation (CBC) and protected area conservation. Both have their advantages but neither is sufficient to protect the biota on its own. 9. CBC is required to conserve the majority of the world's biota not included in protected areas. However, current CBC methods favour a few idiosyncratic species, distort the species complex, and ignore the majority. More comprehensive methods are required for this approach to meet the goal of ecosystem conservation. 10. Protected areas are essential to conserve species unable to coexist with humans. They also function as ecological baselines to monitor the effects of humans on their own ecosystems. 11. However, protected areas suffer from loss of habitat through attrition of critical areas. Thus, renewal (addition) of habitat is required in order to achieve the long-term persistence of biota in functioning ecosystems. Identification of minimum habitat areas and restoration of ecosystems become two major priorities for future research. PMID:16903044

  20. Deriving Freshwater Quality Criteria for Iron, Lead, Nickel, and Zinc for Protection of Aquatic Life in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    M. Shuhaimi-Othman; Nadzifah, Y.; Nur-Amalina, R.; Umirah, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater quality criteria for iron (Fe), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) were developed with particular reference to aquatic biota in Malaysia, and based on USEPA's guidelines. Acute toxicity tests were performed on eight different freshwater domestic species in Malaysia which were Macrobrachium lanchesteri (prawn), two fish: Poecilia reticulata and Rasbora sumatrana, Melanoides tuberculata (snail), Stenocypris major (ostracod), Chironomus javanus (midge larvae), Nais elinguis (anneli...

  1. The RESRAD-BIOTA code for application in biota dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RESRAD-BIOTA code was developed through a partnership among U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. RESRAD-BIOTA provides a full spectrum of analysis capabilities, from cost-effective conservative screening methods (using biota concentration guides) to realistic, organism-specific dose assessment. A beta version of the RESRAD-BIOTA code is currently available for use and testing. Continued coordination and partnerships with U.S. agencies and international organizations is providing opportunities for the inclusion of additional evaluation approaches and capabilities, such as (1) development of biota concentration guides for additional radionuclides, (2) additional flexibility for specifying and expanding organism options, (3) improvements to parameter datasets of environmental transfer factors, (4) inclusion of additional ''reference organism geometries'' (e.g., dose conversion factors for ellipsoids of appropriate size and shielding properties for different sized organisms, appropriate for specific ecosystem types), and (5) the capability to perform sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for calculated dose estimates

  2. Radiological dose conversion factors for non-human biota for Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiro, B.D.

    1992-01-15

    For the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, transport models are used to predict radionuclide movement from an underground vault to the surface environment. Potential radiological doses to humans are calculated and used as a criterion to assess the safety and acceptability of the concept. However, protection of the environment is also a key issue in the permanent disposal of used nuclear fuel. Hence, an estimate of radiological doses to non-human biota is needed to assess the environmental impact. In this report, we present dose conversion factors for calculation of radiological doses to non-human biota. Four generic organisms have been identified, representing animals and plants related to the human food chain: a freshwater fish, a terrestrial plant, a terrestrial mammal, and a terrestrial bird. We calculate the dose converson factors for both internal and external radiation sources, for the radionuclides 14-C, 99-Tc, 129-I, and 137-Cs, which are of key importance. (auth)

  3. Radiation dose to human and non-human biota in the republic of Korea resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the radiation doses to human and non-human biota in the Republic of Korea, as a result of the Fukushima nuclear accident. By using the measured airborne activity and ground deposition, the effective and thyroid doses of five human age groups (infant, 5 years, 10 years, 15 years and adult) were estimated by the ECOSYS code, and the whole body absorbed dose rate of the eight Korean reference animals and plants (RAPs) was estimated by the K-BIOTA (the Korean computer code to assess the risk of radioactivity to wildlife). The first-year effective and thyroid human doses ranged from 5.7E-5 mSv in the infant group to 2.0E-4 mSv in the 5 years group, and from 5.0E-4 mSv in the infant group to 3.4E-3 mSv in the 5 years group, respectively. The life-time (70 years) effective and thyroid human doses ranged from 1.5E-4 mSv in the infant group to 3.0E-4 mSv in the 5 years group, and from 6.0E-4 mSv in the infant group to 3.5E-3 mSv in the 5 years group, respectively. The estimated maximum whole body absorbed dose rate to the Korean RAPs was 6.7E-7 mGy/d for a snake living in soil (terrestrial biota), and 2.0E-5 mGy/d for freshwater fish (aquatic biota), both of which were far less than the generic dose criteria to protect biota from ionizing radiation. Also, the screening level assessment for ERICA's (Environmental Risks from Ionizing Contaminants: Assessments and management) limiting organisms showed that the risk quotient (RQ) for the estimated maximum soilotient (RQ) for the estimated maximum soil and water activity was significantly less than unity for both the terrestrial and freshwater organisms. Conclusively, the radiological risk of the radioactivity released into the environment by the Fukushima nuclear accident to the public and the non-human biota in the republic of Korea is considered negligible.

  4. Preservation of Early Cambrian animals of the Chengjiang biota

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbott, Se; Hou, Xg; Norry, Mj; Siveter, Dj

    2004-01-01

    The Chengjiang biota of Yunnan, China, documents the earliest extensive radiation of the Metazoa recorded in the fossil record. Gauging preservational bias is crucial in providing an assessment of the completeness of this biota and thereby elucidating whether it represents a comprehensive depiction of Early Cambrian life. We here present a model to explain the nature of the exceptional preservation of the Chengjiang biota and details of the decay process. This study indicates that Chengjiang ...

  5. The uptake of radiationless by some fresh water aquatic biota review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented in this paper reviews many studies carried out by the authors along the last thirty years. The behaviour of the radionuclides in the aquatic ecology of Ismailia Canal stream is of great interest for the evaluation of the possible hazards that may occur to man through the movement of such radionuclides via food chain. Laboratory investigations have been carried out in order to understand the accumulation and release of some radionuclide by some aquatic biota (aquatic macrophyte aquatic plants, some snails species and some fish species) inhabiting this fresh water stream. Different parameters such as water ph, contact time, water salinity, etc. were used in these investigations. The kinetic analysis of the uptake process of some radio nuclides by certain biota was performed. From this analysis, it was possible (through the statistical methods) to investigate that the uptake process proceeded through different steps with different rates depending on the radionuclide and the biota species. It was possible to conclude that some of the selected biota can be used as biological indicators for certain radionuclides

  6. Biota-sediment accumulation factors for radionuclides and sediment associated biota of the Ottawa River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As Ottawa River contamination is historical and resides in sediment, ecological risk and trophic transfer depend on linkages between sediment and biota. One of the ways in which this linkage is quantified is through the use of the biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF). In this study, we present the first field estimates of BSAF for a number of radionuclides. The strongest and most consistent BSAFs were those for 137Cs in deposit feeding taxa, suggesting that sediment concentrations rather than dissolved concentrations drive uptake. For crayfish and unionid bivalves that do not feed on sediment, biota radionuclide concentrations were not related to sediment concentrations, but rather reflected concentrations in water. BSAFs would not be appropriate for these non-deposit feeding biota. BSAFs for 137Cs were not significantly different among deposit feeding taxa, suggesting similar processes for ingestion, assimilation and elimination. These data also show that the concentration factor approach used for guidance would have led to spurious results in this study for deposit feeding benthic invertebrates. Concentrations of 137Cs in Hexagenia downstream of the CRL process outfall range by about 2-orders of magnitude, in comparison to relatively uniform water concentrations. The concentration factor approach would have predicted a single value downstream of CRL, underestimating exposure to Hexagenia by almost 2-orders of magnitude at sites close to the CRL process outfall. (author)

  7. Biota-sediment accumulation factors for radionuclides and sediment associated biota of the Ottawa River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowan, D.; Silke, R.; Carr, J., E-mail: rowand@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    As Ottawa River contamination is historical and resides in sediment, ecological risk and trophic transfer depend on linkages between sediment and biota. One of the ways in which this linkage is quantified is through the use of the biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF). In this study, we present the first field estimates of BSAF for a number of radionuclides. The strongest and most consistent BSAFs were those for {sup 137}Cs in deposit feeding taxa, suggesting that sediment concentrations rather than dissolved concentrations drive uptake. For crayfish and unionid bivalves that do not feed on sediment, biota radionuclide concentrations were not related to sediment concentrations, but rather reflected concentrations in water. BSAFs would not be appropriate for these non-deposit feeding biota. BSAFs for {sup 137}Cs were not significantly different among deposit feeding taxa, suggesting similar processes for ingestion, assimilation and elimination. These data also show that the concentration factor approach used for guidance would have led to spurious results in this study for deposit feeding benthic invertebrates. Concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in Hexagenia downstream of the CRL process outfall range by about 2-orders of magnitude, in comparison to relatively uniform water concentrations. The concentration factor approach would have predicted a single value downstream of CRL, underestimating exposure to Hexagenia by almost 2-orders of magnitude at sites close to the CRL process outfall. (author)

  8. Interactions of radionuclides with marine biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake of radioactivity by marine biota can occur through consumption of radioactive food or via direct incorporation from the seawater. As uptake occurs, radioactivity begins to distribute into and onto various body tissues, or ''compartments'', at different rates. A composite uptake curve therefore is curvilinear with time. Elimination can occur via various pathways, including fecal deposition, molting, and excretion of dissolved substances, and therefore a composite loss curve also is curvilinear. Uptake and elimination can occur simultaneously, and under constant conditions over a long time period a steady-state body burden will be achieved. Many factors can affect uptake and loss rates, as well as steady-state body burdens, and some major ones are discussed. Design of radioactivity experiments involving marine biota is explored, and a case study of a ''natural experiment'' involving both reactor-produced and fallout radionuclides in a coastal environment is presented to show how much nuclide introductions can be used to learn about nuclide biomagnification, trophic level relationships, and biological distribution of radioactivity in the sea. (author)

  9. Effect of chronic selenium exposure on the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium is essential for most of living organisms. In oxic to moderately oxic fresh-waters, Se exists predominantly in the (+VI) and (+IV) oxidation states as selenate (SeO42-) and selenite (SeO32-) respectively, whereas in the biota it is incorporated as Se(-II) into seleno-proteins or amino-acids, or as elemental selenium Se(0). At low concentrations, it acts against oxidative damages mainly as the glutathione peroxidase seleno-dependant, but it may be toxic at higher levels (for example, by replacing sulphur in important biomolecules). In filter feeders, such as the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea, selected as biological model, the ventilation activity is a primary limiting step that controls the water influx and therefore the delivery of contaminants. Consequently, a series of short-term experiments were performed to study the effects of different dissolved Se concentrations and forms (selenite; selenate; selenomethionine) on the ventilation activity of Corbicula fluminea and Se tissular distribution. The modification of the ventilation activity of the Se-exposed groups, in comparison to this of reference groups (not exposed to Se) varied greatly according to the form and the concentrations of the Se used. Se concentrations in tissues indicated that selenite was the less bioavailable form whereas selenomethionine displayed the opposite trend. On the basis of this set of experiments, a limited number of conditions have been selected to provide highly contrasting ventilation flow rates and selenium bioaccumulation levels, in order to study the effects of long term exposures, i) at the molecular level, by measuring bio-markers of oxidative stress (forms of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and bio-marker of genotoxicity (comet assay), ii) at the (sub)cellular level by analysing Se micro-localisation in target organs and iii) at the individual level by monitoring the variation in the ventilatory flow rate. (author)

  10. Transcriptomic Profiling of Differential Responses to Drought in Two Freshwater Mussel Species, the Giant Floater Pyganodon grandis and the Pondhorn Uniomerus tetralasmus

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yupeng; Li, Chao; Landis, Andrew Gascho; Wang, Guiling; Stoeckel, James; Peatman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The southeastern US has experienced recurrent drought during recent decades. Increasing demand for water, as precipitation decreases, exacerbates stress on the aquatic biota of the Southeast: a global hotspot for freshwater mussel, crayfish, and fish diversity. Freshwater unionid mussels are ideal candidates to study linkages between ecophysiological and behavioral responses to drought. Previous work on co-occurring mussel species suggests a coupling of physiology and behavior along a gradien...

  11. Effects of the new wildlife transfer factors on RESRAD-BIOTA's screening Biota Concentration Guides and previous model comparison studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RESRAD-BIOTA Level 1 default Biota Concentration Guides (BCGs) are generic screening environmental medium concentrations based on reasonably conservative concentration ratios (CRs). These CRs had been identified from available literature for a variety of biota organisms. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Report Series (TRS) handbook on radionuclide transfer to wildlife was recently published with data that can be compared with the RESRAD-BIOTA values. In addition, previous IAEA Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) II Biota Working Group model comparison results are examined by comparing them with those obtained using the new TRS CR values for wildlife. Since the CR affects only internal doses, the effect on the overall dose depends on the relative contribution from internal and external exposure pathways

  12. Life-cycle and population ecology of the freshwater mysid Limnomysis benedeni

    OpenAIRE

    Hanselmann, Almut

    2012-01-01

    The numbers of alien species in freshwater systems and their detrimental impacts on the stability of ecosystems and global species diversity are increasing. The introduction of alien species leads to changes in species composition inter alia. Functional traits of the biota thereby also change, which in turn will likely alter ecosystem processes, e.g. by modifying the availability, capture, and use of nutrients or by affecting the feeding relationships (trophic structure) within a community. T...

  13. A freshwater biodiversity hotspot under pressure – assessing threats and identifying conservation needs for ancient Lake Ohrid

    OpenAIRE

    Kostoski, G.; Albrecht, C.; Trajanovski, S.; Wilke, T.

    2010-01-01

    Immediate conservation measures for world-wide freshwater resources are of eminent importance. This is particularly true for so-called ancient lakes. While these lakes are famous for being evolutionary theatres, often displaying an extraordinarily high degree of biodiversity and endemism, in many cases these biota are also experiencing extreme anthropogenic impact.

    Lake Ohrid, a major European biodiversity hotspot situated in a trans-frontier setting on the Balkans, is a ...

  14. Establishing a database of radionuclide transfer parameters for freshwater wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental assessments to evaluate potentials risks to humans and wildlife often involve modelling to predict contaminant exposure through key pathways. Such models require input of parameter values, including concentration ratios, to estimate contaminant concentrations in biota based on measurements or estimates of concentrations in environmental media, such as water. Due to the diversity of species and the range in physicochemical conditions in natural ecosystems, concentration ratios can vary by orders of magnitude, even within similar species. Therefore, to improve model input parameter values for application in aquatic systems, freshwater concentration ratios were collated or calculated from national grey literature, Russian language publications, and refereed papers. Collated data were then input into an international database that is being established by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The freshwater database enables entry of information for all radionuclides listed in ICRP (1983), in addition to the corresponding stable elements, and comprises a total of more than 16,500 concentration ratio (CRwo-water) values. Although data were available for all broad wildlife groups (with the exception of birds), data were sparse for many organism types. For example, zooplankton, crustaceans, insects and insect larvae, amphibians, and mammals, for which there were CRwo-water values for less than eight elements. Coverage was most comprehensive for fish, vascular plants, and molluscs. To our knowledge, the freshwater database that has now been established represents the most comprehensive set of CRwo-water values for freshwater species currently available for use in radiological environmental assessments

  15. Defining the spatial area for assessing doses to non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to apply any biota dose assessment methodology, assessors need a way to decide the spatial scale over which it should be applied. Any useful scaling procedure should take into account the level of biological organization at which impacts are to be assessed (usually the population). Both grain and extent of the selected scale should be considered, and the procedure must achieve an optimum balance between cost of sampling or analysis, and assuring protection of biota. That is, the procedure must define the smallest possible total area to be evaluated, divided into the maximum sized assessment units compatible with assuring protection of populations. Ecological processes occur at multiple scales which vary widely between contaminated sites. Therefore, the procedure must also allow for flexibility to apply site specific knowledge. One such procedure was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Biota Dose Assessment Committee to support our proposed dose assessment methodology. The procedure includes the following steps: 1) determine whether this procedure is necessary by using screening models, 2) determine and map the boundaries of areas contaminated with the same radionuclides in similar quantities, 3) determine and map the boundaries of discrete habitat types, and 4) overlay the maps and identify the intersections. Each area of discrete habitat that lies within a discrete contaminated area can be appropriately defined as an assessment unit. Our approach saned as an assessment unit. Our approach satisfies all the requirements for a useful scaling procedure by using site knowledge of, and professional judgement about, environmental contamination and ecological habitats to develop maps of the largest patch sizes over which biota dose assessment parameters can be averaged. In any assessment of radiation dose to biota, it is necessary to average over some assessment area. One cannot generally sample every square millimeter of a site or every organism that lives there. In virtually every case, one must collect representative samples and argue that they represent all the soil, or all the organisms, in some defined spatial area. Usually, one collects a number of samples and assumes their average, their maximum, their upper 95% confidence limit, or some other metric, represents the entire area over which they were collected. Deciding on that area is not necessarily straightforward, but there are some general guiding principles. My objectives in this paper are to discuss some of the general principles one must think about to establish an assessment area, and to describe the procedure the U.S. Department of Energy's Biota Dose Assessment Committee recommends to define an assessment area for the methodology we developed. (author)

  16. The U.S. Department of Energy's graded approach for evaluating radiation doses to non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been active in developing requirements, methods, and guidance for protection of non-human biota from the effects of ionizing radiation since the late 1980's. Radiation protection of the environment is an emerging issue that will likely require attention in environmental monitoring programs, and in decisions regarding cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactively-contaminated sites. The DOE currently has a radiation dose limit for protecting aquatic organisms, and has considered dose limits for terrestrial biota. Practical, cost-effective guidance for implementation of these dose rate guidelines are needed. In response, DOE has developed methods, models, and guidance within a graded approach for evaluating radiation doses to non-human biota. The methodology was developed using an interdisciplinary team approach that included both 'developers' and 'users' through DOE's Biota Dose Assessment Committee (BDAC). The first phase of the graded or multi-tiered approach consists of a general screening methodology that provides limiting concentrations of radionuclides, termed Biota Concentration Guides (BCGs), for use in screening water, sediment, and soil to determine if dose guidelines for non-human biota are exceeded. BCGs were derived for twenty-three target radionuclides. Four organism types (aquatic animals, riparian animals, terrestrial animals, and terrestrial plants) were selected as the basis for methods developmentected as the basis for methods development. Internal doses were calculated as the product of media concentration, bioaccumulation factor(s), and dose conversion factors. External doses were calculated based on the assumption of immersion of the organism in soil, sediment, or water. Kinetic and allometric techniques were used to fill data gaps in predicting radionuclide concentration factors across a large range of terrestrial and riparian species of animals. The assumptions and default parameters result in conservative BCGs for screening purposes. If the BCGs are exceeded, methods for site-specific screening, followed by detailed analysis, are also provided. A user-selected dose standard can be entered in place of default dose guidelines; parameter values, radiation weighting factors, and organism residence times can be modified within site-specific phases of the graded approach. A recent effort by DOE to encode the graded approach methodology into the 'next generation' biota dose evaluation tool, 'RESRAD-BIOTA', is near completion. The RESRAD-BIOTA computer code provides complete analysis capabilities, from general screening to more realistic organism-specific dose estimation. The RESRAD-BIOTA code contains many advanced features such as: dose conversion factors for eight ellipsoid organism geometries; sensitivity analysis; and text and graphic reports for easy interpretation of results. DOE's graded approach to non-human biota dose evaluation is being widely implemented at DOE's facilities. The graded approach is a cost-effective tool for demonstrating compliance with dose limits for non-human biota, and for conducting ecological screening assessments. In can be employed within an international framework for radiation protection of the environment. (author)

  17. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERY

    OpenAIRE

    Višnja Knjaz

    2007-01-01

    The basic characteristics of freshwater fishery in Croatia are predominantly negative trend in the past twenty years. Even though the total fish pond area covers more than 12,000 hectares, only 6,200 hectares of carp ponds and 58,700 m2 of trout ponds have been exploited. In 2006 the production of total freshwater fish reached 6,547 tons, out of which the production of consumable fish amounted to 5,067 tons and the juveniles 1,480 tons. The export of freshwater fish to EU countries, Macedonia...

  18. Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sv?tlík, Ivo; Fejgl, Michal; Malátová, I.; Tomášková, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 93, NOV (2014), s. 82-86. ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : NE-OBT * HTO * NPPs * combustion * biota Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 1.056, year: 2013

  19. Assimilation potential of water column biota: Mesocosm-based evaluations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Ansari, Z.A.; Sadhasivan, A.; Naik, S.; Sawkar, K.

    2003-01-01

    -toxic. It reveals the findings of mesocosm experiments, conducted to evaluate the assimilation potential of water column biota (bacteria, phytoplankton, and zooplankton). Bulk water quantities from coastal locations, characterized by intense tourist activity, were...

  20. Water hardness reduces the accumulation and toxicity of uranium in a freshwater macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a lack of good quality data and mechanistic understanding on the effects of true water hardness (calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg)) on the bioavailability and toxicity of uranium (U) to freshwater biota. This study determined the effect of true water hardness (20, 75, 150, 275 and 400 mg CaCO3 L?1) on the cell surface binding affinity (log K), accumulation and toxicity (growth inhibition) of U in a submerged, rootless, macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum) in a synthetic freshwater with constant alkalinity (13 mg CaCO3 L?1) and pH (6.2) over 7 days. A 20-fold increase in water hardness resulted in a 4-fold decrease in U toxicity (median effect concentration (EC50) = 134 ?g L?1 U at 20 mg CaCO3 L?1 hardness, increasing to 547 ?g L?1 U at 400 mg CaCO3 L?1 hardness), cell surface binding affinity (log K = 6.25 at 20 mg CaCO3 L?1 hardness, decreasing to log K = 5.64 at 400 mg CaCO3 L?1 hardness) and accumulation (the concentration factor decreased from 63 at 20 mg CaCO3 L?1 hardness to 15 at 400 mg CaCO3 L?1 hardness) of U. Calcium provided a 4-fold greater protective effect against U accumulation and toxicity compared to Mg. Speciation calculations indicated negligible differences in the percentages of key U species (UO22+, UO2OH+, UO2(OH)2) over the range of water hardness tested. The inhibition of U binding at the cell surface, and subsequent uptake, by C. demersum, with increasing Ca and/or Mg concentration, may be explained in terms of (i) competition between Ca2+/Mg2+ and UO22+ (and/or UO2OH+) for physiologically active sites at the cell surface, and/or (ii) reduced negative charge (electrical potential) at the cell surface, resulting in a decrease in the activity of UO22+ (and/or UO2OH+) at the plant/water interface (boundary layer), and consequently, less U bound to physiologically active cell surface sites. In the absence of a biotic ligand model for U, the results of this study (together with previous work) reinforce the need for a more flexible, hardness-dependent, U guideline for the protection of selected freshwater biota. - Highlights: ? Effect of water hardness on U toxicity and accumulation in a freshwater macrophyte was studied. ? A 20-fold increase in water hardness resulted in a 4-fold decrease in U toxicity and accumulation. ? Ca provided a 4-fold greater protective effect against U toxicity and accumulation than Mg. ? Negligible differences in the percentages of key U species with increased water hardness ? Mechanisms of competition and/or electrostatic effects at the cell surface are proposed

  1. Water hardness reduces the accumulation and toxicity of uranium in a freshwater macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markich, Scott J., E-mail: smarkich@optusnet.com.au

    2013-01-15

    There is a lack of good quality data and mechanistic understanding on the effects of true water hardness (calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg)) on the bioavailability and toxicity of uranium (U) to freshwater biota. This study determined the effect of true water hardness (20, 75, 150, 275 and 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1}) on the cell surface binding affinity (log K), accumulation and toxicity (growth inhibition) of U in a submerged, rootless, macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum) in a synthetic freshwater with constant alkalinity (13 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1}) and pH (6.2) over 7 days. A 20-fold increase in water hardness resulted in a 4-fold decrease in U toxicity (median effect concentration (EC50) = 134 ?g L{sup ?1} U at 20 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1} hardness, increasing to 547 ?g L{sup ?1} U at 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1} hardness), cell surface binding affinity (log K = 6.25 at 20 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1} hardness, decreasing to log K = 5.64 at 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1} hardness) and accumulation (the concentration factor decreased from 63 at 20 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1} hardness to 15 at 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup ?1} hardness) of U. Calcium provided a 4-fold greater protective effect against U accumulation and toxicity compared to Mg. Speciation calculations indicated negligible differences in the percentages of key U species (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}OH{sup +}, UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}) over the range of water hardness tested. The inhibition of U binding at the cell surface, and subsequent uptake, by C. demersum, with increasing Ca and/or Mg concentration, may be explained in terms of (i) competition between Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} (and/or UO{sub 2}OH{sup +}) for physiologically active sites at the cell surface, and/or (ii) reduced negative charge (electrical potential) at the cell surface, resulting in a decrease in the activity of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} (and/or UO{sub 2}OH{sup +}) at the plant/water interface (boundary layer), and consequently, less U bound to physiologically active cell surface sites. In the absence of a biotic ligand model for U, the results of this study (together with previous work) reinforce the need for a more flexible, hardness-dependent, U guideline for the protection of selected freshwater biota. - Highlights: ? Effect of water hardness on U toxicity and accumulation in a freshwater macrophyte was studied. ? A 20-fold increase in water hardness resulted in a 4-fold decrease in U toxicity and accumulation. ? Ca provided a 4-fold greater protective effect against U toxicity and accumulation than Mg. ? Negligible differences in the percentages of key U species with increased water hardness ? Mechanisms of competition and/or electrostatic effects at the cell surface are proposed.

  2. The biology and functional morphology of Macoma biota (Bivalvia: Tellinidae: Macominae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Pedro Ribeiro, Piffer; Eliane Pintor de, Arruda; Flávio Dias, Passos.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Macoma biota Arruda & Domaneschi, 2005, is a recently described species known only from the intertidal zone of Praia da Cidade, Caraguatatuba Bay, in the state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. The main purpose of the present paper is to describe the biology of M. biota, beginning with a detailed a [...] nalysis of its anatomy and functional morphology and how these attributes are correlated with its habitat and life history. The morphology of the organs in the pallial cavity and their sorting devices indicate that this species has efficient mechanisms to process large amounts of particles that enter this cavity via the inhalant current. M. biota can rapidly select the material suitable for ingestion and direct the undesired excess to the rejection mantle tracts. These characteristics along with the siphon's behavior and the digestive tract configuration reveal that this species can be classified primarily as a deposit feeder, like other species of the genus; however, it can also behave as a suspension feeder, depending on the environmental conditions.

  3. The biology and functional morphology of Macoma biota (Bivalvia: Tellinidae: Macominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ribeiro Piffer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Macoma biota Arruda & Domaneschi, 2005, is a recently described species known only from the intertidal zone of Praia da Cidade, Caraguatatuba Bay, in the state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. The main purpose of the present paper is to describe the biology of M. biota, beginning with a detailed analysis of its anatomy and functional morphology and how these attributes are correlated with its habitat and life history. The morphology of the organs in the pallial cavity and their sorting devices indicate that this species has efficient mechanisms to process large amounts of particles that enter this cavity via the inhalant current. M. biota can rapidly select the material suitable for ingestion and direct the undesired excess to the rejection mantle tracts. These characteristics along with the siphon's behavior and the digestive tract configuration reveal that this species can be classified primarily as a deposit feeder, like other species of the genus; however, it can also behave as a suspension feeder, depending on the environmental conditions.

  4. Approaches to estimating the transfer of radionuclides to arctic biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing concern over potential radioactive contamination of the Arctic due to the wide range of nuclear sources. Environmental characteristics of the Arctic also suggest that it may be comparatively vulnerable to contaminants. Here we review collated data and available models for estimating the transfer of radionuclides to terrestrial biota within the Arctic. The most abundant data are for radiocaesium and radiostrontium although many data for natural radionuclides were available from studies in the Arctic. For some radionuclides no data are available for describing transfer to Arctic biota. Allometric-kinetic models have been used to provide estimates of transfer for radionuclide biota combinations for which data were lacking. Predicted values were in good agreement with observed data for some radionuclides (e.g. Cs, U) although less so for others. However, for some radionuclides where comparison appeared poor there were relatively little observed data with which to compare and the models developed were simplistic excluding some potentially important transfer pathways (e.g. soil ingestion). There are no bespoke models to enable the dynamic prediction of radionuclide transfer to Arctic biota. A human food chain model is available which includes limited parameterization for Cs and Sr transfer in Arctic ecosystems. This has been relatively easily adapted to estimate 137Cs and 90Sr transfer to some Arctic biota and could be readily adapted to other radionuclide-biota combinations. There are many factors of Arctic ecosystems which may influence radionuclide behaviour including short growing seasons, prolonged freezing of soil, and effects of low temperatures on biological rates. However, these are not included within existing predictive models (for human or biota exposure). If exposure to ionising radiation within Arctic ecosystems is to be robustly predicted such factors must be fully understood and properly incorporated into models. (author)

  5. Ecodosimetry weighting factor (eR) for non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP's radiological protection guidance for humans recognizes that equal absorbed doses of different types of radiation can have different biological effects in humans. ICRP publication 60 thus prescribes radiation weighting factors, wR values, to modify the absorbed dose (Gy) to effective dose (Sv) to enable the risk from different types of radiation to be compared on an equivalent basis. The wR values are selected on the basis of various considerations, including the linear energy transfer of the radiation and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values (which are the ratios of the absorbed dose of reference to test radiation that produce an equivalent level of effect, for a given endpoint, system and dose level). There is no similar factor for non-human biota. It would be useful to have one: assessment of possible impacts on non-human biota (particularly from alpha-emitters and tritium beta-rays) is important for Canadian nuclear facilities. We propose a radiation equivalency factor 'eR' for biota to fulfill a role equivalent to that occupied by wR in human radiation protection. RBE values for deterministic effects such as reproduction, fecundity and survival in biota are the critical bases for selection of eR values. These deterministic effects in populations are far more relevant to the assessment endpoints in ecological risk assessment than are stochastic effects, to which RBE values in human radiatiocts, to which RBE values in human radiation protection relate. For tritium ?-rays, most determinations support RBE values of 2-3 for deterministic effects when referenced to gamma radiation but little more than unity when x-rays are the reference radiation. This is because x-rays themselves have RBE -2 if referenced to gamma rays. Despite this, the ICRP assigns a wR of 1 to all electrons and all photons, including tritium beta-rays. Therefore, if eR is constrained to an integer, 1 is more appropriate than a value of 2 for tritium beta-rays. An RBE factor of 200-300 for alpha particles in radiation protection of non-human biota has been suggested in Canada, but in two studies that reported RBE values of about 250, the dosimetry for alpha particles was uncertain. Furthermore, RBE value of 20 for non-human biota is indefensible because it relates to stochastic effects in individuals. For deterministic effects, most animal studies report RBE values (for population-based endpoints) in the range of 5-10. Since ecological risk to biota generally appears only when doses are moderately high, the most logical and reasonable choice of eR for ?-emitters is not the larger, limiting value of RBE value observed at low doses, but rather a value around 5. (author)

  6. LADTAP-2, Organ Doses to Man and Other Biota from Aquatic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: LADTAP2 performs environmental dose analyses for releases of liquid effluents from light-water nuclear power plants into surface waters during routine operation. The analyses estimate radiation doses to individuals, population groups, and biota from ingestion (aquatic foods, water, and terrestrial irrigated foods) and external exposure (shoreline, swimming, and boating) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the 'ALARA' philosophy). The program consists of a hydrologic model chosen to represent mixing in the effluent impoundment system and the receiving surface waters and the exposure pathway models which estimate exposure of selected groups at various water usage locations in the environment. Two types of population doses are calculated. An ALARA analysis is performed based on exposure of people within 50 miles of the site, and a NEPA analysis is performed based on exposure of the entire U.S. population to effluents from the site. A population-dose analysis prepared in the form of a cost-benefit table presents the total-body and thyroid doses from each radionuclide released and the population doses (total-body and thyroid) per curie of each radionuclide released. 2 - Method of solution: The impoundment system is represented by one of four hydrologic models: direct release to the receiving water, lineirect release to the receiving water, linear flow with no mixing (the plug-flow model), linear flow through the impoundment with partial recirculation through the reactor (the partially mixed model), or complete mixing in the impoundment with partial recirculation through the reactor (the completely mixed model). The last three account for radiological decay during transit through the impoundment system. Optional models are available to estimate dilution in nontidal rivers and near-shore lake environments. The consequence calculation part of LADTAP2 starts with the water concentration at a specific usage location in the environment. The effluent concentration from the impoundment system is related to the water concentrations at the usage locations by two parameters, a dilution factor and a transit time (for radiological decay in transport through the surface water system). The water concentration at the usage location is applied to specific pathway models to estimate the resulting exposure. The pathways included are: ingestion of aquatic foods, such as fish, invertebrates, and aquatic plants; external exposure to shoreline; external exposure to water through boating or swimming; ingestion of drinking water (freshwater sites only); and ingestion of irrigated terrestrial food crops. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 200 nuclides in the release source term, 19 sport fish harvest locations, 19 commercial fish harvest locations, 19 sport invertebrate harvest locations, 19 commercial invertebrate harvest locations, 8 body organs. The radionuclide library contains data for 169 radionuclides

  7. Invasive species and habitat degradation in Iberian streams: an analysis of their role in freshwater fish diversity loss

    OpenAIRE

    Hermoso, Virgilio; Clavero, Miguel; Blanco-garrido, F.; Prenda, J.

    2011-01-01

    Mediterranean endemic freshwater fish are among the most threatened biota in the world. Distinguishing the role of different extinction drivers and their potential interactions is crucial for achieving conservation goals. While some authors argue that invasive species are a main driver of native species declines, others see their proliferation as a co-occurring process to biodiversity loss driven by habitat degradation. It is difficult to discern between the two potential causes given that fe...

  8. PBDEs in freshwater mussels and fish from Flanders, Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covaci, A.; Voorspoels, S.; Schepens, P. [Antwerp Univ. (Belgium). Toxicological Center; Bervoets, L.; Hoff, P.; Voets, J.; Campenhout, K. van; Blust, R. [Antwerp Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), a class of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), are widely used in textiles, plastics, electronic equipment and other materials for more than 30 years. Due to their massive use, PBDEs have become ubiquitously present in aquatic organisms and it was recently evidenced that their levels seem to increase rapidly. Higher PBDE concentrations were found in biota from freshwater compared to similar marine species. This is probably due to a higher pollution load found near point pollution sources that are almost exclusively inland located. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) fulfil the requirements of a good biomonitoring organism for freshwater ecosystems: they are easy to collect and to handle, are available in sufficient numbers, have a relative long lifespan, are sedentary and resistant to various types of pollution without suffering a too high mortality and have a high filtration rate which favours the bioaccumulation of organic contaminants. Fish species are another suitable tool for the biomonitoring of organic contaminants. The occurrence of PBDEs in fish species from Europe has already received some attention, but the amount of data is still limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of PBDEs in zebra mussels and several representative freshwater fish species (eel, carp and gibel carp) at different sites in Flanders, Belgium. In parallel, other organohalogenated contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-DDE and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were also measured and their relationship with PBDEs was investigated.

  9. Radio biophysical studies on some fresh water biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study includes biophysical measurements of uptake and release of Co-60 by aquatic biota, water hyacinth plant (Eichhronia Crassipes ) and biomphalaria alexandrina snails placed in ismailia canal water. The uptake of co-60 was studied under different experimental conditions, namely the effect of contact time, variation of p H of the cobalt solution, the presence of competing ions and variation of cobalt carrier concentration. The experimental results of Co-60 uptake and release by the aquatic biota are described using the compartmental model, and also using the well known freudlich isotherm equation model

  10. Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlik, I; Fejgl, M; Malátová, I; Tomaskova, L

    2014-11-01

    A pilot study aimed on possible occurrence of elevated activity of non-exchangable organically bound tritium (NE-OBT) in biota was performed. The first results showed a significant surplus of NE-OBT activity in biota of the valley of Mohelno reservoir and Jihlava river. The liquid releases of HTO from the nuclear power plant Dukovany is the source of tritium in this area. This area can be a source of various types of natural samples for future studies of tritium pathways. PMID:24582481

  11. Phytochemical and Antibacterial Study of Five Freshwater Algal Species

    OpenAIRE

    G.H. Ali; R.A.S. El Din; F.A. Samhan; Hetta, M.H.; S.M. Abdo

    2012-01-01

    A phytochemical study of five freshwater algal species isolated from an Egyptian water station and comparing their inhibition activities against three selected bacterial pathogens in order to correlate the biological activity and the chemical constituents of the algae. Five freshwater algal species, Anabaena sphaerica, Chroococcus turgidus, Oscillatoria limnetica and Spirulina platensis (blue-green algae, Cyanobacteria) and Cosmarium leave (green algae) were isolated from an Egyptian water st...

  12. An Ordovician variation on Burgess Shale-type biotas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botting, Joseph P; Muir, Lucy A; Jordan, Naomi; Upton, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Cambrian Burgess Shale-type biotas form a globally consistent ecosystem, usually dominated by arthropods. Elements of these communities continued into the Early Ordovician at high latitude, but our understanding of ecological changes during the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE) is currently limited by the paucity of Ordovician exceptionally preserved open-marine faunas. Here we clarify the early stages of the GOBE by describing a new open-marine Konservat-Lagerstätte from the Early Ordovician of Wales. The Afon Gam Biota includes many lineages typical of the Cambrian Burgess Shale-type biotas, but the most abundant groups were sponges, algae and worms, with non-trilobite arthropods being unexpectedly rare. Labile tissues occur abundantly in the sponges and are also present in other groups, including brachiopods and hyoliths. Taphonomic biases are considered and rejected as explanations for arthropod rarity; the preserved biota is considered to be an approximation to the original community composition. We note that other exceptionally preserved communities in the Welsh Ordovician are also sponge-dominated, suggesting a regional change in benthic ecology during the early stages of the GOBE. PMID:25909638

  13. Comparison of dose estimate results from radioecological risk assessment models RESRAD-BIOTA, ERICA Tool and SENES Risk Model using a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many software programs designed to estimate the risk to non-human biota from exposure to radioactivity. Three models have been selected for comparison in this study: US DOE RESRAD-BIOTA Model, EC ERICA Tool and SENES Risk Model. It appears that the methodology for these models is similar, whereas the parameters used to model a case study are different, creating different outputs. Issues surrounding combined or 'lumped' parameters were identified with implications on the transparency and uncertainty of results. These issues are explored so that they may be avoided by choosing the appropriate model and implementation for a given scenario. (author)

  14. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Columbia Basin Project, Washington, 1991-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embrey, S.S.; Block, E.K.

    1995-01-01

    The reconnaissance investigation results indicated that irrigation drainage generally has not adversely affected biota in the Columbia Basin Project. Hazards to biota from large concentrations of certain trace elements in water and bottom sediment, and caused by high evaporation rates in irrigated arid lands, are reduced by imported, dilute Columbia River water. However, boron concentrations in aquatic plants might affect waterfowl feeding on these plants and arsenic concentrations in juvenile coots were similar to those in mallard ducklings who exhibited abnormalities after being fed an arsenic-supplemented diet. During irrigation season, concentrations of boron, nitrate, and dissolved solids in water were increased in the southern wasteways because of water reuse. During non-irrigation season, constituent concentrations were large when stream flows are sustained by return water from tile drains and ground water. However, concentrations of dissolved constituents typically did not exceed standards or criteria for humans, freshwater life, or beneficial uses of the water. In water, the herbicide 2,4-D was detected more than any other pesticide and in concentrations from 0.01 to 1.0 microgram per liter. In bottom sediment, organochlorine insecticides were detected in samples from 19 of 21 sites. In fish collected from some wasteways, chlordane, DDT, and dieldrin concentrations occasionally exceeded freshwater protection criteria.

  15. Invasive alien freshwater snail species in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Wolmarans, Cornelius T.; Kock, Kenne? N.

    2008-01-01

    An account is given of all invasive alien freshwater snail species samples found in the Kruger National Park currently on record in the National Freshwater Snail Collection(NFSC) database. This report mainly focuses on samples collected during surveys of selected water bodies in the Kruger National Park (KNP) during 1964, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The progress made by four alien invasive freshwater snail species, Lymnaea columella, Physa acuta, Aplexa marmorata and T...

  16. Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the GAPRAD project are summarised in this report. The background and rationale to GAPRAD are presented and explained. Most notably this relates to a lack of information on naturally occuring radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic systems that have direct applicability for use in environmental impact assessments. Results from field activities are presented from the Dovrefjell area in Norway (terrestrial study) and selected lake and brackish water systems in Finland. The data mainly concern activity concentrations of Po-210 in environmental media and selected biota allowing concentration ratios to be derived where appropriate. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental work conducted within the project are presented. (au)

  17. Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.; Gjelsvik, R. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Holm, E. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Saxen, R.; Outola, I. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-03-15

    The activities of the GAPRAD project are summarised in this report. The background and rationale to GAPRAD are presented and explained. Most notably this relates to a lack of information on naturally occuring radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic systems that have direct applicability for use in environmental impact assessments. Results from field activities are presented from the Dovrefjell area in Norway (terrestrial study) and selected lake and brackish water systems in Finland. The data mainly concern activity concentrations of Po-210 in environmental media and selected biota allowing concentration ratios to be derived where appropriate. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental work conducted within the project are presented. (au)

  18. Comparative food chain behaviour and distribution of actinide elements in and around a contaminated fresh-water pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioaccumulation of sup(233,234)U, 238U, 238Pu, sup(239,240)Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm in both native and introduced biota was studied at Pond 3513, a former low-level radioactive waste settling basin (0.4 ha surface area) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This system, which was decommissioned in 1976 after more than 30 years' use, contains approximately 5 Ci of sup(239,240)Pu; inventories of other actinide isotopes are considerably less. Significantly higher concentrations of actinides in fish that were allowed access to sediments indicated that sedimentary particulates may be the primary source of transuranics to biota in shallow fresh-water ecosystems. The study determined habitat, in particular the degree of association of an organism with the sediment/water interface, to be the primary factor in controlling transuranic concentrations in aquatic biota. In most of the biological samples analysed, excluding samples suspected of being contaminated by sediment, 241Am/239Pu, 244Cm/239Pu, and 238U/239Pu ratios were greater than the respective ratios in sediment while sup(233,234)U/238U, and sup(239,240)Pu/238Pu (aquatic biota only) ratios were not different from the respective ratios in sediment. The relative uptake of actinides from contaminated sediment by aquatic and terrestrial biota at this site was U>Cm>=Am>Pu. The relative extractabilitas U>Cm>=Am>Pu. The relative extractability of actinides from shoreline sediment (using 1 M HNO3 and 0.01 M HCl) was U>Cm approximately equal to Am>Pu. Concentrations of transuranics in water, terrestrial vegetation, and vertebrate carcasses were less than 10% of the recommended public exposure maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of the ICRP, even in this highly contaminated system, which has radioactive inventories atypical of any other fresh-water site now in use or planned for future use in association with nuclear power technologies. (author)

  19. What are the toxicological effects of mercury in Arctic biota?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This review critically evaluates the available mercury (Hg) data in Arctic marine biota and the Inuit population against toxicity threshold values. In particular marine top predators exhibit concentrations of mercury in their tissues and organs that are believed to exceed thresholds for biological effects. Species whose concentrations exceed threshold values include the polar bears (Ursus maritimus), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), pilot whale (Globicephala melas), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), a few seabird species, and landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). Toothed whales appear to be one of the most vulnerable groups, with high concentrations of mercury recorded in brain tissue with associated signs of neurochemical effects. Evidence of increasing concentrations in mercury in some biota in Arctic Canada and Greenland is therefore a concern with respect to ecosystem health.

  20. Human colonic biota studied by ribosomal DNA sequence analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, K. H.; Blitchington, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Human colonic biota is a complex microbial ecosystem that serves as a host defense. Unlike most microbial ecosystems, its composition has been studied extensively by relatively efficient culture methods. We have compared an established culture-based method with direct amplification and partial sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes from a human fecal specimen. Nine cycles of PCR were also compared with 35 cycles. Colonies and cloned amplicons were classified by comparing their ribosomal DNA (rDN...

  1. Conversion ratios for the foodstuffs and biota environmental surveillance program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Ferenbaugh, J.K.

    1998-09-01

    The foodstuffs and biota monitoring programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) comprises two of the five Environmental Surveillance Programs mandated by Department of Energy Orders, and LANL has conducted these studies since the early 1970s (ESR 1997). Because foodstuffs and biota commonly contain very small amounts of radionuclides in the edible portions of the tissue, samples are commonly ashed to concentrate the radioisotope(s) in order to adequately detect the element; therefore, results are usually reported in units per gram of ash. To compensate for the differing water contents in various matrices (gram of ash are usually two to four orders of magnitude higher than live weights), units in gram of ash are converted to units of gram of dry material--the standard representation of data. Further, results in units per gram dry weight are converted to units of wet weight in order to estimate radiation doses to the public from the ingestion of these products. This paper reports the mean ash to dry and dry to wet weight moisture conversion ratios for a variety of foodstuffs and biota that have been collected as part of the Environmental Surveillance Program at LANL from 1990 to present.

  2. Comparative radiation impact on biota and man in the area affected by the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodological approach for a comparative assessment of ionising radiation effects on man and non-human species, based on the use of Radiation Impact Factor (RIF) - ratios of actual exposure doses to biota species and man to critical dose is described. As such doses, radiation safety standards limiting radiation exposure of man and doses at which radiobiological effects in non-human species were not observed after the Chernobyl accident, were employed. For the study area within the 30 km ChNPP zone dose burdens to 10 reference biota groups and the population (with and without evacuation) and the corresponding RIFs were calculated. It has been found that in 1986 (early period after the accident) the emergency radiation standards for man do not guarantee adequate protection of the environment, some species of which could be affected more than man. In 1991 RIFs for man were considerably (by factor of 20.0-1.1 x 105) higher compared with those for selected non-human species. Thus, for the long term after the accident radiation safety standards for man are shown to ensure radiation safety for biota as well

  3. Comparative radiation impact on biota and man in the area affected by the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, S.V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation) and International Atomic Energy Agency, Agency' s Laboratories, Seibersdorf A-2444 (Austria)]. E-mail: s.fesenko@iaea.org; Alexakhin, R.M. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Geras' kin, S.A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Sanzharova, N.I. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Spirin, Ye.V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Spiridonov, S.I. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Gontarenko, I.A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteras (Norway)

    2005-07-01

    A methodological approach for a comparative assessment of ionising radiation effects on man and non-human species, based on the use of Radiation Impact Factor (RIF) - ratios of actual exposure doses to biota species and man to critical dose is described. As such doses, radiation safety standards limiting radiation exposure of man and doses at which radiobiological effects in non-human species were not observed after the Chernobyl accident, were employed. For the study area within the 30 km ChNPP zone dose burdens to 10 reference biota groups and the population (with and without evacuation) and the corresponding RIFs were calculated. It has been found that in 1986 (early period after the accident) the emergency radiation standards for man do not guarantee adequate protection of the environment, some species of which could be affected more than man. In 1991 RIFs for man were considerably (by factor of 20.0-1.1 x 10{sup 5}) higher compared with those for selected non-human species. Thus, for the long term after the accident radiation safety standards for man are shown to ensure radiation safety for biota as well.

  4. Assessment of Marine Biota Doses Arising from the Radioactive Sea Discharges of the COGEMA La Hague Facility. A Comprehensive Case Study (Consensus Appraisal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports an assessment of radiation doses to marine biota arising from the radioactive sea discharges (as liquid effluents) of the COGEMA La Hague facility. The La Hague facility is located in the northwest part of France, in the north-west tip of the Nord-Cotentin Peninsula, along the English Channel south shore. The case study was primarily based on the large amount of data from recent studies of the Nord-Cotentin Radioecology Group (GRNC) and from a recent environmental impact assessment of the La Hague facility. The primary objective of this study was to select a representative set of marine biota for the study area (i.e. the Nord-Cotentin Peninsula coast) and to assess the potential radiological impacts, in terms of biota dose-rates and their related potential health effects on marine biota, arising from the radioactive sea discharges of the COGEMA La Hague facility. For assessing potential effects to biota, the predicted biota dose rates were compared to the available guidance for the protection of populations of non-human biota. The guidance values are based on published data by international organizations (e.g. UNSCEAR and IAEA) and on a screening review of a recent database (by FASSET) on biological effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota. The major conclusion of the case study was that the predicted dose rates to marine biota attributable to radioactive sea discharges from the La Hague facility are small, and in general, well below compari small, and in general, well below comparison guidance levels at which deleterious and observable health effects to populations of marine biota might, according to current knowledge, be expected. The predicted incremental dose rates arising from the La Hague facility are also, in general, well below those caused by the background radioactivity in the region. This conclusion and the dose rate predictions in this study are in close agreement with those for the marine biota of Cap La Hague reported in the MARINAII study recently undertaken for the European Commission. This case study has been presented and discussed at a recent specific workshop of international experts held at La Hague on April 15, 2003. This paper briefly presents the case study and put a particular focus on the study consensus appraisal (which includes the major conclusion stated above) that resulted from the workshop and on an industry perspective on the emerging topic of protection of non-human biota species. The points highlighted in the consensus appraisal have been incorporated in the study final report. The reader is invited to consult the consensus appraisal, contained in the study final report, for an independent and transparent opinion on the La Hague case study that was expressed by a group of international experts. (Author) 15 refs

  5. Marine and freshwater concentration ratios (CRwo-water): review of Japanese data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water-to-organism (whole body) concentration ratio (CRwo-water), which is defined as the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in the biota (Bq kg?1 fresh weight) to that in water (Bq L?1), has been used in mathematical models for environmental radiation protection. In the present paper, published global fallout 90Sr, 137Cs, 106Ru, 144Ce and 239+240Pu activity concentration data and stable element concentration data for Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu and Mn for organisms living in freshwater or seawater areas in Japan were collated. The data suitable for obtaining CRwo-water values were identified. CRwo-water values of 137Cs were similar for pelagic fish, benthic fish and whitebait (immature, small fish) with respective geometric means of 30 (range: 4.4–69), 32 (range: 15–54) and 33 (range: 13–84). The calculated CRwo-water values of the other radionuclides and stable elements were generally similar to other previously reported values; with the exception that those for Ce were lower for marine biota and those of Cu were higher for freshwater fish

  6. Burgess shale-type biotas were not entirely burrowed away

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaines, Robert R.; Droser, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    Burgess Shale-type biotas occur globally in the Cambrian record and offer unparalleled insight into the Cambrian explosion, the initial Phanerozoic radiation of the Metazoa. Deposits bearing exceptionally preserved soft-bodied fossils are unusually common in Cambrian strata; more than 40 are now known. The well-documented decline of soft-bodied preservation following the Middle Cambrian represents the closure of a taphonomic window that was only intermittently open in marine environments thereafter. The prevailing hypothesis for this secular shift in taphonomic conditions of outer shelf environments is that soft-bodied biotas were literally burrowed away from the fossil record by increasing infaunal activity in muddy substrate environments; this would have affected geochemical gradients and increased the efficiency of organic matter recycling in sediments. New and recently published data, however, suggest a more complex scenario. Ichnologic and microstratigraphic data from Burgess Shale-type deposits indicatethat (1) bioturbation exerts a limiting effect on soft-bodied preservation; (2) the observed increase in the depth and extent or bioturbation following the Middle Cambrian would have restricted preservation of Burgess Shale type biotas in a number of settings; but (3) increasing depth and extent of bioturbation would not have affected preservation in many other settings, including the most richly fossiliferous portions of the Chengjiang (China) deposit and the Greater Phyllopod Bed of the Burgess Shale (Canada). Therefore, increasing bioturbation cannot account for the apparent loss of this pathway from the fossil record, and requires that other circumstances, including, but not limited to, widespread benthic anoxia, facilitated widespread exceptional preservation in the Cambrian.

  7. Modelling Radiation Exposure and Radionuclide Transfer for Non-human Species. Report of the Biota Working Group of EMRAS Theme 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internationally, the ICRP, IAEA and European Commission (EC) are addressing environmental protection as an element of their revision of Recommendations and Basic Safety Standards. Some countries already have requirements and guidelines for the protection of non-human biota. For instance, in England and Wales, the requirement to assess impacts affecting Natura 2000 sites has been interpreted to include ionising radiation. In the USA, biota protection guidelines and dose rates are contained in USDOE Orders 5400.5 and 450.1. In response to these developments, a number of models and approaches have been developed specifically to estimate the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiations. Some countries (e.g. Canada, Finland, England and Wales, and the USA) are now using these within their national regulatory frameworks for (existing and proposed) nuclear and other sites that may release radioactivity to the environment. Software and/or documentation for some of these approaches are readily available and hence third parties are able to use them when conducting assessments. The Biota Working Group (BWG) of the IAEA Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety programme was formed in 2004 to address the relative lack of validation and intercomparison of the different models and approaches. The primary objective of the BWG, was: 'to improve Member State's capabilities for protection of the environment by comparing and validating models being used, or developed, for biota dose assessment (that may be used) as part of regulatory process of licensing and compliance monitoring of authorised releases of radionuclides'. Group members included modellers, regulators, industry and researchers. In total, 15 models and approaches were applied to one or more of the four exercises conducted by the BWG. The models/approaches applied encompass those being developed, and in some instances, used in a regulatory context, in Belgium, Canada, France, Lithuania, Russia, the UK and the USA, as well as the outputs of recent EC EURATOM programmes. The participating models included those freely available to any interested users. The four intercomparison exercises included evaluations of the basic components of the models assuming 1 Bq per unit media or 1 Bq kg-1 in the organism, and two scenario (one freshwater and one terrestrial) applications in which model predictions were compared to available field measurements. The work of the BWG has clearly demonstrated that the largest contribution to variability between model predictions, and comparison with available data, is the parameterisation of the models transfer components. The methods used to determine absorbed dose rate contribute relatively little to variability between model outputs. The report concludes with recommendations for future activities within the EMRAS II programme.

  8. Technetium distribution and accumulation in marine sediments and biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium normally exists in marine environments as pertechnetate Tcsup(VII). However when sediments are reduced and organic rich, it becomes fixed rapidly to them. Bacterial activity does not seem to be responsible. Concentration factors for Tc in biota are generally 10-20 but two exceptions are macrophytic algae (1100) and polychaetes (300-800). Biological half lives are weeks or months. Retention was generally about 20% of that in the food source, and 25% of that was retained in the digestive gland or liver. (author)

  9. Anthropogenic radionuclides in biota samples from the Caspian Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Caspian Sea has been recently a subject of many scientific studies mainly related to sea level changes and pollution. For this purpose, two sampling expeditions were organised by IAEA in the Caspian Sea in 1995 and 1996. The aim was to investigate oceanographic conditions, water dynamics and the distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides 90Sr, 137Cs and 239,240Pu in the water column. Considering the unique biodiversity of the Caspian Sea, there has also been interest to obtain information on radionuclide concentrations in biota samples, first of all in sturgeons and in caviar as their production is strongly linked to economical regional needs. The radioactive contamination of Caspian Sea biota has been investigated by analyzing natural 210Po and anthropogenic 137Cs, 239,240Pu and 241Am in biota samples collected in April 1999 offshore of Astrakhan, in the north Caspian Sea. More biota samples from the South West Caspian Sea (Artom Island, June 1999; Devechi District and Neftechala, November 1999) were collected and analyzed for 210Po, 137Cs, 90Sr, 239,240Pu and 241Am. The sampled species were different types of sturgeons (Sevruga, Russkyi Osyotr and Beluga) as well as fresh spawn and caviar. Other fish species (e.g. Cyprinidae) and one algae sample (Cladofila) have also been analysed. Flesh parts have only been analysed in the case oarts have only been analysed in the case of fish samples. The samples were freeze-dried, ground sieved and canned to be counted by gamma-spectrometry for determination of 137Cs. Analytical separation and purification procedures were carried out later. 210Po, 239,240Pu as well as 241Am were measured by alpha-spectrometry whereas 90Sr was measured by beta-spectrometry. The data are reported. In general, radionuclide activities in fish and caviar do not represent any risk for their consumption as they are very low. 239,240Pu and 241Am were close to the limit of detection. When measurable, the 238Pu/239,240Pu ratio is close to the fallout value. 90Sr activities are quite similar in all samples, while concentrations of 137Cs are higher in sturgeons than in cyprinidae fish. This affects the 137Cs/90Sr ratio which varies from 6 to 350. In the caviar and spawn samples, the 137Cs is not as concentrated as in the fish, whereas 90Sr is slightly higher. One caviar sample from the South Western region shows higher levels of plutonium and americium. The algae sample, as expected, has been concentrating these radionuclides as well

  10. Nearctic freshwater tardigrades: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Hinton, Juliana G.; Meyer, Harry A.; Mcfatter, Mitchell M.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution and ecology of limno-terrestrial Tardigrada in the Nearctic realm remain poorly known. This is especially true of freshwater tardigrades (i.e., species found in permanently submerged habitats), which have received much less attention than terrestrial species. We reviewed the literature on Nearctic freshwater tardigrades. Of 204 Nearctic limno-terrestrial tardigrade species, 44 have been collected from sediments and aquatic vegetation of streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, groundwa...

  11. Dose modelling comparison for terrestrial biota: IAEA EMRAS II Biota Working Group's Little Forest Burial Ground scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, M.P.; Barnett, C.L; Beresford, N. A.; J. E. Brown; ?erne, M.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Keum, D-K.; Smodiš, B.; Twining, J.R.; Vandenhove, H.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Wood, M. D.; YU, C

    2011-01-01

    Radiological doses to terrestrial biota have been examined in a model inter-comparison study that emphasised the identification of factors causing variability in dose estimation. Radiological dose rates were modelled for ten species representing a diverse range of terrestrial plant and animals with varying behavioural and physical attributes. Dose to these organisms may occur from a range of gamma (Co-60, Cs-137), beta (Sr-90) and alpha (Th-232, U-234 and U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239/240 and Am-24...

  12. Assessing impacts of ionizing radiation on non-human biota: the ERICA tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been significant developments in the last few years concerning methods to explicitly quantify impacts on the environment arising from exposure by ionising radiation. Central to the ERICA integrated approach is the quantification of environmental risk whereby data on environmental transfer and dosimetry are combined to provide a measure of exposure which is compared to exposure levels at which detrimental effects are known to occur. In view of the large data sets underpinning the assessment approach and the potential to introduce errors when performing numerous calculations manually, a supporting computer-based tool (the ERICA Tool) has been developed. The ERICA Tool is a computerised, flexible software system that has a structure based upon the ERICA Integrated Assessment tiered approach to assessing the radiological risk to biota. The user is guided through the assessment process, recording information and decisions as the assessment progresses. The tool allows the necessary calculations to be performed to estimate risks to selected biota. Tier 1 assessments use pre-calculated environmental media concentration limits to estimate risk quotients and require inputs in the form of media concentrations. At Tier 2 dose-rates are calculated but at this stage, the user is allowed to examine and edit most of the parameters used in the calculation. For Tier 3 assessments, the same flexibility as Tier 2 is allowed but assessments may be run probability if the underling parameter probability distribution functions are defined. Results from the tool can be put into context using incorporated data on dose-effects relationships and background dose-rates. (author)

  13. Contaminants in fine sediments and their consequences for biota of the Severn Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, W J; Pope, N D; Jonas, P J C; Nikitic, C; Field, M D R; Dowell, B; Shillabeer, N; Swarbrick, R H; Brown, A R

    2010-01-01

    When the first MPB special issue was published 25 years ago it was suggested that high body burdens of metals and selected organic pollutants in the Severn Estuary were the result of anthropogenic loadings from a variety of sources. The objective of this synopsis is to illustrate recent trends for contaminants (metals, PAHs, PCBs) in sediments and benthic biota and to consider the evidence for improved environmental quality over the last quarter of a century. Contaminants in sediments and sediment-dwelling fauna such as Hediste(=Nereis)diversicolor are, generally, evenly distributed over the estuary - which is the consequence of extensive re-suspension and redistribution of fine sediment by strong tidal currents. Such dispersal tends to mask the influences of individual discharges and physical characteristics are considered to be the major drivers affecting biodiversity in the Severn Estuary, often overshadowing contaminant concerns. Following the closure of major industries and the introduction of stricter pollution control, many inputs have ceased or been reduced and there are indications that environmental concentrations are now lower. Bioaccumulation of most contaminants has declined accordingly (with the possible exception of Cr). Intuitively, better environmental quality should be linked to ecological improvements. However, due to the dynamic nature of the system (and a lack of biological-effects data) it is difficult to establish direct relationships between inputs, body burdens and biological/ecological consequence. Uniquely, the long-term integrated monitoring program of AstraZeneca (Avonmouth) indicates that recovery of faunal diversity and abundance has occurred in mid-sections of the estuary in recent years implying that contaminants have indeed been a forcing feature for Severn biota. In this context, we highlight contaminant issues and biogeochemical changes which may need to be addressed in connection with the development of proposals for tidal energy schemes. PMID:20106492

  14. Assessing impacts of ionizing radiation on non-human biota : The ERICA Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been significant developments in the last few years concerning methods to explicitly quantify impacts on the environment arising from exposure by ionising radiation. Central to the ERICA integrated approach is the quantification of environmental risk whereby data on environmental transfer and dosimetry are combined to provide a measure of exposure which is compared to exposure levels at which detrimental effects are known to occur. In view of the large data sets underpinning the assessment approach and the potential to introduce errors when performing numerous calculations manually, a supporting computer-based tool (the ERICA Tool) has been developed. The ERICA Tool is a computerised, flexible software system that has a structure based upon the ERICA Integrated Assessment tiered approach to assessing the radiological risk to biota. The user is guided through the assessment process, recording information and decisions as the assessment progresses. The tool allows the necessary calculations to be performed to estimate risks to selected biota. Tier 1 assessments use pre-calculated environmental media concentration limits to estimate risk quotients and require inputs in the form of media concentrations. At Tier 2 dose-rates are calculated but at this stage, the user is allowed to examine and edit most of the parameters used in the calculation. For Tier 3 assessments, the same flexibility as Tier 2 is allowed but assessments may be run probabilistically if the uents may be run probabilistically if the underling parameter probability distribution functions are defined. Results from the Tool can be put into context using incorporated data on dose-effects relationships and background dose-rates. (author)

  15. The levels of heavy metals in water and all aquatic in Ismailia canal, (Egypt) compared with the international permissible limits and accumulative studies for these metals in biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zu, Ni, Fe and Mn were determined in water, and in different organs of fishes, bivalves, snails and plants in Ismailia canal, Egypt. Moreover, accumulation of the investigated heavy metals by aquatic biota in Ismailia canal and the concentration factor values for this accumulation were calculated to qualify the degree of pollution and compare these levels with the international permissible limits. Results showed that Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn were exceeded the permissible limits especially in the industrial area of Abu- Zaabal, Kalubia governorate. The relative order of heavy metal levels in the canal water was: Fe>Mn>Pb>Zn>Ni>Cd>Cu.Accumulation of heavy metals by the aquatic biota was determined. The accumulation of heavy metals by common snails, namely physa acuta and biomphalaria alexandrina and the bivalve oyster Caelatura (caelatura) companyoi was found mainly in the edible parts (soft parts), whereas, the accumulation by their shells, which are mainly formed of calcium carbonate was via adsorption and surface complexation, since all the accumulated heavy metals were released by adding 0.1 M HCl for few minutes . Moreover, accumulation of heavy metals by common plants namely water hyacinth plant (Eichhornia crassipes) and freshwater weeds were determined. It was found that the accumulation of heavy metals was higher in roots than in leaves. On the other hand, the accumulation of heavy metals by common fish namely, Oreochromis niloticus (Nmmon fish namely, Oreochromis niloticus (Nile Tilapia) was measured in its organs : muscles, liver, gills and gonads. It was found that there is variation of distribution of heavy metals among fish organs. Since the high accumulation of heavy metals among the investigated biota, they can be used as biological indicator for pollution of heavy metals in aquatic ecosystem . The average values and standard deviation for all measurements were determined. Data obtained were compared with the permissible concentrations of the environmental protection agency on water quality criteria (W.Q.C.)

  16. Pu-239 organ specific dosimetric model applied to non-human biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Matthew Jason

    There are few locations throughout the world, like the Maralinga nuclear test site located in south western Australia, where sufficient plutonium contaminate concentration levels exist that they can be utilized for studies of the long-term radionuclide accumulation in non-human biota. The information obtained will be useful for the potential human users of the site while also keeping with international efforts to better understand doses to non-human biota. In particular, this study focuses primarily on a rabbit sample set collected from the population located within the site. Our approach is intended to employ the same dose and dose rate methods selected by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and adapted by the scientific community for similar research questions. These models rely on a series of simplifying assumptions on biota and their geometry; in particular; organisms are treated as spherical and ellipsoidal representations displaying the animal mass and volume. These simplifications assume homogeneity of all animal tissues. In collaborative efforts between Colorado State University and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), we are expanding current knowledge on radionuclide accumulation in specific organs causing organ-specific dose rates, such as Pu-239 accumulating in bone, liver, and lungs. Organ-specific dose models have been developed for humans; however, little has been developed for the dose assessment to biota, in particular rabbits. This study will determine if it is scientifically valid to use standard software, in particular ERICA Tool, as a means to determine organ-specific dosimetry due to Pu-239 accumulation in organs. ERICA Tool is normally applied to whole organisms as a means to determine radiological risk to whole ecosystems. We will focus on the aquatic model within ERICA Tool, as animal organs, like aquatic organisms, can be assumed to lie within an infinite uniform medium. This model would scientifically be valid for radionuclides emitting short-range radiation, as with Pu-239, where the energy is deposited locally. Two MCNPX models have been created and evaluated against ERICA Tool's aquatic model. One MCNPX model replicates ERICA Tool's intrinsic assumptions while the other uses a more realistic animal model adopted by ICRP Publication 108 and ERICA Tool for the organs "infinite" surrounding universe. In addition, the role of model geometry will be analyzed by focusing on four geometry sets for the same organ, including a spherical geometry. ERICA Tool will be compared to MCNPX results within and between each organ geometry set. In addition, the organ absorbed dose rate will be calculated for six rabbits located on the Maralinga nuclear test site as a preliminary test for further investigation. Data in all cases will be compared using percent differences and Student's t-test with respect to ERICA Tool's results and the overall average organ mean absorbed dose rate.

  17. Annual variation of radioactivity in marine biota in the pacific off Fukushima after TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many kinds of marine biota could be observed in the coastal area around off Fukushima after this accident, and it is suggested that the changes of activity are caused by the feeding and sediment effects in biota. (author)

  18. Population Dynamics of Biota on the Roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NITA ETIKAWATI

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Azolla was a special fern that their associations with Anabaena azollae able to fix free nitrogen from air, to produce protein. Although by the ages, biota diversity those habits on the roots of Azolla increased and effected to protein concentration. The research was to find out population dynamics of biota on the roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss and the growth peak. This study used Completely Randomized Design with 10 kinds of biota, i.e. bacteria, Fungi, Actinomycetes, Protozoa, Alga, Crustacean, Rotifers, Coelenterate, Insect and Molluscs, and it was used 3 replications. Research was conducted within 4 weeks and the populations of biota were observed every week. Data were statistically analyzed using Analysis Variant and Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. The population dynamics of biota on the roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss were influenced on its quantity and composition, and the growth peak is done in 2nd week.

  19. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for ?13C and ?15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, ?13C, and ?15N.

  20. Korttermynbedreigings vir varswater-Mollusca in die Olifantsrivier en enkele sytakke Short-term threats for the sustained survival of freshwater Mollusca in the Olifants River and selected tributaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenné N. de Kock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Die bewaringstatus van minder as 2% van die ongeveer 7000 molluskspesies bekend wêreldwyd, is tot dusver behoorlik geassesseer. Gevolglik is die algemene vlak van bedreiging vir molluske power gedokumenteer en hoogs waarskynlik onderskat. Varswatermolluske is permanente waterbewoners wat oor beperkte voortbewegingsvermoë beskik en aan ’n verskeidenheid van antropogeniese afvalstowwe blootgestel word omdat waterbronne dikwels as stortplek vir ’n groot verskeidenheid van nadelige besoedelstowwe gebruik word. Die Olifantsrivier word dikwels as een van die mees getransformeerde riviere in Suider-Afrika beskryf en word toenemend aan uitermate hoë druk onderwerp betreffende natuurlike hulpbronne en die geassosieerde landelike versteurings, asook besoedeling. Omdat min inligting oor die diversiteit van Mollusca in die Olifantsrivier op rekord is, is in die huidige studie vier opnames tydens twee opeenvolgende jare gemaak van die molluske in die Olifantsrivier en geselekteerde sytakke by onderskeidelik drie lokaliteite op die Hoëveld en vier in die Laeveld. Die pH en elektriese geleidingsvermoë van die water is by elk van die lokaliteite bepaal en het gewissel tussen 6.93 en 9.50, en 110 µS en 1336 µS, vir pH en geleidingsvermoë onderskeidelik. ’n Totaal van 25 molluskspesies is tydens die vier opnames versamel wat die eksotiese indringerspesies Lymnaea columella, Physa acuta, Aplexa marmorata en Tarebia granifera insluit. Laasgenoemde spesie het verreweg die grootste getal eksemplare in totaal opgelewer, hoofsaaklik by ’n lokaliteit wat as grootliks getransformeerd beskryf kan word. Die resultate van hierdie ondersoek kan as basis vir toekomstige opnames dien om die impak van antropogeniese versteurings op die diversiteit van die Mollusca in die Olifantsrivier- en opvanggebied te evalueer.The conservation status of less than 2% of the more or less 7000 mollusk species known worldwide have been properly assessed. Consequently the general level of imperilment is poorly documented and almost certainly underestimated. Freshwater mollusks live permanently in water, have limited means of movement and are exposed to a variety of anthropogenic waste products due to the fact that waterbodies often act as sinks for a large array of harmful pollutants. The Olifants River is often described as one of the most polluted rivers in Southern Africa and is progressively subjected to extremely high pressure with regard to natural resources and associated rural transformation and pollution. Little is on record regarding the diversity of the Mollusca in the Olifants River; therefore, in the present study, four surveys of the molluscs were conducted in this river and selected tributaries during two consecutive years at three localities situated on the Highveld and four localities situated in the Lowveld respectively. The pH and electric conductivity of the water were determined during each survey at each one of the localities and values ranged from 6.93 to 9.50, and 110 µS to 1336 µS, for pH and conductivity respectively. A total of 25 mollusk species were collected during the four surveys which included the exotic invader species Lymnaea columella, Physa acuta, Aplexa marmorata and Tarebia granifera. The latter species yielded the highest number of specimens by far, mainly at a locality which could be described as largely transformed. The results of this investigation can serve as a point of departure for future surveys to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the mollusc diversity in the Olifants River and catchment.

  1. Agrochemical residue-biota interactions in soil and aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two FAO/IAEA coordinated research programmes are concerned with isotopic tracer-aided studies of agrochemical residue-biota interactions in soils and aquatic ecosystems. They currently involve 18 studies in 14 countries: Brazil, Canada, Egypt, F.R. Germany, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Malaysia, Thailand, Turkey, USA and USSR. The aim was to develop, standardize and apply labelled substrate techniques for comparative assays of primary autotrophic and microheterotrophic production and decay, and complementary tracer techniques to determine the fate, persistence and bioconcentration of trace contaminants. Comparable data were studied concerning the current status of water bodies and likely changes due to contaminants. Soil capacity to decompose undesirable contaminants and residues, and to promote desirable transformations were studied. The techniques were also applied as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, with priority given to rice ecosystems

  2. Taiwan's industrial heavy metal pollution threatens terrestrial biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioconcentration levels of essential (Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Sn) elements have been investigated in different terrestrial biota such as fungi, plant, earthworm, snail, crab, insect, amphibian, lizard, snake, and bat including the associated soil, to investigate the ecosystem health status in Kenting National Park, Taiwan. High bioconcentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in snail, earthworm, crab, lizard, snake, and bat indicated a contaminated terrestrial ecosystem. High concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in plant species, effective bioaccumulation of Cd by earthworm, snail, crab and bat, as well as very high levels of Hg found in invertebrates, amphibians, and reptiles revealed a strong influence from industrial pollution on the biotic community. This study for the first time presents data on the impact of heavy metal pollution on various terrestrial organisms in Taiwan. - Metal effects occur at any terrestrial levels in Taiwan

  3. Freshwater Algae Can Infect Wounds, Study Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater Algae Can Infect Wounds, Study Shows Two cases appear linked to a species in U.S. lakes, but researchers ... and Texas are giving insight into a freshwater algae that can infect wounds. Reporting in the March ...

  4. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for...

  5. Finding patterns of distribution for freshwater phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish, by means of parsimony analysis of endemicity Encontrando patrones de distribución para fitoplancton, zooplancton y peces dulceacuícolas por medio de análisis de parsimonia de endemismos

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Oyanedel, J.; CAREN VEGA-RETTER; SERGIO SCOTT; LUIS FELIPE HINOJOSA; RODRIGO RAMOS-JILIBERTO

    2008-01-01

    During the last decades, limnological studies on Chilean systems have contributed to know the species composition and main environmental variables of many water bodies distributed over a wide latitudinal interval, from 18º to 53º S. However, we still lack of a comprehensive view about the structure and functioning of regional freshwaters. In this work we review the available information about pelagic biota from Chilean basins, in order to reveal patterns of species distribution and their po...

  6. Evaluating Alternative Strategies for Investments in Freshwater Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvelil, K. S.; Kramer, D. B.; Zhang, T.; Ligmann-Zielinska, A.; Soranno, P.; Bremigan, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Efforts towards systematic conservation planning for freshwaters have progressed far less than similar efforts in the terrestrial and marine environments. Although there are differences in the coupled human and natural systems that distinguish freshwater, terrestrial, and marine environments, many of the tools that have been used in terrestrial and marine systems can also be used for conservation planning for freshwater resources. In this paper, we used one such tool, return on investment (ROI), to identify optimal conservation portfolios. Our overarching research question is: how do different strategies for evaluating ROI benefits influence the resulting portfolio and the outcome of interest - in our case, water quality? Specifically, we examined investments to convert farmed agricultural land to fallow land to improve water quality in 55 inland lakes in southwestern Michigan. We simulated investments and compared the ROIs for the following strategies: 1) economic; 2) ecological; 3) environmental policy and 4) agricultural policy. We also tested the well-established assumption that riparian lands, those abutting and within 30 m of freshwater shorelines, have the greatest potential to influence water quality. We found that 1) investments in freshwater resources through the conservation of riparian land are more effective than the conservation of randomly selected parcels of similar land area in the catchment; 2) the costs and benefits of riparian land conservation vary considerably among lakes; 3) the choice of investment strategies results in very different conservation portfolios; 4) the resulting conservation portfolios have very different distributional and policy implications. These analyses and results provide a foundation on which to improve systematic conservation planning for freshwaters.

  7. Toxicity to freshwater organisms from oils and oil spill chemical treatments in laboratory microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Klerks, P.L.; Nyman, J.A

    2003-04-01

    Toxicity of oil and diesel fuel to freshwater biota may be increased by use of oil spill cleaning agents. - Toxicity and temporal changes in toxicity of freshwater-marsh-microcosms containing South Louisiana Crude (SLC) or diesel fuel and treated with a cleaner or dispersant, were investigated using Chironomus tentans, Daphnia pulex, and Oryzias latipes. Bioassays used microcosm water (for D. pulex and O. latipes) or soil slurry (for C. tentans) taken 1,7, 31, and 186 days after treatment. SLC was less toxic than diesel, chemical additives enhanced oil toxicity, the dispersant was more toxic than the cleaner, and toxicities were greatly reduced by day 186. Toxicities were higher in the bioassay with the benthic species than in those with the two water-column species. A separate experiment showed that C. tentans' sensitivity was intermediate to that of Tubifex tubifex and Hyallela azteca. Freshwater organisms, especially benthic invertebrates, thus appear seriously effected by oil under the worst-case-scenario of our microcosms. Moreover, the cleaner and dispersant tested were poor response options under those conditions.

  8. Toxicity to freshwater organisms from oils and oil spill chemical treatments in laboratory microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxicity of oil and diesel fuel to freshwater biota may be increased by use of oil spill cleaning agents. - Toxicity and temporal changes in toxicity of freshwater-marsh-microcosms containing South Louisiana Crude (SLC) or diesel fuel and treated with a cleaner or dispersant, were investigated using Chironomus tentans, Daphnia pulex, and Oryzias latipes. Bioassays used microcosm water (for D. pulex and O. latipes) or soil slurry (for C. tentans) taken 1,7, 31, and 186 days after treatment. SLC was less toxic than diesel, chemical additives enhanced oil toxicity, the dispersant was more toxic than the cleaner, and toxicities were greatly reduced by day 186. Toxicities were higher in the bioassay with the benthic species than in those with the two water-column species. A separate experiment showed that C. tentans' sensitivity was intermediate to that of Tubifex tubifex and Hyallela azteca. Freshwater organisms, especially benthic invertebrates, thus appear seriously effected by oil under the worst-case-scenario of our microcosms. Moreover, the cleaner and dispersant tested were poor response options under those conditions

  9. Acute and chronic aquatic toxicity of ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) to freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Ilaria; de Wolf, Watze; Thompson, Roy S; Farrar, David G; Hoke, Robert A; L'Haridon, Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Recent concerns have been raised concerning the widespread distribution of perfluorinated compounds in environmental matrices and biota. The compounds of interest include ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO, the ammonium salt of perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). APFO is used primarily as a processing aid in the production of fluoropolymers and fluoroelastomers. The environmental presence of perfluorooctanoate (PFO(-), the anion of APFO) and its entry into the environment as APFO make quality aquatic toxicity data necessary to assess the aquatic hazard and risk of APFO. We conducted acute and chronic freshwater aquatic toxicity studies with algae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, the water flea, Daphnia magna, and embryo-larval rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, using OECD test guidelines and a single, well-characterized sample of APFO. Acute 48-96 h LC/EC(50) values were greater than 400mg/l APFO and the lowest chronic NOEC was 12.5mg/l for inhibition of the growth rate and biomass of the freshwater alga. Un-ionized ammonia was calculated to be a potential significant contributor to the observed toxicity of APFO. Based on environmental concentrations of PFO(-) from various aquatic ecosystems, the PNEC value from this study, and unionized ammonia contributions to observed toxicity, APFO demonstrates little or no risk for acute or chronic toxicity to freshwater and marine aquatic organisms at relevant environmental concentrations. PMID:18538392

  10. Incipient toxicity of lithium to freshwater organisms representing a salmonid habitat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the eventual development of fusion power reactors could increase the mining, use and disposal of lithium five-fold by the year 2000, potential effects from unusual amounts of lithium in aquatic environments were investigated. Freshwater oganisms representing a Pacific Northwest salmonid habitat were exposed to elevated conentrations of lithium. Nine parameters were used to determine the incipient toxicity of lithium to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), insect larvae (Chironomus sp.), and Columbia River periphyton. All three groups of biota were incipiently sensitive to lithium at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 1 mg/L. These results correspond with the incipient toxicity of beryllium, a chemically similar component of fusion reactor cores. A maximum lithium concentration of 0.01 mg/L occurs naturally in most freshwater environments (beryllium is rarer). Therefore, a concentration range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/L may be regarded as approaching toxic concentrations when assessing the hazards of lithium in freshwaters

  11. RÉGIMEN DE CAUDAL ECOLÓGICO, HERRAMIENTA DE GESTIÓN PARA CONSERVAR LA BIOTA ACUÁTICA / ECOLOGICAL FLOW REGIMEN, MANAGEMENT TOOLTO PRESERVE ACUATIC BIOTA

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mónica Lucía, Izquierdo Santacruz; Sandra Milena, Madroñero Palacios.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN En el presente artículo de revisión se consolidó información sobre el Régimen de Caudal Ecológico, al constituirse en una herramienta de gestión en la conservación de la Biota Acuática. De esta manera, se considera relevante informar a la comunidad académica y actores de gestión, sobre la im [...] portancia de la gestión del recurso hídrico, el análisis de conceptos sobre el caudal ambiental y ecológico, la descripción de las diferentes metodologías que permiten su determinación y la normatividad ambiental que lo protege. Finalmente, se hace especial énfasis, en la metodología ecohidráulica en la que se aplica el modelo IFIM-PHABSIM, considerada la modelación del hábitat fluvial, que precisa de información sobre la relación entre la densidad de organismos acuáticos y variables hidráulicas de velocidad, profundidad y sustrato; obteniendo como resultado curvas de idoneidad de hábitat e índices de idoneidad, que permitirán entender el funcionamiento de los ecosistemas acuáticos, utilizando dicha información en el manejo y planificación del recurso hídrico. Abstract in english ABSTRACT In this review article was consolidated information about ecological flow regime to become a management tool in the conservation of aquatic biota. This way is considered important to inform the academic community and development actors on the importance of water resource management, the ana [...] lysis of the environmental and ecological flow concepts the description of the different methodologies allowing his determination and environmental regulations related to water management and ecological flow. Finally emphasizing in the methodologies ecohydraulic, implementing of IFIM-PHABSIM model ,considered the methodology of the fluvial habitat modeling, which is required in the relationship information between the density of aquatic organisms and the hydraulic, speed variable, depth and substrate composition. Obtaining as a result habitat suitability curves and indices of suitability which will allow understanding the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, using that information in the management and planning of water resources.

  12. Spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in terrestrial biota from the Canadian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminants in the Canadian Arctic have been studied over the last twelve years under the guidance of the Northern Contaminants Program. This paper summarizes results from that program from 1998 to 2003 with respect to terrestrial animals in the Canadian Arctic. The arctic terrestrial environment has few significant contaminant issues, particularly when compared with freshwater and marine environments. Both current and historical industrial activities in the north may have a continuing effect on biota in the immediate area, but effects tend to be localized. An investigation of arctic ground squirrels at a site in the Northwest Territories that had historically received applications of DDT concluded that DDT in arctic ground squirrels livers was the result of contamination and that this is an indication of the continuing effect of a local point source of DDT. Arsenic concentrations were higher in berries collected from areas around gold mines in the Northwest Territories than from control sites, suggesting that gold mining may significantly affect arsenic levels in berries in the Yellowknives Dene traditional territory. Although moose and caribou from the Canadian Arctic generally carry relatively low contaminant burdens, Yukon moose had high renal selenium concentrations, and moose and some woodland caribou from the same area had high renal cadmium levels, which may put some animals at risk of toxicological effects. Low hepatic copper levels in some caribou herds mayic copper levels in some caribou herds may indicate a shortage of copper for metabolic demands, particularly for females. Similarities in patterns of temporal fluctuations in renal element concentrations for moose and caribou suggest that environmental factors may be a major cause of fluctuations in renal concentrations of some elements. Concentrations of persistent organochlorines and metals in beaver and muskrat from the Northwest Territories, and carnivores from across the Canadian Arctic were very low and considered normal for terrestrial wildlife. Two new classes of persistent fluorinated contaminants, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) were found in arctic carnivores and were most abundant in arctic fox and least abundant in mink. Although trace element concentrations in king and common eider ducks were low and not of toxicological concern, the number of nematode parasites in common eiders was positively correlated with total and organic mercury concentrations. Future research should focus on cadmium in moose and caribou, mercury in caribou, and emerging contaminants, with an effort to sample moose and caribou annually where possible to explore the role of naturally occurring cycles in apparent temporal trends

  13. Are there signs of acidification reversal in freshwaters of the low mountain ranges in Germany?

    OpenAIRE

    Alewell, C.; Armbruster, M.; Bittersohl, J.; Evans, C. D.; Meesenburg, H.; Moritz, K.; Prechtel, A.

    2001-01-01

    The reversal of freshwater acidification in the low mountain ranges of Germany is of public, political and scientific concern, because these regions are near natural ecosystems and function as an important drinking water supply. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status and trends of acidification reversal after two decades of reduced anthropogenic deposition in selected freshwaters of the low mountain ranges in the Harz, the Fichtelgebirge, the Bavarian Forest, the Spessart and the Bl...

  14. Fukushima nuclear accident: preliminary assessment of the risks to non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the 'radio-ecological' impacts of Fukushima nuclear accident on non-human biota using the ERICA Tool, which adopts an internationally verified methodology. The paper estimates the impacts of the accident on terrestrial and marine biota based on the environmental data reported in literature for Japan, China, South Korea and the USA. Discernible impacts have been detected in the marine biota around Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This study confirms that the Fukushima accident had caused heavier damage to marine bionts compared with terrestrial flora and fauna, in Japan. (authors)

  15. Making sense of ocean biota: how evolution and biodiversity of land organisms differ from that of the plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetacek, Victor

    2012-09-01

    The oceans cover 70% of the planet's surface, and their planktonic inhabitants generate about half the global primary production, thereby playing a key role in modulating planetary climate via the carbon cycle. The ocean biota have been under scientific scrutiny for well over a century, and yet our understanding of the processes driving natural selection in the pelagic environment - the open water inhabited by drifting plankton and free-swimming nekton - is still quite vague. Because of the fundamental differences in the physical environment, pelagic ecosystems function differently from the familiar terrestrial ecosystems of which we are a part. Natural selection creates biodiversity but understanding how this quality control of random mutations operates in the oceans - which traits are selected for under what circumstances and by which environmental factors, whether bottom-up or top-down - is currently a major challenge. Rapid advances in genomics are providing information, particularly in the prokaryotic realm, pertaining not only to the biodiversity inventory but also functional groups. This essay is dedicated to the poorly understood tribes of planktonic protists (unicellular eukaryotes) that feed the ocean's animals and continue to run the elemental cycles of our planet. It is an attempt at developing a conceptually coherent framework to understand the course of evolution by natural selection in the plankton and contrast it with the better-known terrestrial realm. I argue that organism interactions, in particular co-evolution between predators and prey (the arms race), play a central role in driving evolution in the pelagic realm. Understanding the evolutionary forces shaping ocean biota is a prerequisite for harnessing plankton for human purposes and also for protecting the oceanic ecosystems currently under severe stress from anthropogenic pressures. PMID:22922185

  16. Compartmentalisation Strategies for Hydrocarbon-based Biota on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, L.; Fortes, A. D.; Skipper, N.; Crawford, I.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of our study is to determine the nature of compartimentalisation strategies for any organisms inhabiting the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan (the largest moon of Saturn). Since receiving huge amounts of data via the Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system astrobiologists have speculated that exotic biota might currently inhabit this environment. The biota have been theorized to consume acetylene and hydrogen whilst excreting methane (1,2) leading to an anomalous hydrogen depletion near the surface; and there has been evidence to suggest this depletion exists (3). Nevertheless, many questions still remain concerning the possible physiological traits of biota in these environments, including whether cell-like structures can form in low temperature, low molecular weight hydrocarbons. The backbone of terrestrial cell membranes are vesicular structures composed primarily of a phospholipid bilayer with the hydrophilic head groups arranged around the periphery and are thought to be akin to the first protocells that terrestrial life utilised (4). It my be possible that reverse vesicles composed of a bilayer with the hydrophilic head groups arranged internally and a nonpolar core may be ideal model cell membranes for hydrocarbon-based organisms inhabiting Titan's hydrocarbon lakes (5). A variety of different surfactants have been used to create reverse vesicles in nonpolar liquids to date including; non-ionic ethers (7) and esters (6, 8); catanionic surfactant mixtures (9); zwitterionic gemini surfactants (10); coblock polymer surfactants (11); and zwitterionic phospholipid surfactants (12). In order to discover whether certain phospholipids can exhibit vesicular behaviour within hydrocarbon liquids, and to analyse their structure, we have carried out experimental studies using environmental conditions that are increasing comparable to those found on the surface of Titan. Experimental methods that have been used to determine the presence of vesicles include the use of microscopy, the presence of the Tyndall scattering effect, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) , small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). These studies are currently being anaylzed, however, some results have indcated the presence of reverse vesicles in certain systems. Compounds that are shown to form reverse vesicles in conditions comparable to those of Titan's lakes could be potential 'biomarkers' and searched for in future missions to Titan. References [1] Schulze-Makuch D et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 36, 324 (2006). [2] McKay C P et al. Icarus 178, 274 (2005). [3] Strobel D F. Icarus 208, 878 (2010). [4]. Fiordemondo D et al. Chem. Bio. Chem. 8, 1965 (2007). [5] Norman L H et al. A&G 52, 39 (2011). [6] Mollee H et al. J Pharm Sci 89, 930 (2000). ). [7] Kunieda H et al. Langmuir 15, 3118 (1999). [8] Shrestha L K et al. Langmuir 22, 1449 (2006). [9] Li H G et al. Chem. Lett 36, 702 (2007). [10] Peresypkin A et al. Mendeleev Commun. 17, 82 (2007). [11] Rangelov S et al. J. Phys. Chem B 108, 7542 (2004). [12] Tung S H et al. J. Am. Chem. 130, 8813 (2008).

  17. Nearctic freshwater tardigrades: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana G. HINTON

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and ecology of limno-terrestrial Tardigrada in the Nearctic realm remain poorly known. This is especially true of freshwater tardigrades (i.e., species found in permanently submerged habitats, which have received much less attention than terrestrial species. We reviewed the literature on Nearctic freshwater tardigrades. Of 204 Nearctic limno-terrestrial tardigrade species, 44 have been collected from sediments and aquatic vegetation of streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, groundwater and cryoconite holes. Of these, 17 are hydrophilous species found exclusively or primarily in aquatic environments. Most of the remainder are probably washed in accidentally from terrestrial substrates. Among the hydrophilous species, five are endemic to the Nearctic realm and three cosmopolitan. Hypsibius dujardini is the most widely-distributed hydrophilous species. There are no regional collections of Nearctic freshwater tardigrades comparable to those for terrestrial species. Aquatic tardigrades are benthic, and are found in sediments and on aquatic vegetation. Hypsibius dujardini and other widespread species are found in both substrates, and there is thus no evidence of substrate specificity. Numerically, tardigrades usually comprise a minor component of benthic invertebrate communities. Nothing is known of their trophic relationships or dispersal in these habitats. The density of Nearctic freshwater tardigrade species peaks in the spring and/or fall. Future research should increase the spatial and temporal scale of study, and employ adequate replication.

  18. Are metals of antifouling paints transferred to marine biota?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir C. Paradas

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of its high toxicity, TBT (trybutiltin was banned since 2003, which resulted in a greater re-use of Cu as based-biocide in antifouling paints (AFP. The aim of this work is to determine if metals form of AFP are transferred to benthic organisms from Guanabara Bay (GB (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Metal concentrations were measured in two main fouling algae species Ulva flexuosa and U. fasciata and one isopod species, Sphaeroma serratum, in two GB marinas areas from sites with artificial substrate covered by AFP and natural substrate.In addition, control samples were collected in an adjacent open ocean area. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined by Atomic Absortion Spectrophotometry. Higher concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn were detected in both algal species from GB in relation to control areas. Among samples of algae and isopod species from GB, populations collected over artificial surfaces covered by AFP presented significantly higher metal concentration than population of rocky natural substrate. Our data showed that the leaching of metals by antifouling paints present on decks and boats are being taken up by algae and isopods. These results indicate that antifouling coatings are the main source of heavy metal to biota of GB marina area.Devido sua alta toxicidade, o TBT está banido desde 2003, o que resultou na re-utilização de tintas a base de cobre. O objetivo deste trabalho é determinar se os metais provenientes das tintas anti-incrustantes (AFP são transferidos para organismos bentônicos da Baía de Guanabara (BG (Rio de janeiro, Brasil. Concentrações de metais foram analisadas em duas espécies de algas Ulva flexuosa e U. fasciata e no isópoda, Sphaeroma serratum, em duas áreas de marinas em locais de substrato artificial coberto com tintas AFP e em locais de substrato natural. Também foram coletadas amostras em uma área oceânica (controle. Concentrações de Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb e Zn foram determinadas por Espectrofotometria de Absorção Atômica. Concentrações mais elevadas de Cu, Pb e Zn foram detectadas na BG em ambas espécies de algas em relação a área controle. Dentre as espécies de algas e do isópoda da BG, as populações coletadas sobre as superfícies cobertas com AFP apresentaram concentrações significativamente mais elevadas do que as populações do substrato natural. Os resultados obtidos demonstram que a liberação de metais presentes nas AFP dos decks e embarcações, estão sendo acumulados pelas algas e isópodas. Esses resultados indicam que o revestimento com AFP é a principal fonte de metais para a biota de marinas em áreas da BG.

  19. Are metals of antifouling paints transferred to marine biota?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Wladimir C., Paradas; Gilberto M., Amado Filho.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Devido sua alta toxicidade, o TBT está banido desde 2003, o que resultou na re-utilização de tintas a base de cobre. O objetivo deste trabalho é determinar se os metais provenientes das tintas anti-incrustantes (AFP) são transferidos para organismos bentônicos da Baía de Guanabara (BG) (Rio de janei [...] ro, Brasil). Concentrações de metais foram analisadas em duas espécies de algas Ulva flexuosa e U. fasciata e no isópoda, Sphaeroma serratum, em duas áreas de marinas em locais de substrato artificial coberto com tintas AFP e em locais de substrato natural. Também foram coletadas amostras em uma área oceânica (controle). Concentrações de Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb e Zn foram determinadas por Espectrofotometria de Absorção Atômica. Concentrações mais elevadas de Cu, Pb e Zn foram detectadas na BG em ambas espécies de algas em relação a área controle. Dentre as espécies de algas e do isópoda da BG, as populações coletadas sobre as superfícies cobertas com AFP apresentaram concentrações significativamente mais elevadas do que as populações do substrato natural. Os resultados obtidos demonstram que a liberação de metais presentes nas AFP dos decks e embarcações, estão sendo acumulados pelas algas e isópodas. Esses resultados indicam que o revestimento com AFP é a principal fonte de metais para a biota de marinas em áreas da BG. Abstract in english Because of its high toxicity, TBT (trybutiltin) was banned since 2003, which resulted in a greater re-use of Cu as based-biocide in antifouling paints (AFP). The aim of this work is to determine if metals form of AFP are transferred to benthic organisms from Guanabara Bay (GB) (Rio de Janeiro, Brazi [...] l). Metal concentrations were measured in two main fouling algae species Ulva flexuosa and U. fasciata and one isopod species, Sphaeroma serratum, in two GB marinas areas from sites with artificial substrate covered by AFP and natural substrate.In addition, control samples were collected in an adjacent open ocean area. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined by Atomic Absortion Spectrophotometry. Higher concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn were detected in both algal species from GB in relation to control areas. Among samples of algae and isopod species from GB, populations collected over artificial surfaces covered by AFP presented significantly higher metal concentration than population of rocky natural substrate. Our data showed that the leaching of metals by antifouling paints present on decks and boats are being taken up by algae and isopods. These results indicate that antifouling coatings are the main source of heavy metal to biota of GB marina area.

  20. Cued in: advances and opportunities in freshwater chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Romi L; Lodge, David M

    2002-10-01

    We focus this mini-review on how naturally occurring chemical cues mediate ecological interactions, especially interspecific competition and predation in freshwater communities. Although freshwater chemical ecology lags behind terrestrial and marine chemical ecology, we identify recent progress toward: (1) identifying the chemical composition of cues important in food web interactions, e.g., specific glucosinolates, benzyl succinoates, and lignoids as deterrents to herbivory on freshwater macrophytes; (2) employing a nonreductionist approach that tests for emergent responses to suites of multiple chemical cues, e.g., trade-offs in snail refuge-seeking behavior in the presence of chemical cues from both fish and crayfish; (3) investigating how abiotic forces, such as hydrodynamics, impact chemical communication across a broad spatial and temporal scale, e.g., drift responses of mayfly nymphs to whole-stream additions of trout cue; and (4) quantifying the importance of genetic variability, e.g., how chemical cues change selective pressures of local environments. The questions of interest in freshwater chemical ecology cross taxonomic boundaries; traverse broad spatial and temporal scales; demonstrate nonlinear, unpredictable results; and necessitate a multidisciplinary approach for adequate understanding. PMID:12474890

  1. Background and anthropogenic radionuclide derived dose rates to freshwater ecosystem - Nuclear power plant cooling pond - Reference organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological assessment of non-human biota to demonstrate protection is now accepted by a number of international and national bodies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a scientific basis to assess and evaluate exposure of biota to ionizing radiation. Radionuclides from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (Lithuania) were discharged into Lake Druksiai cooling pond. Additional radionuclide migration and recharge to this lake from a hypothetical near-surface, low-level radioactive waste disposal, to be situated 1.5 km from the lake, had been simulated using RESRAD-OFFSITE code. This paper uses ERICA Integrated Approach with associated tools and databases to compare the radiological dose to freshwater reference organisms. Based on these data, it can be concluded that background dose rates to non-human biota in Lake Druksiai far exceed those attributable to anthropogenic radionuclides. With respect the fishery and corresponding annual committed effective human dose as a result of this fish consumption Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body with intensive angling and possible commercial fishing. - Highlights: ? Dose rates to the reference organisms are lower than expected from the background radioactivity. ? Pelagic fish part of adult human annual committed effective dose would be as small as a few ?Sv y-1. ? With respect the fishery Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF FRESHWATER MICROALGAL STRAINS TOWARD BIOFUEL PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Xun Yang,; Pinghuai Liu,; Zongdi Hao,; Jie Shi; Seng Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-three algal cultures were isolated from freshwater lakes in Hainan, China. Four microalgal isolates were selected because they could be successfully cultivated at high density and demostrated a strong fluorescence after being stained with nile red. These cultures were identified as strains of Chlorella sp. C11, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii C22, Monoraphidium dybowskii C29, and Chlorella sp. HK12 through microscopic and 18S rDNA analysis. Under similar conditions, the lipid productivity of ...

  3. Deriving freshwater quality criteria for iron, lead, nickel, and zinc for protection of aquatic life in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaimi-Othman, M; Nadzifah, Y; Nur-Amalina, R; Umirah, N S

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater quality criteria for iron (Fe), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) were developed with particular reference to aquatic biota in Malaysia, and based on USEPA's guidelines. Acute toxicity tests were performed on eight different freshwater domestic species in Malaysia which were Macrobrachium lanchesteri (prawn), two fish: Poecilia reticulata and Rasbora sumatrana, Melanoides tuberculata (snail), Stenocypris major (ostracod), Chironomus javanus (midge larvae), Nais elinguis (annelid), and Duttaphrynus melanostictus (tadpole) to determine 96 h LC(50) values for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The final acute value (FAV) for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn were 74.5, 17.0, 165, and 304.9 ?g L(-1), respectively. Using an estimated acute-to-chronic ratio (ACR) of 8.3, the value for final chronic value (FCV) was derived. Based on FAV and FCV, a criterion maximum concentration (CMC) and a criterion continuous concentration (CCC) for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn that are 37.2, 8.5, 82.5, and 152.4 ?g?L(-1) and 9.0, 2.0, 19.9, and 36.7 ?g?L(-1), respectively, were derived. The results of this study provide useful data for deriving national or local water quality criteria for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn based on aquatic biota in Malaysia. Based on LC(50) values, this study indicated that N. elinguis, M. lanchesteri, N. elinguis, and R. sumatrana were the most sensitive to Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn, respectively. PMID:22919358

  4. Deriving freshwater quality criteria for copper, cadmium, aluminum and manganese for protection of aquatic life in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaimi-Othman, M; Nadzifah, Y; Nur-Amalina, R; Umirah, N S

    2013-03-01

    Freshwater quality criteria for copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), aluminum (Al), and manganese (Mn) were developed with particular reference to aquatic biota in Malaysia, and based on USEPA's guidelines. Acute toxicity tests were performed on eight different freshwater domestic species in Malaysia, which were Macrobrachiumlanchesteri (prawn), two fish -Poeciliareticulata and Rasborasumatrana, Melanoidestuberculata (snail), Stenocyprismajor (ostracod), Chironomusjavanus (midge larvae), Naiselinguis (annelid), and Duttaphrynusmelanostictus (tadpole), to determine 96-h LC50 values for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn. The final acute values (FAVs) for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn were 2.5, 3.0, 977.8, and 78.3 ?gL(-1), respectively. Using an estimated acute-to-chronic ratio (ACR) of 8.3, the value for final chronic value (FCV) was derived. Based on FAV and FCV, a Criterion Maximum Concentration (CMC) and a criterion Continuous Concentration (CCC) for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn of 1.3, 1.5, 488.9, and 39.1 ?gL(-1) and 0.3, 0.36, 117.8, and 9.4 ?gL(-1), respectively, were derived. The results of this study provide useful data for deriving national or local water quality criteria for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn based on aquatic biota in Malaysia. Based on LC50 values, this study indicated that R.sumatrana, M.lanchesteri, C.javanus, and N.elinguis were the most sensitive to Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn, respectively. PMID:23246727

  5. Literature Review and Database of Relations Between Salinity and Aquatic Biota: Applications to Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Robert A.; Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Stamm, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term accumulation of salts in wetlands at Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Mont., has raised concern among wetland managers that increasing salinity may threaten plant and invertebrate communities that provide important habitat and food resources for migratory waterfowl. Currently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is evaluating various water management strategies to help maintain suitable ranges of salinity to sustain plant and invertebrate resources of importance to wildlife. To support this evaluation, the USFWS requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provide information on salinity ranges of water and soil for common plants and invertebrates on Bowdoin NWR lands. To address this need, we conducted a search of the literature on occurrences of plants and invertebrates in relation to salinity and pH of the water and soil. The compiled literature was used to (1) provide a general overview of salinity concepts, (2) document published tolerances and adaptations of biota to salinity, (3) develop databases that the USFWS can use to summarize the range of reported salinity values associated with plant and invertebrate taxa, and (4) perform database summaries that describe reported salinity ranges associated with plants and invertebrates at Bowdoin NWR. The purpose of this report is to synthesize information to facilitate a better understanding of the ecological relations between salinity and flora and fauna when developing wetland management strategies. A primary focus of this report is to provide information to help evaluate and address salinity issues at Bowdoin NWR; however, the accompanying databases, as well as concepts and information discussed, are applicable to other areas or refuges. The accompanying databases include salinity values reported for 411 plant taxa and 330 invertebrate taxa. The databases are available in Microsoft Excel version 2007 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5098/downloads/databases_21april2009.xls) and contain 27 data fields that include variables such as taxonomic identification, values for salinity and pH, wetland classification, location of study, and source of data. The databases are not exhaustive of the literature and are biased toward wetland habitats located in the glaciated North-Central United States; however, the databases do encompass a diversity of biota commonly found in brackish and freshwater inland wetland habitats.

  6. Soil biota and ecosystem development in post-mining sites - conclusions and practical implications.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, Jan

    Boca Raton : Taylor & Francis CRC Press, 2013, s. 290-302. ISBN 978-1-4665-9931-4 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : soil biota * ecosystem development * post- mining sites Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science

  7. New occurence of the Cambrian (Stage 4, Series 2 Guanshan Biota in Huize, Yunnan, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Typical elements of the Guanshan Biota are reported from the Cambrian Stage 4 Wulongqing Formation of Huize, Qujing, South China, approximately 100 km north of the Guanshan fossil sites previously reported. Lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the current Zhujiaqing section are also discussed herein. Representatives of various phyla recovered therein include not only previously described sponges, palaeoscolecids, arthropods, brachiopods, echinoderms, and vetulicolians, but also some potential new taxa, e.g. a new species of Vetulicola. This new occurrence not only expands the palaeogeographic distribution of the Guanshan Biota, but also strengthens the ties between the younger Chengjiang Biota and the older Kaili Biota (and also the coeval Burgess Shale community

  8. Contaminant Assessment of Biota and Sediments in the Albermarle-Pamlico region

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a baseline contaminants study of the aquatic biota and sediments in the AlbemarlePamlico region in 198788. Sites in the...

  9. Survey of contaminants in soils and biota at the Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey was conducted in 1987 to assess the presence and degree of contamination in soils and various biota at Seney National Wildlife Refuge, located in the...

  10. Metals in New Jersey's Pinelands National Reserve Sediments, Surface Water and Biota: An Emphasis on Mercury

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Technical data on the nature and extent of chemical contaminants in sediments and biota of the streams comprising the Pinelands National Reserve Pinelands in New...

  11. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by Fukushima coastal biota - Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to Fukushima assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological assessments to non-human marine biota are usually carried out by assuming that the activity concentration in an organism is proportional to the activity concentration in an adjacent volume of water, via a concentration factor (CF). It is also assumed that radionuclides in the water are in isotopic equilibrium with the sediments via a sediment distribution coefficient (Kd). These assumptions are not valid in accidental situations where the biota and the sediments react with a time delay to large variations of activity concentration in seawater. A simple dynamic model was developed to factorise the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments, as determined by a balance between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-life of elimination in the biota. The model calculates activity concentration of 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macro-algae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of this new model is the inclusion of sediment processes in dynamic transfer modelling. The model is adapted to include depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates (particle scavenging), molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation (modelled effectively as a diffusive process) represented by a simple set of differential equations that is coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment to give a more realistic calculation of the external dose to biota compared with the simpler approach based on CF and Kd values used in previous assessments. The model is applied to the assessment of the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the early phase of the accident. It is shown that previous assessment of the external doses to marine biota using a Kd assumption for the sediment contribution are largely overestimated compared with using the dynamic sediment model, as shown by comparison with actual monitoring data for sediments. Likewise, it is also shown that the activity concentration in the biota (and, consequently, the internal dose rate) is better predicted by a dynamic model than with the simpler concentration factor approach. (authors)

  12. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by Fukushima coastal biota - Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to Fukushima assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Radiological assessments to non-human marine biota are usually carried out by assuming that the activity concentration in an organism is proportional to the activity concentration in an adjacent volume of water, via a concentration factor (CF). It is also assumed that radionuclides in the water are in isotopic equilibrium with the sediments via a sediment distribution coefficient (K{sub d}). These assumptions are not valid in accidental situations where the biota and the sediments react with a time delay to large variations of activity concentration in seawater. A simple dynamic model was developed to factorise the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments, as determined by a balance between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-life of elimination in the biota. The model calculates activity concentration of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macro-algae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of this new model is the inclusion of sediment processes in dynamic transfer modelling. The model is adapted to include depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates (particle scavenging), molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation (modelled effectively as a diffusive process) represented by a simple set of differential equations that is coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment to give a more realistic calculation of the external dose to biota compared with the simpler approach based on CF and K{sub d} values used in previous assessments. The model is applied to the assessment of the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the early phase of the accident. It is shown that previous assessment of the external doses to marine biota using a K{sub d} assumption for the sediment contribution are largely overestimated compared with using the dynamic sediment model, as shown by comparison with actual monitoring data for sediments. Likewise, it is also shown that the activity concentration in the biota (and, consequently, the internal dose rate) is better predicted by a dynamic model than with the simpler concentration factor approach. (authors)

  13. Human colonic biota studied by ribosomal DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K H; Blitchington, R B

    1996-07-01

    Human colonic biota is a complex microbial ecosystem that serves as a host defense. Unlike most microbial ecosystems, its composition has been studied extensively by relatively efficient culture methods. We have compared an established culture-based method with direct amplification and partial sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes from a human fecal specimen. Nine cycles of PCR were also compared with 35 cycles. Colonies and cloned amplicons were classified by comparing their ribosomal DNA (rDNA; DNA coding for rRNA) sequences with rDNA sequences of known phylogeny. Quantitative culture recovered 58% of the microscopic count. The 48 colonies identified gave 21 rDNA sequences; it was estimated that 72% of the rDNA sequences from the total population of culturable cells would match these 21 sampled sequences (72% coverage). Fifty 9-cycle clones gave 27 sequences and 59% coverage of cloned rDNAs. Thirty-nine rDNAs cloned after 35 cycles of PCR gave 13 sequences for 74% coverage. Thus, the representation of the ecosystem after 35 cycles of PCR was distorted and lacked diversity. However, when the number of temperature cycles was minimized, biodiversity was preserved, and there was good agreement between culturing bacteria and sampling rDNA directly. PMID:8779565

  14. Soil biota community structure and abundance under agricultural intensification and extensification

    OpenAIRE

    Postma-Blaauw, M.B.; De Goede, R. G. M.; Bloem, J.; Faber, J.H.; Brussaard, L.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of agricultural intensification and extensification on soil biota communities is useful in order to preserve and restore biological diversity in agricultural soils and enhance the role of soil biota in agroecosystem functioning. Over four consecutive years, we investigated the effects of agricultural intensification and extensification (including conversion of grassland to arable land and vice versa, increased and decreased levels of mineral fertilization, and monocu...

  15. Adiciones a la Biota de Uredinales (fungi) de Colombia / Addictions to the Uredinales Biota (fungi) in Colombia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Katherin Maritza, Vanegas Berrouet; Mauricio, Salazar Yepes.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Colecciones de plantas con síntomas de hongos royas (Uredinales, Basidiomycota) realizadas en los últimos años en los departamentos de Amazonas, Antioquia, Caldas, Cundinamarca, Tolima y Valle del Cauca han sido estudiadas y depositadas en el Museo Micológico de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, [...] Sede Medellín (MMUNM). Entre las novedades encontradas, se registran por primera vez para Colombia las royas: Puccinia investita, Sphenospora pallida, Crossopsora piperis, Uredo psychotriicola y Pucciniosira solani. Se adiciona la familia botánica Dioscoreaceae para la Biota de Uredinales colombianos. Se hace la corrección del nombre anamórfico Uredo parthenii publicado para Colombia en 2003, por el nombre teliomorfico válido Puccinia schileana. Son registrados seis nuevos hospedantes parasitados por royas en Colombia, entre estos reviste importancia la colección sobre Origanum vulgare L. una planta aromática y medicinal cultivada mundialmente. Abstract in english Plant collections with symptoms of rusts fungi (Uredinales, Basidiomycota) made during recent years in provinces of Amazonas, Antioquia, Caldas, Cundinamarca, Tolima and Valle del Cauca have been studied and deposited in Museo Micológico of Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín (MMUNM). Th [...] e rusts species Puccinia investita, Sphenospora pallida, Crossopsora piperis, Uredo psychotriicola and Pucciniosira solani are new records for Colombia. A first record for this country of rust fungi in plants of family Dioscoreaceae has been also made. The anamorphic name Uredo parthenii published in 2003 in Colombia, has been corrected by the valid teleomorph Puccinia schileana. Finally, six new hosts parasitized by rusts are recorded, including Origanum vulgare L. a world-wide important aromatic and medicinal plant.

  16. Freshwater and Marine Image Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    The University of Washington Libraries has digitized 21,000 images of freshwater and marine life taken from 1735-1924 that populated various publications about the topic. Some of the publications include 18th and 19th century books with hand-colored images, stereographs, and publications of the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries and related agencies that contain a slew of illustrations. On the far right hand side of the homepage is a list of 24 sample subject areas that the images fall into, including "aquaculture", "mollusks", "polar subjects", and "water birds". Visitors wishing to see the complete list of subjects should click on "Browse Subjects", in the top right of the homepage. The "Other Sources" link at the bottom right hand side of the page has links to over a dozen other websites that contain digitized freshwater and marine images, such as "Sea Lamprey Images", "Shoreline Aerial Photos", and "Reef Snapshots", just to name a few.

  17. Water quality for freshwater fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, G. (ed.) (Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This timely and up-to-date volume brings together recent critical reviews on water quality requirements for freshwater fish commissioned by the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission, an agency of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. It provides a unique and authoritative source of critically evaluated water quality data concerning the effects of chromium, nickel, aluminum and nitrite on freshwater fish and includes an assessment of the toxicity of mixtures. The reports presented in this volume cover all stages of the life cycle and relevant trophic levels, including aquatic invertebrates and plants and potential bioaccumulation through the food chain. An extensive bibliography is provided for each chapter as well as a glossary of terms and a list of fish species mentioned in the text. This compilation of papers is the definitive reference volume for chemists, biologists, ecologists and toxicologists as well as for water resource managers concerned with management and control of pollution in fresh waters.

  18. Comparative food-chain behavior and distribution of actinide elements in and around a contaminated fresh-water pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioaccumulation of 233234U, 238U, 238Pu, 239240Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm in both native and introduced biota was studied at Pond 3513, a former low-level radioactive waste settling basin at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This system, which was decommissioned in 1976 after more than 30 years use, contains approximately 5 Ci of 239240Pu; inventories of other actinide isotopes are considerably less. Significantly higher concentrations of actinides in fish that were allowed access to sediments indicated that sedimentary particulates may be the primary source of transuranics to biota in shallow fresh-water ecosystems. Our study determined habitat, in particular the degree of association of an organism with the sediment-water interface, to be the primary factor in controlling transuranic concentrations in aquatic biota. In most of the biological samples analyzed, excluding samples suspected of being contaminated by sediment, 241Am/239Pu, 244Cm/239Pu, and 238U/239Pu ratios were greater than the respective ratio in sediment while 233234U/238U, and 239240Pu/238Pu ratios were not different from the respective ratios in sediment. The relative uptake of actinides from contaminated sediment by aquatic and terrestrial biota at this site was U > Cm greater than or equal to Am > Pu. The relative extractability of actinides from shoreline sediment was U > Cm approx. = Am > Pu; we also observed the same relative ranking for sediment-water exchange in situ. Concentrations of transuranics in water, terrestrial vegetation, and vertebrate carcasses were less than 10% of the recommended public exposure maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of the ICRP

  19. Panbiogeographical analysis of Costa Rican freshwater fishes

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jonathan, Herrera-Vásquez; William, Bussing; Federico, Villalobos.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de analizar el patrón de distribución de peces de agua dulce de Costa Rica se aplicó un análisis de trazos y de parsimonía de endemismos (PAE). Se construyó una matriz básica utilizando la distribución de 77 especies. Se utilizó el programa CLIQUE con la intención de encontrar los tr [...] azos generalizados y NONA y Winclada, versión 1.00.08, con el fin de llevar a cabo el PAE. Se encontró un total de 14 cliques igualmente probables con 31 especies. De esta cantidad se construyó un trazo generalizado que constituye la intersección del total, dividiendo el país en dos zonas: Atlántico, desde Matina hasta el Lago de Nicaragua y Pacífico desde el río Coto hasta el río Tempisque conectado con la región central del país. El PAE encontró diez cladogramas de áreas (72 pasos, CI=0.45, RI=0.64), cuyo consenso estricto identificó dos zonas de agrupamiento: Atlántico y Pacífico. Ambos análisis muestran la división entre las dos vertientes y la orientación de los trazos generalizados sugiere nueva evidencia de la influencia biogeográfica de los denominados elementos de migración antiguo y nuevo del sur, los cuales se habían sugerido empíricamente en el pasado para explicar las migraciones hacia Centroamérica en dos periodos geológicos diferentes. Abstract in english Track analysis and Parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE) were performed to analyze the distribution pattern of Costa Rican freshwater fishes. A basic matrix (presence/absence) was prepared using the distribution of 77 freshwater fish. The data were analyzed with CLIQUE software in order to find gen [...] eralized tracks (cliques). Data also were analyzed with the software NONA and Winclada version 1.00.08 in order to perform the Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE). Fourteen equally probable cliques were found with 31 species in each and the intersection of the amount was selected as a generalized track dividing the country in two main zones: Atlantic slope from Matina to Lake Nicaragua and Pacific slope from the Coto River to the basin of the Tempisque River connected with some branches oriented to the central part of the country. PAE analysis found ten cladogram areas (72 steps, CI=0.45, RI=0.64), using the "strict consensus option" two grouping zones were identified: Atlantic slope and Pacific slope. Both PAE and Track Analysis show the division of the two slopes and the orientation of the generalized track suggests new biogeographical evidence on the influence of both old and new southern elements to explain the migrations of freshwater fish into Central America during two different geological events. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1): 165-170. Epub 2008 March 31.

  20. Panbiogeographical analysis of Costa Rican freshwater fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Herrera-Vásquez

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Track analysis and Parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE were performed to analyze the distribution pattern of Costa Rican freshwater fishes. A basic matrix (presence/absence was prepared using the distribution of 77 freshwater fish. The data were analyzed with CLIQUE software in order to find generalized tracks (cliques. Data also were analyzed with the software NONA and Winclada version 1.00.08 in order to perform the Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE. Fourteen equally probable cliques were found with 31 species in each and the intersection of the amount was selected as a generalized track dividing the country in two main zones: Atlantic slope from Matina to Lake Nicaragua and Pacific slope from the Coto River to the basin of the Tempisque River connected with some branches oriented to the central part of the country. PAE analysis found ten cladogram areas (72 steps, CI=0.45, RI=0.64, using the "strict consensus option" two grouping zones were identified: Atlantic slope and Pacific slope. Both PAE and Track Analysis show the division of the two slopes and the orientation of the generalized track suggests new biogeographical evidence on the influence of both old and new southern elements to explain the migrations of freshwater fish into Central America during two different geological events. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 165-170. Epub 2008 March 31.Con el objetivo de analizar el patrón de distribución de peces de agua dulce de Costa Rica se aplicó un análisis de trazos y de parsimonía de endemismos (PAE. Se construyó una matriz básica utilizando la distribución de 77 especies. Se utilizó el programa CLIQUE con la intención de encontrar los trazos generalizados y NONA y Winclada, versión 1.00.08, con el fin de llevar a cabo el PAE. Se encontró un total de 14 cliques igualmente probables con 31 especies. De esta cantidad se construyó un trazo generalizado que constituye la intersección del total, dividiendo el país en dos zonas: Atlántico, desde Matina hasta el Lago de Nicaragua y Pacífico desde el río Coto hasta el río Tempisque conectado con la región central del país. El PAE encontró diez cladogramas de áreas (72 pasos, CI=0.45, RI=0.64, cuyo consenso estricto identificó dos zonas de agrupamiento: Atlántico y Pacífico. Ambos análisis muestran la división entre las dos vertientes y la orientación de los trazos generalizados sugiere nueva evidencia de la influencia biogeográfica de los denominados elementos de migración antiguo y nuevo del sur, los cuales se habían sugerido empíricamente en el pasado para explicar las migraciones hacia Centroamérica en dos periodos geológicos diferentes.

  1. Natural radioactivity in some specimens of the marine biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine environment contamination by natural radionuclides (uranium and 238U daughters) is evaluated using marine -fauna and flora elements concentrating fission - and radioactivated products released by nuclear facilities. Total alpha and beta radiometry is done in the the biota to determine the radionuclide concentration. Uranium, 226Ra and 210PO assay is done to estimate their contribution to natural radioactivity in the chosen biological indicators. Several analytical techniques required by each radionuclide are used. Potassium assay is done to evaluate the contribution of 40K to the natural radioactivity, and calcium assay to determine Ra/Ca and U/Ca ratios in the samples. For total alpha radiometry in algae the higher average value is detected in Phaeophyta (84.1 pCi/kg fresh weight); maximum concentration in animals is registered in Bunodosoma caissarum (43.1 pCi/kg fresh weight). For algae, the higher average total beta radiometry detected is in Chlorophyta (6.9 nCi/kg fresh weight); the maximum value found in animals refers to Thais Haemastoma (7.54 nCi/kg fresh weight). Potassium higher average ratio for algae occurs in Chlorophyta (12.77% ashes); for animals, the maximum value is found in Bunodosoma caissarum (13.80% ashes). The uranium concentration factor is maximum in Perna perna bissus (684) while the minimum is registered in Thais haemastoma and Sargassum vulgare (44). The 226Ra concentration factor is maximum in Sargassum vulgare (2143) and minimum in Bunodosoma caissarum (32). Maximum average ratio for 210PO in algae occurs in Phaephyta (11.5 pCi/g dry weight) and the maximum concentration for animals in Perna perna (31.5 pCi/g dry weight). The techniques employed proved to be efficient for the objectives aimed at. (Author)

  2. Modelling potential impacts of effective dispersant use on aquatic biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil spill transport and fate modelling was used to evaluate maximum potential water column hydrocarbon concentrations with dispersant use. Oil spill modelling was performed with SIMAP, and used wind data, current data, and transport and weathering algorithms to calculate the mass of oil components in various environmental compartments; oil pathway over time; surface oil distribution; and concentrations of the oil components in water and sediments. Simulations assuming no dispersant use were compared to simulations where dispersant was applied after 8 or 16 hours of weathering for 2 wind conditions. With 2.5 m/s winds and no dispersant, the concentration plume was relatively small and short-lived. In 7.5 m/s winds, natural dispersion was considerable, and the application of dispersant at 80 per cent efficiency during the same wind conditions increased the volume affected by a factor of 4-6. In 2.5 m/s winds, dispersant use at 80 per cent efficiencies decreased the water volume affected proportionately. Results indicated that the highest water column impacts occurred when chemical dispersant was applied under light wind conditions where dilution was relatively slow. For the oil volume examined and assuming no dispersant use, wildlife impacts would occur on the scale of 100s km2, whereas water column effects with dispersant use in a worst case scenario would occur on the scale of 1 km2 in the upper mixed layer. An exception to the support of disperser. An exception to the support of dispersant use would be if sensitive water column biota are present in the area of the slick. The conclusions applied to unconfined water bodies that were at least 10 metres deep. 18 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  3. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized...

  4. Studies on the estimation of radiation dose to typical non human biota around Kaiga nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to prove exclusively that biota is sufficiently protected from ionizing radiation since pathway leading to biota exposure is quite different compared to that for human being and non human biota has access to contaminated areas while human access is limited. The radiation from purely natural sources may be a useful benchmark since radiation at these levels is tolerated by biota. This paper presents the estimation of radiation dose to typical members of biota around Kaiga site, which includes a herbivorous mammalian species (cow), one avio fauna (pigeon), one burrowing animal (earthworm) and an aquatic animal (fish). The internal and external doses to species from naturally occurring radio nuclides were evaluated from concentrations of radio nuclides in soil, air, water and dietary items and the relevant concentration factors. An attempt is made for the evaluation of dose to above biota from reactor originated radio nuclides. The study identifies the most significant radionuclide, most significant pathway leading to radiological risk to member of biota from natural sources and reactor-produced radionuclides. From the computed dose to biota per unit release from reactor, study identifies the significant radionuclide and pathways for reactor produced radionuclides. The study conclusively proves that biota dose from reactor produced radionuclides from KGS is negligible. (author)

  5. Toxicity of soil iodine to terrestrial biota, with implications for 129I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental impact of 129I has traditionally been assessed by its radiological effects on human health; however, protection of human health does not ensure protection of other biota. Because of the very long half-life of 129I, there is a relatively high molar concentration of I associated with any specified level of radioactivity. The potential exists for chemical toxicity to non-human biota to exceed radiological toxicity in importance. The authors reviewed the literature and conducted laboratory bioassays to obtain information on the chemical toxicity of inorganic I to terrestrial biota. Levels as low as 5 mg I kg-1 soil may have detrimental effects. If this were as 129I, the corresponding radiological effects to non-human biota may not be as important as the chemical toxicity. However, because of the very low risk factor applied to protect humans, levels of 129I in the environment acceptable for human health appear to be acceptable for other biota at the higher risk levels commonly used for them. (author)

  6. Bioaccumulation factor of {sup 137}Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suseno, Heny, E-mail: henis@batan.go.id [Radioactive Waste Technology Center - The Indonesia Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34.

  7. Environmental Contaminants Monitoring in Selected Wetlands of Wyoming: Biologically Active Elements Study

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water and biota were collected from selected wetlands in Wyoming for the Biologically Active Elements BAE Study in 1988, 1989 and 1990 to identify...

  8. Survey for contaminants in sediments and fish at selected sites on the Illinois River and tributaries

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A basinwide survey of contaminants in sediments and biota at several locations on the Illinois River and selected tributaries was conducted during the 1989 field...

  9. Plutonium and americium concentration along fresh-water food chains of the Great Lakes, U.S.A. Progress report, July 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of studying the biogeochemical behavior of transuranic radionuclides in large freshwater lakes began with studies of the distribution of these radionuclides, essentially introduced from the fallout of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, in Lake Ontario. The recognition that an additional source of supply of these nuclides to Lake Ontario (subsequent to their release into Lake Erie) existed in the form of leakage from the Nuclear Fuel Services reprocessing plant at Springville, New York, led to expansion of the program to include sampling at the eastern end of Lake Erie. Much of the program is devoted to studies of the distribution of these nuclides in the lake sediments as they appear to be a major repository for transuranics in freshwater lakes. The extent to which this is a temporary or permanent repository is illuminated by studies of transuranic distributions in the lake waters and biota

  10. The freshwater crab, Trichodactylus fluviatilis (Latreille, 1828 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Trichodactylidae, as perceived by the inhabitants of the county of Pedra Branca, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo Medeiros Costa Neto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater crabs are key elements of the aquatic biota of streams, rivers, lakes, and dams because of their ecological and economic importance. Considering that Trichodactylus fluviatilis (Latreille, 1828 is an important source of food for the human settlements that inhabit the places of its occurrence, this article records, for the first time, an ethnocarcinological study carried out with the inhabitants of Pedra Branca county, Bahia State. Data were obtained from February to June 2005 by means of open-ended interviews using the usual techniques of ethnographical survey. Sixteen women and eleven men were interviewed. Their ages ranged from 25 to 86 years old. The results showed that the ethnocarcinological knowledge about T. fluviatilis is relatively consistent with academic knowledge. Ethnozoological studies that stress the cultural significance of freshwater crustaceans are very important, since they would represent a great contribution to the debate on biodiversity conservation in the environments these animals inhabit.

  11. Biological responses to a resumption in river flow in a freshwater-deprived, permanently open Southern African estuary

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Paul D, Vorwerk; P William, Froneman; Angus W, Paterson; Nadine A, Strydom; Alan K, Whitfield.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The Kariega Estuary is a freshwater-deprived system due to numerous impoundments in the catchment. This system has had little or no horizontal salinity gradient over the last 15 years, with hypersaline conditions sometimes predominating in the upper reaches. Following high rainfall events in the cat [...] chment during the spring of 2006, including a flood event (approximate 1:10 year) in August 2006, a series of riverine pulses entered the estuary and a horizontal salinity gradient was established. This study examined the influence of this freshwater pulse on four components of the biota within the estuary, namely the zooplankton, and larval, littoral and demersal fishes. The study demonstrated that in three of these components elevated densities were recorded following the riverine input, with only the littoral fishes retaining an almost constant density. In addition, changes in the relative contributions of the estuarine utilisation classes for all three fish groups examined indicated that freshwater input into these systems positively influences the abundances. This has significant implications for water managers as it demonstrates the importance of an Ecological Reserve (defined as 'the water required to protect the aquatic ecosystems of the water resource') for this system.

  12. Risk assessment of residual DDTs in freshwater and marine fish cultivated around the Pearl River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, S Y; Kwok, C K; Nie, X P; Cheung, K C; Wong, M H

    2010-02-01

    Six species of freshwater fish collected from 10 fishponds in Shunde and Zhongshan, China, four species of marine fishes collected from different mariculture farms [four in Hong Kong (Tung Lung Chau, Ma Wan, Cheung Chau and Kat O) and two in mainland China (Daya Bay and Shenzhen)] together with feed (both trash fish and commercial pellets) and sediment were analyzed for DDTs. Total DDTs in freshwater fish flesh decreased in the order of: carnivores [1742 microg/kg lipid weight (l.w.)] > herbivores (165 microg/kg, l.w.) > omnivores (42.5 microg/kg, l.w.), with the highest concentration detected in mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) (2641 microg/kg, l.w.). For marine fish, snubnose pompano (Trachinotus blochii) and orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) collected in Ma Wan contained elevated levels of total DDTs (2590 and 2034 microg/kg l.w., respectively). Trash fish used in both freshwater and marine fish farms contained significantly higher levels (86.5-641 microg/kg l.w.) (p < 0.05) of DDTs than in commercial pellets, but correlations between DDT levels in fish feed and muscle were not significant. The elevated biota-sediment accumulating factor for tilapia (Tilapia mossambicus) (24.1) indicated that accumulation of DDTs from sediment to the fish was evident. It can be concluded that trash fish should not be used for fish culture in order to lower the level of residual DDTs in fish muscle. PMID:19603131

  13. The Trace Element Analysis in Freshwater Fish Species, Water and Sediment in Iyidere Stream (Rize-Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Cevik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many environmental problems like dam construction, agricultural debris, flooding and industrial establishments threaten Iyidere stream (Rize, Turkey on the southeastern coast of the Black Sea (Turkey. The trace element concentrations in water, fish and sediments in Iyidere stream (Rize, Turkey were investigated in this study. The concentration of six different elements in ten freshwater fish species and sediment was determined using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method. A radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence analysis using the method of multiple standard addition is applied for the elemental analysis of fish and sediments. Water samples for trace metals were analyzed using standard spectrophotometry methods. A qualitative analysis of spectral peaks showed that ten different freshwater fish samples (Chondrostoma colchicum, Chalcalburnus chalcoides, Salmo trutta labrax, Alburnoides bipunctatus, Leuciscus cephalus, Barbus taurus escherichia, Capoeta tinca, Neogobius kessleri, Rutilus frisii, Lampetra lanceolata and sediment contained phosphorus (P, sulphur (S, chlorine (Cl, potassium (K, calcium (Ca and titanium (Ti. Heavy metals as toxic elements for biota (Pb, Cd, Hg, Zn and Mn etc. were not detected in fish, water and sediments. Thus, It can be declared that freshwater fish of Iyidere does not contains health risks for consumers in terms of metal pollution.

  14. Interannual variations of freshwater in Hornsund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dølven, Knut Ola; Falck, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Hornsund is a fjord situated at the south-west coast of Spitsbergen. The main goal of this study is to calculate and describe the interannual variations of freshwater content in Hornsund. In addition to this, we aim to trace the freshwater sources to the fjord and calculate the fractional contributions from these by using oxygen isotope data. The mixing between these freshwater sources and oceanic waters is described as well as the general summer hydrography of the fjord. Calculation of freshwater content is based on Conductivity-Temperature-Depth data obtained in July of 2001 to 2014. Oxygen isotope data are obtained in Autumn 2013/2014 and Spring 2014. The freshwater in Hornsund is assumed to be provided by either meteoric freshwater sources (glacial melt/precipitation/river-runoff) or the melting of sea ice. Both sources can be produced locally or advected into the fjord. The fraction of the ¹?O isotope (?¹?O) is an effective tracer for freshwater sources in the Arctic due to the progressive depletion of this isotope in water molecules during poleward atmospheric transport (Ostlund and Hut, 1984). Calculation of fractional contribution from the two freshwater sources is done based on a method presented in Ostlund and Hut (1984), where the mass-balance, salinity-balance and ?¹?O-balance are utilized to calculate the fractions of seawater, meteoric water and sea ice meltwater. Preliminary results show freshwater content varying between 0.211km³ and 1.068km³, based on a reference salinity of 34.2. In Autumn 2013, meteoric water was the largest contributor of freshwater to the fjord. However, there was a significant contribution of sea ice meltwater which had a deeper vertical distribution than the meteoric water. References: H. G. Ostlund and G. Hut. 1984. Arctic Ocean water mass balance from isotope data. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 89(C4):6373-6381

  15. K-BIOTA: A Computer Program for Assessing Radiation Doses to Non-human Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Jun, In; Lim, Kwang Muk; Choi, Yong Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Recently, the Internal Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) stressed the importance of the environmental protection from the ionizing radiation and subsequently proposed the reference animal and plant (RAPs) concept, and the methodology to evaluate non-human species radiation dose. In order to apply an integrated methodology of addressing the international recent issue for the protection of the environment from the ionizing radiation to the Korean ecological environment, the K-BIOTA, a computer program for assessing radiation doses to non-human species, is presently being developed. This paper describes the components and methodologies that are considered in the K-BIOTA

  16. Freshwater autotrophic picoplankton: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. STOCKNER

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic picoplankton (APP are distributed worldwide and are ubiquitous in all types of lakes of varying trophic state. APP are major players in carbon production in all aquatic ecosystems, including extreme environments such as cold ice-covered and/or warm tropical lakes and thermal springs. They often form the base of complex microbial food webs, becoming prey for a multitude of protozoan and micro-invertebrate grazers, that effectively channel APP carbon to higher trophic levels including fish. In this review we examine the existing literature on freshwater autotrophic picoplankton, setting recent findings and current ecological issues within an historic framework, and include a description of the occurrence and distribution of both single-cell and colonial APP (picocyanobacteria in different types of lakes. In this review we place considerable emphasis on methodology and ecology, including sampling, counting, preservation, molecular techniques, measurement of photosynthesis, and include extensive comment on their important role in microbial food webs. The model outlined by Stockner of an increase of APP abundance and biomass and a decrease of its relative importance with the increase of phosphorus concentration in lakes has been widely accepted, and only recently confirmed in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Nevertheless the relationship which drives the APP presence and importance in lakes of differing trophic status appears with considerable variation so we must conclude that the success of APP in oligotrophic lakes worldwide is not a certainty but highly probable.

  17. Using growth measures in the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica as biomarkers of Roundup® pollution of South African freshwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, P. K.; Muller, W. J.; Palmer, C. G.

    There has been global concern about the effect of toxic chemicals on aquatic biota due to the upsurge in contamination of aquatic ecosystems by these chemicals, which includes pesticides. Roundup® and other glyphosate-based herbicides are frequently used in the chemical control of weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa. These bio-active chemicals ultimately get into water courses directly or indirectly through processes such as drifting, leaching, surface runoff and foliar spray of aquatic nuisance plants. However, there is no South African water quality guideline to protect indigenous freshwater non-target organisms from the toxic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides. This study evaluated the possible use of growth measures in Caridina nilotica as biomarkers of Roundup® pollution as part of developing glyphosate water quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life in South Africa. Using static-renewal methods in a 25-day growth toxicity test, 40 days post hatch shrimps were exposed to different sub-lethal Roundup® concentrations of 0.0 (control), 2.2, 2.8, 3.4, 4.3 and 5.4 mg/L. Shrimps were fed daily with TetraMin® flake food and test solutions changed every third day. Shrimp total lengths and wet weights were measured every fifth day. These data were used to determine the shrimp’s growth performance and feed utilization in terms of percent weight gain (PWG), percent length gain (PLG), specific growth rate (SGR), condition factor (CF), feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and feed conversion efficiency (FCE). Moulting was observed for 14 days and the data used to determine the daily moult rate for each concentration. Results of growth performance and food utilization indices showed that growth was significantly impaired in all exposed groups compared to control (p toxicity.

  18. Modeling ecosystem processes with variable freshwater inflow to the Caloosahatchee River Estuary, southwest Florida. I. Model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzelli, Christopher; Doering, Peter H.; Wan, Yongshan; Sun, Detong; Fugate, David

    2014-12-01

    Variations in freshwater inflow have ecological consequences for estuaries ranging among eutrophication, flushing and transport, and high and low salinity impacts on biota. Predicting the potential effects of the magnitude and composition of inflow on estuaries over a range of spatial and temporal scales requires reliable mathematical models. The goal of this study was to develop and test a model of ecosystem processes with variable freshwater inflow to the sub-tropical Caloosahatchee River Estuary (CRE) in southwest Florida from 2002 to 2009. The modeling framework combined empirically derived inputs of freshwater and materials from the watershed, daily predictions of salinity, a box model for physical transport, and simulation models of biogeochemical and seagrass dynamics. The CRE was split into 3 segments to estimate advective and dispersive transport of water column constituents. Each segment contained a sub-model to simulate changes in the concentrations of organic nitrogen and phosphorus (ON and OP), ammonium (NH4+), nitrate-nitrite (NOx-), ortho-phosphate (PO4-3), phytoplankton chlorophyll a (CHL), and sediment microalgae (SM). The seaward segment also had sub-models for seagrasses (Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum). The model provided realistic predictions of ON in the upper estuary during wet conditions since organic nitrogen is associated with freshwater inflow and low salinity. Although simulated CHL concentrations were variable, the model proved to be a reliable predictor in time and space. While predicted NOx- concentrations were proportional to freshwater inflow, NH4+ was less predictable due to the complexity of internal cycling during times of reduced freshwater inflow. Overall, the model provided a representation of seagrass biomass changes despite the absence of epiphytes, nutrient effects, or sophisticated translocation in the formulation. The model is being used to investigate the relative importance of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) vs. CHL in submarine light availability throughout the CRE, assess if reductions in nutrient loads are more feasible by controlling freshwater quantity or N and P concentrations, and explore the role of inflow and flushing on the fates of externally and internally derived dissolved and particulate constituents.

  19. The mesoscale and regional freshwater flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, A. L.; Giulivi, C. F.

    2012-12-01

    The closer we look at the ocean, with improved instrumentation and models, the less it looks like the familiar 'textbook' view of overly smoothed maps of SST and SSS, with ocean scale circulation gyres, and more of a jumble of a westward parade of mesoscale features. The question arises: what role does the mesoscale play in compensating the air-sea flux of heat and freshwater? Here we focus on the freshwater balance within the salty North Atlantic subtropics regime, where the annual evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) is over 1 m/year. A traditional view is that the required quasi-steady state ocean freshwater inflow is derived from the wind-driven circulation and the associated shallow meridional overturning circulation. Here we evaluate if the mesoscale 'eddy' field, may stir into the subtropical regime a significant share of the needed freshwater. The Voluntary Observing Ships (VOS) data provide an overview of the SSS seasonal cycle of the Atlantic subtropical regime. While E-P is always positive, greater in January-July, minimum in October, the SSS displays a maximum in October, minimum occurs in April. It is hypothesized that the lower SSS of the winter/spring period marks increased winter freshwater flux by meso-scale activity. While the eddy freshwater flux can be estimated from the Rapid thermohaline and velocity data sections near 24.5°N, it is the meridional convergence of the eddy freshwater flux that compensates the regional E-P. We use the SODA output, which assimilates the VOS and Rapid data, to estimate the eddy freshwater flux convergence. Our preliminary assessment is that the eddy flux convergence does play a major role in closing the seasonal freshwater cycle of the North Atlantic surface layer.

  20. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    The freshwater reservoir effect can result in anomalously old radiocarbon ages of samples from lakes and rivers. This includes the bones of people whose subsistence was based on freshwater fish, and pottery in which fish was cooked. Water rich in dissolved ancient calcium carbonates, commonly known as hard water, is the most common reason for the freshwater reservoir effect. It is therefore also called hardwater effect. Although it has been known for more than 60 years, it is still less well-recognized by archaeologists than the marine reservoir effect. The aim of this study is to examine the order of magnitude and degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants, and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 14C years can occur within one river. The freshwater reservoir effect has also implications for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany. The surprisingly old ages of the earliest pottery most probably are caused by a freshwater reservoir effect. In a sediment core from the Limfjord, northern Denmark, the impact of the freshwater reservoir effect on radiocarbon dating in an estuarine environment is examined. Here, freshwater influence causes reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 14C years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. The examples in this study show clearly that the freshwater reservoir effect can seriously corrupt radiocarbon dating at inland sites. Reservoir effects should therefore be considered whenever food remains on pottery or the bones of omnivores are radiocarbon dated - irrespective of the site’s distance to the coast.

  1. BSAFs and Food Web Modeling for Establishing Contaminant Relationships between Biota and Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation will cover how to measure and evaluate BSAFs (biota-sediment accumulation factors), and how to construct, calibrate, validate, and evaluate food web models. The presentation will also discuss the advantages of the two approaches for establishing contaminant rel...

  2. Management of freshwater invasive alien species.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Francis, R. A.; Pyšek, Petr

    London : Earthscan, 2012 - (Francis, R.), s. 435-446 ISBN 978-1-84971-228-6 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biological invasions * management * freshwater habitats Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  3. Ecology of freshwater mussels in disturbed environments

    OpenAIRE

    O?sterling, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The number of species extinctions is increasing at an alarming rate. Long-lived freshwater mussels of the order Unionoida, which include a parasitic stage on a host fish, are highly threatened. Habitat degradation by turbidity and sedimentation is thought to be one major reason for their decline. The objective of this thesis was to examine recruitment patterns and identify the causes of the lack of recruitment in the threatened unionoid freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera margaritifera). I...

  4. Global priorities for conservation of threatened species, carbon storage, and freshwater services : scope for synergy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Frank Wugt; Londoño-Murcia, Maria C.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of global biodiversity conservation efforts to also deliver critical benefits, such as carbon storage and freshwater services, is still unclear. Using spatially explicit data on 3,500 range-restricted threatened species, carbon storage, and freshwater provision to people, we conducted tradeoff analyses, explicitly addressing both biodiversity and ecosystem services in selection of priority areas, to explore the potential for aligning these objectives. These analyses revealed a promising scope for aligning objectives, in particular for biodiversity and freshwater, which is not evident from previous studies that merely analyzed overlap of biodiversity and ecosystem services derived for each objective independently. However, this alignment is not complete. By revealing important synergies and tradeoffs among services, these analyzes suggest particular regions and service combinations for which spatial planning and appropriate conservation mechanisms (e.g., payments for ecosystem services) can be used to realize synergies and mitigate tradeoffs.

  5. Key Issues Concerning Biolog Use for Aerobic and Anaerobic Freshwater Bacterial Community-Level Physiological Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Bradley W.; Lind, Owen T.

    2006-06-01

    Bacterial heterotrophy in aquatic ecosystems is important in the overall carbon cycle. Biolog MicroPlates provide information into the metabolic potential of bacteria involved in carbon cycling. Specifically, Biolog EcoPlatesTM were developed with ecologically relevant carbon substrates to allow investigators to measure carbon substrate utilization patterns and develop community-level physiological profiles from natural bacterial assemblages. However, understanding of the functionality of these plates in freshwater research is limited. We explored several issues of EcoPlate use for freshwater bacterial assemblages including inoculum density, incubation temperature, non-bacterial color development, and substrate selectivity. Each of these has various effects on plate interpretation. We offer suggestions and techniques to resolve these interpretation issues. Lastly we propose a technique to allow EcoPlate use in anaerobic freshwater bacterial studies.

  6. Towards a universal sampling protocol for soil biotas in the humid tropics / Em direção a um protocolo universal de amostragem de biotas do solo nos trópicos úmidos

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    David Edward, Bignell.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho faz uma revisão dos métodos de inventariado da biota edáfica nos trópicos úmidos para documentar a (hipotética) perda de biodiversidade do solo associada ao desmatamento e à intensificação agrícola nas margens de florestas. A biota foi agrupada em oito categorias, cada uma corresponden [...] te a um grande grupo funcional considerado importante ou essencial para a função do solo. Um inventário cuidadoso dos organismos do solo pode auxiliar a gestão de ecossistemas e a sustentabilidade da produção agrícola. As vantagens e desvantagens de métodos de amostragem baseados em transectos ou em malhas são discutidas e ilustradas por protocolos publicados, desde o original "transeto TSBF", passando por versões desenvolvidas para o projeto "Alternatives to Slash-and-Burn" (ASB), até o esquema final (com suas variantes) adotado pelo projeto "Conservation and Sustainable Management of Below-ground Biodiversity" (CSM-BGBD). Considerou-se a importância de repetição de amostras e argumenta-se que os novos protocolos de amostragem são: inclusivos, ou seja, desenhados para amostrar os oito grupos bióticos ao mesmo tempo no campo; dimensionados espacialmente, pois fornecem dados de biodiversidade nos níveis de lugar, localidade, paisagem e região e associam esses dados ao uso e cobertura do solo; e estatisticamente robustos, como evidenciado por uma aleatorização parcial das localizações dos lotes de amostragem. Abstract in english This paper reviews the methods for the inventory of below-ground biotas in the humid tropics, to document the (hypothesized) loss of soil biodiversity associated with deforestation and agricultural intensification at forest margins. The biotas were grouped into eight categories, each of which corres [...] ponded to a major functional group considered important or essential to soil function. An accurate inventory of soil organisms can assist in ecosystem management and help sustain agricultural production. The advantages and disadvantages of transect-based and grid-based sampling methods are discussed, illustrated by published protocols ranging from the original "TSBF transect", through versions developed for the alternatives to Slash-and-Burn Project (ASB) to the final schemes (with variants) adopted by the Conservation and Sustainable Management of Below-ground Biodiversity Project (CSM-BGBD). Consideration is given to the place and importance of replication in below-ground biological sampling and it is argued that the new sampling protocols are inclusive, i.e. designed to sample all eight biotic groups in the same field exercise; spatially scaled, i.e. provide biodiversity data at site, locality, landscape and regional levels, and link the data to land use and land cover; and statistically robust, as shown by a partial randomization of plot locations for sampling.

  7. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN FRESHWATER MICROCOSMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.

    1978-01-01

    Two cylindrical freshwater microcosms with a volume of 700 {ell} were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 190 days. The two microcosms were identical with regard to initial chemical composition and biological inocula, with the exceptions that in one microcosm (designated Tank 2) mosquitofish (Gambusia) and herbivorous catfish (Placostomas) were added. Three distinct communities developed in the tanks: (1) a phytoplankton-zooplankton assemblage and (2) two periphyton-zoobenthos communities associated with the sides and bottom of the tank, respectively. Community development and successional patterns were similar in both tanks. Major differences between the tanks involved timing of succession of the zooplankton and zoobenthos, attributable to predation by fish, principally Gambusia. A major drawback for these microcosms as use for experimental analogs such as lakes was a luxuriant periphyton growth which eventually overwhelmed the biomass of the system. The tanks displayed a degree of successional replicability, a large number of species, and a diversity of community development. Microcosms of this size could find use as experimental systems for higher level trophic manipulation and observation of life cycles not amenable to field studies.

  8. Methane release by freshwater pockmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Ingeborg; Schlömer, Stefan; Schlüter, Michael; Wessels, Martin

    2010-05-01

    In the eastern part of Lake Constance (Germany) near the Rhine River hundreds of pockmarks, morphological depressions at the lake floor, were observed. The diameter of these pockmarks was up to 16 m and at a high number of them permanent release of methane bubbles was detected. The isotopic analysis of the escaping gas indicated methane of biogenic origin.. At the shallow pockmarks (10 m), migration of gas bubbles through the sediment caused increased methane concentrations in the pore waters close to the sediments as compared to sites unaffected by bubble migration outside the pockmarks. Thus, the diffusive methane flux and oxidation rates were much higher inside the pockmark than outside. Nevertheless, methane ebullition into the water column is by far the dominating pathway of methane release (estimated 10 L h-1). At the deep pockmark (80 m) - even though bubble release was observed -, the sediment inside the pockmark had the same methane concentrations and geochemistry compared with a reference site outside the pockmark. In profundal freshwater sediments a strong recent methanogenesis leads to high methane concentrations, often above saturation. So, additional emerging methane (bubbles) from deeper layers escapes from the sediment essentially unaffected by diffsuion into the sediment or by methane oxidation. Thus, the background concentration of methane in the sediment, determines if methane passes through the sedimentary filter or is directly released into the water column and possibly the atmosphere.

  9. Radiation dose and countermeasure model for a decision support system on freshwater ecosystems contaminated with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the participation of several European institutions The MOIRA project (A MOdel based computerised system for management support to Identify optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems, European Commission contract FI4P-CT96-0036) has developed a computerised Decision Support System that will allow decision makers to choose optimal intervention strategies for freshwater ecosystems with different radioactive contamination scenarios. An important factor for the decision analysis is the radiation dose resulting to humans and biota from the contamination. Not less important is to quantify the impact that intervention strategies may have on the potential resulting dose. With that aim, the system is incorporating a dose and countermeasure model, very flexible, that is able to estimate dose to the critical individuals and collective dose to the affected population, as well as maximum dose to fish species, representative of the threats to biota from radioactive contamination of water bodies. The model main characteristics are: Applicable to different water bodies (in principle lakes and rivers) contaminated with Cs-137 and/or Sr-90. The model is driven by the time series of radionuclide concentrations in the water, in the bottom sediments and fish (predator and prey species), which are the output from other environmental models of the MOIRA system. Main sub-models: individual and collective external dose and ingestion dose for 6 ae external dose and ingestion dose for 6 age groups; dose to fish. Countermeasures. External dose assessment takes into account exposure pathways as direct dose from the water body and dose from the shoreline deposits. The model makes use of external dose factors available in the literature, shielding factors applicable for the different situations considered, and mean exposure times. Countermeasures modelled: restriction of access to contaminated areas. For internal dose from ingestion, the exposure pathways considered are: ingestion of water, consumption of fish (prey, predator), consumption of crops irrigated by contaminated water (5 categories), and consumption of milk and meat from livestock (cow, sheep, and pig) watered with contaminated water or fed with contaminated crops. Countermeasures modelled: restrictions to water and food consumption, and restrictions to water use for irrigation, based on contamination levels or on user defined periods. Models for calculating concentrations of radionuclides in crops, soil and livestock products are based on a dynamic compartment structure based on validated models described in the specialised literature. The paper makes a summary description of the model, its applications and importance in a Decision Support System for the restoration of contaminated freshwater ecosystems, based on a Multiattribute approach. (author)

  10. Locally differentiated cryptic pigmentation in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargeby, A; Stoltz, J; Johansson, J

    2005-05-01

    A repeated pattern of background colour matching in animals is an indication that pigmentation may be cryptic. Here, we examine the relationship between pigmentation of the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus and background darkness in 29 lakes, wetlands and ponds in Southern Sweden. The results show that Asellus pigmentation was correlated with substrate darkness across all localities. In seven localities, in which two contrasting substrate types were noted, Asellus populations were differentiated with respect to pigmentation. These findings thus provide phenomenological support for cryptic pigmentation in Asellus. Pigmentation generally increased with body size, but the relationship between pigmentation and size differed among localities, possibly as a result of differences in correlational selection on pigmentation and size. Selection thus appears to have resulted in local differentiation over a small spatial scale, even within lakes and wetlands. This differentiation is a likely cause behind elevated phenotype variation noted in localities with two substrate types, suggesting that habitat heterogeneity promotes genetic diversity. PMID:15842500

  11. KERAGAMAN AKTIVITAS ANTIFUNGI BIOTA LAUT TERHADAP Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vanillae, PENYEBAB BUSUK BATANG VANILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Suada

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of marine biota resources is very high, therefore it is necessary to be recovered for our life need. The objective of this research is to know the antifungal ability of marine biota derived from Bali Island against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vanillae. Samples were collected at the intertidal zone of seven beaches around Bali. Extraction of antifungal substance of raw material extract was conducted using various organic solvents until the best ability was obtained. The dry material extract was then screened using well diffusion method. The method was also used to determine the inhibition indicators to Fusarium. The methanolic extract of Aglaophenia sp. marine animal was able to suppress the Fusarium effectively, with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC of 0.05%. The extract inhibited the colony growth, total of conidial forming, total of growing colony, total of mycelial dry weight, total of mycelial protein, however, increased fusaric acid production of the pathogen.

  12. Total petroleum hydrocarbons in edible marine biota from Northern Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozar, Seyedeh Laili Mohebbi; Pauzi, Mohamad Zakaria; Salarpouri, Ali; Daghooghi, Behnam; Salimizadeh, Maryam

    2015-04-01

    To provide a baseline information for consumer's health, distribution of total petroleum hydrocarbons in 18 edible marine biota species from northern Persian Gulf was evaluated. The samples were purchased from fish market of Hormozgan Province, South of Iran. Marine biota samples included different species with various feeding habits and were analyzed based on ultraviolet florescence spectroscopy. Petroleum hydrocarbons showed narrow variation, ranging from 0.67 to 3.36 ?g/g dry weight. The maximum value was observed in silver pomfret. Anchovy and silver pomfret with the highest content of petroleum hydrocarbons were known as good indicator for oil pollution in the studied area. From public health point of view, the detected concentrations for total petroleum hydrocarbons were lower than hazardous guidelines. The results were recorded as background data and information in the studied area; the continuous monitoring of pollutants is recommended, according to the rapid extension of industrial and oily activities in Hormozgan Province. PMID:25819925

  13. Doses to Marine Biota from Radioactive Waste Dumping in the Fjords of Novaya Zemlya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current and future radioecological situation has been analysed for the fjords of the Novaya Zemlya archipelago (Abrosimov and Tsivolki Fjords) where the largest radioactive waste (RW) dumping sites are located. The current radiation dose rates to the local marine biota were calculated using the results of the expeditions of 1992-1994, and were found to be very small, (0.5-10) x 10-9 Sv.d-1, with maximum external dose rates up to 8.5 x 10-6 Sv.d-1 within small contaminated spots on the seabed. The future radioecological situation in the Tsivolki Fjord was simulated, using the scenario of an accidental disruption of the RW disposal site in 2050 AD. Dose rates to marine biota in the period of highest releases vary in the range 0.007-0.4 mSv.h-1, with a dominating contribution from alpha-emitting radionuclides. (author)

  14. Contribution to the lichen biota of the Pogórze Wi?nickie foothills (Carpathians)

    OpenAIRE

    Lucyna ?liwa

    2010-01-01

    The Pogórze Wi?nickie foothills are situated in close vicinity to the Kraków agglomeration and is highly influenced by human activity. Lichen studies in the area revealed 163 species so far. A current checklist of the lichen biota of the territory is provided with numerous new regional records, e.g. Bacidina sulphurella, Evernia prunastri, Fuscidea pusilla, Lecanora albellula, Lepraria ecorticata, Mycobilimbia epixanthoides, Ramalina farinacea, R.. fastigiata, Ropalospora viridis, Verrucaria ...

  15. Fruit and seed floras from exceptionally preserved biotas in the European Paleogene

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes P; Wilde V; Manchester S R; Collinson M

    2010-01-01

    Fossil fruit and seed assemblages from two exceptionally preserved biotas provide considerable information about systematics, diversity, dispersal biology and plant animal interactions in the European Paleogene. The first is from the Middle Eocene Messel oil shale in the Messel Pit near Darmstadt, Germany and occurs in association with exceptionally preserved flowers, insects and vertebrates. The second is from the latest Eocene Insect Limestone (Bembridge Marls Member, Solent Group) from the...

  16. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama–Sechura)

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Pablo C.; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T K; Wiens, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama–Sechura Desert of South America, one of ...

  17. Historical records of radioactive contamination in biota at the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes and reports a literature search of 85 environmental monitoring records of wildlife and vegetation (biota) at the 200 East Area and the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site since 1965. These records were published annually and provided the majority of the data in this report. Additional sources of data have included records of specific facilities, such as site characterization documents and preoperational environmental surveys. These documents have been released for public use. Records before 1965 were still being researched and therefore not included in this document. The intent of compiling these data into a single source was to identify past and current concentrations of radionuclides in biota at specific facilities and waste sites within each operable unit that may be used to help guide cleanup activities in the 200 Areas to be completed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). The 200 East Area and 200 West Area were the locations of the Hanford Site separation and process facilities and waste management units. For the purposes of this document, a sample was of interest if a Geiger-Mueller counter equipped with a pancake probe-indicated beta/gamma emitting radioactivity above 200 counts per minute (cpm), or if laboratory radioanalyses indicated a radionuclide concentration equaled or exceeded 10 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). About 4,500 individual cases of monitoring for radionuclide uptake or transport in biota in the 200 Areas environs were included in the documents reviewed. About 1,900 (i.e., 42%) of these biota had radionuclide concentrations in excess of 10 pCi/g. These radionuclide transport or uptake cases were distributed among 45 species of wildlife (primarily small mammals and feces) and 30 species of vegetation. The wildlife species most commonly associated with radioactive contamination were the house mouse and the deer mouse and of vegetation species, the Russian thistle

  18. An adaptation of human food chain models to predicting internal exposure of biota: the Faster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an acknowledged lack of available data to derive parameters describing the transfer of many radionuclides from soil to wild species. Furthermore, many approaches to estimating the internal exposure of biota assume equilibrium transfer from soil to biota. However, as environmental impact assessments may need to be conducted for many scenarios (e.g. chronic or acute releases to air and ground waters) assumptions of equilibrium soil to biota transfer many be neither sufficient nor conservative. Much effort has previously been devoted to derive semi-mechanistic models to enable the transfer of radionuclides through human food chains to be predicted dynamically. A logical first step to addressing the data gaps in our ability to predict internal activity concentrations of biota is to consider adapting these models for wild species. Here we describe the development of a semi-mechanistic model to estimate activity concentrations in wild mammals by adaptation of existing human food chain models. Interception, weathering, plant uptake and soil migration parameters are derived from previously published models or collations such as IAEA Technical Report Series No. 364. Allometric relationships dependent on body mass are used to estimate wild animal parameters including, for most radionuclides, biological half-life. Comparison of predictions with observed data allows limited comment on the validity of model predictions. For instance, predicted Cs values are within observed ranges, and an increase in Cs activity concentrations from prey-carnivore as observed by many authors is predicted. Predicted values for 90Sr, 226Ra and U also appear reasonable whilst those for the actinide elements are low compared with the limited available data. To date a simple source-grass-herbivore-carnivore food chain has been considered; the potential for further development of the model is discussed. (author)

  19. Living Landscapes: Present and Past Interactions Between Coastal Sediments and Biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the dawn of life, sedimentary landscapes have been interacting with biota. This is particularly evident in coastal environments, where sediment transport and production are strongly influenced by microbes, plants and animals. Here I will discuss examples ranging from erosion of modern coastal wetlands to evidence of early life in sedimentary rocks. Using mathematical models and laboratory experiments I will investigate processes and present new perspectives at the border between geomorphology, ecology and paleontology.

  20. The use of biota sampling for environmental contaminant analysis for characterization of benthic communities in the Aleutians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is increasingly clear that the public, native tribes, and governmental agencies are interested in assessing the well-being of natural resources and ecosystems. This may take the form of understanding species presence, monitoring population status and trends, measuring behavior, or quantifying physiology, biological stresses, or chemical/radiological exposure through biomarkers. Often there is a separation between understanding the biological aspects of species well-being and assessing exposure to contaminants. In this paper we examine the applicability of using scuba sampling aimed primarily at specimen collection for radionuclide analysis to assess species presence/absence and to compare among sampling sites and depths. We were especially interested in whether dive transects could provide information on species presence and potential exposure to environmental contaminants. In June/July 2004 we sampled at 49 depth stations along 19 transects at Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the western Aleutian Islands in the Northern Pacific/Bering Sea region. Amchitka Island, a former World War II U.S. Navy base, was the site of three underground nuclear test shots from 1965 to 1971. Four to six transects were established at three Amchitka sites and two Kiska Sites, and 2 to 4 stations were sampled on each transect. Bottom conditions, weather and currents prevented a complete sampling of all stations. There were interspecific differences in the percent of stations where biota werin the percent of stations where biota were found and collected, in their occurrence near the three test shots on Amchitka, and in the depth where they were found. There were no significant differences between Amchitka and Kiska Island in the percent of stations where species were found. These data suggest that information gathered incidentally to the collection of specimens for chemical/radiological analysis can prove useful for understanding the presence of benthic organisms along particular transects, at given depths, and at different geographical locations. This information also provides a baseline for the range of organisms that could be exposed to future physical or chemical/radiological stressors. The data are useful for developing future biomonitoring plans to assess biological well-being and chemical/radiological exposure only if they are published and available to the public, public policy makers, and managers. Just as it is critical to select endpoints and bioindicators that are of interest for assessing both human and ecological health, specimens should be collected using a protocol that is useful for both chemical/radiological analysis and biological information

  1. Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in water, sediments and biota in the vicinity of Cluff mining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data is presented on the concentrations of U, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-230, Th, As, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni and Zn in water, sediments, aquatic macrophytes and fish near a high grade uranium mining facility. Baseline data acquired in 1975 and 1978-79 is compared to post-development environmental monitoring data from 1980 to 1985. Distribution coefficients (KD) for sediment, and transfer coefficients (T.C.) for biota and derived from the water, sediment and biota concentrations

  2. Non-human biota dose assessment. Sensitivity analysis and knowledge quality assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of a programme of work, commissioned within the BIOPROTA collaborative forum, to assess the quantitative and qualitative elements of uncertainty associated with biota dose assessment of potential impacts of long-term releases from geological disposal facilities (GDF). Quantitative and qualitative aspects of uncertainty were determined through sensitivity and knowledge quality assessments, respectively. Both assessments focused on default assessment parameters within the ERICA assessment approach. The sensitivity analysis was conducted within the EIKOS sensitivity analysis software tool and was run in both generic and test case modes. The knowledge quality assessment involved development of a questionnaire around the ERICA assessment approach, which was distributed to a range of experts in the fields of non-human biota dose assessment and radioactive waste disposal assessments. Combined, these assessments enabled critical model features and parameters that are both sensitive (i.e. have a large influence on model output) and of low knowledge quality to be identified for each of the three test cases. The output of this project is intended to provide information on those parameters that may need to be considered in more detail for prospective site-specific biota dose assessments for GDFs. Such information should help users to enhance the quality of their assessments and build greater confidence in the results. (orig.)

  3. Trace organic contamination in biota collected from the Pearl River Estuary, China: a preliminary risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, S; Lau, R K F; Fung, C N; Zheng, G J; Lam, J C W; Connell, D W; Fang, Z; Richardson, B J; Lam, P K S

    2006-12-01

    The marine ecosystem of the Pearl River Delta, located on the southern coast of China, has been heavily exploited following the rapid economic growth that has occurred since the 1980s. This investigation aimed to elucidate trace organic contamination in marine biota inhabiting the Pearl River Delta area. Biota samples, including green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis), oysters (Crassostrea rivularis) and shrimp (Penaeus orientalis) were sampled from 16 stations fringing the Estuary. Elevated concentrations (on a dry weight basis) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (27.8-1041.0 ng/g), petroleum hydrocarbons (1.7-2345.4 microg/g), polychlorinated biphenyls (2.1-108.8 ng/g), DDTs (1.9-79.0 ng/g), and hexachlorocyclohexanes (n.d.-38.4 ng/g) were recorded. A human health risk assessment was conducted to estimate the risk to local residents associated with the consumption of biota collected from the Pearl River Estuary. The results indicated that PCBs were at levels that may cause deleterious health effects in populations that consume large amounts of seafood. However, it would be instructive to establish health criteria for trace organic contaminants that are specific to the local populations, in order to derive a more accurate and relevant health risk assessment. PMID:16908034

  4. Cretaceous biota of the Triângulo Mineiro region (Brazil: A review of recent finds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candeiro, C. R. A.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bauru Group (Adamantina, Uberaba, and Marília Formations crop out in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, and yield a rich continental biota. Invertebrate and vertebrate taxa from underlying and overlying strata, as well as biostratigraphical correlations with other fossil sites in Argentina, suggest an Upper Cretaceous age for this biota. The diversity of the fossil assemblage recorded in these formations is summarized here and includes: frogs, lizards, crocodiles, titanosaurs, abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid dinosaurs. This fossil assemblage provides important clues to understand faunas from other southern landmasses, particularly those from the Cretaceous of the African continent.Los afloramientos del Grupo Bauru (formaciones Adamantina, Uberaba y Marília en la región del Triângulo Mineiro, Provincia de Minas Gerais, Brasil, posee un rico contenido de biota continental. Los taxa de invertebrados y vertebrados de estos estratos, así como las correlaciones biostratigráficas con otros yacimientos fósiles de Argentina, sugieren una edad del Cretácico Tardío. La diversidad de la asociación fósil registrada en las formaciones del Triângulo Mineiro se resume en el presente trabajo e incluye: sapos, lagartos, tortugas, cocodrilianos, titanosaurideos, dinosaurios abelisaurideos y carcharodontosaurideos. Esta asociación es importante para la comprensión de las faunas del sur de América y también de las del Cretácico de África.

  5. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  6. Ecosystem Services : In Nordic Freshwater Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Kristin; Hasler, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Human wellbeing is dependent upon and benefit from ecosystem services which are delivered by well-functioning ecosystems. Ecosystem services can be mapped and assessed consistently within an ecosystem service framework. This project aims to explore the use and usefulness of the ecosystem service framework in freshwater management, particularly water management according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD). There are several examples of how ecosystem services have been used in WFD related studies in all the Nordic countries. Most of them involve listing, describing and categorizing freshwater ecosystem services, while there are few comprehensive Cost Benefit Analyses and analyses of disproportionate costs that apply this framework. More knowledge about ecosystem services and the value of ecosystem services for freshwater systems is needed.

  7. 137Cs in freshwater fish in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with an evaluation of the importance of Finnish freshwater fish as a source of 137Cs in the diet. Freshwater fish were analysed for 137Cs in 1982. The 137Cs concentration factors from water to edible fish were determined for the same year. The evaluation is based on an extensive surface water investigation performed from 1965 to 1967. Along with the continuous fallout monitoring since the beginning of the 1960'es, this material makes it possible to valuate the 137Cs levels in surface water right up to the 1980'es. In 1982 the Finns received an average of 90 Bq 137Cs from freshwater fish. This dose constitutes a quarter of the 137Cs uptake from the total food consumtion in Finland in 1982

  8. Acute and chronic effects of sodium and potassium on the tropical freshwater cladoceran Pseudosida ramosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Emanuela Cristina; Rocha, Odete

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the toxicities of sodium and potassium to the tropical freshwater cladoceran Pseudosida ramosa were assessed. Acute toxicity tests on this species showed that the 48-h LC(50) of Na(+) was 556 mg l(-1), while that of K(+) was 17.7 mg l(-1). Long-term exposure of female P. ramosa to sodium reduced the total number of survivors from 10 to 6 at a concentration of 249 mg l(-1), 21-day fecundity from 20.4 to 14.3 eggs female(-1) at concentrations ranging from 72 to 249 mg l(-1), 21-day fertility from 20.1 to 6.5 neonates female(-1) at concentrations ranging from 25 to 249 mg l(-1). Furthermore, fecundity of each brood from the second to the fifth was significantly lower at 249 mg l(-1) and fertility of each brood from the first to the fifth at concentrations ranging from 25 to 249 mg l(-1). A significant decrease in fertility was associated with an increase in the number of aborted eggs. Long-term exposure to potassium decreased the 21-day fecundity of P. ramosa from 14.2 to 10.8 eggs female(-1) at a concentration of 11 mg l(-1) and fertility (fourth brood only) at 6.2 and 11 mg l(-1). Tropical reservoirs located near areas where the soil is overloaded with fertilizers and ferti-irrigation with vinasse already show concentrations of Na(+) and K(+) very close to those producing sub-lethal long-term effects on P. ramosa. A possible consequence is that organisms of the aquatic biota cannot adapt and freshwater taxa may become locally extinct, transferring dominance to salt-tolerant taxa. PMID:20978846

  9. Evaluation of multixenobiotic resistance in dreissenid mussels as a screening tool for toxicity in freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ács, A; Imre, K; Kiss, Gy; Csaba, J; Gy?ri, J; Vehovszky, Á; Farkas, A

    2015-05-01

    The multixenobiotic defense mechanism (MXR) in aquatic organisms was recognized as a first-line defense system, and its potential use as an early biomarker of exposure to environmental stress has raised attention in the last two decades. To evaluate the relevance of this biomarker in the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha, we studied its responsiveness within laboratory exposures to contaminants sequestered in freshwater sediments affected by moderate anthropogenic impact. The effectiveness of this biomarker was assessed by comparing the MXR-transporter activities determined in bivalves first with toxicity scores recorded with the D. rerio embryo developmental assay. Both bioassays were applied in the sediment contact test format. As a second evaluation approach, MXR activities determined in exposed mussels were compared with sediment-contamination data integrated into toxic units on the basis of acute toxicity to Daphnia magna. In D. polymorpha subjected to acute exposure with moderately polluted sediments, we detected limited (22-33 %) but statistically significant induction of MXR activity. Mean MXR activities significantly correlated with TU values computed for test sediments. MXR activities in mussels showed strong positive correlation with the metal load of sediments and proved to be unrelated to the contamination with polycyclic aromatic compounds. MXR activity in laboratory-exposed mussels showed low variability within treatments and thus reliably reflected even low contaminant differences between the negative reference and moderately polluted harbor sediments. The strong correlation found in this study between the MXR-transporter activity in exposed mussels and environmentally realistic sediment contamination underscores the fairly good sensitivity of this biomarker in laboratory testing conditions to signal the bioavailability of sediment bound contaminants, and it may also anticipate even the incidence of toxicity to biota. PMID:25801701

  10. Toxicity assessment of oil-contaminated freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaise, Christian; Gagné, François; Chèvre, Nathalie; Harwood, Manon; Lee, Ken; Lappalainen, Juha; Chial, Belgis; Persoone, Guido; Doe, Ken

    2004-08-01

    The performance of four microscale toxicity bioassays conducted on whole sediments was evaluated during a bioremediation project undertaken in 1999-2000 on a crude oil-contaminated freshwater shoreline of the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. The toxicity tests assessed included: (1) the Microtox solid-phase assay (MSPT), (2) the Biotox Flash solid-phase test (Flash), (3) the algal solid-phase assay (ASPA), and 4) the Ostracodtoxkit solid-phase assay. Data generated with these assays were compared with those obtained using the standard endobenthic amphipod (Hyalella azteca) bioassay. Bioanalytical comparisons indicated that all five solid-phase tests were useful in detecting the toxicity of oiled sediments; however, statistical analyses distinguished a difference in response between the invertebrate (amphipod and Ostracodtoxkit) and bacterial luminescence tests (MSPT and Flash). Based on these results, it is recommended that careful selection of biotests be made in the design of the test battery for assessment of residual oil sediment toxicity. Time-series toxicity data generated with ASPA indicated that oiled sediments in the freshwater wetlands of the St. Lawrence River remained toxic to phytoplankton for at least 65 weeks and that remediation treatment was able to accelerate detoxification by 16 weeks. PMID:15269895

  11. Acute toxicity of heavy metals towards freshwater ciliated protists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute toxicity of five heavy metals to four species of freshwater ciliates (Colpidium colpoda, Dexiotricha granulosa, Euplotes aediculatus, and Halteria grandinella) was examined in laboratory tests. After exposing the ciliates to soluble compound of cadmium, copper, chromium, lead, and nickel at several selected concentrations, the mortality rate was registered and the LC5 values (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated. Large differences appeared in sensitivities of the four species to the metals. H. grandinella showed the highest sensitivity for cadmium (0.07 mg l-1, LC5) and lead (0.12 mg l-1, LC5), whilst E. aediculatus showed the highest sensitivity for nickel (0.03 mg l-1, LC5). The comparison with data obtained with other species indicate that Halteria grandinella and Euplotes aediculatus are excellent and convenient bioindicator for evaluating the toxicity of waters and wastewaters polluted by heavy metals. The short time (24 h) and simplicity of the test procedure enable this test to be used in laboratory studies. - Ciliated protozoa are suitable bioindicators of heavy metal pollution in freshwater environments

  12. FRESHWATER FISHERY OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatko Homen; Irena Jahutka; Ante Mišura; Vesna Fu?ek; Josip Sui?

    1999-01-01

    As fishery, including freshwater, is very important for economy of the Republic of Croatia, the aim of this paper is to show its condition from 1995 to 1998. and also to draw a plan for fish production in 1999. The period from 1998-1999. is more stressed in order to have a total and detailed view into the present condition of the freshwater fishery and into the direction in wish that production is going. Data about carp ponds and also about trout ponds is presented. Twentynine fish-ponds are ...

  13. Freshwater exposure pathways in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report relates to a subproject under a Nordic project called ''Large reactor accidents - consequences and mitigating actions''. The report summarizes information available, primarily in the Nordic countries, on freshwater exposure pathways. Experimental and theoretical data concerning the deposition and run-off of the nuclides *sp90*Sr and*Sp137*Cs is presented. Internal exposure via drinking water and freshwater fish is dealt with, as well as external exposure due to swimming, boating, contact with fishing utensils and use of beach areas. In addition is exposure via irrigated agricultural products considered. (RF)

  14. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and fish catch according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the production and the catch in 1997 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased for 836 ha or 8.40%. The total fish amount was bigger for 477 tons, or 10,52%. The feeding coefficient is 2.6 kg decreased 35% for in comparison to the bigger compared to the previous year. The amount of the fertilizer used is bigger for 37.30%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 6.50% of the total fish pond surfaces, the young carp ponds 22.04/0, and the ponds with consumption fish 70.31%. The total amount in the carp ponds was 446 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 160.8 tons/ha. The most produced fish species is the carp with 79.32%, followed by the trout with 11.50%, the herbivorous fish with 4.25%, while all the other fish species make up 4.93% of the entire production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 69,23%, followed by the big head carp with 29.74% and the silver carp with 1.03%. Compared to the previous year the production of the carp, grass carp and tench is increased. Fish catch in open waters has decreased by 5.53% in comparison to the previous year. In the production and catch of the total freshwater fish, carp made up 75.34%, herbivorous fish made up 3.89%, trout 10.66%, sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2.70% and all other fish species 7.41%. As far as the distribution of production and catch of fish is concerned, 52,80% were sold on the market, 37.94% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms, mortality was 1.43%, and for personal use (sports fishing 7.83%. The number of fisheries workers has decreased for 8.17%, and the production per worker is bigger for 22.25%, compared to the previous year. Average production per worker was 7.17% tons of fish.

  15. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1996.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and fish catch according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the production and the catch in 1996 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased by 1357 ha or 11.99%. The total fish amount has decreased by 1,921.00 tons or 29.76%. The feeding coefficient is 4 kg (33.33% bigger compared to the previous year. The amount of the fertilizer used has decreased by 18.79%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 5.99% of the total fish pond surfaces, the young carp ponds 21.13%, and the ponds with consumption fish 71.53%. The total fish amount in the carp ponds was 376 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 146.6 tons/ha. The most produced fish species is the carp with 82.21 %, followed by the trout with 8.57%, the herbivorous fish with 4.78%, while all the other fish species make up 4.44% of the entire production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 64,28%, followed by the big head carp with 26.02% and the silver carp with 9.70%. Compared to the previous year the production of the trout and tench has somewhat increased, while the production of all the other species of fish has decreased. Fish catch in open waters has increased by 19.23% in comparison to the previous year. In the production and catch of the total freshwater fish, carp made up 77.46%, the herbivorous fish made up 4.32%, trout 4.32%, sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2.99% and all other fish species 7.36%. As far as the distribution of production and catch is concerned, 46.91% were sold on the market, 39.19% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms, mortalities were 6.23%, and for personal use (sports fishing 7.67% was used. The number of fisheries workers has decreased by 17.75%, and the production per worker has also decreased by 26.62%, compared to the previous year. Average production per worker was 5.87 tons of fish.

  16. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO42- concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 ?M. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 ?M h-1 while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 ?M h-1, respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 ?g d-1 g-1) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 ?g d-1 g-1) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 ?g d-1 g-1) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m-2 d-1, while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination paper. 67 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Optimized separation and determination of methyl sulfone metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p,p'-DDE in biota samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shaogang; Covaci, Adrian; Haraguchi, Koichi; Schepens, Paul

    2002-12-01

    An optimised method is described for the determination of 27 methyl sulfone polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and DDE in biota samples. Initially, the samples were extracted by hot Soxhlet and the methyl sulfones were separated by liquid/liquid extraction with concentrated sulfuric acid and back-extracted with hexane. The parameters of the back-extraction were studied and it was found that for a quantitative extraction of the methyl sulfones from the concentrated acid layer, a 50% dilution with cold water should be done. The hexane layer containing the methyl sulfones was further cleaned-up on basic silica (33% KOH) and Florisil. After concentration, the extract was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with electron capture negative ionisation (ECNI) in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM). It was shown that, for methyl sulfones, the ion formation was dependent on the chlorine substitution, position of the MeSO2-group and the ion source temperature. If the ion source temperature was higher than 200 degrees C, [M-CH3]- was the predominant ion for most methyl sulfones. Therefore, for increased sensitivity, quantitation of most congeners was done using [M-CH3]- ions instead of the molecular ion as used in previously reported methods. The method was validated for the determination of 26 tri- to hepta- 3- and 4-substituted MeSO2-PCBs and 3-MeSO2-DDE in animal and human tissues. Good sensitivity and selectivity of the method were obtained. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.06 to 0.10 ng g(-1) lipid weight. Average recoveries of individual congeners from vegetable oil spiked with individual standards (3.33 ng g(-1)) ranged from 73 to 112% with a mean value of 89%. The coefficients of variation ranged from 5.2 to 12.2%, which is within the acceptable range for environmental analyses. PMID:12537370

  18. Actinorhodopsin genes discovered in diverse freshwater habitats and among cultivated freshwater Actinobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sharma, A. K.; Sommerfeld, K.; Bullerjahn, G. S.; Matteson, A. R.; Wilhelm, S. W.; Jezbera, Jan; Brandt, U.; Doolittle, W.F.; Hahn, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 3, ?. 6 (2009), s. 726-737. ISSN 1751-7362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : rhodopsins * actinorhodopsin * freshwater * Actinobacteria * Superior * Erie Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.397, year: 2009

  19. Polychlorinated biphenyls in freshwater salmonids from the Kerguelen Islands in the Southern Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Subantarctic Kerguelen Islands (49oS, 70oE) contain freshwater ecosystems among the most isolated in the world. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were assessed in the muscle of 48 brook trout and 38 brown trout caught during summer and spring 2006 in the rivers, lakes and ponds of Kerguelen. The sum of 29 PCBs averaged 404 and 358 ng g-1 lipid, and dioxin-like PCB was 19 and 69 ng g-1 lipid, in brook and brown trout, respectively. The values showed a high variability and some fish accumulated PCBs at levels similar to those of fish from impacted areas. While inter-sex differences were limited, the season and the morphotype appeared to have the most influence. Fish captured in summer had muscle PCB concentrations about three times higher than those caught in spring and the 'river' morphotype of brook trout showed the highest PCB levels. - Highlights: ? First assessment of PCB contamination of biota in Kerguelen Islands, Sub-Antarctica. ? PCB bioaccumulation level in trout varies from very high to undetectable. ? Habitat and morphotype are the most influential factors on the variability. ? Distribution pattern of PCBs in the muscle of fish is morphotype dependent. - Salmonids in hydrosystems of the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Ocean) show a high PCB bioaccumulation.

  20. Effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on freshwater organisms and ecosystems in the northern Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of studies have examined the direct human health effects of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident, but little has been done to assess the effects on wild organisms, or the cycling of contaminants in the local environment. The authors sampled fish, molluscs, water and sediment from 10 ponds within and outside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Sediments contained 0.07 to 2.5 pCi/g 134Cs and 1.1 to 33 pCi/g 137Cs. Similar levels occur in lakes at nuclear production facilities in the US. Waters were soft (conductivity 45-450 ?S/cm) and low in Ca and K, conditions which favor the uptake of contaminants by biota. In addition to radionuclides, fish from the region contained up to 0.5 ppm Hg in edible muscle. Fish and molluscs are currently being evaluated for possible genetic damage due to contaminant exposure by flow cytometry, DNA strand-breakage assay, and cytogenetic techniques. The ponds surveyed are in an agricultural region, with subsistence hunting and fishing, suggesting that contaminants accumulated in freshwater systems may be entering humans via diet

  1. Can freshwater mites act as forensic tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Heather C

    2009-10-01

    Determination of post-mortem interval often employs analysis of age structure and diversity of saprophilic arthropods (including mites) that have colonized corpses. The majority of research has focused on decomposition processes in terrestrial situations, with relatively few studies on the utility of freshwater invertebrates as forensic agents. Most freshwater mites are predators, detritivores or algivores, and hence seem unlikely candidates as tools for aging or determining original placement of corpses or other bodily remains. The main exceptions to this are some aquatic Astigmata, which have occasionally been observed feeding on the tissues of moribund aquatic animals. Here I investigate Canadian law literature and published forensic research to determine how frequently freshwater mites are included in court cases or are found attending dead bodies. I found only one questionable report of aquatic mites in over 30 years of material from legal databases. Three published research papers reported mites associated with vertebrate flesh in fresh water. Only one paper provided an identification of mites finer than 'Acari' or 'water mites'. In this case, the mites were identified as Hydrozetes (Oribatida). In none of these papers were mites reported to be high in abundance or biomass, and in two of the three publications methodological problems and/or poor reporting of data raised doubts about interpretation of results. I conclude that based on their biology, there is little expectation that freshwater mites should be of great value as forensic tools, and this survey of legal and scientific literature supports my argument. PMID:19513807

  2. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  4. Freshwater savings from marine protein consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Pace, Michael L.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Marine fisheries provide an essential source of protein for many people around the world. Unlike alternative terrestrial sources of protein, marine fish production requires little to no freshwater inputs. Consuming marine fish protein instead of terrestrial protein therefore represents freshwater savings (equivalent to an avoided water cost) and contributes to a low water footprint diet. These water savings are realized by the producers of alternative protein sources, rather than the consumers of marine protein. This study quantifies freshwater savings from marine fish consumption around the world by estimating the water footprint of replacing marine fish with terrestrial protein based on current consumption patterns. An estimated 7 600 km3 yr-1 of water is used for human food production. Replacing marine protein with terrestrial protein would require an additional 350 km3 yr-1 of water, meaning that marine protein provides current water savings of 4.6%. The importance of these freshwater savings is highly uneven around the globe, with savings ranging from as little as 0 to as much as 50%. The largest savings as a per cent of current water footprints occur in Asia, Oceania, and several coastal African nations. The greatest national water savings from marine fish protein occur in Southeast Asia and the United States. As the human population increases, future water savings from marine fish consumption will be increasingly important to food and water security and depend on sustainable harvest of capture fisheries and low water footprint growth of marine aquaculture.

  5. Investigation of manganese in salt- and freshwater pearls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace element distribution in natural and cultured pearls is analysed by micro-PIXE, cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to develop a new method to distinguish cultured from natural pearls. These different kinds of pearls can be identified by their manganese content and its distribution in aragonite and calcite structure, respectively. Manganese content of natural freshwater pearls from Persian Gulf was compared to that of natural freshwater pearls from the Mississippi river (USA). Moreover manganese content of tissue-graft freshwater pearls from Chansu (China) was compared to that of natural freshwater pearls from the Mississippi river (USA). It was proved that the Chinese freshwater tissue-graft cultured pearls generally contain domains of calcite, emitting orange Mn2+-activated CL which are almost absent in the natural freshwater pearls from the Mississippi river. Freshwater pearls showing much higher Mn concentrations build in calcitic and aragonitic parts compared to saltwater pearls

  6. Freshwater ecotoxicity characterisation factor for metal oxide nanoparticles: a case study on titanium dioxide nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salieri, Beatrice; Righi, Serena; Pasteris, Andrea; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2015-02-01

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is widely applied in several industrial sectors to evaluate the environmental performance of processes, products and services. Recently, several reports and studies have emphasized the importance of LCA in the field of engineered nanomaterials. However, to date only a few LCA studies on nanotechnology have been carried out, and fewer still have assessed aspects relating to ecotoxicity. This is mainly due to the lack of knowledge in relation on human and environmental exposure and effect of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This bottleneck is continued when performing Life Cycle Impact Assessment, where characterization models and consequently characterization factors (CFs) for ENPs are missing. This paper aims to provide the freshwater ecotoxicity CF for titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO?). The USEtox model has been selected as a characterisation model. An adjusted multimedia fate model has been developed which accounts for nano-specific fate process descriptors (i.e. sedimentation, aggregation with suspended particle matter, etc.) to estimate the fate of nano-TiO? in freshwater. A literature survey of toxicity tests performed on freshwater organism representative of multiple trophic levels was conducted, including algae, crustaceans and fish in order to collect relevant EC?? values. Then, the toxic effect of nano-TiO? was computed on the basis of the HC?? value. Thus, following the principle of USEtox model and accounting for nano-specific descriptors a CF for the toxic impact of freshwater ecotoxicity of 0.28 PAFdaym(3)kg(-1) is proposed. PMID:25461051

  7. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and catch of fish according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the product and catch in 1994 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased by 274 ha or 2,51%. The total amount of fish has decreased by 1.263 tons or 14,78%. The highest production of fish was reached by the fish farm Donji Miholjac with 1.231 kg/ha. The feeding coefficient is 3,10 kg. Only on one fish farm was the feeding coefficient less than 2.0 kg (1,40 and on two large farms this coefficient was greater than 5,00 kg. The main fish food is still wheat followed by corn. The amount of fertilizer used was decreased by 14,40%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 0,92% of the surface area of the entire fish farm, the young carp ponds 21,77% and the culturing ponds for consumption fish 76,55%. The total amount of fish in the carp ponds was 660 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 123.4 tons/ha. The carp is the highest produced fish with 80, 35%, then the herbivorous fish with 5,65 and all other fish make up 14% of the total production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 54, 70%, followed by the big head carp with 25,54% and the silver carp with 19,76%. In comparison with the previous year the production of "all other fish- has significantly increased (287%, and sheat fish 18,90%, while the production of trench has decreased (71%. Fish catch in open waters has increased by 20,57% in comparison to the previous year. Carp made up 78,07% of the total production and catch of freshwater fish, the herbivorous fish made up 5,40%, trout 4,38%, the sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2,86% and all other fish species 9,28%. As far as the distribution of production and catch, 51,60% were sold on the market, 37,54% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms , mortalities were 6,35% and for personal use (sports fishing 4,50% was used. The number of fisheries workers decreased by 10,72% and the production per worker decreased by 3,12% in comparison to the previous year. According to each worker their was an average production of 9,00 tons of fish. In 1994 the highest production of fish was reached in Garešnica with 14,70 tons of fish per worker.

  8. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The data on the production and catch of fish according to sorts, pond ackerage, fishing means as well as the distribution of production and catch in 1995 have been stated in the paper. Ackerages used for the fish production have been increased by 1710 acres or 6.51%; total fish prinos* is less for 1,252 tons or 17.05%. The highest production of fish was reched by the fish farm Donji Miholjac with 859 kg/ha. A nutritive coefficient is 3.0 kg and it is less by 3.22% compared with the previous year. The nutritive coefficient is less than 2.0 kg in three fish-farms but it is greater than 4.0 kg in five large fish farms. Mostly corn but also wheat dominate in fish nutrition. The fertilizers consumption has been reduced by 14.53%. Of total pond ackerage, growing fish farms occupy 1.25%, new fish farms occupy 17.90% and consumptive fish farms occupy 79.64%. Total fish production in carp ponds is 507 kg/ha and 136.1 ton/ha in trout ponds. With 84.33%, carp is the mostly produced fish sorts, herbivore fish follow it with 3.89% and the production of all other fish makes 11.78% of the total. With 83.97%, grass carp takes the first place in the structure of herbivore fish. It is followed by the big head carp with 9.28% and silver carp with 6.75%. The trout production has been slightly increased by 6. 3%. Pike has appeared again and all other fish sorts has been reduced. Fish catch in open water has been increased by 7.06% compared with the previous year. When we sum up total production and catch of fresh-water fish, we can conclude that carp contributes with 81.08%; herbivore fish with 3.67%; trouts with 5.53%; sheat-fish, pike-perch and pike with 2.74% and all other fish sorts with 6.98%. As to the distribution of production and catch, there has been 49.02% sold on markets, 38.02% has been spent on farm reproduction (set back in ponds, the percentage of mortalities is 7.90%. Sport fishers have spent 5.06% of fish. The number of employees has been reduced by 12.05% and fish production per employee has also been reduced by 1.10% compared with the previous year. It has been produced 8.0 tons of fish per employee. In 1995, the production has been greatest in Dragani?i: 15.60 tons of fish per employee.

  9. Freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Mernild

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial inputs of freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland, were estimated, indicating ice discharge to be the dominant source of freshwater. A freshwater flux of 40.4 ± 4.9×109 m3 y?1 was found (1999–2008, with an 85% contribution originated from ice discharge (65% alone from Helheim Glacier, 11% from terrestrial surface runoff (from melt water and rain, 3% from precipitation at the fjord surface area, and 1% from subglacial geothermal and frictional melting due to basal ice motion. The results demonstrate the dominance of ice discharge as a primary mechanism for delivering freshwater to Sermilik Fjord. Time series of ice discharge for Helheim Glacier, Midgård Glacier, and Fenris Glacier were calculated from satellite-derived average surface velocity, glacier width, and estimated ice thickness, and fluctuations in terrestrial surface freshwater runoff were simulated based on observed meteorological data. These simulations were compared and bias corrected against independent glacier catchment runoff observations. Modeled runoff to Sermilik Fjord was variable, ranging from 2.9 ± 0.4×109 m3 y?1 in 1999 to 5.9 ± 0.9×109 m3 y?1 in 2005. The sub-catchment runoff of the Helheim Glacier region accounted for 25% of the total runoff to Sermilik Fjord. The runoff distribution from the different sub-catchments suggested a strong influence from the spatial variation in glacier coverage, indicating high runoff volumes, where glacier cover was present at low elevations.

  10. Comparison of two reference systems for biomarker data analysis in a freshwater biomonitoring context

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Wilfried; Piccini, Benjamin; Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle; Porcher, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of fish biomarkers for freshwater biomonitoring is now well recognized, but they still pose several questions to ecotoxicology researchers. The present study, designed to assess the effects of a small city located in an agricultural river basin watershed on sticklebacks living in an adjacent river, underlines the importance of reference selection. Two reference systems were used to analyse responses of a set of biomarkers, including biotransformation enzymes, oxidative stress p...

  11. Assessment of the impact of radionuclide releases from Canadian nuclear facilities on non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact of radionuclides released from nuclear facilities is being assessed for regulatory purposes using an ecological assessment framework. Hazard quotients are determined by dividing an estimated exposure value (EEV) by an estimated no effect value (ENEV). Values less than one indicate that environmental harm is not likely, whereas in Tier 2 or Tier 3 assessments values greater than one indicate the potential for environmental harm. Radiation exposure values are calculated using annual mean radionuclide concentrations in water, sediment and biota, and either published screening DCFs or dosimetry equations taking into account the geometry and size of the organism. A relative biological effectiveness (RBE) weighting factor of 40 for alpha emitters and 3 for tritium is used in the dose calculations. When radionuclide concentrations are not measured in biota, they are estimated from published geometric mean concentration ratios. Radionuclide concentrations in benthic invertebrates are assumed to be equivalent to those in the sediment. The radiation dose is the sum of the internal and external doses, except for benthic invertebrates where the total radiation dose is assumed to be from internal radiation exposure. The ENEVs for the various taxonomic groups are determined from literature data using an ecotoxicological approach. The ENEVs derived for radiation effects on biota are: 0.2 Gy·a-1 for fish, 2 G a-1 for both benthic inverteG a-1 for both benthic invertebrates and terrestrial invertebrates, and 1 Gy·a-1 for algae, macrophytes, mammals and terrestrial plants. The assessment conducted for uranium mines and mills is presented as a case study outlining the recommended approach. The results suggest that a probabilistic Tier 3 assessment may not be necessary when environmental data are readily available. (author)

  12. A model for selecting bioindicators to monitor radionuclide concentrations using Amchitka Island in the Aleutians as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World War II and the Cold War have left the Unites States, and other Nations, with massive cleanup and remediation tasks for radioactive and other legacy hazardous wastes. While some sites can be cleaned up to acceptable residential risk levels, others will continue to hold hazardous wastes, which must be contained and monitored to protect human health and the environment. While media (soil, sediment, groundwater) monitoring is the usual norm at many radiological waste sites, for some situations (both biological and societal), biomonitoring may provide the necessary information to assure greater peace of mind for local and regional residents, and to protect ecologically valuable buffer lands or waters. In most cases, indicators are selected using scientific expertise and a literature review, but not all selected indicators will seem relevant to stakeholders. In this paper, I provide a model for the inclusion of stakeholders in the development of bioindicators for assessing radionuclide levels of biota in the marine environment around Amchitka Island, in the Aleutian Chain of Alaska. Amchitka was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. The process was stakeholder-initiated, stakeholder-driven, and included stakeholders during each phase. Phases included conceptualization, initial selection of biota and radionuclides, refinement of biota and radionuclide target lists, collection of biota, selection of biota and radionuclides for analysis, and selea and radionuclides for analysis, and selection of biota, tissues, and radionuclides for bioindicators. The process produced site-specific information on biota availability and on radionuclide levels that led to selection of site-appropriate bioindicators. I suggest that the lengthy, iterative, stakeholder-driven process described in this paper results in selection of bioindicators that are accepted by biologists, public health personnel, public-policy makers, resource agencies, regulatory agencies, subsistence hunters/fishers, and a wide range of other stakeholders. The process is applicable to other sites with ecologically important buffer lands or waters, or where contamination issues are contentious

  13. Antifibrotic activity of diterpenes from Biota orientalis leaves on hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyeong; Yang, Hyekyung; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Jeong, Eun Ju; Kim, Do Yoon; Ha, Na Ry; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2008-07-01

    Antifibrotic effect of twelve diterpenes (1-12) from the 90% methanolic fraction of Biota orientalis leaves was evaluated employing HSC-T6 cells by assessing cell proliferation and morphological change. Among these diterpenes, totarol (8) and isopimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid (9) dramatically reduced cell proliferation in dose-and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with these compounds resulted in the different pattern of morphological changes of HSC-T6 cells. Taken together, antiproliferative activity of diterpenes from B. orientalis might suggest therapeutic potentials against liver fibrosis. PMID:18704328

  14. Isolation and characterization of platelet-activating factor receptor binding antagonists from Biota orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H O; Suh, D Y; Han, B H

    1995-02-01

    The leaf extract of Biota orientalis showed potent PAF receptor binding antagonistic activity in our previous screening studies on 234 Korean medicinal plants using rabbit platelet receptor binding tests. The activity-guided purification of the plant extract resulted in the isolation of six compounds, including two active substances. The chemical structures of the compounds isolated were established by chemical and spectrometric analyses as dotriacontane, totarol, 8 beta-hydroxy-3-oxopimar-15-ene, cedrol (IC50 = 1.3 x 10(-5) M), pinusolide (IC50 = 2.52 x 10(-7) M), and 5-hydroxy-7,4'-dimethoxyflavone. PMID:7700989

  15. Soil organic matter, biota and aggregation in temperate and tropical soils - Effects of no-tillage

    OpenAIRE

    Six, Johan; Feller, Christian (ed.); Denef, Karolien; Ogle, Stephen; Joao Carlos de Moraes Sa,; Albrecht, Alain

    2002-01-01

    The long-term stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) in tropical and temperate regions is mediated by soil biota (e.g. fungi, bacteria, roots and earthworms), soil structure (e.g. aggregation) and their interactions. On average, soil C turnover was twice as fast in tropical compared with temperate regions, but no major differences were observed in SOM quality between the two regions. Probably due to the soil mineralogy dominated by 1:1 clay minerals and oxides in tropical regions, we foun...

  16. Ecosystem services driven by soil biota - Relevance and management in land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Martin; Peres, Guenola; Zaller, Johann; Pullemann, Mirjam; Taylor, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    To understand how land use systems affect soil biodiversity and how soil biodiversity (i.e. the performance of functional groups) feeds back to soil functions and ecosystem services is essential to establish sustainable practices in future soil management. This poster aims to summaries the current knowledge and perspectives on soil biota as the driver of key processes in soil and ecosystem functioning. We will list key processes and the driving organisms, as well as indicate and valuate management practices refering to current European projects. In conclusion we will suggest implementation strategies and identify research needs.

  17. Applying DoE's Graded Approach for assessing radiation impacts to non-human biota at the Incl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 2002, The US Department of Energy (DOE) released a new technical standard entitled A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota. DOE facilities are annually required to demonstrate that routine radioactive releases from their sites are protective of non-human receptors and sites are encouraged to use the Graded Approach for this purpose. Use of the Graded Approach requires completion of several preliminary steps, to evaluate the degree to which the site environmental monitoring program is appropriate for evaluating impacts to non-human biota. We completed these necessary activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using the following four tasks: (1) develop conceptual models and evaluate exposure pathways; (2) define INL evaluation areas; (3) evaluate sampling locations and media; (4) evaluate data gaps. All of the information developed in the four steps was incorporated, data sources were identified, departures from the Graded Approach were justified, and a step-by-step procedure for biota dose assessment at the INL was specified. Finally, we completed a site-wide biota dose assessment using the 2002 environmental surveillance data and an offsite assessment using soil and surface water data collected since 1996. These assessments demonstrated the environmental concentrations of radionuclides measured on and near the INL do not present significant risks to populations of non-human biotauman biota

  18. Soil Biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine McCarville

    In teams of two, students collect samples from one or two different environments -- agricultural fields, sports turf areas, lawns, forest floor, wetland/pond margin, greenhouse, etc. They construct a Berlese funnel apparatus, process their two samples, identify and photograph (under a microscope) the organisms they isolate. The class aggregates their data from all the different environments, calculates a Simpson's diversity index for each environment, and uses this value to compare the diversity of the different environments.

  19. A freshwater biodiversity hotspot under pressure – assessing threats and identifying conservation needs for ancient Lake Ohrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kostoski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater habitats and species living in freshwater are generally more prone to extinction than terrestrial or marine ones. Immediate conservation measures for world-wide freshwater resources are thus of eminent importance. This is particularly true for so called ancient lakes. While these lakes are famous for being evolutionary theatres, often displaying an extraordinarily high degree of biodiversity and endemism, in many cases these biota are also experiencing extreme anthropogenic impact.

    Lake Ohrid, the European biodiversity hotspot, is a prime example for a lake with a magnitude of narrow range endemic taxa that are under increasing anthropogenic pressure. Unfortunately, evidence for a "creeping biodiversity crisis" has accumulated over the last decades, and major socio-political changes have gone along with human-mediated environmental changes.

    Based on field surveys, monitoring data, published records, and expert interviews, we aimed to (1 assess threats to Lake Ohrids' (endemic biodiversity, (2 summarize existing conservation activities and strategies, and (3 outline future conservation needs for Lake Ohrid. We compiled threats to both specific taxa (and in cases to particular species as well as to the lake ecosystems itself. Major conservation concerns identified for Lake Ohrid are: (1 watershed impacts, (2 agriculture and forestry, (3 tourism and population growth, (4 non-indigenous species, (5 habitat alteration or loss, (6 unsustainable exploitation of fisheries, and (7 global climate change.

    Of the 11 IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources threat classes scored, seven have moderate and three severe impacts. These latter threat classes are energy production and mining, biological resource use, and pollution. We review and discuss institutional responsibilities, environmental monitoring and ecosystem management, existing parks and reserves, biodiversity and species measures, international conservation activities, and ongoing research on conservation and raising of public awareness. Following this summary, we evaluate the status quo and future of Lake Ohrid and its biota. Given the number of identified threats, it is clear that only concerted international action can stop or at least slow down further degradation of Lake Ohrid and the creeping biodiversity crisis already evident. A comprehensive conservation strategy should include measures that result in an immediate reduction of pollution, particularly with phosphorous, in order to slow down the ongoing eutrophication process. The existing watershed management should become more effective. Implementation and particularly with a view to the enforcement of national laws should be enhanced. Increased research on the lakes' limnology, biodiversity, and conservation management practices are necessary. The latter research should identify conservation priorities. Public awareness should be enhanced. Facing these parallel needs to protect the unique biodiversity of Lake Ohrid, we suggest urging (a implementation and enforcement of the General Management Plan that would ensure long-term integrated and sustainable use of the lake and its watershed, (b scientific studies on ecology, biodiversity and effects of human impact, (c the establishment of Core Conservation areas (CCA, including underwater reserves, and (d Coastal Zone Management (CZM areas that would constitute buffer zones for the CCA around the lake.

    These activities should, among others, ultimately lead to a trans-boundary major conservation area of the Ohrid-Prespa region that would allow long-term integration of both humans and nature.

  20. Occurrence of platinum and additional traffic related heavy metals in sediments and biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, N; Zimmermann, S; Wiegand, J; Sures, B

    2007-01-01

    Non-point sources play an important role in metal emissions into surface waters. One of the most important non-point sources is automobile traffic. Recent studies determining traffic related heavy metals in surface waters have concentrated mainly on worst case scenarios by analyzing heavy metal loads in waters and sediments close to storm-water overflow inlets. The present study aims at identifying traffic related heavy metals in moderately polluted sites, as they occur in highly urbanized regions. Therefore, the concentrations of eight traffic related metals (Pt, Sb, Mo, Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr and Zn) were determined in sediment and crustacean samples from eight different aquatic habitats in the Ruhr district, Germany. Traffic related heavy metals could be identified in sediment and biota samples as a combination of heavy metals (Pt, Sb, Cd, Pb for sediments and Pt and Sb for crustacean samples). Pt concentrations received special attention due to the relatively recent occurrence of anthropogenically emitted Pt in the environment. At six sampling sites, Pt was detected in sediment and/or biota samples. The uptake of Pt compared to other traffic related heavy metals by Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus pulex is relatively high and can be compared with the uptake rates of essential metals like Zn. PMID:16996105

  1. Climate-change impacts on sandy-beach biota: crossing a line in the sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, David S; Schlacher, Thomas A; Defeo, Omar

    2014-08-01

    Sandy ocean beaches are iconic assets that provide irreplaceable ecosystem services to society. Despite their great socioeconomic importance, beaches as ecosystems are severely under-represented in the literature on climate-change ecology. Here, we redress this imbalance by examining whether beach biota have been observed to respond to recent climate change in ways that are consistent with expectations under climate change. We base our assessments on evidence coming from case studies on beach invertebrates in South America and on sea turtles globally. Surprisingly, we find that observational evidence for climate-change responses in beach biota is more convincing for invertebrates than for highly charismatic turtles. This asymmetry is paradoxical given the better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms by which turtles are likely to respond to changes in climate. Regardless of this disparity, knowledge of the unique attributes of beach systems can complement our detection of climate-change impacts on sandy-shore invertebrates to add rigor to studies of climate-change ecology for sandy beaches. To this end, we combine theory from beach ecology and climate-change ecology to put forward a suite of predictive hypotheses regarding climate impacts on beaches and to suggest ways that these can be tested. Addressing these hypotheses could significantly advance both beach and climate-change ecology, thereby progressing understanding of how future climate change will impact coastal ecosystems more generally. PMID:25121188

  2. Natural Isotope Radium in Marine Biota at Kapar, Klang Coastal Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities concentration of 226Ra and 228Ra in marine biota at Kapar coastal area nearby Sultan Salahudin Abdul Aziz Shah Power Station (SJSSAAS) had been analyzed. The techniques that had been used to determine the activities concentration of 226Ra dan 228Ra are radiochemistry procedures and liquid scintillation counter (LSC). Results shows that the distribution of radium isotopes depend on the location and during sampling periods. The activities concentration of 226Rai and 228Rai in tissue were ranged 11.82 ± 5.23 Bq/ kg - 17.67 ± 6.81 Bq/ kg and 40.42 ± 16.20 Bq/ kg - 67.86 ± 23.11 Bq/ kg, respectively. The mean activities concentration of radium isotopes in bivalvia such as cockles (anadara granosa) are 61.73 ± 24.15 Bq/ kg (226Raag) and 232.62 ± 119.44 Bq/ kg (228Raag). Meanwhile for green mussles (perna viridis), the mean activities concentration of 226Rapv dan 228Rapv are 38.24 ± 14.19 Bq/ kg dan 99.59 ± 44.91 Bq/ kg, respectively. Concentration Factor (CF) in marine biota is higher than 1 x 104 and it is because of the accumulated radium isotopes is low and has a high affinity for organic matter. The study also shows the effectiveness of dose in radium isotopes were measured to ensure the safety of users and it is still below the limit allowed Malaysia which is 1 mSv / year. (author)

  3. Study of the behaviour of transuranics and possible chemical homologues in Lake Michigan water and biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentration factors for Pu, Am and U in Lake Michigan biota are compared to those of a number of stable trace elements that have short residence times in Lake Michigan water. The relative order of uptake for these nuclides in Lake Michigan biota is Am>Pu much>U. Evidence is summarized which suggests that the predominant oxidation state of 239, 240Pu in Lake Michigan water is 4+. Concentrations of 239, 240Pu in net plankton, filterable particulate matter, sediment trap, and benthic floc samples indicate that sorption by biogenic detritus, and settling of this material, can account for the reduced concentration of 239, 240Pu observed in surface waters during summer stratification, but that deposition into the sediments is primarily non-biological. Concentrations of 7Be, 144Ce and 137Cs in sediment trap samples show the effect of spring convective mixing and demonstrate the resuspension of mineral-rich surficial sediments during the summer months. The effect on the concentration of dissolved plutonium in the water column, of varying degrees of resuspension of sedimentary floc, is described using a simple mass-action model. A radiochemical method for the determination of americium and uranium in Lake Michigan environmental samples is also presented. (author)

  4. The 2.1 Ga Old Francevillian Biota: Biogenicity, Taphonomy and Biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Albani, Abderrazak; Bengtson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The Paleoproterozoic Era witnessed crucial steps in the evolution of Earth's surface environments following the first appreciable rise of free atmospheric oxygen concentrations similar to 2.3 to 2.1 Ga ago, and concomitant shallow ocean oxygenation. While most sedimentary successions deposited during this time interval have experienced thermal overprinting from burial diagenesis and metamorphism, the ca. 2.1 Ga black shales of the Francevillian B Formation (FB2) cropping out in southeastern Gabon have not. The Francevillian Formation contains centimeter-sized structures interpreted as organized and spatially discrete populations of colonial organisms living in an oxygenated marine ecosystem. Here, new material from the FB2 black shales is presented and analyzed to further explore its biogenicity and taphonomy. Our extended record comprises variably sized, shaped, and structured pyritized macrofossils of lobate, elongated, and rodshaped morphologies as well as abundant non-pyritized disk-shaped macrofossils and organic-walled acritarchs. Combined microtomography, geochemistry, and sedimentary analysis suggest a biota fossilized during early diagenesis. The emergence of this biota follows a rise in atmospheric oxygen, which is consistent with the idea that surface oxygenation allowed the evolution and ecological expansion of complex megascopic life.

  5. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF ANIMAL MANURE – IMPLICATIONS FOR CROP YIELDS AND SOIL BIOTA IN ORGANIC FARMING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun

    Anaerobic digestion of farmyard manures may help farmers to produce bioenergy instead of using fossil fuels, support cycling of nutrients and reduce greenhouse gas emission. However, compared to pristine slurry, digested slurry has a reduced content of organic carbon which may impact the soil biota negatively due to substrate shortage. Our knowledge on these processes and their influence on soil quality is scarce. Hence, a field experiment with two organic cropping systems (grass-clover ley and arable system; at two slurry-application levels) was established in 2011, to study how application of digestates affects crop yields, soil characteristics and soil biota (earthworms, springtails, microbiota). The grass-clover system showed comparable yield levels over 3 years when digested slurry was compared to untreated slurry. Digested slurries had no influence on soil nutrient concentrations or on soil organic matter levels over the first 2 years. Application of high levels of manure increased the mortality of bothsurface-dwelling and soil-living earthworms just after application, but the long-term effect of manure application seemed more positive, especially at low application levels. Springtails and microorganisms seemed only little affected by application of digested slurry.

  6. Efectos de la biota edáfica en las interacciones planta-insecto a nivel foliar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. de la Pe\\u00F1a

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de la inmensa diversidad de especies que habitan en el suelo y de la importancia funcional que tiene la biota edáfica tanto a nivel de comunidad como de ecosistema, la teoría ecológica ha tenido tradicionalmente sólo en cuenta las interacciones que ocurren en la parte aérea de las plantas. Recientemente esta situación ha cambiado y durante los últimos diez años se han publicado numerosos estudios que destacan la importancia que tienen las interacciones bióticas entre plantas y organismos edáficos sobre diferentes procesos que se dan enla parte aérea. Estos estudios han demostrado que las interacciones que se dan entre las raíces y los herbívoros edáficos, los hongos mutualistas y la flora microbiana, tienen efecto no sólo en el crecimiento de las plantas sino también en niveles tróficos superiores como son los herbívoros foliares, parasitoides, hiperparasitoides y polinizadores. En este artículo se hace una breve revisión de los mecanismos fundamentales que median la relación entre la biota edáfica y las interacciones bióticas de la parte aérea. Por último, se proponen abordajes complementarios como son la utilización de modelos espaciales y el estudio de estas interacciones desde una perspectiva evolutiva.

  7. Selenium accumulation in aquatic biota downstream of a uranium mining and milling operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium mining and milling operations have the potential to release trace elements such as arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, selenium and uranium and ions (e.g., sulfate, ammonium) into the receiving aquatic ecosystem. The major implication of elevated environmental selenium is its propensity to accumulate in the aquatic food chain, potentially impairing fish reproduction. The objective of this study was to investigate the accumulation of selenium in the major compartments of aquatic ecosystems (lakes) upstream and downstream of a uranium mine in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Selenium concentrations in aquatic biota were elevated in the exposure lake although water and sediment concentrations were low (0.43 ?g/L and 0.54 ?g/g dry weight, respectively). Biomagnification of selenium resulted in approximately 1.5 to 6 fold increase in the selenium concentration between plankton, invertebrates and fish. However, no biomagnification was observed between forage and predatory fish. Although some aquatic biota (e.g., forage fish) exceeded the lower limit of the proposed 3 to 11 ?g/g (dry weight) dietary toxicity threshold for fish, no adverse effects of selenium could be identified in this aquatic system. Continued environmental monitoring is recommended to avoid potential selenium impacts

  8. Bioaccumulation of artificial radionuclides and dose assessment to biota in the Yenisei River (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yenisei is a large river situated in Central Siberia (Russia). It flows northwards to the Yenisei Bay of the Kara Sea. The length of the Yenisei River is 3840 km, the average annual water discharge is 591 km3. Since 1958, the Yenisei River is contaminated by the routine releases of radionuclides from the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Industrial Complex (KMCIC). Among the radionuclides presented in liquid discharges from KMCIC, radioisotopes of phosphorus, caesium and zinc are of major radioecological importance, since they are easily assimilated by the aquatic biota. Yenisei River is characterized by low concentrations of stable nutrients in water, particularly of phosphorus. This may be the reason for the intensive bioassimilation of radioactive phosphorus by organisms in the Yenisei River. The subject of this paper is reconstruction of accumulation of artificial radionuclides (32P, 137Cs, 65Zn, 51Cr, 54Mn) by the Yenisei River biota during the 25-years period (1975 - 2000), and estimation of the internal dose rates to the river organisms. Among the radionuclides presented in the releases, 32P is of particular importance. Reconstruction of the radionuclide assimilation by the Yenisei biota was performed using the ECOMOD model approach. The model considers a radionuclide as a tracer, identical in its properties to a stable (analogous) element participated in the metabolism of aquatic orrticipated in the metabolism of aquatic organism. Radionuclide assimilated by an organism goes to the production of new biomass, and to compensation of metabolic losses of the analogous bioelement. Basic equations of the general ECOMOD approach were described in paper. The model was adapted to the conditions of the Yenisei River and applied to calculate the dynamics of 3'2P, 137Cs, 65Zn, 51Cr, 54Mn in the most typical Yenisei fish species: roach (non-predatory) and pike (predatory). The reconstructed activity concentrations in roach and pike at the distances 16-80 km downstream the KMCIC are shown. Activity concentrations of 32P in the Yenisei fish were considerably higher comparing with other radionuclides. Activity concentrations of 32P, 65Zn, 51Cr, 54Mn in roach are higher than in pike, whereas activity concentrations of 137Cs are higher in predatory species. Results of the model reconstruction were compared with the available data of measurements, and such comparison confirms adequacy of the model predictions. Long-term dynamics of the internal exposure was estimated for the river organisms at the distances 16 - 80 km downstream the KMCIC. Average dose rates from incorporated ?-emitters were calculated taking into account geometric characteristics of organisms; ?-particles were assumed to be totally absorbed within the organisms. Average length of roach in the Yenisei River is 0.2 m, weight 0.17 kg; average length of pike in the Yenisei River is 0.52 m, weight 1.2 kg. Dose conversion factors for 32P, 137Cs, 65Zn, 51Cr and 54Mn are shown in Table III. Annual average dose rates from incorporated radionuclides to the Yenisei biota are presented in Table IV. Maximum dose rates occurred in 1975-1980 and varied from 11 mGy/year (predatory fish) to 63 mGy/year (molluscs). These levels were several times higher than the background exposure to the Yenisei organisms, which was estimated as 0.7 - 4 mGy/year. Major contributor to the internal exposure to the Yenisei biota is 32P (up to 95%)

  9. Assessing the freshwater distribution of yellow eel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasne É.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the global context of the decline in wild species, modeling the distribution of populations is a crucial aspect of ecological management. This can be a major challenge, especially for species, such as the European eel, that have complex life cycles, exhibit cryptic behavior, or migrate over long distances. A review of the literature suggests that eel size data could be used to assess and analyze freshwater distribution of eel. We argue that analyses based on small yellow eels (? 300 mm along the longitudinal course of rivers could provide a valuable tool for population monitoring. We propose a standardized catchment recruitment index and a colonization index based on the probability of occurrence (presence/absence data using logistic models for different size classes. The model developed here provides a convenient guide for assessing yellow eel stages in freshwater areas, and should have concrete applications for management of the species.

  10. Assessment of Total Mercury (HgT) in Sediments and Biota of Indian Sundarban Wetland and Adjacent Coastal Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Mousumi Chatterjee; Lucas Sklenars; Chenery, Simon R.; Michael J. Watts; Andrew Lewis Marriott; Debyendu Rakshit; Sarkar, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of total mercury (HgT) in surface sediments (0-5 cm; n = 12; particle size < 63 µm) and representative biota (benthic polychaetes, bivalve mollusks and finfish) were observed in the Sundarban mangrove wetland and adjacent regions nearby the Indian Ganges river estuary. Relatively low concentrations of HgT were measured in sediments ranging from 0.008 µg g-1 to 0.056 µg g-1. There exist sharp differences in HgT accumulation in biota which revealed the following decreasin...

  11. Anthropogenic PAHs in Sediment-Dwelling Biota from Mangrove Areas of the Calabar River, SE Niger Delta, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ekpo, Bassey O.; Oyo Ita, Orok E.; Offem, John O.; Adie, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in mangrove sediment-dwelling biota (crabs and molluscs) from the Calabar River, SE Niger Delta of Nigeria were analyzed using GC-MS in order to assess the degree of contamination of the river by anthropogenic activity. The associated sediment samples (where these biota were collected) showed much higher total PAH (TPAH) concentration (16,028.3 ng/g dry weight (dw)) at the upper mangrove area (UMA) than that found toward the river mouth (MR; 1,667.5 ng/...

  12. An international comparison of models and approaches for the estimation of the radiological exposure of non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade a number of models and approaches have been developed for the estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiations. In some countries these are now being used in regulatory assessments. However, to date there has been no attempt to compare the outputs of the different models used. This paper presents the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency's EMRAS Biota Working Group which compares the predictions of a number of such models in model-model and model-data inter-comparisons

  13. Freshwater invertebrates of subantarctic Marion Island

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert John Dartnall; Smith, Valdon R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The freshwater habitats (mires; streams; crater lakes; inland, intermediate and coastal lakes and pools; and wallows) on subantarctic Marion Island were examined for invertebrates. Sixty-eight species were found, 45 of which are new records for the Island. Of these 56 were bona fide aquatic invertebrates, the rest being terrestrial or brackish interlopers that had fallen or been blown into the water. The aquatic species include five platyhelminthes, a gastrotrich, three tardigrades, ...

  14. Freshwater peat on the continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, K.O.; Wigley, R.L.; Bartlett, A.S.; Rubin, M.; Barghoorn, E.S.

    1967-01-01

    Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west.

  15. Freshwater Algae: Essential Nutrients and Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima, Zarrin

    2014-01-01

    Algal growth in an acidic environment was analyzed using Algae Turf Scrubbers (ATS). The main objective was to assess and understand the role of nutrients and other environmental factors including temperature, pH and turbidity necessary for algal growth. The acidic environment was achieved by the addition of heavy metal contaminated processed wastewater to the ATS and monitoring the growth pattern over a course of 6 weeks. A total of 10 freshwater species were first cultivated separately and ...

  16. Assessing the freshwater distribution of yellow eel

    OpenAIRE

    E?, Lasne; Laffaille P.

    2009-01-01

    In the global context of the decline in wild species, modeling the distribution of populations is a crucial aspect of ecological management. This can be a major challenge, especially for species, such as the European eel, that have complex life cycles, exhibit cryptic behavior, or migrate over long distances. A review of the literature suggests that eel size data could be used to assess and analyze freshwater distribution of eel. We argue that analyses based on small yellow eels (? 300 mm)...

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT OF FRESHWATER FISHING IN ELAZI?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki BOYRAZ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing world population has more demand for healthy food day after day. Our research draws attention to increasing freshwater fishery in Elaz?? that increased its importance depending on the fishery activities in inland water in recent years. Our reasearch area, Elaz??, is situated in the Upper F?rat part, in the southwest of Eastern Anatolia Region. The main factor that allows freshwater fishery develop in the research field is the existence of fresh water. The most important river within the city borders is F?rat and its tributaries. Hazar Lake has a 86 km2 surface area and it is 30 km far from the city center. Also the Keban Dam, 675 km2 and Karakaya Dam, 268 km2 make up the city borders. Other important dams like Kralk?z?, 57 km2 and Özlüce 26 km2 are situated in near distances. In this study we will focus on the potential and development of the freshwater fishery in Elaz??.

  18. Nutrients in a freshwater lagoon, lagos, nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water samples were taken from a freshwater lagoon of Nigeria for determination of inorganic nutrients and other water constituents at different sampling points of Owo river and Ologe lagoon at bimonthly intervals for a period of two years from January, 1997 to December, 1998. Indications of the pristine nature of the environment were considerable lower concentrations of dissolved phosphate, nitrate and ammonia than the global averages for unpolluted freshwater. Less significant differences were observed between spatial and seasonal variations in NO/sub 3/ -N and NH/sub 3/ -N concentration. PO/sub 3/O/sub 4/ -P concentrations on the other hand showed no significant difference. Phosphorus level was below 0.1 mg/l throughout the study period which signal eutrophy in lotic systems. Nitrogen/phosphorus ratios in Owo river and lagoon system (3.0 -3.2) were lower than expected in P-limited freshwater systems, where molar ratio of N/P is generally >10 to 15. Hence, the nutrient limiting aquatic primary productivity and the most critical to control in the entire study area was nitrogen. (author)

  19. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

  20. Environmental Risk assessment by multi-bio marker responses in aquatic biota of three trophic levels in a lake of the Mexican Central Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Lopez, E.; Sedeno-Diaz, J. E.

    2009-07-01

    Aquatic ecosystems continually are impacted by wastewater and lixiviation of the adjacent areas. The inputs of xenobiotics generate complex mixtures that provoke adverse effects in the aquatic biota. The use of a battery of bio markers for the toxic effect assessment of xenobiotics in the aquatic biota is usefully for the environmental risk assessment (ERA). (Author)

  1. Production of Freshwater and Energy from Earth’s Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2011-01-01

    The author offers a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth’s atmosphere. The suggested method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except the Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its p...

  2. A Complete Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of Southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Skelton, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    Those of us interested in freshwater fishes and related environmental issues have waited several years for Paul Skelton's A Complete Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of Southern Africa. The final result proves to be well worth the long wait, for with this book the author manages to disseminate a reasonable amount of detailed information on freshwater fishes to the layman, angler and naturalist. Although Skelton's book is not specifically aimed at the scientist, it contains condensed, updated an...

  3. Anthropogenic Litter in Urban Freshwater Ecosystems: Distribution and Microbial Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hoellein, Timothy; Rojas, Miguel; Pink, Adam; Gasior, Joseph; Kelly, John

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic litter (i.e. garbage; AL) and its ecosystem effects in marine environments are well documented. Rivers receive AL from terrestrial habitats and represent a major source of AL to marine environments, but AL is rarely studied within freshwater ecosystems. Our objectives were to 1) quantify AL density in urban freshwaters, 2) compare AL abundance among freshwater, terrestrial, and marine ecosystems, and 3) characterize the activity and composition of AL biofilms in ...

  4. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Brown, Justin (eds.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Holm, Elis (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Roos, Per (Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Saxen, Ritva; Outola, Iisa (STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  5. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  6. Freshwater rotifers from Hordaland, western Norway, with a survey of freshwater rotifers previously found in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brit Godske Bjørklund

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available   Bjørklund BG. 2009. Freshwater rotifers from Hordaland western Norway with a u survey of freshwater rotifers previously found in Norway. Fauna Norvegica29: 11-54. A total of 156 species (or subspecies o rotifers, mostly non-planktonic, have been identified from freshwater or slightly brackish-water localities in the county of Hordaland; 83 are new to Norway and 24 others are new to the county. One hundred of the species were collected from the two valleys of Eksingedalen and Teigdalen in spring and summer 1967. Samples were taken on the shallow shores of lake-like parts of the rivers, and in pools, tarns and small lakes. Forty more or less euryhaline fresh­water rotifers were also collected during studies of slightly brackish-water localities around Bergen in 1963-1969. A number of freshwater rotifers were collected at several localities in and around Bergen in 1968-1970, and on the western part of Hardangervidda. Of those so far identified ,23 are new to Norway and 8 more are new to the county. They are therefore included in the species list. A few additional ones are referred to in the taxonomical notes. All the species are listed with localities and habitat categories, or, in the case of the last-mentioned ones, just the district where they were collected. The paper includes notes, measurements and ,in most cases, figures regarding 44 little known, variable or taxonomically problematical species, especially in the genera Cephalodella and Trichocerca. Comments are given on the distribution , abundance and diversity of the species. The paper presents asurvey of previous investigations on rotifers in Norway, listing 200 previously recorded freshwater (a few euryhaline rotifers, giving other names, the authors who recorded the finds and, in most cases, the counties where the species were collected. 

  7. Environmental occurrence and biota concentration of phthalate esters in Epe and Lagos Lagoons, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Omogbemi, Emmanuel D; Chukwuka, Azubuike V; Adegbola, Rachel A; Adewuyi, Gregory A; Arukwe, Augustine

    2015-07-01

    The high global occurrence of phthalates in different environmental matrixes has resulted in the detection of their metabolites in human urine, blood, and breast milk, indicating a widespread human exposure. In addition, the notorious endocrine disrupting effects of phthalates have shown that they mimic or antagonize the action of endogenous hormones, consequently producing adverse effects on reproduction, growth and development. Herein, we have studied the occurrence of phthalate esters (PEs) in water, sediment and biota of two lagoons (Epe and Lagos) in Nigeria. Two fish species (Tilapia guineensis, and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus) and a crustacean (the African river prawn - Macrobrachium vollenhovenii) were analyzed for PEs levels using a HPLC method and the derived values were used for calculating bioconcentration factor (BCF), biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) and phthalate pollution index (PPI) in the biota and environment. We observed that the growth and health condition of the fish species were normal with a k-factor of >1. Sediment PE levels were compared with water, at both lagoons showing concentration pattern that is characterized as DEHP = DEP > DBP. We observed that DBP was the predominant compound in T. guineensis, C. nigrodigitatus and African prawn, at both lagoons, showing organ-specific differences in bioconcentration (BCF and BSAF) patterns in the fish species. While there were no observed consistency in the pattern of PE concentration in fish organs, elevated DBP levels in different fish organs may be related to fish habitat and degradation level of phthalates. Low concentration of DEHP, compared with DBP and DEP, was measured in fish organs and whole prawn body. The BSAF values for DEHP were lowest, and highest for DBP for all species at both lagoons, and DEHP easily accumulated more in the sediment (sediment PPI = 0.28 and 0.16 for Epe and Lagos lagoon, respectively). Overall, our findings suggest a broader environmental and human health implication of the high PE levels in these lagoons since they represent significant sources of aquatic food resources for the neighboring communities. PMID:25935094

  8. A new tropical algal test to assess the toxicity of metals in freshwaters. Supervising Scientists Report 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper (Cu) and uranium (U) are of potential ecotoxicological concern to tropical Australian freshwater biota as a result of mining impacts. No local data on the toxicity of these metals to tropical freshwater algae are currently available. The aim of this study was to develop a toxicity test for an Australian tropical freshwater alga that can be added to the suite of tests currently available for tropical freshwater invertebrates and fish. This toxicity test was used to investigate the toxicity of Cu and U to the alga Chlorella sp (new species) in a synthetic softwater and to specifically determine the effect of pH on metal toxicity over the range typically found in soft fresh surface waters in tropical northern Australia. A growth inhibition toxicity test was successfully developed for this alga, which was isolated from Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, prior to conducting the toxicity testing. Key environmental parameters including light, temperature and nutrients were optimised to obtain acceptable algal growth rates over 72 hours. HEPES buffer (2 mM at pH 6.5) was found to be a suitable and practical option for pH control that could be incorporated in the test protocol for Chlorella sp. The results obtained in this study confirmed a lack of toxic effects by HEPES on the algae, as well as negligible complexation with both Cu and U. Adequate pH control (ie -1) than U (13 ?g L-1), and more sensitive than other Australian tropical freshwater species, with an order of sensitivity: Alga ?Crustacea > Cnidaria > Mollusca > Chordata. The toxicity of Cu and U was highly pH-dependent. Copper concentrations needed to inhibit growth by 50% (72 h EC50) increased from 1.5 to 35 ?g Cu L-1 as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.7. The 72 h EC50 for U increased from 44 to 78 ?g U L-1 over the same pH range. Decreased toxicity at pH 5.7 was due to lower concentrations of cell-bound and intracellular Cu and U compared to that at pH 6.5. These results are explained in terms of the possible mechanism of competition between H+ and the metal ion at the cell surface. The comparative sensitivity of Chlorella sp to Cu and U was also assessed. Chlorella sp was two times more sensitive to Cu than to U at pH 5.7 and up to 30 times more sensitive to Cu at pH 6.5 on a weight basis. However, on a molar basis, Chlorella sp was two times more sensitive to U than to Cu at pH 5.7. At pH 6.5, Cu was >8 times more toxic to the alga than U. This species was sensitive enough to detect adverse effects of Cu at the ANZECC guideline values of 5 ?g Cu L-1, making it a sensitive test organism for the assessment of Cu contamination of freshwaters. However, the unusual, often non-sigmoidal, concentration-response curve for Chlorella sp may reduce the reproducibility of the toxicity test. Despite this, Chlorella sp does possess a number of desirable characteristics for use in toxicity assessment and therefore is recommended to be used as part of a battery of toxicity tests with other local freshwater organisms. In particular, the alga's high sensitivity to Cu and U and environmental relevance make it a suitable choice for site-specific testing of mine wastewaters in tropical Australia. The findings obtained in this study have the potential to be incorporated into future revisions of the Australian water quality guidelines

  9. Comparing sediment equilibrium partitioning and passive sampling techniques to estimate benthic biota PCDD/F concentrations in Newark Bay, New Jersey (U.S.A.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment and polyethylene sampler-based estimates of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) concentrations in Newark Bay, New Jersey (USA) benthic biota were compared. Biota concentrations based on sediment were estimated using an organic carbon (OC)-water partitioning model and an OC and black carbon (BC)-water dual model. Biota concentrations based on polyethylene were estimated from samplers deployed in the Newark Bay water column and samplers immersed in a sediment/porewater slurry in the laboratory. Porewater samplers provided the best estimates of biota concentrations (within 3.1×), with best results achieved for deposit-feeders (within 1.6×). Polyethylene deployed in deep water also provided good estimates of biota concentrations (within 4×). By contrast, OC-water partitioning overestimated biota concentrations by up to 7×, while OC and BC combined underestimated biota concentrations by up to 13×. We recommend passive samplers such as polyethylene for estimating concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants in field biota given its simplicity and relatively lower uncertainty compared to sediment equilibrium partitioning. -- Highlights: • PE samplers accurately estimate Newark Bay biota PCDD/F concentrations. • A traditional KOC partitioning model overestimated PCDD/F uptake by a factor of 4–7. • A dual KOC and KBC model underestimated biota PCDD/F uptake by a factor of 4–13. • Sediment- and depth-specific KBCs improved predictions of PCDD/F uptake. • Deposit feeder uptake switches from porewater control to ingestion at log KOW 6–7. -- Using polyethylene samplers to measure porewater concentrations is a more efficient approach for estimating site-specific bioavailable organic contaminants than equilibrium partitioning

  10. Study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, R; Beresford, N A; Agüero, A; Broed, R; Brown, J; Iospje, M; Robles, B; Suañez, A

    2004-12-01

    Uncertainty in estimations of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation may arise from a number of sources including values of the model parameters, empirical data, measurement errors and biases in the sampling. The significance of the overall uncertainty of an exposure assessment will depend on how the estimated dose compares with reference doses used for risk characterisation. In this paper, we present the results of a study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota using some of the models and parameters recommended in the FASSET methodology. The study was carried out for semi-natural terrestrial, agricultural and marine ecosystems, and for four radionuclides (137Cs, 239Pu, 129I and 237Np). The parameters of the radionuclide transfer models showed the highest sensitivity and contributed the most to the uncertainty in the predictions of doses to biota. The most important ones were related to the bioavailability and mobility of radionuclides in the environment, for example soil-to-plant transfer factors, the bioaccumulation factors for marine biota and the gut uptake fraction for terrestrial mammals. In contrast, the dose conversion coefficients showed low sensitivity and contributed little to the overall uncertainty. Radiobiological effectiveness contributed to the overall uncertainty of the dose estimations for alpha emitters although to a lesser degree than a number of transfer model parameters. PMID:15700701

  11. Soil biota development in post mining sites on climatic gradient from East to Mid-west of USA.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, Jan; Pižl, Václav; Tajovský, Karel; Starý, Josef; Hán?l, Ladislav; Nováková, Alena; Lukešová, Alena; Krišt?fek, Václav; Devetter, Miloslav; Cajthaml, T.

    Lexington : American Society of Mining and Reclamation, 2012. s. 135. [Annual National Conference of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation /29./. 08.06.2012-15.06.2012, Tupelo] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : soil biota development * post mining sites * climatic gradient Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. Soil biota in Bt-corn: effect on community structure and function in laboratory and field experiments.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, Jan; Kocourek, F.

    ?eské Bud?jovice : Institute of Soil Biology ASCR, 2005. s. 24. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /8./. 20.04.2005-22.04.2005, ?eské Bud?jovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : soil biota * Bt- corn * laboratory and field experiments Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  13. Concentrations and trophic magnification of cyclic siloxanes in aquatic biota from the Western Basin of Lake Erie, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the concentrations and food web biomagnification of three cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) using aquatic biota collected from Lake Erie. Concentrations of cVMS in biota were within the range reported for other studies of cVMS in aquatic biota. Trophic magnification factors (TMF) were assessed in various food web configurations to investigate the effects of food web structure. TMF estimates were highly dependent on the inclusion/exclusion of the organisms occupying the highest and lowest trophic levels and were >1 for D4 and D5, indicating biomagnification, in only 1 of the 5 food web configurations investigated and were <1 in the remaining 4 food web configurations. TMF estimates for PCB180 were also dependant on food web configuration, but did not correspond with those obtained for cVMS materials. These differences may be attributed to environmental exposure and/or lipid partitioning differences between PCB180 and cVMS. -- Highlights: • We investigated trophic magnification of siloxanes in aquatic biota from Lake Erie. • Trophic magnification estimates were variable and sensitive to food web structure. • Lipid partitioning of siloxanes and PCBs differ and may contribute to variability. -- Biomagnification estimates for siloxanes in Lake Erie are sensitive to food web structure, contaminant exposure pathways, and lipid partitioning differences between PCBs and siloxanes

  14. Soil development and succession of soil biota in afforested and non-reclaimed sites in post mining landscape - preliminary results.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, Jan; Pižl, Václav; Tajovský, Karel; Balík, Vladimír; Hán?l, Ladislav; Starý, Josef; Lukešová, Alena; Nováková, Alena; Šourková, Monika; P?ikryl, I.

    Cagliari : DIGITA Facolta Ingegneria, 2002, s. 621-626. [Symposium on Environmental Issues and Waste Management of Mineral and Energy Production 2002. Cagliari (IT), 07.10.2002-10.10.2002] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA526/01/1055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : succession * soil biota * post mining landscape Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Screes as important landscape structures for xeric and psychrophilic biota conservation and monitoring environmental change in the Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zacharda, Miloslav; Boucníková, Eva

    Sup.1/2005, ?. 24 (2005), s. 28-38. ISSN 1335-342X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : scree * landscape diversity * biota * conservation * global change Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.085, year: 2005

  16. Doses to Terrestrial Biota in the Vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, Cumbria, UK (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Source terms and corresponding radionuclide activity concentrations in biota for 134Cs, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am have been assessed for three semi-natural ecosystems in the vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, Cumbria, UK. Estimates of absorbed doses (mGy.d-1) have been calculated. Doses to key indicator species, Oniscus asellus (detritivorous invertebrate), Carabus violaceous (predatory invertebrate) and Apodemus sylvaticus (granivorous wood mouse) are discussed with reference to the 1 mGy.d-1 level, below which it is postulated that no observable effects on populations in a terrestrial ecosystem occur. Implications for the 'critical group' and 'reference model' approaches for a framework of radiological environmental protection are discussed. The need to assess the most highly exposed species is advanced. New research focused on the application of biomarker techniques as a mechanism for determining the interactions and effects of environmental contaminants on ecosystem structure and functioning is presented. (author)

  17. Bioaccumulation of artificial radionuclides and dose assessment to biota in the Yenisei River (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this paper is reconstruction of accumulation of artificial radionuclides (32P, 137Cs, 65Zn, 51Cr, 54Mn) by the Yenisei River biota during the 25-years period (1975-2000), and estimation of the internal dose rates to the river organisms. Yenisei River is located in Central Siberia (Russia); since 1958 artificial radionuclides intake to the Yenisei River with the routine releases from the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Industrial Complex (KMCIC). Among the radionuclides presented in the releases, 32P is of particular importance. Reconstruction of the radionuclide assimilation by the Yenisei biota was performed using the ECOMOD model approach. The model considers a radionuclide as a tracer, identical in its properties to a stable (analogous) element participated in the metabolism of aquatic organism. Radionuclide assimilated by an organism goes to the production of new biomass, and to compensation of metabolic losses of the analogous bioelement. Basic equations of the general ECOMOD approach are described in the paper. The model was adapted to the conditions of the Yenisei River and applied to calculate the dynamics of 32P, 137Cs, 65Zn, 51Cr, 54Mn in the most typical Yenisei fish species: roach (non-predatory) and pike (predatory). Shown are the reconstructed activity concentrations in roach and pike at the distances 16-80 km downstream pike at the distances 16-80 km downstream the KMCIC. Activity concentrations of 32P in the Yenisei fish were considerably higher comparing with other radionuclides. Activity concentrations of 32P, 65Zn, 51Cr, 54Mn in roach are higher than in pike, whereas activity concentrations of 137Cs are higher in predatory species. Results of the model reconstruction were compared with the available data of measurements, and such comparison confirms adequacy of the model predictions. Long-term dynamics of the internal exposure was estimated for the river organisms at the distances 16-80 km downstream the KMCIC. Average dose rates from incorporated ?-emitters were calculated taking into account geometric characteristics of organisms; ?- particles were assumed to be totally absorbed within the organisms. Average length of roach in the Yenisei River is 0.2 m, weight 0.17 kg; average length of pike in the Yenisei River is 0.52 m, weight 1.2 kg. Dose conversion factors for 32P, 137Cs, 65Zn, 51Cr and 54Mn are shown in Table 3. Annual average dose rates from incorporated radionuclides to the Yenisei biota are presented. Maximum dose rates occurred in 1975-1980 and varied from 11 mGy/year (predatory fish) to 63 mGy/year (molluscs). These levels were several times higher than the background exposure to the Yenisei organisms, which was estimated as 0.7-4 mGy/year. Major contributor to the internal exposure to the Yenisei biota is 32P (up to 95%)

  18. Pesticide Interactions with N source and Tillage: Effects on soil biota and ecosystem services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, John; Petersen, SØren O

    Pesticide effects on soil biota must be interpreted in the context of the specific management practice, including rotation, fertilization, tillage, and pest control. Tillage, foe example, has been shown to reduce earthworm populations by up to 80%, depending on timing and specific tillage technique. Such disturbances may fully or partly obscure the effects of pesticides. The direct effects of pesticides and other management factors and their interactions must, therefore, be quantified before integrated pest management strategies that protect soil biodiversity and maintain soil functions can be identified. This study was planned to evaluate interactions between pesticide use and other soil management factors. The study was carried out within a long-term tillage experiment using two tillage practices (no-till (NT) and mouldboard ploughing (MP), two contrasting N sources (manure and mineral fertiliser), and two pesticides (the fungicide mancozeb and the insecticide alpha-cypermethrin) in a split-plot design.Results on earthworms and microarthropods will be shown and discussed.

  19. Sensing of Scent, Fragrance, Smell, and Odor Emissions from Biota Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hyun Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available People encounter enormous numbers of chemicals present in the outdoor atmosphere and/or in the various facilities they use daily. Despite such diversity, not many of them have necessarily the potential to draw human’s nasal attraction if their perception thresholds are in general not sufficiently low enough, regardless of abundance. In this sense, many types of scents, musks, fragrances, smells, odors, and pheromones are unique enough to draw a great deal of attention mainly by their presence at or near threshold levels which are far lower than those of common chemicals with poor odorant characteristics. It is known that most of the diverse characters of odor-related ingredients or expressions are commonly produced from various biota sources present in the biosphere, e.g., fauna, flora, bacteria, fruits, flowers, trees, meats, fresh/decaying foods, etc.

  20. Fruit and seed floras from exceptionally preserved biotas in the European Paleogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fruit and seed assemblages from two exceptionally preserved biotas provide considerable information about systematics, diversity, dispersal biology and plant animal interactions in the European Paleogene. The first is from the Middle Eocene Messel oil shale in the Messel Pit near Darmstadt, Germany and occurs in association with exceptionally preserved flowers, insects and vertebrates. The second is from the latest Eocene Insect Limestone (Bembridge Marls Member, Solent Group from the northern coast of the Isle of Wight, UK and occurs in association with exceptionally preserved insects. These two assemblages of compressed fruits and seeds both preserve delicate structures including plumes, wings and a fruit with a long awn. The Messel site also has rare, completely preserved fruiting heads and other specimens with organic connections, preservation of soft tissues, and seeds found within animal gut contents. The Messel flora is especially important for understanding Middle Eocene dispersal biology, biogeography and floristic diversity.

  1. A well-preserved aneuretopsychid from the Jehol Biota of China (Insecta, Mecoptera,?Aneuretopsychidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad Labandeira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Aneuretopsychidae is an unspeciose and enigmatic family of long-proboscid insects that presently consist of one known genus and three species from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous of north-central Asia. In this paper, a new genus and species of fossil aneuretopsychid is described and illustrated, Jeholopsyche liaoningensis gen. et sp. n. Fossils representing this new taxon were collected from mid Early Cretaceous strata of the well known Jehol Biota in Liaoning Province, China. This finding documents the first formal record of fossil Aneuretopsychidae in China. In addition, this well-preserved and new material reveals previously unknown and detailed morphological structure of the mouthparts, antennae, head, thorax, legs and abdomen of this distinctive insect lineage.

  2. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

  3. Floodplain data: ecosystem characteristics and 137Cs concentrations in biota and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium (137Cs) distribution was determined in soil, roots, ground vegetation, overstory, litter, mammals, feces, and insects for a floodplain ecosystem contaminated by radioactive wastes from Manhattan Project operations in 1944. The 2-ha research site was located on the ERDA reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in a drained holding pond between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and White Oak Lake. Maximum 137Cs concentrations in soil occurred near the old retention pond dam (84,400 pCi/g) and at the upper portion of the floodplain boundary (70,500 pCi/g). This bimodal distribution pattern of 137Cs was evident for all samples collected. Large amounts of data have been collected since the summer of 1974. This report documents the data on ecosystem characteristics and 137Cs concentrations in biota and soil

  4. Nuclear explosives, ionizin.o. radiation and the effects on the biota of the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After giving a general discussion of nuclear explosives, weapons testing and peaceful use of nuclear explosives under Plowshare project, ecological studies carried out at weapon test sites and Plowshare project sites in United States are reviewed. It is noted that though considerable data are available on the behaviour of radionuclides in natural environments on these sites, only a few observations of effects of ionizing radiations on the biota of the natural environments of these sites have been made. The major effects on the natural environments of these sites have been attributed to physical effects of nuclear detonations and site preparation. These effects are physical destruction of plants and animals and habitat modification such as soil disturbances. Recolonization of ground zeros and adjacent areas is observed to follow the successional pattern unique to the site. Observed effects of ionizing radiation on shrubs in the vicinity of cratering tests appear to be inconsequential when one considers the ecosystem as a whole. (M.G.B.)

  5. Taiwan's industrial heavy metal pollution threatens terrestrial biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, M.J. [Department of Biological Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Selvaraj, K. [Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Agoramoorthy, G. [Department of Pharmacy, Tajen University, Yanpu, Pingtung 907, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: agoram@mail.tajen.edu.tw

    2006-09-15

    The bioconcentration levels of essential (Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Sn) elements have been investigated in different terrestrial biota such as fungi, plant, earthworm, snail, crab, insect, amphibian, lizard, snake, and bat including the associated soil, to investigate the ecosystem health status in Kenting National Park, Taiwan. High bioconcentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in snail, earthworm, crab, lizard, snake, and bat indicated a contaminated terrestrial ecosystem. High concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in plant species, effective bioaccumulation of Cd by earthworm, snail, crab and bat, as well as very high levels of Hg found in invertebrates, amphibians, and reptiles revealed a strong influence from industrial pollution on the biotic community. This study for the first time presents data on the impact of heavy metal pollution on various terrestrial organisms in Taiwan. - Metal effects occur at any terrestrial levels in Taiwan.

  6. Natural radionuclides in certain intertidal biota and the radiotoxicological concerns, Gulf of Mannar, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of non-human biota from ionizing radiation, especially in the vicinity of nuclear installations is a very important aspect for nuclear engineers and ecologists. In order to ensure that certain limits of contamination are not exceeded, for the absolute protection of biota and humans is mandatory for nuclear agencies. 210Po (t1/2 = 138.4 days) and 210Pb (t1/2 = 22 years), in marine food has received much interest from the marine scientific community because of the high toxicity and radioactive dose they deliver to marine organisms and human beings when compared to anthropogenic radionuclides released into coastal waters. The present study focused on determining 210Po and 210Pb in some intertidal biota such as crustaceans and mollusks and the exposure risk assessment performed. The study was carried out along the coast of Kudankulam. Samples were processed and analysed as per the standard protocol of IAEA. A portion of 10 g dried fish sample with 0.2 Bq 208Po tracer was wet-digested using a mixed solution of HNO3, H2O2 and HCl. After the resultant solutions were evaporated to dryness, each residue was dissolved in 0.5 N HCL of 50 ml for plating Polonium. Polonium was spontaneously deposited on both sides of a silver disc from the solution for plating for 6 h at a temperature of 80-90 deg C. Both sides of the silver disc are counted with an alpha-ray colver disc are counted with an alpha-ray counter (RC 605A, Nucleonix; efficiency of 35% for a 241Am standard; minimum detectable limit is 0.02 Bq), and the results were combined. After plating, the solution was stored for 6 months in glass bottles to allow the growth of 210Po from 210Pb. Subsequent determination of the ingrown 210Po was carried out as described above for the determination of 210Pb. The average 208Po recovery of 93 ± 2% was obtained by this method. The concentration of both the radionuclides was noticed higher in the organs associated with digestion and metabolism. Filter feeding bivalve molluscs registered the maximum activity of 210Po in their whole body compared to grazing gastropods and other crustaceans. The sensitive indicator, 210Po:210Pb ratio was calculated to be greater than unity in most of the analysed tissues. The ecological sensitivity of biota to the radiation exposure and the safeness of the environment was analysed by calculating the external and internal dose rate. The total weighted internal dose rate was higher than the external dose rate. The calculated hazard quotient for molluscs was lesser than the global bench mark dose rate of 10 ?Gy h-1. (author)

  7. Radionuclide accumulation by aquatic biota exposed to contaminated water in artificial ecosystems before and after its passage through the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the comparative accumulation of radionuclides from contaminated water in artificial ecosystems before and after the water's passage through the ground. Fish, clams, algae, and an emergent vascular plant were experimentally exposed to mixtures of radionuclides in three aqueous streams. Two streams consisted of industrial water discharged directly into a leaching trench, and the same water after it had migrated through the ground for a distance of 260 meters. The third stream was river water, which served as a background or control. Biota exposed to river water in the control stream had very low concentrations of 60Co, less than 3 pCi per gram dry weight (pCi/g DW). Other radionuclides were essentially unmeasurable. Biota exposed to trench water accumulated very high relative concentrations of 60Co. Biota exposed to trench water also had measurable concentrations of 155Eu, 144Ce, 141Ce, 125Sb, 124Sb, 103Ru, 106Ru, 137Cs, 95Zr, 95Nb, 58Co, 54Mn, 59Fe, 65Zn, 90Sr, /sup 239,240/Pu, and 238Pu. Biota exposed to ground water had concentrations of 60Co that ranged between 50 and 1200 pCi/g DW. Fish flesh had the lowest concentration of 60Co and algae the highest. Strontium-90 was measured in the tissues of aquatic biota ateasured in the tissues of aquatic biota at concentrations ranging between 360 pCi/g DW in clam flesh to 3400 pCi/g DW in leaves and stems of Veronica. Leaves and fruits of tomato plants rooted in the ground water accumulated 90Sr at concentrations of 160 pCi in fruits and 4200 pCi in leaves. Data indicate that 60Co and 90Sr migrated through the ground along with ground-water flow and were available to all classes of aquatic biota and tomato plants rooted in the water via root uptake, sorption, and food chain transfers. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  8. TENORM wastes and the potential alpha radiation dose to aquatic biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the years seventies release-rates and derived limits for releasing radionuclides into the environment were adopted for each particular radionuclide and for a number of pathways. The release-rate limit adopted for alpha emitters was 1015 Bq.y-1 for a single site, but limited to 1014 Bq.y-1 for 226Ra and supported 210Po. In addition, to meet the requirements of the London Convention, a derived limit should be expressed in terms of concentration, which for alpha emitters was 1010 Bq.t-1 , but limited to 1014 Bq.t-1 for 226Ra and supported 210Po, assuming an upper limit to the mass dumping rate of 105 t per year at a single dumping site. New data on the radioactivity in the marine environment and biota, including plankton, indicated a potential alpha radiation dose to these aquatic organisms due to the release of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) wastes. At the highest accumulation of 239Pu in the zooplankton Gammarus in Thule, Greenland, due to an accidental release associated with military activities, the dose rate reached about 0.14 ?Gy.h-1 . Such dose rate was similar to that received by the phytoplankton Chaetoceros and Rhizosolenia from Agulhas current, Africa, due to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) supposedly enhanced for almost one century of gold mining at first, and subsequently because of heap-leaching uranium extraction from the tailings left behind by earlier gold miners. The paper will discuss the alpha radiation dose to aquatic biota, in general, and to plankton, in particular, due to potential releases of TENORM wastes in the aquatic environment. (author)

  9. Review of research on impacts to biota of discharges of naturally occurring radionuclides in produced water to the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced water has been described as the largest volume waste stream in the exploration and production process of oil and gas. It is accompanied by discharges of naturally occurring radionuclides raising concerns over the potential radiological impacts of produced water on marine biota. In the Northern European marine environment, radioactivity in produced water has received substantial attention owing to the OSPAR Radioactive Substances Strategy which aims at achieving ‘concentrations in the environment near background values for naturally occurring radioactive substances’. This review provides an overview of published research on the impacts to biota from naturally occurring radionuclides discharged in produced water by the offshore oil and gas industry. In addition to summarising studies and data that deal directly with the issue of dose and effect, the review also considers studies related to the impact of added chemicals on the fate of discharged radionuclides. The review clearly illustrates that only a limited number of studies have investigated possible impacts on biota from naturally occurring radionuclides present in produced water. Hence, although these studies indicate that the risk to the environment from naturally occurring radionuclides discharged in produced water is negligible, the substantial uncertainties involved in the assessments of impact make it difficult to be conclusive. With regard to the complexity involved in the problem under consideration there is a pressing need to supplement existing data and acquire new knowledge. Finally, the present work identifies some knowledge gaps to indicate future research requirements. -- Highlights: ? Produced water from offshore oil industry contains naturally occurring radionuclides. ? Published research on the impacts to biota from these radionuclides is reviewed. ? Review includes impact of added chemicals on the fate of discharged radionuclides. ? Studies indicate negligible risk to biota but substantial uncertainties remain.

  10. Range size patterns in European freshwater trematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieltges, David; Hof, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Aim We investigated the relationship between host and parasite diversity as well as latitudinal gradients in parasite diversity on a continental scale in European freshwater trematodes. Location European freshwaters. Methods We extracted distributional data for 564 freshwater trematodes across 25 biogeographical regions in Europe from the Limnofauna Europaea and used multiple regression analyses to test for correlations between the diversity of definitive (vertebrates) or first intermediate (gastropods) hosts and that of trematodes, and for latitudinal gradients in trematode diversity. In particular, we investigated patterns in beta diversity among latitudinal bands and between trematode species that parasitize host groups with low (autogenic) and high (allogenic) dispersal capacity.We also tested for a latitudinal gradient in the proportional representation of these two trematode groups within regional faunas. Results Latitude or first intermediate host richness had no effect on trematode richness, but definitive host richness was a strong predictor of trematode richness, among both allogenic and autogenic parasites. We found that beta diversity of trematode faunas within latitudinal bands decreased to the north, with similar values for allogenic and autogenic trematodes. Finally, we observed an increasing proportion of autogenic species toward the north of Europe. Main conclusions The richness of definitive hosts appears to be the driver of trematode diversity at a continental scale. The latitudinal gradient in beta diversity reflects patterns observed in free-living species and probably results from recolonization in the aftermath of the ice ages. The similar beta-diversity patterns of allogenic and autogenic trematodes and the increasing proportion of autogenic trematodes with increasing latitude are surprising.We suggest that the geographical scale of our analysis or confounding factors such as differences in habitat utilization and specialization may partly explain these patterns.

  11. Freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Mernild

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in terrestrial surface freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland, were simulated and analyzed. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution, snow and ice melt, and runoff modeling system, was used to simulate the temporal and spatial terrestrial runoff distribution to the fjord based on observed meteorological data (1999–2008 from stations located on and around the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS. Simulated runoff was compared and verified against independent glacier catchment runoff observations (1999–2005. Modeled runoff to Sermilik Fjord was highly variable, ranging from 2.9×109 m3 y?1 in 1999 to 5.9×109 m3 y?1 in 2005. The uneven spatial runoff distribution produced an areally-averaged annual maximum runoff at the Helheim glacier terminus of more than 3.8 m w.eq. The sub-catchment runoff of the Helheim glacier region accounted for 25% of the total runoff to Sermilik Fjord. The runoff distribution from the different sub-catchments suggested a strong influence from the spatial variation in glacier coverage. To assess the Sermilik Fjord freshwater flux, simulated terrestrial runoff and net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation and sublimation for the fjord area were combined with satellite-derived ice discharge and subglacial geothermal and frictional melting due to basal ice motion. A terrestrial freshwater flux of ~40.4×109 m3 y?1 was found for Sermilik Fjord, with an 11% contribution originated from surface runoff. For the Helheim glacier sub-catchment only 4% of the flux originated from terrestrial surface runoff.

  12. Practical aids for freshwater spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current research program at API is focused on the environmental and human health effects from oil spills in freshwater habitats. Components of the program include lessons learned from spill response, development of decision-making protocols for the use of chemicals during initial response operations, preparation of a manual for spill response and contingency planning, and a review of the literature on environmental and human health effects from inland spills. API has reviewed past inland spill responses to identify lessons learned. A survey questionnaire has been developed to collect information from freshwater spill responders on their successes and difficulties in response operations. The questionnaire is tailored to focus on the impact to the operations from the absence of technical/scientific data on environmental effects or operation effectiveness/efficiency as well as to identify situations in which the use of particular response or cleanup options is likely to be effective. The questionnaires will be available at the Conference. Published case studies also will be examined for lessons-learned information. The results will be used to identify and prioritize API research needs in freshwater spill response. General concerns about the effectiveness of the toxicity associated with chemicals in spill response has prevented their use in fresh water. API has begun a detailed survey and interview process with state and federal regulatory personnel to identify their al regulatory personnel to identify their concerns and decision criteria to evaluate the use of chemicals in initial spill response. Ten classes of chemicals were identified for consideration: dispersants, shoreline cleaners, shoreline protection agents, herding agents, solidifiers, demulsifiers, emulsion inhibitors, foaming agents, oxidizing agents, and burning agents

  13. Reassessing the planetary boundary for freshwater consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerten, Dieter; Pastor, Amandine; Jägermeyr, Jonas; Hoff, Holger; Rockström, Johan; Kummu, Matti

    2014-05-01

    This presentation reviews the conceptual and quantitative foundation of the recently suggested 'planetary boundary' for freshwater (i.e. the volume of human 'blue' water consumption that is deemed to be tolerable; see Rockström et al. in Nature 2009). It also proposes ways forward to refine and reassess this planetary boundary. As a key element of such a revision we provide a bottom-up quantification of local water availabilities taking account of environmental flow requirement in a spatially explicit manner and using five different methods to estimate these flow requirements with a global dynamic hydrology and vegetation model (LPJmL). Our analysis suggests that the planetary boundary for freshwater consumption may adopt a value of about 2800 km3 yr-1 (which is the average of an uncertainty range of 1100-4500 km3 yr-1). This is notably lower than the original suggestion based on a simpler top-down analysis that relied on some global estimates of environmental flow requirements (4,000 km3 yr-1, the lower value of an uncertainty range of 4000-6000 km3 yr-1). Although assessed with spatial detail, this new estimate remains provisional, pending further refinement by analyses of local water accessibility and further constraints up-scaled to the global domain, including study of cascading impacts on Earth system properties. Nonetheless, with a current blue water consumption of >1,700 km3 yr-1, it appears that the freshwater boundary appears is being approached fast, and perhaps faster than suggested earlier. Thus, design opportunities to remain within this boundary are imperative - we argue that their comprehensive quantification requires analysis of tradeoffs with other planetary boundaries such as those for land use and climate change.

  14. Enantioselective analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in freshwater fish based on microextraction with a supramolecular liquid and chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballo, Carmen; Sicilia, Maria Dolores; Rubio, Soledad

    2015-06-01

    Toxicity of pharmaceuticals to aquatic biota is still largely unknown, and no research on the stereoselective toxicity of chiral drugs to these organisms has been undertaken to date. Because of the lack of analytical methods available for this purpose, this manuscript deals, for the first time, with the enantioselective analysis of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, naproxen and ketoprofen in freshwater fish. The method was based on the microextraction of NSAIDs from fish muscle with a supramolecular liquid made up of inverted hexagonal aggregates of decanoic acid, their enantiomeric separation by liquid chromatography onto a (R)-1-naphthylglycine and 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid stationary phase and quantification by tandem mass spectrometry. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for NSAID enantiomers were in the range 1.7-3.3 ng g(-1). Absolute recoveries were from 97 to 104 %, which indicated the high extraction efficiency of the supramolecular solvent. Extraction equilibrium conditions were reached after 10 min which permitted fast sample treatment. Relative standard deviations for enantiomers in fish muscle were always below 6 %. Isotopically labelled internal standards were used to compensate for matrix interferences. The method in-house validation was carried out with the Oncorhynchus mykiss species, and it was applied to the determination of NSAID enantiomers in different fortified freshwater fish species (Alburnus alburnus, Lepomis gibbosus, Micropterus salmoides, O. mykiss and Cyprinus carpio). PMID:25869485

  15. Opisthorchis viverrini metacercaria in Thai freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikagul, J

    1998-06-01

    Examination for metacercaria in freshwater fish, the common intermediate hosts of Opisthorchis viverrini was carried out during 1992-1996. The 4-year survey of fish from markets in 14 provinces revealed that metacercariae of O. viverrini were found in fish from Udon Thani, Sa Kaeo and Prachin Buri Provinces; fish from Aranyaprathet district had the highest positive rates (25-28%). Fish from 12 provinces were found to be positive with heterophyid metacercariae, namely: Haplorchis pumilio, H. taichui, H. yokogawai, Stellantchasmus falcatus, Centrocestus formosanus and Haplorchoides cahirinus. It was also observed that the prevalence of O. viverrini metacercaria in fish decreased markedly during the last 10 years. PMID:9886121

  16. MOLLUSKS IN RADIOECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS

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    ?. ??????

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Species-specificity and dynamics of 90Sr, 137Cs and some transurani? elements accumulation in bivalveand gastropod freshwater molluscs of the Chernobyl exclusion zone during 1998–2010 was analyzed. Theresults of radiation dose as well as chromosome aberration rate estimation and analysis of hemolymphcomposition of molluscs was produced. The radiation absorbed dose rate was registered in the range of 0.3–85.0 ?Gy h–1. In closed water bodies the heightened chromosome aberration rate (up to 27 % in embryotissues, and also change of haematological indexes for the adult individuals of snails was registered

  17. Seasonal Variation, Export Dynamics and Consumption of Freshwater Invertebrates in an Estuarine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. D.; Williams, N. E.

    1998-03-01

    In the Aber Estuary, North Wales, significant numbers of freshwater benthic invertebrates occurred in the tidal freshwater area. Distinct seasonal patterns were observed in their longitudinal zonation which appeared to be unrelated to variations in tidal inundation. The December extension downstream of freshwater taxa is hypothesized to be in response to decreasing water temperatures. In April, larvae/nymphs of the Trichoptera (caddisflies), Ephemeroptera (mayflies) and Plecoptera (stoneflies) ranged as far as a site inundated by 80·9% of all high tides, and larval Elmidae and Chironomidae (midges) occurred at the most marine site (inundated twice daily by all high tides). In July, with the exception of the Chironomidae, the range of most aquatic insects had contracted to the upper estuary. Although, in general, densities of aquatic insects decreased towards the lower estuary, significant densities persisted there. For example, maxima of 3514 chironomid larvae and 48 caddisfly larvae m -2were recorded at the 80·9% inundation site. An estimated 31×10 6freshwater invertebrates (weighing 62·6 kg), per annum, passed from fresh water into salt water across any given transect along the estuary. In comparison, the annual influx of invertebrates carried upstream by incoming tides was estimated to be 1·9×10 6(6·2%; weighing 2·5 kg). Predominant in the downstream drift were the larvae/nymphs and/or pupae of chironomids, mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies. The ' reverse ' drift comprised mainly copepods, ostracods, amphipods and oligochaetes. Mites and the brackishwater amphipod Gammarus zaddachicommonly moved in both directions. Highest drift densities occurred in July, whereas the lowest densities occurred in late autumn and winter. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between total drift or ' reverse ' drift densities and any of the measured environmental variables. Many of the freshwater invertebrates appeared not to die upon passing into tidal sections but resumed a benthic existence by virtue of varying degrees of salt tolerance. Of the three fish species common in the estuary, eel, common goby and flounder, the last two preyed measurably on freshwater taxa. Whereas gobies tended to be opportunistic feeders, depending on the section of estuary that they occupied, flounder were more restricted to the upper estuary where they fed selectively on chironomid larvae. On the latter diet, between March and September, the mean wet weight of flounders increased by more than 100 times (from 5 to 540 mg). Gobies were more numerous in the estuary from September to February, and although they ate insects their primary prey was G. zaddachi.

  18. Effects of water hardness and alkalinity on the toxicity of uranium to a tropical freshwater hydra (Hydra viridissima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmuller, N; Markich, S J; Van Dam, R A; Parry, D

    2001-01-01

    In tropical Australian freshwaters, uranium (U) is of potential ecotoxicological concern, largely as a consequence of mining activities. Although the toxicity of uranium to Australian freshwater biota is comprehensive, by world standards, few data are available on the effects of physicochemical variables, such as hardness, alkalinity, pH and organic matter, on uranium speciation and bioavailability. This study determined the individual effects of water hardness (6.6, 165 and 330 mg l(-1) as CaCO3) and alkalinity (4.0 and 102 mg l(-1) as CaCO3), at a constant pH (6.0), on the toxicity (96 h population growth) of uranium to Hydra viridissima (green hydra). A 50-fold increase in hardness (Ca and Mg concentration) resulted in a 92% (two-fold) decrease in the toxicity of uranium to H. viridissima [i.e. an increase in the EC50 value and 95% confidence interval from 114 (107-121) to 219 (192-246) µg l(-1)]. Conversely, at a constant hardness (165 mg l-1 as CaCO3), the toxicity of uranium to H. viridissima was not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by a 25-fold increase in alkalinity (carbonate concentration) [i.e. EC50 values of 177 (166-188) and 171 (150-192) µg l(-1) at 4.0 and 102 mg l(-1) as CaCO3, respectively]. A knowledge of the relationship between water chemistry variables, including hardness and alkalinity, and uranium toxicity is useful for predicting the potential ecological detriment in aquatic systems, and can be used to relax national water quality guidelines on a site-specific basis. PMID:23886056

  19. Finding patterns of distribution for freshwater phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish, by means of parsimony analysis of endemicity Encontrando patrones de distribución para fitoplancton, zooplancton y peces dulceacuícolas por medio de análisis de parsimonia de endemismos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. PABLO OYANEDEL

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, limnological studies on Chilean systems have contributed to know the species composition and main environmental variables of many water bodies distributed over a wide latitudinal interval, from 18º to 53º S. However, we still lack of a comprehensive view about the structure and functioning of regional freshwaters. In this work we review the available information about pelagic biota from Chilean basins, in order to reveal patterns of species distribution and their possible association with environmental variables. We built presence-absence matrices for phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish over lakes and basins. From this database, we performed parsimony analysis of endemicity as a tool for determining fundamental distribution patterns of freshwater biota. Also, we assessed the relationship between species occurrences and some available site-related variables. Our results indicated that latitude exerted the strongest influence on species distribution, although altitude, longitude, and area also exerted significant effects for some groups. On the other hand, our results suggest a relationship between the degree of vagility of the groups and the degree of metacommunity structuring, related to the number of endemicity areas.Durante las últimas décadas, los estudios limnológicos en sistemas chilenos han contribuido al conocimiento de la composición de especies y de las principales variables ambientales de muchos cuerpos de agua distribuidos sobre un amplio intervalo latitudinal, desde los 18º a los 53º S. Asimismo, aún carecemos de una visión comprensiva acerca de la estructura y funcionamiento de las aguas dulces regionales. En este trabajo revisamos la información sobre la biota pelágica de las cuencas de Chile, con el propósito de revelar patrones de distribución de especies y su posible asociación con variables ambientales. Construimos matrices de presencia-ausencia para fitoplancton, zooplancton y peces en lagos y cuencas. Desde esta base de datos, realizamos análisis de parsimonia de endemismo, como medio para determinar patrones fundamentales de distribución de la biota dulceacuícola. También, determinamos la relación entre la presencia de especies y algunas variables relevantes de los sitios. Nuestros resultados sugieren que la latitud ejerce una fuerte influencia en la distribución de especies, aunque también la altitud, longitud y el área ejercen efectos significativos en algunos grupos. Por otro lado, los resultados sugieren una relación entre el grado de vagilidad de los grupos y el grado de estructuración de la metacomunidad, relacionada con el número de áreas de endemismos.

  20. Adaptation of a freshwater anammox population to high salinity wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Boran; Koleva, Mariana; Arsov, Roumen; van der Star, Wouter; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc

    2006-12-01

    For the successful application of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in wastewater practice it is important to know how to seed new anammox reactors with biomass from existing reactors. In this study, a new high salinity anammox reactor was inoculated with biomass from a freshwater system. The changes in activity and population shifts were monitored. It was shown that freshwater anammox bacteria could adapt to salt concentrations as high as 30 gl(-1) provided the salt concentration was gradually increased. Higher salt concentrations reversibly inhibited anammox bacteria. The nitrogen removal efficiency and maximum anammox activity of the salt adapted sludge was very similar to the reference freshwater sludge. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the freshwater anammox species Candidatus "Kuenenia stuttgartiensis" was the dominant in both salt adapted sludge and freshwater sludge. These results show that gradual adaptation may be the key to successful seeding of anammox bioreactors. PMID:16806555

  1. Recent changes in the freshwater composition east of Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steur, L.; Pickart, R. S.; Torres, D. J.; Valdimarsson, H.

    2015-04-01

    Results from three hydrographic surveys across the East Greenland Current between 2011 and 2013 are presented with focus on the freshwater sources. End-member analysis using salinity, ?18O, and nutrient data shows that while meteoric water dominated the freshwater content, a significant amount of Pacific freshwater was present near Denmark Strait with a maximum in August 2013. While in 2011 and 2012 the net sea ice melt was dominated by brine, in 2013 it became close to zero. The amount of Pacific freshwater observed near Denmark Strait in 2013 is as large as the previous maximum in 1998. This, together with the decrease in meteoric water and brine, suggests a larger contribution from the Canadian Basin. We hypothesize that the increase of Pacific freshwater is the result of enhanced flux through Bering Strait and a shorter pathway of Pacific water through the interior Arctic to Fram Strait.

  2. The large-scale freshwater cycle of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serreze, Mark C.; Barrett, Andrew P.; Slater, Andrew G.; Woodgate, Rebecca A.; Aagaard, Knut; Lammers, Richard B.; Steele, Michael; Moritz, Richard; Meredith, Michael; Lee, Craig M.

    2006-11-01

    This paper synthesizes our understanding of the Arctic's large-scale freshwater cycle. It combines terrestrial and oceanic observations with insights gained from the ERA-40 reanalysis and land surface and ice-ocean models. Annual mean freshwater input to the Arctic Ocean is dominated by river discharge (38%), inflow through Bering Strait (30%), and net precipitation (24%). Total freshwater export from the Arctic Ocean to the North Atlantic is dominated by transports through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (35%) and via Fram Strait as liquid (26%) and sea ice (25%). All terms are computed relative to a reference salinity of 34.8. Compared to earlier estimates, our budget features larger import of freshwater through Bering Strait and larger liquid phase export through Fram Strait. While there is no reason to expect a steady state, error analysis indicates that the difference between annual mean oceanic inflows and outflows (˜8% of the total inflow) is indistinguishable from zero. Freshwater in the Arctic Ocean has a mean residence time of about a decade. This is understood in that annual freshwater input, while large (˜8500 km3), is an order of magnitude smaller than oceanic freshwater storage of ˜84,000 km3. Freshwater in the atmosphere, as water vapor, has a residence time of about a week. Seasonality in Arctic Ocean freshwater storage is nevertheless highly uncertain, reflecting both sparse hydrographic data and insufficient information on sea ice volume. Uncertainties mask seasonal storage changes forced by freshwater fluxes. Of flux terms with sufficient data for analysis, Fram Strait ice outflow shows the largest interannual variability.

  3. Acute and delayed effects of the neonicotinoid insecticide thiacloprid on seven freshwater arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketov, Mikhail A; Liess, Matthias

    2008-02-01

    Ecotoxicological risk assessment of contaminants often is based on toxicity tests with continuous-exposure profiles. However, input of many contaminants (e.g., insecticides) to surface waters typically occurs in pulses rather than continuously. Neonicotinoids are a new group of insecticides, and little is known about their toxicity to nontarget freshwater organisms and potential effects on freshwater ecosystems. The aim of the present research was to assess effects of short-term (24-h) exposure to the neonicotinoid insecticide thiacloprid, including a postexposure observation period. A comparison of several freshwater insect and crustacean species showed an increase of sensitivity by three orders of magnitude in the following order: Daphnia magna Asellus aquaticus = Gammarus pulex 50-fold. Hence, delayed effects occurring after short-term exposure should be considered in risk assessment. The 5% hazardous concentration (HC5) of thiacloprid obtained in the present study (0.72 microg/L) is more than one order of magnitude below the currently predicted worst-case environmental concentrations in surface water. Concerning the selection of test organisms, we observed that the widely employed test organism D. magna is least sensitive among the arthropods tested and that, for neonicotinoid insecticides, an insect like the mosquito C. pipiens would be more suitable for predicting effects on sensitive species. PMID:18348641

  4. Ecotoxicological risks of calcium nitrate exposure to freshwater tropical organisms: Laboratory and field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueitt, A P E; Yamada-Ferraz, T M; Oliveira, A F; Botta, C M R; Fadini, P S; Nascimento, M R L; Faria, B M; Mozeto, A A

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to analyze laboratory and field data to assess the ecotoxicological risks of calcium nitrate exposure to freshwater tropical biota. Short-term laboratorial tests resulted in estimated EC50 values of 76.72 (67.32-86.12)mg N- [Formula: see text] L(-1) for C. silvestrii and 296.46 (277.16-315.76)mg N- [Formula: see text] L(-1) for C. xanthus. Long-term laboratorial tests generated IC25 values of 5.05 (4.35-5.75) and 28.73 (26.30-31.15)mg N- [Formula: see text] L(-1) for C. silvestrii and C. xanthus, respectively. The results from in situ mesocosm experiments performed in the Ibirité reservoir (a tropical eutrophic urban water body located in SE Brazil) indicated that C. silvestrii and C. xanthus were not under severe deleterious acute impact due to the treatment because the higher nitrate concentrations determined were 5.2mg N- [Formula: see text] L(-1) (t=24h; sediment-water interface) and 17.5mg N- [Formula: see text] L(-1) (t=600h; interstitial water). However, an abrupt decrease in the densities of Cyanophyceae members and other benthic taxa was observed. In summary, the present work contributes greatly to the toxicity data linked to two taxonomically distinct organisms that have never been screened for calcium nitrate sensitivity. Furthermore, considering the problem of the management and restoration of eutrophic environments, our study reports a comprehensive field assessment that allows the elucidation of the possible toxic impacts caused by the addition of calcium nitrate (a remediation technique) on aquatic and benthic organisms as well as the implications on the aquatic ecosystem as a whole, which may greatly allow expanding the current knowledgebase on the topic. PMID:25868152

  5. Spatial heterogeneity in the Mediterranean Biodiversity Hotspot affects barcoding accuracy of its freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, M F; Herder, F; Monaghan, M T; Almada, V; Barbieri, R; Bariche, M; Berrebi, P; Bohlen, J; Casal-Lopez, M; Delmastro, G B; Denys, G P J; Dettai, A; Doadrio, I; Kalogianni, E; Kärst, H; Kottelat, M; Kova?i?, M; Laporte, M; Lorenzoni, M; Mar?i?, Z; Özulu?, M; Perdices, A; Perea, S; Persat, H; Porcelotti, S; Puzzi, C; Robalo, J; Šanda, R; Schneider, M; Šlechtová, V; Stoumboudi, M; Walter, S; Freyhof, J

    2014-11-01

    Incomplete knowledge of biodiversity remains a stumbling block for conservation planning and even occurs within globally important Biodiversity Hotspots (BH). Although technical advances have boosted the power of molecular biodiversity assessments, the link between DNA sequences and species and the analytics to discriminate entities remain crucial. Here, we present an analysis of the first DNA barcode library for the freshwater fish fauna of the Mediterranean BH (526 spp.), with virtually complete species coverage (498 spp., 98% extant species). In order to build an identification system supporting conservation, we compared species determination by taxonomists to multiple clustering analyses of DNA barcodes for 3165 specimens. The congruence of barcode clusters with morphological determination was strongly dependent on the method of cluster delineation, but was highest with the general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model-based approach (83% of all species recovered as GMYC entity). Overall, genetic morphological discontinuities suggest the existence of up to 64 previously unrecognized candidate species. We found reduced identification accuracy when using the entire DNA-barcode database, compared with analyses on databases for individual river catchments. This scale effect has important implications for barcoding assessments and suggests that fairly simple identification pipelines provide sufficient resolution in local applications. We calculated Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered scores in order to identify candidate species for conservation priority and argue that the evolutionary content of barcode data can be used to detect priority species for future IUCN assessments. We show that large-scale barcoding inventories of complex biotas are feasible and contribute directly to the evaluation of conservation priorities. PMID:24690331

  6. Effects of cadmium stress and sorption kinetics on tropical freshwater periphytic communities in indoor mesocosm experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the cause and effect relationship between stressors and biota is crucial for the effective management, restoration and preservation of aquatic systems. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of five Cd concentrations on tropical periphyton community growth, Cd accumulation kinetics, as well as the effects of Cd on diatom community structure and composition. Natural periphyton communities were transferred to artificial stream chambers and exposed to Cd concentrations of 0.005, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 mg.L?1. Metal accumulation (total and intracellular) in biofilms, dry weight and ash-free dry mass, growth rate, algal cell density and diatom community composition were analysed on samples collected after 1, 2 and 4 weeks of colonization. Periphyton growth and development were significantly lowered by Cd concentrations > 0.03 mg.L?1. High Cd accumulation capacity by periphyton was demonstrated with total and intracellular Cd content in biofilms reflecting the effects of concentrations of Cd in the culture media and exposure duration. Total and intracellular Cd content generally increased in treatments in the order 0.005 ?1 at any sampling time with increasing level of accumulated Cd with duration of exposure in all the systems. Shifts in species composition (development of more resistant species like Achnanthidium minutissimum and reduction of sensitive ones like Diatoma vulgare, Navicula viridula and Navicula cryptocephala), decreases in species richness and diversity and morphological alterations (deformities) of diatom cells with increasing Cd concentration and exposure duration were observed. The results give valuable information on Cd impact of freshwater biofilms. -- Highlights: ? We investigated toxicity and sorption kinetics of Cd on periphyton communities. ? [Cd] > 0.03 mg.L?1 lowers growth. ? Absorbed Cd was a function of duration of exposure and [Cd]. ? Changes in community composition were recorded. ? Biofilms are potential monitors of metal pollution in aquatic systems.

  7. Freshwater fishes of Tsitsikamma National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fishes in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Fish assemblages in six river systems were sampled in 2001, with a total of 323 fish from eight species recorded. Indigenous fish collected included four freshwater species (Pseudobarbus afer, Pseudobarbus tenuis, Sandelia capensis, Anguilla mossambica, three estuarine species (Monodactylus falciformis, Caffrogobius gilchristi, Myxus capensis, and one alien (Micropterus salmoides. One additional indigenous species (Galaxias zebratus and two aliens (Salmo trutta, Oncorhynchus mykiss could potentially occur within the park. The topography and locality of the park presents a unique opportunity to meaningfully conserve the endangered P. tenuis as well as other fish characteristic of the eastern reaches of the Cape Floristic Region. Management action is required to minimise opportunities for further establishment and spread of alien fish species and to conserve indigenous fish assemblages within the park.

  8. Freshwater fishes of Bontebok National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Fish assemblages were sampled at six sites in the Breede River in the Bontebok National Park during 1999 and 2000. A total of 380 fish from 12 species was recorded. Indigenous fish collected included one freshwater species (Barbus andrewi, two catodromous species (Anguilla mossambica, Myxus capensis. and three estuarine species (Gilchris- tella aestuaria, Monodactylusfalciformis, Mugil cephalus. Four of the species recorded were aliens (Tinea tinea, Lepomis macrochirus, Micropterus salmoides, Micropterus dolomieu and two species translocated from other South African rivers (Tilapia sparrmanii, Clarias gariepinus. A further two indigenous species (Sandelia capensis, Pseudobarbus biirchelli could potentially occur within the park, though the high abundance of alien predators means that there is little chance for recolonisation from tributaries higher in the Breede River system. There is little opportunity to meaningfully conserve most indigenous freshwater fish in Bontebok National Park.

  9. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  10. Radurization of commercial freshwater fish species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.; McDougall, T. E.; Sprung, W.; Sullivan, V.

    The effect of radurization on the shelf life of fresh Whitefish obtained through ordinary commercial channels has been determined. Whitefish fillets irradiated at 1.2 kGy and stored at 3°C have a shelf life three times longer than the unirradiated fish. When the fish was irradiated at 0.82 kGy a two fold shelf-life extension was obtained. The shelf life was estimated by sensory, chemical and microbiological evaluations. Sensory evaluation involved organoleptic assessment of raw and cooked samples. Since freshwater fish do not contain trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), alternate tests for freshness were required. It was found the determination of hypoxanthine and total volatile acid number (VAN) are excellent tests for freshness and quality of freshwater fish; thus, these analyses were adopted. The degree of radiation-induced lipid oxidation was measured by the thiobarbituric acid test (TBA). It was found at doses of 0.82 and 1.2 kGy the TBA number remained within acceptable limits in all samples. Microbiological analyses consisted of the total microbial load assessment in the sample, as well as Pseudomonas and total psychrotrophic counts. The estimated shelf lives as determined by the three separate evaluations were in very good agreement.

  11. Monitoring endangered freshwater biodiversity using environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Kielgast, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are among the most endangered habitats on Earth, with thousands of animal species known to be threatened or already extinct. Reliable monitoring of threatened organisms is crucial for data-driven conservation actions but remains a challenge owing to nonstandardized methods that depend on practical and taxonomic expertise, which is rapidly declining. Here, we show that a diversity of rare and threatened freshwater animals-representing amphibians, fish, mammals, insects and crustaceans-can be detected and quantified based on DNA obtained directly from small water samples of lakes, ponds and streams. We successfully validate our findings in a controlled mesocosm experiment and show that DNA becomes undetectable within 2 weeks after removal of animals, indicating that DNA traces are near contemporary with presence of the species. We further demonstrate that entire faunas of amphibians and fish can be detected by high-throughput sequencing of DNA extracted from pond water. Our findings underpin the ubiquitous nature of DNA traces in the environment and establish environmental DNA as a tool for monitoring rare and threatened species across a wide range of taxonomic groups.

  12. Radurization of commercial freshwater fish species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of radurization on the shelf life of fresh Whitefish obtained through ordinary commercial channels has been determined. Whitefish fillets irradiated at 1.2 kGy and stored at 30C have a shelf life three times longer than the unirradiated fish. When the fish was irradiated at 0.82 kGy a two fold shelf-life extension was obtained. The shelf life was estimated by sensory, chemical and microbiological evaluations. Sensory evaluation involved organoleptic assessment of raw and cooked samples. Since freshwater fish do not contain trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), alternate tests for freshness were required. It was found the determination of hypoxanthine and total volatile acid number (VAN) are excellent tests for freshness and quality of freshwater fish; thus, these analyses were adopted. The degree of radiation-induced lipid oxidation was measured by the thiobarbituric acid test (TBA). It was found at doses of 0.82 and 1.2 kGy the TBA number remained within acceptable limits in all samples. Microbiological analyses consisted of the total microbial load assessment in the sample, as well as Pseudomonas and total psychrotrophic counts. The estimated shelf lives as determined by the three separate evaluations were in very good agreement. (author)

  13. Assessment of heavy metal concentrations in water, sediment and biota (fish and crabs) samples from the Densu Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was assess the concentration of some selected heavy metals in water, sediments and biota (fish and crab) sampled from the Densu Delta. In situ and laboratory based analysis were carried out to measure the following physicochemical properties of surface water from the delta; temperature, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), salinity, total dissolved solids (TDS), alkalinity, sodium ion concentration (Na+), potassium ion concentration (K+), chloride ion concentration (Cl), bicarbonate concentration, phosphate concentration, nitrate concentration, sulphate concentration and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Heavy metal (Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr, Pb and Hg) concentrations in water, sediments, fish and crab sampled at six sites from the Densu Delta wetland in the month of December, 2009 were analysed using VARIAN Fast Sequential Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) model AA240 FS. Two fish species; Blackchin tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron), White mullet (Mugil curema) and one species of crab; Blue swimming crab (Callinectes amnicola) were collected from the Densu Delta wetland and analysed. Heavy metal contents in the fish were higher in gill tissue than muscle tissue while in crabs concentrations were higher in the soft tissue than the shell. Levels of Fe, Zn and Cu in the muscle tissue of S. melanotheron were greater than the levels detected in the muscle tissue of M. curema. Cd, Ni and Hg were detected in gill tissue but not in the muscle tissue gill tissue but not in the muscle tissue of S. melanotheron, M. curema on the other hand contained these metals in both gill and muscle tissue. The maximum level of Fe (34.98 mg/L), Zn (25.08 mg/L) in the muscle of S. melanotheron was observed at Bortianor and Zn (2.70 mg/L) was observed at Tetegu. In the M. curema, the maximum level of Fe (34.66 mg/L), Zn (15.9 mg/L) and Cu (1.43 mg/L) was detected at Aplaku, Tetegu and Faana respectively. Heavy metal concentrations were higher in sediment than water. The presence of elevated levels of Cd and Ni in the muscle tissue of the white mullet fish from Tetegu and Faana, is a potential public health hazard to the inhabitants of these two communities and other neighbouring communities who depend on fish from the delta as their source of protein. (au)

  14. The role of vegetation on freshwater lens sustainability in small coral islands facing climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, Jean-Christophe; Join, Jean-Lambert; Banton, Olivier; Nicolini, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Small islands are commonly densely vegetated despite a near absence of surface water and a limited fresh groundwater resource (freshwater lenses) subjected to widespread seawater intrusion. Due to both the shallow depth of the water table, and the low water storage capacity of the soils, vegetation roots abstract water directly from groundwater. Where groundwater contains dissolved salt, roots selectively uptake freshwater which results in salt concentration in groundwater. Groundwater dynamics and salt transport are therefore coupled with vegetation activity and dynamics. However, roots cannot tolerate high levels of dissolved salt due to its phytotoxicity. This results in a buffer mechanism where vegetation regresses, and therefore groundwater uptake decreases, with increased salinization. A numerical groundwater model is applied to a monitored small coral island in the western Indian Ocean to simulate the freshwater lens behaviour and its response to climate changes. A phytotoxicity model is coupled with the groundwater model. Simulations assessed against field observations show the major control currently exerted by the vegetation with regards to the freshwater lens morphology. In particular, thinnest lenses and seawater intrusions observed in the island depressions can be explained by high vegetation activity due to the shallowest water table. Simulation of the response to predicted long-term changes in both groundwater recharge and sea level shows general lens regression by salinization associated with a simultaneous decrease in vegetation activity. Interestingly, the salinization is far less important than when omitting phytotoxicity processes. This demonstrates the need to couple groundwater and ecohydrological models when modelling the impact of climate changes on groundwater resources in small islands.

  15. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and freshwater aquatic weeds. Progress report, May 1--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Research was divided between basic physiological studies of the growth and nutrient-uptake kinetics of macroscopic marine algae and the more applied problems involved in the selection of species and the development of inexpensive, non-energy intensive culture methods for growing seaweeds and freshwater plants as a biomass source for conversion to energy. Best growth of the seaweeds occurs at low (0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..molar) concentration of major nutrients, with ammonia as a nitrogen source, with rapid exchange of the culture medium (residence time of 0.05 days or less). Of 43 species of seaweeds evaluated, representatives of the large red alga genus Gracilaria appear most promising with potential yields, in a highly intensive culture system under optimal conditions, of some 129 metric dry tons per hectare per year (about half of which is organic). Non-intensive culture methods have yielded one-third to one-half that figure. Unexplained periodicity of growth and overgrowth by epiphytes remain the most critical constraint to large-scale seaweed culture. Freshwater weed species in culture include water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), duckweed (Lemna minor), and Hydrilla vertecillata, with yields to date averaging 15, 4, and 8 g dry wt/m/sup 2//day, respectively. However, these plants have not yet been grown through the winter, so average annual yields are expected to be lower. In contrast to the seaweeds, the freshwater plants grow well at high nutrient concentrations and slow culture volume exchange rates (residence time ca. 20 days or more). Experiments were initiated on the recycling of digester residues from the fermentation of the freshwater and marine plants as a possible nutrient source for growth of the same species.

  16. Freshwater ecotoxicity characterisation factor for metal oxide nanoparticles: A case study on titanium dioxide nanoparticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salieri, Beatrice; Righi, Serena

    2015-01-01

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is widely applied in several industrial sectors to evaluate the environmental performance of processes, products and services. Recently, several reports and studies have emphasized the importance of LCA in the field of engineered nanomaterials. However, to date only a few LCA studies on nanotechnology have been carried out, and fewer still have assessed aspects relating to ecotoxicity. This is mainly due to the lack of knowledge in relation on human and environmental exposure and effect of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This bottleneck is continued when performing Life Cycle Impact Assessment, where characterization models and consequently characterization factors (CFs) for ENPs are missing. This paper aims to provide the freshwater ecotoxicity CF for titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2). The USEtox™ model has been selected as a characterisation model. An adjusted multimedia fate model has been developed which accounts for nano-specific fate process descriptors (i.e. sedimentation, aggregation with suspended particle matter, etc.) to estimate the fate of nano-TiO2 in freshwater. A literature survey of toxicity tests performed on freshwater organism representative of multiple trophic levels was conducted, including algae, crustaceans and fish in order to collect relevant EC50 values. Then, the toxic effect of nano-TiO2 was computed on the basis of the HC50 value. Thus, following the principle of USEtox™ model and accounting for nano-specific descriptors a CF for the toxic impact of freshwater ecotoxicity of 0.28PAFdaym3kg-1 is proposed.

  17. Accounting for the dissociating properties of organic chemicals in LCIA: An uncertainty analysis applied to micropollutants in the assessment of freshwater ecotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Fate parameters of dissociating chemicals were estimated and applied to an LCIA model. ? Results were compared to the default model using non-polar partitioning regressions. ? Negligible differences were estimated for direct emissions to freshwater. ? Results were overestimated in the default model for indirect emissions. ? Sorption of the cationic fraction of organic bases was the most influential parameter. -- Abstract: In life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) models, the sorption of the ionic fraction of dissociating organic chemicals is not adequately modeled because conventional non-polar partitioning models are applied. Therefore, high uncertainties are expected when modeling the mobility, as well as the bioavailability for uptake by exposed biota and degradation, of dissociating organic chemicals. Alternative regressions that account for the ionized fraction of a molecule to estimate fate parameters were applied to the USEtox model. The most sensitive model parameters in the estimation of ecotoxicological characterization factors (CFs) of micropollutants were evaluated by Monte Carlo analysis in both the default USEtox model and the alternative approach. Negligible differences of CFs values and 95% confidence limits between the two approaches were estimated for direct emissions to the freshwater compartment; however the default USEtox model overestimates CFs and the 95% confidence limits of basic compounds up to three orders and four orders of magnitude, respectively, relatively to the alternative approach for emissions to the agricultural soil compartment. For three emission scenarios, LCIA results show that the default USEtox model overestimates freshwater ecotoxicity impacts for the emission scenarios to agricultural soil by one order of magnitude, and larger confidence limits were estimated, relatively to the alternative approach

  18. Avoidance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments by the freshwater invertebrates Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, Hendrika J; Sperber, Veerle; Peeters, Edwin T H M

    2006-02-01

    Contamination of sediments is a serious problem in most industrialized areas. Sediments are often contaminated with trace metals and organic contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Bioassays are often used to determine the effect of contaminants on biota. However, survival or growth may not be the most sensitive endpoints. Behavioral changes often occur at much lower concentrations. Our study aimed to assess the effect of PAHs on habitat choice of two common freshwater invertebrates, the amphipod Gammarus pulex and the isopod Asellus aquaticus. We spiked clean field sediment with a mixture of four PAHs, fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and benzo[k]fluoranthene, to a total concentration of 30 mg PAH/kg dry weight. Both species were offered a choice between PAH-spiked sediments and clean sediments in laboratory experiments. Results show that both species avoid PAH-spiked sediment. Origin of the population, either from a clean reference site or from a polluted site, did not affect habitat choice of either species. PMID:16519306

  19. Community structure and decadal changes in macrozoobenthic assemblages in Lake Poyang, the largest freshwater lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Poyang is the largest freshwater lake in China and contains unique and diverse biota within the Yangtze floodplain ecosystem. However, knowledge of its macrozoobenthic assemblages remains inadequate. To characterize the current community structure of these assemblages and to portray their decadal changes, quarterly investigations were conducted at 15 sites from February to November 2012. A total of 42 taxa were recorded, and Corbicula fluminea, Limnoperna fortunei, Gammaridae sp., Nephtys polybranchia, Polypedilum scalaenum and Branchiura sowerbyi were found to dominate the community in terms of abundance. The bivalves Corbicula fluminea, Lamprotula rochechouarti, Arconaia lanceolata and Lamprotula caveata dominated the community in biomass due to their large body size. The mean abundance of the total macrozoobenthos varied from 48 to 920 ind·m-2, the mean biomass ranged from 28 to 428 g·m-2. The substrate type affected strongly the abundance, biomass, and diversity of the macrozoobenthos, with muddy sand substrates showing the highest values. Compared with historical data, remarkable changes were observed in the abundance of macrozoobenthos and the identity of the dominant species. The mean total abundance decreased from 724 ind·m-2 in 1992 to 228 ind·m-2 in 2012. The dominant species have shifted dramatically. Large unionids were dominant before 1998, whereas pollution-tolerant species (e.g., Branchiura sowerbyi increased in dominance after 2008. Our findings should have implications for the conservation of the benthic biodiversity of this large Yangtze-connected lake.

  20. Tritium kinetics in a freshwater marsh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten curies (Ci) of tritium (as tritiated water) were applied to a 2-ha Lake Erie marsh in northwestern Ohio on 29 October 1973. Tritium kinetics in the marsh water, bottom sediment, crayfish (Procambarus blandingi), and fish (Lepomis macrochirus) were determined over an 8 to 12-month period. Tritium half-life in the water was 64.5 days. Approximately 3 percent of the initial tritium present in the water remained after 332 days. Following application, peak tritium levels in the sediment were observed on day 13 in the top 1-cm layer, on day 27 at 5-cm depth and on day 64 at a 10-cm depth. Tritium uptake in the biota was rapid. After the initial uptake, loss of tritium from unbound (body-water) compartments paralleled marsh water activity. Loss of bound (tissue structure) tritium from bluegill muscle was similar to loss of tritium from the marsh water. Loss of bound tritium from crayfish muscle was slower than loss of tritium from the marsh water. A model based on diffusion theory described tritium movement through the sediment. Tritium uptake and loss by the crayfish and bluegills were described by a set of simple linear differential equations.nt through the sediment. Tritium uptake and loss by the crayfish and bluegills were described by a set of simple linear differential equations

  1. Uptake, turnover and distribution of chlorinated fatty acids in aquatic biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoern, Helena

    1999-09-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids (CIFAs) are the major contributors of extractable, organically bound chlorine in fish lipids. A known anthropogenic source of CIFAs is chlorine bleached pulp production. Additional anthropogenic sources may exist, e.g., chlorine-containing discharge from industrial and household waste and they may also occur naturally. CIFAs have a wide geographic distribution. They have, for instance, been identified in fish both from Alaskan and Scandinavian waters. In toxicological studies of CIFAs, the most pronounced effects have been found in reproductive related processes. CIFAs have also been shown to disrupt cell membrane functions. The present study was carried out to further characterise the ecotoxicological properties of CIFAs and their presence in biota. To investigate the biological stability of CIFAs, two experiments were carried out using radiolabelled chlorinated and non-chlorinated fatty acids. In both experiments, CIFAs were taken up from food by fish and assimilated to lipids. From the first experiment it was concluded that the chlorinated fatty acid investigated was turned over in the fish to a lower degree than the non-chlorinated analogue. In the second experiment, the transfer of a chlorinated fatty acid was followed over several trophic levels and the chlorinated fatty acid was transferred to the highest trophic level. In samples with differing loads of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from both fish and marine mammals, high concentrations and diversity of CIFAs were detected. This was also observed in samples with low POP concentration. Chlorohydroxy fatty acids made up a considerable portion of the CIFAs in certain samples, both from limnic fish and marine mammals. CIFAs in fish were found to be bound in complex lipids such as triacylglycerols (storage lipids) and phospholipids, as well as in acyl sterols (membrane lipids). In the marine mammals investigated, high concentrations of CIFAs were mainly bound in phospholipids. If CIFAs are assimilated like `normal` fatty acids, are incorporated into membrane lipids, and are recalcitrant to catabolism, they may thus give rise to ecotoxicological effects when released to the environment and accumulated in biota 55 refs, 1 fig

  2. CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF FRESHWATER MICROALGAL STRAINS TOWARD BIOFUEL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Yang,

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-three algal cultures were isolated from freshwater lakes in Hainan, China. Four microalgal isolates were selected because they could be successfully cultivated at high density and demostrated a strong fluorescence after being stained with nile red. These cultures were identified as strains of Chlorella sp. C11, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii C22, Monoraphidium dybowskii C29, and Chlorella sp. HK12 through microscopic and 18S rDNA analysis. Under similar conditions, the lipid productivity of Chlorella sp. C11, Chla. reinhardtii C22, M. dybowskii C29 , and Chlorella sp. HK12 were 1.88, 2.79, 2.00, and 3.25 g L-1, respectively. Chla. reinhardtii C22 yielded a higher lipid content (51%, with a lower biomass concentration (5.47 g dwt L-1. Chlorella sp. HK12 reached a growth rate of 0.88 day-1 at OD540nm and yielded a biomass concentration of 7.56 g dwt L-1, with a high lipid content of 43%. Gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry analysis indicated that lipid fraction mainly comprises hydrocarbons including palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acids. Our results suggest that Chlorella sp. HK12 is a promising species for biodiesel production, because of its high lipid productivity and a relatively high content of oleic acid.

  3. Culture of Freshwater Prawns (Macrobrachium Rosenbergii) Using Geothermal Waste Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.

    1978-01-01

    The farming of freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) in geothermal-heated water has been demonstrated to be feasible in a non-tropical climate. The husbandry of prawns is being done in two outdoor raceway ponds, 9.1 m by 2.5 m and 29 m by 3.5 m that are 1.2 m deep. The ponds are not shielded from the ambient climate which during the winter months has recorded air temperatures as low as -20oC. A selected brood stock is held in a small spawning building where larvae are hatched in artificial saltwater and reared to the post-larvae stage which makes the facility self-supporting. This project is providing a model for potential investors to utilize the low-temperature geothermal resources in the western United States for warm water aquaculture. Zooplankton, macroscopic crusteans, from a local euthrophic lake are being fed to the post-larvae and adult prawns in addition to prepared commercial dry pelleted foods to keep operational costs at a minimum. Initial measurements of growth and weight gains indicate the production of two crops of prawns per year at seven to the pond is possible. No work on intensive culture has been done. Plans to enlarge the facility and do work on developing intensive culture are being considered.

  4. Dynamics of radiation exposure to marine biota in the area of the Fukushima NPP in March–May 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of radiation dose rates are presented for marine biota in March–May 2011 in the coastal zone near Fukushima NPP, and in the open sea. Calculations of fish contamination were made using two methods: a concentration factor approach, and a dynamic model. For representative marine organisms (fish and molluscs) the radiation dose rates did not exceed the reference level of 10 mGy/day. At a distance 30 km from the NPP, in the open sea the radiation doses for marine biota were much lower than those in the coastal zone near the NPP. Comparative estimates are presented for radiation doses to aquatic organisms in the exclusion zones of the Eastern Urals Radioactive Trail, and the Chernobyl NPP.

  5. The role of regional information in the dose rate estimation of biota: from the view point of stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dose evaluation system developed to judge environmental radiation safety was proposed in order to evaluate the effect on environmental flora and fauna. However, it was noted that large differences exist between biota doses based on the regional data and those determined by the dose evaluation system developed. In order to realize successful mutual communication among stakeholders, information needed for environmental radiation protection has been investigated in various kinds of exposure situations, because the Japanese tend to act following the standards set by them to get the most appropriate results in the situations they are faced with. It became clear from the investigation on beliefs about environmental issues that the Japanese are concerned about regional characteristics of natural environments and biota through which they observe variations in their living conditions. Furthermore, the systematic approach for compilation of the regional environmental parameters and data becomes important to accomplish a social agreement on environmental safety. (author)

  6. Analysis of Selenium Concentrations in Biota and Sediment from Stewart Lake and the Middle Green River, 1995-1999: Evaluation of Phase IV Remediation

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report presents the analytical results and analysis of selenium concentrations in biota and sediment samples collected by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  7. Freshwater Microcosms-Based Assessment of Eco-toxicological Effects of a Chemical Effluent from the Pilcam Industry in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Djomo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the acute toxicity of a raw effluent from a battery manufacturing plant (Pilcam in Douala, Cameroon, to a freshwater fish (Oreochromis niloticus, and subsequently evaluated its sub-acute effects on water quality and the biota in freshwater microscosms. The acute toxicity test was based on 96 hrs static renewal bioassays that resulted in 96-h LC50 and LC90 values of 16 and 20.7% (v/v, respectively. The sub-acute experiments were conducted by exposing several species of aquatic organisms (plankton, macro-invertebrates and mollusks to lower effluent concentrations [1.6%, 8.0%, 16% (v/v] for six weeks, and monitoring their survival rates, as well as the physical and chemical characteristics of water. These concentrations were based on 10%, 50%, and 100% of the 96 h - median lethal concentrations (LC50 of the effluent to the freshwater fish, Oreochromis niloticus. Significant effects on functional parameters, such as, chlorophyll-a and total protein could not be demonstrated. However, the activity of alkaline phosphatase was significantly inhibited at all concentrations tested. Phytoplankton, zooplankton, macro-invertebrate communities and snails were negatively affected by the effluent application at concentrations ≥ 8% (v/v, with chlorophyta, ciliates, ostracoda, annelida, planaria and snails being the most sensitive groups. The snails were eliminated after 24 h exposure from microcosms treated with effluent at concentration ≥ 8% (v/v. Effluent exposure also caused significant effects on water quality parameters (DO, pH, hardness, conductivity, color, turbidity, ammonia in general at concentrations ≥ 8% (v/v. Temperature and alkalinity were not significantly affected. Overall, data from this research indicate that a dilution of the Pilcam effluent down to 1.6% does not provide protection against chronic toxicity to aquatic organisms. Further studies are needed to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL, as well as a chronic reference concentration for this effluent.

  8. Development of soil, soil biota and above-ground vegetation at post mining sites under different afforestation management.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tajovský, Karel; Frouz, Jan; Pižl, Václav; Velichová, Václava; Starý, Josef; Hán?l, Ladislav

    Greifswald : University of Greifswald, 2006. s. 171. [Land use changes in Europe as a challenge for restoration. Ecological, economical and ethical dimensions. European Conference on Ecological Restoration /5./. 21.08.2006-25.08.2006, Greifswald] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R(CZ) 1QS600660505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : development of soil * soil biota * post mining sites Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  9. Biota: sediment partitioning of aluminium smelter related PAHs and pulp mill related diterpenes by intertidal clams at Kitimat, British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Mark B; Lachmuth, Cara L; Cretney, Walter J; Fowler, Brian R; Dangerfield, Neil; White, Linda; Ross, Peter S

    2011-09-01

    The question of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability and its relationship to specific PAH sources with different PAH binding characteristics is an important one, because bioavailability drives PAH accumulation in biota and ultimately the biochemical responses to the PAH contaminants. The industrial harbour at Kitimat (British Columbia, Canada) provides an ideal location to study the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of sediment hydrocarbons to low trophic level biota. Samples of soft shell clams (Mya arenaria) and intertidal sediment collected from multiple sites over six years at various distances from an aluminium smelter and a pulp and paper mill were analysed for 106 PAHs, plant diterpenes and other aromatic fraction hydrocarbons. Interpretation using PAH source ratios and multivariate data analysis reveals six principal hydrocarbon sources: PAHs in coke, pitch and emissions from anode combustion from the aluminium smelter, vascular plant terpenes and aromatised terpenes from the pulp and paper mill, petroleum PAHs from shipping and other anthropogenic activities and PAHs from natural plant detritus. Harbour sediments predominantly contain either pitch or pyrogenic PAHs from the smelter, while clams predominantly contain plant derived PAHs and diterpenes from the adjacent pulp mill. PAHs from the smelter have low bioavailability to clams (Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors; BSAFs 500). Thus while most of the smelter associated PAHs in sediments may not be bioavailable to benthic organisms, the plant terpenes (including retene, totarol, ferruginol, manool, dehydroabietane and other plant terpenes that form the chemical defence mechanism of conifers) released by pulp mills are bioavailable and possess demonstrated toxic properties. The large scale release of plant terpenes by some of the many pulp mills located in British Columbia and elsewhere represents a largely undocumented risk to aquatic biota. PMID:21788067

  10. Assessment of radiological risk for marine biota and human consumers of seafood in the coast of Qingdao, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baolu; Ha, Yiming; Jin, Jing

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the levels of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs in the edible parts of 11 different marine species collected from the Qingdao coast of China. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranged from 0.08±0.03 to 1.65±0.60Bqkg(-1) w.w., 0.09±0.02 to 1.44±0.10Bqkg(-1) w.w., 26.89±1.25 to 219.25±5.61Bqkg(-1) w.w., respectively. Artificial (137)Cs was undetectable or close to the detection limit in the biota sampled. To link radioactivity to possible impact on health, we calculated radiation doses to both the marine biota and human beings. We showed that doses in all cases were dominated by naturally occurring (40)K and that (137)Cs doses were negligible compared with (40)K-derived doses. The total doses to marine biota ranged between 16.55 and 62.41nGyh(-1) among different biota species, which were below the benchmark level of aquatic organism. The committed effective dose to humans through seafood consumption varied from 10.55 to 36.17?Svy(-1), and the associated lifetime cancer risks ranged from 5.93E-05 to 9.49E-05 for different age and gender groups. Both the dose and cancer risk to humans were at the acceptable range. Despite the significant amount of radionuclides released as a result of the Fukushima accident, their impact on the seafood in Qingdao coast appears to be negligible based on our measurements of concentrations of radionuclide activity and internal dose estimates. PMID:25985213

  11. Assessment of doses to non-human biota: Review of developments and demonstration assessment for Olkiluoto repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of work commissioned by Posiva Oy and undertaken by Enviros Consulting Ltd to support the development of a strategy for the assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation associated with the Olkiluoto waste repository, Finland, as part of the development of the Posiva Safety Case Portfolio. This project included a review of the development of international policies and standards related to protection of biota from the effects of ionizing radiation and of biota assessment methodologies, paying particular attention to those that have been applied to waste repository performance assessments. On the basis of this review, recommendations were developed on the most appropriate methodology to apply in order to assess the impact of radioactive releases from the planned spent fuel repository in Olkiluoto. A test-case was developed, in collaboration with staff from Posiva and Facilia AB, and an assessment was performed. The results and experience of which were analysed and summarised to develop recommendations for a future strategy. The test case highlighted some significant data gaps related to the assessment of impacts to both generic biota types and to interest species. In particular, concentration ratios for generic carnivorous mammals and migratory species such as moose that may consume food from multiple ecosystems and dose conversion factors for large burrowing (i.e. hibernating) mammals. However, in general terms, the dose rates predicted for all organism types were several orders of magnitude below those at which population effects would be expected to be observed and those at which effects on the individual may be anticipated. There would therefore be scope for simplifying the approach applied, although there would be value in performing a sensitivity analysis to ensure that the simplification is applied appropriately. There would also be value in ensuring consistency of the developing approach for non-human biota with that applied for human protection. (orig.)

  12. LEAD (Pb) IN BIOTA AND PERCEPTIONS OF Pb EXPOSURE AT A RECENTLY DESIGNATED SUPERFUND BEACH SITE IN NEW JERSEY

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-01-01

    The Raritan Bay Slag Site (New Jersey) was designated a Superfund site in 2009 because the seawall, jetties, and sediment contained lead (Pb). Our objective was to compare Pb and mercury (Hg) levels in biota and public perceptions of exposure at the Superfund and reference sites. Samples (algae, invertebrates, fish) were collected from the Raritan Bay Slag Site and reference sites and analyzed for Pb and Hg. Waterfront users were interviewed using a standard questionnaire. Levels of Pb in aqu...

  13. Anthropogenic PAHs in Sediment-Dwelling Biota from Mangrove Areas of the Calabar River, SE Niger Delta, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassey O. Ekpo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in mangrove sediment-dwelling biota (crabs and molluscs from the Calabar River, SE Niger Delta of Nigeria were analyzed using GC-MS in order to assess the degree of contamination of the river by anthropogenic activity. The associated sediment samples (where these biota were collected showed much higher total PAH (TPAH concentration (16,028.3 ng/g dry weight (dw at the upper mangrove area (UMA than that found toward the river mouth (MR; 1,667.5 ng/g dw. However, the mean TPAH levels were higher in molluscs (16,749.8 ng/g ww and crabs (29,325.1 ng/g ww at theMR, and in molluscs (28,580.8 ng/g ww and crabs (71,782.6 ng/g ww at the UMA than in the associated sediments, indicating occurrence of bio-accumulation/bio-concentration of PAHs in tissues of these organisms. The results revealed that molluscs are safer to consume than crabs. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA indicated no significant relationship between lipid content or body size of organisms and contaminant load probably because of non-equilibrium situation: smaller animals accumulated more PAHs than their larger counterparts, suggesting different uptake and elimination rates for these compounds. Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs varied among the organisms (4.84-14.98 and were generally lower for highly polluted site (UMA; fresh water area and higher for area of low anthropogenic pressure (MR- brackish water area. Risk assessment against USEPA standard show the biota to be highly contaminated with carcinogenic PAHs and may pose life-time cancer risk, especially to residents of the riverine/coastal communities who often consume more of these organisms than those living hinterland.

  14. Survival strategies of freshwater insects in cold environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria LENCIONI

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available At high latitudes and altitudes, ice formation is a major variable affecting survival of freshwater fauna and hence the abundance and composition of invertebrate communities. Freezing, but also desiccation and anoxia, are lethal threats to all life stages of aquatic insects, from the eggs to the adults. During cold periods, the aquatic stages commonly remain in or move to a portion of the water body that will not freeze or dry (e.g., deep waters of lakes, springs and hyporheic zone where they can remain active. Less frequently they migrate to habitats that will freeze at the onset of winter. Insects have developed a complex of strategies to survive at their physiological temperature minimum, comprising (a morphological (melanism, reduction in size, hairiness/pubescence, brachyptery and aptery, (b behavioural (basking in the sun, changes in feeding and mating habit, parthenogenesis, polyploidy, ovoviviparity, habitat selection and cocoon building, (c ecological (extension of development to several years by quiescence or diapause and reduction of the number of generations per year, (d physiological and biochemical (freezing tolerance and freezing avoidance adaptations. Most species develop a combination of these survival strategies that can be different in the aquatic and terrestrial phase. Freezing avoidance and freezing tolerance may be accompanied by diapause. Both cold hardiness and diapause manifest during the unfavourable season and: (i involve storage of food resources (commonly glycogen and lipids; (ii are under hormonal control (ecdysone and juvenile hormone; (iii involve a depression or suppression of the oxidative metabolism with mitochondrial degradation. However, where the growing season is reduced to a few weeks, insects may develop cold hardiness without entering diapause, maintaining in the haemolymph a high concentration of Thermal Hysteris Proteins (THPs for the entire year and a slow but continuous growth. A synthesis of literature regarding adaptation strategies in aquatic insects is presented, highlighting the scarcity of information on freshwater insects from Alpine regions. Most references are on Diptera Chironomidae from North America and North Europe. Some recent findings on aquatic insects from Italian Alpine streams are also presented.

  15. Proposal of a weight factor for alpha radiation aiming biota radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several proposals based on the environmental radioprotection of calculating the absorbed dose in biota have been suggested. The absorbed dose expresses the deposition of energy per mass unit. The differences in biological effects of the absorbed dose can be quantified by applying a correction factor to the absorbed dose. The correction factor for radiation is easier to establish, because radiations exist in smaller number (alpha, beta, neutrons and photons) and can be set for groups of organisms. This work aims to propose a correction factor for radiation, in order to adequate the concept of absorbed dose currently used to the concept of equivalent dose. A survey of the literature on correction factors proposed for alpha radiation was carried out and, when possible, the biological endpoint was identified, as well as the radionuclide and the biological target. A variation of the weight factor for alpha radiation from 1 to 377 was observed and a number of biological endpoints, biological target and alpha emitter radionuclide were identified. Finally we propose a weight value for alpha radiation of 40, and we propose also the name of correction factor for radiation alpha as being ecological radiation weighting factor (WRE) the name 'equivalent dose for flora and fauna' (HTFF) to name of the new dose. (author)

  16. Distribution of arsenic in the sediments and biota of Hilo Bay, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallacher, L.E.; Kho, E.B.; Bernard, N.D.; Orcutt, A.M.; Dudley, W.C. Jr.; Hammond, T.M.

    1985-07-01

    Sediment samples collected from the Waiakea Mill Pond, Wailoa River, and Hilo Bay were analyzed for arsenic. Arsenic was detectable in 10 of 11 sediment samples, and ranged in concentration from 2 to 715 ppm. Two species of plant and seven species of animal were collected from the Waiakea Mill Pond and analyzed for arsenic. No arsenic was detected in the plants, whereas four of the seven animal species had arsenic concentrations ranging from a trace to 1.3 ppm. Sediments of the Wailoa River estuary have much higher concentrations of arsenic than those of Hilo Bay, indicating that most arsenic is located near the original source of pollution, a factory that once operated on the shores of the Waiakea Mill Pond. Much of the arsenic is found in anaerobic regions of the sediment where it has been relatively undisturbed by biological activity. The low levels of arsenic in the biota of the estuary suggest that there is little remineralization of the region's arsenic and that it is trapped in anaerobic sediment layers.

  17. Doses to Terrestrial Biota in the Vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, Cumbria, UK (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copplestone, D.; Johnson, M.S.; Jackson, D.; Jones, S.R

    2000-07-01

    Source terms and corresponding radionuclide activity concentrations in biota for {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am have been assessed for three semi-natural ecosystems in the vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, Cumbria, UK. Estimates of absorbed doses (mGy.d{sup -1}) have been calculated. Doses to key indicator species, Oniscus asellus (detritivorous invertebrate), Carabus violaceous (predatory invertebrate) and Apodemus sylvaticus (granivorous wood mouse) are discussed with reference to the 1 mGy.d{sup -1} level, below which it is postulated that no observable effects on populations in a terrestrial ecosystem occur. Implications for the 'critical group' and 'reference model' approaches for a framework of radiological environmental protection are discussed. The need to assess the most highly exposed species is advanced. New research focused on the application of biomarker techniques as a mechanism for determining the interactions and effects of environmental contaminants on ecosystem structure and functioning is presented. (author)

  18. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama-Sechura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Pablo C; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T K; Wiens, John J

    2013-07-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama-Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth's driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama-Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4-14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ?8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ?2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

  19. Mass extinction of the marine biota at the Ordovician-Silurian transition due to environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    The terminal Ordovician was marked by one of five great mass extinction events of the Phanerozoic (445.6-443.0 Ma ago), when up to 86% of the marine species became extinct. The rapid onset of the continental glaciation on Gondwana determined by its position in the South Pole area; the cooling; the hydrodynamic changes through the entire water column in the World Ocean; and the corresponding sea level fall, which was responsible for the reduction of shelf areas and shallow-water basins, i.e., the main ecological niche of the Ordovician marine biota, were main prerequisites of the stress conditions. Similar to other mass extinction events, these processes were accompanied by volcanism, impact events, a corresponding reduction of the photosynthesis and bioproductivity, the destruction of food chains, and anoxia. The appearance and development of terrestrial plants and microphytoplankton, which consumed atmospheric carbon dioxide, thus, diminishing the greenhouse effect and promoting the transition of the climatic system to the glacial mode, played a unique role in that period.

  20. Determining the response of African biota to climate change: using the past to model the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, K. J.; Bennett, K. D.; Burrough, S. L.; Macias-Fauria, M.; Tovar, C.

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of biotic responses to future climate change in tropical Africa tends to be based on two modelling approaches: bioclimatic species envelope models and dynamic vegetation models. Another complementary but underused approach is to examine biotic responses to similar climatic changes in the past as evidenced in fossil and historical records. This paper reviews these records and highlights the information that they provide in terms of understanding the local- and regional-scale responses of African vegetation to future climate change. A key point that emerges is that a move to warmer and wetter conditions in the past resulted in a large increase in biomass and a range distribution of woody plants up to 400–500 km north of its present location, the so-called greening of the Sahara. By contrast, a transition to warmer and drier conditions resulted in a reduction in woody vegetation in many regions and an increase in grass/savanna-dominated landscapes. The rapid rate of climate warming coming into the current interglacial resulted in a dramatic increase in community turnover, but there is little evidence for widespread extinctions. However, huge variation in biotic response in both space and time is apparent with, in some cases, totally different responses to the same climatic driver. This highlights the importance of local features such as soils, topography and also internal biotic factors in determining responses and resilience of the African biota to climate change, information that is difficult to obtain from modelling but is abundant in palaeoecological records. PMID:23878343

  1. Novel brominated flame retardants and dechlorane plus in Greenland air and biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Bossi, Rossana; Riget, Frank F; Skov, Henrik; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Following the ban of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, other halogenated flame retardants (FRs) might be used increasingly. This study has analyzed hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-ethane (BTBPE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) and dechloraneplus (DP) in Greenland air over the course of a year. Moreover, BTBPE, DPTE, DP, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were analyzed in samples of polar bear, ringed seal, black guillemot and glaucous gull from Greenland. HBCD in air appeared low, while mean concentrations of syn- and anti-DP were 2.3 and 5.2 pg/m(3), respectively. BTBPE and DPTE were undetectable in air. Detection frequencies in biota were <50% for BTBPE, TBPH and DBDPE, but near 100% for the remaining compounds. Ringed seals from East Greenland had highest mean concentrations of TBB, DPTE, syn- and anti-DP (1.02, 0.078, 0.096 and 0.42 ng/g wet weight, respectively). Our study documents the long-range transport and, to some extent, bioaccumulation of these novel FRs. PMID:25463724

  2. Screening level dose assessment of aquatic biota downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in southern France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Pierre, S.; Chambers, D.B.; Lowe, L.M.; Bontoux, J.G.

    1999-09-01

    Aquatic biota in the Rhone River downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in France are exposed to natural sources of radiation and to radioactivity released from the Marcoule complex. A simple conservative screening level model was used to estimate the range of concentrations in aquatic media of both artificial and natural radionuclides and the consequent absorbed dose rates for aquatic organisms. Five categories of aquatic organisms were studied, namely, submerged aquatic plants (phanerogam), non-bottom-feeding fish, bottom-feeding fish, mollusca, and fish-eating birds. The analysis was based on the radionuclide concentrations reported in four consecutive annual radioecological monitoring reports published by French agencies with nuclear regulatory responsibilities. The results of this assessment were used to determine, qualitatively, the magnitude of any potential health impacts on each of the five categories of aquatic organisms studied. The range of dose rate estimates ranged over three orders of magnitude, with maximum dose rates estimated to be in the order of 1 to 10 {micro}Gy h{sup {minus}1}. These maximum dose rates are a factor 40 or more below the international guideline intended to ensure the protection of aquatic populations, and a factor ten or more below the level which may trigger the need for a more detailed evaluation of potential ecological consequences to the exposed populations.

  3. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama–Sechura)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Pablo C.; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Wiens, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama–Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth’s driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama–Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4–14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ?8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ?2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

  4. Doses to members of the general public and observed effects on biota: Chernobyl Forum update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl Forum was organized by the United Nations to examine the health and environmental effects of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. This paper is concerned with the environmental effects, as determined by Expert Group Environment. The accident resulted in release of a large amount of radioactive materials over a period of 10 days. These materials were deposited throughout Europe with the three more affected countries being Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. More than 5 million persons lived on territories in these countries judged to be contaminated at >37 kBq m-2. Many countermeasures were employed to mitigate the effects of the accident. The collective effective dose to the residents of the contaminated territories is estimated to be about 55 000 person-Sv. Effects on non-human biota were observed that ranged from minor to lethal; the current increase in the number and diversity of species in the most contaminated area is due to absence of human pressure

  5. Cernavoda NPP impact study on terrestrial and aquatic biota. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against industrial pollutants has been recognized. The concept of sustainable development, requires new and developing international policies for environmental protection. See 'Protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation' IAEA-TECDOC-1091, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. As it is recommended in 'Cernavoda Unit No. 2 NPP Environmental Impact Assessment CES-03702-IAD-006', it is Cernavoda NPP responsibility to conduct an Ecological Risk Assessment study, mainly to assess the impact of nuclear power plant operation on terrestrial and aquatic biota. Long records from normal operation of Cernavoda Unit 1, wind pattern, meteorological conditions, and source terms data were used to evaluate areas of interest for environmental impact, conducting to a circle of 20 km radius around mentioned nuclear objective. The screening campaign established tritium level (because Cernavoda NPP is a CANDU type reactor, and tritium is the most important radioisotope evacuated in the environment) in air, water, soil and vegetation, focusing the interest area on particular ecosystem. Using these primary data it was evaluated which are the monitored ecological receptors and which are the measurement endpoints.This paper presents the Ecological Risk Assessment at Cernavoda NPP technical requirements, and the preliminary results of evaluating criteria for renary results of evaluating criteria for representative ecosystem components at Cernavoda NPP. (authors)

  6. Sediment distribution coefficients and concentration factors for biota in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 247 (TRS 247), Sediment Kds and Concentration Factors for Radionuclides in the Marine Environment, which provided sediment distribution coefficients (Kds) and concentration factor (CF) data for marine biological material that could be used in models simulating the dispersion of radioactive waste that had been disposed of in the sea. TRS 247 described an approach for calculating sediment or water Kds using stable element geochemical data developed by J.M. Bewers, even though the use of field derived data was emphasized whenever possible. Over the years, TRS 247 has proved to be a valuable reference for radioecologists, marine modellers and other scientists involved in assessing the impact of radionuclides in the marine environment. In 2000 the IAEA initiated a revision of TRS 247 to take account of the new sets of data obtained since 1985.The outcome of this work is this report, which contains revised sediment Kds for the open ocean and ocean margins and CFs for marine biota. CFs for deep ocean ferromanganese nodules. In addition, this report contains CFs for a limited number of elements for marine mammals not included in TRS 247. This revision was carried out at three IAEA Consultants Meetings held in Monaco and Vienna between April 2000 and December 2002

  7. Fouling and corrosion of freshwater heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouling in freshwater heat exchangers (HX) costs the Canadian nuclear power industry millions of dollars annually in replacement energy and capital equipment. The main reasons are loss of heat transfer and corrosion. Underdeposit pitting is the predominant corrosion mechanism. Erosion corrosion has also been observed. Failure analyses, field studies, and laboratory research have provided us with information to help explain the reasons for reduced performance. Newly installed HX tubing immediately becomes colonized with a complex community of bacteria in a slimey organic matrix. The biofilm itself produces corrosive species and in addition it promotes the attachment of sediment particles and the deposition of calcareous material. The result is a thick, adherent deposit which creates crevices, concentrates aggressive species and alters the system's hydrodynamics

  8. Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs

  9. Freshwater aquaculture in the United States: Complying with environmental protection law and policy

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, M.

    1993-01-01

    The author deal with the relations between the freshwater fish culture and the many regulations of the environmental protection in USA. The author develops the federal and state administrative frameworks (federal government administration of aquaculture, the state government administration of aquaculture), the freshwater aquaculture and water rights, the freshwater aquaculture and wetlands regulation, the freshwater aquaculture and water quality regulation, the freshwater aquaculture and wild...

  10. Baseline survey on air, water, soil quality, radioactivity and aquatic biota in and around the project site on new uranium mining site, Tummalapalle, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study four ecological parameters of the environment ie. water, air, soil and biota were monitored at the new uranium mining site of Tummalapalle, Andhra Pradesh. The water quality was assessed by estimating trace metals, natural uranium, physical and chemical parameters. Air quality was assessed through PM10, TSP, PM2.5, SOx and NOx parameters. Soil samples were analysed for trace metals, metal oxides and natural radionuclides. Similarly biota samples were analysed for trace metals and radionuclides

  11. Radiological benchmarks for screening contaminants of potential concern for effects on aquatic biota at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hazardous waste site may contain hundreds of contaminants; therefore, it is important to screen contaminants of potential concern for the ecological risk assessment. Often this screening is done as part of a screening assessment, the purpose of which is to evaluate the available data, identify data gaps, and screen contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by using a set of toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks are helpful in determining whether contaminants warrant further assessment or are at a level that requires no further attention. Unlike exposures to chemicals, which are expressed as the concentration in water or sediment, exposures to radionuclides are expressed as the dose rate received by the organism. The recommended acceptable dose rate to natural populations of aquatic biota is 1 rad d-1. Blaylock, Frank, and O'Neal provide formulas and exposure factors for estimating the dose rates to representative aquatic organisms. Those formulas were used herein to calculate the water and sediment concentrations that result in a total dose rate of 1 rad d-1 to fish for selected radionuclides. These radiological benchmarks are intended for use at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation and at the Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plants as screening values only to show the nature and extent of contamination and identify the need for additional site-specific investigation

  12. Terrestrial and freshwater Tardigrada of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Harry A

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of the freshwater and terrestrial tardigrade fauna reported from the Americas (North America, South America, Central America and the West Indies), their distribution in the Americas, and the substrates from which they have been reported. Data were obtained from 316 published references. Authors' identifications were accepted at face value unless subsequently amended. Taxa were assigned to sub-national units (states, provinces, etc.). Many areas, in particular large portions of Central America and the West Indies, have no reported tardigrade fauna.        The presence of 54 genera and 380 species has been reported for the Americas; 245 species have been collected in the Nearctic ecozone and 251 in the Neotropical ecozone. Among the tardigrade species found in the Americas, 52 are currently considered cosmopolitan, while 153 species have known distributions restricted to the Americas. Based on recent taxonomic revision of the genus Milnesium, the vast majority of records of M. tardigradum in the Americas should now be reassigned to Milnesium tardigradum sensu lato, either because the provided description differs from M. tardigradum sensu stricto or because insufficient description is provided to make a determination; the remainder should be considered Milnesium cf. tardigradum.        Most terrestrial tardigrade sampling in the Americas has focused on cryptogams (mosses, lichens and liverworts); 90% of the species have been collected in such substrates. The proportion of species collected in other habitats is lower: 14% in leaf litter, 20% in soil, and 24% in aquatic samples (in other terrestrial substrates the proportion never exceeds 5%). Most freshwater tardigrades have been collected from aquatic vegetation and sediment. For nine species in the Americas no substrates have been reported.  PMID:25113595

  13. Freshwater reservoir effect variability in Northern Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente; Heinemeier, Jan

    The freshwater reservoir effect is a potential problem when radiocarbon dating fishbones, shells, human bones or food crusts on pottery from sites next to rivers or lakes. The reservoir age in rivers containing considerable amounts of dissolved 14C-free carbonates can be up to several thousand years and may be highly variable. For accurate radiocarbon dating of freshwater-based samples, the order of magnitude of the reservoir effect as well as the degree of variability has to be known. The initial problem in this case was the accurate dating of food crusts on pottery from the Mesolithic sites Kayhude at the river Alster and Schlamersdorf at the river Trave, both in Schleswig-Holstein, Northern Germany. Measurements on modern materials from these rivers may not give a single reservoir age correction that can be applied to archaeological samples, but they will show the order of magnitude and variability that can also be expected for the past. Water DIC from different seasons, and from the same season in different years, has been dated because it is the carbon source in photosynthesis and thus at the basis of the rivers’ food webs. The radiocarbon ages of underwater plants and different parts (underwater or floating) of emerging water plants are compared, as it might be expected that the reservoir age is higher for plants that assimilate DIC as for plants or parts of plants that assimilate atmospheric CO2. Mollusc shells as well as flesh and bone collagen of fish are dated as well. Radiocarbon datings of archaeological samples from the two Mesolithic sites will be analysed, considering the insights provided by the study of modern material.

  14. Radiation Dose Assessment For The Biota Of Terrestrial Ecosystems In The Shoreline Zone Of The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from 90Sr and 137Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that ancentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  15. Technical report: Metal concentrations in sediments, and selected biota from mine tailings in Gastineau Channel, Juneau, Alaska [Draft

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Hardrock gold mining occurred in Juneau from 1880 to 1944. Tailings and waste rock from the mines were deposited into Gastineau Channel and formed beaches along...

  16. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  17. Simulation of radioactive cesium transfer in the southern Fukushima coastal biota using a dynamic food chain transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) accident occurred on 11 March 2011. The accident introduced 137Cs into the coastal waters which was subsequently transferred to the local coastal biota thereby elevating the concentration of this radionuclide in coastal organisms. In this study, the radioactive cesium levels in coastal biota from the southern Fukushima area were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. The simulation derived the possible maximum radioactive cesium levels in organisms, indicating that the maximum 137Cs concentrations in invertebrates, benthic fish and predator fish occurred during late April, late May and late July, respectively in the studied area where the source was mainly the direct leakage of 137Cs effluent from the 1F NPP. The delay of a 137Cs increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer of 137Cs introduced to the ecosystem from the initial contamination of the seawater. The model also provided the degree of radionuclide depuration in organisms, and it demonstrated the latest start of the decontamination phase in benthic fish. The ecological half-lives, derived both from model simulation and observation, were 1–4 months in invertebrates, and 2–9 months in plankton feeding fish and coastal predator fish from the studied area. In contrast, it was not possible to similarly calculate these parameters in benthic fish because of an unidentified additional radionuclide source which was deduced from the biological compartment model. To adequately reconstruct the in-situ depuration of radiocesium in benthic fish in the natural ecosystem, a contamination source associated with the bottom sediments is necessary. -- Highlights: • Cs-137 in the southern Fukushima coastal biota were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. • Simulation derived contamination phase of marine biota was completed until late April to July 2011. • The delay of Cs-137 concentration increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer. • The ecological half-lives during model derived depuration period were 1–9 months in coastal biota. • Additional source is necessary to reconstruct observed delay of Cs-137 depuration in benthic fish

  18. New and interesting records of freshwater Verrucaria in Central Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Krzewicka; Mariusz Hachu?ka

    2008-01-01

    Verrucaria madida is reported as new to Poland. Three other associated species, V. aquatilis, V. hydrela and V. rheitrophila, are compared. The known distribution in Poland and the ecology of these freshwater species are presented.

  19. Caernarvon freshwater diversion: Contaminants monitoring study (interim report)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Caernarvon Freshwater Diversion Structure was completed in January 1991 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The purpose of the structure is to divert...

  20. A Comparison of Freshwater Macroinvertebrate Communities on Small Caribbean Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAVID BASS (; )

    2003-11-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience is about freshwater macroinvetebrate communities. An ongoing survey of macroinvertebrates inhabiting the relatively unstudied freshwater habitats on 14 small Caribbean islands was initiated in 1991. These collections have yielded almost 200 species; when these species are combined with collections previously made by other researchers, a total of at least 328 freshwater macroinvertebrates are now known from these islands. The dominant taxa on the islands include several species of snails, shrimps, mayflies, dragonflies, damselflies, beetles, and other insects. Many of these species have fairly widespread distributions across the islands. Most stream species are associated with leaf packs, and most pond species are associated with aquatic macrophytes. As is typical of tropical island systems, the macroinvertebrate faunas of these islands are sparse, most likely because of their oceanic origin, their small size, and the frequent disturbances to their freshwater environments.

  1. Imperiled Freshwater and Diadromous Fishes of North America

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — List of imperiled freshwater and diadromous fishes of North America as determined by the 2008 American Fisheries Society (AFS) Endangered Species Committee (ESC) on...

  2. Freshwater mussels of North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A literature search of the distribution of freshwater mussels anticipated to be found on refuges assoicated with the North Mississippi Refuges Cjomplex and museum...

  3. Bibliography on cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography is a listing of pertinent literature directly addressing the cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems. Data on cycling, including the influences of environmental mediators, are included. 151 references

  4. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY ON NATURAL NUTRITION OF FRESH-WATER FISH

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Piria; Tomislav Treer; Roman Safner; Ivica Ani?i?; Tea Odak

    2001-01-01

    This paper offers the entire review on the research methodology in natural nutrition of fresh-water fish. The data on fresh-water fish nutrition, particularly on fish of lower economic value, is inadequate. Reviewing the literature on assesment of nutritional parameters, the authors obviously use differenet approaches and methods. This paper is about most frequently used parameteres in qualitative and quantitative analysis. The qualitative analysis of food structure is the overall list of det...

  5. Impact of climate change on freshwater snail species' ranges

    OpenAIRE

    Cordellier, Mathilde

    2009-01-01

    Global warming is expected to be associated with diverse changes in freshwater habitats in north-western Europe. Increasing evaporation, lower oxygen concentration due to increased water temperature and changes in precipitation pattern are likely to affect the survival ratio and reproduction rate of freshwater gastropods (Pulmonata, Basommatophora). This work is a comprehensive analyse of the climatic factors influencing their ranges both in the past and in the near future. A macroecological ...

  6. UAV-based hyperspectral monitoring of small freshwater area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölönen, I.; Puupponen, H.-H.; Honkavaara, Eija; Lindfors, A.; Saari, H.; Markelin, L.; Hakala, T.; Nurminen, K.

    2014-10-01

    Recent development in compact, lightweight hyperspectral imagers have enabled UAV-based remote sensing with reasonable costs. We used small hyperspectral imager based on Fabry-Perot interferometer for monitoring small freshwater area in southern Finland. In this study we shortly describe the utilized technology and the field studies performed. We explain processing pipeline for gathered spectral data and introduce target detection-based algorithm for estimating levels of algae, aquatic chlorophyll and turbidity in freshwater. Certain challenges we faced are pointed out.

  7. Nucleus Pearl Coating Process of Freshwater Mussel Anodonta woodiana (Unionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    WASMEN MANALU; DEDY DURYADI SOLIHIN; SATA YOSHIDA SRIE RAHAYU; RIDWAN AFFANDI

    2013-01-01

    The limiting factor which is a weakness of sea water pearl production are high costs, the risk of major business failures and a long coating time. From the issue of freshwater pearls appear to have prospects of alternative substitution for sea water pearl. This present study aimed to evaluate effect of loads (the number and diameter nucleus) on freshwater pearl coating process and the number and size of the appropriate nucleus diameter, to produce the optimum coating thickness of half-round p...

  8. Non-Native freshwater fish management in Biosphere Reserves

    OpenAIRE

    Puig, J. (Josep); PINO-DEL-CARPIO, A; Miranda, R

    2010-01-01

    The consideration of non-native freshwater fish species in the management plans of 18 Biosphere Reserves is evaluated. Additionally, impacts caused by introduced freshwater fish species are described. Some measures to alleviate the ecological effects of fish species introductions are proposed, while paying attention to local development as well. The introduction of non-native species may have negative conse-quences for the ecosystems. The analysis of the management plans of the Reserves confi...

  9. Viruses of Freshwater Finfish in the Asian–Pacific Region

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, P. K.; Goodwin, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    There has been a tremendous increase in global demand for marine and freshwater fish to meet the protein needs of our expanding human population. However, due to the limited capacity of the wild-capture sector and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture, particularly freshwater aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. A large number of aquatic animal spe...

  10. New data on freshwater psammic Gastrotricha from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Balsamo; André Rinaldo Garraffoni; Thiago Araujo; Anete Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    Current knowledge of freshwater gastrotrich fauna from Brazil is underestimated as only two studies are available. The present communication is a taxonomic account of the first-ever survey of freshwater Gastrotricha in Minas Gerais State. Samplings were carried out yielding six species of three Chaetonotidae genera: Aspidiophorus cf. pleustonicus, Ichthydium cf. chaetiferum, Chaetonotus acanthocephalus, Chaetonotus heideri, Chaetonotus cf. succinctus, Chaetonotus sp., and also an undescribed ...

  11. FRESHWATER FISHERY OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Homen

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available As fishery, including freshwater, is very important for economy of the Republic of Croatia, the aim of this paper is to show its condition from 1995 to 1998. and also to draw a plan for fish production in 1999. The period from 1998-1999. is more stressed in order to have a total and detailed view into the present condition of the freshwater fishery and into the direction in wish that production is going. Data about carp ponds and also about trout ponds is presented. Twentynine fish-ponds are processed out of which 20 are carp ponds and 9 trout ponds. Data was delivered to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry Fisheries Directorate. An assessment of the condition is made for 3 fish-ponds as the desired data was not provided. As to the number of employees on fish-ponds, a slight decline could be percived in the period from 1995 to 1997. In 1998 a number of employees considerably increased for 10.07% in relation to 1997. qualification of the employees in 1998. show that the most of them are unqualified what is in accord with the requirements of a job on a fish-pond. Overall surface of the carp ponds in 1998 was 12,708 and the production surface was 9,782 ha. The most of the fish-ponds have up to 500 ha of total surface (45.45%, while 50% of the fish-ponds have production surface from 500-100 ha. The production in the trout ponds is made on 165,905 m 2 of the overall surface of the ponds, and only 40,538 m 2 are the production surface of the ponds. The production of fish in that period was in constant increase and that increasing trend in expected in 1999, and it will be an 28.30 % increase in relation to 1998. The increase is expected for all kids of fish except for big head carps, silver carps and tinch fishs. As a part of the production of tinch fishs an increase in production of consumption tinch fish is expected, but a decrease in production of one-year and two-year old fishs and two-year old fish. Out of all kinds of fish, the most produced in 1998. was carp (80.93%, then trout (8.30 %, herbivorous kinds of fish (8.01% and all other fish (2.76% out of which sheat fish was the most produced. Only slightly changed structure of the production is expected in 1999. Carp production will still be the most prolific and slightly increased - 81.97%, trout - production - 6.68 %, herbivorous fish - 7.69% and other kinds of fish - 3.69% which in increased percentage in relation to 1998. Taking into consideration production surfaces of the fish ponds and the realized production in 1998., it can be conciuded that the average amount in carp fish ponds was 710.37 kg/ha which is substantially under desired amount of about 1000 kg/ha. Surely, it should be stressed that some fish ponds managed to attain that number and even to exceed it. In trout fish ponds the average amount was 133.17 t/ha. The increased production requires an increased need for food. It is expected that the largest expenditure for fish feeding will be that of corn (60.59%, wheat (14.91%, mixture (10.36%, barley (8.38%, and soya shot (3.29%, meat-bone flour (0.48, fish flour (0.51%, medicines, medicinal food and aditives (0.68% and other food (0.81%. Fish in carp ponds are sold on the domestic market and abroad, while trouts are sold only on the domestic market. Total realization on the freshwater fish market was 45 milions kunas in 1998. As one of the mesaures for improvement of fishery and aquaculture in general are stimuli for production of freshwater fish. On the grounds of the law of monetary incentive in agriculture and fishery. During 1998. A monetary incentive for growing of freshwater fish was payed and it was 5,623,957.01 kunas which is an increase of 77.57% in relation to 1997.

  12. Stormwater runoff drives viral community composition changes in inland freshwaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KurtE.Williamson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Storm events impact freshwater microbial communities by transporting terrestrial viruses and other microbes to freshwater systems, and by potentially resuspending microbes from bottom sediments. The magnitude of these impacts on freshwater ecosystems is unknown and largely unexplored. Field studies carried out at two discrete sites in coastal Virginia (USA were used to characterize the viral load carried by runoff and to test the hypothesis that terrestrial viruses introduced through stormwater runoff change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Field data gathered from an agricultural watershed indicated that primary runoff can contain viral densities approximating those of receiving waters. Furthermore, viruses attached to suspended colloids made up a large fraction of the total load, particularly in early stages of the storm. At a second field site (stormwater retention pond, RAPD-PCR profiling showed that the viral community of the pond changed dramatically over the course of two intense storms while relatively little change was observed over similar time scales in the absence of disturbance. Comparisons of planktonic and particle-associated viral communities revealed two completely distinct communities, suggesting that particle-associated viruses represent a potentially large and overlooked portion of aquatic viral abundance and diversity. Our findings show that stormwater runoff can quickly change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Based on these findings, increased storms in the coastal mid-Atlantic region predicted by most climate change models will likely have important impacts on the structure and function of local freshwater microbial communities.

  13. Stormwater runoff drives viral community composition changes in inland freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kurt E; Harris, Jamie V; Green, Jasmin C; Rahman, Faraz; Chambers, Randolph M

    2014-01-01

    Storm events impact freshwater microbial communities by transporting terrestrial viruses and other microbes to freshwater systems, and by potentially resuspending microbes from bottom sediments. The magnitude of these impacts on freshwater ecosystems is unknown and largely unexplored. Field studies carried out at two discrete sites in coastal Virginia (USA) were used to characterize the viral load carried by runoff and to test the hypothesis that terrestrial viruses introduced through stormwater runoff change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Field data gathered from an agricultural watershed indicated that primary runoff can contain viral densities approximating those of receiving waters. Furthermore, viruses attached to suspended colloids made up a large fraction of the total load, particularly in early stages of the storm. At a second field site (stormwater retention pond), RAPD-PCR profiling showed that the viral community of the pond changed dramatically over the course of two intense storms while relatively little change was observed over similar time scales in the absence of disturbance. Comparisons of planktonic and particle-associated viral communities revealed two completely distinct communities, suggesting that particle-associated viruses represent a potentially large and overlooked portion of aquatic viral abundance and diversity. Our findings show that stormwater runoff can quickly change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Based on these findings, increased storms in the coastal mid-Atlantic region predicted by most climate change models will likely have important impacts on the structure and function of local freshwater microbial communities. PMID:24672520

  14. Climate change and Southern Ocean ecosystems I: how changes in physical habitats directly affect marine biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Andrew J; Melbourne-Thomas, Jessica; Corney, Stuart P; Arrigo, Kevin R; Barbraud, Christophe; Barnes, David K A; Bindoff, Nathaniel L; Boyd, Philip W; Brandt, Angelika; Costa, Daniel P; Davidson, Andrew T; Ducklow, Hugh W; Emmerson, Louise; Fukuchi, Mitsuo; Gutt, Julian; Hindell, Mark A; Hofmann, Eileen E; Hosie, Graham W; Iida, Takahiro; Jacob, Sarah; Johnston, Nadine M; Kawaguchi, So; Kokubun, Nobuo; Koubbi, Philippe; Lea, Mary-Anne; Makhado, Azwianewi; Massom, Rob A; Meiners, Klaus; Meredith, Michael P; Murphy, Eugene J; Nicol, Stephen; Reid, Keith; Richerson, Kate; Riddle, Martin J; Rintoul, Stephen R; Smith, Walker O; Southwell, Colin; Stark, Jonathon S; Sumner, Michael; Swadling, Kerrie M; Takahashi, Kunio T; Trathan, Phil N; Welsford, Dirk C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Westwood, Karen J; Wienecke, Barbara C; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Wright, Simon W; Xavier, Jose C; Ziegler, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Antarctic and Southern Ocean (ASO) marine ecosystems have been changing for at least the last 30 years, including in response to increasing ocean temperatures and changes in the extent and seasonality of sea ice; the magnitude and direction of these changes differ between regions around Antarctica that could see populations of the same species changing differently in different regions. This article reviews current and expected changes in ASO physical habitats in response to climate change. It then reviews how these changes may impact the autecology of marine biota of this polar region: microbes, zooplankton, salps, Antarctic krill, fish, cephalopods, marine mammals, seabirds, and benthos. The general prognosis for ASO marine habitats is for an overall warming and freshening, strengthening of westerly winds, with a potential pole-ward movement of those winds and the frontal systems, and an increase in ocean eddy activity. Many habitat parameters will have regionally specific changes, particularly relating to sea ice characteristics and seasonal dynamics. Lower trophic levels are expected to move south as the ocean conditions in which they are currently found move pole-ward. For Antarctic krill and finfish, the latitudinal breadth of their range will depend on their tolerance of warming oceans and changes to productivity. Ocean acidification is a concern not only for calcifying organisms but also for crustaceans such as Antarctic krill; it is also likely to be the most important change in benthic habitats over the coming century. For marine mammals and birds, the expected changes primarily relate to their flexibility in moving to alternative locations for food and the energetic cost of longer or more complex foraging trips for those that are bound to breeding colonies. Few species are sufficiently well studied to make comprehensive species-specific vulnerability assessments possible. Priorities for future work are discussed. PMID:24802817

  15. Adaptative Response and Bystander Effects in Human and Non-Human Biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in our understanding of effects of radiation on living cells suggests that fundamentally different mechanisms are operating at low doses compared with high doses. Also, acute low doses appear to involve different response mechanisms compared with chronic low dose. Both genomic instability and so called bystander effects show many similarities with well known cellular responses to oxidative stress. These predominate following low dose exposures and are maximally expressed at doses as low as 5mGy. At the biological level this is not surprising. Chemical toxicity has been known for many years to show these patterns of dose response. Cell signaling and coordinated stress mechanisms appear to dominate acute low dose exposure to chemicals. Adaptation to chemical exposures is also well documented although mechanisms of adaptive responses are less clear. In the radiation field adaptive responses also become important when low doses are protracted or fractionated. Recent data from our group concerning bystander effects following multiple low dose exposure suggest that adaptive responses can be induced in cells which only receive signals from irradiated neighbours. We have determined using genetically distinct mice, with different radiosensitivities, that bystander effects occur in vivo and vary according to genetic background. We also have data showing delayed and bystander effects in fish and in prawns following in vitro irradiation of haematopoietic tissue. Tro irradiation of haematopoietic tissue. These data have implications for environmental radiation protection of human and non human species alike. Simple extrapolations from high to low dose exposure may need to be re evaluated. This paper discusses our knowledge about these low dose radiobiological effects in both human and non-human biota and draws attention to the problem of defining the important questions relevant for the level of biological organisation being studied. (Author)

  16. Radiation-induced bystander effects: Relevance for radiation protection of human and non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low dose low LET ionizing radiation is reviewed in the context of relevance to radiation protection issues. The question of how bystander effects may be related to observed adaptive responses, systemic genomic instability or other effects of low doses exposures is also considered. Bystander effects appear to be the result of a generalized stress response in tissues or cells. The signals may be produced by all exposed cells, but the response may require additional system parameters to exist in order to be expressed. The major response involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature is a death response. This can manifest as apoptotic cell death, terminal differentiation, reproductive cell death or necrosis. While a death response might appear to be adverse, the position is argued in this paper, that it can in fact be protective and remove damaged cells from the reproducing population. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation (so-called 'background damage'), it is possible that low dose radiation exposures cause removal of cells damaged by agents other than the test dose of radiation. This mechanism would lead to the production of 'u- or n-shaped' dose response curves. In this scenario, the level of harmful or beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the cell population and damage carried by the cell population and the genetic program determining response to damage. This model--may be particularly important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving radiation and other environmental stressors on biota. (author)

  17. The effect of native and introduced biofuel crops on the composition of soil biota communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hed?nec, Petr; Ustak, Sergej; Novotný, David; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Biofuel crops are an accepted alternative to fossil fuels, but little is known about the ecological impact of their production. The aim of this contribution is to study the effect of native (Salix viminalis and Phalaris arundinacea) and introduced (Helianthus tuberosus, Reynoutria sachalinensis and Silphium perfoliatum) biofuel crop plantations on the soil biota in comparison with cultural meadow vegetation used as control. The study was performed as part of a split plot field experiment of the Crop Research Institute in the city of Chomutov (Czech Republic). The composition of the soil meso- and macrofauna community, composition of the cultivable fraction of the soil fungal community, cellulose decomposition (using litter bags), microbial biomass, basal soil respiration and PLFA composition (incl. F/B ratio) were studied in each site. The C:N ratio and content of polyphenols differed among plant species, but these results could not be considered significant between introduced and native plant species. Abundance of the soil meso- and macrofauna was higher in field sites planted with S. viminalis and P. arundinacea than those planted with S. perfoliatum, H. tuberosus and R. sachalinensis. RDA and Monte Carlo Permutation Test showed that the composition of the faunal community differed significantly between various native and introduced plants. Significantly different basal soil respiration was found in sites planted with various energy crops; however, this difference was not significant between native and introduced species. Microbial biomass carbon and cellulose decomposition did not exhibit any statistical differences among the biofuel crops. The largest statistically significant difference we found was in the content of actinobacterial and bacterial (bacteria, G+ bacteria and G- bacteria) PLFA in sites overgrown by P. arundinacea compared to introduced as well as native biofuel crops. In conclusion, certain parameters significantly differ between various native and introduced species of biofuel crops; however, the functional importance of these differences requires further research.

  18. Comparing measured and predicted PCB concentrations in Arctic seawater and marine biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a mechanistic food web model was parameterized for the Arctic marine ecosystem, it predicted PCB concentrations in zooplankton and fish that were two orders of magnitude lower than measured. PCB concentrations measured in zooplankton and fish were within the laboratory's accredited quality assured criteria, and were comparable to other Arctic regions. Although on a different scale, the predicted and measured PCB concentrations were highly correlated. As sensitivity analyses indicated water concentrations as the most sensitive parameter for the model output, dissolved water concentrations were predicted using measured zooplankton and air PCB concentrations, and empirical and mechanistic models. The food web model and the empirical relationship between bioaccumulation factor and octanol-water partitioning coefficient predicted mean dissolved water concentrations of 28 and 29 pg/L ?PCB6 (PCB-28, -52, -105, -118, -138, -153), respectively. Mean dissolved water concentration predicted from measured air concentrations in 1996 was 7.6 pg/L ?PCB5 (PCB-28 was not analysed). Mean dissolved water concentration measured in Barents Sea water sampled simultaneously as the biota in 1999 was 0.3 pg/L ?PCB6. The dissolved water concentrations predicted from zooplankton PCB concentrations were comparable to water concentrations measured in 1996, whereas the dissolved water concentrations measured in 1999 were comparable to measurements from 2001re comparable to measurements from 2001. If the present high empirically derived bioaccumulation factors (log BAF 7.3-9.0) were realistic, this suggests that bioaccumulation in Arctic zooplankton is more efficient that previously assumed. The present study illustrates and discusses some of the difficulties encountered when different approaches to study environmental distribution of contaminants are compared

  19. Soil biota effects on clonal growth and flowering in the forest herb Stachys sylvatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Eduardo; Bonte, Dries

    2011-03-01

    The composition of a soil community can vary drastically at extremely short distances. Therefore, plants from any given population can be expected to experience strong differences in belowground biotic interactions. Although it is well recognized that the soil biota plays a significant role in the structure and dynamics of plant communities, plastic responses in growth strategies as a function of soil biotic interactions have received little attention. In this study, we question whether the biotic soil context from two forest associated contrasting environments (the forest understory and the hedgerows) determines the balance between clonal growth and flowering of the perennial Stachys sylvatica. Using artificial soils, we compared the growth responses of this species following inoculation with the mycorrhizal and microbial community extracted either from rhizospheric soil of the forest understory or from the hedgerows. The microbial context had a strong effect on plant functional traits, determining the production of runners and inflorescences. Plants inoculated with the hedgerow community had a greater biomass, larger number of runners, and lower resource investment in flower production than was seen in plants inoculated with the understory microbial community. The obtained results illustrate that belowground biotic interactions are essential to understand basic plastic growth responses determinant for plant establishment and survival. The interactions with microbial communities from two contrasting habitats resulted in two different, and presumably adaptive, growth strategies that were optimal for the conditions prevalent in the environments compared; and they are as such an essential factor to understand plant-plant, plant-animal interactions and the dispersal capacities of clonal plants.

  20. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  1. [Latin American malacology. Freshwater mollusks from Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumi, Alejandra; Gregoric, Diego E Gutiérrez; Núñez, Verónica; Darrigran, Gustavo A

    2008-03-01

    A report and an updated list with comments on the species of freshwater molluscs of Argentina which covers an area of 2 777 815 km2 is presented. Distributions of Gastropoda and Bivalvia families, endemic, exotic, invasive as well as entities of sanitary importance are also studied and recommendations on their conservation are provided. Molluscs related to the Del Plata Basin have been thoroughly studied in comparison to others areas of the country. This fauna exhibits relatively the biggest specific richness and keeps its affinity with the fauna of other regions of the basin in areas of Paraguay and Brasil. The 4 500 records of molluscs considered in this paper arise from the study of the collections of Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Buenos Aires; Museo de La Plata, La Plata and Fundación "Miguel Lillo", Tucumán. These institutions keep very important collections of molluscs in southern South America. Field information has recently been obtained and localities cited by other authors are also included in the data base. Until today, 166 species have been described, 101 belonging to 10 families of Gastropoda and 65 to 7 of Bivalvia. Families with highest specific richness are Lithoglyphidae (22) and Sphaeriidae (25), respectively. The number of endemic species (those present only in Argentina) by family is: Gastropoda: Ampullariidae (1), Cochliopidae (10), Lithoglyphidae (11), Thiariidae (3), Chilinidae (11), Lymnaeidae (2) and Physidae (2?); Bivalvia: Hyriidae (1?); Etheriidae (1?) and Sphaeriidae (10). Families with a distribution that comprise almost the whole country are: the Sphaeriidae and the gastropods Cochliopidae, Chilinidae and Lymnaeidae. Families Erodonidae and Solecurtidae (Bivalvia) were registered in mixohaline environments from Buenos Aires province. Gastropod families Thiaridae and Glacidorbiidae show a very restricted distribution. The rest of the families are present mainly in the center and north of the country. Species of sanitary interest are the propagators of: schistosomiasis -Biomphalaria peregrina, B. straminea y B. tenagophila, Planorbidae-, fasciolasis -Lymnaea viatrix and L. columnella, Lymnaeidae- and dermatitis -Chilina gibbosa and C. fluminea, Chilinidae. Invasive species are: Corbicula fluminea (Corbiculidae) and Limnoperna fortunei (Mytilidae). The construction of new areas for the protection and conservation of the high risk endemic species of freshwater molluscs is a priority. It is necessary to give special attention to the species of the patagonic mountain range and of the mesopotamic area of the Del Plata Basin. PMID:18624229

  2. Potential impacts of leakage from deep CO2 geosequestration on overlying freshwater aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Mark G; Jackson, Robert B

    2010-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage may use deep saline aquifers for CO(2) sequestration, but small CO(2) leakage could pose a risk to overlying fresh groundwater. We performed laboratory incubations of CO(2) infiltration under oxidizing conditions for >300 days on samples from four freshwater aquifers to 1) understand how CO(2) leakage affects freshwater quality; 2) develop selection criteria for deep sequestration sites based on inorganic metal contamination caused by CO(2) leaks to shallow aquifers; and 3) identify geochemical signatures for early detection criteria. After exposure to CO(2), water pH declines of 1-2 units were apparent in all aquifer samples. CO(2) caused concentrations of the alkali and alkaline earths and manganese, cobalt, nickel, and iron to increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Potentially dangerous uranium and barium increased throughout the entire experiment in some samples. Solid-phase metal mobility, carbonate buffering capacity, and redox state in the shallow overlying aquifers influence the impact of CO(2) leakage and should be considered when selecting deep geosequestration sites. Manganese, iron, calcium, and pH could be used as geochemical markers of a CO(2) leak, as their concentrations increase within 2 weeks of exposure to CO(2). PMID:20977267

  3. Biofouling problems in freshwater cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In aqueous environments, microorganisms (bacteria, algae, fungi etc.,) are attracted towards surfaces, which they readily colonise resulting in the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofouling are energy losses due to increased fluid frictional resistance and increased heat transfer resistance. The temperatures prevalent inside the condenser system provide a favorable environment for the rapid growth of microorganisms. This results in thick slime deposit, which is responsible for heat transfer losses, thereby enhancing aggregation of deposits on the material surface and induces localised corrosion. There have been instances of increased capital costs due to premature replacement of equipment caused by severe under deposit corrosion due to biofouling. Moreover, fouling of service water systems of nuclear power plants is of concern, because it reduces the heat transfer capacity during an emergency or an accident. The growth of microbial films (slimes) a few tens of microns thick, in a condenser tube is sufficient to induce microbiologically influenced corrosion and cause irreparable damage to the condenser tubes and other structural materials. The down time costs to power plant due to condenser fouling and corrosion are quite large. This paper presents the author's experience in biofouling and corrosion problems in various power plants cooled by freshwater. (author)

  4. Organic environmental poisons in Norwegian freshwater fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to this article, the level of organic poisons in Norwegian freshwater fish is, on the whole, is too small to threaten human health. It has been found, however, that liver from some species such as burbot, from some lakes, should not be eaten. These lakes are found to contain higher levels of PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) and DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Previously, pregnant or breast-feeding women anywhere in Norway have been advised not to eat pike, large perch or large trout because of too much mercury. Other people should not eat these species more often than once per month. In general, the level of organic environmental poisons is higher in the southern part of the country than in the northern part. The sediments of the lakes in large parts of South Norway are contaminated with lead, mercury and cadmium as compared with the conditions before the industrial revolution. However, the level of metals in the lake sediments are relatively low, and these substances are unlikely to appear in the food chain, by and large. The anthropogenic emission of lead was insignificant before the industrial revolution. The exception of lead from German mining industry in the 1700s

  5. 2007 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Teel

    2008-03-18

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, lower Columbia River, 2007. Final report submitted to the Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RLO1830.' Genotypic data were collected for 108 Chinook salmon and used in the genetic stock identification analysis. Results of the mixture analysis are presented in Table 1. Percentage estimates for four genetic stock groups (West Cascade Tributary Fall, Willamette River Spring, Deschutes River Fall, and Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall) ranged from 11% to 43%, all with non-zero lower 95% confidence intervals. Small contributions were also estimated for the West Cascade Tributary Spring (3%) and Snake River Fall (6%) stock groups. Results of individual fish probability assignments were summed by collection date (Figure 1) and site (Figure 2). Assignment probabilities for the most likely stock group for each individual ranged from 0.51 to 1.00 with approximately 60% of the assignments greater than 0.90 (data not shown). Nearly all of the low probability assignments were fish with assignments split between the Deschutes River Fall and Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall groups.

  6. 75 FR 64249 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Extension of the Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ...A-570-848] Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China. See Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of...

  7. 78 FR 24723 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ...A-570-848] Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the [[Page 24724

  8. 75 FR 13497 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat from the People's Republic of China: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ...A-570-848 Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat from the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat (crawfish) from the People's Republic...Antidumping Duty Order: Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of...

  9. Investigating salt and naphthenic acids interactions in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Kautzman, M.; Wojnarowicz, P.; Cutter, J.; Bird, E.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The hot water extraction process used to produce bitumens from oil sands produces a large volume of oil sands process water (OSPW) that contain elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids (NA) and salts. Many oil sands reclamation projects are proposing the use of OSPW as part of reconstructed wetlands projects. This study investigated the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates. The toxic interactions between NA and salinity on freshwater invertebrates were assessed. Bioassays with laboratory-cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The study showed that while the concentrations of NAs and salinity were elevated in OSPW waters that caused toxic responses, the concentrations of salinity ions varied greatly among the OSPW samples. Results of the study suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Interactions between NAs and salinity were then assessed by performing bioassays with mixtures representing major ion combinations in OSPW.

  10. Investigating salt and naphthenic acids interactions in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot water extraction process used to produce bitumens from oil sands produces a large volume of oil sands process water (OSPW) that contain elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids (NA) and salts. Many oil sands reclamation projects are proposing the use of OSPW as part of reconstructed wetlands projects. This study investigated the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates. The toxic interactions between NA and salinity on freshwater invertebrates were assessed. Bioassays with laboratory-cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The study showed that while the concentrations of NAs and salinity were elevated in OSPW waters that caused toxic responses, the concentrations of salinity ions varied greatly among the OSPW samples. Results of the study suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Interactions between NAs and salinity were then assessed by performing bioassays with mixtures representing major ion combinations in OSPW.

  11. Influence of short term exposure of TBT on the male reproductive activity in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revathi, Peranandam; Iyapparaj, Palanisamy; Vasanthi, Lourduraj Arockia; Munuswamy, Natesan; Prasanna, Vimalanathan Arun; Pandiyarajan, Jayaraj; Krishnan, Muthukalingan

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the effect of tributyltin (TBT) on the histopathological and hormonal changes during spermatogenesis in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii was documented. Three experimental concentrations such as 10, 100 and 1,000 ng/L were selected and exposed to prawns for 45 days. After TBT exposure, the reproductive activities like sperm count and sperm length were decreased when compared with control. Further, abnormal structure of the seminiferous tubule, decrease in spermatozoa concentration, diminution of the seminiferous tubule membrane and the abundance of spermatocytes in the testis were noticed in treated prawns. Interestingly, radioimmunoassay clearly revealed the reduction of testosterone level in TBT exposed groups. Thus, TBT has considerably reduced the level of testosterone and caused the impairment of spermatogenesis in the freshwater male prawn M. rosenbergii. PMID:25016935

  12. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43??g/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13??g/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  13. New Zealand Freshwater Management: Changing Policy for a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, H. L.; Norton, N.

    2014-12-01

    Fresh water is essential to New Zealand's economic, environmental, cultural and social well-being. In line with global trends, New Zealand's freshwater resources are under pressure from increased abstraction and changes in land-use which contribute contaminants to our freshwater systems. Recent central government policy reform introduces greater national direction and guidance, to bring about a step-change in freshwater management. An existing national policy for freshwater management introduced in 2011 requires regional authorities to produce freshwater management plans containing clear freshwater objectives (measurable statements about the desired environmental state for water bodies) and associated limits to resource use (such as environmental flows and quantity allocation limits, and loads of contaminants to be discharged). These plans must integrate water quantity and quality management, consider climate change, and incorporate tangata whenua (New Zealand m?ori) roles and interests. In recent (2014) national policy amendments, the regional authorities are also required to implement national 'bottom-line' standards for certain attributes of the system to be managed; undertake accounting for all water takes and all sources of contaminants; and to develop and implement their plans in a collaborative way with communities. This rapid change in national policy has necessitated a new way of working for authorities tasked with implementation; many obstacles lie in their path. The scientific methods required to help set water quantity limits are well established, but water quality methods are less so. Collaborative processes have well documented benefits but also raise many challenges, particularly for the communication of complex and often uncertain scientific information. This paper provides background on the national policy changes and offers some early lessons learned by the regional authorities implementing collaborative freshwater management in New Zealand.

  14. Mechanical challenges to freshwater residency in sharks and rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiss, Adrian C; Potvin, Jean; Keleher, James J; Whitty, Jeff M; Morgan, David L; Goldbogen, Jeremy A

    2015-04-01

    Major transitions between marine and freshwater habitats are relatively infrequent, primarily as a result of major physiological and ecological challenges. Few species of cartilaginous fish have evolved to occupy freshwater habitats. Current thought suggests that the metabolic physiology of sharks has remained a barrier to the diversification of this taxon in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we demonstrate that the physical properties of water provide an additional constraint for this species-rich group to occupy freshwater systems. Using hydromechanical modeling, we show that occurrence in fresh water results in a two- to three-fold increase in negative buoyancy for sharks and rays. This carries the energetic cost of lift production and results in increased buoyancy-dependent mechanical power requirements for swimming and increased optimal swim speeds. The primary source of buoyancy, the lipid-rich liver, offers only limited compensation for increased negative buoyancy as a result of decreasing water density; maintaining the same submerged weight would involve increasing the liver volume by very large amounts: 3- to 4-fold in scenarios where liver density is also reduced to currently observed minimal levels and 8-fold without any changes in liver density. The first data on body density from two species of elasmobranch occurring in freshwater (the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas, Müller and Henle 1839, and the largetooth sawfish Pristis pristis, Linnaeus 1758) support this hypothesis, showing similar liver sizes as marine forms but lower liver densities, but the greatest negative buoyancies of any elasmobranch studied to date. Our data suggest that the mechanical challenges associated with buoyancy control may have hampered the invasion of freshwater habitats in elasmobranchs, highlighting an additional key factor that may govern the predisposition of marine organisms to successfully establish in freshwater habitats. PMID:25573824

  15. Anthropogenic litter in urban freshwater ecosystems: distribution and microbial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellein, Timothy; Rojas, Miguel; Pink, Adam; Gasior, Joseph; Kelly, John

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic litter (i.e. garbage; AL) and its ecosystem effects in marine environments are well documented. Rivers receive AL from terrestrial habitats and represent a major source of AL to marine environments, but AL is rarely studied within freshwater ecosystems. Our objectives were to 1) quantify AL density in urban freshwaters, 2) compare AL abundance among freshwater, terrestrial, and marine ecosystems, and 3) characterize the activity and composition of AL biofilms in freshwater habitats. We quantified AL from the Chicago River and Chicago's Lake Michigan shoreline, and found that AL abundance in Chicago freshwater ecosystems was comparable to previously reported data for marine and terrestrial ecosystems, although AL density and composition differed among habitats. To assess microbial interactions with AL, we incubated AL and natural substrates in 3 freshwater ecosystems, quantified biofilm metabolism as gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (CR), and characterized biofilm bacterial community composition via high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The main driver of biofilm community composition was incubation location (e.g., river vs pond), but there were some significant differences in biofilm composition and metabolism among substrates. For example, biofilms on organic substrates (cardboard and leaves) had lower GPP than hard substrates (glass, plastic, aluminum and tiles). In addition, bacterial communities on organic substrates were distinct in composition from those on hard substrates, with higher relative abundances of bacteria associated with cellulose decomposition. Finally, we used our results to develop a conceptual diagram designed to unite the study of AL in terrestrial and freshwater environments with the well-established field of marine debris research. We suggest this broad perspective will be useful for future studies which synthesize AL sources, ecosystem effects, and fate across multiple ecosystem types, and will benefit management and reduction of global AL accumulations. PMID:24955768

  16. THE FRESHWATER FISHERIES LAW (»Narodne novine«, br. 106/01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Sui?

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The first chapter (Common regulations contains basic definitions as well as the vocabulary of the terms which were used in the text of the act, furthermore dividing of fishing waters, the work of the institutions registered for the freshwater fisheries and ecology of inland waters. Chapter II. deals with the conditions for commercial fisheries. In Chapter III., which is related to recreational–sports fisheries, the conditions for recreational–sports fisheries (fishing exams, fishing licences, fishing right, management acts, yearly plans fishguard service etc were defined, as well as the public empowering dedicated to the H[RS (The Croatian Sports Fisheries Association The Chapter IV contains conditions for the aquaculture. The protection of the fish is regulated in Chapter V. (selective fishing, restocking of fishing waters, no–fishing periods, minimal sizes of catch, fishing gear, compensation of damages. Chapter VI. contains regulations of usage of money funds collected on basis of fishing licences for recreational–sports fisheries, commercial fisheries and aquaculture. Chapter VII. is dealing with the system of data collecting in commercial fisheries, recreational–sports fisheries and aquaculture. Chapter VIII. regulates the administrative inspection (Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and field inspection (State inspectorate and authorized official persons of Ministry of Internal Affairs. Chapter IX. — Special regulations — deals with foreign persons in aquaculture and fishing. Chapter X. contains the amounts of financial punishments. Transitional and final regulations in Chapter XI deal with the terms in which the Minister of agriculture and forestry should bring all the sub–laws on basis of this law. Also the terms are defined regarding the management acts and all the documents (permissions and exams

  17. Sensitivity test of food chain model of temporal 137Cs distribution in coastal biota in case of short term introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the criticality accident occurred at JCO Co. Ltd. on September 30, 1999 in Tokai, Japan, short term estimation of released radionuclides behavior will be required for decision-making in emergent action. To predict radionuclide concentrations in marine organisms under short term radionuclide introduction to coastal water such as accidental situation, models of nuclide transfer both from seawater and food chain to marine organisms are studied by TATEDA (1994, 1997), TATEDA et al. (1997, 2001). The model was developed for typical Japanese coastal water including benthic food chain and planktonic food chain, with transfer parameter data set, such as uptake rate constant, excretion rate constants, gut transfer rates, food ingestion rates of 137Cs, those collected by many tracer experiment studies. Using the model verified by (calculated equilibrated concentrations)/ (observed concentrations) in biota and (calculated decrease curves of 137Cs concentrations)/(observed curves) in biota under the Chernobyl fallout introduction in Japan, we estimate the period for decontamination time of 137Cs in organisms of marine food chain under several imaginable cases. However, prediction by this model still contains uncertainty because of the variation of transfer parameters used in the model. In this study, we tested the model sensitivity for the different combinations of varied transfer parameters reported, and predicted the temporal and special distribution of 137Cs in biota in the coastal area of future nuclear fuel reprocessing plant site at Rokkasho, Aomori, Japan. The result of sensitivity analyses suggested that the effects of the variation of transfer parameters to the output of model calculations are within a range of 3 - 10 times in temporal 137Cs concentrations in coastal organisms. (author)

  18. Filling the gaps: Predicting the distribution of temperate reef biota using high resolution biological and acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicole A.; Lucieer, Vanessa; Barrett, Neville S.; Anderson, Tara J.; Williams, Stefan B.

    2014-06-01

    Management of the marine environment is often hampered by a lack of comprehensive spatial information on the distribution of diversity and the bio-physical processes structuring regional ecosystems. This is particularly true in temperate reef systems beyond depths easily accessible to divers. Yet these systems harbor a diversity of sessile life that provide essential ecosystem services, sustain fisheries and, as with shallower ecosystems, are also increasingly vulnerable to anthropogenic impacts and environmental change. Here we use cutting-edge tools (Autonomous Underwater Vehicles and ship-borne acoustics) and analytical approaches (predictive modelling) to quantify and map these highly productive ecosystems. We find the occurrence of key temperate-reef biota can be explained and predicted using standard (depth) and novel (texture) surrogates derived from multibeam acoustic data, and geographic surrogates. This suggests that combinations of fine-scale processes, such as light limitation and habitat complexity, and broad-scale processes, such as regional currents and exposure regimes, are important in structuring these diverse deep-reef communities. While some dominant habitat forming biota, including canopy algae, were widely distributed, others, including gorgonians and sea whips, exhibited patchy and restricted distributions across the reef system. In addition to providing the first quantitative and full coverage maps of reef diversity for this area, our modelling revealed that offshore reefs represented a regional diversity hotspot that is of high ecological and conservation value. Regional reef systems should not, therefore, be considered homogenous units in conservation planning and management. Full-coverage maps of the predicted distribution of biota (and associated uncertainty) are likely to be increasingly valuable, not only for conservation planning, but in the ongoing management and monitoring of these less-accessible ecosystems.

  19. Occurrence, distribution and bioaccumulation of endocrine disrupting compounds in water, sediment and biota samples from a European river basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Besada, V; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2015-10-01

    The occurrence, distribution and bioaccumulation of five endocrine disrupting compounds (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol and bisphenol A) in water, sediment and biota (Corbicula fluminea) collected along the Minho River estuary (NW Iberian Peninsula) were examined. Samples were collected in two campaigns (May and November, 2012) and analyzed by different extraction procedures followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination. The presence of linear isomers (4-n-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol) was scarcely observed whereas branched isomers (4-tert-octylphenol and nonylphenol) were measured in almost all samples. Wastewater treatment plant effluents and nautical, fishing and agricultural activities are considered the primary source of pollution of the river by alkylphenols. The presence of bisphenol A in the river could be mainly associated to punctual sources of contamination from industrial discharges. A decrease in the total concentration of phenolic compounds in water was observed from spring to autumn (from 0.888?gL(-1) in May to 0.05?gL(-1) in November), while similar values were shown in C. fluminea samples from the two campaigns (1388 and 1228ngg(-1) dw in spring and autumn, respectively). In sediments, the total concentration of the target compounds varied between 13 and 4536ngg(-1) dw (average of 1041ngg(-1) dw). Sediment-water partition coefficient (Kd), bioaccumulation factor (BAF) and biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) were estimated and highest values were obtained for nonylphenol. Calculated risk quotients showed low and moderate risk for the aquatic environment from the presence of the target compounds at all sampling points. The estimation of the daily intake of the studied compounds via water and biota ingestion indicated no risk for human health. PMID:26005755

  20. Dichlobenil and 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in the environment: What are the risks to humans and biota?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichlobenil is a herbicide widely used for weed control, mainly in non-agricultural areas and in the aquatic environment. When released into the environment, dichlobenil can undergo many processes such as vaporization to air, binding to soil and sediment, as well as degradation to a number of new compounds. The main metabolite is 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) which is water soluble and causes ground water contamination. It is frequently found in levels exceeding maximum allowed concentrations of pesticides and metabolites in ground water (0.1 ?g/L) set by the European Commission. The environmental distribution of both dichlobenil and BAM was outlined and the risk quotients were calculated for biota and for humans. For organisms living in aquatic habitats, risk quotients were low for both dichlobenil and BAM, approximately 0.02 for dichlobenil and 2.4 . 10-4 to 1.3 . 10-3 for BAM. For humans, a margin of safety above 15,000 was estimated for dichlobenil. The most unusual and extreme concentration of BAM ever found in ground water is 560 ?g/L. Even at this concentration, the margin of safety for humans was 313 for a 70 kilo man and 56 for a 25 kilo child. The results clearly demonstrate that the risks to biota and humans are very low. - Highlights: ? The herbicide dichlobenil degrades into 2,6-dichlorobenzamide(BAM) when applied in the environment. ? An overview of maximum reported concentration of dichlobenil and BAM in the environment is outll and BAM in the environment is outlined. ? A summary of toxicity studies published for dichlobenil and BAM is presented. ? The risk quotients (RQs) were calculated for biota and humans comparing maximum concentrations and lowest toxicity data.

  1. Paleoecology of an early Holocene faunal and floral assemblage from the Dows Local Biota of north-central Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Curtis M.

    1984-05-01

    The faunas and floras from the Dows Local Biota provide an opportunity to compare Holocene taxa without a cultural bias. The Dows Local Biota is located in a large depression on the back side (north) of the Altamont I Moraine complex within the Des Moines Lobe. The Dows Silt Fauna/Flora ( = DSF; ca. 9380 ± 130 yr B.P.), one horizon of the Dows Local Biota, was collected for plant macrofossils, mollusks, and micromammals. DSF terrestrial gastropods are upland mesic forest dwellers although one species, Strobilops affinis, is characteristic of more xeric forests and may represent open woods. The aquatic gastropods reflect both permanent and periodic waters. DSF micromammals prefer an open, mesic, deciduous forest. The micromammal sympatry is restricted to a small area within the tension zone and deciduous forest belt of west-central Wisconsin. DSF plants are characteristic of upland forests, moist meadowlands or disturbed areas, and aquatic habitats. The DSF plant sympatry is large but restricted to the conifer-hardwood and deciduous forests along the Great Lakes-New England regions. Quantitative climatic data for the combined DSF sympatries suggest that Dows (ca. 9380 yr B.P.) was cooler than at present, and is nearly identical to that achieved by pollen analyses at the Cherokee Sewer-Lake West Okoboji sites (ca. 9000 yr B.P.) in northwest Iowa. Based on common habitat interpretations and sympatries, about 9380 yr B.P. north-central Iowa was cooler and moister than at present and was occupied by an open deciduous forest.

  2. A freshwater biodiversity hotspot under pressure - assessing threats and identifying conservation needs for ancient Lake Ohrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostoski, G.; Albrecht, C.; Trajanovski, S.; Wilke, T.

    2010-12-01

    Immediate conservation measures for world-wide freshwater resources are of eminent importance. This is particularly true for so-called ancient lakes. While these lakes are famous for being evolutionary theatres, often displaying an extraordinarily high degree of biodiversity and endemism, in many cases these biota are also experiencing extreme anthropogenic impact. Lake Ohrid, a major European biodiversity hotspot situated in a trans-frontier setting on the Balkans, is a prime example for a lake with a magnitude of narrow range endemic taxa that are under increasing anthropogenic pressure. Unfortunately, evidence for a "creeping biodiversity crisis" has accumulated over the last decades, and major socio-political changes have gone along with human-mediated environmental changes. Based on field surveys, monitoring data, published records, and expert interviews, we aimed to (1) assess threats to Lake Ohrids' (endemic) biodiversity, (2) summarize existing conservation activities and strategies, and (3) outline future conservation needs for Lake Ohrid. We compiled threats to both specific taxa (and in cases to particular species) as well as to the lake ecosystems itself. Major conservation concerns identified for Lake Ohrid are: (1) watershed impacts, (2) agriculture and forestry, (3) tourism and population growth, (4) non-indigenous species, (5) habitat alteration or loss, (6) unsustainable exploitation of fisheries, and (7) global climate change. Among the major (well-known) threats with high impact are nutrient input (particularly of phosphorus), habitat conversion and silt load. Other threats are potentially of high impact but less well known. Such threats include pollution with hazardous substances (from sources such as mines, former industries, agriculture) or climate change. We review and discuss institutional responsibilities, environmental monitoring and ecosystem management, existing parks and reserves, biodiversity and species measures, international conservation activities, and ongoing research on conservation and raising of public awareness. Following this summary, we evaluate the status quo and future of Lake Ohrid and its biota. A comprehensive conservation strategy should include measures that result in an immediate reduction of nutrient input, particularly with phosphorus, in order to slow down the ongoing eutrophication process. The existing watershed management should become more effective. Implementation and particularly with a view to the enforcement of national laws should be enhanced. Increased research on the lakes' limnology, biodiversity, and conservation management practices are necessary. The latter research should identify conservation priorities. Public awareness should be enhanced. Facing these parallel needs to protect the unique biodiversity of Lake Ohrid, we suggest urging (a) implementation and enforcement of the General Management Plan that would ensure long-term integrated and sustainable use of the lake and its watershed, (b) scientific studies on ecology, biodiversity and effects of human impact, (c) the establishment of Core Conservation areas (CCA), including underwater reserves, and (d) Coastal Zone Management (CZM) areas that would constitute buffer zones for the CCAs around the lake. Given the number of identified threats, it is clear that only concerted international action can stop or at least slow down further degradation of Lake Ohrid and the creeping biodiversity crisis already evident. All conservation activities should, among others, ultimately lead to a trans-boundary major conservation area of the Ohrid-Prespa region that would allow long-term integration of both humans and nature.

  3. A freshwater biodiversity hotspot under pressure – assessing threats and identifying conservation needs for ancient Lake Ohrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kostoski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Immediate conservation measures for world-wide freshwater resources are of eminent importance. This is particularly true for so-called ancient lakes. While these lakes are famous for being evolutionary theatres, often displaying an extraordinarily high degree of biodiversity and endemism, in many cases these biota are also experiencing extreme anthropogenic impact.

    Lake Ohrid, a major European biodiversity hotspot situated in a trans-frontier setting on the Balkans, is a prime example for a lake with a magnitude of narrow range endemic taxa that are under increasing anthropogenic pressure. Unfortunately, evidence for a "creeping biodiversity crisis" has accumulated over the last decades, and major socio-political changes have gone along with human-mediated environmental changes.

    Based on field surveys, monitoring data, published records, and expert interviews, we aimed to (1 assess threats to Lake Ohrids' (endemic biodiversity, (2 summarize existing conservation activities and strategies, and (3 outline future conservation needs for Lake Ohrid. We compiled threats to both specific taxa (and in cases to particular species as well as to the lake ecosystems itself. Major conservation concerns identified for Lake Ohrid are: (1 watershed impacts, (2 agriculture and forestry, (3 tourism and population growth, (4 non-indigenous species, (5 habitat alteration or loss, (6 unsustainable exploitation of fisheries, and (7 global climate change.

    Among the major (well-known threats with high impact are nutrient input (particularly of phosphorus, habitat conversion and silt load. Other threats are potentially of high impact but less well known. Such threats include pollution with hazardous substances (from sources such as mines, former industries, agriculture or climate change. We review and discuss institutional responsibilities, environmental monitoring and ecosystem management, existing parks and reserves, biodiversity and species measures, international conservation activities, and ongoing research on conservation and raising of public awareness. Following this summary, we evaluate the status quo and future of Lake Ohrid and its biota. A comprehensive conservation strategy should include measures that result in an immediate reduction of nutrient input, particularly with phosphorus, in order to slow down the ongoing eutrophication process. The existing watershed management should become more effective. Implementation and particularly with a view to the enforcement of national laws should be enhanced. Increased research on the lakes' limnology, biodiversity, and conservation management practices are necessary. The latter research should identify conservation priorities. Public awareness should be enhanced. Facing these parallel needs to protect the unique biodiversity of Lake Ohrid, we suggest urging (a implementation and enforcement of the General Management Plan that would ensure long-term integrated and sustainable use of the lake and its watershed, (b scientific studies on ecology, biodiversity and effects of human impact, (c the establishment of Core Conservation areas (CCA, including underwater reserves, and (d Coastal Zone Management (CZM areas that would constitute buffer zones for the CCAs around the lake. Given the number of identified threats, it is clear that only concerted international action can stop or at least slow down further degradation of Lake Ohrid and the creeping biodiversity crisis already evident. All conservation activities should, among others, ultimately lead to a trans-boundary major conservation area of the Ohrid-Prespa region that would allow long-term integration of both humans and nature.

  4. A dynamic model to estimate the dose rate of marine biota (K-BIOTADYN- M) and its application to the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a dynamic compartment model, K-BIOTA-DYN-M, to assess the activity concentration and dose rate of marine biota when the seawater activity varies with time, which is likely for the early phase after an accident. The model consists of seven compartments, phytoplankton, zooplankton, prey fish, benthic fish, crustacean, mollusk, and macro-algae. The phytoplankton compartment is assumed to be instantaneously in equilibrium with the seawater owing to the huge mass of the plankton in sea, and thus the activity of the phytoplankton is estimated using the equilibrium concentration ratio. The other compartments intake the radioactivity from both water and food, and lose the radioactivity by the biological elimination and radioactivity decay. Given the seawater activity, a set of ordinary differential equations representing the activity balance for biota is solved to obtain the time-variant activity concentration of biota, which is subsequently used to calculate the internal dose rate. The key parameters include the water intake rate, the daily feeding rate, the assimilation efficiency of radionuclides from food, the occupancy factor, and so on. The model has been applied to predict the activity concentration and dose rate of marine biota as a result the Fukushima nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. Using the seawater activities measured at three locations near the Fukushima NPPs, the time-variant activity concentration and dose rate during a few months after an accident for the seven model biota have been estimated. The preliminary results showed that the activity concentration of 137Cs in fish inhabiting the sea close to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP increased up to tenth-thousands of Bq/kg around the peak time of the seawater activity. This level is much higher than the food consumption restriction level for human protection; however, the estimated total dose rates (internal + external) for biota during the entire simulation time were all much less than the UNSCEAR's benchmark level to protect the aquatic biota from the ionizing radiation, indicating that the integrity of marine ecosystem would be maintained. In addition, the simulation results will be compared with the measured activity concentration of the biota as well as the results predicted by the equilibrium model. (authors)

  5. A dynamic model to estimate the dose rate of marine biota (K-BIOTADYN- M) and its application to the Fukushima accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Jun, In; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-ho [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeodaero, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a dynamic compartment model, K-BIOTA-DYN-M, to assess the activity concentration and dose rate of marine biota when the seawater activity varies with time, which is likely for the early phase after an accident. The model consists of seven compartments, phytoplankton, zooplankton, prey fish, benthic fish, crustacean, mollusk, and macro-algae. The phytoplankton compartment is assumed to be instantaneously in equilibrium with the seawater owing to the huge mass of the plankton in sea, and thus the activity of the phytoplankton is estimated using the equilibrium concentration ratio. The other compartments intake the radioactivity from both water and food, and lose the radioactivity by the biological elimination and radioactivity decay. Given the seawater activity, a set of ordinary differential equations representing the activity balance for biota is solved to obtain the time-variant activity concentration of biota, which is subsequently used to calculate the internal dose rate. The key parameters include the water intake rate, the daily feeding rate, the assimilation efficiency of radionuclides from food, the occupancy factor, and so on. The model has been applied to predict the activity concentration and dose rate of marine biota as a result the Fukushima nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. Using the seawater activities measured at three locations near the Fukushima NPPs, the time-variant activity concentration and dose rate during a few months after an accident for the seven model biota have been estimated. The preliminary results showed that the activity concentration of {sup 137}Cs in fish inhabiting the sea close to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP increased up to tenth-thousands of Bq/kg around the peak time of the seawater activity. This level is much higher than the food consumption restriction level for human protection; however, the estimated total dose rates (internal + external) for biota during the entire simulation time were all much less than the UNSCEAR's benchmark level to protect the aquatic biota from the ionizing radiation, indicating that the integrity of marine ecosystem would be maintained. In addition, the simulation results will be compared with the measured activity concentration of the biota as well as the results predicted by the equilibrium model. (authors)

  6. The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on marine biota: Retrospective assessment of the first year and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.vives.i.batlle@sckcen.be [Biosphere Impact Studies Unit, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Aono, Tatsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Brown, Justin E.; Hosseini, Ali [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway); CERAD Centre of Excellence, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway); Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, Department for research and expertise in environmental risks, PRP-ENV/SERIS, Cadarache, Building 159, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Sazykina, Tatiana [State Institution Research and Production Association Typhoon, 4 Pobedy Str., Obninsk, Kaluga Region 249038 (Russian Federation); Steenhuisen, Frits [Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Strand, Per [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway); CERAD Centre of Excellence, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    An international study under the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was performed to assess radiological impact of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) on the marine environment. This work constitutes the first international assessment of this type, drawing upon methodologies that incorporate the most up-to-date radioecological models and knowledge. To quantify the radiological impact on marine wildlife, a suite of state-of-the-art approaches to assess exposures to Fukushima derived radionuclides of marine biota, including predictive dynamic transfer modelling, was applied to a comprehensive dataset consisting of over 500 sediment, 6000 seawater and 5000 biota data points representative of the geographically relevant area during the first year after the accident. The dataset covers the period from May 2011 to August 2012. The method used to evaluate the ecological impact consists of comparing dose (rates) to which living species of interest are exposed during a defined period to critical effects values arising from the literature. The assessed doses follow a highly variable pattern and generally do not seem to indicate the potential for effects. A possible exception of a transient nature is the relatively contaminated area in the vicinity of the discharge point, where effects on sensitive endpoints in individual plants and animals might have occurred in the weeks directly following the accident. However, impacts on population integrity would have been unlikely due to the short duration and the limited space area of the initially high exposures. Our understanding of the biological impact of radiation on chronically exposed plants and animals continues to evolve, and still needs to be improved through future studies in the FDNPS marine environment. - Highlights: • UNSCEAR assessment of the Fukushima accident impact on the marine environment. • The study covers the period from March 2011 to August 2012. • Doses to marine organisms are generally below levels for effects on populations. • The only exception is {sup 131}I in macroalgae near the plant early after the accident. • Exposures to biota in the late phase are below the thresholds for population effects. • Further away from the plant, potential effects on biota will be significantly lower.

  7. The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on marine biota: Retrospective assessment of the first year and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international study under the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was performed to assess radiological impact of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) on the marine environment. This work constitutes the first international assessment of this type, drawing upon methodologies that incorporate the most up-to-date radioecological models and knowledge. To quantify the radiological impact on marine wildlife, a suite of state-of-the-art approaches to assess exposures to Fukushima derived radionuclides of marine biota, including predictive dynamic transfer modelling, was applied to a comprehensive dataset consisting of over 500 sediment, 6000 seawater and 5000 biota data points representative of the geographically relevant area during the first year after the accident. The dataset covers the period from May 2011 to August 2012. The method used to evaluate the ecological impact consists of comparing dose (rates) to which living species of interest are exposed during a defined period to critical effects values arising from the literature. The assessed doses follow a highly variable pattern and generally do not seem to indicate the potential for effects. A possible exception of a transient nature is the relatively contaminated area in the vicinity of the discharge point, where effects on sensitive endpoints in individual plants and animals might have occurred in the weeks directly following the accident. However, impacts on population integrity would have been unlikely due to the short duration and the limited space area of the initially high exposures. Our understanding of the biological impact of radiation on chronically exposed plants and animals continues to evolve, and still needs to be improved through future studies in the FDNPS marine environment. - Highlights: • UNSCEAR assessment of the Fukushima accident impact on the marine environment. • The study covers the period from March 2011 to August 2012. • Doses to marine organisms are generally below levels for effects on populations. • The only exception is 131I in macroalgae near the plant early after the accident. • Exposures to biota in the late phase are below the thresholds for population effects. • Further away from the plant, potential effects on biota will be significantly lower

  8. The global carbon cycle change: Le Chatelier principle in the response of biota to changing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term existence of natural biota in the environment means that such a system is stable with respect to external disturbances. This system must follow the Le Chatelier principle which is based on the processes that compensate the disturbing effects. The use of the Le Chatelier principle makes it possible to choose between contradictory observational data. Available observational data on variations of the concentration of rare carbon isotopes in various media show that the oceanic biota follows the Le Chatelier principle and absorbs about half the carbon which the ocean gets from the atmosphere, compensating an increment of carbon in the atmosphere caused by an anthropogenic impact. The strongly anthropogenetically disturbed land biota does not follow the Le Chatelier principle, starting from the middle of this century. The land biota not only cannot absorb excess carbon accumulated in the atmosphere: it ejects carbon to the atmosphere in quantities equal to halved emission of carbon through fossil fuel burning. All the quantitative results considered in this paper have been obtained without using models of the biota and of the ocean

  9. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from their roots and thereby stimulate nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification in their rhizosphere. However, oxygen release and inorganic nitrogen concentrations differ markedly between macrophyte species. We therefore propose (i) that the rhizosphere of freshwater macrophytes harbours a species-specific microbial community distinct from that of unvegetated sediment and (ii) that aquatic macrophytes have an impact on abundance and activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in freshwater sediment. The goal of this study was to test these hypotheses for the key functional group for coupled nitrification-denitrification, the ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes. Six different sites and three macrophyte species with contrasting root systems and rhizosphere microenvironments, i.e. Littorella uniflora, Juncus bulbosus, and Myriophyllum alterniflorum, were selected for comparative investigations. Porewater analyses and potential rate measurements revealed clear differences in ammonia oxidation rates. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was assessed using the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene as functional marker. Both AOA and AOB could be detected in the rhizosphere of all three plant species, whereas AOA were absent in some unvegetated sediments. Distribution patterns of AOA and AOB phylotypes suggest that plant species as well as site-dependant sediment properties influence nitrifier community composition. Preliminary quantitative results from fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR indicate higher abundances of nitrifying prokaryotes in the rhizosphere compared to unvegetated sediment, and a dominance of AOA over AOB in most rhizospheres. Whether AOA also dominate ammonia oxidation activity remains to be investigated.    

  10. Predator-specific enrichment of actinobacteria from a cosmopolitan freshwater clade in mixed continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernthaler, J; Posch, T; Simek, K; Vrba, J; Pernthaler, A; Glöckner, F O; Nübel, U; Psenner, R; Amann, R

    2001-05-01

    We investigated whether individual populations of freshwater bacteria in mixed experimental communities may exhibit specific responses to the presence of different bacterivorous protists. In two successive experiments, a two-stage continuous cultivation system was inoculated with nonaxenic batch cultures of the cryptophyte Cryptomonas sp. Algal exudates provided the sole source of organic carbon for growth of the accompanying microflora. The dynamics of several 16S rRNA-defined bacterial populations were followed in the experimental communities. Although the composition and stability of the two microbial communities differed, numerous members of the first assemblage could again be detected during the second experiment. The introduction of a size-selectively feeding mixotrophic nanoflagellate (Ochromonas sp.) always resulted in an immediate bloom of a single phylotype population of members of the class Actinobacteria (Ac1). These bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with an uncultured lineage of gram-positive bacteria that have been found in freshwater habitats only. The Ac1 cells were close to the average size of freshwater bacterioplankton and significantly smaller than any of the other experimental community members. In contrast, no increase of the Ac1 population was observed in vessels exposed to the bacterivorous ciliate Cyclidium glaucoma. However, when the Ochromonas sp. was added after the establishment of C. glaucoma, the proportion of population Ac1 within the microbial community rapidly increased. Populations of a beta proteobacterial phylotype related to an Aquabacterium sp. decreased relative to the total bacterial communities following the addition of either predator, albeit to different extents. The community structure of pelagic microbial assemblages can therefore be influenced by the taxonomic composition of the predator community. PMID:11319094

  11. High levels of natural radioactivity in biota from deep sea hydrothermal vents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are associated with areas of tectonic activities throughout the deep sea and are thus enriched in natural primitive radionuclides characterizing the magma source i.e. uranium-thorium series. However, the amount of data on radionuclide content in hydrothermal vent biota is very scarce. Here we present data from various archived biological samples collected on several hydrothermal vent site. Samples were collected by manned or unmanned submersibles on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) in 1996 and 2002 and on the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) in 2001. Their concentrations in uranium and thorium isotopes were determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Measurements were performed with a Sector field ICP-MS, the Axiom single collector from VG Elemental (Winsford, Cheshire, UK). 210Po was determined through alpha spectrometry. Results underline that high levels in uranium isotopes are found in polychaetes from the East Pacific Rise. The highest contents characterize their tubes plus mucus samples. On the contrary, the deep-sea amphipod sample (Orchomenella) collected outside hydrothermal vent areas exhibits the lowest values though direct comparison is difficult due to variability between species. 238U contents in coastal marine organisms are generally in the range 1 to 5 Bq kg-1 dry weight. Comparison between sites (Atlantic vs. Pacific) is not obvious since different species have been sampled on MAR and EPR but the have been sampled on MAR and EPR but the highest levels characterize the samples from EPR. Some samples demonstrate 234U/238U ratios very close to the mean value for seawater (1.1 - 1.2) but four present lower ratios (i.e. one sample of Bathymodiolus, Paralvinella, Riftia and Orchomenella). This is certainly to be linked to an uptake of particulate uranium. 210Po contents are very high in polychaetes tubes and mucus and are almost entirely supported by 210Pb. This in agreement with what has been reported by Cherry et al. (1992) for polychaetes (Alvinella and Paralvinella) from EPR. These authors also reported highest levels for these elements in Paralvinella (i.e. 15113 and 19038 Bq kg-1 dry weight for 210Pb and 210Po respectively). We are aware that this work is still based on too few data. A major work has to be done on this topic but these first results appear to be promising. The determination of vent organism concentrations for key elements in the uranium- thorium families has to be carried out in order to precisely determine the radiation exposure they are subject to. This appears especially important at the time where international bodies aim at promoting the development of criteria on the protection of the environment from effects arising from exposures to ionizing radiation

  12. Geochemistry, biota and natural background levels in an arsenic naturally contaminated volcanic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi, Elisabetta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Di Lorenzo, Tiziana; Parrone, Daniele; Rossi, David; Ghergo, Stefano; Lungarini, Silvia; Zoppini, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The tight links between chemical and ecological status are largely acknowledged as for surface water bodies, while aquifers are still considered as hidden groundwater reservoirs, rather than ecosystems to be preserved. Geochemical and biological interactions play a key role in all subterranean processes, including the dynamics of the fate of anthropogenic contaminants. Studies on groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDE) were mainly focused on karst aquifers so far, but an increased awareness on the importance of water-rock interactions and methodological improvements in microbial ecology are rapidly increasing the level of characterization of groundwater ecosystems in various hydrogeological contexts. Similarly, knowledge about groundwater biodiversity is still limited, especially if porous habitats are concerned. Yet, groundwater and GDEs are populated by a diverse and highly adapted biota, dominated by crustaceans, which provide important ecosystem services and act as biological indicators of chemical and quantitative impact on groundwater resources. In a previous research (Amalfitano et al. 2014), we reported that the microbial community heterogeneity may reflect the lithological and hydrogeological complexity within volcanic and alluvial facies transition in a groundwater body. The quantitative tracking of the microbial community structure allowed disentangling the natural biogeochemical processes evolving within the aquifer flow path. The analyses of groundwater crustaceans assemblages may contribute to shed more light upon the state and dynamics of such ecosystems. In the present research, a comprehensive study of a water table aquifer flowing through a quaternary volcanic district is being performed, including the geochemical (inorganic) composition, the microbial composition, and the analysis of crustacean assemblages . Groundwater samples are periodically collected from private wells and springs under a low anthropic impact. The key issues within the sampling area are related to occurrence of arsenic from natural sources, fluoride and coliforms, which make the water resource unsuitable for human consumption. The aim of this work is to present the first outcomes of this activity. References Amalfitano S, Del Bon A, Zoppini AM, Ghergo S, Fazi S, Parrone D, Casella P, Stano F, Preziosi E (2014) Groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure in the aquifer transition from volcanic to alluvial areas. Water Research, 65 (2014) 384-394. Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2014.08.004

  13. Chromium in water, suspended particles, sediments and biota in the Iraja River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W.C.; Fiszman, M.; de Lacerda, L.D.; van Weerfelt, M.; Carbonell, N.

    1982-11-01

    Analyses of chromium concentrations in waters, suspended particles, bottom sediments, fish (Poecilia reticulata), plants (Paspalum vaginatum, Sesuvium portulacastrum, Philoxeros vermicularis), soils and barnacles (Balanus sp.) were performed from August 1976 to September 1980 in samples collected from the Iraja River and inside its estuary in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Sediments and water from the Iraja River showed chromium concentrations of 17536 and 23.39 ppm--a thousand times higher than the published data for freshwater systems. Chromium removed from solution by bottom sediments reaches Guanabara Bay linked to particulate matter. Fish and emergent grass inside the river concentrate chromium from water and/or sediment, returning the metal to the system as detritus. Soil and plants inside the estuary concentrate chromium thirty and ten times higher than in the control area. The vegetal community exhibits a concentration factor smaller than that related to soil and prevents the return of chromium to the estuarine waters. Inside the Guanabara Bay, Balanus sp. appears to be an effective biological monitor as it concentrates chromium in soft tissues 10/sup 3/ times higher than values found in suspended particles (0.012 ..mu..g ml/sup -1/).

  14. How to prevent legionella infestation. Pt. 1. Central freshwater heating systems; Wie man Legionellen vermeiden. T. 1. Zentrale Trinkwassererwaermungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Robert [DVGW-Fachausschuss Trinkwasserhygiene in Gebaeuden, Leverkusen (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The contribution focuses on hygienically safe freshwater heating. Legionella prophylaxis is discussed, as are new findings concerning practical implementation of new requirements on modern freshwater supply systems. (orig.)

  15. Trajectory shifts in the Arctic and subarctic freshwater cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bruce J; McClelland, James; Curry, Ruth; Holmes, Robert M; Walsh, John E; Aagaard, Knut

    2006-08-25

    Manifold changes in the freshwater cycle of high-latitude lands and oceans have been reported in the past few years. A synthesis of these changes in freshwater sources and in ocean freshwater storage illustrates the complementary and synoptic temporal pattern and magnitude of these changes over the past 50 years. Increasing river discharge anomalies and excess net precipitation on the ocean contributed approximately 20,000 cubic kilometers of fresh water to the Arctic and high-latitude North Atlantic oceans from lows in the 1960s to highs in the 1990s. Sea ice attrition provided another approximately 15,000 cubic kilometers, and glacial melt added approximately 2000 cubic kilometers. The sum of anomalous inputs from these freshwater sources matched the amount and rate at which fresh water accumulated in the North Atlantic during much of the period from 1965 through 1995. The changes in freshwater inputs and ocean storage occurred in conjunction with the amplifying North Atlantic Oscillation and rising air temperatures. Fresh water may now be accumulating in the Arctic Ocean and will likely be exported southward if and when the North Atlantic Oscillation enters into a new high phase. PMID:16931747

  16. Taking high conservation value from forests to freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Robin; Morgan, Siân K; Morgan, Alexis J

    2015-07-01

    The high conservation value (HCV) concept, originally developed by the Forest Stewardship Council, has been widely incorporated outside the forestry sector into companies' supply chain assessments and responsible purchasing policies, financial institutions' investment policies, and numerous voluntary commodity standards. Many, if not most, of these newer applications relate to production practices that are likely to affect freshwater systems directly or indirectly, yet there is little guidance as to whether or how HCV can be applied to water bodies. We focus this paper on commodity standards and begin by exploring how prominent standards currently address both HCVs and freshwaters. We then highlight freshwater features of high conservation importance and examine how well those features are captured by the existing HCV framework. We propose a new set of freshwater 'elements' for each of the six values and suggest an approach for identifying HCV Areas that takes out-of-fence line impacts into account, thereby spatially extending the scope of existing methods to define HCVs. We argue that virtually any non-marine HCV assessment, regardless of the production sector, should be expanded to include freshwater values, and we suggest how to put those recommendations into practice. PMID:25948151

  17. Effects of cadmium stress and sorption kinetics on tropical freshwater periphytic communities in indoor mesocosm experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bere, Taurai, E-mail: taubere@yahoo.com [Instituto Internacional de Ecologia, Rua Bento Carlos, 750, Centro, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Federal De Sao Carlosm, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia e Recursos Naturais, Rodovia Washington Luis, km 235, SP-310, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tundisi, Jose Galizia [Instituto Internacional de Ecologia, Rua Bento Carlos, 750, Centro, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    Understanding the cause and effect relationship between stressors and biota is crucial for the effective management, restoration and preservation of aquatic systems. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of five Cd concentrations on tropical periphyton community growth, Cd accumulation kinetics, as well as the effects of Cd on diatom community structure and composition. Natural periphyton communities were transferred to artificial stream chambers and exposed to Cd concentrations of 0.005, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 mg.L{sup -1}. Metal accumulation (total and intracellular) in biofilms, dry weight and ash-free dry mass, growth rate, algal cell density and diatom community composition were analysed on samples collected after 1, 2 and 4 weeks of colonization. Periphyton growth and development were significantly lowered by Cd concentrations > 0.03 mg.L{sup -1}. High Cd accumulation capacity by periphyton was demonstrated with total and intracellular Cd content in biofilms reflecting the effects of concentrations of Cd in the culture media and exposure duration. Total and intracellular Cd content generally increased in treatments in the order 0.005 < 0.01 < 0.03 < 0.05 < 0.1 mg.L{sup -1} at any sampling time with increasing level of accumulated Cd with duration of exposure in all the systems. Shifts in species composition (development of more resistant species like Achnanthidium minutissimum and reduction of sensitive ones like Diatoma vulgare, Navicula viridula and Navicula cryptocephala), decreases in species richness and diversity and morphological alterations (deformities) of diatom cells with increasing Cd concentration and exposure duration were observed. The results give valuable information on Cd impact of freshwater biofilms. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated toxicity and sorption kinetics of Cd on periphyton communities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Cd] > 0.03 mg.L{sup -1} lowers growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbed Cd was a function of duration of exposure and [Cd]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in community composition were recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biofilms are potential monitors of metal pollution in aquatic systems.

  18. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P.M., E-mail: chamani.marasinghe.wadige@canberra.edu.au; Maher, William A.; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) ?g/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed organisms, which suggests that H. australis has some tolerance to cadmium. The metallothionein like protein fraction played an important role in the sequestration and detoxification of cadmium and the amount sequestered in this fraction increased with increased cadmium exposure. The highest percentage of biologically active cadmium was associated with the lysosome + microsome and mitochondrial fractions. Cadmium concentrations in these two fractions of cadmium exposed organisms were significantly higher with respect to controls. Total antioxidant capacity decreased with increased cadmium exposure and tissue dose. Lipid peroxidation increased and lysosomal membrane stability decreased significantly with increased cadmium exposure and tissue dose. Based on exposure–dose–response analysis in this study, H. australis would be a suitable organism for assessing cadmium sediment exposure and toxicity.

  19. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) ?g/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed organisms, which suggests that H. australis has some tolerance to cadmium. The metallothionein like protein fraction played an important role in the sequestration and detoxification of cadmium and the amount sequestered in this fraction increased with increased cadmium exposure. The highest percentage of biologically active cadmium was associated with the lysosome + microsome and mitochondrial fractions. Cadmium concentrations in these two fractions of cadmium exposed organisms were significantly higher with respect to controls. Total antioxidant capacity decreased with increased cadmium exposure and tissue dose. Lipid peroxidation increased and lysosomal membrane stability decreased significantly with increased cadmium exposure and tissue dose. Based on exposure–dose–response analysis in this study, H. australis would be a suitable organism for assessing cadmium sediment exposure and toxicity

  20. Estimating freshwater flows from tidally affected hydrographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagendam, D. E.; Percival, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    Detiding end-of-catchment flow data are an important step in determining the total volumes of freshwater (and associated pollutant loads) entering the ocean. We examine three approaches for separating freshwater and tidal flows from tidally affected data: (i) a simple low-pass Butterworth filter (BWF); (ii) a robust, harmonic analysis with Kalman smoothing (RoHAKS) which is a novel approach introduced in this paper; and (iii) dynamic harmonic regression (DHR). Using hydrographic data collected in the Logan River, Australia, over a period of 452 days, we judge the accuracy of the three methods based on three criteria: consistency of freshwater flows with upstream gauges; consistency of total discharge volumes with the raw data over the event; and minimal upstream flow. A simulation experiment shows that RoHAKS outperforms both BWF and DHR on a number of criteria. In addition, RoHAKS enjoys a computational advantage over DHR in speed and use of freely available software.

  1. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes, 1900-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhead, Noel M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread evidence shows that the modern rates of extinction in many plants and animals exceed background rates in the fossil record. In the present article, I investigate this issue with regard to North American freshwater fishes. From 1898 to 2006, 57 taxa became extinct, and three distinct populations were extirpated from the continent. Since 1989, the numbers of extinct North American fishes have increased by 25%. From the end of the nineteenth century to the present, modern extinctions varied by decade but significantly increased after 1950 (post-1950s mean = 7.5 extinct taxa per decade). The modern extinction rate for North American freshwater fishes is conservatively estimated to be 877 times greater than the background extinction rate for freshwater fishes (one extinction every 3 million years). Reasonable estimates project that future increases in extinctions will range from 53 to 86 species by 2050.

  2. New data on freshwater psammic Gastrotricha from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Balsamo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge of freshwater gastrotrich fauna from Brazil is underestimated as only two studies are available. The present communication is a taxonomic account of the first-ever survey of freshwater Gastrotricha in Minas Gerais State. Samplings were carried out yielding six species of three Chaetonotidae genera: Aspidiophorus cf. pleustonicus, Ichthydium cf. chaetiferum, Chaetonotus acanthocephalus, C. heideri, C. cf. succinctus, Chaetonotus sp., and also an undescribed species belonging to the genus Redudasys (incertae sedis: this is the first finding of specimens of Redudasys outside of original type locality. These preliminary observations suggest that the knowledge of the biodiversity of Gastrotricha in the Minas Gerais State, as well as in the whole Brazil, will certainly increase as further investigations are undertaken, and that freshwater Macrodasyida may be more common than previously thought.

  3. Assessing radiation impact at a protected coastal sand dune site: an intercomparison of models for estimating the radiological exposure of non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the application of three publicly available biota dose assessment models (the ERICA Tool, R and D128/SP1a and RESRAD-BIOTA) to an assessment of the Drigg coastal sand dunes. Using measured 90Sr, 99Tc, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am activity concentrations in sand dune soil, activity concentration and dose rate predictions are made for a range of organisms including amphibians, birds, invertebrates, mammals, reptiles, plants and fungi. Predicted biota activity concentrations are compared to measured data where available. The main source of variability in the model predictions is the transfer parameters used and it is concluded that developing the available transfer databases should be a focus of future research effort. The value of taking an informed user approach to investigate the way in which models may be expected to be applied in practice is highlighted and a strategy for the future development of intercomparison exercises is presented.

  4. Bystander effects and biota: implications of radiation-induced bystander effects for protection of the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystander effects are now known to be induced by both high and low LET in a variety of cells in culture. They have been proven to occur in vivo in mice following 0.5Gy total body irradiation and in blood from humans being treated for cancer by radiotherapy. Effects have also been detected in fish, crustacea and molluscs. The important questions now are not whether bystander effects occur but why and what implications they have, if any, for radiation protection. Different species and different genetic backgrounds within a species produce different types of bystander effect, different organs also produce different effects. This paper will review the data in this field and will discuss likely implications for protection of man and non-human biota. In particular it will look at the potential long-term outcomes for different organisational levels, from cell to ecosystem, of bystander mechanisms. In view of new concerns about the effects of low level radiation on non-human biota, emphasis will be placed on considering how bystander effects might operate at chronic low doses versus acute accidental low doses. Problems of radiation interaction with chemicals, whether chemicals can also induce 'bystander effects' , and how regulators might handle these situations which occur all the time in real environments, will be presented for discussion. Finally the paper will discuss likely implications of these mechanisms for evolutionary biologyy

  5. Fate of a broad spectrum of perfluorinated compounds in soils and biota from Tierra del Fuego and Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the presence of 18 perfluorinated compounds was investigated in biota and environmental samples from the Antarctica and Tierra de Fuego, which were collected during a sampling campaign carried out along February and March 2010. 61 samples were analysed including fish, superficial soils, guano, algae, dung and tissues of Papua penguin by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The concentrations of PFCs were ranging from 0.10 to 240 ng/g for most of the samples except for penguin dung, which presented levels between 95 and 603 ng/g for perfluorooctane sulfonate, and guano samples from Ushuaia, with concentration levels of 1190–2480 ng/g of perfluorohexanoic acid. PFCs acids presented, in general, the highest levels of concentration and perfluorooctanesulfonate was the most frequently found compound. The present study provides a significant amount of results, which globally supports the previous studies, related to the transport, deposition, biodegradation and bioaccumulation patterns of PFCs. - Highlights: ? 61 samples from the Antarctica and Tierra de Fuego analysed for the presence of 18 perfluorinated compounds. ? Acid compounds presented the highest levels of concentration and perfluorooctane sulfonate was the most frequently found. ? Concentrations in algae much higher than those in soils. ? Data supporting existing models for the transport, deposition, biodegradation and bioaccumulation patterns are presented. - 18 perfatterns are presented. - 18 perfluorinated compounds assessed in biota and environmental samples from Tierra del Fuego and the Antarctica. Concentrations related to Compounds properties.

  6. Transcriptomic profiling of differential responses to drought in two freshwater mussel species, the giant floater Pyganodon grandis and the pondhorn Uniomerus tetralasmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yupeng; Li, Chao; Landis, Andrew Gascho; Wang, Guiling; Stoeckel, James; Peatman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The southeastern US has experienced recurrent drought during recent decades. Increasing demand for water, as precipitation decreases, exacerbates stress on the aquatic biota of the Southeast: a global hotspot for freshwater mussel, crayfish, and fish diversity. Freshwater unionid mussels are ideal candidates to study linkages between ecophysiological and behavioral responses to drought. Previous work on co-occurring mussel species suggests a coupling of physiology and behavior along a gradient ranging from intolerant species such as Pyganodon grandis (giant floater) that track receding waters and rarely burrow in the substrates to tolerant species such as Uniomerus tetralasmus (pondhorn) that rarely track receding waters, but readily burrow into the drying sediments. We utilized a next-generation sequencing-based RNA-Seq approach to examine heat/desiccation-induced transcriptomic profiles of these two species in order to identify linkages between patterns of gene expression, physiology and behavior. Sequencing produced over 425 million 100 bp reads. Using the de novo assembly package Trinity, we assembled the short reads into 321,250 contigs from giant floater (average length 835 bp) and 385,735 contigs from pondhorn (average length 929 bp). BLAST-based annotation and gene expression analysis revealed 2,832 differentially expressed genes in giant floater and 2,758 differentially expressed genes in pondhorn. Trancriptomic responses included changes in molecular chaperones, oxidative stress profiles, cell cycling, energy metabolism, immunity, and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Comparative analyses between species indicated significantly higher induction of molecular chaperones and cytoskeletal elements in the intolerant P. grandis as well as important differences in genes regulating apoptosis and immunity. PMID:24586812

  7. Production of Freshwater and Energy from Earth’s Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The author offers a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth’s atmosphere. The suggested method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater. This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except the Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environmentally-friendly. The author’s method has two working versions: 1 In the first variant warm (or hot atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric water vapor is condensed into freshwater: 2 in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version 2 wind and fans are used for causing air movment. The first method does not need energy, the second needs a small amount. Moreover, in variant 1 the freshwater has a high pressure (> 30 or more atm and can be used for production of energy such as electricity and in that way the freshwater cost is lower. For increasing the productivity the seawater is injected into air and a solar air heater may be used. The solar air heater produces a huge amount of electricity as a very powerful electrical generation plant. The offered electricity installation is 100 - 200 times cheaper than any common electric plant of equivalent output.

  8. 2H and 18O Freshwater Isoscapes of Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Kemp, Helen; Frew, Danny

    2013-04-01

    Scotland's freshwater lochs and reservoirs provide a vital resource for sustaining biodiversity, agriculture, food production as well as for human consumption. Regular monitoring of freshwaters by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) fulfils legislative requirements with regards to water quality but new scientific methods involving stable isotope analysis present an opportunity combining these mandatory monitoring schemes with fundamental research to inform and deliver on current and nascent government policies [1] through gaining a greater understanding of Scottish waters and their importance in the context of climate change, environmental sustainability and food security. For example, 2H and 18O isoscapes of Scottish freshwater could be used to underpin research and its applications in: • Climate change - Using longitudinal changes in the characteristic isotope composition of freshwater lochs and reservoirs as proxy, isoscapes will provide a means to assess if and how changes in temperature and weather patterns might impact on precipitation patterns and amount. • Scottish branding - Location specific stable isotope signatures of Scottish freshwater have the potential to be used as a tool for provenancing and thus protecting premium Scottish produce such as Scottish beef, Scottish soft fruit and Scottish Whisky. During 2011 and 2012, with the support of SEPA more than 110 samples from freshwater lochs and reservoirs were collected from 127 different locations across Scotland including the Highlands and Islands. Here we present the results of this sampling and analysis exercise isotope analyses in form of 2H and 18O isoscapes with an unprecedented grid resolution of 26.5 × 26.5 km (or 16.4 × 16.4 miles). [1] Adaptation Framework - Adapting Our Ways: Managing Scotland's Climate Risk (2009): Scotland's Biodiversity: It's in Your Hands - A strategy for the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity in Scotland (2005); Recipe For Success - Scotland's National Food and Drink Policy (2009); Scottish Planning Policy Environmental Report (2009); Scottish Planning Policy (SPP) 15 Planning for Rural Development (2005); National Planning Policy Guideline (NPPG) 14: Natural Heritage (1999).

  9. "Key to Freshwater Algae": A Web-Based Tool to Enhance Understanding of Microscopic Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayler, Hannah A.; Siver, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    The Freshwater Ecology Laboratory at Connecticut College has developed an interactive, Web-based identification key to freshwater algal genera using the Lucid Professional and Lucid 3 software developed by the Centre for Biological Information Technology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. The "Key to Freshwater Algae" was funded…

  10. Freshwater plants synthesize sulfated polysaccharides: heterogalactans from Water Hyacinth (Eicchornia crassipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; Costa, Leandro Silva; Cordeiro, Sara Lima; Costa, Mariana Santos Santana Pereira; Trindade, Edvaldo Silva; Franco, Célia Regina Chavichiolo; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Leite, Edda Lisboa; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides (SP) are found mainly in seaweeds and animals. To date, they have only been found in six plants and all inhabit saline environments. Furthermore, there are no reports of SP in freshwater or terrestrial plants. As such, this study investigated the presence of SP in freshwaters Eichhornia crassipes, Egeria densa, Egeria naja, Cabomba caroliniana, Hydrocotyle bonariensis and Nymphaea ampla. Chemical analysis identified sulfate in N. ampla, H. bonariensis and, more specifically, E. crassipes. In addition, chemical analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, histological analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), as well as agarose gel electrophoresis detected SP in all parts of E. crassipes, primarily in the root (epidermis and vascular bundle). Galactose, glucose and arabinose are the main monosaccharides found in the sulfated polysaccharides from E. crassipes. In activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test, to evaluate the intrinsic coagulation pathway, SP from the root and rhizome prolonged the coagulation time to double the baseline value, with 0.1 mg/mL and 0.15 mg/mL, respectively. However, SP from the leaf and petiole showed no anticoagulant activity. Eichornia SP demonstrated promising anticoagulant potential and have been selected for further studies on bioguided fractionation; isolation and characterization of pure polysaccharides from this species. Additionally in vivo experiments are needed and are already underway. PMID:22312297

  11. Survival of freezing by hydrated tardigrades inhabiting terrestrial and freshwater habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Roberto; Altiero, Tiziana; Bertolani, Roberto; Grazioso, Pasqualina; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2011-04-01

    The seasonality and unpredictability of environmental conditions at high altitudes and latitudes govern the life cycle patterns of organisms, giving rise to stresses that cause death or development of specific adaptations. Ice formation is a major variable affecting the survival of both freshwater fauna and fauna inhabiting lichens, mosses and leaf litter. Tardigrades occupy a wide range of niches in marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments. The highest number of species is found in terrestrial habitats thanks to their ability to enter anhydrobiosis and cryobiosis. The cryobiotic ability of tardigrade species from polar regions is well known. Consequently, we focused our research on the ability to survive freezing in the active hydrated state using seven tardigrade species differing in phylogenetic position and collected at various altitudes and from different habitats in a temperate area. Specimens were cooled at different cooling rates (from 0.31° C min(-1) to 3.26° C min(-1)). Even though the final survival and the time required by animals to recover to active life were both inversely related to the cooling rate, highly significant interspecific differences were found. Species survival ability ranged from excellent to none. Species living in xeric habitats withstood freezing better than those living in hygrophilous habitats, while true limnic species did not exhibit any cryobiotic ability. The ability to withstand freezing seems linked to the anhydrobiotic ability. The differences in cryptobiotic performance among tardigrade species seem more influenced by selective pressures linked to local adaptation to habitat characteristics than by phylogenetic relationships. PMID:21429723

  12. Improved Data, Models and Investigations of Anthropogenic Effects on Freshwater Ecosystems at a Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, B.

    2008-12-01

    Anthropogenic effects on the biosphere are typically assessed with a terrestrial focus. In most approaches, the impact of humans is estimated or modeled based on population density maps, by applying buffer zones around population centers or by defining the range of influence around terrestrial infrastructure. If atmospheric processes are taken into account (such as air pollution or climate change) the effects are mostly assigned to terrestrial units like countries or terrestrial ecosystems. Only few studies investigate the anthropogenic effects on freshwater ecosystems, not least due to a severe lack of appropriate data sources and models. As a key distinction to the terrestrial approaches, freshwater studies need to take river topology and connectivity into account. Models need to incorporate the process of anthropogenic effects being propagated and accumulated along river networks, and appropriate modeling frameworks and data sources need to be prepared. Recently, several new datasets have become available to allow for a new generation of such studies. This presentation will focus on selected new data developments and discuss their possible application towards assessing the human influence on global river systems, lakes and wetlands. Key data layers include the global distribution of human-made reservoirs (GRanD Database), the anthropogenic withdrawals of water resources (based on global model results), and a high resolution global river network (HydroSHEDS).

  13. Chemical Footprint Method for Improved Communication of Freshwater Ecotoxicity Impacts in the Context of Ecological Limits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    BjØrn, Anders; Diamond, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The ecological footprint method has been successful in communicating environmental impacts of anthropogenic activities in the context of ecological limits. We introduce a chemical footprint method that expresses ecotoxicity impacts from anthropogenic chemical emissions as the dilution needed to avoid freshwater ecosystem damage. The indicator is based on USEtox characterization factors with a modified toxicity reference point. Chemical footprint results can be compared to the actual dilution capacity within the geographic vicinity receiving the emissions to estimate whether its ecological limit has been exceeded and hence whether emissions can be expected to be environmentally sustainable. The footprint method was illustrated using two case studies. The first was all inventoried emissions from European countries and selected metropolitan areas in 2004, which indicated that the dilution capacity was likely exceeded for most European countries and all landlocked metropolitan areas. The second case study indicated that peak application of pesticides alone was likely to exceed Denmark's freshwater dilution capacity in 1999-2011. The uncertainty assessment showed that better spatially differentiated fate factors would be useful and pointed out other major sources of uncertainty and some opportunities to reduce these.

  14. White Tail Disease of Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    OpenAIRE

    Sahul Hameed, A. S.; Bonami, Jean-robert

    2012-01-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii is the most important cultured freshwater prawn in the world and it is now farmed on a large scale in many countries. Generally, freshwater prawn is considered to be tolerant to diseases but a disease of viral origin is responsible for severe mortalities in larval, post-larval and juvenile stages of prawn. This viral infection namely white tail disease (WTD) was reported in the island of Guadeloupe in 1995 and later in Martinique (FrenchWest Indies) in Taiwan, the Pe...

  15. Potential Impacts of Food Production on Freshwater Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shinjiro; Hanasaki, Naota; Itsubo, Norihiro; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan

    2014-05-01

    The sustainability of freshwater use is often evaluated based on the total volume of water consumption or withdrawal. However, the renewable freshwater resource and potential impacts of water depletion differ with location and water source. In addition, most estimates of the environmental impacts of water use have focused on depletion from a single-source perspective without separating geographically different water sources. Therefore, comprehensive potential impacts from multiple water sources remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the potential impacts of the global food production on freshwater availability (water availability footprint), applying the Water Availability Factor (fwa). Each water source including rainfall, surface water, and groundwater had individual fwa, which is calculated based on the geophysical hydrological cycle, to reflect the differences among renewable freshwater resources by place and source. The fwa for each water source was estimated based on land area or time period required to obtain the reference volume of freshwater. The reference volume was regarded as 1 m3 of rainfall over an area of 1.0 m2 (1,000 mm/year), based on the global mean annual precipitation. This concept is consistent with the Ecological Footprint (EF), which measures how much biologically productive land area is required to provide the resources consumed. The EF concept is measured in global hectares, a standardized unit equal to one hectare with global average bioproductivity. We found that the current agriculture consumes freshwater resources at 1.3 times the rapid rate than sustainable water use. This rate can also indicate environmental water scarcity. Among environmentally water-scarce countries, well-financed countries tend to import cereal products as virtual water to compensate for their domestic water resources. Among water-abundant countries, well-financed countries tend to export cereal products by exploiting their freshwater availability. The fwa concept provides a non-conventional approach to compare and integrate the potential impacts of freshwater use from various sources and climatic conditions. The results should focus attention on the need to address not only physical but also social and environmental water-scarcity issues.

  16. Freshwater Variability between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethie, W. M.; Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Friedrich, R.; Steele, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Switchyard Project has established a time series of CTD and chemical measurements between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole and annual observations have been taken since 2005 to the present. The total freshwater inventory and inventories of the freshwater components (meteoric water [MEW], sea-ice melt water [SIMW] and inflow from the Pacific Ocean [PFW]) are determined from measurements of temperature, salinity, delta O-18, nitrate and phosphate, each year. The total inventory has varied by about 5 m between 2005 and 2013, which is about 50% of the lowest inventory. The total inventory was fairly stable between 2003 - 2007, then increased dramatically between 2007 and 2008 and again between 2008 and 2009. It then decreased between 2009 and 2011 and increased from 2011 to 2013. The increase between 2007 and 2008 resulted primarily from an increase in MEW tempered by decreases in SIMW and PFW. Back tracks of ice flow suggested that these waters came from the Russian continental shelves via the Transpolar Drift along the Lomonosov Ridge. The continued freshening in 2009 corresponded with a change is the large scale circulation of the Canada Basin with a weakening of the Beaufort Gyre and expulsion of freshwater, which included water from the large sea ice melting event of 2007. SIMW accounted for about two-thirds of the freshening. Ice back tracks suggest that water flowed out of the Beaufort Sea in an anticylonic pattern and crossed the Canada Basin along the Mendelev Ridge to reach the Lincoln Sea with a transport time of 2-3 years. The freshwater decrease between 2010 and 2011 was the result of a 70% decrease in SIMW and 30% decrease in MEW and the ice track flow pattern had shifted back to the pattern prior to 2009. The source of freshwater for the increase in freshwater inventory between 2011 and 2013 was MEW. PFW retreated to the continental shelf of Ellesmere Island, decreasing by about 30% and SIMW decreased to more negative values indicating water flowing into the region had been subjected to substantial sea ice formation, removing freshwater. There was a major decrease in sea ice in the summer of 2012, reaching values lower than the 2007 event. A pulse of freshwater from sea ice melt was observed two years later as discussed above. It will be interesting see if a pulse is observed in 2014, but the flow pathways may be different now than during the 2009-2010 period when sea ice and presumably surface water were exiting the Beaufort Gyre in an anticyclonic flow.

  17. MOIRA: a computerised decision support system for the restoration of radionuclide contaminated freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation dose resulting from contamination of freshwater ecosystems due to the release of radioactive substances into the environment may be reduced by applying suitable countermeasures. The options for intervention are wide-ranging and can be broadly grouped into three main categories: chemical, physical and social countermeasures. In some cases, a combination of actions -or even the no action- may be the optimal strategy. Despite their benefits, intervention strategies may have detrimental effects of economic, ecological and social nature. Thus, it is of paramount importance to assess, by objective criteria, the global cost-benefit balance of different options. The MOIRA project (A MOdel based computerised system for management support to Identity optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems, European Commission contract FI4P-CT96-0036) has developed a user-friendly, computerised tool that will allow decision makers to choose optimal intervention strategies for freshwater ecosystems with different contamination scenarios. To achieve that goal, the MOIRA software system -apart from a user-friendly interface- incorporates several innovative aspects: - eographical information system (GIS) and databases to get to get the values of the model parameters at different locations in Europe. - redictive ecosystem models for the behaviour of radionuclides (namely Cs-137 and Sr-90) in catchments, lakes and rivers, complemented with ents, lakes and rivers, complemented with models of the effect of the countermeasures on the environmental contamination levels. These models are based on an extensive use of aggregate parameters' that summarise, in single quantities, the effects of a variety of environmental processes. Methods for critical model testing, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have been applied to them getting a high reliability. - cosystem index (EI) to handle the influence chemical remedial measures may have on the structure, reproduction and biomass of key functional groups of aquatic organisms. Radiation dose to fish (prey and predator) is also assessed as another threat to ecosystem biota. - se assessment model for individual and collective dose that takes into account different external and internal exposure pathways, including the use of water for irrigation of pasture and crops. The dose model is also used to assess the impact of 'social' countermeasures, like bans or restrictions on water and fish consumption, on irrigation of crops, or on accusing contaminated areas, which may directly change the dose received. - Suitable models for evaluation of the economic impact of countermeasures. - Multi-Attribute Analysis (MAA) module, fully interactive, that makes the process of decision making as easy and efficient as possible for the user. MAA is a methodology for rationally analysing complex decision problems. An organic set of MAA procedures has been developed for the specific goals of the MOIRA project (evaluation of the global effectiveness of the intervention strategies). Such procedures account for the most important environmental, social and economic factors previously quantified by the system models. The aim of the paper is to briefly describe the main principles of the MOIRA system and to demonstrate its application using real case based scenarios. (author)

  18. [Freshwater fish freshness on-line detection method based on near-infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Li, Xiao-Yu; Peng, Yi; Tao, Hai-Long; Li, Peng; Xiong, Shan-Bai

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the near infrared spectrum of freshwater fish was used to detect the freshness on line, and the near infrared spectra on-line acquisition device was built to get the fish spectrum. In the process of spectrum acquisition, experiment samples move at a speed of 0.5 m · s(-1), the near-infrared diffuse reflection spectrum (900-2,500 nm) could be got for the next analyzing, and SVM was used to build on-line detection model. Sample set partitioning based on joint X-Y distances algo- rithm (SPXY) was used to divide sample set, there were 111 samples in calibration set (57 fresh samples and 54 bad samples), and 37 samples in test set (19 fresh samples and 18 bad samples). Seven spectral preprocessing methods were utilized to prepro- cess the spectrum, and the influences of different methods were compared. Model results indicated that first derivative (FD) with autoscale was the best preprocessing method, the model recognition rate of calibration set was 97.96%, and the recognition rate of test set was 95.92%. In order to improve the modeling speed, it is necessary to optimize the spectra variables. Therefore genetic algorithm (GA), successive projection algorithm (SPA) and competitive adaptive reweighed sampling (CARS) were adopted to select characteristic variables respectively. Finally CARS was proved to be the optimal variable selection method, 10 characteristic wavelengths were selected to develop SVM model, recognition rate of calibration set reached 100%, and recognition rate of test set was 93.88%. The research provided technical reference for freshwater fish freshness online detection. PMID:25739217

  19. High levels of natural radioactivity in biota from deep sea hydrothermal vents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are associated with areas of tectonic activities throughout the deep sea and are thus enriched in natural primitive radionuclides characterizing the magma source i.e. uranium-thorium series. However, the amount of data on radionuclide content in hydrothermal vent biota is very scarce. Here we present data from various archived biological samples collected on several hydrothermal vent site. Samples were collected by manned or unmanned submersibles on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) in 1996 and 2002 and on the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) in 2001. Their concentrations in uranium and thorium isotopes were determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Measurements were performed with a Sector field ICP-MS, the Axiom single collector from VG Elemental (Winsford, Cheshire, UK). 210Po was determined through alpha spectrometry. Results in Table II underline that high levels in uranium isotopes are found in polychaetes from the East Pacific Rise. The highest contents characterize their tubes plus mucus samples. On the contrary, the deep-sea amphipod sample (Orchomenella) collected outside hydrothermal vent areas exhibits the lowest values though direct comparison is difficult due to variability between species. 238U contents in coastal marine organisms are generally in the range 1 to 5 Bq kg-1 dry weight. Comparison between sites (Atlantic vs Pacific) is not obvious since different species have been sampled on MAR and Eent species have been sampled on MAR and EPR but the highest levels characterize the samples from EPR. Some samples demonstrate 234U/238U ratios very close to the mean value for seawater (1.1 - 1.2) but four present lower ratios (i.e. one sample of Bathymodiolus, Paralvinella, Riftia and Orchomenella). This is certainly to be linked to an uptake of particulate uranium. 210Po contents are very high in polychaetes tubes and mucus and are almost entirely supported by 210Pb. This in agreement with what has been reported by Cherry et al. (1992) for polychaetes (Alvinella and Paralvinella) from EPR. These authors also reported highest levels for these elements in Paralvinella (i.e. 15113 and 19038 Bq kg-1 dry weight for 210Pb and 210Po respectively). We are aware that this work is still based on too few data. A major work has to be done on this topic but these first results appear to be promising. The determination of vent organism concentrations for key elements in the uranium-thorium families has to be carried out in order to precisely determine the radiation exposure they are subject to. This appears especially important at the time where international bodies aim at promoting the development of criteria on the protection of the environment from effects arising from exposures to ionizing radiation

  20. Worldwide Laboratory Comparison on the Determination of Trace Elements in IAEA-452 Biota Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Marine Environmental Studies Laboratory (MESL) of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environment Laboratories (IAEA-NAEL) has the programmatic responsibility to provide assistance to Member States' laboratories in maintaining and improving the reliability of analytical measurement results, both in trace elements and organic pollutants. This is accomplished through the provision of reference materials of marine origin, validated analytical procedures, training in the implementation of internal quality control, and through the evaluation of measurement performance by the organization of worldwide and regional interlaboratory comparison exercises. For nearly thirty years, the MESL has conducted worldwide laboratory performance studies, also known as interlaboratory comparison. The results have been used to evaluate laboratory performance with respect to a wide range of organic and inorganic pollutants, including methyl mercury. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the UNEP Regional Seas Programme. The goal of interlaboratory comparison is to demonstrate the measurement capabilities of laboratories participating in interlaboratory comparisons (ILCs) and proficiency tests (PTs). The results from ILCs or PTs are of crucial interest for laboratories as these provide clear information of its measurement capabilities. It should be pointed out that the participation is either voluntary or forced by external requirements (e.g. legal, accreditation, control bodies). NAEL's interlaboratory comparison (ILC) and proficiency test (PT) schemes involve comparison of participant's results with an assigned value, which usually is delivered as a consensus value from the overall population of test results. Those exercises are designed to monitor and demonstrate the performance and analytical capabilities of the participating laboratories, and to identify gaps and problem areas where further development is needed. Continued membership has benefits in training and educational opportunities, enhanced mutual trust in results and methodology and objective evidence for accreditation purposes The present ILC was designed in order to evaluate the measurement performance of participating laboratories for the analysis of trace elements in biota samples. The test material was distributed to 150 laboratories worldwide and the results from 143 laboratories in 59 countries were received by the end 2009. The data reported by the laboratories, together with the technical and statistical evaluations of the results for each element, are included in this report. The performance of the participant laboratories was assessed through evaluating Z-scores in accordance with ISO 13528 and the International Harmonised Protocol for the Proficiency Testing of Analytical Chemistry Laboratories. On the basis of the outcome from previous ILCs, organised by NAEL for the same population of laboratories, the standard deviation for proficiency assessment (also called target standard deviation) was fixed to 12.5%. Z-scores obtained from this ILC results should assist chemists to make appropriate modifications in their laboratory analytical procedures in order to improve data quality. All results were treated confidentially and each laboratory was identified with a code number for anonymity.

  1. Value-chain analysis of freshwater apple snail (Pila globosa) used for on-farm feeds in the freshwater prawn farming sector in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Nahid, S. A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Growth of the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) sector in Bangladesh since 1970s has been supported by natural availability of freshwater apple snail (Pila globosa), used for on-farm prawn feeds. The present study identified the current configuration of the value-chain benefits and constraints of freshwater apple snail in south-western Bangladesh in August 2011, based upon Rapid Market Appraisal (RMA) approach. The site of snail collection was Chanda Beel in Gopalganj district, whi...

  2. HAZARD ANALYSIS OF EXOTIC PATHOGENS OF POTENTIAL THREAT TO EUROPEAN FRESHWATER CRAYFISH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDGERTON B. F.

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Managers, scientists, fishermen and farmers who work with freshwater crayfish understand clearly the severe affects that the introduction of an exotic pathogen can have on freshwater crayfish populations. This acute awareness is due to the severe impact on native European freshwater crayfish of the introduction of crayfish plague fungus Aphanomyces astaci. This issue has been thoroughly covered in previous reviews. The potential impact of other pathogens on European freshwater crayfish has not been addressed. This paper presents a hazard analysis of pathogens of freshwater crayfish exotic to Europe, which is the first step of import risk analysis.

  3. Accumulation of transuranic elements in the aquatic biota of the Belarusian sector of contaminated area near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant - Accumulation of transuranic elements in aquatic biota of Belarusian sector of contaminated area of Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of nuclear contamination of Belarus territory after Chernobyl accident includes the four stages: 1. Iodine-neptunium stage, caused mainly by short-lived radionuclides 131I, 239Np and others with a half-life period of several weeks; II. Intermediate stage, caused by radionuclides with a half-life period of a year (144Ce, 106Ru, 134Cs, etc.); III. Strontium-cesium stage, caused by 90Sr and 137Cs with a half-life period of about 30 years; IV. Plutonium-americium, caused by long-lived ?-emitting radionuclides 241Am (period of half-life of 432 years) and 239+240Pu, having high radio and chemo-toxicity. According to forecasts, activity of 241Am to 2050 year will increase by 2.5 times and it will be the most important dose-related factor for the aquatic biota within the Chernobyl accident zone. In 2002 - 2008 years we have studied the accumulation of trans-uranic elements (TUE, 241Am, 239+240Pu) in basic components of water body ecosystems within the Chernobyl zone - non-flowing Perstok Lake, weak-flowing Borschevka flooding and small Braginka River. Among investigated components are water, bottom sediments, submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum submersum, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, Lemna minor, Nuphar lutea, Stratiotes aloides), emergent macrophytes (Typha spp.), shellfish and fish. In the soil cover in the vicinity of the Perstok Lake activity of 241Am at present is equivalent to 300 - 600 Bq.kg-1, that is the basic source of its income to the lake. Radionuclides mobility in the water environment is higher than in the soil, that facilitates the rapid incorporation of 241Am to the trophic nets of water bodies and its removal by near-water animals in the terrestrial biotopes, including outside Chernobyl zone. Thus, the activity of 241Am in bottom sediments in the Perstok Lake and Borschevka flooding in 2008 year reach respectively 324 and 131 Bq.kg-1, and the activity of 241Am in macrophytes of the Perstok Lake at the same year was 1,0 - 3,7 Bq.kg-1. In summer period 2002 the activity of 241Am and 241Pu in the water of Perstok lake was 0,15 and 0,089 Bq.kg-1, and in the Braginka River - correspondingly 0,0044 and 0,16 Bq.l-1 Among the biota TUE maximum activity in 2002 was observed in emergent macrophytes of the Perstok Lake - up to 16 - 32 Bq.kg-1 on 239+240Pu and 5,7 - 20 on 241Am. TUE activity in emergent macrophytes was significantly lower - within 0,2 - 1,4 Bq.kg-1. Activity of TUE in submerge and emergent microphytes in Braginka River ranged within 0,12 - 1,8 B kg-1. Accumulation factors for 241Am (calculated for water) for macrophytes of the Prestok Lake were 1,3 - 130, and for 239+240Pu - 16 - 2000. Activity of TUE in fish and shellfish from the Perstok Lake in 2002 was lower than on macrophytes correspondingly 0,35 and 0,25 Bq.kg-1. With its half-life and mobility in water environment, TUE will be accumulated in stagnant water bodies and activated through trophic chains to the cycling of matter. Over the next centuries will represent radiological danger for aquatic biota. Therefore, the further investigations of dynamics of TUE accumulation by biota and their resulted biological effects are very urgent. (authors)

  4. Accumulation of transuranic elements in the aquatic biota of the Belarusian sector of contaminated area near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant - Accumulation of transuranic elements in aquatic biota of Belarusian sector of contaminated area of Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, Alexander; Mironov, Vladislav [International Sakharov Environmental University. Box 220070, 23 Dolgobrodskaya Street, Minsk, 220070 (Belarus)

    2014-07-01

    The evolution of nuclear contamination of Belarus territory after Chernobyl accident includes the four stages: 1. Iodine-neptunium stage, caused mainly by short-lived radionuclides {sup 131}I, {sup 239}Np and others with a half-life period of several weeks; II. Intermediate stage, caused by radionuclides with a half-life period of a year ({sup 144}Ce, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 134}Cs, etc.); III. Strontium-cesium stage, caused by {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs with a half-life period of about 30 years; IV. Plutonium-americium, caused by long-lived ?-emitting radionuclides {sup 241}Am (period of half-life of 432 years) and {sup 239+240}Pu, having high radio and chemo-toxicity. According to forecasts, activity of {sup 241}Am to 2050 year will increase by 2.5 times and it will be the most important dose-related factor for the aquatic biota within the Chernobyl accident zone. In 2002 - 2008 years we have studied the accumulation of trans-uranic elements (TUE, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239+240}Pu) in basic components of water body ecosystems within the Chernobyl zone - non-flowing Perstok Lake, weak-flowing Borschevka flooding and small Braginka River. Among investigated components are water, bottom sediments, submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum submersum, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, Lemna minor, Nuphar lutea, Stratiotes aloides), emergent macrophytes (Typha spp.), shellfish and fish. In the soil cover in the vicinity of the Perstok Lake activity of {sup 241}Am at present is equivalent to 300 - 600 Bq.kg{sup -1}, that is the basic source of its income to the lake. Radionuclides mobility in the water environment is higher than in the soil, that facilitates the rapid incorporation of {sup 241}Am to the trophic nets of water bodies and its removal by near-water animals in the terrestrial biotopes, including outside Chernobyl zone. Thus, the activity of {sup 241}Am in bottom sediments in the Perstok Lake and Borschevka flooding in 2008 year reach respectively 324 and 131 Bq.kg{sup -1}, and the activity of {sup 241}Am in macrophytes of the Perstok Lake at the same year was 1,0 - 3,7 Bq.kg{sup -1}. In summer period 2002 the activity of {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu in the water of Perstok lake was 0,15 and 0,089 Bq.kg{sup -1}, and in the Braginka River - correspondingly 0,0044 and 0,16 Bq.l{sup -1} Among the biota TUE maximum activity in 2002 was observed in emergent macrophytes of the Perstok Lake - up to 16 - 32 Bq.kg{sup -1} on {sup 239+240}Pu and 5,7 - 20 on {sup 241}Am. TUE activity in emergent macrophytes was significantly lower - within 0,2 - 1,4 Bq.kg{sup -1}. Activity of TUE in submerge and emergent microphytes in Braginka River ranged within 0,12 - 1,8 B kg{sup -1}. Accumulation factors for {sup 241}Am (calculated for water) for macrophytes of the Prestok Lake were 1,3 - 130, and for {sup 239+240}Pu - 16 - 2000. Activity of TUE in fish and shellfish from the Perstok Lake in 2002 was lower than on macrophytes correspondingly 0,35 and 0,25 Bq.kg{sup -1}. With its half-life and mobility in water environment, TUE will be accumulated in stagnant water bodies and activated through trophic chains to the cycling of matter. Over the next centuries will represent radiological danger for aquatic biota. Therefore, the further investigations of dynamics of TUE accumulation by biota and their resulted biological effects are very urgent. (authors)

  5. Saltwater flushing by freshwater in a laboratory beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi-Nasab, Ali; Boufadel, Michel C.; Li, Hailong; Weaver, James W.

    2010-05-01

    SummaryExperiments were conducted to investigate the flushing of saltwater out of a laboratory aquifer (or beach) by freshwater propagating seaward. After a steady state distribution was achieved with a seaward hydraulic gradient, freshwater was introduced while keeping the total head constant at each boundary. This caused the propagation of freshwater seaward. Two initial uniform concentrations were used: Case 1: 2.0 g/L (low salinity case) and Case 2: 34.0 g/L (high salinity case). The observed salinity and pressure data were closely reproduced using the MARUN ( Boufadel et al. 1999a) numerical code. The results indicated that buoyancy plays an important role for Case 2 but is negligible for Case 1. The results also indicated that the flow in the offshore beach aquifer (submerged portion of beach) was negligible especially for Case 2. For this case, the pressure increased with time until reaching a peak and then decreased (i.e., humps were formed). This was not observed in the low salinity case. Investigations revealed that the increase in pressure is due to a combination of remnant high salinity and a rise in the water table at that location. Numerical investigations revealed that for the same difference in total head, the seaward flow of freshwater increases with a decrease in the seawater salinity. The increase, however, was nonlinear as a function of seawater density. For example, the discharge in the high salinity case was 20% lower than that in the low salinity case.

  6. Escherichia coli and fecal coliforms in freshwater and estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been known for some time that substantial populations of fecal coliforms and E. coli are harbored in freshwater bottom sediments, bank soils, and beach sands. However, the relative importance of sediments as bacterial habitats and as a source of water-borne fecal coliforms and E. coli has not...

  7. There and back again: migration in freshwater fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brönmark, C.; Hulthén, K.

    2013-01-01

    Animal migration is an amazing phenomenon that has fascinated humans for long. Many freshwater fishes also show remarkable migrations, whereof the spectacular mass migrations of salmonids from the spawning streams are the most well known and well studied. However, recent studies have shown that migration occurs in a range of freshwater fish taxa from many different habitats. In this review we focus on the causes and consequences of migration in freshwater fishes. We start with an introduction of concepts and categories of migration, and then address the evolutionary causes that drive individuals to make these migratory journeys. The basis for the decision of an individual fish to migrate or stay resident is an evaluation of the costs and benefits of different strategies to maximize its lifetime reproductive effort. We provide examples by discussing our own work on the causes behind seasonal migration in a cyprinid fish, roach (Rutilus rutilus (L., 1758)), within this framework. We then highlight different adaptations that allow fish to migrate over sometimes vast journeys across space, including capacity for orientation, osmoregulation, and efficient energy expenditure. Following this we consider the consequences of migration in freshwater fish from ecological, evolutionary, and conservation perspectives, and finally, we detail some of the recent developments in the methodologies used to collect data on fish migration and how these could be used in future research

  8. Limnology of freshwater lakes of Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    Ten freshwater lakes in the Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica, with water temperature varying from 1.0 to 7.9 degrees; dissolved oxygen from 10.4 to 13.8 mg l/1 and pH from 7.6 to 8.8, were studied biologically during January-February of 1985 and 1987...

  9. Ecobiological studies of the freshwater lakes at Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Dhargalkar, V.K.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    1996-01-01

    . These values were comparable to other freshwater lakes in Antarctica. SiO sub(3) concentration showed large fluctuations between lakes. Urea, ammonia, total nitrogen (TN) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) attained maximum values of 1.39, 1.79, 16 and 0...

  10. The freshwater fishes of the middle and lower Orange river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A Cambray

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and distribution of freshwater fishes of the middle and lower Orange River in the Republic of South Africa is presented, based on a survey conducted in September 1980. Particular attention is paid to the Augrabies Falls region including the Augrabies Falls National Park. Comments on the distribution and conservation status of the fishes are given.

  11. The freshwater fishes of the middle and lower Orange river

    OpenAIRE

    Cambray, J. A.; Skelton, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of freshwater fishes of the middle and lower Orange River in the Republic of South Africa is presented, based on a survey conducted in September 1980. Particular attention is paid to the Augrabies Falls region including the Augrabies Falls National Park. Comments on the distribution and conservation status of the fishes are given.

  12. Helminth parasites of freshwater fish in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Salgado-Maldonado, G.; Caspeta-Mandujano, J. M.; Moravec, František; Soto-Galera, E.; Rodiles-Hernández, R.; Cabanas-Carranza, G.; Montoya-Mendoza, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 108, ?. 1 (2011), s. 31-59. ISSN 0932-0113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Helminth parasites * freshwater fish * Chiapas Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2011

  13. Human impact on freshwater ecosystem services: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Walter K; Perkin, Joshuah S; Gerken, Joseph E

    2013-08-20

    Human environmental change influences freshwaters as well as the regulating, provisioning, and cultural services that ecosystems provide worldwide. Here, we assess the global human impact on the potential value of six freshwater ecosystem services (ES) and estimate the proportion of each used globally (the mean value across all countries is in parentheses): biodiversity (0.37), disturbance regulation (0.24), commodities (0.39), greenhouse gases (0.09), water availability (0.10), and water quality (0.33). We also created a composite index of the impact. Using different valuation schemes, we found that humans have used potential global freshwater ES scaled by a relative value of roughly 4-20%, with a median of 16%. All countries use a considerable amount of the potential ES value, invalidating the idea that wealthier countries have less impact on their ES once they have developed. The data suggest that humans have diminished the potential ES provided by freshwaters across the globe and that factors associated with high population growth rates are related to the overall degradation. PMID:23885808

  14. Effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review is presented dealing with studies on the effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. The pollutants studied included acid mine drainage, PCBs, cadmium, lead, naphthalene, plutonium, in addition to several studies dealing with pH effects

  15. Acoustic detection of freshwater insects and other invertebrates.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouzová, Jaroslava; Kube?ka, Jan; Mat?na, Josef; Frouz, Jan

    Durban : International Convention Centre, 2008. [ICE 2008. International Congress of Entomology /23./. 06.07.2008-12.07.2008, Durban] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : acoustic detection * freshwater insects * invertebrates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. New Records for the Freshwater Algae of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Tülay BAYKAL; Akbulut, Ayd?n; AÇIKGÖZ, ?lkay

    2009-01-01

    Algae samples were collected from important dam lakes and running waters of the Lower Euphrates Basin. Eighteen new records of Turkish freshwater algae were identified. Among these new records, 5 belong to Cyanophyta, 10 to Chlorophyta, 1 to Xanthophyta, and 2 to Bacillariophyta.

  17. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Rice and Wetland Biota: employing integrated indices of processes that drive methylmercury risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.; Windham-Myers, L.; Fleck, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands often are associated with elevated methylmercury (MeHg) production and food web bioaccumulation, making them potentially important sources of Hg to surrounding waters and to wetland-dependent fish and wildlife. However, the cycling of MeHg through wetlands can vary markedly with wetland type. Agricultural wetlands such as rice fields can exhibit particularly pronounced MeHg concentrations and bioaccumulation because their biogeochemical, hydrological, and ecological characteristics facilitate the conversion of inorganic mercury (Hg) to MeHg. Rice fields are characterized by a series of seasonal extreme wetting and drying cycles, sulfate-containing fertilizers, and high levels of labile organic carbon, all of which are key processes in the Hg cycle. Rice fields comprise approximately 20% of freshwater habitats and 11% of cultivated land area globally, providing critical wildlife habitat while offering substantial economic, human health, and ecosystem benefits. Thus, there is strong impetus to better understand the drivers of Hg cycling in rice fields and to develop useful management approaches for minimizing Hg risk associated with rice agriculture without compromising rice production. We examined the role of rice wetlands on MeHg bioaccumulation through foodwebs by employing biosentinel caged fish as integrators of MeHg cycling processes. With experimental field studies in California's Central Valley, we placed biosentinel fishes into nine rice wetlands that were subjected to three different harvest strategies, and into nine managed wetlands that encompassed three different hydrological regimes. We simultaneously measured a suite of biogeochemical processes in surface water, sediment, and pore water in order to link the response in fish Hg bioaccumulation with within-field processes that regulate MeHg cycling. Our preliminary results indicate that fish Hg concentrations were 1.6 times higher in rice wetlands than in managed wetlands. Additionally, fish Hg concentrations increased across rice fields from inlets to outlets indicating that in situ processes enhanced MeHg production rice fields, whereas concentrations decreased from inlets to outlets in managed wetlands. Finally, our preliminary results suggest organic carbon associated with rice plants was an important contributor to fish Hg concentrations, whereas plants in managed wetlands were not strongly linked to fish Hg concentrations. Our preliminary findings suggest that there are strong linkages between biogeochemical processes inherent in rice wetlands and MeHg cycling and bioaccumulation, which are further described in a companion presentation by Windham-Myers (this session). These results have important implications for managing MeHg risk in areas with extensive rice agriculture.

  18. Impact of changing DOC concentrations on the potential distribution of acid sensitive biota in a boreal stream network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laudon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DOC concentrations have increased in many surface waters in Europe and North America over the past few decades. As DOC exudes a strong influence on pH this DOC increase could have detrimental effects on acid sensitive biota in many streams and lakes. To investigate the potential implications of changes in the DOC concentration on stream water biota, we have used a mesoscale boreal stream network in northern Sweden as a case study. The network was sampled for stream water chemistry at 60 locations during both winter base flow and spring flood periods, representing the extremes experienced annually in these streams both in terms of discharge and acidity. The effect of changing DOC on pH was modeled for all sampling locations using an organic acid model, with input DOC concentrations for different scenarios adjusted by between ?30% and +50% from measured present concentrations. The resulting effect on pH was then used to quantify the proportion of stream length in the catchment with pH below the acid thresholds of pH 5.5 and pH 5.0. The results suggest that a change in stream water DOC during base flow would have only a limited effect on pH and hence on the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. During the spring flood on the other hand a change in DOC would strongly influence pH and the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. For example an increase in DOC concentration of 30% at all sites would increase the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.5 from 37% to 65%, and the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.0 would increase from 18% to 27%. The results suggest that in high DOC waters, even a marginal change in the DOC concentration could impact acid sensitive biota in a large portion of the aquatic landscape.

  19. Impact of changing DOC concentrations on the potential distribution of acid sensitive biota in a boreal stream network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laudon

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available DOC concentrations have increased in many surface waters in Europe and North America over the past few decades. As DOC exerts a strong influence on pH this DOC increase could have detrimental effects on acid sensitive biota in many streams and lakes. To investigate the potential implications of changes in the DOC concentration on stream water biota, we have used a mesoscale boreal stream network in northern Sweden as a case study. The network was sampled for stream water chemistry at 60 locations during both winter base flow and spring flood periods, representing the extremes experienced annually in these streams both in terms of discharge and acidity. The effect of changing DOC on pH was modeled for all sampling locations using an organic acid model, with input DOC concentrations for different scenarios adjusted by between –30% and +50% from measured present concentrations. The resulting effect on pH was then used to quantify the proportion of stream length in the catchment with pH below the acid thresholds of pH 5.5 and pH 5.0. The results suggest that a change in stream water DOC during base flow would have only a limited effect on pH and hence on the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. During the spring flood on the other hand a change in DOC would strongly influence pH and the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. For example an increase in DOC concentration of 30% at all sites would increase the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.5 from 37% to 65%, and the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.0 would increase from 18% to 27%. The results suggest that in poorly-buffered high DOC waters, even a marginal change in the DOC concentration could impact acid sensitive biota in a large portion of the aquatic landscape.

  20. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Freshwater Fish Database, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_freshwater_fish_LDWF_2001

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for freshwater (inland) fish species in coastal Louisiana. Vector polygons represent water-bodies and...

  1. Doses due to naturally occurring radionuclides to wildlife terrestrial and freshwater species in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of soil and fresh water systems by naturally occurring radionuclides in South Africa have existed in mining and mineral processing areas for more than a hundred years. The gold deposits of the Witwatersrand Basin gave rise to huge quantities of historical residues, many of them exhibiting elevated concentration of natural radionuclides. This contamination has chronically exposed wildlife species and this paper attempts to present some results, based on available database of contaminated areas, regarding doses received by selected terrestrial and freshwater species. The results obtained indicate that doses received by the majority of species considered in the paper are below the presently recommended guideline levels, however, doses to some species (mammalian herbivores, benthic molluscs) are above these levels and could be of concern. It should also be taken into consideration that the obtained results are likely underestimated due to limited data available. (author)

  2. Ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to freshwater organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch

    2011-01-01

    A large variety of societal benefits are expected from the development and use of engineered nanoparticles. At present, the majority of ‘nano-products’ put on the market can be classified as consumer products, whereas future applications are expected to have more widespread and societal benefits in areas as diverse as cancer treatment, groundwater remediation and industrial coatings. Nanoparticles are used to give the products new and improved characteristics. Yet exactly these new and nano-specific properties might be a cause of concern in a health and environment context. In order to ensure adequate protection of humans and the environment, a pro-active effort to understand, identify and minimise potential risks is needed at an early stage in the innovation process. However, due to the fundamentally different nature of nanoparticles as discrete entities, compared to ‘conventional’ water soluble chemicals, many aspects of commonly used test methods for evaluation of potential adverse environmental effects make their applicability to nanoparticles questionable. For this reason the overarching aim of this PhD project has been to acquire information, which can be disseminated and applied in relation to appropriate test methods for identifying potential adverse effects of nanoparticles; this is of great relevance from both a scientific and regulatory point of view. An important aspect of this project was the acquisition of experience in testing nanoparticles in aqueous test systems – both through practical lab-based studies as well as literature studies. The process of testing nanoparticles in aquatic ecotoxicity tests has been as important in the project approach as the test outcomes. Applied test methods have included acute and chronic toxicity tests as well as bioaccumulation studies with freshwater filter feeder Daphnia magna, sediment feeder Lumbriculus variegatus and green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The results made it possible to identify major scientific and methodological challenges in the testing of nanoparticles compared to ‘conventional’ chemicals. It has been highlighted that while it is possible to obtain dose-response relationships for nanoparticles, such tests often raise as many questions as they answer. Issues requiring further attention include nonlinear concentration-aggregation relationships, adhesion of nanoparticles to the cell and organism surfaces, problems of relating effects directly to properties of the primary nanoparticles, dynamic two-way interactions between nanoparticles and organisms as well as how to best quantify and qualify exposure in a dynamic system. Particularly for algal growth inhibition tests, methodological issues were raised related to biomass quantification methods. Here, a combination of several techniques is recommended. The combination of visual inspection, cell counting and fluorescence measurement of acetone-extracted pigments was found to give additional insight into the nature of the observed effects. A separate task was to explore the role of nanoparticles in chemical mixtures, elucidated through experimental and conceptual studies. Interaction between nanoparticles and co-contaminants in chemical mixtures may result in changes in the bioavailability and toxicity of the individual compounds. A conceptual model for interaction scenarios between nanoparticles and co-existing environmental pollutants was developed. Experimental results showed that several types of nanoparticles (e.g. TiO2 and C60) have a large adsorption capacity for some heavy metals and organic chemicals. Nonetheless, cadmium adsorbed to TiO2 nanoparticles was found to be bioavailable to D. magna, L. variegatus and P. subcapitata. TiO2 nanoparticles were seen to attach to the surface of P. subcapitata and to mainly be located in the gut of D. magna. In D. magna the presence of TiO2 resulted in increased uptake of cadmium but not in overall increased toxicity. Interaction studies (especially binary multiple-dose studies) may be considered premature at present due to the additional

  3. Are there signs of acidification reversal in freshwaters of the low mountain ranges in Germany?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alewell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reversal of freshwater acidification in the low mountain ranges of Germany is of public, political and scientific concern, because these regions are near natural ecosystems and function as an important drinking water supply. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status and trends of acidification reversal after two decades of reduced anthropogenic deposition in selected freshwaters of the low mountain ranges in the Harz, the Fichtelgebirge, the Bavarian Forest, the Spessart and the Black Forest. In response to decreased sulphate deposition, seven out of nine streams investigated had significantly decreasing sulphate concentrations (all trends were calculated with the Seasonal Kendall Test. The decrease in sulphate concentration was only minor, however, due to the release of previously stored soil sulphur. No increase was found in pH and acid neutralising capacity (defined by Reuss and Johnson, 1986. Aluminum concentrations in the streams did not decrease. Thus, no major acidification reversal can currently be noted in spite of two decades of decreased acid deposition. Nevertheless, the first signs of improvement in water quality were detected as there was a decrease in the level and frequency of extreme values of pH, acid neutralising capacity and aluminium concentrations in streams. With respect to nitrogen, no change was determined for either nitrate or ammonium concentrations in precipitation or stream water. Base cation fluxes indicate increasing net loss of base cations from all ecosystems investigated, which could be interpreted as an increase in soil acidification. The latter was due to a combination of continued high anion leaching and significant reduction of base cation deposition. No major improvement was noted in biological recovery, however, initial signs of recovery were detectable as there was re-occurrence of some single macroinvertebrate species which were formerly extinct. The results of this study have important implications for water authorities, forest managers and policy makers: the delay in acidification reversal suggests a need for ongoing intensive amelioration of waters, a careful selection of management tools to guarantee sustainable management of forests and the reduction of nitrogen deposition to prevent further acidification of soils and waters. Keywords: freshwater, acidification reversal, drinking water supply, forested catchments, Germany

  4. Biogeography of freshwater fishes from the Northeastern Mata Atlântica freshwater ecoregion: distribution, endemism, and area relationships

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Priscila, Camelier; Angela M., Zanata.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A ecorregião Mata Atlântica Nordeste (NMAF) inclui parte das drenagens costeiras do leste do Brasil, tem alto grau de endemismo de peixes e grande significado biogeográfico. Um levantamento taxonômico da ictiofauna de água doce de 25 drenagens da ecorregião NMAF e uma análise biogeográfica utilizand [...] o o método de Análise de Parcimônia de Endemismo (PAE) foram realizados. Um total de 192 espécies nativas foi listado. O método PAE foi aplicado a 24 bacias e 37 espécies, resultando em cinco diagramas de áreas igualmente parcimoniosos. O diagrama de consenso estrito indica a existência de dois grupos de bacias principais ao longo da ecorregião NMAF. Estes grupos foram denominados: Grupo Norte e Grupo Centro-Sul. O Grupo Centro-Sul apresenta uma politomia basal composta por dois grupos (Grupo Centro e Grupo Sul) mais a bacia do rio Itapemirim. O Grupo Norte é formado por oito drenagens entre o rio Sergipe e o rio Paraguaçu, o Grupo Centro por cinco drenagens entre o rio Cachoeira e o rio Jequitinhonha e o Grupo Sul por nove drenagens entre o rio Buranhém e rio Doce. Comentários sobre a distribuição das espécies e a fauna compartilhada com ecorregiões adjacentes são fornecidos. Apresentamos também uma comparação da hipótese de relação aqui obtida com filogenias publicadas para alguns táxons relevantes ao presente estudo. Abstract in english The Northeastern Mata Atlântica freshwater ecoregion (NMAF) includes part of the eastern Brazilian coastal drainages, has high level of fish endemism and great biogeographic significance. A taxonomic inventory of freshwater fishes from 25 drainages of the NMAF ecoregion and a biogeographic analysis [...] using the Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE) method were carried out. A total of 192 native species was listed. The PAE method was applied to 24 basins and 37 species, resulting in five equally parsimonious area diagrams. The strict consensus diagram indicates the existence of two main groups of basins throughout the NMAF ecoregion. These groups were denominated: North Group and Central-South Group. The Central-South Group shows a basal polytomy composed by two Groups (Central Group and South Group) plus the rio Itapemirim basin. The North Group is composed by eight drainages from the rio Sergipe to the rio Paraguaçu, the Central Group by five drainages from the rio Cachoeira to the rio Jequitinhonha, and the South Group by nine drainages from the rio Buranhém to the rio Doce. Comments about the species distribution and the fish fauna shared with adjacent ecoregions are provided. We also present a comparison of the hypothesis of river relationships proposed herein with published phylogenetic hypotheses that include taxa relevant to this study.

  5. Highest PBDE levels (max 63 ppm) yet found in biota measured in seabird eggs from San Francisco Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, J.; Holden, A.; Tanner, M.; Sharp, M.; Hooper, K. [Department of Toxic Substances Control, Berkeley, CA (United States). Hazardous Materials Lab.; Adelsbach, T. [Environmental Contaminants Division, Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    High levels of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) have been found in humans and wildlife from the San Francisco Bay Area, with levels in women among the highest in the world, and levels in piscivorous seabird eggs at the ppm level. Seabirds are useful for monitoring and assessing ecosystem health at various times and places because they occupy a high trophic level in the marine food web, are long-lived, and are generally localized near their breeding and non-breeding sites. In collaboration with the US Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS), we are carrying out a three-year investigation of dioxin, PCB and PBDE levels in eggs from fish-eating seabirds. Year 1 (2002) PBDE measurements from 73 bird eggs were reported at Dioxin2003. Year 2 (2003) PBDE measurements from 45 samples are presented in this report. The highest PBDE level measured in eggs was 63 ppm, lipid, which is the highest PBDE level, yet reported in biota.

  6. Assessment of Total Mercury (HgT in Sediments and Biota of Indian Sundarban Wetland and Adjacent Coastal Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Chatterjee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of total mercury (HgT in surface sediments (0-5 cm; n = 12; particle size < 63 µm and representative biota (benthic polychaetes, bivalve mollusks and finfish were observed in the Sundarban mangrove wetland and adjacent regions nearby the Indian Ganges river estuary. Relatively low concentrations of HgT were measured in sediments ranging from 0.008 µg g-1 to 0.056 µg g-1. There exist sharp differences in HgT accumulation in biota which revealed the following decreasing trend: polychaetes > fish > bivalve mollusks. These variations are related to a number of intrinsic (size, age and sex and extrinsic (pH and salinity factors together with the accumulation mechanisms intrinsic to each species for mercury. An organ-specific HgT accumulation in bivalve mollusks was evidenced with the following decreasing order: visceral mass > siphon > adductor muscle > mantle > gill, with a maximum value of 0.42 µg g-1 in Sanguinolaria acuminata. Fishes showed wide efficiency in HgT accumulation in dorsal muscle, and of most concern, one species presented HgT above 0.05 µg g-1 levels, the prescribed limit established by European Union. The benthic polychaetes showed extreme variations of HgT in their body tissues, with the maximum value of 0.603 µg g-1 in Dendronereis heteropoda which is above the European Union threshold value. The authors strongly recommend further monitoring to investigate the source of toxic metals, including Hg which may originate from diverse potential sources such as industrial discharges, agricultural runoff and sewage sludge from upstream of the Ganges River Estuary.

  7. The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on marine biota: retrospective assessment of the first year and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Aono, Tatsuo; Brown, Justin E; Hosseini, Ali; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Sazykina, Tatiana; Steenhuisen, Frits; Strand, Per

    2014-07-15

    An international study under the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was performed to assess radiological impact of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) on the marine environment. This work constitutes the first international assessment of this type, drawing upon methodologies that incorporate the most up-to-date radioecological models and knowledge. To quantify the radiological impact on marine wildlife, a suite of state-of-the-art approaches to assess exposures to Fukushima derived radionuclides of marine biota, including predictive dynamic transfer modelling, was applied to a comprehensive dataset consisting of over 500 sediment, 6000 seawater and 5000 biota data points representative of the geographically relevant area during the first year after the accident. The dataset covers the period from May 2011 to August 2012. The method used to evaluate the ecological impact consists of comparing dose (rates) to which living species of interest are exposed during a defined period to critical effects values arising from the literature. The assessed doses follow a highly variable pattern and generally do not seem to indicate the potential for effects. A possible exception of a transient nature is the relatively contaminated area in the vicinity of the discharge point, where effects on sensitive endpoints in individual plants and animals might have occurred in the weeks directly following the accident. However, impacts on population integrity would have been unlikely due to the short duration and the limited space area of the initially high exposures. Our understanding of the biological impact of radiation on chronically exposed plants and animals continues to evolve, and still needs to be improved through future studies in the FDNPS marine environment. PMID:24784739

  8. Simulation of radioactive cesium transfer in the southern Fukushima coastal biota using a dynamic food chain transfer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateda, Yutaka; Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki

    2013-10-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) accident occurred on 11 March 2011. The accident introduced (137)Cs into the coastal waters which was subsequently transferred to the local coastal biota thereby elevating the concentration of this radionuclide in coastal organisms. In this study, the radioactive cesium levels in coastal biota from the southern Fukushima area were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. The simulation derived the possible maximum radioactive cesium levels in organisms, indicating that the maximum (137)Cs concentrations in invertebrates, benthic fish and predator fish occurred during late April, late May and late July, respectively in the studied area where the source was mainly the direct leakage of (137)Cs effluent from the 1F NPP. The delay of a (137)Cs increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer of (137)Cs introduced to the ecosystem from the initial contamination of the seawater. The model also provided the degree of radionuclide depuration in organisms, and it demonstrated the latest start of the decontamination phase in benthic fish. The ecological half-lives, derived both from model simulation and observation, were 1-4 months in invertebrates, and 2-9 months in plankton feeding fish and coastal predator fish from the studied area. In contrast, it was not possible to similarly calculate these parameters in benthic fish because of an unidentified additional radionuclide source which was deduced from the biological compartment model. To adequately reconstruct the in-situ depuration of radiocesium in benthic fish in the natural ecos